Science.gov

Sample records for nerve sheath meningioma

  1. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size. PMID:27310300

  2. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  3. Analyses on the misdiagnoses of 25 patients with unilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Xia, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Xiang-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Wen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate clinical features of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) that was misdiagnosed, and to find methods to reduce the misdiagnoses. METHODS Retrospective series study. Twenty-five misdisgnosed patients with unilateral ONSM were collected from Jan. 2008 to Jan. 2015 and the clinical records reviewed. RESULTS Patients were misdiagnosed with acute papillitis most frequently (n=17), immediately followed by optic atrophy (n=8), ischemic optic neuropathy (n=5), acute retrobulbar optic neuritis (n=5), optic disc vasculitis (n=3). For each patient, the minimum frequency of misdiagnoses was once and the maximum was 4 times. As for the lasting time of being misdiagnosed, the shortest was 1.5mo and the longest was 45mo. Twenty-one cases (84%) were once treated with glucocorticoids, and its side effects was found in seventeen patients. Twenty patients (80%) complained with varying degree of vision loss. When a definite diagnosis was made, sixteen cases (64%) showed slight exophthalmos and eighteen cases (72%) had the tubular ONSM. CONCLUSION ONSM without loss obvious exophthalmos is easily misdiagnosed in clinic, and for most of these ONSMs are tubular. PMID:27672598

  4. Analyses on the misdiagnoses of 25 patients with unilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Xia, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Xiang-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Wen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate clinical features of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) that was misdiagnosed, and to find methods to reduce the misdiagnoses. METHODS Retrospective series study. Twenty-five misdisgnosed patients with unilateral ONSM were collected from Jan. 2008 to Jan. 2015 and the clinical records reviewed. RESULTS Patients were misdiagnosed with acute papillitis most frequently (n=17), immediately followed by optic atrophy (n=8), ischemic optic neuropathy (n=5), acute retrobulbar optic neuritis (n=5), optic disc vasculitis (n=3). For each patient, the minimum frequency of misdiagnoses was once and the maximum was 4 times. As for the lasting time of being misdiagnosed, the shortest was 1.5mo and the longest was 45mo. Twenty-one cases (84%) were once treated with glucocorticoids, and its side effects was found in seventeen patients. Twenty patients (80%) complained with varying degree of vision loss. When a definite diagnosis was made, sixteen cases (64%) showed slight exophthalmos and eighteen cases (72%) had the tubular ONSM. CONCLUSION ONSM without loss obvious exophthalmos is easily misdiagnosed in clinic, and for most of these ONSMs are tubular.

  5. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  6. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Abouaf, Lucie; Girard, Nicolas; Lefort, Thibaud; D'hombres, Anne; Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain; Mornex, Francoise

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  7. Radiation therapy for primary optic nerve meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Vuksanovic, M.M.; Yates, B.M.; Bienfang, D.C.

    1981-06-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas, formerly thought to be rare, have been encountered with surprising frequency since the widespread use of computed tomography. Early diagnosis led to an enthusiastic surgical approach to these lesions, but this has been tempered by the realization that even in the best of hands, blindness followed such surgery with distressing frequency. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas may be divided into primary, secondary, and multiple meningioma groups. Five patients with primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas treated with irradiation therapy are presented in this report. Improvement in visual acuity, stabilization to increase in the visual field, and decrease in size to total regression of optociliary veins, have been documented following irradiation therapy of the posterior orbital and intracanalicular portions of the optic nerve in some of these cases. Although each patient must be carefully individualized, there is no question that visual palliation can be achieved in some cases of optic nerve sheath meningioma. Further investigation of this therapeutic modality in selected cases in advised.

  8. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy for Management of Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas: Long-Term Outcomes of Tumor Control and Visual Function at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Kapoor, Sumit; Kharkar, Siddharth; Batra, Sachin; Jackson, Juan F.; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Miller, Neil R.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the long-term outcomes of patients treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCRT) for presumed optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2002, 9 patients with a presumed ONSM were treated with FCRT at our institution. The indications for FCRT were significant visual dysfunction at presentation, progression of visual dysfunction during a period of observation, tumor growth documented by sequential imaging, or a combination of these findings. In 2 patients, FCRT was performed as adjuvant therapy, and in 7, it was the initial and primary treatment. Results: Of the 9 patients, 6 were women and 3 were men, with a mean age of 47 years. All 9 patients had evidence of optic nerve dysfunction in the affected eye, characterized by reduced visual acuity, a visual field defect, and a relative afferent pupillary defect. In addition, 2 patients had proptosis and 1 had diplopia. The mean follow-up period was 98 {+-} 31.7 months (median, 90; range, 61-151). After FCRT, the visual function improved in the 7 patients who had undergone FCRT as the primary treatment. However, 2 patients who were blind in their affected eye at FCRT remained blind. In 4 of the 7 patients with improvement, the improvement was documented within 1-3 months after FCRT. The tumor control rate was 100%. Proptosis and diplopia also regressed in 100% of patients. At 2 years after FCRT, 1 patient had developed radiation retinopathy. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that FCRT is a safe and effective treatment of ONSMs, affording satisfactory long-term tumor control, good functional outcome, and low treatment morbidity. FCRT should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with presumed ONSMs for whom the treatment has been deemed appropriate.

  9. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease. PMID:27165368

  11. Penetration and Splitting of Optic Nerve by Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of the optic nerves is an important issue in the resection of tuberculum sellae meningiomas. We report the case of a patient whose optic nerve was penetrated by a tuberculum sellae meningioma. During surgery, a bulging tumor was found to penetrate the right optic nerve. The tumor was gross totally removed, including tumors bulging through the optic nerve. Two trunks of the split optic nerve were preserved. The penetrated shape of the optic nerve may lead to misjudgment and its damage. Divided trunks of optic nerves are difficult to recognize and may be confused for the tumor capsule, because they may be thinned and seem to contain tumors. In addition, a single trunk may be confused for the whole nerve; thus, the other trunk may be easily damaged if not dissected cautiously. Treatment strategy according to the remnant visual acuity was suggested. PMID:27651874

  12. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  13. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  14. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  15. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE PRAWN NERVE SHEATHS

    PubMed Central

    Doggenweiler, C. F.; Heuser, John E.

    1967-01-01

    The sheaths from freshly teased nerve fibers of the prawn exhibit a positive radial birefringence, consistent with their EM appearance as highly organized laminated structures composed of numerous thin cytoplasmic sheets or laminae bordered by unit membranes and arranged concentrically around the axon. The closely apposed membranes in these sheaths are fragile and often break down into rows of vesicles during fixation. Desmosome-like attachment zones occur in many regions of the sheath. The membranes within these zones resist vesiculation and thereby provide a "control" region for relating the type of vesicles formed in the fragile portions of the sheaths to the specific fixation conditions. It is proposed that during fixation the production of artifactual vesicles is governed by an interplay of three factors: (a) direct chemical action of the fixative on the polar strata of adjacent unit membranes, (b) osmotic forces applied to membranes during fixation, and (c) the pre-existing natural relations between adjacent membranes. It is found that permanganate best preserves the continuity of the membranes but will still produce vesicles if the fixative exerts severe osmotic forces. These results support other reports (19) of the importance of comparing tissues fixed by complementary procedures so that systematic artifacts will not be described as characteristic of the natural state. PMID:4166578

  16. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  17. MENINGIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Leland; Barani, Igor; Chamberlain, Marc; Kaley, Thomas; McDermott, Michael; Raizer, Jeffrey; Schiff, David; Weber, Damien C.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolving interest in meningioma, the most common primary brain tumor, has refined contemporary management of these tumors. Problematic, however, is the paucity of prospective clinical trials that provide an evidence-based algorithm for managing meningioma. The current review summarizes the published literature regarding the treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent meningioma, with an emphasis on outcomes stratified by World Health Organization (WHO) tumor grade. In particular this review focuses on patient outcomes following treatment (either adjuvant or at recurrence) with surgery or radiation therapy inclusive of radiosurgery and fractionated irradiation. Phase II trials for patients with meningioma have recently completed accrual within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) consortia, and phase III studies are being developed. However, at present, there are no completed prospective, randomized trials assessing the role of either surgery or radiotherapy. Successful completion of future studies will require a multidisciplinary effort, dissemination of the current knowledge base, improved implementation of WHO grading criteria, standardization of response criteria and other outcome endpoints, and concerted efforts to address weaknesses in present treatment paradigms, particularly for patients with progressive or recurrent low grade meningioma, or with high-grade meningioma. In parallel efforts, Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) subcommittees are developing a manuscript on systemic therapies for meningioma, and a separate article proposing standardized endpoint and response criteria for meningioma. PMID:25343186

  18. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin.

  19. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  20. Ewing sarcoma mimicking a peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B D; Fox, B D; Viswanathan, A; Mitchell, A H; Powell, S Z; Cech, D A

    2010-10-01

    We describe the first patient with an extradural, extramedullary Ewing's sarcoma tumor mimicking a nerve sheath tumor with no overt evidence of metastasis. A 28-year-old woman with no past medical history presented with a progressive 3-year history of low back pain and right-sided lower extremity radiculopathy after having failed conservative therapies. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed a right-sided enhancing, dumbbell-shaped lesion at the right neural foramen appearing to originate from the L4 nerve root, suspicious for a peripheral nerve sheath tumor or schwannoma. The patient and findings are discussed in the context of the literature, including an update on the relatively recent diagnostic redesignation of the Ewing's sarcoma family tumors.

  1. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-01-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves. Design A prospective study within-subjects design. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures Cranial nerve identification. Results The group of nine meningiomas was composed of one cavernous sinus, three petroclival, one tuberculum sellae, two sphenoid wing, one olfactory groove, and one temporal floor meningioma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strong, and the contrast with cranial nerves clearly evident. There were one definite olfactory nerve deficit, one transient abducens deficit, and one definite hemiparesis. All lesions were resected (Simpson grades 1 and 2). The analysis of the difference of the delta SF wavelength between the meningiomas and cranial nerve contrast was performed by the Wilcoxon signed rank test and showed p = 0.011. Conclusions The contrast between the enhanced meningiomas and cranial nerves was evident and assisted in the visualization and microsurgical dissection of these structures. The anatomical preservation of these structures was improved using the contrast. PMID:27054056

  2. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-08-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves. Design A prospective study within-subjects design. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures Cranial nerve identification. Results The group of nine meningiomas was composed of one cavernous sinus, three petroclival, one tuberculum sellae, two sphenoid wing, one olfactory groove, and one temporal floor meningioma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strong, and the contrast with cranial nerves clearly evident. There were one definite olfactory nerve deficit, one transient abducens deficit, and one definite hemiparesis. All lesions were resected (Simpson grades 1 and 2). The analysis of the difference of the delta SF wavelength between the meningiomas and cranial nerve contrast was performed by the Wilcoxon signed rank test and showed p = 0.011. Conclusions The contrast between the enhanced meningiomas and cranial nerves was evident and assisted in the visualization and microsurgical dissection of these structures. The anatomical preservation of these structures was improved using the contrast.

  3. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF.

  4. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  5. Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor at unusual location

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Srikant; Dhir, Manmath Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. Most arise in association with major nerve trunks. Their most common anatomical sites are the proximal portions of the upper and lower extremities and the trunk. MPNSTs have rarely been reported in literature to occur in other unusual body parts. We review all such cases reported till now in terms of site of origin, surgical treatment, adjuvant therapy and outcome and shortly describe our experience with two of these cases. Both of our case presented with lump at unusual sites resembling neurofibroma, one at orbitotemporal area and other in the paraspinal region with characteristic feature of neurofibroma with the exception that both had very short history of progression. They underwent gross total removal of the tumor with adjuvant radiotherapy postoperatively. At 6-month follow-up both are doing well with no evidence of recurrence. PMID:24174807

  6. Nocturnal ultrasound measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter correlate with intracranial pressure in children with craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Caroline; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Lequin, Maarten; Joosten, Koen F M; Mathijssen, Irene M J

    2012-09-01

    Children with craniosynostosis are at risk for increased intracranial pressure, and additional possibilities to screen for increased intracranial pressure are required. The authors' aim was to use ultrasound measurements of the optic nerve sheath to understand and express the variability of intracranial pressure in syndromic craniosynostosis. Therefore, five pediatric patients with craniosynostosis underwent invasive 24-hour intracranial pressure monitoring and simultaneous optic nerve sheath measurements. In three patients, the intracranial pressure was abnormal, and during the second half of the night, the optic nerve sheath was increased in all three patients. The optic nerve sheath diameter changes during the night and is as dynamic as the intracranial pressure. To the best of their knowledge, the authors are the first to describe a real-time relationship of the optic nerve sheath with increased intracranial pressure in children.

  7. Excellent response of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of retroperitoneum to radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Ali; Binesh, Fariba; Ghannadi, Fazlollah; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are high-grade sarcomas originating from Schwann cells or nerve sheath cells. Most of these tumours are associated with major nerves of the body wall and extremities. The lower extremity and the retroperitoneum are the most common sites. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment, however, radiation therapy is usually used as an adjuvant treatment. In this paper we present a 57-year-old Iranian woman with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of retroperitoneum who was operated subtotally and then underwent radiation therapy which led to disappearance of all gross residual disease. PMID:23257269

  8. Cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor, triton tumor variant: case report.

    PubMed

    Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Peralta-Olvera, Fabiola; Marhx-Bracho, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Jurado, Rodolfo; De Leon-Bojorge, Beatriz

    2003-01-01

    A case of a cerebral malignant triton tumor in a 3-year-old boy with a 2-month history of frontal headache and no clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis is reported. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large, irregular tumor in the right parietooccipital lobe. A partial surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor was highly cellular and consisted of spindle cells with hyperchromatic and pleomorphic nuclei. Focally, neoplastic cells with rhabdomyoblastic features were found. The immunohistochemical study showed that tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein and CD57, and the rhabdomyoblasts expressed desmin, Myo-D1, and myoglobin. During the postoperative period, a massive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was identified and surgical drainage was performed. The patient worsened and died 10 days after the first surgery. Postmortem study was not authorized. Six cases of cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor have been described; however, primary intraparenchymal malignant triton tumor has not been previously described.

  9. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  10. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  11. Ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Chun; Choi, Ho-Jung; Choi, Min-Cheol; Yoon, Jung-Hee

    2003-12-01

    This study was carried out to assess the feasibility of ultrasonographic measurements of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) in normal dogs and evaluate the effect of breed, sex, body weight and age on biometry of ONSD. The ONSDs were evaluated in 15 dogs (10-50 months old) with normal eye (7 Yorkshire terrier and 8 Maltese). Ultrasonographic measurements of the ONSD were carried out at a constant position located 5 mm behind the optic disc. Eyes were collected immediately after euthanasia, and were used for saline immersion technique and direct measurement by calipers for biometry of ONSD. In this study, there was no significant difference of ONSD between the left and the right eyes, and was no significant difference among ONSD values obtained from ultrasonographical method, saline immersion technique and direct measurement (k=0.95). Also, there was no correlations between ONSD and sex, body weight and age, but was significant between the mean ONSD of Yorkshire terrier and Maltese (p<0.01). The mean ONSD of Yorkshire terrier was 2.10 +/- 0.22 mm and Maltese was 1.63 +/- 0.23 mm. This study suggests that ultrasonographic measurements is useful method for biometry of the ONSD in normal dogs and provides baseline information for the study of evaluating ONSD in various breeds and diagnosing several diseases with the change of the ONSD.

  12. Benign Nerve Sheath Myxoma in an Infant Misdiagnosed as Infantile Digital Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Şule; Şişman, Servet; Kocaturk, Emek; Oguz Topal, Ilteris; Yıldırım, Selda

    2016-07-01

    Herein we present the case of a 16-month boy, clinically diagnosed with infantile digital fibromatosis, but 9 months after continued growth, the mass was excised and the histopathologic diagnosis was that of a benign nerve sheath myxoma. We present this case to emphasize that nerve sheath myxomas (also known as myxoid neurothekeoma) should be included in the differential diagnosis of dermal nodules in infants. PMID:27196676

  13. Characterization of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors with 3T Proton MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, L.M.; Wang, X.; Blakeley, J.O.; Durand, D.J.; Jacobs, M.A.; Demehri, S.; Subhawong, T.K.; Soldatos, T.; Barker, P.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The characterization of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is challenging. The purpose here was to investigate the diagnostic value of quantitative proton MR spectroscopy at 3T for the characterization of peripheral nerve sheath tumors as benign or malignant, compared with PET. Materials and Methods Twenty participants with 24 peripheral nerve sheath tumors underwent MR spectroscopy by use of a point-resolved sequence (TE, 135 ms). Six voxels were placed in 4 histologically proven malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and 22 voxels in 20 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors (9 histologically proven, 11 with documented stability). The presence or absence of a trimethylamine signal was evaluated, the trimethylamine concentration estimated by use of phantom replacement methodology, and the trimethylamine fraction relative to Cr measured. MR spectroscopy results for benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors were compared by use of a Mann-Whitney test, and concordance or discordance with PET findings was recorded. Results In all malignant tumors and in 9 of 18 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, a trimethylamine peak was detected, offering the presence of trimethylamine as a sensitive (100%), but not specific (50%), marker of malignant disease. Trimethylamine concentrations (2.2 ± 2.8 vs 6.6 ± 5.8 institutional units; P < .049) and the trimethylamine fraction (27 ± 42 vs 88 ± 22%; P < .012) were lower in benign than malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. A trimethylamine fraction threshold of 50% resulted in 100% sensitivity (95% CI, 58.0%–100%) and 72.2% (95% CI, 59.5%–75%) specificity for distinguishing benign from malignant disease. MR spectroscopy and PET results were concordant in 12 of 16 cases, (2 false-positive results for MR spectroscopy and PET each). Conclusions Quantitative measurement of trimethylamine concentration by use of MR spectroscopy is feasible in peripheral nerve sheath tumors and shows promise as a

  14. THE FINE STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF NERVE FIBERS, SHEATHS, AND GLIAL CELLS IN THE PRAWN, PALAEMONETES VULGARIS

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, John E.; Doggenweiler, Carlos F.

    1966-01-01

    In view of reports that the nerve fibers of the sea prawn conduct impulses more rapidly than other invertebrate nerves and look like myelinated vertebrate nerves in the light microscope, prawn nerve fibers were studied with the electron microscope. Their sheaths are found to have a consistent and unique structure that is unlike vertebrate myelin in four respects: (1) The sheath is composed of 10 to 50 thin (200- to 1000-A) layers or laminae; each lamina is a cellular process that contains cytoplasm and wraps concentrically around the axon. The laminae do not connect to form a spiral; in fact, no cytoplasmic continuity has been demonstrated among them. (2) Nuclei of sheath cells occur only in the innermost lamina of the sheath; thus, they lie between the sheath and the axon rather than outside the sheath as in vertebrate myelinated fibers. (3) In regions in which the structural integrity of the sheath is most prominent, radially oriented stacks of desmosomes are formed between adjacent laminae. (4) An ∼200-A extracellular gap occurs around the axon and between the innermost sheath laminae, but it is separated from surrounding extracellular spaces by gap closure between the outer sheath laminae, as the membranes of adjacent laminae adhere to form external compound membranes (ECM's). Sheaths are interrupted periodically to form nodes, analogous to vertebrate nodes of Ranvier, where a new type of glial cell called the "nodal cell" loosely enmeshes the axon and intermittently forms tight junctions (ECM's) with it. This nodal cell, in turn, forms tight junctions with other glial cells which ramify widely within the cord, suggesting the possibility of functional axon-glia interaction. PMID:5968976

  15. Pathology in practice: Peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Shubunkin goldfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) have been detected in many fish species, including goldfish, several species of snapper, coho salmon, the bicolor damselfish, and rainbow smelt. They originate from neural crest cells and generally occur along the subcutaneous nerves. A viral etiology has bee...

  16. The coexistence of peripheral nerve sheath tumors and vitiligo: more than coincidence?

    PubMed

    Elsherif, Mohamed A; Spinner, Robert J; Miest, Rachel Y

    2016-01-01

    Neurocristopathies arise from abnormal migration, differentiation, or proliferation of neural crest derivatives, leading to diverse clinical and pathological features. They are classified into dysgenetic or neoplastic, and can affect single or multiple sites (simple versus complex). Examples include congenital melanocytic nevi, neuroblastoma, Hirshsprung's disease, Waardenburg's syndrome, neurofibromatosis (NF) 1 and multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and 2B. We report two cases of peripheral nerve sheath tumors associated with vitiligo and discuss the possible implicated embryologic, genetic and molecular mechanisms. To our knowledge, we also report the first case of de novo malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) associated with vitiligo. PMID:26607956

  17. The coexistence of peripheral nerve sheath tumors and vitiligo: more than coincidence?

    PubMed

    Elsherif, Mohamed A; Spinner, Robert J; Miest, Rachel Y

    2016-01-01

    Neurocristopathies arise from abnormal migration, differentiation, or proliferation of neural crest derivatives, leading to diverse clinical and pathological features. They are classified into dysgenetic or neoplastic, and can affect single or multiple sites (simple versus complex). Examples include congenital melanocytic nevi, neuroblastoma, Hirshsprung's disease, Waardenburg's syndrome, neurofibromatosis (NF) 1 and multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and 2B. We report two cases of peripheral nerve sheath tumors associated with vitiligo and discuss the possible implicated embryologic, genetic and molecular mechanisms. To our knowledge, we also report the first case of de novo malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) associated with vitiligo.

  18. Peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a subadult golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Wernick, Morena Bernadette; Dennler, Matthias; Beckmann, Kathrin; Schybli, Martina; Albini, Sarah; Hoop, Richard K; Steffen, Frank; Kircher, Patrick; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2014-03-01

    A 5-year-old, female golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) was admitted with tetraplegia that progressed to a nonambulatory, spastic tetraparesis after a few days of treatment. Clinical and radiologic examinations, including radiography, computed tomography scan, and myelography, were indicative of neoplasia involving a spinal nerve root. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging and necropsy findings confirmed the diagnosis of a peripheral nerve sheath neoplasia, not, to our knowledge, previously reported in a raptor. PMID:24881155

  19. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration with the free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Head, William S.; Mavity-Hudson, Julia A.; Nunnally, Amy H.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the free electron laser (FEL) energy can be delivered to a small space to perform optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal acute nerve damage. Methods: A 530 mm hollow waveguide probe was designed. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (1.0 mm diameter) was performed in 8 rabbits using either the FEL (4 eyes, 6.45mm, 10 Hz, 2 mJ) or a knife (4 eyes). Within 2 hours following surgery, the animals were perfused with aldehyde fixative. The integrity of the optic nerve and glial response at the site of fenestration were evaluated on tissue selections with H&E, and antibodies to S100β or GFAP. Results: Surgery using the FEL probe was found to be technically superior to the knife. The glial reaction was limited to a zone adjacent to the fenestration and was similar in both the FEL and knife incisions. Conclusions: The FEL appears capable of efficiently performing an optic nerve sheath fenestration in a small space with minimal acute damage. Both the FEL and knife incisions result in a rapid glial response at the site of fenestration even when optic nerve integrity is not compromised.

  20. Morphometric analysis of connective tissue sheaths of sural nerve in diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves.

  1. Morphometric analysis of connective tissue sheaths of sural nerve in diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  2. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration in humans using the free electron laser (FEL): a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Mawn, Louise A.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Jansen, E. Duco; Casagrande, Vivien A.

    2002-06-01

    Our previous studies using rabbits and monkeys showed that the Amide II wavelength (6.45 micrometers ) produced by the FEL could efficiently produce an optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal damage. In order to determine if the technology safely could be applied to human surgery, we used 2 blind human eyes during enucleation to compare the results of producing fenestrations with the FEL or a scissors. FDA and Vanderbilt IRB approvals, and individual patient consents were obtained. The FEL energy was transmitted to a human operating room. After disinsertion of the medial rectus muscle, an optic nerve sheath fenestration (2 mm diameter) was made with either the FEL (6.45 micrometers , 325 micrometers spot size, 30 Hz, 3 mJ) through a hollow waveguide surgical probe or with a scissors. The enucleation was then completed. The optic nerve was dissected from the globe and fixed. Specimens were examined histologically. Dural incisions were effective with both methods. FEL energy at 6.45 micrometers can be transmitted to an operating room and delivered to human ocular tissue through a hollow waveguide surgical probe. This FEL wavelength can produce an optic nerve sheath fenestration without acute direct damage to the nerve in this case report.

  3. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  4. Support of Nerve Conduction by Respiring Myelin Sheath: Role of Connexons.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Adriano, Enrico; Garbati, Patrizia; Ferrando, Sara; Ramoino, Paola; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Balestrino, Maurizio; Panfoli, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that myelin conducts an extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, hypothesizing a novel supportive role for myelin in favor of the axon. We have also hypothesized that the ATP produced in myelin could be transferred thought gap junctions. In this work, by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques, the existence of a connection among myelin to the axon was evaluated, to understand how ATP could be transferred from sheath to the axoplasm. Data confirm a functional expression of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin. Moreover, WB and immunohistochemistry on optic nerve slices show that connexins 32 and 43 are present in myelin and colocalize with myelin basic protein. Interestingly, addition of carbenoxolone or oleamide, two gap junction blockers, causes a decrease in oxidative metabolism in purified myelin, but not in mitochondria. Similar effects were observed on conduction speed in hippocampal Schaffer collateral, in the presence of oleamide. Confocal analysis of optic nerve slices showed that lucifer yellow (that only passes through aqueous pores) signal was found in both the sheath layers and the axoplasma. In the presence of oleamide, but not with oleic acid, signal significantly decreased in the sheath and was lost inside the axon. This suggests the existence of a link among myelin and axons. These results, while supporting the idea that ATP aerobically synthesized in myelin sheath could be transferred to the axoplasm through gap junctions, shed new light on the function of the sheath.

  5. Epicardial Ablation: Prevention of Phrenic Nerve Damage by Pericardial Injection of Saline and the Use of a Steerable Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Neven, Kars; Fernandez-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Berruezo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged. PMID:24669108

  6. Optic nerve sheath fenestration for the treatment of papilledema secondary to cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Jennifer; Tzu, Jonathan H; Schatz, Norman J; Lee, Wendy W

    2014-03-01

    A 16-year-old adolescent girl with multiple risk factors for thrombosis presented with acute onset of headache, decreased vision, and papilledema. Evaluation demonstrated cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) involving the left transverse and sigmoid sinuses and left internal jugular vein. Following bilateral optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF), she experienced improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. In selected cases, ONSF is an effective surgical option for the treatment of papilledema due to CVT after medical treatment has failed. PMID:24343230

  7. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J.; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance. PMID:24216989

  8. Lost in translation: ambiguity in nerve sheath tumor nomenclature and its resultant treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Jones, Kevin B; Monument, Michael J; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R Lor

    2013-05-08

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance.

  9. Gene profiling in the dynamic regulation of the lifespan of the myelin sheath structure in the optic nerve of rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Fu, Han; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Aging of the nervous system leads to impairments in cognition and motor skills, and is a major risk factor for several neurological disorders. Recently, numerous nerve function deficits that appear with aging have been found to be a consequence of myelin abnormalities; however, the genetic mechanism of the age‑related alterations in the myelin sheath has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, the morphology of the myelin sheath in the optic nerve of rats was analyzed at 10 time‑points throughout life. Marked alterations in the myelin sheath were observed in aging and aged optic nerves, and these became progressively more severe with time. To determine the biological processes affected by aging in the myelin sheath, the age‑related profiling of the myelin sheath in rat optic nerves was established using microarray hybridization at 10 time‑points throughout life, between birth and senescence. From the results, 3,826 transcripts associated with the age‑related alterations in the myelin sheath of the optic nerve were identified. It was found that the biological processes most significantly altered by aging were lipid metabolism, the immune response and transmitter transport. This suggests that the downregulation of lipid synthesis genes and the upregulation of immune and neurotransmitter transport genes in aging may be the genetic basis for the age‑related alterations observed in the myelin sheath.

  10. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter in dogs with and without presumed intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Peter V; Fletcher, Daniel J; Cooley, Stacy D; Rosenblatt, Alana J; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a cause of cerebral ischemia and neurologic deficits in dogs. Goals of this retrospective study were to test interobserver agreement for MRI measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter and associations between optic nerve sheath diameter, signalment data, and presumed intracranial hypertension status in a cohort of dogs. A veterinary radiologist interpreted scans of 100 dogs and dogs were assigned to groups based on presence or absence of at least two MRI characteristics of presumed intracranial hypertension. Two observers who were unaware of group status independently measured optic nerve diameter from transverse T2-weighted sequences. Mean optic nerve sheath diameter for all dogs was 3 mm (1-4 mm). The mean difference between observers was 0.3 mm (limits of agreement, -0.4 and 1.0 mm). There was no correlation between optic nerve sheath diameter and age for either observer (r = -0.06 to 0.00) but a moderate positive correlation was observed between optic nerve sheath diameter and body weight for both observers (r = 0.70-0.76). The 22 dogs with presumed intracranial hypertension weighed less than the 78 dogs without (P = 0.02) and were more often female (P = 0.04). Dogs with presumed intracranial hypertension had a larger ratio of optic nerve sheath diameter to body weight for each observer-side pair (P = 0.01-0.04) than dogs without. Findings indicated that the ratio of MRI optic nerve sheath diameter relative to body weight may be a repeatable predictor of intracranial hypertension in dogs.

  11. Optic Nerve Sheath as a Novel Mechanical Load on the Globe in Ocular Duction

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The optic nerve (ON) sheath's role in limiting duction has been previously unappreciated. This study employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate this constraint on adduction. Methods High-resolution, surface coil axial MRI was obtained in 11 normal adults, 14 subjects with esotropia (ET) having normal axial length (AL) < 25.8 mm, 13 myopic subjects with ET and mean AL 29.3 ± 3.3 (SD) mm, and 7 subjects with exotropia (XT). Gaze angles and ON lengths were measured for scans employing eccentric lateral fixation in which an ON became completely straightened. Results In all groups, ON straightening occurred only in the adducting, not abducting, eye. Adduction at ON straightening was 26.0 ± 8.8° in normal subjects, not significantly different from XT at 22.2 ± 11.8°. However, there was significant increase in comparable adduction in ET to 36.3 ± 9.3°, and in myopic ET to 33.6 ± 10.7° (P < 0.04). Optic nerve length at straightening was 27.6 ± 2.7 mm in normals, not significantly different from 28.2 ± 2.8 mm in ET and 27.8 ± 2.7 mm in XT. In myopic ET, ON length at straightening was significantly reduced to 24.0 ± 2.9 mm (P < 0.002) and was associated with globe retraction in adduction, suggesting ON tethering. Conclusions Large adduction may exhaust length redundancy in the normally sinuous ON and sheath, so that additional adduction must stretch the sheath and retract or deform the globe. These mechanical effects are most significant in ET with axial myopia, but may also exert traction on the posterior sclera absent strabismus or myopia. Tethering by the ON sheath in adduction is an important, novel mechanical load on the globe. PMID:27082297

  12. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT.

  13. Preoperative Embolization of a Posterior Mediastinal Lipid-Poor Angiolipoma Mimicking a Paravertebral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; García-Poza, Javier; González-Gordaliza, María Cristina; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Saldaña-Garrido, David

    2015-08-01

    Mediastinal angiolipomas are extremely rare tumors within the thorax, and only 6 cases have been previously reported in the literature. We describe the case of a lipid-poor angiolipoma within the posterior mediastinum of a 63-year-old man who complained of chest pain. Interestingly, initial imaging of the posterior mediastinal mass of our patient suggested a nerve sheath tumor. A specimen from a percutaneous transthoracic core needle biopsy confirmed an angiolipoma. We decided to preoperatively embolize the posterior mediastinal mass to reduce intraoperative bleeding and to facilitate the excision of the tumor.

  14. Electron microscope and low-angle x-ray diffraction studies of the nerve myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    FERNANDEZ-MORAN, H; FINEAN, J B

    1957-09-25

    1. A close correlation has been obtained between high resolution electron microscopy and low-angle x-ray diffraction studies of the myelin sheath of frog and rat peripheral and central nerves. Extensive studies were performed by application of both techniques to the same specimens, prepared for examination by OsO(4) or KMnO(4) fixation, and embedding either in methacrylate or in gelatin employing a new procedure. Controlled physical and chemical modifications of the myelin sheath prior to fixation were also investigated. 2. A correspondence was established between the layer spacings observed in electron micrographs and the fundamental radial repeating unit indicated by the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns. The variations in relative intensities of the low-angle x-ray reflections could be related to the radial density distributions seen in the electron micrographs. 3. An analysis of the preparation procedures revealed that OsO(4) fixation introduces a greater shrinkage of the layer spacings and more pronounced changes in the density distribution within the layers than KMnO(4) fixation. The effects of methacrylate and gelatin embedding are described, and their relative merits considered in relation to the preservation of myelin structure by OsO(4) fixation. 4. The experimental modifications introduced by freezing and thawing of fresh whole nerve are described, particularly the enhancement of the intermediate lines and the dissociation of the layer components in the myelin sheath. A characteristic collapsing of the radial period of the sheath is observed after subjecting fresh nerve trunks to prolonged and intense ultracentrifugation. 5. Controlled extraction of fresh nerve with acetone at 0 degrees C., which preferentially removes cholesterol, produces characteristic, differentiated modifications of the myelin sheath structure. Electron microscopy reveals several types of modifications within a single preparation, including both expanded and collapsed layer

  15. Breast metastases from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the kidney: An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Alessio, Ricardo C; Rajpurkar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are extremely rare soft tissue sarcomas of ectomesenchymal origin. They are commonly seen in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1), but can also occur without a history of NF (isolated MPNST). MPNSTs are most commonly located on the extremities (brachial and sacral plexus), head and neck, and trunk regions and are rarely reported in genitourinary organs. These tumors are aggressive, with a high recurrence rate and distant metastases. MPNST involving the kidney is extremely rare, and review of the literature using PubMed from 2001 to 2014 revealed eight cases of MPNST involving the kidney (seven, primarily involving the kidney and one metastatic MPNST of the kidney). Herein, we describe a case of breast metastases from an MPNST of the kidney without a history of NF-1. The patient was initially diagnosed with a spindle cell neoplasm of the kidney with peripheral nerve sheath differentiation. Eventually, the patient developed a right breast mass that was diagnosed as metastatic MPNST. The patient refused any kind of treatment and died 6 months later in hospice care. PMID:27453670

  16. Breast metastases from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the kidney: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Alessio, Ricardo C.; Rajpurkar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are extremely rare soft tissue sarcomas of ectomesenchymal origin. They are commonly seen in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1), but can also occur without a history of NF (isolated MPNST). MPNSTs are most commonly located on the extremities (brachial and sacral plexus), head and neck, and trunk regions and are rarely reported in genitourinary organs. These tumors are aggressive, with a high recurrence rate and distant metastases. MPNST involving the kidney is extremely rare, and review of the literature using PubMed from 2001 to 2014 revealed eight cases of MPNST involving the kidney (seven, primarily involving the kidney and one metastatic MPNST of the kidney). Herein, we describe a case of breast metastases from an MPNST of the kidney without a history of NF-1. The patient was initially diagnosed with a spindle cell neoplasm of the kidney with peripheral nerve sheath differentiation. Eventually, the patient developed a right breast mass that was diagnosed as metastatic MPNST. The patient refused any kind of treatment and died 6 months later in hospice care. PMID:27453670

  17. Intercellular junctions between palisade nerve endings and outer root sheath cells of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, T; Inoué, T

    2000-05-15

    Hair follicles have a longitudinal set of sensory nerve endings called palisade nerve endings (PN). We examined the junctional structures between the PN and outer root sheath (ORS) cells of hair follicles in the rat external ear. Transmission electron microscopy of serial thin sections showed that the processes of the ORS cells penetrated the basal lamina of the hair follicle, forming intercellular junctions with the PN (PN-ORS junctions). Two types of junctions were found: junctions between nerve endings and ORS cells (N-ORS junctions) and those between Schwann cell processes and ORS cells (S-ORS junctions). The N-ORS junctions had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was attached to the nerve ending (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the nerve ending (type II). The S-ORS junctions also had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was abutted on the Schwann cell process (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the Schwann cell process (type II). Vesicles, coated pits, coated vesicles, and endosomes were sometimes seen in nerve endings, Schwann cells, and ORS cells near the junctions. Computer-aided reconstruction of the serial thin sections displayed the three-dimensional structure of these junctions. These results suggested that the PN-ORS junctions provided direct relationships between the PN and ORS in at least four different patterns. The discovery of these junctions shows the PN-ORS relationship to be closer than previously realized. We speculate that these junctions may have roles in attachment of the PN to the ORS, contributing to increases in the sensitivity of the PN, and in chemical signaling between the PN and ORS.

  18. Microsurgical management of giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the scalp: two case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Ou, Shao-wu; Guo, Zong-ze; Wang, Yun-jie; Xing, De-guang

    2013-10-10

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the scalp are rare lesions of the nervous system. Only 14 cases have been reported to date. The field of neurosurgery has struggled with diagnosing and treating these tumors. In this report, we present two cases of giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the scalp and retrospectively analyze the clinical features, imaging findings, pathological features, and prognoses of these two patients. Each underwent microsurgery and radiotherapy. In addition, based on a literature review, we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies used to treat these unusual lesions.

  19. The effect of buffer molarity on the size, shape and sheath thickness of peripheral myelinated nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Holland, G R

    1982-08-01

    Nineteen rats were perfused intracardially with a 2% glutaraldehyde solution in cacodylate buffers adjusted in molarity from 0 to 0.4 M. Ultrathin sections of the inferior alveolar nerve were photographed in the electron microscope. The circumference, a shape factor, small diameter and myelin sheath thickness of each myelinated nerve fibre were measured using a semi-automatic image analysis system. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the nerve profiles increasingly deviate from a true circle with higher concentrations of buffer. The small diameter of the myelinated nerve fibres declines linearly with increasing buffer molarity whereas circumference is unaffected. Myelin sheath thickness is correlated with fibre size but is not affected by changes in buffer molarity. The use of fibre circumference is recommended to allow valid comparison of results between studies in which fixation protocols may differ.

  20. Meningiomas of the Pediatric Skull Base: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gump, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric skull base meningiomas are rare and complex clinical entities. Meningioma is a relatively uncommon brain tumor in children, and only ∼ 27% involve the skull base. Some evidence suggests that these tumors are more likely to be atypical or malignant in children than adults. The absence of female preponderance in pediatric meningiomas is reflected in the skull base subpopulation. Skull base meningiomas in children are most likely to be found in the anterior or middle fossa base, or involving the orbit and optic nerve sheath. Petroclival, suprasellar/parasellar, cerebellopontine angle, cavernous sinus, and foramen magnum tumors are very rare. Meningiomas constitute a small proportion of reported cases of pediatric skull base pathology, and they are entirely absent from many case series. Initial gross total resection is consistently associated with superior outcomes. Surgical approaches to the pediatric skull base must take additional factors into consideration including relatively smaller anatomy, immature dentition, incompletely aerated sinuses and air cells, and altered configurations of structures such as the pterional bony complex. Multidisciplinary expertise is essential to optimizing treatment outcomes. PMID:25685652

  1. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) when increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is suspected. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound since 2009 as a proxy for ICP in non-acute monitoring for space medicine purposes. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before launch. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Our data characterize the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, its longitudinal trends in long-duration spaceflight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased ICP outcomes.

  2. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising in a traumatic neuroma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kos, Zuzana; Robertson, Susan J; Purgina, Bibianna M; Verma, Shailendra; Gravel, Denis H

    2013-10-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer presented with a soft tissue mass at the site of a remote, non-neoplastic lumbar surgery. Excisional biopsy revealed a traumatic neuroma. Five years later she re-presented with a rapidly growing, tender nodule at the same site. An excisional biopsy was again performed and revealed a tumor composed of malignant epithelioid and spindle cells merging imperceptibly with residual traumatic neuroma. The malignant cells were positive for vimentin, S-100 and micropthalmia transcription factor. They were negative for cytokeratins, muscle markers, Melan-A, HMB45, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein. Electron microscopy showed no melanosomes. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising within a long-standing traumatic neuroma was rendered and represents a hitherto unreported origin of this rare, aggressive soft tissue sarcoma.

  3. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as orbito temporal lump: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Mishra, Sanjib; Das, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. The most common anatomical sites include the upper and lower extremities and trunk and less commonly the head and neck. To our knowledge, few patients with a cranial or facial MPNST have been reported. We report such a lesion in a 35-year-old woman who presented with left sided rapidly progressive proptosis and visual loss due to an orbital lump extending up to the temporal lobe. Cranial imaging showed a huge mass invading the orbital wall and temporal bone. The presumptive diagnosis was a malignant orbital tumor. Preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology of the orbital mass came to be neurofibroma. Near total resection of the tumor was done. Histopathology revealed MPNST which was subsequently confirmed on the basis of immunopositivity for S-100. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 8 days after surgery with an advice to attend cancer institute for possible radiotherapy. PMID:27057226

  4. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as orbito temporal lump: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu S; Mishra, Sanjib; Das, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. The most common anatomical sites include the upper and lower extremities and trunk and less commonly the head and neck. To our knowledge, few patients with a cranial or facial MPNST have been reported. We report such a lesion in a 35-year-old woman who presented with left sided rapidly progressive proptosis and visual loss due to an orbital lump extending up to the temporal lobe. Cranial imaging showed a huge mass invading the orbital wall and temporal bone. The presumptive diagnosis was a malignant orbital tumor. Preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology of the orbital mass came to be neurofibroma. Near total resection of the tumor was done. Histopathology revealed MPNST which was subsequently confirmed on the basis of immunopositivity for S-100. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 8 days after surgery with an advice to attend cancer institute for possible radiotherapy. PMID:27057226

  5. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in the nasopharynx of a cow.

    PubMed

    Sydler, T; Lesser, M; Waldern, N; Dennler, M; Bode-Lesniewska, B; Pospischil, A; Braun, U

    2013-11-01

    This case describes the findings in a Swiss Braunvieh cow with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) in the nasopharynx. The major clinical signs were mixed dyspnoea with inspiratory and expiratory noises. Radiographic views of the head revealed an irregular mass with soft-tissue density in the nasopharynx originating from the dorsal pharynx and occupying and restricting the pharyngeal cavity. Endoscopic examination showed a lobulated mass obstructing almost the entire lumen of the aboral nasal passages and nasopharynx. Postmortem examination revealed a lobulated mass in the choanae with a broad attachment to the dorsal pharynx and histologically a soft tissue sarcoma with tumour cells positive for the S-100 and p75NTR (neurotrophin receptor) proteins and negative for CNPase. Electron microscopic examination showed few structures that indicated that the tumour originated from Schwann cells.

  6. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and β subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the unknown trophic role of myelin sheath. It may be energy supplier for the axon, explaining why in demyelinating diseases and neuropathies, myelin sheath loss is associated with axonal degeneration.

  7. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation. PMID:27588138

  8. Primary spinal intradural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma mimicking a giant nerve sheath tumor: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingfei; Zhang, Buyi; Liang, Feng; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Primary intradural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma is a very rare form of malignant neoplasm. Only few cases have been reported on the literature. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy who had a chief complaint of pain and tingling in the right lower limb. The patient initially seemed to have a giant nerve sheath tumor but was eventually diagnosed with intradural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma arising from the nerve roots of the cauda equine. The literature with regard to primary spinal intradural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma is reviewed. PMID:25674292

  9. Chromosomal imbalances in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor detected by metaphase and microarray comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuko; Yoshida, Aki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Wai, Daniel; Ohata, Norihide; Takeda, Ken; Kawai, Akira; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly malignant tumors affecting adolescents and adults. There have been a few reports on chromosomal aberrations of MPNSTs; however, the tumor-specific alteration remains unknown. We characterized the genomic alterations in 8 MPNSTs and 8 schwannomas by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In 5 of 8 MPNSTs, microarray CGH was added for more detailed analyses. Frequent gains were identified on 3q13-26, 5p13-14, and 12q11-23 and frequent losses were at 1p31, 10p, 11q24-qter, 16, and 17. Microarray CGH revealed frequent gains of EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, KCNK12, DDX15, CDK6, and LAMA3, and losses of CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, and SULT2A1. These genes seem to be responsible for developing MPNSTs. The concordance rate between metaphase CGH and microarray CGH was 66%. Metaphase CGH was useful for identifying chromosomal alterations before applying microarray CGH. PMID:16391845

  10. Critical role of PTEN for development and progression of nerve sheath tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Mawrin, Christian

    2010-04-01

    Evaluation of: Gregorian C, Nakashima J, Dry SM et al.: PTEN dosage is essential for neurofibroma development and malignant transformation. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106(46), 19479-19484 (2009). Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is among the most common inherited tumor-predisposing syndromes in humans. Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from neurofibroma significantly affects the morbidity and mortality of NF1 patients. The authors demonstrate, using different genetically engineered mouse models, that loss of the tumor suppressor Pten in combination with overexpression of the K-ras oncogene is an important step in MPNST development. In both mouse and human tumors, the transition from low-grade neurofibromas to MPNST is associated with reduced Pten expression, deregulated mTOR signaling activity and increased proliferation. This tumor transition can be monitored by (18)F-fluoro-D-glucose-PET, offering close clinical monitoring of NF1 patients and thus early detection of MPNST development in the future. PMID:20373864

  11. Trp53 Haploinsufficiency Modifies EGFR-Driven Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P.; Moriarity, Branden S.; Otto, George M.; Watson, Adrienne L.; Choi, Kwangmin; Collins, Margaret H.; Wallace, Margaret; Webber, Beau R.; Forster, Colleen L.; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are genetically diverse, aggressive sarcomas that occur sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome. Reduced TP53 gene expression and amplification/overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene occur in MPNST formation. We focused on determining the cooperativity between reduced TP53 expression and EGFR overexpression for Schwann cell transformation in vitro (immortalized human Schwann cells) and MPNST formation in vivo (transgenic mice). Human gene copy number alteration data, microarray expression data, and TMA analysis indicate that TP53 haploinsufficiency and increased EGFR expression co-occur in human MPNST samples. Concurrent modulation of EGFR and TP53 expression in HSC1λ cells significantly increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Transgenic mice heterozygous for a Trp53-null allele and overexpressing EGFR in Schwann cells had a significant increase in neurofibroma and grade 3 PNST (MPNST) formation compared with single transgenic controls. Histological analysis of tumors identified a significant increase in pAkt expression in grade 3 PNSTs compared with neurofibromas. Array comparative genome hybridization analysis of grade 3 PNSTs identified recurrent focal regions of chromosomal gains with significant enrichment in genes involved in extracellular signal–regulated kinase 5 signaling. Collectively, altered p53 expression cooperates with overexpression of EGFR in Schwann cells to enhance in vitro oncogenic properties and tumorigenesis and progression in vivo. PMID:24832557

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the vulva, an unusual differential diagnosis for vulvar mass

    PubMed Central

    Özdal, Bülent; Öz, Murat; Korkmaz, Elmas; Ataoğlu, Ömür; Güngör, Tayfun; Meydanli, Mehmet Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare, up to one half of the MPNSTs occur in patients with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1), while the rest are sporadic. Here, we present a 52-year-old woman with MPNST of the vulva without NF-1. We will discuss basics of the disease, treatment options and follow-up strategies. PRESENTATION OF CASE 52-year-old female admitted to our hospital with complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding and rapidly growing vulvar mass. Excisional biopsy of the mass showed MPNST of the vulva. Afterwards, the patient underwent radical vulvectomy with inguinofemoral lymph node dissection. Short after the surgery, multiple lung metastasis were shown and responded to chemotherapy, but rapid local recurrence occurred short after the completion of the chemotherapy. DISCUSSION The primary treatment option in MPNSTs is surgical excision with or without adjuvant therapy. There is not enough data about the role of systemic chemotherapy in the management of MPNSTs and it still remains controversial. CONCLUSION In general, radiation therapy has not been demonstrated to improve overall survival. Complete surgical resection of the primary tumor is the mainstay of the treatment. PMID:25290384

  13. Survivin Expression and Prognostic Significance in Pediatric Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Boldrin, Daniela; Merlo, Anna; Gambini, Claudio; Ferrari, Andrea; Dall'Igna, Patrizia; Coffin, Cheryl M.; Martines, Annalisa; Bonaldi, Laura; De Salvo, Gian Luca; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are very aggressive malignancies comprising approximately 5–10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. In this study, we focused on pediatric MPNST arising in the first 2 decades of life, as they represent one the most frequent non-rhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcomas in children. In MPNST, several genetic alterations affect the chromosomal region 17q encompassing the BIRC5/SURVIVIN gene. As cancer-specific expression of survivin has been found to be an effective marker for cancer detection and outcome prediction, we analyzed survivin expression in 35 tumor samples derived from young patients affected by sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-associated MPNST. Survivin mRNA and protein expression were assessed by Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, while gene amplification was analyzed by FISH. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of patients. Survivin mRNA was overexpressed in pediatric MPNST and associated to a copy number gain of BIRC5; furthermore, increased levels of transcripts correlated with a higher FNCLCC tumor grade (grade 1 and 2 vs. 3, p = 0.0067), and with a lower survival probability (Log-rank test, p = 0.0038). Overall, these data support the concept that survivin can be regarded as a useful prognostic marker for pediatric MPNST and a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24303016

  14. Critical role of PTEN for development and progression of nerve sheath tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Mawrin, Christian

    2010-04-01

    Evaluation of: Gregorian C, Nakashima J, Dry SM et al.: PTEN dosage is essential for neurofibroma development and malignant transformation. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106(46), 19479-19484 (2009). Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is among the most common inherited tumor-predisposing syndromes in humans. Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from neurofibroma significantly affects the morbidity and mortality of NF1 patients. The authors demonstrate, using different genetically engineered mouse models, that loss of the tumor suppressor Pten in combination with overexpression of the K-ras oncogene is an important step in MPNST development. In both mouse and human tumors, the transition from low-grade neurofibromas to MPNST is associated with reduced Pten expression, deregulated mTOR signaling activity and increased proliferation. This tumor transition can be monitored by (18)F-fluoro-D-glucose-PET, offering close clinical monitoring of NF1 patients and thus early detection of MPNST development in the future.

  15. Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Spitze, Arielle; Lam, Peter; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) has been increasing in prevalence in the past decade, following the obesity epidemic. When medical treatment fails, surgical treatment options must be considered. However, controversy remains as to which surgical procedure is the preferred surgical option – optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting – for the long-term treatment of this syndrome. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of ONSF versus shunt placement for the treatment of IIH. Design: This was a retrospective review of the current literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: The authors conducted a PubMed search using the following terms: Idiopathic IIH, pseudotumor cerebri, ONSF, CSF shunts, vetriculo-peritoneal shunting, and lumbo-peritoneal shunting. The authors included pertinent and significant original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed the new aspects and updates in these topics. Results: The treatment of IIH remains controversial and lacks randomized controlled clinical trial data. Treatment of IIH rests with the determination of the severity of IIH-related visual loss and headache. Conclusion: The decision for ONSF versus shunting is somewhat institution and surgeon dependent. ONSF is preferred for patients with visual symptoms whereas shunting is reserved for patients with headache. There are positive and negative aspects of both procedures, and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is needed (currently underway). This article will hopefully be helpful in allowing the reader to make a more informed decision until that time. PMID:25449938

  16. Prognostic roles for fibroblast growth factor receptor family members in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fengju; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are rare, highly malignant, and poorly understood sarcomas. The often poor outcome of MPNST highlights the necessity of identifying prognostic predictors for this aggressive sarcoma. Here, we investigate the role of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family members in human MPNSTs. Results aCGH and bioinformatics analysis identified frequent amplification of the FGFR1 gene. FISH analysis revealed that 26.9% MPNST samples had amplification of FGFR1, with both focal and polysomy patterns observed. IHC identified that FGFR1 protein expression was positively correlated with FGFR1 gene amplification. High expression of FGFR1 protein was associated with better overall survival (OS) and was an independent prognostic predictor for OS of MPNST patients. Additionally, combined expression of FGFR1 and FGFR2 protein characterized a subtype of MPNST with better OS. FGFR4 protein was expressed 82.3% of MPNST samples, and was associated with poor disease-free survival. Materials and Methods We performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 26 patients from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to validate the gene amplification detected by aCGH analysis. Another cohort of 63 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded MPNST samples (including 52 samples for FISH assay) was obtained to explore FGFR1, 2, 3, and 4 protein expression by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Conclusions Our integrated genomic and molecular studies provide evidence that FGFRs play different prognostic roles in MPNST. PMID:26993773

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Remains Constant during Robot Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Verdonck, Philip; Kalmar, Alain F.; Suy, Koen; Geeraerts, Thomas; Vercauteren, Marcel; Mottrie, Alex; De Wolf, Andre M.; Hendrickx, Jan F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background During robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP), a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CO2PP) is applied and the patient is placed in a head-down position. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is expected to acutely increase under these conditions. A non-invasive method, the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurement, may warn us that the mechanism of protective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shifts becomes exhausted. Methods After obtaining IRB approval and written informed consent, ONSD was measured by ocular ultrasound in 20 ASA I–II patients at various stages of the RALRP procedure: baseline awake, after induction, after applying the CO2PP, during head-down position, after resuming the supine position, in the postoperative anaesthesia care unit, and on day one postoperatively. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated as the mean arterial (MAP) minus central venous pressure (CVP). Results The ONSD did not change during head-down position, although the CVP increased from 4.2(2.5) mm Hg to 27.6(3.8) mm Hg. The CPP was decreased 70 min after assuming the head-down position until 15 min after resuming the supine position, but remained above 60 mm Hg at all times. Conclusion Even though ICP has been documented to increase during CO2PP and head-down positioning, we did not find any changes in ONSD during head-down position. These results indicate that intracranial blood volume does not increase up to a point that CSF migration as a compensation mechanism becomes exhausted, suggesting any increases in ICP are likely to be small. PMID:25369152

  18. Morphological spectrum of peripheral nerve sheath tumors: An insight into World Health Organization 2013 classification

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Boovalli, Mythri M.; Nathiyal, Velusamy; Venkataramappa, Srinivasamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) are neuroectodermal in origin. Now these tumors are classified under World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of soft tissue and bone 2013. Objective: To study the morphological spectrum of PNST and to study the secondary degenerative changes associated with it. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from January 2010 to June 2015. The gross details of tumor and patient's demographic profiles were reviewed. The hematoxylin and eosin stained slides were reassessed and the lesions were categorized and classified as per the WHO 2013 classification. The tumors were also assessed for secondary degenerative changes. Results: Our study comprised 143 cases of PNST. Age of the patients ranged from 5 to 75 years. 21–30 years is the most common age of occurrence with head and neck being the most common site. The PNSTs observed in the present study were neurofibroma (NF) (61.5%), schwannoma (36%), malignant PNST (2%), and granular cell tumor (0.5%). Nearly 10% of NF fulfilled the criteria for neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Rare tumors such as plexiform schwannoma and granular cell tumor were also observed. Malignant tumors were larger in dimension than benign. Myxoid, cystic, and hyaline changes were commonly associated with benign tumors while necrosis, hemorrhage, and mitotic activity were seen with malignant tumors. Conclusion: This series highlights the pathological variants of PNST along with their morphological changes and NF1 association. It is essential to be familiar with all these variants of PNST for accurate diagnosis as they have varied biological behavior. PMID:27365950

  19. Visual outcomes following optic nerve sheath fenestration via the medial transconjunctival approach.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Neel S; Mahmoud, Ashraf M; Buzzacco, Dominic; Katz, Steven E

    2016-10-01

    This article determines the safety of optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) for the treatment of patients with intracranial hypertension in the immediate 6-month post-operative period and its efficacy in reducing optic disk edema. Retrospective, non-comparative interventional case series. 207 eyes in 104 patients undergoing ONSF between the years 2005 and 2014. Papilledema grade based on modified Frisen scale and mean deviation of Humphrey visual field. 207 eyes of 104 patients (102 IIH, 2 IH due to dural sinus thrombosis) were included in the study. The patients were 96.1% female (N = 100) and 3.9% male (N = 4). The average patient age was 28.8 years (SD ± 9.5 years) and had a mean opening pressure of 39.85 cmH2O (SD ± 8.4 cmH2O). Mean follow-up period was 6.0 months (SD ± 5.9 months). Papilledema resolved in 76.1% of eyes at 1 week (N = 102 eyes), 75% of eyes at 1 month (N = 90 eyes), and 71% of eyes at 6 months (N = 94 eyes). Visual field comparison had a mean of the paired differences in MD at 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months of 1.59dB (P = 0.006), 2.53dB (P < 0.001), and 1.30dB (P = 0.016), respectively. ONSF is effective in reducing optic disk edema and does not cause vision loss in the 6-month post-operative period regardless of severity of IIH (as judged by elevation of opening pressure measured at pre-operative assessment). PMID:27541942

  20. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, Jillian; Fersht, Naomi; Bremner, Fion; Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya; Short, Susan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  1. The dural sheath of the optic nerve: descriptive anatomy and surgical applications.

    PubMed

    Francois, P; Lescanne, E; Velut, S

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the descriptive anatomy of the optic dural sheath using microanatomical dissections on cadavers. The orbit is the rostral part of the extradural neural axis compartment; the optic dural sheath forms the central portion of the orbit.In order to describe this specific anatomy, we carefully dissected 5 cadaveric heads (10 orbits) up to the meningeal structure of the orbit and its contents. 1 cadaveric head was reserved for electron microscopy to add to our knowledge of the collagen structure of the optic dural sheath.In this chapter, we describe the anatomy of the interperiostal-dural concept and the anatomy of the orbit. The optic dural sheath contains three portions: the intracranial, the intracanalicular and the intraorbital segment. Each one has specific anatomic relations which result in particular surgical considerations.

  2. The optic nerve sheath hemorrhage is a non-specific finding in cases of suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Marc De; Beuls, Emile; Jorens, Philippe G; Parizel, Paul; Jacobs, Werner

    2015-11-01

    In young infants, the triad consisting of acute encephalopathy, retinal hemorrhages, and a subdural hematoma is a nonspecific finding. It has traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies. The triad may be found among a vast spectrum of natural diseases. Optic nerve sheath hemorrhage in infants is typically detected at autopsy. It is a nonspecific finding that can be found in traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies. Neither the triad nor the ONSH are pathognomonic for an abusive head injury. Opposite to the triad, the spectrum of non-traumatic etiologies of ONSH is limited. In infants ONSH rarely occurs in spontaneous subarachnoidal hemorrhage or in infectious conditions. Our results show that the clinical significance of the optic nerve sheath hemorrhage in the forensic work-up of fatal cases of alleged abusive head injury is its limited differential diagnosis. Only after careful differential diagnosis ONSH may contribute to the diagnosis of AHT. However, the main limitation of our study is the sampling bias, as the eyes are usually removed when abusive head trauma is suspected. PMID:26386200

  3. Influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor nerve on its myelinated sensory axons and on their sprouting into the end-to-side coapted nerve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Uroš; Zele, Tilen; Tomšič, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2012-12-10

    The influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor sural nerve on axonal sprouting into the end-to-side coapted peroneal nerve was examined in the rat. In parallel, the effect of these procedures on the donor nerve was assessed. The sheaths of the donor nerve at the coaptation site were either left completely intact (group A) or they were breached by epineurial sutures (group B), an epineurial window (group C), or a perineurial window (group D). In group A, the compound action potential (CAP) of sensory axons was detected in ~10% and 40% of the recipient nerves at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, which was significantly less frequently than in group D at both recovery periods. In addition, the number of myelinated axons in the recipient nerve was significantly larger in group D than in other groups at 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, the number of axons in group A was only ~15% of the axon numbers in other groups (p<0.05). Focal subepineurial degenerative changes in the donor nerves were only seen after 4 weeks, but not later. The average CAP area and the total number of myelinated axons in the donor nerves were not different among the experimental groups. In conclusion, myelinated sensory axons are able to penetrate the epiperineurium of donor nerves after end-to-side nerve coaption; however, their ingrowth into recipient nerves is significantly enhanced by breaching the epiperineurial sheets at the coaptation site. Breaching does not cause permanent injury to the donor nerve.

  4. Peripheral nerve connections influence the appearance of neurosecretary material in neural sheath of ventral ganglion of the fly Sarcophaga bullata: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, P; Sood, Prem Prakash

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the role of the brain and peripheral connections with the target organs in the appearance of neurosecretary material within the dorsal neural sheath of the ventral ganglion of the fly S. bullata. Specifically, the accumulation of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (the neurosecretary material) was examined by immunocytochemistry. Immunoreactions were performed on: (1) a normal intact ventral ganglion, (2) an isolated ventral ganglion that was cultured in vivo, and (3) a ventral ganglion that was isolated by transection from the brain, but retained its peripheral nerve connections. The results demonstrate that (a) the neurons of the ganglia survive and exhibit FMRFamide immune reaction independent of their peripheral connections, and (b) the accumulation of neuropeptide in the dorsal neural sheath is controlled by intact peripheral nerve connections with the ganglion. It is suggested that in the absence of their peripheral connections, the axons of FMRFamide immunoreactive neurons fail to invade the neural sheath resulting in the accumulation of neurosecretary material.

  5. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique Into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara S.; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine physicians recently adopted the use of ultrasonography to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as concomitant with increased intracranial pressure. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound capabilities since 2009 to consider this anatomical measure as a proxy for intracranial pressure in the microgravity environment. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before missions. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Data will be presented characterizing the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, longitudinal trends in-flight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased intracranial pressure outcomes.

  6. Simultaneous presentation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and moyamoya disease associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 in a child.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sun Young; Hwang, Sun Mi; Lee, Min Kyung; Jo, Dae Sun; Hwang, Pyoung Han

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is a rare hereditary disorder, which is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by multiple caféau- lait spots of the skin, benign cutaneous neurofibromas, skeletal dysplasia and learning disability. The association of NF-1 with benign and malignant tumors is well established. The lifetime risk of patients with NF-1 developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) has been estimated to be 8-13%. Such tumors can develop in any part of the body, but their occurrence in the gastrointestinal tract is rare. Patients with NF-1 have a wide spectrum of vascular abnormalities. Cerebrovascular lesions have been found in approximately 2.5% of children with NF1. We encountered a case of NF-1 with MPNSTs in the gastrointestinal tract and moyamoya disease.

  7. Divergent differentiation in malignant soft tissue neoplasms: the paradigm of liposarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter; Taxy, Jerome B; Krausz, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In tumors clonality does not always translate into morphologic uniformity. While most sarcomas exhibit only one line of histologic differentiation, a minority may display a strikingly diverse phenotype in addition to the main lineage. This phenomenon not only presents a diagnostic problem but also raises questions about the commitment of tumor cells toward a specific phenotype. Among sarcomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and dedifferentiated liposarcoma are two entities in which divergent differentiation is a relatively frequent event. Diagnostically it is crucial to recognize the "primary" sarcoma in such tumors correctly and distinguish it from the "secondary" divergent elements. The presence of the latter could be the first morphologic clue to a specific sarcoma type. Even though it may be difficult to explain the pathogenesis of divergent differentiation, divergence still illustrates that the phenotype of a tumor cell is not set in stone but can be modulated or switched by a number of factors.

  8. Simultaneous presentation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and moyamoya disease associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 in a child.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sun Young; Hwang, Sun Mi; Lee, Min Kyung; Jo, Dae Sun; Hwang, Pyoung Han

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is a rare hereditary disorder, which is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by multiple caféau- lait spots of the skin, benign cutaneous neurofibromas, skeletal dysplasia and learning disability. The association of NF-1 with benign and malignant tumors is well established. The lifetime risk of patients with NF-1 developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) has been estimated to be 8-13%. Such tumors can develop in any part of the body, but their occurrence in the gastrointestinal tract is rare. Patients with NF-1 have a wide spectrum of vascular abnormalities. Cerebrovascular lesions have been found in approximately 2.5% of children with NF1. We encountered a case of NF-1 with MPNSTs in the gastrointestinal tract and moyamoya disease. PMID:26690608

  9. BET Bromodomain Inhibition Triggers Apoptosis of NF1-associated Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors through Bim Induction

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amish J.; Liao, Chung-Ping; Chen, Zhiguo; Liu, Chiachi; Wang, Yong; Le, Lu Q.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that develop sporadically or in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients. There is no effective treatment for MPNSTs and they are typically fatal. To gain insights into MPNST pathogenesis, we utilized a novel MPNST mouse model that allowed us to study the evolution of these tumors at the transcriptome level. Strikingly, in MPNSTs we found upregulation of chromatin regulator Brd4, and show that BRD4 inhibition profoundly suppresses both growth and tumorigenesis. Our findings reveal new roles for BET bromodomains in MPNST development, and report a novel mechanism by which bromodomain inhibition induces apoptosis through induction of pro-apoptotic Bim, which may represent a paradigm shift in therapy for MPNST patients. Moreover, these findings indicate novel epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance of anti-/pro-apoptotic molecules, and that bromodomain inhibition can shift this balance in favor of cancer cell apoptosis. PMID:24373973

  10. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  11. Ras-Driven Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Aurora Kinase A as a Potential Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami V.; Eaves, David; Jessen, Walter J.; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A.; Qian, Mark G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Perentesis, John P.; Serra, Eduard; Cripe, Timothy P.; Miller, Shyra J.; Ratner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) develop malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) which are often inoperable and do not respond well to current chemotherapies or radiation. The goal of this study was to utilize comprehensive gene expression analysis to identify novel therapeutic targets. Experimental Design Nerve Schwann cells and/or their precursors are the tumorigenic cell types in MPNST due to the loss of the NF1 gene, which encodes the RasGAP protein neurofibromin. Therefore, we created a transgenic mouse model, CNP-HRas12V, expressing constitutively-active HRas in Schwann cells and defined a Ras-induced gene expression signature to drive a Bayesian factor regression model analysis of differentially expressed genes in mouse and human neurofibromas and MPNSTs. We tested functional significance of Aurora kinase over-expression in MPNST in vitro and in vivo using Aurora kinase shRNAs and compounds that inhibit Aurora kinase. Results We identified 2000 genes with probability of linkage to nerve Ras signaling of which 339 were significantly differentially expressed in mouse and human NF1-related tumor samples relative to normal nerves, including Aurora kinase A (AURKA). AURKA was dramatically over-expressed and genomically amplified in MPNSTs but not neurofibromas. Aurora kinase shRNAs and Aurora kinase inhibitors blocked MPNST cell growth in vitro. Furthermore, an AURKA selective inhibitor, MLN8237, stabilized tumor volume and significantly increased survival of mice with MPNST xenografts. Conclusion Integrative cross-species transcriptome analyses combined with preclinical testing has provided an effective method for identifying candidates for molecular-targeted therapeutics. Blocking Aurora kinases may be a viable treatment platform for MPNST. PMID:22811580

  12. Comprehensive establishment and characterization of orthoxenograft mouse models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Castellsagué, Joan; Gel, Bernat; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Llatjós, Roger; Blanco, Ignacio; Benavente, Yolanda; Pérez-Sidelnikova, Diana; García-del Muro, Javier; Viñals, Joan Maria; Vidal, August; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Terribas, Ernest; López-Doriga, Adriana; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Serra, Eduard; Villanueva, Alberto; Lázaro, Conxi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft-tissue sarcomas that can arise either sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). These aggressive malignancies confer poor survival, with no effective therapy available. We present the generation and characterization of five distinct MPNST orthoxenograft models for preclinical testing and personalized medicine. Four of the models are patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX), two independent MPNSTs from the same NF1 patient and two from different sporadic patients. The fifth model is an orthoxenograft derived from an NF1-related MPNST cell line. All MPNST orthoxenografts were generated by tumor implantation, or cell line injection, next to the sciatic nerve of nude mice, and were perpetuated by 7–10 mouse-to-mouse passages. The models reliably recapitulate the histopathological properties of their parental primary tumors. They also mimic distal dissemination properties in mice. Human stroma was rapidly lost after MPNST engraftment and replaced by murine stroma, which facilitated genomic tumor characterization. Compatible with an origin in a catastrophic event and subsequent genome stabilization, MPNST contained highly altered genomes that remained remarkably stable in orthoxenograft establishment and along passages. Mutational frequency and type of somatic point mutations were highly variable among the different MPNSTs modeled, but very consistent when comparing primary tumors with matched orthoxenografts generated. Unsupervised cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using an MPNST expression signature of ~1,000 genes grouped together all primary tumor–orthoxenograft pairs. Our work points to differences in the engraftment process of primary tumors compared with the engraftment of established cell lines. Following standardization and extensive characterization and validation, the orthoxenograft models were used for initial preclinical drug testing. Sorafenib (a

  13. Combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine effectively inhibits malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth by targeting complementary signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Stephanie N; Turk, Amy N; Byer, Stephanie J; Longo, Jody Fromm; Kappes, John C; Roth, Kevin A; Carroll, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents effective against malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are urgently needed. We recently found that tamoxifen potently impedes xenograft growth. In vitro, tamoxifen inhibits MPNST proliferation and survival in an estrogen receptor-independent manner; these effects are phenocopied by the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. The present study was performed to establish the mechanism of action of tamoxifen in vivo and optimize its therapeutic effectiveness. To determine if tamoxifen has estrogen receptor-dependent effects in vivo, we grafted MPNST cells in castrated and ovariectomized mice; xenograft growth was unaffected by reductions in sex hormones. To establish whether tamoxifen and trifluoperazine additively or synergistically impede MPNST growth, mice xenografted with neurofibromatosis type 1-associated or sporadic MPNST cells were treated with tamoxifen, trifluoperazine, or both drugs for 30 days. Both monotherapies inhibited graft growth by 50%, whereas combinatorial treatment maximally reduced graft mass by 90% and enhanced decreases in proliferation and survival. Kinomic analyses showed that tamoxifen and trifluoperazine have both shared and distinct targets in MPNSTs. In addition, trifluoperazine prevented tamoxifen-induced increases in serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1, a protein linked to tamoxifen resistance. These findings suggest that combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine is effective against MPNSTs because these agents target complementary pathways that are essential for MPNST pathogenesis.

  14. Genomic and molecular aberrations in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and their roles in personalized target therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jilong; Du, Xiaoling

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are malignant tumors with a high rate of local recurrence and a significant tendency to metastasize. Its dismal outcome points to the urgent need to establish better therapeutic strategies for patients harboring MPNSTs. The investigations of genomic and molecular aberrations in MPNSTs which detect many chromosomal aberrations, pathway abnormalities, and specific molecular aberrant events would supply multiple potential therapy targets and contribute to achievement of personalized medicine. The involved genes in the significant gains aberrations include BIRC5, CCNE2, DAB2, DDX15, EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, CDK6, HGF, ITGB4, KCNK12, LAMA3, LOXL2, MET, and PDGFRA. The involved genes in the significant deletion aberrations include CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, SULT2A1, GLTSCR2, HMMR/RHAMM, LICAM2, MMP13, p16/INK4a, RASSF2, NM-23H1, and TP53. These genetic aberrations involve in several important signaling pathways such as TFF, EGFR, ARF, IGF1R signaling pathways. The genomic and molecular aberrations of EGFR, IGF1R, SOX9, EYA4, TOP2A, ETV4, and BIRC5 exhibit great promise as personalized therapeutic targets for MPNST patients. PMID:23830351

  15. Telomerase activity is a biomarker for high grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1 individuals.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kiran K; Caley, Matthew; Stephens, Phil; Jones, Christopher J; Kluwe, Lan; Guha, Abhijit; Mautner, Victor; Upadhyaya, Meena

    2008-03-01

    Telomerase activity (TA) and the expression of its enzymatic subunits, which have been demonstrated in many tumors, remain poorly investigated in tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In this study, we analysed the association of TA and the expression of telomerase RNA (TR) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in 23 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) (17 high grade and 6 low grade tumors), 11 plexiform neurofibromas (PNF) and 6 dermal neurofibromas (DNF). TA was studied using telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay and expression of TR and TERT was investigated using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. TA was detected in 14 out of 17 (82%) high grade MPNST, whereas all 6 low grade MPNST and 17 benign tumors were telomerase negative. The TERT transcripts were detected in all high grade MPNST, 50% of the low grade MPNST, and 4 benign tumors. However, the expression level of the TERT strikingly correlated with TA and high grade MPNST. Thus, while TERT expression was similar in both low grade MPNST and PNF (P = 0.115), it was significantly higher in high grade MPNST when compared to either low grade MPNST (P = 0.042), PNF (P = 0.001) or DNF tumors (P = 0.010). These findings indicate that TA and expression level of TERT are potential markers for high grade malignancy in NF1 patients.

  16. Forward genetic screen for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation identifies new genes and genetic pathways driving tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P; Watson, Adrienne L; Keng, Vincent W; Choi, Kwangmin; Moriarity, Branden S; Beckmann, Dominic A; Wolf, Natalie; Sarver, Aaron; Collins, Margaret H; Moertel, Christopher L; Wallace, Margaret R; Gel, Bernat; Serra, Eduard; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas of Schwann cell-lineage origin that occur sporadically or in association with the inherited syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Type 1. To identify genetic drivers of MPNST development, we utilized the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based somatic mutagenesis system in mice with somatic loss of tumor protein p53 (Trp53) function and/or overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 269 neurofibromas and 106 MPNSTs identified 695 and 87 sites with a statistically significant number of recurrent transposon insertions, respectively. Comparison to human data sets revealed novel and known driver genes for MPNST formation at these sites. Pairwise co-occurrence analysis of CIS-associated genes identified many cooperating mutations that are enriched for in Wnt/CTNNB1, PI3K/Akt/mTor, and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several novel proto-oncogenes including forkhead box R2 (Foxr2), which we functionally validated as a proto-oncogene involved in MPNST maintenance. PMID:23685747

  17. Meningioma of the Posterior Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Michael Thomas; Fagan, Paul A.; Sheehy, John P.R.; Bentivoglio, Peter J.; Doust, Bruce D.; Tonkin, John

    1991-01-01

    Combined intratemporal and cerebellopontine angle meningiomas are rejatively rare. There are unsolved problems with the stability of the skull and spine and the lower cranial nerves and there is a marked tendency for the tumor to involve the spinal cord. This article reports on five cases of combined intratemporal and cerebellopontine angle meningiomas. ImagesFigure 1p44-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17170820

  18. Genomic amplification and high expression of EGFR are key targetable oncogenic events in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The dismal outcome of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) highlights the necessity of finding new therapeutic methods to benefit patients with this aggressive sarcoma. Our purpose was to investigate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a potential therapeutic target in MPNSTs. Patients and methods We performed a microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) and 26 patients from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute & Hospital (TMUCIH). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to validate the gene amplification detected by aCGH analysis. Another independent cohort of 56 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) MPNST samples was obtained to explore EGFR protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. Cell biology detection and validation were performed on human MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and STS26T. Results aCGH and pathway analysis of the 51 MPNSTs identified significant gene amplification events in EGFR pathway, including frequent amplifications of EGFR gene itself, which was subsequently validated by FISH assay. High expression of EGFR protein was associated with poor disease-free and overall survival of human MPNST patients. In human MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and STS26T, inhibition of EGFR by siRNA or Gefitinib led to decreased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion accompanied by attenuation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Conclusion These results suggest that EGFR is a potential therapeutic target for MPNST. PMID:24341609

  19. Can sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter be used to detect raised intracranial pressure in patients with tuberculous meningitis? A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Shruti V; Parikh, Samira

    2015-01-01

    CNS Tuberculosis can manifest as meningitis, arachnoiditis and a tuberculoma. The rupture of a tubercle into the subarachnoid space leads to Tuberculosis Meningitis (TBME); the resulting hypersensitivity reaction can lead to an elevation of the intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. While bedside optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) ultrasonography (USG) can be a sensitive screening test for elevated intracranial pressure in adult head injury, little is known regarding ONSD measurements in Tuberculosis Meningitis. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with TBME had dilation of the optic nerve sheath, as detected by ocular USG performed in the emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study on adult ED patients with suspected TBME. Patients underwent USG measurements of the optic nerve followed by MRI. The ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe in each eye. MRI evidence of basilar meningeal enhancement and any degree of hydrocephalus was suggestive of TBME. Those patients without evidence of hydrocephalus subsequently underwent a lumbar puncture to confirm the diagnosis. Exclusion criteria were age less than 18 and obvious ocular pathology. In total, the optic nerve sheath diameters of 25 adults with confirmed TBME were measured. These measurements were compared with 120 control patients. Results: The upper limit of normal ONSD was 4.37 mm in control group. Those patients with TBME had a mean ONSD of 5.81 mm (SD 0.42). These results confirm that patients with tuberculosis meningitis have an ONSD in excess of the control data (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The evaluation of the ONSD is a simple non-invasive and potentially useful tool in the assessment of adults suspected of having TBME. PMID:25969641

  20. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival Via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brossier, Nicole M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S.; Byer, Stephanie J.; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators, (guanine nucleotide exchange factors), in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25946318

  1. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Brossier, Nicole M; Prechtl, Amanda M; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S; Byer, Stephanie J; Brosius, Stephanie N; Carroll, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis, and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators (guanine nucleotide exchange factors) in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells, and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras, and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation, and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades.

  2. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin-Tao; Fang, Yin; Cao, Yan; Wu, Feng-Hua; Liu, E; Mo, Guo-Yan; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. PMID:27103823

  3. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin-tao; Fang, Yin; Cao, Yan; Wu, Feng-hua; Liu, E; Mo, Guo-yan; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. PMID:27103823

  4. Lack of SYT-SSX fusion transcripts in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors on RT-PCR analysis of 34 archival cases.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Elena; Agus, Viviana; Perrone, Federica; Papini, Daniela; Romanò, Roberta; Pasini, Barbara; Gronchi, Alessandro; Colecchia, Maurizio; Rosai, Juan; Pierotti, Marco A; Pilotti, Silvana

    2002-05-01

    The translocation t(X;18) is currently regarded as a specific molecular marker of synovial sarcoma (SS). Recently, however, it has been reported that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors expressed this marker in 75% of the cases. To test independently this iconoclastic claim, a molecular analysis for the detection of the SYT-SSX fusion genes was carried out using archival material of 34 consecutive cases diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and treated in our Institute from 1998 to 2000. In four of these cases, the molecular analysis on fixed tissues was supplemented with an analysis on fresh frozen tissue. RNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks was evaluated for the presence of SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 fusion transcripts by RT-PCR. This analysis was extended to a wide variety of normal tissues simultaneously extracted and equally processed. Only two of the cases studied harbored SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2 fusion transcripts, respectively. The diagnostic reevaluation of these two cases in light of the molecular data disclosed that one had the features of a monophasic SS and the other was compatible with that entity. Both of these tumors were strongly immunoreactive for bcl-2, confirming the diagnostic utility of this marker in this instance. Our results reaffirm the specificity of SYT-SSX for SS and suggest that an opposite claim made in a recent study may have been due to a faulty interpretation of the molecular results caused by a contamination of the samples. PMID:12004001

  5. Expression profiling of 519 kinase genes in matched malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor/plexiform neurofibroma samples is discriminatory and identifies mitotic regulators BUB1B, PBK and NEK2 as overexpressed with transformation.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Thomas P; Henriksen, Kammi J; Tonsgard, James H; Montag, Anthony G; Krausz, Thomas N; Pytel, Peter

    2013-07-01

    About 50% of all malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) arise as neurofibromatosis type 1 associated lesions. In those patients malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are thought to arise through malignant transformation of a preexisting plexiform neurofibroma. The molecular changes associated with this transformation are still poorly understood. We sought to test the hypothesis that dysregulation of expression of kinases contributes to this malignant transformation. We analyzed expression of all 519 kinase genes in the human genome using the nanostring nCounter system. Twelve cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising in a background of preexisting plexiform neurofibroma were included. Both components were separately sampled. Statistical analysis compared global changes in expression levels as well as changes observed in the pairwise comparison of samples taken from the same surgical specimen. Immunohistochemical studies were performed on tissue array slides to confirm expression of selected proteins. The expression pattern of kinase genes can separate malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and preexisting plexiform neurofibromas. The majority of kinase genes is downregulated rather than overexpressed with malignant transformation. The patterns of expression changes are complex without simple recurring alteration. Pathway analysis demonstrates that differentially expressed kinases are enriched for kinases involved in the direct regulation of mitosis, and several of these show increased expression in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Immunohistochemical studies for the mitotic regulators BUB1B, PBK and NEK2 confirm higher expression levels at the protein level. These results suggest that the malignant transformation of plexiform neurofibroma is associated with distinct changes in the expression of kinase genes. The patterns of these changes are complex and heterogeneous. There is no single unifying alteration. Kinases involved

  6. Checkpoint inhibition in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Wu, Winona W; Santagata, Sandro; Reardon, David A; Dunn, Ian F

    2016-06-01

    Meningiomas are increasingly appreciated to share similar features with other intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms as well as systemic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibition has emerged as a promising therapy in a number of cancers, with durable responses of years in a subset of patients. Several lines of evidence support a role for immune-based therapeutic strategies in the management of meningiomas, especially high-grade subtypes. Meningiomas frequently originate juxtaposed to venous sinuses, where an anatomic conduit for lymphatic drainage resides. Multiple populations of immune cells have been observed in meningiomas. PD-1/PD-L1 mediated immunosuppression has been implicated in high-grade meningiomas, with association between PD-L1 expression with negative prognostic outcome. These data point to the promise of future combinatorial therapeutic strategies in meningioma. PMID:27197540

  7. Angiomatous meningioma in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of an intraventricular angiomatous meningioma arising in a 3-year-old boy diagnosed with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) who presented with intractable epilepsy and right-sided hemiparesis. He underwent surgical resection of the epileptogenic focus. Histologic sections showed the typical findings of SWS accompanied by adjacent mild focal cortical dysplasia (International League Against Epilepsy Type Ib pattern; Palmini et al. Type IA). A small intraventricular mass, which was incidentally noted on imaging studies, was also excised. The mass showed a prominent venous vasculature with intermixed meningothelial cells, consistent with an angiomatous meningioma World Health Organization Grade I. SWS is a rare, sporadically occurring disorder marked by a port wine stain (hemangioma of the skin) arising in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve accompanied by an angiomatous proliferation in the leptomeninges. The underlying cortex often shows prominent dystrophic mineralization and gliosis. Patients often present with seizures and may require surgical resection when seizures prove to be pharmacoresistant. Meningiomas in SWS are a rare occurrence (only one known previously reported case) and angiomatous meningioma in SWS has never been described. The literature is briefly reviewed and the pathogenesis of hemangiomas in SWS and its implication in angiomatous meningioma is discussed. PMID:25766367

  8. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  9. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed.

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Invasion Requires Aberrantly Expressed Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Receptors and is Variably Enhanced by Multiple EGF Family Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Byer, Stephanie J.; Brossier, Nicole M.; Peavler, Lafe T.; Eckert, Jenell M.; Watkins, Stacey; Roth, Kevin A.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression promotes the pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), the most common malignancy associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, but the mechanisms by which EGFR expression promotes MPNST pathogenesis are poorly understood. We hypothesized that inappropriately expressed EGFRs promote MPNST invasion and found that these kinases are concentrated in MPNST invadopodia in vitro. EGFR knockdown inhibited the migration of unstimulated MPNST cells in vitro and exogenous EGF further enhanced MPNST migration in a substrate-specific manner, promoting migration on laminin and, to a lesser extent, collagen. Thus, in this setting, EGF acts as a chemotactic factor. We also found that the 7 known EGFR ligands (EGF, betacellulin, epiregulin, heparin-binding EGF, transforming growth factor α [TGFα], amphiregulin, and epigen) variably enhanced MPNST migration in a concentration-dependent manner, with TGFα being particularly potent. With the exception of epigen, these factors similarly promoted the migration of non-neoplastic Schwann cells. Although transcripts encoding all 7 EGFR ligands were detected in human MPNST cells and tumor tissues, only TGFα was consistently overexpressed and was found to colocalize with EGFR in situ. These data indicate that constitutive EGFR activation, potentially driven by autocrine or paracrine TGFα signaling, promotes the aggressive invasive behavior characteristic of MPNSTs. PMID:23399900

  11. A case report of meningioma extending to the middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Miyashita, Mie

    2012-01-01

    Extracranial meningioma with extension into a middle ear is very uncommon. A 74-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with right ear bleeding when removing earwax. In this case, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, her past history and operative findings would consider as infiltrative growth from the right sphenoid ridge meningioma to the right middle ear via the right petrous pyramid and bilateral optic nerve. She underwent only partial extirpation with decompression for optic nerve, rather than total extirpation including middle ear and temporal bone, due to wide invasion of the middle cranial fossa and caversinus sinus. PMID:24765466

  12. A novel NF1 mutation in a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait macule in neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tong, H-X; Li, M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, J; Lu, W-Q

    2012-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; OMIM#162200) is a common neurocutaneous disorder that is characterized by multiple café-au-lait, skinfold freckling, Lisch nodules, and neurofibromas. Mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the neurofibromin protein, have been identified as the pathogenic gene of NF1. In this study, we present a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait in NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body, axillary freckling, and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas. He also had a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormalities. The germline mutational analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel missense mutation in exon 13. It is a novel heterozygous nucleotide G>A transition at position 2241 of the NF1 gene. We found no mutation in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor DNA from this patient. This expands the database for NF1 gene mutations in NF1. Its absence in the normal chromosomes suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of giant café-au-lait macule in NF1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

  13. The role of MAPK signaling pathway in the Her-2-positive meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Shan; Wang, Shanshan; Tu, Yi; Xiong, Yifeng; Mei, Jinhong; Wang, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are common types of adult nerve system tumors. Although most cases are considered benign, due to its high rate of recurrence and easy malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma they present a puzzle for the current treatment. The HER-2 oncogene has important value for meningioma cells development and progression. So far, little is known about the effect on the exact underlying signal pathway and molecular mechanisms of HER-2-positive meningioma cells. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of HER-2 gene and possible involvement of MAPK signal pathway in human malignant meningioma. We applied q-PCR analysis, immunofluorescence (IF) staining, western blot analysis, animal model, MAPK inhibition, MTT assay and cell invasion analysis for the investigation. The results demonstrated that the downregulation of the expression of HER-2 significantly inhibited cell motility and proliferation of human meningioma cells in vivo. Accordingly, in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of ERK1/2, ERK5, JNK, in the cells with the ERK1/2, ERK5 inhibition, protein expression was markedly suppressed as well as the cell proliferation resistance. No difference was observed in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of JNK. These findings suggest that HER-2 gene can affect the proliferation ability of human meningioma cells in vivo and MAPK signal pathway may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of human meningiomas combinating with HER-2. PMID:27279438

  14. The role of MAPK signaling pathway in the Her-2-positive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Shan; Wang, Shanshan; Tu, Yi; Xiong, Yifeng; Mei, Jinhong; Wang, Chunliang

    2016-08-01

    Meningiomas are common types of adult nerve system tumors. Although most cases are considered benign, due to its high rate of recurrence and easy malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma they present a puzzle for the current treatment. The HER-2 oncogene has important value for meningioma cells development and progression. So far, little is known about the effect on the exact underlying signal pathway and molecular mechanisms of HER-2-positive meningioma cells. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of HER-2 gene and possible involvement of MAPK signal pathway in human malignant meningioma. We applied q-PCR analysis, immunofluorescence (IF) staining, western blot analysis, animal model, MAPK inhibition, MTT assay and cell invasion analysis for the investigation. The results demonstrated that the downregulation of the expression of HER-2 significantly inhibited cell motility and proliferation of human meningioma cells in vivo. Accordingly, in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of ERK1/2, ERK5, JNK, in the cells with the ERK1/2, ERK5 inhibition, protein expression was markedly suppressed as well as the cell proliferation resistance. No difference was observed in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of JNK. These findings suggest that HER-2 gene can affect the proliferation ability of human meningioma cells in vivo and MAPK signal pathway may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of human meningiomas combinating with HER-2. PMID:27279438

  15. Primary intraosseous hybrid nerve sheath tumor of femur: a hitherto undescribed occurrence in bone with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst formation resulting in pathological fracture.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2015-05-01

    Soft tissue perineurioma besides its pure form may coexist with schwannoma as hybrid nerve sheath tumor (HNST) which occurs in the limbs, head and neck, trunk and occasionally colon but origination in other organ sites has not been reported. We report the first case of primary intraosseous HNST. An 18-year-old man suffered from pathological fracture of his right femur after an impact which was preceded by a similar episode two weeks previously. Plain radiograph revealed a displaced fracture in the superior diaphysis of the right femur where an expansile osteolytic lesion with relatively well defined borders was seen. Histologic examination of the curetted lesion showed a well circumscribed spindle cell neoplasm displaying predominantly storiform but focally whorled patterns. In areas, the cells possessed thin wavy spindle nuclei and delicate elongated bipolar cytoplasmic processes supported in a fibromyxoid stroma. They stained positively for EMA, claudin, CD34, collagen 4 and focally for S100 but negatively for MUC4 and BCL-2, indicative of perineurial differentiation. Situated in the periphery of some of these perineurial whorls are spindle cells bearing plump tapering wavy nuclei and palely eosinophilic cytoplasm with indistinct cell borders. They stained intensely for S100 but negatively for EMA, claudin, CD34, collagen 4, MUC4 and BCL-2, consistent with schwannian differentiation. Focally, these two varieties of cells intimately intermingled with each other. Features of aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) formation were present but no mitotic figures, establishing the final diagnosis of primary intraosseous HNST with secondary ABC formation. The patient remained well 7 months after curettage and internal fixation of his fracture.

  16. TAGLN expression is upregulated in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors by hypomethylation in its promoter and subpromoter regions

    PubMed Central

    PARK, GUN-HOO; LEE, SU-JIN; YIM, HYUNE; HAN, JAE-HO; KIM, HYON J.; SOHN, YOUNG-BAE; KO, JUNG MIN; JEONG, SEON-YONG

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) caused by NF1 gene mutation is a commonly inherited autosomal dominant disorder. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), a type of aggressive sarcoma, are a major cause of mortality in NF1 patients. The malignant transformation of benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) to MPNSTs is a marked peculiarity in NF1 patients, yet the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. We found that an actin-associated protein transgelin (SM22) was highly expressed in NF1-deficient MPNST tissues compared to NF1-deficient PN tissues using immunohistological staining and primary cultured MPNST cells in western blot analysis. We further found that this transgelin upregulation was caused by increased transcriptional expression of the TAGLN gene encoding transgelin. Comparison of DNA methylation values in the promoter and subpromoter regions of the TAGLN gene in three types of NF1-deficient primary-cultured cells, derived from an NF1 patient’s normal phenotype, a benign PN and MPNST tissues, revealed that the TAGLN gene was hypomethylated in the MPNST cells. Next, to determine the functional role of transgelin in MPNST pathogenesis, we manipulated the TAGLN gene expression and investigated the alteration of the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the normal-phenotypic and malignant tumor cells. The downregulation of TAGLN expression in NF1-deficient MPNST tumor cells through the treatment of the small interfering RNA resulted in a decrease in the RAS activation (GTP-RAS) and the downstream ERK1/2 activation (phosphorylated ERK1/2), while the overexpression of TAGLN in normal-phenotypic NF1-deficient cells caused an increase in RAS and ERK1/2 activation. These results indicate that upregulation of transgelin caused by hypomethylation of the TAGLN gene is closely involved in tumor progression in NF1. PMID:25109740

  17. Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Identifies the IGF1R Pathway as a Primary Target for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jilong; Ylipää, Antti; Sun, Yan; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Kexin; Nykter, Matti; Trent, Jonathan; Ratner, Nancy; Lev, Dina C.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare sarcoma that lacks effective therapeutic strategies. We gain insight into the most recurrent genetically altered pathways with the purpose of scanning possible therapeutic targets. Experimental design We performed a microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 26 patients from Tianjin Cancer Hospital. IHC and cell biology detection and validation were performed on human MPNST tissues and cell lines. Results Genomic characterization of 51 MPNST tissue samples identified several frequently amplified regions harboring 2,599 genes and regions of deletion including 4,901 genes. At the pathway level, we identified a significant enrichment of copy number–altering events in the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) pathway, including frequent amplifications of the IGF1R gene itself. To validate the IGF1R pathway as a potential target in MPNSTs, we first confirmed that high IGF1R protein correlated with worse tumor-free survival in an independent set of samples using immunohistochemistry. Two MPNST cell lines (ST88-14 and STS26T) were used to determine the effect of attenuating IGF1R. Inhibition of IGF1R in ST88-14 cells using small interfering RNAs or an IGF1R inhibitor, MK-0646, led to significant decreases in cell proliferation, invasion, and migration accompanied by attenuation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Conclusion These integrated genomic and molecular studies provide evidence that the IGF1R pathway is a potential therapeutic target for patients with MPNST. PMID:22042973

  18. MicroRNAome profiling in benign and malignant neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors: evidences of PTEN pathway alterations in early NF1 tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common dominant tumor predisposition syndrome affecting 1 in 3,500 individuals. The hallmarks of NF1 are the development of peripheral nerve sheath tumors either benign (dermal and plexiform neurofibromas) or malignant (MPNSTs). Results To comprehensively characterize the role of microRNAs in NF1 tumorigenesis, we analyzed 377 miRNAs expression in a large panel of dermal and plexiform neurofibromas, and MPNSTs. The most significantly upregulated miRNA in plexiform neurofibromas was miR-486-3p that targets the major tumor suppressor gene, PTEN. We confirmed PTEN downregulation at mRNA level. In plexiform neurofibromas, we also report aberrant expression of four miRNAs involved in the RAS-MAPK pathway (miR-370, miR-143, miR-181a, and miR-145). In MPNSTs, significant deregulated miRNAs were involved in PTEN repression (miR-301a, miR-19a, and miR-106b), RAS-MAPK pathway regulation (Let-7b, miR-195, and miR-10b), mesenchymal transition (miR-200c, let-7b, miR-135a, miR-135b, and miR-9), HOX genes expression (miR-210, miR-196b, miR-10a, miR-10b, and miR-9), and cell cycle progression (miR-195, let-7b, miR-20a, miR-210, miR-129-3p, miR-449a, and miR-106b). Conclusion We confirmed the implication of PTEN in genesis of plexiform neurofibromas and MPNSTs in NF1. Markedly deregulated miRNAs might have potential diagnostic or prognostic value and could represent novel strategies for effective pharmacological therapies of NF1 tumors. PMID:23848554

  19. Optic nerve sheath diameter threshold by ocular ultrasonography for detection of increased intracranial pressure in Korean adult patients with brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Un; Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Lee, Hannah; Han, Jung Ho; Seo, Mingu; Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Cho, Won-Sang; Ryu, Ho Geol; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Jang, Kyung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) seen on ocular US has been associated with increased intracranial pressure (IICP). However, most studies have analyzed normal range of ONSD and its optimal cut-off point for IICP in Caucasian populations. Considering ONSD differences according to ethnicity, previous results may not accurately reflect the association between IICP and ONSD in Koreans. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate normal range of ONSD and its optimal threshold for detecting IICP in Korean patients. This prospective multicenter study was performed for patients with suspected IICP. ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe using a 13-MHz US probe. IICP was defined as significant brain edema, midline shift, compression of ventricle or basal cistern, effacement of sulci, insufficient gray/white differentiation, and transfalcine herniation by radiologic tests. The results of the ONSD are described as the median (25th–75th percentile). The differences of ONSD according to disease entity were analyzed. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to determine the optimal cut-off point for identifying IICP. A total of 134 patients were enrolled. The patients were divided into 3 groups as follows: patients with IICP, n = 81 (60.5%); patients without IICP, n = 27 (20.1%); and control group, n = 26 (19.4%). ONSD in patients with IICP (5.9 mm [5.8–6.2]) is significantly higher than those without IICP (5.2 mm [4.8–5.4]) (P < 0.01) and normal control group (4.9 mm [4.6–5.2]) (P < 0.001). Between patients without IICP and normal control group, the difference of ONSD did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.31). ONSD >5.5 mm yielded a sensitivity of 98.77% (95% CI: 93.3%–100%) and a specificity of 85.19% (95% CI: 66.3%–95.8%). In conclusion, the optimal cut-off point of ONSD for identifying IICP was 5.5 mm. ONSD seen on ocular US can be a feasible method for detection and serial monitoring of ICP in

  20. An optometric purview of intraorbital meningioma.

    PubMed

    Newsome, P R

    1984-04-01

    A 34-year-old black male presented with marked unilateral proptosis and pain in the left eye. Visual acuities were OD 6/7.5 (20/25) and OS 6/120 (20/400). His left eye was exophthalmic , had a Marcus Gunn pupil, and exposure keratitis. Sectorial pallor and a decreased Kestenbaum count were evident on the left optic nerve head. A tentative diagnosis of orbital meningioma was made and later confirmed. Optometric management of the patient, including appropriate screening tests and referrals, are discussed.

  1. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  2. PTEN and NF1 inactivation in Schwann cells produces a severe phenotype in the peripheral nervous system that promotes the development and malignant progression of peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Keng, Vincent W.; Rahrmann, Eric P.; Watson, Adrienne L.; Tschida, Barbara R.; Moertel, Christopher L.; Jessen, Walter J.; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Collins, Margaret H.; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic evolution from a benign neurofibroma to a malignant sarcoma in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) syndrome remains unclear. Schwann cells and/or their precursor cells are believed to be the primary pathogenic cell in neurofibromas because they harbor biallelic neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene mutations. However, the phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) and neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) genes recently were found to be co-mutated in high-grade peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) in mice. In this study, we created transgenic mice that lack both Pten and Nf1 in Schwann cells and Schwann cell precursor cells in order to validate the role of these two genes in PNST formation in vivo. Haploinsufficiency or complete loss of Pten dramatically accelerated neurofibroma development and led to the development of higher-grade PNSTs in the context of Nf1 loss. Pten dosage, together with Nf1 loss, was sufficient for the progression from low-grade to high-grade PNSTs. Genetic analysis of human sporadic malignant pheripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) also revealed down-regulation of PTEN expression, suggesting that Pten-regulated pathways are major tumor suppressive barriers to neurofibroma progression. Together, our findings establish a novel mouse model that can rapidly recapitulate the onset of human neurofibroma tumorigenesis and the progression to MPNSTs. PMID:22700876

  3. Surgical Treatment for Falcotentorial Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang Ki; Hong, Je Beom; Park, Hunho; Moon, Ju Hyung; Chang, Jong Hee; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2016-01-01

    Among intracranial meningiomas, falcotentorial meningiomas, occurring at the junction of the falx cerebri and tentorial dural folds, are extremely rare. Because of their deep location, they are surrounded by critical structures, and have been regarded as one of the most challenging lesions for surgical treatment. In this study, we describe our surgical strategy for falcotentorial meningiomas and provide a review of our experience. PMID:27189300

  4. Osteoblastic meningioma with turtle shell: Different entity from calcified meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Aggarwal, Ashish; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara; Gochhait, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Bone formation within meningioma is secondary to metaplasia of the meningothelial cells into osteoblastic cells. This needs to be differentiated form the commonly seen calcification. We describe a rare case of osteobalstic meningioma in which bony trabeculae were seen within meningothelial cells. PMID:27695563

  5. Osteoblastic meningioma with turtle shell: Different entity from calcified meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Aggarwal, Ashish; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara; Gochhait, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Bone formation within meningioma is secondary to metaplasia of the meningothelial cells into osteoblastic cells. This needs to be differentiated form the commonly seen calcification. We describe a rare case of osteobalstic meningioma in which bony trabeculae were seen within meningothelial cells.

  6. Chordoid meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Je-young; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2003-01-01

    The term "chordoid meningioma" means meningioma, which is pathologically similar to chordoma, and previously reported that rarely associated with microcytic anemia and/or dysgammaglobulinemia especially in pediatric population. We present a case of this rare variant, which comprises less than 0.5% of all meningiomas. A 33-yr-old man visited our hospital, complaining visual field defect worsening over 7 yr. Neurological examination showed left homonymous hemianopsia. The brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed well enhancing right temporo-occipital mass with cystic portion. Histopathologic findings of resected tumor were compatible with chordoid meningioma which included trabeculae of eosinophilic, vacuolated cells in a myxoid matrix with prominent lymphoplasmacellular infiltration. The neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein and cytokeratin. This is an adult case of chordoid meningioma without anemia or dysgammaglobulinemia. PMID:14555838

  7. Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Meningiomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-26

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type 2; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  8. Unilateral vocal cord palsy and dysphagia: an unusual presentation of cerebellopontine angle meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Andrew; Douglas, James Andrew; Thompson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours are the most common neoplasms in the posterior fossa, accounting for 5–10% of intracranial tumours. Most CPA tumours are benign, with most being vestibular schwannomas. Meningiomas arising from the jugular foramen are among the rarest of all with very few being described in the literature. Treatment options vary considerably as experience with these tumours is limited. One option is a skull base approach, but this depends on size, location and ability to preserve lower cranial nerve function. This can be extremely challenging and is accompanied by high mortality risk; therefore, a more conservative option must be considered. This case report highlights the difficulty in management of patients with jugular fossa meningiomas, including appropriate investigations, analysis of surgical versus conservative treatment and associated complications. Furthermore, we elaborate the decision-making process pertaining to the tailoring of the surgical route used for the resection of jugular foramen meningiomas. (Jugular Foramen Meningioma, cerebellopontine angle). PMID:26486157

  9. Infratentorial meningioma in an 8-year-old child as first sign of neurofibromatosis type 2.

    PubMed

    Stettner, G M; Rostasy, K M; Ludwig, H C; Merkler, D; Fahsold, R; Gärtner, J

    2007-02-01

    Meningiomas are rare intracranial tumors in pediatric patients. In contrast to meningiomas in adults, childhood ones have a poorer prognosis because of their high growth potential and tendency to recur. Meningiomas are often associated with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) which is an autosomal-dominant disorder. In contrast to adults who primarily present with symptoms due to vestibular tumors, the initial symptoms in children with NF2 are subtle skin tumors, posterior capsular cataracts, or neurological signs secondary to cranial nerve(s) schwannoma excluding vestibular nerve, and/or brainstem or spinal cord compression. Here we report on the clinical, radiological, and histological findings in an 8-year-old boy who was diagnosed with an isolated infratentorial meningioma and a novel splice site mutation in the NF2 gene. The same mutation was detected in the boy's mother who suffered from hearing loss and tinnitus due to a bilateral vestibular schwannoma. Our patient demonstrates the need for molecular testing for NF2 gene mutations even in isolated childhood meningiomas although they do not fulfill the clinical criteria of NF2.

  10. KINOMIC ALTERATIONS IN ATYPICAL MENINGIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Taylor, Robert B.; Fiveash, John B.; de Wijn, Rik; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Willey, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to profile Atypical Meningioma in a high-throughput manner to better understand the altered signaling within these tumors and specifically the kinases altered in recurrent atypical meningioma. Kinomic Profiles could be used to identify prognostic biomarkers for responders/non-responders to classify future patients that are unlikely to benefit from current therapies. Directly these results could be used to identify drug-actionable kinase targets as well. Methods Peptide-substrate microarray kinase activity analysis was conducted with a PamStation®12 analyzing the tyrosine kinome in each tumor kinetically against ~144 target peptides. These data were then analyzed relative to clinical outcome (e.g., tumor recurrence). Results 3 major clusters of atypical meningiomas were identified with highly variant peptides primarily being targets of EGFR family, ABL, BRK and BMX kinases. Kinomic analysis of recurrent atypical meningiomas indicated patterns of increased phosphorylation of BMX, TYRO3 and FAK substrates as compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion The atypical meningiomas profiled here exhibited molecular sub-clustering that may have phenotypic corollaries predictive of outcome. Recurrent tumors had increases in kinase activity that may predict resistance to current therapies, and may guide selection of directed therapies. Taken together these data further the understanding of kinomic alteration in atypical meningioma, and the processes that may not only mediate recurrence, but additionally may identify kinase targets for intervention. PMID:27158663

  11. Medical treatment of recurrent meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2011-10-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary brain tumor and are primarily treated with surgery (with or without embolization) and radiotherapy. Increasingly today, meningiomas undergo multiple resections and two radiotherapy treatments (either stereotactic or conventional external beam) before consideration for hormonal, chemotherapy or targeted therapy. The failure of hormonal and cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of recurrent meningioma and increasing understanding of potential molecular targets in meningioma has resulted in multiple studies utilizing single-agent targeted therapy directed at biologically relevant signaling pathways, such as somatostatin (Sandostatin(®) LAR, SOM230c), PDGF (imatinib), EGF (erlotinib) and VEGF (sunitinib and vatalanib). Early results using a targeted approach have been modest at best and are often associated with significant toxicity. Consequently and at present, the brain tumor guidelines recognize only three medical therapies for inoperable and radiation-refractory meningiomas: hydroxyurea, IFN-α and Sandostatin LAR, a somatostatin analogue. Clearly, there remains an unmet need in neuro-oncology with respect to the medical treatment of recurrent meningiomas. PMID:21955199

  12. Distinguishing grade I meningioma from higher grade meningiomas without biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Varlotto, John; Flickinger, John; Pavelic, Martin T.; Specht, Charles S.; Sheehan, Jonas M.; Timek, Dana T.; Glantz, Michael J.; Sogge, Steven; Dimaio, Christopher; Moser, Richard; Yunus, Shakeeb; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Urvashi; Rava, Paul; Tangel, Matthew; Yao, Aaron; Kanekar, Sangam

    2015-01-01

    Background Many meningiomas are identified by imaging and followed, with an assumption that they are WHO Grade I tumors. The purpose of our investigation is to find clinical or imaging predictors of WHO Grade II/III tumors to distinguish them from Grade I meningiomas. Methods Patients with a pathologic diagnosis of meningioma from 2002–2009 were included if they had pre-operative MRI studies and pathology for review. A Neuro-Pathologist reviewed and classified all tumors by WHO 2007. All Brain MRI imaging was reviewed by a Neuro-radiologist. Pathology and Radiology reviews were blinded from each other and clinical course. Recursive partitioning was used to create predictive models for identifying meningioma grades. Results Factors significantly correlating with a diagnosis of WHO Grade II-III tumors in univariate analysis: prior CVA (p = 0.005), CABG (p = 0.010), paresis (p = 0.008), vascularity index = 4/4: (p = 0.009), convexity vs other (p = 0.014), metabolic syndrome (p = 0.025), non-skull base (p = 0.041) and non-postmenopausal female (p = 0.045). Recursive partitioning analysis identified four categories: 1. prior CVA, 2. vascular index (vi) = 4 (no CVA), 3. premenopausal or male, vi < 4, no CVA. 4. Postmenopausal, vi < 4, no CVA with corresponding rates of 73, 54, 35 and 10% of being Grade II-III meningiomas. Conclusions Meningioma patients with prior CVA and those grade 4/4 vascularity are the most likely to have WHO Grade II-III tumors while post-menopausal women without these features are the most likely to have Grade I meningiomas. Further study of the associations of clinical and imaging factors with grade and clinical behavior are needed to better predict behavior of these tumors without biopsy. PMID:26472106

  13. Meningioma after radiotherapy for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Shah, Kalee; Dunkel, Ira J; Reiner, Anne S; Khakoo, Yasmin; Rosenblum, Marc K; Gutin, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Complications of radiation exposure have gained importance with increasing cancer survivorship. Secondary malignancies have been associated with cranial radiation exposure. We present our experience with intracranial radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) and discuss the implications of its presentation and natural history for patient management. Patients diagnosed with meningioma who had received radiation therapy between 1960 and 2014 were identified. Records were retrospectively reviewed for details of radiation exposure, previous malignancies, meningioma subtypes, multiplicity and pathologic descriptions, treatment and follow-up. Thirty patients were diagnosed with RIM. Initial malignancies included acute lymphocytic leukemia (33.3%), medulloblastoma (26.7%) and glioma (16.7%) at a mean age of 8.1years (range 0.04-33years). The mean radiation dose was 34Gy (range 16-60Gy) and latency time to meningioma was 26years (range 8-51years). Twenty-one patients (70%) underwent surgery. Of these, 57.1% of tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I while 42.9% were WHO II (atypical). The mean MIB-1 labeling index for patients with WHO I tumors was 5.44%, with 33.3% exhibiting at least 5% staining. Mean follow-up after meningioma diagnosis was 5.8years. Mortality was zero during the follow-up period. Meningioma is an important long-term complication of therapeutic radiation. While more aggressive pathology occurs more frequently in RIM than in sporadic meningioma, it remains unclear whether this translates into an effect on survival. Further study should be aimed at delineating the risks and benefits of routine surveillance for the development of secondary neoplasms after radiation therapy.

  14. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  15. The incidence of multiple meningiomas--do solitary meningiomas exist?

    PubMed

    Borovich, B; Doron, Y; Braun, J; Feinsod, M; Goldsher, D; Gruszkiewicz, J; Guilburd, J N; Zaaroor, M; Levi, L; Soustiel, J F

    1988-01-01

    Since the advent of computed tomography (CT) the recognition of the occurrence of multiple intracranial meningiomas (MIM) in the same individual has been on the increase. In our material the incidence of MIM at first assessment of CT films was 20%, with distant multiplicity prevailing over the regional one. This incidence will probably change in the course of time as MIM develop not only concurrently but also consecutively. On the other hand our surgical macroscopic incidence of regional multiplicity alone was 49%. The discrepancy between the CT and surgical findings prompted us to reevaluate the CT studies of 100 consecutive patients. This reevaluation demonstrated: 1. in two cases, small meningiomas were overlooked at first assessment; 2. nineteen cases of solitary globoid meningiomas seemed to be the consequence of the coalescence of adjacent smaller masses. Thus, the CT incidence of MIM increased to 40%, with regional multiplicity prevailing over the distant one. The authors think that the aforesaid findings question the very existence of solitary meningiomas as a pathological entity. They would be the end product of a coalescence of multiple adjacent smaller growths. Accordingly, a more aggressive surgical approach is suggested to include the resection of a generous fringe of dura mater around the main tumour. As this is not always possible, or too risky, a comprehensive complement to surgery like radiotherapy could be given a reasonable randomized trial.

  16. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael . E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G.; Ma, Roy; Lee, Richard; Vollans, Emily; Robar, James; Gete, Ermias; Martin, Monty

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  17. Presentation and Patterns of Late Recurrence of Olfactory Groove Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, William E.; Shah, Mitesh V.; Weisberger, Edward C.; Campbell, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the recurrence pattern of olfactory groove meningiomas after surgical resection. Four patients, one female and three males, with surgically resected olfactory groove meningiomas presented with tumor recurrence. All patients underwent resection of an olfactory groove meningioma and later presented with recurrent tumors. The mean age at initial diagnosis was 47 years. All presented initially with vision changes, anosmia, memory dysfunction, and personality changes. Three patients had a preoperative MRI scan. All patients had a craniotomy, with gross total resection achieved in three, and 90% tumor removal achieved in the fourth. Involved dura was coagulated, but not resected, in all cases. Three patients were followed with routine head CT scans postoperatively, and none was followed with MRI scan. The mean time to recurrence was 6 years. Three patients presented with recurrent visual deterioration, and one presented with symptoms of nasal obstruction. Postoperative CT scans failed to document early tumor recurrence, whereas MRI documented tumor recurrence in all patients. Tumor resection and optic nerve decompression improved vision in two patients and stabilized vision in two. Complete resection was not possible because of extensive bony involvement around the anterior clinoid and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa in all cases. Evaluation of four patients with recurrent growth of olfactory groove meningiomas showed the epicenter of recurrence to be inferior to the anterior cranial fossa, with posterior extension involving the optic canals, leading to visual deterioration. This location led to a delay in diagnosis in patients who were followed only with routine CT scans. Initial surgical procedures should include removal of involved dura and bone, and follow-up evaluation should include formal ophthalmologic evaluations and routine head MRI scans. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID

  18. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  19. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  20. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  1. Primary intraosseous meningioma: CT and MRI appearance.

    PubMed

    Tokgoz, Nil; Oner, Yusuf A; Kaymaz, Memduh; Ucar, Murat; Yilmaz, Guldal; Tali, Turgut E

    2005-09-01

    Benign primary intraosseous meningioma presenting with osteolytic skull lesion and soft-tissue component is rare. CT and MR imaging of a patient with frontoparietal scalp swelling showed an osteolytic intracalvarial lesion with an extradural soft-tissue component. Following wide surgical resection, the histological examination revealed an intraosseous chordoid meningioma. The clinical and radiological findings of primary intraosseous meningioma are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed.

  2. Reduced expression of neurofibromin in human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, V; Lee, J H; Harwalkar, J A; Stein, D J; Roudebush, M; Stacey, D W; Golubic, M

    1997-01-01

    Meningiomas are common, mostly benign, tumours arising from leptomeningeal cells of the meninges, which frequently contain mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene. In this study, we analysed a protein product of the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, neurofibromin, in human established leptomeningeal cells LTAg2B, in 17 sporadic meningiomas and in a meningioma from a patient affected by NF2. The expression level of neurofibromin was determined by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation with anti-neurofibromin antibodies. The functional status of neurofibromin was analysed through its ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of p21 ras. In the cytosolic extracts of four sporadic meningiomas and in the NF2-related meningioma, the expression level and the GTPase stimulatory activity of neurofibromin were drastically reduced compared with the level present in the human brain, human established leptomeningeal cells LTAg2B and the remaining 13 meningiomas. Our results suggest that neurofibromin is expressed in leptomeningeal cells LTAg2B and in most meningiomas, i.e. tumours derived from these cells. The reduced expression and GTPase stimulatory activity of neurofibromin was found in about 23% of meningiomas and in the single NF2-related meningioma analysed. These results suggest that decreased levels of neurofibromin in these tumours may contribute to their tumorigenesis.

  3. Incidental Meningiomas: Management in the Neuroimaging Era.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Marko; Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Barnette, Natalie; Bhatt, Nikhilesh S; Lee, Seung James; Ung, Nolan; Gopen, Quinton; Yang, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    The number of patient imaging studies has increased because of precautious physicians ordering scans when a vague symptom is presented; subsequently, the number of incidental meningiomas detected has increased as well. These brain tumors do not present with related symptoms and are usually small. MRI and computed tomographic scans most frequently capture incidental meningiomas. Incidental meningiomas are managed with observation, radiation, and surgical resection. Ultimately, a conservative approach is recommended, such as observing an incidental meningioma and then only radiating if the tumor displays growth, whereas a surgical approach is to be used only when proven necessary. PMID:27012387

  4. Extracranial sinonasal tract meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Serry, P; Rombaux, Ph; Ledeghen, S; Collet, S; Eloy, Ph; Hamoir, M; Bertrand, B

    2004-01-01

    Extracranial meningioma is an unusual tumor, mainly found in the head and neck area. Before surgical removal and histopathological examination, this diagnosis is rarely considered. We report a case of an extracranial meningioma located in the frontal sinuses of a 65-year-old-woman. Symptomatology included trouble of vision due to bilateral exophtalmos and mild headaches. Bilateral exophtalmos was secondary to the development of huge frontal mucoceles. These mucoceles grew slowly due to the frontal recesses blockage by the extracranial meningioma. External approach was performed with removal of the mucocele walls and of the extracranial meningioma itself. The frontal recesses were blocked with synthetic cement, and orbital roofs were reconstructed with a polydioxanon-sheet (PDS). Frontal sinuses were excluded and filled with bone bank grafts. A review of the literature on extracranial meningioma and a discussion about the surgical management of this case are proposed in this paper.

  5. Granulofilamentous inclusions in a meningioma.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J E; Horoupian, D S; Johnson, A B

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the histology, immunocytochemistry, and ultrastructure of a syncytial meningioma which contained the unusual feature of large eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions. Electron microscopic examination revealed that these bodies were granular, osmiophilic masses, closely associated with cytoplasmic filaments of intermediate size. Desmosomal junctions with a somewhat abnormal morphology were also observed, and the possible relationship between the inclusions and the dense components of desmosomes is discussed. This tumor is also compared to other tumors of the central nervous system with hyaline and granulofilamentous inclusions.

  6. Meningioma Genomics: Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Zhang, Michael; Wu, Winona W.; Mei, Yu; Dunn, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent revolution in our understanding of the genetic factors that drive meningioma, punctuating an equilibrium that has existed since Cushing’s germinal studies nearly a century ago. A growing appreciation that meningiomas share similar biologic features with other malignancies has allowed extrapolation of management strategies and lessons from intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms and systemic cancers to meningiomas. These features include a natural proclivity for invasion, frequent intratumoral heterogeneity, and correlation between biologic profile and clinical behavior. Next-generation sequencing has characterized recurrent somatic mutations in NF2, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, SMO, and PIK3CA, which are collectively present in ~80% of sporadic meningiomas. Genomic features of meningioma further associate with tumor location, histologic subtype, and possibly clinical behavior. Such genomic decryption, along with advances in targeted pharmacotherapy, provides a maturing integrated view of meningiomas. We review recent advances in meningioma genomics and probe their potential applications in diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic frontiers. PMID:27458586

  7. Return of the sheath.

    PubMed

    Felstein, I

    1980-10-01

    The history of the condom is reviewed with attention directed to the medical perspective that the return of the sheath to use is hopeful in terms of venereal disease control improvements. By 1950, condom manufacturers could claim that 1/2 of all the married couples using contraception included the sheath as a major or ancillary method in both the United States and the British Isles. The introduction of the oral contraceptive led to the sheath losing a large measure of its once universal popularity. Simultaneously there was a marked increase in venereal infections with a dramatic rise in gonorrhea and non-specific urethritis. Venereologists have been disturbed by the decline of sheath usage. The manufacturers of the sheath did not accept the reduction in sales. Taking advantage of the changed attitudes to sexuality and sex aids, manufacturers began to make colored sheaths and to vary textures in order to raise or lower sensitivity, increase or decrease friction, and add or diminish lubrication. Shapes have also been varied, and several attachments to the sheath have included clitoral stimulators and vulval stretchers. Improved marketing has seen retailing of condoms in open areas. PMID:6903257

  8. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  9. Anaplastic meningioma with extremely rapid recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yosuke; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Watanabe, Takuya; Tamase, Akira; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nitta, Hisashi; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented with an uncommon case of anaplastic meningioma manifesting as recent memory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass located in the right temporal lobe. She became unconscious because of uncal herniation and underwent urgent surgery. The tumor was completely resected, except for a lesion tightly attached to arteries. Histological examination indicated the presence of anaplastic meningioma with an extremely high MIB-1 labeling index (70%). After 43 days, the patient developed local recurrence and dissemination in the left temporal lobe. The exceptionally high MIB-1 labeling index corresponded with a short tumor doubling time (8.2 days). Whole-brain irradiation and linear accelerator surgery for disseminated lesions were performed, and the tumor growth halted. Although meningiomas rarely show malignant behavior, corresponding to World Health Organization grade III, it is necessary to consider malignant behavior when treating meningiomas. PMID:21613768

  10. Extradural spinal meningioma: Revisiting a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bettaswamy, Guruprasad; Ambesh, Paurush; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Sahu, Rabi; Srivastava, Arun; Mehrotra, Anant; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Jaiswal, Sushila; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Spinal meningiomas are mostly intradural in location although at times these are associated with some extradural extensions. Purely extradural spinal meningiomas (EDSMs) are however, extremely rare and when present, may cause diagnostic dilemma preoperatively. Only seven cases of pure EDSM have been reported till date. In this paper, we describe two cases of EDSM affecting the cervical spine and present their clinical profiles, radiological findings, operative management, and follow-up data, along with a review of the literature. PMID:27041890

  11. Parotid gland metastasis originating from malignant meningioma.

    PubMed

    Dmytriw, Adam A; Gullane, Patrick; Bartlett, Eric; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Yu, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    A case of malignant meningioma with metastasis to the parotid gland is reported. A 60-year-old woman with right-sided neurological symptoms secondary to malignant meningioma developed bilateral parotid masses with identical histology to the primary lesion. The primary lesion was differentiated from a benign oligodendroma with MRI, and the radiological features of this extraordinarily rare metastasis are chronicled with MRI and computed tomography.

  12. [Meningiomas: anatomical pathology and molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Bekiashev, A Kh; Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the past 5-10 years, there has been a considerable progress the understanding of the biology of meningioma. The most important advances have been made by comprehensive studies of the pathogenesis of meningioma in molecular genetics. Several target genes could be identified for mutation or inactivation. Additional chromosomal regions that are usually subject to deletion or amplification and point to the presence of tumor suppressor genes or proto-oncogenes were found. The revised and updated 2000 WHO Classification is a major innovation in the histopathology of meningiomas. The new classification system more precisely and objectively determines the grade of meningioma, which allows one to more logically make a prognosis of the recurrence and aggressive behavior of the tumor. The present overview places particular emphasis on recent advances in its molecular biology. It summarizes the most important aspects of the classification of meningiomas, which makes it possible to include the results of biological observations into the respective context, and also considers the mechanisms of angiogenesis and edema development and the role of hormonal receptors in meningiomas.

  13. Atypical Growth Pattern of an Intraparenchymal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary nonneuroglial extra-axial neoplasms, which commonly present as spherical or oval masses with a dural attachment. Meningiomas without dural attachment are rare and, according to their locations, are classified into 5 varieties, including intraventricular, deep Sylvain fissure, pineal region, intraparenchymal, or subcortical meningiomas. To the best of our knowledge, intraparenchymal meningioma with cerebriform pattern has never been reported. In this paper, we report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with paroxysmal headaches and progressive loss of vision for 10 months and blindness for 2 weeks. A thorough physical examination revealed loss of bilateral direct and indirect light reflex. No other relevant medical history and neurologic deficits were noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed an irregular mass with a unique cerebriform pattern and extensive peritumoral edema in the parietal-occipital-temporal region of the right cerebral hemisphere. The initial diagnosis was lymphoma. Intraoperatively, the tumor was completely buried in a sulcus in the parietal-occipital-temporal region without connecting to the dura. The histological diagnosis was intracranial meningioma based on pathological examination. Therefore, when an unusual cerebriform growth pattern of a tumor is encountered, an intraparenchymal meningioma should be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:27752384

  14. Meningiomas with Rhabdoid or Papillary Components : Prognosis and Comparison with Anaplastic Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Kwon; Jung, Shin; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Papillary and rhabdoid meningiomas are pathologically World Health Organization (WHO) grade III. Any correlation between clinical prognosis and pathologic component is not clear. We analyzed the prognoses of patients with meningiomas with a rhabdoid or papillary component compared to those of patients with anaplastic meningiomas. From 1994 to June 2013, 14 anaplastic meningiomas, 6 meningiomas with a rhabdoid component, and 5 meningiomas with papillary component were pathologically diagnosed. We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, extent of removal, adjuvant treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and pathologic features of 14 anaplastic meningiomas (group A), 5 meningiomas with a predominant (≥50%) papillary or rhabdoid component (group B1), and 6 meningiomas without a predominant (<50%) rhabdoid or papillary component (group B2). Homogeneous enhancement on MRI was associated with improved PFS compared to heterogeneous enhancement (p=0.025). Depending on pathology, the mean PFS was 134.9±31.6 months for group A, 46.6±13.4 months for group B1, and 118.7±19.2 months for group B2. The mean OS was 138.5±24.6 months for group A and 59.7±16.8 months for group B1. All recurrent tumors were of the previously diagnosed pathology, except for one tumor from group B1, which recurred as an atypical meningioma without a papillary component. Group B1 tumors showed a more aggressive behavior than group B2 tumors. In group B2 cases, the pathologic findings of non-rhabdoid/papillary portion could be considered for further adjuvant treatment. PMID:27446516

  15. Ulnar nerve tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Chandra, V V; Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of tuberculoma involving the ulnar nerve. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, presented with swelling over the medial aspect of her right forearm just below the elbow joint, with features of ulnar nerve palsy, including paresthesias along the little and ring fingers and claw hand deformity. There was a history of trauma and contact with a contagious case of tuberculosis. There were no other signs of tuberculosis. At surgical exploration the ulnar nerve was found to be thickened, and on opening the sheath there was evidence of caseous material enclosed in a fibrous capsule compressing and displacing the nerve fibers. The lesion, along with the capsule, was subtotally removed using curettage, and a part of the capsule that was densely adherent to the nerve fibers was left in the patient. Histopathological examination of the specimen was consistent with tuberculoma. The patient received adequate antitubercular treatment and showed significant improvement.

  16. [Psychopathology and neuro-ophthalmology in meningioma of the olfactory groove].

    PubMed

    Lange, E; Bräunig, K P; Fötzsch, R

    1982-01-01

    In 14 patients with a surgically nad histopathologically verified meningioma of the olfactory nerve groove (OGM) (12 women, 2 men), clinical findings and diagnosis were analysed, especially with respect to neuropathology and psychopathology. The apodictic theorem that an OGM leads to a Foster-Kennedy syndrome as well as to a psychopathological orbital brain syndrome cannot be maintained. The Foster-Kennedy syndrome does not occur in a characteristically high incidence, and psychopathologically an orbital brain syndrome can only be diagnosed in case of an anterior location of the OGM. The more the OGM shows starting point or growth development to or from the anterior chiasmal angle, the more is resembles that psychopathological syndrome that we have found and described for the meningioma of the Tuberculus sellae.

  17. Transient overvoltages on cable sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhaus, H. G.

    1983-08-01

    Transient overvoltage on the sheaths of high voltage cables with single point sheath earthing or cross bonding of the cable sheaths involve danger for the cable and the joints. The investigations of transient overvoltages in the case of a switching operation on a 110 kV single core oil filled cable with single sided sheath earthing are reported. A comparison between measured transient voltage variations and those calculated with the help of a traveling wave analyzer program shows very good agreement. The investigations showed that with single point sheath earthing, the unearthed sheath end ought to be protected against overvoltages.

  18. Suprasellar Clear Cell Meningioma in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Anunobi, Charles C; Bankole, Olufemi; Ikeri, Nzechukwu Z; Adeleke, Nurudeen A

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell meningiomas are an uncommon subtype of meningioma rarely seen in infancy. We report a case of clear cell meningioma in an 8-month-old male infant. He presented at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, in 2015 with persistent vomiting, poor feeding and failure to thrive over a four month period. Generalised hypertonia and hyperreflexia were noted on examination. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a huge largely isodense suprasellar mass with a hypodense core. The tumour, which measured 6 × 5 × 4 cm, enhanced non-uniformly with contrast injection and extended to occlude the third ventricle. The patient underwent a bifrontal craniotomy with subtotal tumour excision. Six hours postoperatively, he went into cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. A histological diagnosis of clear cell meningioma was made as the tumour cells were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen, S100 protein and vimentin. This case of clear cell meningioma was unusual due to its early occurrence and supratentorial location. PMID:27606120

  19. Transformation of a meningioma with atypical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Deopujari, Chandrashekhar; Karmarkar, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are benign tumors of the central nervous system. They have long term curability if they are excised completely. If not, they can recur after a prolonged period and can lead to increased morbidity during re-surgery. Recurrence is rarely associated with invasiveness. Usually de-differentiation in case of meningiomas is uncommon without any predisposing factors including different genetic mutations or radiation to the involved region. We report a case of a 38-year-old female who was operated for a benign para-sagittal meningioma 8 years back and subsequently developed an invasive recurrence off late. Also this time, the imaging morphology was slightly different for a meningioma and gross as well as microscopic findings were very atypical. Awareness for such cases must be there while dealing with recurrent meningiomas as invasiveness may not always be associated with adverse predisposing factors like radiation. As invasiveness is always a histopathological diagnosis, picking up such features on imaging is a daunting task and if done, can help neurosurgeons prognosticate such invasive recurrences in a better fashion. PMID:27366271

  20. Suprasellar Clear Cell Meningioma in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Anunobi, Charles C.; Bankole, Olufemi; Ikeri, Nzechukwu Z.; Adeleke, Nurudeen A.

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell meningiomas are an uncommon subtype of meningioma rarely seen in infancy. We report a case of clear cell meningioma in an 8-month-old male infant. He presented at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, in 2015 with persistent vomiting, poor feeding and failure to thrive over a four month period. Generalised hypertonia and hyperreflexia were noted on examination. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a huge largely isodense suprasellar mass with a hypodense core. The tumour, which measured 6 × 5 × 4 cm, enhanced non-uniformly with contrast injection and extended to occlude the third ventricle. The patient underwent a bifrontal craniotomy with subtotal tumour excision. Six hours postoperatively, he went into cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. A histological diagnosis of clear cell meningioma was made as the tumour cells were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen, S100 protein and vimentin. This case of clear cell meningioma was unusual due to its early occurrence and supratentorial location. PMID:27606120

  1. Suprasellar Clear Cell Meningioma in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Anunobi, Charles C.; Bankole, Olufemi; Ikeri, Nzechukwu Z.; Adeleke, Nurudeen A.

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell meningiomas are an uncommon subtype of meningioma rarely seen in infancy. We report a case of clear cell meningioma in an 8-month-old male infant. He presented at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, in 2015 with persistent vomiting, poor feeding and failure to thrive over a four month period. Generalised hypertonia and hyperreflexia were noted on examination. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a huge largely isodense suprasellar mass with a hypodense core. The tumour, which measured 6 × 5 × 4 cm, enhanced non-uniformly with contrast injection and extended to occlude the third ventricle. The patient underwent a bifrontal craniotomy with subtotal tumour excision. Six hours postoperatively, he went into cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. A histological diagnosis of clear cell meningioma was made as the tumour cells were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen, S100 protein and vimentin. This case of clear cell meningioma was unusual due to its early occurrence and supratentorial location.

  2. Primary meningioma of the ethmoid sinus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Daneshi, Ahmad; Asghari, Alimohamad; Bahramy, Eshagh

    2003-04-01

    Meningioma is a well-recognized tumor of the central nervous system, but it rarely appears as a primary extracranial tumor of the paranasal sinuses. We report a case of a primary right anterior ethmoid meningioma that resembled a mucocele in its presentation. A primary meningioma can be differentiated from a secondary meningioma in three ways: (1) by observing an intact bony wall of the sinus on imaging or on inspection during surgery, (2) by noting the absence of a simultaneous intracranial meningioma on imaging or on inspection during surgery, and (3) by identifying a bulging of the sinus wall toward the cranium rather than in the opposite direction.

  3. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  4. Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome following resection of meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Clifford Leigh; Smith, Timothy; Karabatsou, Konstantina; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we present the case of a patient who developed the strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome 3 weeks after an uneventful resection of a sphenoid wing meningioma. She originally presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and was given dexamethasone before surgery. The pathology, diagnosis and management of Strongyloides stercoralis are reviewed. PMID:22717933

  5. Spinal metastases from pituitary hemangiopericytic meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Masih, A.S.; McComb, R.D.

    1987-10-01

    A rare, previously irradiated, recurrent malignant angioblastic meningioma of the pituitary, hemangiopericytic type, was locally controlled by a new endocurietherapy technique that allows delivery of very high (10,000 cGy), sharply localized irradiation. Rather than succumbing to the local tumor recurrence, as would otherwise be expected, the patient developed distant spinal metastases several years later.

  6. Global expression profile in low grade meningiomas and schwannomas shows upregulation of PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2 compared to their healthy tissue

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTIN, MIGUEL; LASSALETTA, LUIS; ISLA, ALBERTO; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; MELENDEZ, BARBARA; REY, JUAN A.

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas and grade I meningiomas are non-metastatic neoplasms that share the common mutation of gene NF2. They usually appear in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients. Currently, there is no drug treatment available for both tumors, thus the use of wide expression technologies is crucial to identify therapeutic targets. Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST was used to test global gene expression in 22 meningiomas, 31 schwannomas and, as non-tumoral controls, 3 healthy meningeal tissues, 8 non-tumoral nerves and 1 primary Schwann cell culture. A non-stringent P-value cut-off and fold change were used to establish deregulated genes. We identified a subset of genes that were upregulated in meningiomas and schwannomas when compared to their respectively healthy tissues, including PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2. Thus, these genes should be thoroughly studied as targets in a possible combined treatment. PMID:25333347

  7. Global expression profile in low grade meningiomas and schwannomas shows upregulation of PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2 compared to their healthy tissue.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martin, Miguel; Lassaletta, Luis; Isla, Alberto; De Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Castresana, Javier S; Melendez, Barbara; Rey, Juan A

    2014-12-01

    Schwannomas and grade I meningiomas are non‑metastatic neoplasms that share the common mutation of gene NF2. They usually appear in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients. Currently, there is no drug treatment available for both tumors, thus the use of wide expression technologies is crucial to identify therapeutic targets. Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST was used to test global gene expression in 22 meningiomas, 31 schwannomas and, as non-tumoral controls, 3 healthy meningeal tissues, 8 non-tumoral nerves and 1 primary Schwann cell culture. A non-stringent P-value cut-off and fold change were used to establish deregulated genes. We identified a subset of genes that were upregulated in meningiomas and schwannomas when compared to their respectively healthy tissues, including PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2. Thus, these genes should be thoroughly studied as targets in a possible combined treatment. PMID:25333347

  8. Immunohistochemical characterization of brain-invasive meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Backer-Grøndahl, Thomas; Moen, Bjørnar H; Arnli, Magnus B; Torseth, Kathrin; Torp, Sverre H

    2014-01-01

    Brain-invasive meningiomas have an adverse prognosis, so it is important to detect and correctly evaluate brain invasion by light microscopy. Furthermore, the underlying biological mechanisms responsible for brain-invasive growth are incompletely understood. The primary aim of this study was to identify immunohistochemical markers that could improve identification and evaluation of brain invasion in meningiomas. A second aim was to investigate the process of brain invasion using immunohistochemical markers of proliferation, extracellular matrix modulation, and cell adhesion. From a series of 196 human meningiomas, 67 cases were selected for analysis because of the presence of brain tissue in tumor specimens. Fourteen of these 67 meningiomas were brain-invasive. Invasiveness was determined primarily by evaluation of hematoxylin-erytrosin-saffron- (HES-) stained specimens, although glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), anti-collagen IV, and cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) markers provided additional information. It was important to examine microscopic sections from various levels of the paraffin-embedded tissue block to adequately assess invasiveness. Sections stained using antibodies against Ki-67/MIB-1, phospohistone-H3 (PHH3), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cathepsin D, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and E-cadherin antigens were used to characterize brain-invasive meningiomas and to investigate the process of brain invasion. Only increased expression of the extracellular matrix modulator MMP-9 correlated with brain-invasive growth (p=0.025). Examination of HES-stained sections identified brain invasion. Use of relevant immunohistochemical markers did not contribute substantially to this evaluation. Evaluation of stepwise sections should be considered when brain-invasive growth is suspected. MMP-9 may be an important mediator of brain-invasive growth. PMID:25400818

  9. Multiple Meningiomas in a Patient with Cowden Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pain, Margaret; Darbinyan, Armine; Fowkes, Mary; Shrivastava, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background  Cowden syndrome is a rare, multisystem disease manifesting with increased hamartomas and neoplasms. Though meningioma has been documented in patients with Cowden syndrome, the relationship between these two phenomena is still unclear. Case Description  We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with a known PTEN mutation and clinical history of Cowden syndrome. A workup of headache demonstrated two skull base meningiomas. At the time of surgery, several additional tiny meningiomas were detected in the same region. Conclusions  The development of multiple meningiomas in a patient with predisposition for tumor is more than coincidental. Though PTEN mutations and deletions have not been shown to be critical for meningioma development, this case challenges that conclusion. In light of recent genetic advances in meningioma molecular pathogenesis, the role of the PTEN/AKT/PI3K pathway is discussed. PMID:27563534

  10. Pathology and Molecular Genetics of Meningioma: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    SHIBUYA, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial primary neoplasm in adults. Although the spectrum of clinical and molecular genetic issues regarding meningiomas remains undefined, novel genetic alterations that are associated with tumor morphology, malignancy, or location have recently been discovered. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding of the heterogenous pathology of meningiomas, particularly on associations between the clinical, histological, etiological, epidemiological, and molecular genetical aspects of the neoplasm. PMID:25744347

  11. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  12. Loss of SUFU Function in Familial Multiple Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Aavikko, Mervi; Li, Song-Ping; Saarinen, Silva; Alhopuro, Pia; Kaasinen, Eevi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Li, Yilong; Vesanen, Kari; Smith, Miriam J.; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Pöyhönen, Minna; Kiuru, Anne; Auvinen, Anssi; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Taipale, Jussi; Vahteristo, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary tumors of the CNS and account for up to 30% of all CNS tumors. An increased risk of meningiomas has been associated with certain tumor-susceptibility syndromes, especially neurofibromatosis type II, but no gene defects predisposing to isolated familial meningiomas have thus far been identified. Here, we report on a family of five meningioma-affected siblings, four of whom have multiple tumors. No NF2 mutations were identified in the germline or tumors. We combined genome-wide linkage analysis and exome sequencing, and we identified in suppressor of fused homolog (Drosophila), SUFU, a c.367C>T (p.Arg123Cys) mutation segregating with the meningiomas in the family. The variation was not present in healthy controls, and all seven meningiomas analyzed displayed loss of the wild-type allele according to the classic two-hit model for tumor-suppressor genes. In silico modeling predicted the variant to affect the tertiary structure of the protein, and functional analyses showed that the activity of the altered SUFU was significantly reduced and therefore led to dysregulated hedgehog (Hh) signaling. SUFU is a known tumor-suppressor gene previously associated with childhood medulloblastoma predisposition. Our genetic and functional analyses indicate that germline mutations in SUFU also predispose to meningiomas, particularly to multiple meningiomas. It is possible that other genic mutations resulting in aberrant activation of the Hh pathway might underlie meningioma predisposition in families with an unknown etiology. PMID:22958902

  13. Cavernous Hemangioma of the Skull and Meningioma: Association or Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, M.; Darmoul, M.; Hammedi, F.; Ben Nsir, A.; Hattab, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas of the skull are rare. Meningiomas are quite frequently encountered in a neurosurgical practice. The association between these two entities is nevertheless very uncommon. The authors present a case of a 72-year-old woman suffering from headache. The MRI showed a parietal meningioma with adjacent thick bone. The meningioma and the bone were removed. The histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of meningioma and revealed a cavernoma of the skull. The relationship between the lesions suggests more than a coincidental association. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain common causal connections. PMID:25960899

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  15. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  16. Treatment recommendations for primary extradural meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin; Hughes, Betsy; Oleson, James; Reardon, David; McLendon, Roger; Adamson, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas (PEMs) represent about 2% of all meningiomas and are often encountered by non-neurosurgeons. These lesions typically present as enlarging, painless, benign masses that can be surgically cured. Imaging is critical for defining involvement of adjacent structures; however, diagnosis depends on classic histologic patterns. Treatment for benign PEMs (WHO I) consists of resection with wide margins, whereas adjuvant therapy after resection of atypical (WHO II) or malignant (WHO III) PEMs should be considered. By using the collective experience from our comprehensive cancer center, including neuro-oncologists, neuroradiologists, and neurosurgeons, in addition to a complete literature review, the authors have established treatment guidelines not previously reported. This manuscript describes key features of these challenging tumors to aid in diagnosis, presents the largest published review of all reported PEMs (n = 163), and provides salient treatment guidelines to surgeons unfamiliar with these challenging tumors.

  17. Fourth ventricle meningiomas: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Angelo; Ruggeri, Andrea; Morselli, Carlotta; Delfini, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    Fourth ventricle meningiomas (FVMs) are rare, often misdiagnosed, lesions. To the best of our knowledge, 47 cases have been reported in the literature: we describe our series of three cases treated at our Institution, focusing on some diagnostic tips and intraoperative features of these tumours. Our three patients have a history of headache. Gait disturbances, vomiting and/or diplopia complicated the clinical picture before the referral at our Department. The operations were uneventful, and the patients fully recovered from neurological symptoms. They are free of recurrence at a median follow-up of 19 years. FVMs are rare lesions, which are difficult to differentiate preoperatively from the much more common ependymomas. A preoperative distinction would be extremely advantageous: indeed, although both tumours share similar radiological and clinical patterns, they clearly differ as to surgical difficulty and outcome. In fact, meningiomas are comparatively easier to remove, granting better clinical results.

  18. Olfactory groove meningiomas: approaches and complications.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires de; Tahara, Adriana; Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Simm, Renata; Silva, Arnaldo Neves da; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfatt; Panagopoulos, Alexandros Theodoros; Zicarelli, Carlos Alexandre; Silva, Pedro Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM) account for 4.5% of all intracranial meningiomas. We report 21 patients with OGMs. Tumors were operated on using three surgical approaches: bifrontal (7 patients), fronto-pterional (11 patients) and fronto-orbital (3 patients). Total tumor removal (Simpson Grade 1) was achieved in 13 patients and Simpson II in 8 patients. Perioperative mortality was 4.76%. The average size of the OGM was 4.3+/-1.1cm. The overall recurrence rate was 19%. We preferred to use the pterional approach, which provides quick access to the tumor with less brain exposure. It also allows complete drainage of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid, providing a good level of brain relaxation during surgery. However, for long, thin tumors, hemostasis can be difficult using this approach.

  19. Anterior fossa schwannoma mimicking an olfactory groove meningioma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sauvaget, F; François, P; Ben Ismail, M; Thomas, C; Velut, S

    2013-04-01

    Intracranial schwannomas not associated with cranial nerves account for less than 1% of surgically treated schwannomas of the central and peripheral nervous system. With only 45 cases reported to date, subfrontal schwannomas are very rare tumors, leaving the issue of their origin controversial. A 66-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of progressive headaches. Clinical examination revealed hypoesthesia of the nasal tip. CT-scan and MRI studies revealed a large subfrontal tumor thought preoperatively to be a meningioma. Intraoperatively, a large extra-axial tumor arising from the floor of the right frontal fossa was encountered. Histopathology identified the tumor as a schwannoma. This current case gives strong clinical presumption of an origin from the anterior ethmoidal nerve. We reviewed the literature in order to establish the epidemiology of these tumors, from which there appear to be divergent profiles depending on tumor origin and histology. Despite close similarities with olfactory groove meningiomas, patient history and radiological findings provide substantial evidence for differential diagnosis.

  20. Radiosurgery of Spinal Meningiomas and Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Kufeld, M.; Wowra, B.; Muacevic, A.; Zausinger, Stefan; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze local control, clinical symptoms and toxicity after image-guided radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas. Standard treatment of benign spinal lesions is microsurgical resection. While a few publications have reported about radiosurgery for benign spinal lesions, this is the first study analyzing the outcome of robotic radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors, treated exclusively with a non-invasive, fiducial free, single-fraction setup. Thirty-six patients with spinal meningiomas or schwannomas were treated, utilizing a robotic radiosurgery system (CyberKnife®, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale CA), and were followed prospectively. Medical history, histology, clinical symptoms and radiographic outcome were recorded. Thirty-nine spinal lesions were treated because of tumor recurrence, remnants after microsurgery, multiple lesions, or rejection of open surgery. Median age was 45 years (range 18–80 years). Median target volume was 3.4 cm3 (range 0.2–43.4 cm3). Histology revealed 28 schwannomas and 11 meningiomas (WHO grade I). All spinal levels were affected. Median prescription dose was 14 Gray (95% C.I. 13.4–14 Gy) to the 70% isodose. After a median follow-up of 18 months (range 6–50 months) no local tumor progression was detected. 20 lesions (51%) remained stable, 19 tumors (49%) decreased in size. One patient with schwannomatosis was treated repeatedly for three new tumor locations. Pain was the initial symptom in 16 of 25 schwannoma patients, and in 3 of 11 patients with meningiomas. Pain levels decreased in 8/19 patients. All but one patient with motor deficits remained clinically stable. No myelopathic signs where found. Single-session radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors in selected patients has proven to inhibit tumor progression within the observed period without signs of early toxicity. Radiosurgery offers an additional treatment option, if microsurgery is not feasible in cases of tumor recurrence, post

  1. Supratentorial meningiomas of the skull base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maira, G.; Amante, P. R.; Anile, C.; Carletti, S.

    1996-12-01

    Different lasers are today used in many neurosurgical centers, in clinical practice or in basic and clinical research. Even if the laser effects have been studied in other pathological conditions, the laser technology has been mostly applied to the treatment of intracranial tumors. This paper will be mainly concerned with the aspects of surgical technique regarding the supratentorial meningiomas of the skull base, derived from our experience with a series of skull base meningiomas operated on between January 1981 and July 1996. The subject of our analysis are 110 patients who underwent a total of 121 operations. In addition to simple bipolar coagulation and removal of the mass in small coagulated fragments, we have utilized various lasers with different sources of emission, namely CO2, Argon and Nd:YAG. The CO2 laser was utilized in 10 cases, the Argon laser in 2 cases and the Nd:YAG laser in 27 cases in both the contact and remote modalities. Among these last 27 patients a total removal was achieved in 96 percent, against 86 percent obtained in the remaining 83 meningiomas. Six patients were reoperated on for recurrences; none of them had been operated on using the Nd:YAG laser.

  2. Meninigiomas of the Craniocervical Junction – A Distinctive Subgroup of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Dührsen, Lasse; Emami, Pedram; Matschke, Jakob; Abboud, Tammam; Westphal, Manfred; Regelsberger, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Meningioma of the cranio-cervical junction is a rare diagnosis and demand a thorough surgical planning as radical excision of these tumors is difficult. In this context recurrence is most likely due to regrowth of residual tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical course of patients operated for craniocervical meningioma (CCM) and to investigate the histological features of these tumors and their impact on recurrence rate. Methods All patients who were operated for CCM at our institution between 2003 and 2012 were identified. Presenting symptoms, MRI findings, surgical approaches and recurrence rate were reviewed retrospectively using medical charts. Histological features of the included tumors were studied focusing on subtypes and MIB-1 immunoreactivity and compared with MIB-1 immunoreactivity in an age and gender-matched control group of patients with supratentorial meningioma. Results 18 patients with CCM with a mean age of 56.2 years and median follow-up of 60 months were included in the study. Sensory or motor deficit was the most frequent presenting symptom followed by neck pain and lower cranial nerve palsy. Simpson grade II resection was achieved in 16 patients and Simpson grade III resection in two patients. Mortality, morbidity and recurrence rates were 16.7%, 5.5% and 5.5%, respectively. According to the WHO-grading all were found to be grade I meningiomas. Histological subtypes included meningotheliomatous (10), transitional (2), fibrillar (2), angiomatous (3) and secretory (1) meningioma. The mean MIB-1 labeling index in the study group was significantly higher than in the control group, (7.2% and 3.6%, respectively), p < 0.05. There was no correlation between MIB-1 levels and tumor recurrence. Conclusions CCM seems to have a benign character. Despite a significantly higher MIB-1 index, a high rate of recurrence was not observed. Therefore, approaches with high morbidity are not justified. Nevertheless, in view of the

  3. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  4. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  5. Challenging diagnosis of peripillous sheaths.

    PubMed

    Gnarra, Maria; Saraceni, Pierluigi; Rossi, Alfredo; Murabit, Amera; Caradonna, Emanuela; Fania, Luca; Feliciani, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Peripillous sheaths, or hair casts, are asymptomatic, white, cylindrical concretions that encircle the hair without adhering to it. They are infrequently documented in the literature, are often misdiagnosed, and generate avoidable apprehension and expense for parents and caregivers. Dermoscopy is the standard for a rapid, noninvasive, cost-effective diagnosis. We describe a case of peripillous sheaths presenting in a boy. PMID:24846654

  6. Electromagnetic induction between axons and their schwann cell myelin-protein sheaths.

    PubMed

    Goodman, G; Bercovich, D

    2013-12-01

    Two concepts have long dominated vertebrate nerve electrophysiology: (a) Schwann cell-formed myelin sheaths separated by minute non-myelinated nodal gaps and spiraling around axons of peripheral motor nerves reduce current leakage during propagation of trains of axon action potentials; (b) "jumping" by action potentials between successive nodes greatly increases signal conduction velocity. Long-held and more recent assumptions and issues underlying those concepts have been obscured by research emphasis on axon-sheath biochemical symbiosis and nerve regeneration. We hypothesize: mutual electromagnetic induction in the axon-glial sheath association, is fundamental in signal conduction in peripheral and central myelinated axons, explains the g-ratio and is relevant to animal navigation.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  8. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities.

  9. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  10. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  11. Meningeal fibroma: a rare meningioma mimic.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Goyal, Nishant; Sarkar, Chitra; Suri, Vaishali; Garg, Ajay; Kale, Shashank S; Suri, Ashish

    2014-08-01

    Meningeal fibromas are rare intracranial tumors that mimic meningiomas radiologically as well as histologically. The authors report 2 cases of meningeal fibroma with detailed clinical, radiological, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features, and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity. Knowledge of this rare tumor is essential for pathologists to be able distinguish it from more common meningeal tumors, especially in younger patients. This knowledge is also essential for neurosurgeons, as incomplete resection may lead to tumor recurrence, and such patients require close follow-up.

  12. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  13. The diagnostic value of hyperostosis in midline subfrontal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Lee, K F

    1976-04-01

    Roentgenologic analysis of 66 patients with proved midline subfrontal meningioma indicates a very high incidence of hyperostosis. A total of 63 patients (95%) showed varying degrees of hyperostosis involving the cribiform plate, planum sphenoidale, or tuberculum sellae (including the chiasmatic sulcus). The planum sphenoidale is the most common site of hyperostosis (59%). In 19 cases (29%), the region of hyperostosis did not correspond to the site of tumor attachment. Mild or localized hyperostosis may be apparent only on tomograms. Small "blistering" and "saw-tooth-like" osteoma formation are reliable early signs of midline subfrontal meningioma; conversely, midline subfrontal meningioma can be virtually ruled out if hyperostosis is absent.

  14. Expression of androgen and progesterone receptors in primary human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M; Galanopoulos, T; Neville-Golden, J; Antoniades, H N

    1993-03-01

    Meningiomas are common brain tumors that show a predilection for females and become more aggressive during pregnancy and menses. The existence of gender-specific hormone receptors in meningiomas has long been a matter of controversy; the recent cloning of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors has facilitated their direct evaluation. The authors have demonstrated the expression of androgen and progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein product in nine primary human meningiomas by Northern blot analysis. Cellular localization was achieved by in situ hybridization analysis. Estrogen receptor expression was not detected. Normal adult meninges were shown to express very low levels of both androgen and progesterone receptors.

  15. Foramen Magnum Meningioma: a Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jurinovic, Pavao; Bulicic, Ana Repic; Marcic, Marino; Mise, Nikolina Ivica; Titlic, Marina; Suljic, Enra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Meningiomas are slow-growing benign tumors that arise at any location where arachnoid cells reside. Although meningiomas account for a sizable proportion of all primary intracranial neoplasms (14.3–19%), only 1.8 to 3.2% arise at the foramen magnum. Their indolent development at the craniocervical junction makes clinical diagnosis complex and often leads to a long interval between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Case report: We report a case of a 79-year-old male patient, presented with ataxia and sense of threatening fainting during verticalization. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of meningioma in the right side of craniospinal junction. PMID:27041817

  16. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, C; O'Connor, O J; O'Regan, K N; Keohane, C; Dineen, J; Hinchion, J; Sweeney, B; Maher, M M

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy. PMID:21088084

  17. Dorsal extradural meningioma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dehcordi, Soheila Raysi; Ricci, Alessandro; Chiominto, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo; Di Vitantonio, Hambra; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural spinal mass lesions are most commonly metastatic tumors. Extradural meningiomas are rare, accounting for approximately 2.5–3.5% of spinal meningiomas; intraoperatively, they are easily mistaken for malignant tumors, especially in the en plaque variety, resulting in inadequate surgical treatment. Case Description: Our case is one of the first to describe a patient with two purely extradural meningiomas, one each between D3–D4 and between D5–D6 vertebral levels. Surgical resection was radical, and pathologically both lesions were meningothelialmeningiomas. Conclusions: Reviewing the literature, we discuss the pathogenesis, treatment strategies, and long-term behavior of these uncommon lesions.

  18. Functional outcome of patients with benign meningioma treated by 3D conformal irradiation with a combination of photons and protons

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Georges . E-mail: noel@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bollet, Marc A.; Calugaru, Valentin; Feuvret, Loic; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dhermain, Frederic; Ferrand, Regis; Boisserie, Gilbert; Beaudre, Anne; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Habrand, Jean-Louis

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and tolerance of external fractionated combination of photon and proton radiation therapy (RT) for intracranial benign meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 51 patients with intracranial meningiomas of the base of the skull were treated with a combination of photon and proton RT. Median total dose was 60.6 cobalt Gy equivalent (54-64). One hundred eight eye-related symptoms were collected; 80 other symptoms were noted and followed up. Results: Mean follow-up was 25.4 months. Acute tolerance was excellent. Out of the 108 eye-related symptoms, 106 (96%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported for 73 (68.8%) of them. Out of the 88 other miscellaneous symptoms, 81 (92%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported in 54 cases (67%). Median time to improvement ranged from 1 to 24 months after completion of the radiotherapy, depending on the symptom. We did not observe any worsening of primary clinical signs. Radiologically, 1 patient relapsed 4 months after the end of irradiation. Pathology revealed a malignant (Grade 3) transformation of the initial Grade 1 meningioma. Four-year local control and overall survival rates were, respectively, 98% and 100%. Stabilization of the tumor was observed in 38 cases (72%), volume reduction in 10 cases (20%), and intratumor necrosis in 3 cases. Two patients complained of Grade 3 side effects: 1 unilateral hearing loss requiring aid and 1 case of complete pituitary deficiency. Conclusion: These results stressed the clinical efficacy of fractionated-associated photon-proton RT in the treatment of meningiomas, especially on cranial nerve palsies, without severe toxicity in almost all patients.

  19. Single-fraction Radiosurgery for Presumed Intracranial Meningiomas: Efficacy and Complications From a 22-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the rate of tumor control and factors associated with radiation-related complications after single-fraction radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with imaging defined intracranial meningiomas. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 251 patients (192 women, 59 men) having SRS for imaging-defined intracranial meningiomas between 1990 and 2008. Excluded were patients with radiation-induced tumors, meningiomatosis, or neurofibromatosis. The mean patient age was 58.6 {+-} 13.4 years. The majority of tumors involved the skull base/tentorium (n = 210, 83.7%). The mean treatment volume was 7.7 {+-} 6.2 cm{sup 3}; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.8 {+-} 2.0 Gy. Follow-up (mean, 62.9 {+-} 43.9 months) was censored at last evaluation (n = 224), death (n = 22), or tumor resection (n = 5). Results: No patient died from tumor progression or radiation-related complications. Tumor size decreased in 181 patients (72.1%) and was unchanged in 67 patients (26.7%). Three patients (1.2%) had in-field tumor progression noted at 28, 145, and 150 months, respectively. No patient had a marginal tumor progression. The 3- and 10-year local control rate was 99.4%. One patient had distant tumor progression at 105 months and underwent repeat SRS. Thirty-one patients (12.4%) had either temporary (n = 8, 3.2%) or permanent (n = 23, 9.2%) symptomatic radiation-related complications including cranial nerve deficits (n = 14), headaches (n = 5), hemiparesis (n = 5), new/worsened seizure (n = 4), cyst-formation (n = 1), hemifacial spasm (n = 1), and stroke (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year complication rates were 8.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Radiation-related complications were associated with convexity/falx tumors (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.1, p = 0.009) and increasing tumor volume (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.0-1.1, p = 0.04) on multivariate analysis. No patient developed a radiation-induced tumor. Conclusions: Single-fraction SRS at the used dose range provides a high rate of tumor control for

  20. [An operated case of a meningioma causing acute subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Koyama, Shinya; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sannohe, Seiya; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Midorikawa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2013-03-01

    We report a rare case of a meningioma causing acute hematoma. A 67-year-old woman presented with sudden headache. No evidence of trauma was seen. CT demonstrated a subdural hematoma in the convexity of the fronto-temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity in the convexity of the frontal lobe. One week later, the patient underwent hematoma evacuation and tumor resection including the attached dura mater. The histological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma. The clot was connected directly to the tumor and the origin of the subdural hematoma was identified as the meningioma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the headache improved. Meningiomas have a relatively benign course but rarely present with hemorrhage. Surgical exploration is the effective and recommended treatment.

  1. Foster Kennedy Syndrome Due to Meningioma Growth during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porcel, Federico; Hughes, Ian; Anderson, Douglas; Lee, John; Biller, José

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the olfactory groove may cause unilateral optic atrophy with contralateral papilledema and anosmia (Foster Kennedy syndrome). We describe a case of a young pregnant woman with Foster Kennedy syndrome due to an olfactory groove meningioma. PMID:24273529

  2. Morphology of human intracardiac nerves: an electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    PAUZIENE, NERINGA; PAUZA, DAINIUS H.; STROPUS, RIMVYDAS

    2000-01-01

    Since many human heart diseases involve both the intrinsic cardiac neurons and nerves, their detailed normal ultrastructure was examined in material from autopsy cases without cardiac complications obtained no more than 8 h after death. Many intracardiac nerves were covered by epineurium, the thickness of which was related to nerve diameter. The perineurial sheath varied from nerve to nerve and, depending on nerve diameter, contained up to 12 layers of perineurial cells. The sheaths of the intracardiac nerves therefore become progressively attenuated during their course in the heart. The intraneural capillaries of the human heart differ from those in animals in possessing an increased number of endothelial cells. A proportion of the intraneural capillaries were fenestrated. The number of unmyelinated axons within unmyelinated nerve fibres was related to nerve diameter, thin cardiac nerves possessing fewer axons. The most distinctive feature was the presence of stacks of laminated Schwann cell processes unassociated with axons that were more frequent in older subjects. Most unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibres showed normal ultrastructure, although a number of profiles displayed a variety of different axoplasmic contents. Collectively, the data provide baseline information on the normal structure of intracardiac nerves in healthy humans which may be useful for assessing the degree of nerve damage both in autonomic and sensory neuropathies in the human heart. PMID:11117629

  3. Radiation-induced meningioma: a distinct molecular genetic pattern?

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Y; Chernova, O; Juen, S S; Somerville, R P; Israel, Z; Barnett, G H; Cowell, J K

    2000-07-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas arise after low-dose irradiation treatment of certain medical conditions and are recognized as clinically separate from sporadic meningioma. These tumors are often aggressive or malignant, they are likely to be multiple, and they have a high recurrence rate following treatment compared with sporadic meningiomas. To understand the molecular mechanism by which radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) arise, we compared genetic changes in 7 RIM and 8 sporadic meningioma (SM) samples. The presence of mutations in the 17 exons of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, which has been shown to be inactivated in sporadic meningiomas, was analyzed in RIM and SM using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. In contrast to SM, which showed NF2 mutations in 50% of specimens, no mutations were found in RIM. In addition, Western blot analysis of schwannomin/merlin protein, the NF2 gene product, demonstrated protein levels comparable to normal brain in 4/4 RIM tumor samples analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genomic regions, which were reported for SM, was also analyzed in all cases of RIM using 22 polymorphic DNA markers. Allele losses were found on chromosomes 1p (4/7), 9p (2/7), 19q (2/7), 22q (2/7), and 18q (1/7). From these observations we conclude that unlike sporadic meningiomas, NF2 gene inactivation and chromosome 22q deletions are far less frequent in RIM, and their role in meningioma development following low dose irradiation is less significant. Other chromosomal lesions, especially loss of 1p, possibly induced by irradiation, may be more important in the development of these tumors. PMID:10901233

  4. Cystic meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst: report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Jorge; Jorge, Docampo; Gonzalez, Nadia; Nadia, Gonzalez; Vazquez, Claudio; Claudio, Vazquez; Morales, Carlos; Carlos, Morales; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo; Eduardo, Gonzalez-Toledo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show an unusual case of meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst on CT scan and MRI, diagnosed in a 63-year-old woman evaluated for headache and vision disorders. The meningioma shown is predominantly cystic with a small mural nodule enhancing after gadolinium and exhibiting diffusion restriction. Cystic portion of the tumor is hypodense on CT, and evidences fluid signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging.

  5. Ultrastructure of psammoma bodies of meningioma in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Lipper, S; Dalzell, J C; Watkins, P J

    1979-12-01

    An 8-day-old tissue culture of a human meningioma was studied by electron microscopy. Psammoma bodies were detected in all stages of evolution, affording a unique opportunity for observing the genesis of these structures. Matrix vesicles appeared instrumental in the calcification of a granular extracellular material. Although matrix vesicles are described in both physiologic and pathologic calcification, they have not been previously reported in the very few ultrastructural studies of psammoma bodies in meningiomas.

  6. Temporal bone meningioma involving the middle ear: A case report

    PubMed Central

    RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO; FATTORE, LUCIA; LIGUORI, MARIA ESTER; OLIVA, FLAVIA; LUCE, AMALIA; ABATE, TERESA; CARAGLIA, MICHELE; PIANESE, ANNALISA; RAUCCI, ALDO FALCO

    2015-01-01

    Meningioma is a common intracranial tumor involving the meninges. The localization of this type of tumor is rarely extracranial due to its typically low invasive properties. Furthermore, invasion of the middle ear is exceptional. The present study reported a case of meningioma extending into the middle ear from the middle cranial fossa through the tegmen tympani. The clinical and pathological characteristics, as well as the outcome of the patient, were described. PMID:26622828

  7. Dust in the magnetized sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Samarian, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2007-09-15

    In the present work the structure of the magnetized sheath is investigated in the multifluid framework. The ambient magnetic field is assumed parallel to the wall and the effect of the plasma magnetization, plasma ionization, and plasma-neutral collisions on the sheath is examined. It is shown that the width of the non-neutral boundary layer is dependent on the collision frequencies as well as on the plasma magnetization. The size of the sheath layer can decrease with the increase in magnetic field. The increase in the ion-neutral collision can also adversely affect the sheath size. The equilibrium and levitation of the dust particles in a collisional magnetized sheath are shown to depend on the collision frequencies and on the magnetization. Further, the increase in the collision or magnetization invariably leads to the presence of the positively charged grains near the plasma wall suggesting that the grain levitation inside the charged layer is implicitly dependent on the plasma parameters in a nontrivial way.

  8. Hidden association of Cowden syndrome, PTEN mutation and meningioma frequency

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Ghoochani, Ali; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is clinically presented by multiple hamartomas, often with mucocutaneous lesions, goiter, breast cancer and gastrointestinal polyps. CS is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance and is one distinct syndrome of the phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) hamartoma tumor spectrum. Noteworthy, PTEN germline mutations are related to a wide range of brain tumors. We performed a systematic analysis and review of the medical literature for Cowden syndrome and meningioma and additionally present the case of a 29-year- old CS patient diagnosed with multiple meningiomas. We found strong evidence for high incidence of brain tumors in CS patients. In particular meningiomas and gangliocytomas/Lhermitte-Duclos disease were often associated with 8% and 9% respectively in CS patients. Since aberrations in chromosome 10q are associated with meningiomas, it is likely that the underlying mutations in CS drive to a certain extent neoplastic meningioma growth. We propose to include meningiomas and brain tumors in the major criteria spectrum of CS-related disorders. This could warrant early diagnosis of brain lesions and close therapy, as well as better monitoring of patients with CS. PMID:27489861

  9. EANO guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Goldbrunner, Roland; Minniti, Giuseppe; Preusser, Matthias; Jenkinson, Michael D; Sallabanda, Kita; Houdart, Emmanuel; von Deimling, Andreas; Stavrinou, Pantelis; Lefranc, Florence; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan; Brandsma, Dieta; Henriksson, Roger; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Although meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumours, the level of evidence to provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of meningiomas is low compared with other tumours such as high-grade gliomas. The meningioma task force of the European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) assessed the scientific literature and composed a framework of the best possible evidence-based recommendations for health professionals. The provisional diagnosis of meningioma is mainly made by MRI. Definitive diagnosis, including histological classification, grading, and molecular profiling, requires a surgical procedure to obtain tumour tissue. Therefore, in many elderly patients, observation is the best therapeutic option. If therapy is deemed necessary, the standard treatment is gross total surgical resection including the involved dura. As an alternative, radiosurgery can be done for small tumours, or fractionated radiotherapy in large or previously treated tumours. Treatment concepts combining surgery and radiosurgery or fractionated radiotherapy, which enable treatment of the complete tumour volume with low morbidity, are being developed. Pharmacotherapy for meningiomas has remained largely experimental. However, antiangiogenic drugs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, and targeted agents are promising candidates for future pharmacological approaches to treat refractory meningiomas across all WHO grades. PMID:27599143

  10. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of a primary ectopic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Arif; Gokden, Murat; Hanna, Ehab Y

    2002-05-01

    Meningiomas are benign tumors derived from arachnoid cells. Most commonly an intracranial lesion, meningiomas may be found extracranially in various anatomic sites. A 23-yr-old white female presented with left-sided palpable mass located submucosally in the floor of the mouth. CT scan revealed no evidence of mass elsewhere in the head and neck region. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) showed loose and cohesive cellular fragments with lobular growth pattern and uniform round or ovoid cells. The diagnosis of low-grade salivary gland neoplasm, not further classified, was made. The tumor was locally excised. The differential diagnoses of an extracranial meningioma and pleomorphic adenoma were discussed at the frozen section. Based on light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic (EM) findings, the final diagnosis of an ectopic meningioma was rendered. Ectopic meningiomas may pose a diagnostic challenge to clinicians and cytopathologists. It is easily forgotten in the list of differential diagnosis at an ectopic site. Primary ectopic meningioma in a region containing salivary gland(s) may mimic benign and low-grade malignant salivary gland tumors in FNAC.

  11. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  12. Foramen magnum meningiomas: detailed surgical approaches and technical aspects at Lariboisière Hospital and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    George, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Foramen magnum meningiomas are challenging tumors, requiring special considerations because of the vicinity of the medulla oblongata, the lower cranial nerves, and the vertebral artery. After detailing the relevant anatomy of the foramen magnum area, we will explain our classification system based on the compartment of development, the dural insertion, and the relation to the vertebral artery. The compartment of development is most of the time intradural and less frequently extradural or both intraextradural. Intradurally, foramen magnum meningiomas are classified posterior, lateral, and anterior if their insertion is, respectively, posterior to the dentate ligament, anterior to the dentate ligament, and anterior to the dentate ligament with extension over the midline. This classification system helps to define the best surgical approach and the lateral extent of drilling needed and anticipate the relation with the lower cranial nerves. In our department, three basic surgical approaches were used: the posterior midline, the postero-lateral, and the antero-lateral approaches. We will explain in detail our surgical technique. Finally, a review of the literature is provided to allow comparison with the treatment options advocated by other skull base surgeons. PMID:17882459

  13. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CAVERNOUS SINUS SURGERY FOR MENINGIOMAS AND RESULTANT COMMON OPHTHALMIC COMPLICATIONS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHLAMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Cavernous sinus surgery is considered neurosurgically feasible. A systematic review of patients undergoing cavernous sinus procedures for meningioma was undertaken to determine whether cavernous sinus surgery could be performed with an acceptable level of iatrogenic-induced dysfunction. Methods Fifty-six patients undergoing 57 cavernous sinus surgical procedures performed by a single senior neurosurgeon were systematically evaluated to determine the consequences of surgery. Quantitative assessment of afferent (acuity, fields, pupil) and efferent function was stressed. Results Five of 20 patients (25%) with preoperative optic nerve dysfunction improved, but vision worsened in 6 (30%), including 4 (20%) whose vision deteriorated to no light perception. Four (11%) of 37 patients developed newly acquired optic neuropathy. No patients with preoperative third nerve palsies (19) cleared, although one improved. All 57 patients had evidence of some cranial nerve dysfunction (III, IV, V, or VI) immediately after surgery. Eight patients with long-term follow-up had complete sixth nerve palsies (7 preoperatively), and 4 had complete third nerve dysfunction (none in patients normal preoperatively). Nine (16%) had evidence of aberrant regeneration of the third nerve, and 12 (21%) developed neurotrophic keratitis. Conclusions Cavernous sinus surgery results in transient worsening of third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerve function. Cavernous sinus surgery carries a high risk of worsening ocular motor disorders and producing new ones. Preexisting cranial nerve dysfunction (other than optic nerve) rarely improves. Patients and physicians should be aware of the potential for ophthalmic complications in addition to the more generalized risks of neurosurgery (eg, cerebrospinal fluid leak, infection, stroke). PMID:18427624

  14. Sphenoid wing meningioma progression after placement of a subcutaneous progesterone agonist contraceptive implant.

    PubMed

    Piper, J G; Follett, K A; Fantin, A

    1994-04-01

    A causal relationship between sex steroids and meningioma proliferation has long been suspected. We report a case of the clinical progression of a sphenoid wing meningioma after the placement of Norplant, a subcutaneous contraceptive implant containing levonorgestrel, a progesterone agonist. Although not proof of causation, this observation lends further credence to the importance of progesterone receptors in the growth and possible treatment of meningiomas.

  15. Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomi, Hamid; Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2010-09-15

    The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

  16. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  17. MS-31INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS COMPLICATED BY HYPERTENSION: FOUR CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Haining; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Jun; Huo, Junli; Zhang, Xiang; Fei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology and mechanism of both meningioma and hypertension are still not fully understood, and their diagnosis and treatment still need to be improved. The phenomenon that some meningiomas can directly lead hypertension was never reported previously. Here we reported four consecutive cases with hypertension secondary to intracranial meningiomas. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 62-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm) at left frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 10 years; Case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 1.5 cm × 1.2 cm × 1.1 cm) at right parietal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 4 years; Case 3 was a 42-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.7 cm × 2.6 cm × 2.3 cm) in trigonum of left lateral ventricle and with a medical history of hypertension for 3 months; Case 4 was a 56-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.8 cm × 1.5 cm) at bilateral falx of frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 8 years. All the four cases were treated in our hospital from April to June in 2013. After surgical resection of the tumors, blood pressure of all the patients returned to normal level in a short term, and it remained stable for 10 to 12 months of postoperative follow-up period. CONCLUSION: These four cases may present a new clinical syndrome and provide important clinical insights, and also should attract the attention of clinicians, i.e. in patients with hypertension, coexisting intracranial meningiomas should be suspected, and appropriate diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment should be provided; for patients with hypertension secondary to meningiomas, their hypertension can be cured after surgical removal of the tumors.

  18. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  19. Rhabdoid papillary meningioma: a clinicopathologic case series study.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Ting; Ho, Jih-Tsun; Lin, Yu-Jun; Lin, Jui-Wei

    2011-12-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) grade III meningiomas are subclassified on the basis of their architectural pattern into papillary and rhabdoid subtypes. Some meningiomas even combine papillary architecture with rhabdoid cytology. Additionally, they always show malignant histological features, follow an aggressive clinical course and tend to spread through the CSF after frequent local recurrence. We render the first series of rhabdoid papillary meningioma with review of the literature to further elucidate its biological behavior. From six patients (three male, three female), nine specimens of rhabdoid papillary meningioma were obtained between 1994 and 2010. Correlations of histologic parameters, immunohistochemical study, and clinical features were assessed. The mean age of patients was 44.7 years at their first operation. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 63.2 months. Five patients experienced tumor recurrence, and one of them died from the disease after diffuse leptomeningeal dissemination. The mean time to first recurrence was 28 months. Only one patient was free of tumoral recurrence after an 8-year follow-up. Immunohistochemically, all tumors were positive for vimentin and epithelial membrane antigen. MIB-1 labeling indices were higher following tumor recurrence. The present study expands the clinicopathologic horizon of rhabdoid papillary meningioma and suggests that it will behave aggressively based on its histology and concomitant features of atypia or malignancy or high MIB-1 labeling indices. Close follow-up and aggressive treatments of these tumors are warranted.

  20. Spinal meningiomas: clinicoradiological factors predicting recurrence and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Kalakoti, Piyush; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal meningiomas are benign tumors with a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological features at presentation. The authors analyzed multiple clinicoradiological factors to predict recurrence and functional outcome in a cohort with a mean follow-up of more than 4 years. The authors also discuss the results of clinical studies regarding spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological details of patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors between 2001 and 2015 that were histopathologically confirmed as meningiomas. Demographic parameters, such as age, sex, race, and association with neurofibromatosis Type 2, were considered. Radiological parameters, such as tumor size, signal changes of spinal cord, spinal level, number of levels, location of tumor attachment, shape of tumor, and presence of dural tail/calcification, were noted. These factors were analyzed to predict recurrence and functional outcome. Furthermore, a pooled analysis was performed from 13 reports of spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years. RESULTS A total of 38 patients were included in this study. Male sex and tumors with radiological evidence of a dural tail were associated with an increased risk of recurrence at a mean follow-up of 51.2 months. Ventral or ventrolateral location, large tumors, T2 cord signal changes, and poor preoperative functional status were associated with poor functional outcome at 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Spine surgeons must be aware of the natural history and risk factors of spinal meningiomas to establish a prognosis for their patients.

  1. Surgically resected skull base meningiomas demonstrate a divergent postoperative recurrence pattern compared with non-skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Klironomos, George; Taslimi, Shervin; Kilian, Alex; Gentili, Fred; Khan, Osaama H; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to identify the natural history and clinical predictors of postoperative recurrence of skull base and non-skull base meningiomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective hospital-based study of all patients with meningioma referred to their institution from September 1993 to January 2014. The cohort constituted both patients with a first-time presentation and those with evidence of recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for analysis of recurrence and differences were assessed using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify potential predictors of recurrence. RESULTS Overall, 398 intracranial meningiomas were reviewed, including 269 (68%) non-skull base and 129 (32%) skull base meningiomas (median follow-up 30.2 months, interquartile range [IQR] 8.5-76 months). The 10-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients with gross-total resection (GTR) and subtotal resection (STR) were 90% and 43%, respectively. Skull base tumors were associated with a lower proliferation index (0.041 vs 0.062, p = 0.001), higher likelihood of WHO Grade I (85.3% vs 69.1%, p = 0.003), and younger patient age (55.2 vs 58.3 years, p = 0.01). Meningiomas in all locations demonstrated an average recurrence rate of 30% at 100 months of follow-up. Subsequently, the recurrence of skull base meningiomas plateaued whereas non-skull base lesions had an 80% recurrence rate at 230 months follow-up (p = 0.02). On univariate analysis, a prior history of recurrence (p < 0.001), initial WHO grade following resection (p < 0.001), and the inability to obtain GTR (p < 0.001) were predictors of future recurrence. On multivariate analysis a prior history of recurrence (p = 0.02) and an STR (p < 0.01) were independent predictors of a recurrence. Assessing only patients with primary presentations, STR and WHO Grades II and III were independent predictors of recurrence (p < 0.001 for both). CONCLUSIONS Patients with skull

  2. Surgically resected skull base meningiomas demonstrate a divergent postoperative recurrence pattern compared with non-skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Klironomos, George; Taslimi, Shervin; Kilian, Alex; Gentili, Fred; Khan, Osaama H; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to identify the natural history and clinical predictors of postoperative recurrence of skull base and non-skull base meningiomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective hospital-based study of all patients with meningioma referred to their institution from September 1993 to January 2014. The cohort constituted both patients with a first-time presentation and those with evidence of recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for analysis of recurrence and differences were assessed using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify potential predictors of recurrence. RESULTS Overall, 398 intracranial meningiomas were reviewed, including 269 (68%) non-skull base and 129 (32%) skull base meningiomas (median follow-up 30.2 months, interquartile range [IQR] 8.5-76 months). The 10-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients with gross-total resection (GTR) and subtotal resection (STR) were 90% and 43%, respectively. Skull base tumors were associated with a lower proliferation index (0.041 vs 0.062, p = 0.001), higher likelihood of WHO Grade I (85.3% vs 69.1%, p = 0.003), and younger patient age (55.2 vs 58.3 years, p = 0.01). Meningiomas in all locations demonstrated an average recurrence rate of 30% at 100 months of follow-up. Subsequently, the recurrence of skull base meningiomas plateaued whereas non-skull base lesions had an 80% recurrence rate at 230 months follow-up (p = 0.02). On univariate analysis, a prior history of recurrence (p < 0.001), initial WHO grade following resection (p < 0.001), and the inability to obtain GTR (p < 0.001) were predictors of future recurrence. On multivariate analysis a prior history of recurrence (p = 0.02) and an STR (p < 0.01) were independent predictors of a recurrence. Assessing only patients with primary presentations, STR and WHO Grades II and III were independent predictors of recurrence (p < 0.001 for both). CONCLUSIONS Patients with skull

  3. Meningioma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Akin, Erin Y; Baumgartner, Wes A; Lee, Jung Keun; Beasley, Michaela J

    2013-09-01

    A 17-yr-old female ovariectomized Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented dead on arrival to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The tiger was a resident of a sanctuary for big cats and had a history of juvenile-onset blindness of unknown cause. The tiger suffered two seizures the morning of presentation and expired shortly after resolution of the second seizure. Gross necropsy findings included a meningioma attached to the left frontal bone and associated with the left frontal lobe. Histologically, the mass was composed of meningothelial cells arising from the meninges, forming whorls and streams. Cells often formed syncytia and psammoma bodies were present. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, S100, and cytokeratin, but negative for GFAP. All findings were consistent with a meningioma. This is the first documentation of a meningioma in a Bengal tiger.

  4. Dorsal extradural meningioma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dehcordi, Soheila Raysi; Ricci, Alessandro; Chiominto, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo; Di Vitantonio, Hambra; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural spinal mass lesions are most commonly metastatic tumors. Extradural meningiomas are rare, accounting for approximately 2.5–3.5% of spinal meningiomas; intraoperatively, they are easily mistaken for malignant tumors, especially in the en plaque variety, resulting in inadequate surgical treatment. Case Description: Our case is one of the first to describe a patient with two purely extradural meningiomas, one each between D3–D4 and between D5–D6 vertebral levels. Surgical resection was radical, and pathologically both lesions were meningothelialmeningiomas. Conclusions: Reviewing the literature, we discuss the pathogenesis, treatment strategies, and long-term behavior of these uncommon lesions. PMID:27625886

  5. Meningioma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Akin, Erin Y; Baumgartner, Wes A; Lee, Jung Keun; Beasley, Michaela J

    2013-09-01

    A 17-yr-old female ovariectomized Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented dead on arrival to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The tiger was a resident of a sanctuary for big cats and had a history of juvenile-onset blindness of unknown cause. The tiger suffered two seizures the morning of presentation and expired shortly after resolution of the second seizure. Gross necropsy findings included a meningioma attached to the left frontal bone and associated with the left frontal lobe. Histologically, the mass was composed of meningothelial cells arising from the meninges, forming whorls and streams. Cells often formed syncytia and psammoma bodies were present. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, S100, and cytokeratin, but negative for GFAP. All findings were consistent with a meningioma. This is the first documentation of a meningioma in a Bengal tiger. PMID:24063109

  6. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTÍN, MIGUEL; MARTINEZ-GLEZ, VICTOR; PEÑA-GRANERO, CAROLINA; ISLA, ALBERTO; LASSALETTA, LUIS; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; MELÉNDEZ, BÁRBARA; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; REY, JUAN A.

    2013-01-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  7. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martín, Miguel; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Peña-Granero, Carolina; Isla, Alberto; Lassaletta, Luis; DE Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Meléndez, Bárbara; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2013-07-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  8. Atypical growth pattern of a meningioma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Michele; Perez, Rosa; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Castellano, Isabella; Cassoni, Paola; Ducati, Alessandro

    2007-08-01

    A 49-year-old woman presented with a rare atypical growth pattern of meningioma without evidence of dural attachment manifesting as chronic headache associated with transient paresthesia and left motor disorders. On admission, neurological examination showed no abnormalities. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a right temporo-parieto-occipital lesion, which appeared to involve the subdural space and filling the cortical sulci. The lesion caused peritumoral white matter edema. The tumor appeared hypointense on T(1)-weighted and hyperintense on T(2)-weighted MR images, with homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A biopsy of the lesion was performed. Histological examination indicated that the lesion was a meningioma. Intraparenchymal meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraaxial lesions in patients of any age.

  9. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-07-15

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed.

  10. Olfactory function in patients with olfactory groove meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Welge-Luessen, A; Temmel, A; Quint, C; Moll, B; Wolf, S; Hummel, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Olfactory meningiomas are rare benign tumours and represent about 12% of all basal meningiomas. Anosmia is thought to be among the first symptoms, even though patients often present with headaches or visual problems. However, so far no detailed physophysical tests of olfactory function have been performed in a large number of those patients.
METHODS—Twelve patients (five men, seven women; mean age 52 years) with olfactory meningiomas were examined. In all patients extensive preoperative and postoperative lateralised olfactory testing was performed using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery, a psychometric testing tool. In eight cases the meningioma was lateralised (five left, three right), in four patients a bilateral meningioma was found. In addition to a detailed ear, nose, and throat examination MRI was performed in all patients.
RESULTS—In preoperative testing six patients were found to be anosmic on the side of the tumour, two were hyposmic. Four patients were normosmic. Postoperative investigations showed lateralised anosmia in four patients on the operated side, three were normosmic on the contralateral side and one hyposmic. The remaining eight patients were completely anosmic postoperatively.
CONCLUSIONS—(1) Contrary to expectations, olfactory testing seems to be of little help in detecting olfactory meningiomas. (2) The likelihood of normal postoperative olfactory function contralateral to the tumour was high when the tumour was less than 3 cm in diameter and preoperative normosmia had been established. (3) Preservation of olfactory function ipsilateral to the tumour seems to be extremely difficult, irrespective of tumour size or surgical approach.

 PMID:11160471

  11. Recurrent prolactinoma and meningioma following irradiation and bromocriptine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodny, J.; Dluhy, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    This case report describes a 45-year-old man with a massive extrasellar prolactinoma, treated initially with surgery and radiotherapy, who experienced a dramatic reduction of the bulk of his tumor but persistence and subsequent progression of an extrasellar portion while receiving long-term bromocriptine therapy, despite stable, suppressed prolactin levels. Although the residual tumor was thought to be adenomatous tissue unresponsive to bromocriptine, a meningioma was ultimately diagnosed. Because the meningioma may have been radiation-induced, clinicians are reminded to consider a second neoplasm in cases of apparent bromocriptine treatment failures, especially when prolactin levels are stable.

  12. Intracranial meningioma with ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Canfield, Don R

    2012-10-01

    A 21-y-old female rhesus macaque presented with signs of internal and external ophthamoplegia, including anisocoria and ptosis. Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or weakness of one or more intraocular or extraocular muscles that control the movement of eye; this condition can be caused by neurologic or muscle disorders. The macaque was euthanized due to progression of clinical symptoms, and postmortem gross examination revealed a mass at the base of the brain attached to the meninges. Histopathologic examination led to the diagnosis of intracranial meningioma. Here we describe a case of intracranial meningioma with internal and external ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

  13. Intraosseous meningioma: a rare tumor reconstructed with porous polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Kucukyuruk, Baris; Biceroglu, Huseyin; Abuzayed, Bashar; Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Sanus, Galip Zihni

    2010-05-01

    A 45-year-old woman described the pain and the swelling at the left frontoparietal region. No significant findings were noted on physical examination, except a heterogeneous palpable lesion at the described region. Computed tomographic scan revealed an expansive bone lesion with homogeneous density, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed similar findings with no contrast enhancement. The lesion was totally resected, and cranioplasty with a porous polyethylene sheet (Medpor Biomaterial; Porex Surgical, Newnan, GA) was achieved. Histopathologic examination revealed an intraosseous meningioma. As far as we know, this case is the first case, in which total excision of the interosseous meningioma is followed by reconstruction with Medpor.

  14. Gamma Knife radiosurgery of olfactory groove meningiomas provides a method to preserve subjective olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Gande, Abhiram; Kano, Hideyuki; Bowden, Gregory; Mousavi, Seyed H; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-02-01

    Anosmia is a common outcome after resection of olfactory groove meningioma(s) (OGM) and for some patients represents a significant disability. To evaluate long term tumor control rates and preservation of subjective olfaction after Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of OGM. We performed a retrospective chart review and telephone assessments of 41 patients who underwent GK SRS between 1987 and 2008. Clinical outcomes were stratified by full, partial or no subjective olfaction, whereas tumor control was assessed by changes in volume greater or lesser than 25%. The median clinical and imaging follow-up were 76 and 65 months, respectively. Prior to SRS, 19 (46%) patients had surgical resections and two (5%) had received fractionated radiation therapy. Twenty four patients (59%) reported a normal sense of smell, 12 (29%) reported a reduced sense of smell and five (12%) had complete anosmia. The median tumor volume was 8.5 cm(3) (range 0.6-56.1), the mean radiation dose at the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 10-20) and the median estimated dose to the olfactory nerve was 5.1 Gy (range 1.1-18.1). At follow-up, 27 patients (66%) reported intact olfaction (three (7%) described return to a normal sense of smell), nine (22%) described partial anosmia, and five (12%) had complete anosmia. No patient reported deterioration in olfaction after SRS. Thirteen patients (32%) showed significant tumor regression, 26 (63%) had no further growth and two (5%) had progressed. The progression free tumor control rates were 97% at 1 year and 95% at 2, 10 and 20 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in three (7%) patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery provided both long term tumor control and preservation of olfaction.

  15. [Prognostic factors in elderly patient meningioma].

    PubMed

    Villalpando-Navarrete, Edgar; Rosas-Peralta, Víctor Hugo; Sandoval-Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: frecuentemente debe tomarse una decisión terapéutica para el manejo del meningioma en el paciente geriátrico. El presente estudio analiza factores pronósticos, así como la escala Clinical- Radiological Grading Score (CRGS) como auxiliar para la decisión terapéutica. Métodos: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo entre 2009 y 2010. La población estudiada fue de 28 pacientes mayores de 65 años de edad. Se analizaron factores clínicos, imagenológicos e histopatológicos. Se utilizó la prueba chi cuadrada y la exacta de Fisher para variables cuantitativas y U de Mann-Whitney para variables cualitativas. Resultados: la mortalidad global a los 3, 6 y 12 meses de seguimiento fue del 7.14, 10.71 y 14.28 %, respectivamente. El análisis reveló que el estado funcional con la escala de Karnofsky (p = 0.02), la localización de la lesión (p = 0.002), el grado de malignidad histopatológico (p = 0.038) y una puntuación menor de 10 en la escala CRGS (p = 0.003) se asocian con un mal pronóstico. Conclusión: el manejo neuroquirúrgico del paciente geriátrico es una posibilidad terapéutica con un pronóstico favorable en pacientes con una puntuación igual o mayor de 10 y en aquellos con un adecuado estado funcional.

  16. Cdc42 regulates Schwann cell radial sorting and myelin sheath folding through NF2/merlin-dependent and independent signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Moon, Chandra; Zheng, Yi; Ratner, Nancy

    2013-11-01

    The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 has been implicated in developmental Schwann cell (SC) proliferation, providing sufficient SCs for radial sorting of axons preceding SC differentiation in the peripheral nervous system. We generated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42-CKO) mice and confirmed aberrant axon sorting in Cdc42-CKO nerves. In adult Cdc42-CKO nerves, blood vessels were enlarged, and mature Remak bundles containing small axons were absent. Abnormal infoldings and outfoldings of myelin sheaths developed in Cdc42-CKO nerves, mimicking pathological features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The NF2/merlin tumor suppressor has been implicated up- and down-stream of Cdc42. In Cdc42-CKO;NF2-del double mutant mice, radial sorting defects seen in Cdc42-CKO nerves were rescued, while changes in myelin sheaths in Cdc42-CKO nerves were not. Phosphorylation of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and P-GSK3β, as well as expression of β-catenin were decreased in Cdc42-CKO nerves, and these changes were rescued by NF2/merlin mutation in Cdc42-CKO;NF2-del double mutant mice. Thus, Cdc42 regulates SC radial sorting in vivo through NF2/merlin dependent signaling pathways, while Cdc42 modulation of myelin sheath folding is NF2/merlin independent.

  17. Bevacizumab treatment for meningiomas in NF2: a retrospective analysis of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Fabio P; Merker, Vanessa L; Jennings, Dominique; Caruso, Paul A; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Muzikansky, Alona; Barker, Fred G; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Plotkin, Scott R

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab treatment can result in tumor shrinkage of progressive vestibular schwannomas in some neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) patients but its effect on meningiomas has not been defined. To determine the clinical activity of bevacizumab against NF2-related meningiomas, we measured changes in volume of meningiomas in NF2 patients who received bevacizumab for treatment of progressive vestibular schwannomas. A radiographic response was defined as a 20% decrease in tumor size by volumetric MRI analysis. In addition, we determined the expression pattern of growth factors associated with tumor angiogenesis in paraffin-embedded tissues from 26 unrelated meningiomas. A total of 48 meningiomas in 15 NF2 patients were included in this study with a median follow up time of 18 months. A volumetric radiographic response was seen in 29% of the meningiomas (14/48). Tumor shrinkage was not durable: the median duration of response was 3.7 months and the median time to progression was 15 months. There was no significant correlation between pre-treatment growth rate and meningioma response in regression models. Tissue analysis showed no correlation between tumor microvascular density and expression of VEGF pathway components. This data suggests that, in contrast to schwannomas, activation of VEGF pathway is not the primary driver of angiogenesis in meningiomas. Our results suggest that a minority of NF2-associated meningiomas shrink during bevacizumab therapy and that these responses were of short duration. These results are comparable to previous studies of bevacizumab in sporadic meningiomas. PMID:23555840

  18. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  19. Molecular genetics of meningiomas: from basic research to potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Simon, Matthias; Boström, Jan P; Hartmann, Christian

    2007-05-01

    To review our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of meningiomas, to suggest topics for future investigations, and to present perspectives for clinical application. Significant progress has been made in recent years in delineating the molecular mechanisms involved in meningioma formation, growth, and malignant progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. Mutations in the NF2 gene probably account for the formation of more than half of all meningiomas. On the other hand, the molecular events underlying the initiation of meningiomas without NF2 mutations have yet to be identified. Investigating hereditary conditions associated with an increased meningioma incidence and the mechanisms underlying the development of radiation-induced meningiomas could potentially yield relevant insights. Meningioma growth is sustained by the dysregulated expression of steroid hormones, growth factors, their receptors, and activation of signal transduction cascades. The underlying genetic causes are unknown. Malignant progression of meningiomas probably involves the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes on chromosomes 1p, 9p, 10q, and 14q. However, with the possible exception of INK4A/INK4B, the actual targets of these chromosomal losses have remained largely elusive. Cell cycle dysregulation and telomerase activation have been recognized as important steps in meningioma progression. Telomere dynamics, cell cycle control, and the mechanisms responsible for deoxyribonucleic acid damage control are tightly interwoven. Investigating genes involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity might significantly deepen the understanding of meningioma progression. An area that has received relatively little attention thus far is the genetic background of meningioma spread and invasion. Possible clinical applications of the molecular data available may include a meningioma grading system based on genetic alterations, as well as therapeutic strategies for refractory

  20. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu protein expression in meningiomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are common slow-growing primary central nervous system tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid and spinal cord. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or HER2/neu (also known as c-erbB2) is a 185-kD transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity expressed in meningiomas and various other tumors. It can be used in targeted therapy for HER2/neu positive meningiomas. Aim: To correlate the expression of HER2/neu protein in meningiomas with gender, location, histological subtypes, and grade. Materials and Methods: It was 3½ years prospective (March 2010–October 2011) and retrospective (May 2008–February 2010) study of histopathologically diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal meningiomas. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the computerized hospital information system. Immunohistochemistry for HER2/neu protein was performed along with scoring. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to look for any association of HER2/neu with gender, location, grade, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas at 5% level of significance. Results: A total of 100 cases of meningiomas were found during the study period. Of which, 80 were Grade I, 18 were Grade II, and 2 were Grade III meningiomas as per the World Health Organization 2007 criteria. The female-male ratio was 1.9:1 and the mean age was 47.8 years. HER2/neu protein was expressed in 75% of Grade I and 72.2% of Grade II and none of Grade III meningiomas. About 72.7% brain invasive meningiomas showed HER2/neu immunopositivity. Conclusion: HER2/neu protein was expressed in 73% of meningiomas. Statistically significant difference of HER2/neu expression was not seen between females and males of Grade I and Grade II/III meningiomas, intracranial and spinal tumors, Grade I and Grade II/III cases, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas.

  1. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu protein expression in meningiomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are common slow-growing primary central nervous system tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid and spinal cord. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or HER2/neu (also known as c-erbB2) is a 185-kD transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity expressed in meningiomas and various other tumors. It can be used in targeted therapy for HER2/neu positive meningiomas. Aim: To correlate the expression of HER2/neu protein in meningiomas with gender, location, histological subtypes, and grade. Materials and Methods: It was 3½ years prospective (March 2010–October 2011) and retrospective (May 2008–February 2010) study of histopathologically diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal meningiomas. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the computerized hospital information system. Immunohistochemistry for HER2/neu protein was performed along with scoring. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to look for any association of HER2/neu with gender, location, grade, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas at 5% level of significance. Results: A total of 100 cases of meningiomas were found during the study period. Of which, 80 were Grade I, 18 were Grade II, and 2 were Grade III meningiomas as per the World Health Organization 2007 criteria. The female-male ratio was 1.9:1 and the mean age was 47.8 years. HER2/neu protein was expressed in 75% of Grade I and 72.2% of Grade II and none of Grade III meningiomas. About 72.7% brain invasive meningiomas showed HER2/neu immunopositivity. Conclusion: HER2/neu protein was expressed in 73% of meningiomas. Statistically significant difference of HER2/neu expression was not seen between females and males of Grade I and Grade II/III meningiomas, intracranial and spinal tumors, Grade I and Grade II/III cases, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas. PMID:27695231

  2. Intracerebral metaplastic meningioma with prominent ossification and extensive calcification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingxiang; Petersson, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a patient (male 26 years) with a short history of recurrent seizures induced by a largely intracerebrally located frontal lobe meningioma. The tumor displayed a heretofore unpublished combination of extensive metaplastic bone formation and prominent non-psammomatous calcifications with focal chicken-wire pattern. PMID:21769319

  3. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition: possible role in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Pecina-Slaus, Nives; Cicvara-Pecina, Tatjana; Kafka, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchimal transition (EMT) is a process involved in invasion and metastasis of tumors. The occurrence of EMT during tumor progression resembles the developmental scenario and sheds light on important mechanisms for the initial step of metastasis - invasion where noninvasive tumor cells acquire motility and ultimately disseminate to distant organs. The hallmark of EMT is the loss of expression of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The numerous reports by many authors as well as our own results indicate that E-cadherin plays a role in CNS tumors - meningiomas. Our studies showed that 73 % of meningiomas had downregulation of E-cadherin. Moreover, loss of heterozygosity of E-cadherin was observed in 32 % of meningiomas. Bound to E-cadherin in adherens junctions is beta-catenin, whose translocation to the nucleus is yet another molecular event involved in EMT. In our study beta-catenin was progressively upregulated from meningothelial to atypical, while 60 % of anaplastic meningiomas showed upregulation and nuclear localization of the protein. The elucidation of molecular mechanisms that govern EMT will offer new approaches and targets to restrain metastasis.

  4. Psychiatric symptoms and an anterior cranial fossa meningioma.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, G; Austin, H; Neehall, J E

    1998-09-01

    We present a case of a patient admitted to a psychiatric hospital with psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairment but who was subsequently found to have an anterior interhemispheric falx meningioma. There must be a high index of suspicion for organic brain disease in patients over age 45 years presenting with psychotic symptoms and seizures for the first time.

  5. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  6. Human Vagus Nerve Branching in the Cervical Region

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Niels; Glätzner, Juliane; Feja, Christine; Kühne, Christian; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Planitzer, Uwe; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Tillmann, Bernhard N.; Winkler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation. Materials and Methods Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides) in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections. Results Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally) and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22%) was more common than left-sided branching (12%) and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm) and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2). Discussion Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation. PMID:25679804

  7. Assessment of candidate immunohistochemical prognostic markers of meningioma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Csonka, T; Murnyák, B; Szepesi, R; Bencze, J; Bognár, L; Klekner, A; Hortobágyi, T

    2016-01-01

    Although tumour recurrence is an important and not infrequent event in meningiomas, predictive immunohistochemical markers have not been identified yet. The aim of this study was to address this clinically relevant problem by systematic retrospective analysis of surgically completely resected meningiomas with and without recurrence, including tumour samples from patients who underwent repeat surgeries. Three established immunohistochemical markers of routine pathological meningioma work-up have been assessed: the proliferative marker Ki-67 (clone Mib1), the tumour suppressor gene p53 and progesterone receptor (PR). All these proteins correlate with the tumour WHO grade, however the predictive value regarding recurrence and progression in tumour grade is unknown. One hundred and fourteen surgical specimens of 70 meningioma patients (16 male and 54 female) in a 16 years' interval have been studied. All tumours had apparently complete surgical removal. On Mib1, PR and p53 immunostained sections, the percentage of labelled tumour cells, the staining intensity and the multiplied values of these parameters (the histoscore) was calculated. Results were statistically correlated with tumour WHO grade, (sub)type, recurrence and progression in WHO grade at subsequent biopsies. Our results confirmed previous findings that the WHO grade is directly proportional to Mib1 and p53 and is inversely proportional to the PR immunostain. We have demonstrated that Mib1 and p53 have a significant correlation with and predictive value of relapse/recurrence irrespective of the histological subtype of the same WHO grade. As a quantitative marker, Mib1 has the best correlation with a percentage of labelled cells, whereas p53 with intensity and histoscore. In conclusion, the immunohistochemical panel of PR, p53, Mib1 in parallel with applying standard diagnostic criteria based on H and E stained sections is sufficient and reliable to predict meningioma recurrence in surgically completely

  8. The results of radiosurgical management of 72 middle fossa meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V; Schinaia, G; Raimondi, A J

    1993-01-01

    Of 812 patients with intracranial tumours treated by radiosurgery during the period 1984-1990, 129 had meningiomas. Of these latter, 72 had middle fossa meningiomas. Patients with meningiomas treated by us since March 1990 are not included in this report since we established the investigative principle of a minimum of 30 months follow-up. Seventeen of the 72 patients were treated after incomplete surgical resection, and 21 for tumour regrowth. In 34 patients, radiosurgery was the primary treatment. The tumour volume was calculated by the ellipsoid method. It ranged from 0.588-76.346 ml. Radiosurgery was performed using the non-invasive stereotactic fixation head device (Greitz-Bergström) adapted to the Fixster frame, and dynamic irradiation performed with the linear accelerator, using especially designed collimators. The total tumour dose for each patient ranged from 15-45 Gy. The minimum follow-up was 2 1/2 years and the maximum 8 years. In 50 patients there was tumour shrinkage ranging from 24-91% of the initial tumour volume. Shrinkage was associated with central tumour necrosis in 11 of these 50 patients. In 18 patients the tumour volume remained stable. In 2 patients there was tumour progression and in 2 there was regrowth after initial reduction of tumour volume. There were no significant treatment complications. Radiosurgery is preferable to re-operation in recurrent meningiomas and indicated after incomplete surgical removal. In high risk patients, as well as in "unresectable" meningiomas, it is an obvious alternative to microsurgery.

  9. Rare Parenchyma Meningioma in an Adolescent Female With Cheek Tingling

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Li, Meirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The following is a report on a rare parenchyma meningioma and the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. To our knowledge, this was the first characterization of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a parenchyma meningioma. Three days after initial presentation, a 14-year-old female student reported feeling tingling in her cheek, grading 3 to 4 points. Two hours later, the tingling had disappeared. The patient was admitted to hospital with stable vital signs and no abnormal presentations upon physical examination. A routine CT scan of the brain showed a quasicircular region of the left occipital lobe was homogenous hyperdense and an arcualia calcification was found on the lesion's margin and the boundary was ill-defined. Further MRI and contrast-enhanced scanning of the brain showed that a lobulated nidus with abnormal signaling was present in the left occipital lobe and was approximately 1.9 × 2.0 cm. Hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging and a slight hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging was also observed. A short T2 signal appeared on the margin and a few longer T2 edema zones appeared around the nidus, whereas the lesion showed homogenous enhancement. MRS was characterized by a slight or moderate increase of a choline (Cho) peak and a small reduction of the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) peak. After completing the preoperative preparation, the excision of the supratentorial deep lesions was performed on the patient. The pathology led to a diagnosis of a left occipital lobe meningioma, WHO I. The patient was followed-up for 14 months postoperation, and had no reoccurrences. Intraparenchymal meningioma rarely occurs in brain parenchyma, and is characterized by lesions with abundant blood supply and requires a glioma to be identified. MRS is a potential tool for preoperative diagnosis of intraparenchymal meningioma. PMID:27082619

  10. Preliminary Results of Helical Tomotherapy in Patients with Complex-Shaped Meningiomas Close to the Optic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Schiappacasse, Luis Cendales, Ricardo; Sallabanda, Kita; Schnitman, Franco; Samblas, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common benign intracranial tumor. Meningiomas close to the optic pathway represent a treatment challenge both for surgery and radiotherapy. The aim of this article is to describe early results of helical tomotherapy treatment in complex-shaped meningiomas close to the optic pathway. Twenty-eight patients were consecutively treated. All patients were immobilized with a thermoplastic head mask and planned with the aid of a magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion. All treatments included daily image guidance. Pretreatment symptoms and acute toxicity were recorded. Median age was 57.5 years, and 92.8% patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status scale {<=}1. The most common localizations were the sella turcica, followed by the cavernous sinus and the sphenoid. The most common symptoms were derived from cranial nerve deficits. Tomotherapy was administered as primary treatment in 35.7% of patients, as an adjuvant treatment in 32.4%, and as a rescue treatment after postsurgical progression in 32.1% patients. Most patients were either inoperable or Simpson IV. Total dose varied between 5000 and 5400 cGy; fractionation varied between 180 and 200 cGy. Median dose to the planning target volume was 51.7 Gy (range, 50.2-55.9 Gy). Median coverage index was 0.89 (range, 0.18-0.97). Median homogeneity index was 1.05 (range, 1-1.12). Acute transient toxicity was grade 1 and included headache in 35.7% patients, ocular pain/dryness in 28.5%, and radiation dermatitis in 25%. Thus far, with a maximal follow-up of 3 years, no late effects have been seen and all patients have a radiological stabilization of the disease. Helical tomotherapy offered a safe and effective therapeutic alternative for patients with inoperable or subtotally resected complex-shaped meningiomas close to the optic pathway. Acceptable coverage and homogeneity indexes were achieved with appropriate values for maximal doses delivered to the eyes, lenses

  11. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow.

  12. Sheath insulator test thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Celia C. M.

    Thermal models were developed for Instrumented Fast Reactor Component Sheath Insulator (IFAC-SI) test to aid in the design and fabrication of the experiment which is part of the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program. The actual experiment with two heat pipes in one test capsule is described by Miskolczy and Lee (1990). Two-dimensional finite element models were used in conjunction with other explicit programs to determine the necessary fin design and argon filling conditions of the vapor controlled heat pipes used to maintain desired operating temperatures. Four two-dimensional finite element models were developed: an axisymmetric capsule model; a radial sheath insulator model; a radial fin model, and an axial fin model. All finite element models were verified by comparing results between models and explicit one-dimensional heat-flow calculations. This thermal analysis package of 2D FEMs and explicit programs predicts the best geometry and placement of fins to compensate for uncertainties from internal gamma heating, emissivity of niobium, and outer sodium temperature.

  13. Sheath insulator test thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Celia C. M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal models were developed for Instrumented Fast Reactor Component Sheath Insulator (IFAC-SI) test to aid in the design and fabrication of the experiment which is part of the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program. The actual experiment with two heat pipes in one test capsule is described by Miskolczy and Lee (1990). Two-dimensional finite element models were used in conjunction with other explicit programs to determine the necessary fin design and argon filling conditions of the vapor controlled heat pipes used to maintain desired operating temperatures. Four two-dimensional finite element models were developed: an axisymmetric capsule model; a radial sheath insulator model; a radial fin model, and an axial fin model. All finite element models were verified by comparing results between models and explicity one-dimensional heat-flow calculations. Additional programs were written to calculate the thermal expansion of the capsule components and argon volumes for operating temperatures. This thermal analysis package of two-dimensional finite element models and explicit programs predicts the best geometry and placement of fins to compensate for uncertainties from internal gamma heating, emissivity of niobium, and outer sodium temperature.

  14. Unusual Intracranial Parasagittal Meningioma Extending into the Internal Jugular Vein through the Sinuses.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eui-Kyo; Cho, Yong-Jae; Koo, Heasoo; Lim, Soo-Mee

    2008-05-01

    Meningiomas frequently invade cerebral venus sinuses, especially parasagittal meningioma to superior sagittal sinus. However, most invasions do not reach internal jugular vein. We present a case of parasagittal meningioma extending into the internal jugular vein through the sinuses. Radiological investigation revealed that the tumor was invading the sagittal, transverse, sigmoid sinus and junction of the internal jugular vein to subclavian vein, which was filled with tumor. The histopathological examinations revealed that both the cerebral tumor and mass in the internal jugular vein contributed to the transitional meningioma. This is a rare case of a meningioma extending into the internal jugular vein through the sinuses. According to this case, the frontal parasagittal meningioma could invade directly the internal jugular vein. The significance of this association to cerebral venus sinuses and internal jugular vein are discussed. PMID:19096607

  15. Multiple pulmonary metastases in recurrent intracranial meningioma: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Zhan, Renya; Zhang, Chong; Zhou, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary metastases from meningioma are rare. We report here a 59-year-old man with multiple pulmonary metastases from a recurrent intracranial meningioma. The primary intracranial tumour in the left occiput was totally excised in 2009. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of atypical meningioma and adjuvant radiotherapy was given to help prevent recurrence. However, recurrence occurred in the left occipital region in 2011 and the meningioma was re-excised in 2012. At the same time, multiple metastases in the right pulmonary lobe were found and excised 3 months after the second craniotomy. The patient has not developed any further recurrence or metastases to date. Neurosurgeons should be aware of the occurrence of pulmonary metastases in patients with intracranial meningioma; potential predictive factors include atypical meningioma, venous sinus invasion, recurrence or previous intracranial surgery, and loss of heterozygosity. PMID:26944388

  16. Common variation at 10p12.31 near MLLT10 influences meningioma risk

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, Sara E; Broderick, Peter; Melin, Beatrice; Feychting, Maria; Johansen, Christoffer; Andersson, Ulrika; Brännström, Thomas; Schramm, Johannes; Olver, Bianca; Lloyd, Amy; Ma, Yussanne P; Hosking, Fay J; Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Henriksson, Roger; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Hepworth, Sarah J; Hoffmann, Per; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Muir, Kenneth; Swerdlow, Anthony; Simon, Matthias; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify predisposition loci for meningioma we conducted a genome-wide association study of 859 cases and 704 controls with validation in two independent sample sets totaling 774 cases and 1,764 controls. We identified a novel susceptibility locus for meningioma at 10p12.31 (MLLT10; rs11012732, OR=1.46, Pcombined=1.88x10-14). This finding advances our understanding of the genetic basis of meningioma development. PMID:21804547

  17. Multiple Fibromas of Tendon Sheath: Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Young; Jin, Seon Pil; Yeom, Bora; Kim, Shin Woo; Cho, So Yun

    2011-01-01

    Fibroma of the tendon sheath is an uncommon soft tissue tumor presenting as a solitary, slow-growing, firm, painless, small nodule, which shows strong attachment to the tendon or tendon sheath. It is usually localized on fingers and hand tendons in adults between the age of 20 and 40 years old. This case concerns a 61-year-old man presenting with a 5-year history of multiple cutaneous nodules on both palms and soles. Skin biopsy confirmed fibroma of the tendon sheath. Blood tests showed a high titer of rheumatoid factor and positivity to anti-nuclear antibody. No case of fibroma of the tendon sheath occurring multifocally on both palms and soles has been previously reported. Herein, we report on a very rare case of multiple fibromas of the tendon sheath arising from palms and soles, which supports the pathogenetic hypothesis that this tumor may be a reactive process rather than a true neoplasm. PMID:22028571

  18. A strongly CD34-positive meningioma that was difficult to distinguish from a solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomu; Fujitsu, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Teruo; Mukaihara, Shigeo; Miyahara, Kousuke; Tanino, Shin; Uriu, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Takahiro; Hataoka, Syunsuke; Kubota, Jyunichi; Suzuki, Kouji; Niino, Hitoshi; Yagishita, Saburou

    2014-08-01

    Fibrous or transitional meningioma and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) are frequently difficult to differentiate from each other on the basis of histopathology. It is extremely unusual for a meningioma to exhibit diffuse, strongly positive immunoreactivity for cluster of differentiation 34 (CD34), and this has never been previously reported from a histopathological specimen. A patient with transitional meningioma that exhibited strongly positive for CD34, which has been regarded as characteristic of SFT and is considered to be useful for distinguishing the latter from meningioma, is reported.

  19. Infratentorial benign cystic meningioma mimicking a hemangioblastoma radiologically and a pilocytic astrocytoma intraoperatively: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cystic meningiomas are rare variants of meningiomas; they can pose a radiological diagnostic dilemma. Case presentation We present a rare case of a 30-year-old Chinese woman with a histopathological diagnosis of infratentorial cystic meningioma (World Health Organization Grade 1) in which the features in imaging modalities were suggestive of a hemangioblastoma. Intraoperatively, however, the gross macroscopic features were more in keeping with a pilocytic astrocytoma. Conclusion In benign cystic meningiomas, particularly the infratentorial variety, radiological findings utilizing the various imaging modalities and intraoperative impressions may not be reflective of or in keeping with the final histopathological diagnosis. PMID:23537099

  20. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  1. Flexor Tendon Sheath Ganglions: Results of Surgical Excision

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Edwin E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the clinical features and determine the results following surgical excision of a flexor tendon sheath ganglion. A retrospective analysis of 24 consecutive patients (25 ganglions) who underwent excision of a painful flexor tendon sheath ganglion by the same surgeon was performed. The patient’s medical and operative records were reviewed. Each patient was invited to return for an evaluation, which consisted of a clinical interview, completion of a questionnaire, and physical examination. Those patients that were unable to return underwent a detailed telephone interview. Sixteen patients returned for a clinical evaluation, while eight patients underwent a telephone interview. There were 15 women and nine men, with an average age of 43 years (range, 21–68 years). The dominant hand was involved in 15 patients. The long finger was most commonly involved (11 cases). The ganglion arose from the A1 pulley in 13 cases, between the A1 and A2 pulleys in three cases, and from the A2 pulley in nine cases. At an average follow-up of 18.5 months (range, 5–38 months), all of the patients were satisfied with their final result. No patient developed a recurrence and all returned to their previous functional level. There were two minor complications that resolved uneventfully; one patient experienced mild incisional tenderness, while an additional patient experienced transient digital nerve paresthesias. We conclude that surgical excision is a simple, safe, and effective method for treating a painful ganglion of the digital flexor tendon sheath. PMID:18780066

  2. Primary intra-fourth ventricular meningioma: Report two cases

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiva, Nishanth; Rao, Shilpa; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Shukla, Dhaval

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma's occurring intraventricular region are rare and these occurring in the fourth ventricle is even rare. Because of the rarity, it is not usually considered as a differential diagnosis in any age group. Clinical features and Imaging is not characteristic, and most of them are thought to be some different tumor. Here, we discuss two cases harboring a primary fourth ventricular meningioma Grade II, which was surgically excised successfully. Total excision was achieved in both cases and as the tumor was firm to soft and vermian splitting was not required. Understanding the clinical features and a careful preoperative radiological examination is required to differentiate this tumor from more commonly occurring lesions at this location. PMID:27114661

  3. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  4. Optical properties of nonextensive inhomogeneous plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic wave through an inhomogeneous magnetized nonextensive plasma sheath is numerically examined for a realistic density profile of a reentry problem around a hypersonic vehicle. The effect of nonextensivity and inhomogeneity on radio wave communication is studied parametrically. Variation of reflection and transmission coefficients, total attenuation, and total phase shift over the plasma sheath with respect to the strength of applied magnetic field are derived and compared for different values of q-nonextensive parameter. The obtained results for inhomogeneous plasma sheath are compared with previously obtained results of authors for homogeneous plasma sheath. The comparison shows that radio communication in the inhomogeneous plasma sheath is more advantageous than that in the homogeneous case. The transmission coefficient of a plasma sheath with superthermal electrons ( /1 3 < q < 1 ) has larger value compared to that with q > 1. Moreover, for ω c e > ω , the minimum value of total attenuation corresponds to the range /1 3 < q < 1 . An interesting result is that nonextensivity effect on wave propagation in plasma sheath depends on the strength of the ambient magnetic field. The effect of nonextensivity on attenuation coefficient is found to be negligible for ω c e < ω while it is significant for ω c e > ω .

  5. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  6. The cavernous sinus meningiomas' dilemma: Surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery?

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Laura; Biroli, Antonio; Signorelli, Antonio; Broggi, Morgan; Marchetti, Marcello; Biroli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in techniques and technologies, the management of cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas still remains a challenge for both neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the improvement of the anatomical knowledge and the microsurgical techniques together with diffusion of radiosurgery are currently changing the treatment strategy, opening new perspectives to the patients which are suffering from such lesions. The authors reviewed here the literature data. A multidisciplinary treatment algorithm is also proposed. PMID:27330423

  7. Meningiomas of the lateral ventricle - a report of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Menon, G; Nair, S; Sudhir, J; Rao, R; Easwer, H V; Krishnakumar, K

    2009-06-01

    Lateral ventricular meningiomas are rare tumours that pose considerable surgical challenge. This study attempts to analyse some of the important clinical features of these tumours and review technical considerations in surgery for lateral ventricular meningiomas. A retrospective analysis of the case records of patients with lateral ventricular meningiomas operated in our institute since 1998 with a minimum of one year follow up was done. The variables analysed included age, sex, clinical presentation, imaging characteristics, histopathology and operative details. Outcome was analysed using the Glasgow outcome score (GOS). Fifteen patients with a mean age of 40.6 years formed the study group. A female preponderance was observed (M:F 5:10). Raised intracranial pressure was the predominant symptom at presentation (10/15; 66%) followed by visual field deficits (6/15; 40%) and contralateral motor deficits (5/15; 33.3%). One patient presented with evidence of intratumoural bleed. The tumour was on the right side in 7 patients and on the left side in 8 patients. The lesion was located in the trigone of the lateral ventricle in 13 patients and in the body of the ventricle in two. The tumours were excised through a parietooccipital approach in 11 (73.33%) patients and through a middle temporal gyrus approach in 4 (26.66%).The tumour recurred in 2 patients, both tumours being histologically fibroblastic variants. Fresh operative complications included motor deficits in 3, contralateral homonymous hemianopia in 2, dysphasia in 1, refractory seizures in 2 and loculated hydrocephalus in one. We had no operative mortality. At last follow-up for 10 patients were in GOS 5, two were in GOS 4 and three in GOS 3. Lateral ventricular meningiomas are difficult tumours to operate. Total surgical excision through a superior parietal lobule or middle temporal gyrus approach is possible in most cases with minimal morbidity.

  8. Mature posterior fossa teratoma mimicking infratentorial meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, O; El Kacemi, I; Fatemi, N; Gana, R; Saïdi, A; Maaqili, R; Jiddane, M; Bellakhdar, F

    2012-02-01

    Intracranial teratomas are congenital neoplasms mostly diagnosed in the pediatric hood and usually involve supratentorial midline structures. These teratomas, especially those involving the posterior fossa are an uncommon and representing less than 0.5% of all intracranial tumors. We report a case of mature posterior fossa teratoma in an adult patient diagnosed in the 4th decade of life. This lesion was taken for a huge infratentorial meningioma.

  9. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control.

  10. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    SciTech Connect

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  11. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    DOE PAGES

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperaturemore » plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.« less

  12. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions ( Te≫Ti ), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  13. Reduced activity of CD13/aminopeptidase N (APN) in aggressive meningiomas is associated with increased levels of SPARC.

    PubMed

    Mawrin, Christian; Wolke, Carmen; Haase, Daniela; Krüger, Sabine; Firsching, Raimund; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Paulus, Werner; Gutmann, David H; Lal, Anita; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common brain tumors in adults, and meningiomas exhibit a tendency to invade adjacent structures. Compared with high-grade gliomas, little is known about the molecular changes that potentially underlie the invasive behavior of meningiomas. In this study, we examined the expression and function of the membrane alanyl-aminopeptidase [mAAP, aminopeptidase N (APN), CD13, EC3.4.11.2] zinc-dependent ectopeptidase in meningiomas and meningioma cell lines, based on its prior association with tumor invasion in colorectal and renal carcinomas. We found a significant reduction of APNmRNA and protein expression, as well as enzymatic activity, in high-grade meningiomas. While meningioma tumor cell proliferation was not affected by either pharmacologic APN inhibition or siRNA-mediated APN silencing, APN pharmacologic and siRNA knockdown significantly reduced meningioma cell invasion in vitro. Next, we employed pathway-specific cDNA microarray analyses to identify extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules regulated by APN, and found that APN-siRNA knockdown substantially increased the expression of secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)/osteonectin. Finally, we demonstrated that SPARC, which has been previously associated with meningioma invasiveness, was increased in aggressive meningiomas. Collectively, these results suggest that APN expression and enzymatic function is reduced in aggressive meningiomas, and that alterations in the balance between APN and SPARC might favor meningioma invasion.

  14. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  15. Expressions of Endocan in Patients with Meningiomas and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Okan; Turkmen Inanir, Nursel

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endocan has been shown to be a marker for several cancers and may show degree of malignancy. The aim of this study is to assess tissue levels of endocan in common brain tumors, namely, meningiomas, low-grade gliomas (LGGs), and high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Patients and Methods. Endocan was assayed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in a total of 50 brain tumors (20 meningiomas, 19 LGGs, and 20 HGGs) and 15 controls. The results were compared to control brain tissues. Results. Each tumor group showed significant higher levels of endocan compared to controls (p < 0.05). In addition, endocan levels showed steady increase from the least (meningiomas) to the most (HGGs) malignant tumors and positive correlation was noted between the degree of malignancy and endocan level (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. Endocan, a vital molecule for angiogenesis, is expressed in common brain tumors and results suggest that endocan could be a marker for malignancy. PMID:27528791

  16. Craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas: historical overview.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valero, Saul F; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Loumiotis, Ioannis; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    The surgical treatment of meningiomas located at the base of the anterior cranial fossa is often challenging, and the evolution of the surgical strategy to resect these tumors parallels the development of craniotomy, and neurosurgery in general, over the past century. Early successful operations to treat these tumors were pioneered by prominent figures such as Sir William Macewen and Francesco Durante. Following these early reports, Harvey Cushing made significant contributions, allowing a better understanding and treatment of meningiomas in general, but particularly those involving the anterior cranial base. Initially, large-sized unilateral or bilateral craniotomies were necessary to approach these deep-seated lesions. Technical advances such as the introduction of electrosurgery, the operating microscope, and refined microsurgical instruments allowed neurosurgeons to perform less invasive surgical procedures with better results. Today, a wide variety of surgical strategies, including endoscopic surgery and radiosurgery, are used to treat these tumors. In this review, the authors trace the evolution of craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas. PMID:24684326

  17. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  19. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  20. Subtle clinical signs of a meningioma in an adult: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common brain tumor in the adult population. This case report describes the epidemiology, the clinical presentation as well as the current treatment options for this condition. Case presentation A 49 year-old man attended a chiropractic clinic with non-specific chronic low back pain. Upon the history taking and the systems review, he reported a loss of both smell and taste for which investigations conducted by two different otolaryngologists did not yield a specific diagnosis. The patient was referred to a neurologist who ordered a computer tomography scan that eventually revealed a compression brain tumor. Brain tumors can produce a large variety of clinical presentations, such as upper motor neuron lesion symptoms, altered consciousness or vital functions which are easy to identify. However, subtle signs, such as those presented in this case, can be neglected. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of uncommon clinical presentations including cranial nerve or neurological dysfunction and refer their patient to a specialist when detected. PMID:24490991

  1. Behavioral and electrophysiological recovery following cryogenic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, M W; Myers, R R

    1987-06-01

    Postthoracotomy pain can be reduced by cryoanalgesia of intercostal nerves. The technique involves focal freezing of peripheral nerves to interrupt pain pathways, producing immediate functional changes that recover as the nerves regenerate. To assess the time-course of functional changes that follow nerve injury, unilateral freeze lesions of sciatic nerve were induced in rats with a cryosurgical unit. The contralateral nerves were used as sham-operated controls. Following nerve injury, behavioral and electrophysiologic tests were repeated to 90 days. The acute effect of nerve injury was a decrease in behavioral measures of hind limb function (P less than 0.05), an increase in electrical threshold to elicit hind limb contraction (P less than 0.005), and an absence of stimulus-evoked compound action potential (P less than 0.005). Morphologic changes included substantial endoneurial edema associated with Wallerian degeneration. Remyelination occurred subsequently during the following 35 days. Although all physiologic measures returned toward normal, nerve conduction velocities were still much slower in the experimental group. In a second study, the long-term effects of cryogenic injury were compared with neurolytic injury with 10% procaine HCl, both of which produced a conduction velocity deficit that persisted at least 90 days after the initial injury. These behavioral and electrophysiologic results complement previous reports of morphologic deficits in the nerves including incomplete recovery of nerve fiber diameter and increased thickness of the perineurial sheath. PMID:3582553

  2. A rare case of atypical skull base meningioma with perineural spread

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Henry; Morley, Simon; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atypical meningioma is a rare cause of perineural tumour spread. In this report, we present the case of a 46-year-old female with an atypical meningioma of the skull base demonstrating perineural tumour spread. We describe the imaging features of this condition and its distinguishing features from other tumours exhibiting perineural spread. PMID:27200171

  3. Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Meningiomas with Reference to Proliferative Markers p53 and Ki-67

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Meningiomas are slow growing primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours attached to the duramater, which arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid. Grading of meningioma based on histological findings assisted with supplementary immunohistochemical studies, predicts the prognosis of meningioma with good precision. Aim To evaluate proliferative markers and correlate with various histological subtypes and grade. Materials and Methods A total of 224 meningiomas, diagnosed between January1995 and October 2011were graded according to WHO 2007 criteria. Immunostaining for p53 and Ki-67 markers were performed on 100 cases. Results There was female predominance. There were 194 Grade I, 24 Grade II and 6 Grade III meningiomas. Brain invasion noted in 18(8%) meningiomas predominantly in grade III followed by grade II. Recurrence was seen in 7 (3.1%) cases, most common in psammomatous followed by angiomatous meningioma. Immunostaining showed p53 positivity in 72.5% of grade I, 83.3% of grade II and all the cases of grade III tumours. Ki-67 Labelling Index (LI) consistently increased from grade I to grade III tumours. Conclusion p53 and Ki-67 LI correlated well with increasing histological grade and biological behaviour of meningioma. PMID:26894073

  4. Laboratory simulations of photoelectron sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Wang, X.; Robertson, S. H.; Poppe, A.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Surfaces of airless natural bodies, such as the Moon and asteroids, and spacecraft in space are exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation that creates a photoelectron sheath that dominates the near-surface plasma environment. In order to reproduce and investigate this photoelectron layer, we conduct experiments in vacuum with Xe excimer lamps that emit UV light at ~172 nm (7.21 eV) which is of sufficient intensity to create a photoelectron layer with a characteristic length on the order of several centimeters. We utilize surfaces, such as Zr and CeO2 that have a low work function and a high photoelectron emission yield to maximize the electron density. In order to repel stray electrons that are produced by other surfaces in the chamber, and to define a reference potential, a negatively biased grid is placed 7.5 cm above the surface. The surface and the grid are used as a retarding potential analyzer to determine the energy distribution of the electrons emitted from the surface. When the grid is biased to -20 V, the emitted electrons have an approximately Maxwellian energy distribution with a characteristic temperature of 1.4 ± 0.3 eV. A Langmuir probe is also used as a diagnostic tool to find the effective electron temperature and electron density within the pure electron plasma, and is moved in order to probe different heights above the surface. The derived densities and potentials are compared with those predicted by 1-D PIC code simulations.

  5. Dynamics of dust in the sheath of weakly electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhengxiong; Wang Xiaogang; Liu Jinyuan; Liu Yue

    2005-01-15

    The dynamics of dust in the sheath of weakly electronegative plasmas are investigated with the single dust model as well as the self-consistently variable dust charge. It is shown that when the dust particles enter the sheath region from the sheath edge with different initial velocities they may display different motion states: levitation in the sheath, returning from the sheath edge, and traversing the sheath region, under action of electrostatic, gravitational, ion-drag, and neutral collision forces. Furthermore, the electronegativity also plays an important role in the dust particle motion states in the sheath besides affecting the distributions of the spatial potential and the charging of the dust particles.

  6. Instrumented Sheath Insulator Experiment (IFAC-SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Celia; Miskolczy, Gabor; Lieb, David P.; Witt, Tony

    The Instrumented Fast-Reactor Accelerated Component-Sheath Insulator test (IFAC-SI) is a key experiment of the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program designed to allow continuous monitoring of sheath insulator specimens with an applied voltage during the in-reactor test. This paper describes the IFAC-SI experiment test setting, including shear insulator samples, heat pipes, fins, and enclosing container, and discusses the thermal models and their effects on the experimental design.

  7. Effect of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent anaplastic meningioma: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Kawaji, Hiroshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Shinmura, Kazuya; Kawabata, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman died of systemic metastasis from anaplastic meningioma and underwent autopsy. The patient underwent twice total removal of the right sphenoid ridge meningioma 2 years ago. The tumor recurred 3 times, and then stereotactic radiotherapy was employed. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was performed for the fourth local recurrence and an additional new lesion. Proliferative activity of the newly developed meningioma, which had been treated with BNCT only, was significantly lower than that of untreated metastatic liver tumor, as well as that of the meningioma specimen obtained at the second surgery. Our pathological findings demonstrated, for the first time, the therapeutic effect of BNCT on anaplastic meningioma at an early stage (2.5 months).

  8. Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma with invasion of bone: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Dhruba J.; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, R. S.; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacyte-rich (LPR) meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma, which is characterized by conspicuous infiltration of plasma cells and lymphocytes and a variable proportion of meningothelial elements, and is classified as a grade I tumor in World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of central nervous system. The origin and biological behavior of this rare variant of meningioma is still not clear. Till date, very few cases of LPR meningioma have been reported globally. Here, we are presenting a case of right parietal convexity LPR meningioma with invasion of bone in a 32-year-old male patient, who presented to us with complaints of focal seizures and weakness in left upper limb. PMID:27695559

  9. Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma with invasion of bone: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Dhruba J.; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, R. S.; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacyte-rich (LPR) meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma, which is characterized by conspicuous infiltration of plasma cells and lymphocytes and a variable proportion of meningothelial elements, and is classified as a grade I tumor in World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of central nervous system. The origin and biological behavior of this rare variant of meningioma is still not clear. Till date, very few cases of LPR meningioma have been reported globally. Here, we are presenting a case of right parietal convexity LPR meningioma with invasion of bone in a 32-year-old male patient, who presented to us with complaints of focal seizures and weakness in left upper limb.

  10. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair. PMID:25206505

  11. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  12. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  13. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  14. Dust particle dynamics in magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, the structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated, and dynamics of a dust particle embedded in the sheath is elaborated. To simulate the sheath, a weakly collisional two-fluid model is implemented. For various magnitudes and directions of the magnetic field and chamber pressures, different plasma parameters including the electron and ion densities, ion flow velocity, and electric potential are calculated. A complete set of forces acting on the dust particle originating from the electric field in the sheath, the static magnetic field, gravity, and ion and neutral drags is taken into account. Through the trapping potential energy, the particle stable and unstable equilibria are studied while the particle is stationary inside the sheath. Other features such as the possibility of the dust levitation and trapping in the sheath, and the effect of the Lorentz force on the charged dust particle motion are also examined. An interesting feature is captured for the variation of the particle charge as a function of the magnetic field magnitude.

  15. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the velocity distribution function (VDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that electron sheaths are not so simple. Motivated by VDFs observed in recent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions, an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient allows the generation of large flows compared to those that would be generated by the electric field alone. It is due to this pressure gradient that the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma (nominally by a factor of √{mi /me }) than an analogous ion presheath. Results of the model are compared with PIC simulations. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  16. Primary intraosseous atypical inflammatory meningioma presenting as a lytic skull lesion: Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Sangita; Agarwal, Swapnil; Khurana, Nita; Pandey, P N

    2016-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas of the skull comprise 1% of all meningiomas, and lytic skull meningiomas are still rarer and are said to be more aggressive. We present a case of 38-year-old male with an extradural tumor which on histopathological examination showed features of inflammatory atypical meningioma (WHO Grade II). The intense inflammatory nature of osteolytic primary intraosseous meningioma has not been reported before. This entity deserves special mention because of the need for adjuvant therapy and proper follow-up. PMID:27510685

  17. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  18. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  19. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  20. A simple protocol for paraffin-embedded myelin sheath staining with osmium tetroxide for light microscope observation.

    PubMed

    Di Scipio, Federica; Raimondo, Stefania; Tos, Pierluigi; Geuna, Stefano

    2008-07-01

    Experimental investigation of peripheral nerve fiber regeneration is attracting more and more attention among both basic and clinical researchers. Assessment of myelinated nerve fiber morphology is a pillar of peripheral nerve regeneration research. The gold standard for light microscopic imaging of myelinated nerve fibers is toluidine blue staining of resin-embedded semithin sections. However, many researchers are unaware that the dark staining of myelin sheaths typically produced by this procedure is due to osmium tetroxide postfixation and not due to toluidine blue. In this article, we describe a simple pre-embedding protocol for staining myelin sheaths in paraffin-embedded nerve specimens using osmium tetroxide. The method involves immersing the specimen in 2% osmium tetroxide for 2 h after paraformaldehyde fixation, followed by routine dehydration and paraffin embedding. Sections can then be observed directly under the microscope or counterstained using routine histological methods. Particularly good results were obtained with Masson's trichrome counterstain, which permits the imaging of connective structures in nerves that are not detectable in toluidine blue-stained resin sections. Finally, we describe a simple protocol for osmium etching of sections, which makes further immunohistochemical analysis possible on the same specimens. Taken together, our results suggest that the protocol described in this article is a valid alternative to the conventional resin embedding-based protocol: it is much cheaper, can be adopted by any histological laboratory, and allows immunohistochemical analysis to be conducted.

  1. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  2. Malignant granular cell tumor of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve: report of a case with cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Luca; Magrini, Elisabetta; Consales, Alessandro; Poppi, Massimo; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Dorji, Tsering; Benedetti, Giovanni; Baccarini, Paola

    2002-12-01

    Malignant granular cell tumors (MGCTs) are rare neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis. We report a case of MGCT involving a peripheral nerve with peritoneal and omental dissemination in which cytogenetic findings are available. Our results show that MGCTs share some cytogenetic abnormalities with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), supporting the hypothesis that they may represent histogenetically related lesions.

  3. [Morphometric analysis of the sciatic nerve and its principal branches in the pigeon (Columba livia)].

    PubMed

    Vita, G; Muglia, U; Ciriaco, E; Gugliotta, M A; Abbate, F; Laurà, R; Germanà, G P; Germanà, G

    1991-01-01

    The methodological approach used in this study is to characterize the number, the density and the diameter distribution of myelinated fibers (MFs) and unmyelinated fibers (UMFs) in sciatic nerve and its main branches of pigeon. The results have shown that the fiber composition is quite variable because in pigeon there are relatively MF with thin myelin sheaths and MF with thicker sheaths. Our data suggest that morphometric analysis could represent a helpful methodological approach to better characterize these systems.

  4. Posterolateral approach for spinal intradural meningioma with ventral attachment

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Yoshimura, Masaki; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal meningioma with ventral attachment is a challenging pathology. Several technical modifications have been proposed to secure safe and precise resection of these tumors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study focused on the precise and safe surgery of spinal meningiomas with strictly ventral attachment of cervical or thoracic spine. The surgical technique included a lateral oblique position for the patient, laminectomy with unilateral medial facetectomy on the tumor side, and spinal cord rotation with the dentate ligament. The neurological status of patients was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema (mMFS) and sensory pain scale (SPS) before and at least 3 months after surgery. Patients were followed-up for a mean of 23.7 months. Tumor removal was graded using the Simpson grade for removal of meningiomas, and the extent of excision was confirmed using early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Simpson grade 1 or 2 resections were achieved in all cases. No major surgery-related complications were encountered, postoperatively. The mean mMFS score before surgery was 3.1, improving significantly to 1.7 after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean SPS score before surgery was 2.4, improving significantly to 1.6 after surgery (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This surgical technique offers a posterolateral surgical corridor to the ventral canal of both cervical and thoracic spine. The present preliminary analysis suggests that functional outcomes were satisfactory with minimal surgery-related complications, although considerable surgical experience is needed to achieve a high level of surgical confidence. PMID:26692694

  5. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone mimicking meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shu, Hansheng; Tian, Xuping; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Qiujian; Guo, Liemei

    2015-03-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumor that usually arises from lower-extremity long-bone metaphyses, with approximately 5.4% of all CMFs presenting in the craniofacial bones. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone is exceedingly rare, with only a few cases reported. Herein, we report another case of CMF arising from the frontal bone mimicking meningioma. We suggest that histopathologic examination is of vital importance for the diagnosis of CMF; complete surgical resection is the best treatment option for frontal CMF.

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Meningioma and Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral vestibular schwannomata and meningiomata are the tumours most commonly associated with neurofibromatosis type II (NF2). These tumours may also be seen in patients with schwannomatosis and familial meningioma, but these phenotypes are usually easy to distinguish. The main diagnostic challenge when managing these tumours is distinguishing between sporadic disease which carries low risk of subsequent tumours or NF2 with its associated morbidities and reduced life expectancy. This chapter outlines some of the diagnostic and management considerations along with associated evidence. PMID:27075346

  7. Management of pregnant female with meningioma for craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Lata, Indu; Gupta, Devendra

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial meningioma during pregnancy challenges the skill of obstetricians, neurosurgeons and neuroanesthesiologists in resection of the tumor and to secure delivery of the baby. Advances in fetal and maternal monitoring, neuroanesthesia, and microsurgical techniques allow safe neurosurgical management of these patients. Urgent neurosurgical intervention is reserved for the management of malignancies, active hydrocephalus, and benign brain tumors associated with signs of impending herniation or progressive neurological deficit. Particular attention is given to maintain stable maternal hemodynamics to avoid uterine hypo perfusion and fetal hypoxia intraoperatively. Therefore, the major challenge of neuroanesthesia during pregnancy is to provide an appropriate balance between competing, and even contradictory, clinical goals of neuroanesthesiology and obstetric practice. PMID:21799618

  8. AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF HUGE MENINGIOMA EXTRUDING OUT OF SKULL.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Mirza Faisal Ahmed; Khaleeq-uz-Zaman; Ibrahima, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Scalp masses are commonly seen in clinical practice. They range from simple sebaceous cyst to malignant neoplasms. Clinical presentation is straight forward in most of the cases. Simple subcutaneous swelling till erosion of scalp and skull all can occur. However very few intracranial masses present with exophytic scalp swelling. This is because they have to erode dura, thick skull bone and all the layers of scalp to appear out on scalp. It is very unusual that an intracranial mass present like a scalp swelling. Some of the intracranial masses have tendency to erode skull. Dermoid & meningioma are among the most common. PMID:27323599

  9. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone mimicking meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shu, Hansheng; Tian, Xuping; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Qiujian; Guo, Liemei

    2015-03-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumor that usually arises from lower-extremity long-bone metaphyses, with approximately 5.4% of all CMFs presenting in the craniofacial bones. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone is exceedingly rare, with only a few cases reported. Herein, we report another case of CMF arising from the frontal bone mimicking meningioma. We suggest that histopathologic examination is of vital importance for the diagnosis of CMF; complete surgical resection is the best treatment option for frontal CMF. PMID:25748938

  10. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  11. Gain of chromosome arm 1q in atypical meningioma correlates with shorter progression-free survival

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M.; Mohapatra, G.; Betensky, R.A.; Keohane, C.; Louis, D.N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas have moderately high recurrence rates; even for completely resected tumours, approximately one-third will recur. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) may aid local control and improve survival, but carries the risk of side effects. More accurate prediction of recurrence risk is therefore needed for patients with atypical meningioma. Previously, we used high-resolution array CGH to identify genetic variations in 47 primary atypical meningiomas and found that approximately 60% of tumors show gain of 1q at 1q25.1 and 1q25.3 to 1q32.1 and that 1q gain appeared to correlate with shorter progression-free survival. This study aimed to validate and extend these findings in an independent sample. Methods 86 completely resected atypical meningiomas (with 25 recurrences) from two neurosurgical centres in Ireland were identified and clinical follow up was obtained. Utilizing a dual-colour interphase FISH assay, 1q gain was assessed using BAC probes directed against 1q25.1 and 1q32.1. Results The results confirm the high prevalence of 1q gain at these loci in atypical meningiomas. We further show that gain at 1q32.1 and age each correlate with progression-free survival in patients who have undergone complete surgical resection of atypical meningiomas. Conclusions These independent findings suggest that assessment of 1q copy number status can add clinically useful information for the management of patients with atypical meningiomas. PMID:21988727

  12. Genomic sequencing of meningiomas identifies oncogenic SMO and AKT1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Santagata, Sandro; Jones, Robert T.; McKenna, Aaron; Getz, Gad; Ligon, Keith L.; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Van Hummelen, Paul; Ducar, Matthew D.; Raza, Alina; Sunkavalli, Ashwini; MacConaill, Laura E.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Louis, David N.; Hahn, William C.; Dunn, Ian F.; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2013-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary nervous system tumor. The tumor suppressor NF2 is disrupted in approximately half of meningiomas1 but the complete spectrum of genetic changes remains undefined. We performed whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing on 17 meningiomas and focused sequencing on an additional 48 tumors to identify and validate somatic genetic alterations. Most meningiomas exhibited simple genomes, with fewer mutations, rearrangements, and copy-number alterations than reported in other adult tumors. However, several meningiomas harbored more complex patterns of copy-number changes and rearrangements including one tumor with chromothripsis. We confirmed focal NF2 inactivation in 43% of tumors and found alterations in epigenetic modifiers among an additional 8% of tumors. A subset of meningiomas lacking NF2 alterations harbored recurrent oncogenic mutations in AKT1 (E17K) and SMO (W535L) and exhibited immunohistochemical evidence of activation of their pathways. These mutations were present in therapeutically challenging tumors of the skull base and higher grade. These results begin to define the spectrum of genetic alterations in meningiomas and identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23334667

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  14. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  15. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Jean, Walter C; Felbaum, Daniel R; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  16. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  17. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Ndubuisi, Chika C; Chikani, Mark C; Achebe, David S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Results: Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. Conclusion: The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare. PMID:23188985

  18. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  19. Spinal osteoblastic meningioma with hematopoiesis: radiologic-pathologic correlation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Elizabeth J; Schlauderaff, Abraham; Rand, Scott D; Eckardt, Gerald W; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas associated with bone formation and hematopoiesis are rare tumors with only 3 prior case reports in the literature. We describe a case report of a woman who presented with back pain and an isolated event of urinary incontinence. A calcified spinal canal mass at T8 was identified on computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging. A gross total resection of the tumor was performed and pathologic examination showed a meningioma, World Health Organization grade 1, containing bone and bone marrow elements. A review of previously reported cases and a discussion of possible mechanisms of bone and hematopoiesis development in meningioma are presented. PMID:27649951

  20. Systemic cancer metastasis in a meningioma: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Michele; Benech, Franco; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Cassoni, Paola; Ducati, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    "Tumour-to-tumour" phenomenon is a rare event; meningioma has been reported as the most common primary intracranial tumour to harbour metastases, the majority of which arise from breast and lung carcinomas. Several hypotheses have been previously proposed to explain this occurrence, but the exact mechanisms responsible for the development of metastases in meningiomas are not known. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy could be useful to hypothesize this uncommon event, but its preoperative diagnosis remains highly difficult. Two patients are reported, with breast and renal carcinoma metastases in an intracranial meningioma. Pathogenetic mechanisms and neuroimaging features are discussed. A brief review of the literature is presented.

  1. A case of a temporal bone meningioma presenting as a serous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    De Foer, Bert; Bernaerts, Anja; Van Dinther, Joost; Parizel, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    We report the imaging features of a case of a temporal bone meningioma extending into the middle ear cavity and clinically presenting as a serous otitis media. Temporal bone meningioma extending in the mastoid or the middle ear cavity, however, is very rare. In case of unexplained or therapy-resistant serous otitis media and a nasopharyngeal tumor being ruled out, a temporal bone computed tomography (CT) should be performed. If CT findings are suggestive of a temporal bone meningioma, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination with gadolinium will confirm diagnosis and show the exact extension of the lesion. PMID:25535569

  2. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  3. Cerebral venous malformation with meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MU, QINGCHUN; ZHANG, KUN; WANG, JUSTIN; SAYARI, ARASH; HUANG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China) on 1st October 2011 with a 10-day history of discontinuous, whole-brain headache and a 1-year history of impaired vision and memory deterioration, accompanied by right facial numbness. Clinical signs and radiological features observed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led to the diagnosis of an intracranial meningioma accompanied by a cerebral venous malformation (CVM). The patient underwent neurosurgical resection of the meningioma, but required no further treatment for the CVM. At a 1-year follow-up examination, the patient continued to complain of discontinuous headache. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to reconfirm the CVM diagnosis; however, no treatment was administered due to the high risks of treatment and only mild symptoms experienced by the patient. The present case demonstrates the efficacy of DSA for detecting the presence and specific nature of CVM, and compares the value of MRI and DSA in the diagnosis of CVM. The majority of CVM patients exhibit no clinical symptoms, and the disease prognosis is typically favorable. PMID:26998016

  4. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  5. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  6. Microanatomy and Histological Features of Central Myelin in the Root Exit Zone of Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Chan-Jong; Han, Seong-Rok; Choi, Chan-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the microanatomy and histological features of the central myelin in the root exit zone of facial nerve. Methods Forty facial nerves with brain stem were obtained from 20 formalin fixed cadavers. Among them 17 facial nerves were ruined during preparation and 23 root entry zone (REZ) of facial nerves could be examined. The length of medial REZ, from detach point of facial nerve at the brain stem to transitional area, and the thickness of glial membrane of central myelin was measured. We cut brain stem along the facial nerve and made a tissue block of facial nerve REZ. Each tissue block was embedded with paraffin and serially sectioned. Slices were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), periodic acid-Schiff, and glial fibrillary acid protein. Microscopy was used to measure the extent of central myelin and thickness of outer glial membrane of central myelin. Thickness of glial membrane was examined at two different points, the thickest area of proximal and distal REZ. Results Special stain with PAS and GFAP could be differentiated the central and peripheral myelin of facial nerve. The length of medial REZ was mean 2.6 mm (1.6-3.5 mm). The glial limiting membrane of brain stem is continued to the end of central myelin. We called it glial sheath of REZ. The thickness of glial sheath was mean 66.5 µm (40-110 µm) at proximal REZ and 7.4 µm (5-10 µm) at distal REZ. Conclusion Medial REZ of facial nerve is mean 2.6 mm in length and covered by glial sheath continued from glial limiting membrane of brain stem. Glial sheath of central myelin tends to become thin toward transitional zone. PMID:25132929

  7. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  8. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  9. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  11. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    PubMed

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  12. Microsurgical resectability, outcomes, and tumor control in meningiomas occupying the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Thakur, Jai Deep; Sonig, Ashish; Missios, Symeon

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSMs) represent a cohort of challenging skull base tumors. Proper management requires achieving a balance between optimal resection, restoration of cranial nerve (CN) function, and maintaining or improving quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess the pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors related to clinical and neurological outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and tumor control in patients with CSM. METHODS A retrospective review of a single surgeon's experience with microsurgical removal of CSM in 65 patients between January 1996 and August 2013 was done. Sekhar's classification, modified Kobayashi grading, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale were used to define tumor extension, tumor removal, and clinical outcomes, respectively. RESULTS Preoperative CN dysfunction was evident in 64.6% of patients. CN II deficits were most common. The greatest improvement was seen for CN V deficits, whereas CN II and CN IV deficits showed the smallest degree of recovery. Complete resection was achieved in 41.5% of cases and was not significantly associated with functional CN recovery. Internal carotid artery encasement significantly limited the complete microscopic resection of CSM (p < 0.0001). Overall, 18.5% of patients showed symptomatic recurrence after their initial surgery (mean follow-up 60.8 months [range 3-199 months]). The use of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after microsurgery independently decreased the recurrence rate (p = 0.009; OR 0.036; 95% CI 0.003-0.430). CONCLUSIONS Modified Kobayashi tumor resection (Grades I-IIIB) was possible in 41.5% of patients. CN recovery and tumor control were independent of extent of tumor removal. The combination of resection and adjuvant SRS can achieve excellent tumor control. Furthermore, the use of adjuvant SRS independently decreases the recurrence rates of CSM.

  13. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  14. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  15. Swimming exercise in the acute or late phase after sciatic nerve crush accelerates nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; de Lima Montebelo, Maria Imaculada

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury.

  16. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  17. Meningioma: The role of a foreign body and irradiation in tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, J.; Silberstein, H.J.; Salner, A.L.; Uphoff, D.F. )

    1991-07-01

    A case of meningioma is reported. At the age of 18 years, the patient had undergone insertion of a Torkildsen shunt through a posteroparietal burr hole for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to a tumor of the pineal region, of which no biopsy had been made. After the hydrocephalus was relieved, he underwent irradiation of the tumor. Thirty years later, he was treated for an intracranial meningioma wrapped around the shunt. The tumor followed the shunt in all of its intracranial course. Microscopy disclosed pieces of the shunt tube within the meningioma. The role of a foreign body and irradiation in the induction of meningiomas is discussed, and a comprehensive review of the literature is presented. 47 references.

  18. Regression of Intracranial Meningioma during Treatment with α1-Adrenoceptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Hoegestoel, Einar August; Berg-Johnsen, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Regression of meningioma has been reported after hemorrhage or hormonal withdrawal. Here, we report a case of an incidentally diagnosed meningioma that regressed in association with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Case report A 59-year old male patient with an incidentally diagnosed lateral sphenoid wing meningioma was followed with serial magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor with a maximum diameter of 43 mm showed progressive regression, and after 3 years the size was reduced to 22% of the initial volume. During follow-up the patient was treated with an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin) for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Possible mechanisms are discussed, including our main hypothesis of reduced mitogenic effects through phospholipase C-signal transduction. Conclusion This is the first report of regression of an incidentally diagnosed meningioma associated with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment. PMID:27175325

  19. Unilateral proptosis and blindness caused by meningioma in a patient treated with cyproterone acetate

    PubMed Central

    Sys, Celine; Kestelyn, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Cyproterone has antiandrogenic, antigonadotropic, and progestagenic activity. High-dose preparations are used for treatment of prostate cancer and for treatment of hypersexuality. We describe a patient who was referred to our clinic with slowly progressive unilateral proptosis and blindness of the left eye. He had been treated with high-dose cyproterone actate (CPA) for 23 years. An obvious proptosis and exodeviation of his left eye was noted on ophthalmic examination. Fundoscopy showed left optic atrophy. The literature suggests a link between long-term high-dose exogenous progesterone agonist exposure and the progression and/or development of meningioma. MRI of the brain was performed and revealed multiple meningiomas. One large meningioma located in the anterior temporal lobe extended into the left orbit and caused the proptosis and blindness. Treatment with CPA was stopped and follow-up imaging 11 months later showed a significant decrease in size of the largest meningiomas.

  20. Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of a coexistent pituitary macroadenoma and a tuberculum sellae meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mahvash, Mehran; Igressa, Ahadi; Pechlivanis, Ioannis; Weber, Friedrich; Charalampaki, Patra

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of a pituitary macroadenoma and a tuberculum sellae meningioma is very rare. This article demonstrates the surgical technique of the simultaneous resection of a pituitary macroadenoma and a tuberculum sellae meningioma using an endoscopic, endonasal, biportal, transsphenoidal approach. A 36-year-old woman presented with frontal headache and extended visual field loss of the right eye. She underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealing a 2 × 2 × 2.5 mm contrast-enhancing intrasellar and suprasellar lesion with compression of the optic chiasma. The coexistence of a pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma was suggested. A biportal endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach was performed to remove both lesions. The histological results confirmed the coexistence of the pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma, World Health Organization (WHO) grade I. The endoscopic, endonasal, transsphenoidal approach is a safe and reliable minimal invasive surgical alternative for resection of the intra-, supra- and parasellar lesions, avoiding additional craniotomy. PMID:25685225

  1. Genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways targeted

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Ruiz, Laura; Miranda, David; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are usually considered to be benign central nervous system tumors; however, they show heterogenous clinical, histolopathological and cytogenetic features associated with a variable outcome. In recent years important advances have been achieved in the identification of the genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways involved. Thus, monosomy 22, which is often associated with mutations of the NF2 gene, has emerged as the most frequent alteration of meningiomas; in addition, several other genes (e.g. AKT1, KLF4, TRAF7, SMO) and chromosomes have been found to be recurrently altered often in association with more complex karyotypes and involvement of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the current knowledge about the most relevant genes involved and the signaling pathways targeted by such alterations. In addition, we summarize those proposals that have been made so far for classification and prognostic stratification of meningiomas based on their genetic/genomic features. PMID:25965831

  2. Meningiomas and Proteomics: Focus on New Potential Biomarkers and Molecular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Polito, Francesca; Cucinotta, Maria; Lo Giudice, Claudio; Caffo, Maria; Tomasello, Chiara; Germanò, Antonino; Aguennouz, Mohammed

    Meningiomas are one of the most common tumors affecting the central nervous system, exhibiting a great heterogeneity in grading, treatment and molecular background. This article provides an overview of the current literature regarding the molecular aspect of meningiomas. Analysis of potential biomarkers in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pathological tissues was reported. Applying bioinformatic methods and matching the common proteic profile, arising from different biological samples, we highlighted the role of nine proteins, particularly related to tumorigenesis and grading of meningiomas: serpin peptidase inhibitor alpha 1, ceruloplasmin, hemopexin, albumin, C3, apolipoprotein, haptoglobin, amyloid-P-component serum and alpha-1-beta-glycoprotein. These proteins and their associated pathways, including complement and coagulation cascades, plasma lipoprotein particle remodeling and lipid metabolism could be considered possible diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers, and eventually therapeutic targets. Further investigations are needed to better characterize the role of these proteins and pathways in meningiomas. The role of new therapeutic strategies are also discussed. PMID:27566655

  3. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  4. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-01

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  5. Differential Diagnosis of Meningeal SFT-HPC and Meningioma: Which Immunohistochemical Markers Should Be Used?

    PubMed

    Macagno, Nicolas; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokthari, Karima; Metellus, Philippe; Jouvet, Anne; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Loundou, Anderson; Bouvier, Corinne

    2016-02-01

    Meningeal solitary fibrous tumors-hemangiopericytomas (SFT-HPC) and meningiomas can be difficult to distinguish on histologic examination. STAT6 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a reliable diagnostic marker of SFT-HPCs. Recently, GRIA2 has also been reported to be a diagnostic marker of SFT-HPC, although no extensive data are available for meningeal SFT-HPCs yet. The aim of this study was to test their diagnostic performance in a large cohort of SFT-HPCs and meningiomas. IHC analyses for GRIA2 and STAT6 were performed on tissue microarrays containing 76 SFT-HPCs and 181 meningiomas. Results were compared with previous data with ALDH1 and CD34. Two different anti-STAT6 antibodies were tested: SC-20 polyclonal and YE361 monoclonal antibody. Ninety-six percent of meningeal SFT-HPCs but no meningioma displayed nuclear STAT6 positivity. With SC-20 antibody, concomitant cytoplasmic staining for STAT6 was observed in >50% of all cases, including meningiomas. However, using YE361 antibody, cytoplasmic staining was absent, and nuclear signal intensity was stronger leading to better interpretation of STAT6 IHC. GRIA2 was positive in 84% of SFT-HPCs and in 16% of meningiomas. STAT6 had excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%), ALDH1 and GRIA2 had same sensitivity (84%), but ALDH1 and CD34 had better specificity than GRIA2 (97% and 96% vs. 84%, respectively). For the differential diagnosis of SFT-HPCs versus meningiomas, the best diagnostic approach is to perform STAT6, followed by ALDH1 and CD34 in the case of uncommon STAT6-negative cases. Because of meningioma positivity, GRIA2 seems less useful in this indication. PMID:26448189

  6. Probable Drug-Related Meningioma Detected During the Course of Medication Review Services.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence to support a link between treatment with high-dose cyproterone acetate and the development of meningioma. This report describes a case where an elderly man with intellectual disability who was treated with cyproterone for problematic sexual behavior developed a meningioma. The case was the subject of a residential medication management review provided under the auspices of a program funded by the Commonwealth Government of Australia. A discussion of clinical and ethical implications of the case is provided. PMID:27636874

  7. Differential Diagnosis of Meningeal SFT-HPC and Meningioma: Which Immunohistochemical Markers Should Be Used?

    PubMed

    Macagno, Nicolas; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokthari, Karima; Metellus, Philippe; Jouvet, Anne; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Loundou, Anderson; Bouvier, Corinne

    2016-02-01

    Meningeal solitary fibrous tumors-hemangiopericytomas (SFT-HPC) and meningiomas can be difficult to distinguish on histologic examination. STAT6 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a reliable diagnostic marker of SFT-HPCs. Recently, GRIA2 has also been reported to be a diagnostic marker of SFT-HPC, although no extensive data are available for meningeal SFT-HPCs yet. The aim of this study was to test their diagnostic performance in a large cohort of SFT-HPCs and meningiomas. IHC analyses for GRIA2 and STAT6 were performed on tissue microarrays containing 76 SFT-HPCs and 181 meningiomas. Results were compared with previous data with ALDH1 and CD34. Two different anti-STAT6 antibodies were tested: SC-20 polyclonal and YE361 monoclonal antibody. Ninety-six percent of meningeal SFT-HPCs but no meningioma displayed nuclear STAT6 positivity. With SC-20 antibody, concomitant cytoplasmic staining for STAT6 was observed in >50% of all cases, including meningiomas. However, using YE361 antibody, cytoplasmic staining was absent, and nuclear signal intensity was stronger leading to better interpretation of STAT6 IHC. GRIA2 was positive in 84% of SFT-HPCs and in 16% of meningiomas. STAT6 had excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%), ALDH1 and GRIA2 had same sensitivity (84%), but ALDH1 and CD34 had better specificity than GRIA2 (97% and 96% vs. 84%, respectively). For the differential diagnosis of SFT-HPCs versus meningiomas, the best diagnostic approach is to perform STAT6, followed by ALDH1 and CD34 in the case of uncommon STAT6-negative cases. Because of meningioma positivity, GRIA2 seems less useful in this indication.

  8. MicroRNA-224 targets ERG2 and contributes to malignant progressions of meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maomao; Deng, Xiaodong; Ying, Qi; Jin, Tingyan; Li, Ming; Liang, Chong

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA-224 is overexpressed in various malignant tumors with poor prognosis, which plays a critical role in biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and several developmental and physiological progressions. However, the potential association between miR-224 and clinical outcome in patients with meningiomas remains unknown. Here, we investigate miR-224 expression and biological functions in meningiomas. MiR-224 expression was measured by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in meningioma and normal brain tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to exam its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognostic value. The biological effects of miR-224 on the cell proliferation and apoptosis in meningioma cells were examined by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We found the expression levels of miR-224 were significantly higher in meningioma tissues than that in normal brain, positively correlated with advanced pathological grade. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that meningioma patients with low miR-224 expression exhibited significantly prolonged overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ERG2 was an identical candidate target gene of MiR-224 in vitro. Our results indicated that downregulation of miR-224 suppressed cell growth and resulted in the enhancement of cell apoptosis through activation of the ERG2-BAK-induced apoptosis pathway. Our findings imply the miR-224 expression could predict the overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with meningioma and it might be a promising therapeutic target for treating malignant meningiomas.

  9. Triad of Intraspinal Meningioma, Schwannoma, and Ependymoma: Report of an Extremely Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Faiza; Fatima, Saira; Ahmad, Zubair

    2016-02-01

    Mixed tumors composed of schwannoma and meningioma are extremely rare and are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. So far, all the cases reported have involved the cerebellopontine angle. Only 3 reported cases did not have a clear association with neurofibromatosis type 2. We report a mixed tumor comprising schwannoma admixed with meningioma and ependymoma in the cervical spinal cord of a 22-year-old male. PMID:26316051

  10. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  15. Successful Reconstruction of Nerve Defects Using Distraction Neurogenesis with a New Experimental Device

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid Ali; Dionigi, Paolo; Marconi, Stefania; Calligaro, Alberto; Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Alfonsi, Enrico; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Repair of peripheral nerve injuries is an intensive area of challenge and research in modern reconstructive microsurgery. Intensive research is being carried out to develop effective alternatives to the standard nerve autografting, avoiding its drawbacks. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly designed mechanical device for the reconstruction of the sciatic nerve in rats in comparison to nerve autografting and to assess the pain during the period of distraction neurogenesis. Methods: Fourteen Sprague Dawley rats were used and randomly assigned into 2 groups with 7 rats in each group; group A (Nerve Autografting group) in which a 10-mm segment of the sciatic nerve was resected and rotated 180 degrees, then primary end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed in the reverse direction; group B (Nerve Lengthening group) in which the mechanical device was inserted after surgical resection of 10 mm of the sciatic nerve, then secondary end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed after completing the nerve lengthening. Thirteen weeks later, assessment of the functional sciatic nerve recovery using static sciatic index (SSI) was performed. Furthermore, fourteen weeks after the nerve resection, assessment of the nerve regeneration with electrophysiological study and histological analysis were performed. Also, gastrocnemius wet weight was measured. For pain assessment in group B, Rat Grimace Scale (RGS) score was used. Results: Significantly better functional recovery rate (using the SSI) was reported in the nerve lengthening group in comparison to autografting group. Also, a statistically significant higher nerve conduction velocity was detected in the nerve lengthening group. On histological analysis of the distal nerve section at 3 mm distal to the nerve repair site, significant myelin sheath thickness was detected in the nerve lengthening group. Discussion: Distraction neurogenesis with the new experimental device is a reliable therapeutic

  16. Assessment of nerve ultrastructure by fibre-optic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cushway, T R; Lanzetta, M; Cox, G; Trickett, R; Owen, E R

    1996-01-01

    Fibre-optic technology combined with confocality produces a microscope capable of optical thin sectioning. In this original study, tibial nerves have been stained in a rat model with a vital dye, 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide, and analysed by fibre-optic confocal microscopy to produce detailed images of nerve ultrastructure. Schwann cells, nodes of Ranvier and longitudinal myelinated sheaths enclosing axons were clearly visible. Single axons appeared as brightly staining longitudinal structures. This allowed easy tracing of multiple signal axons within the nerve tissue. An accurate measurement of internodal lengths was easily accomplished. This technique is comparable to current histological techniques, but does not require biopsy, thin sectioning or tissue fixing. This study offers a standard for further in vivo microscopy, including the possibility of monitoring the progression of nerve regeneration following microsurgical neurorraphy. PMID:9393664

  17. [A case of retroperitoneal schwannoma of the vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byoung Kwan; Yoo, Kyo Sang; Park, Chul Sung; Lee, Jung Wha; Yoo, Ji Youn; Moon, Joon Ho; Jung, Jae One; Kim, Jong Pyo; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Park, Cheol Hee; Hahn, Tae Ho; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Min, Soo Kee; Yang, Dae Hyun; Park, Choong Kee

    2005-10-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors that originate from any anatomical site. Most schwannomas occur in the head, neck or limbs, but rarely occur in the retroperitoneal space. Furthermore, the schwannoma originating from the vagus nerve of retroperitoneal space is much rare. We experienced a case of retroperitoneal schwannoma of the vagus nerve. A 34-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of abdominal mass on ultrasonography. Endoscopic examination revealed submucosal tumor-like lesion on high body of the stomach. Computed tomography (CT) revealed that the stomach was compressed by a solid tumor in the retroperitoneum. On exploratory laparotomy, this mass turned out to be a baseball sized mass in the retroperitoneal space. The mass was excised in an encapsulated state. Histological examination with immunohistochemical stains revealed a schwannoma of the vagus nerve.

  18. Application of oncogenetic trees mixtures as a biostatistical model of the clonal cytogenetic evolution of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ketter, Ralf; Urbschat, Steffi; Henn, Wolfram; Feiden, Wolfgang; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Lengauer, Thomas; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Zang, Klaus D; Rahnenführer, Jörg

    2007-10-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors that originate from the coverings of brain and spinal cord. Typically, they reveal a normal karyotype or monosomy for chromosome 22. Rare clinical progression of meningiomas is associated with a nonrandom pattern of secondary losses of other autosomes. Deletion of the short arm of one chromosome 1 appears to be a decisive step for anaplastic growth in meningiomas. We calculated an oncogenetic tree model that estimates the most likely cytogenetic pathways of 661 meningioma patients in terms of accumulation of somatic chromosome changes in tumor cells. The genetic progression score (GPS) estimates the genetic status of a tumor as progression in the corresponding tumor cells along this model. Large GPS values are highly correlated with early recurrence of meningiomas [p < 10(-4)]. This correlation holds even if patients are stratified by WHO grade. We show that tumor location also has an impact on genetic progression. Clinical relevance of the GPS is thus demonstrated with respect to origin, WHO grade and recurrence of the tumor. As a quantitative measure the GPS allows a more precise assessment of the prognosis of meningiomas than categorical cytogenetic markers based on single chromosomal aberrations.

  19. Group I Paks as therapeutic targets in NF2-deficient meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Sergio G.; Campbell, David A.; Ong, Christy C.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D. Bradley; Yang, Zeng-jie; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of multiple tumors in the central nervous system, most notably schwannomas and meningiomas. Mutational inactivation of NF2 is found in 40–60% of sporadic meningiomas, but the molecular mechanisms underlying malignant changes of meningioma cells remain unclear. Because group I p21-activated kinases (Paks) bind to and are inhibited by the NF2-encoded protein Merlin, we assessed the signaling and anti-tumor effects of three group-I specific Pak inhibitors - Frax597, 716 and 1036 - in NF2−/− meningiomas in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model. We found that these Pak inhibitors suppressed the proliferation and motility of both benign (Ben-Men1) and malignant (KT21-MG1) meningiomas cells. In addition, we found a strong reduction in phosphorylation of Mek and S6, and decreased cyclin D1 expression in both cell lines after treatment with Pak inhibitors. Using intracranial xenografts of luciferase-expressing KT21-MG1 cells, we found that treated mice showed significant tumor suppression for all three Pak inhibitors. Similar effects were observed in Ben-Men1 cells. Tumors dissected from treated animals exhibited an increase in apoptosis without notable change in proliferation. Collectively, these results suggest that Pak inhibitors might be useful agents in treating NF2-deficient meningiomas. PMID:25596744

  20. The heterogeneity of meningioma revealed by multiparameter analysis: infiltrative and non-infiltrative clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gay, Emmanuel; Lages, Elodie; Ramus, Claire; Guttin, Audrey; El Atifi, Michèle; Dupré, Isabelle; Bouamrani, Ali; Salon, Caroline; Ratel, David; Wion, Didier; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Tumor invasion or infiltration of adjacent tissues is the source of clinical challenges in diagnosis as well as prevention and treatment. Among brain tumors, infiltration of the adjacent tissues with diverse pleiotropic mechanisms is frequently encountered in benign meningiomas. We assessed whether a multiparametric analysis of meningiomas based on data from both clinical observations and molecular analyses could provide a consistent and accurate appraisal of invasive and infiltrative phenotypes and help determine the diagnosis of these tumors. Tissue analyses of 37 meningiomas combined enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) assays of two different protein biomarkers (thrombospondin 1 and a phosphorylated form of vimentin) as well as gene expression analyses with oligonucleotide micro-arrays. Up to four different clinical and molecular parameters were then examined for tumor classification. From this study, we were able to cluster 36 out of the 37 tumors into two different subsets corresponding to infiltrative/invasive and non-infiltrative tumors. In addition, meningiomas that invade brain and those that infiltrate the neighboring skull bone exhibited no distinguishable molecular features. Our multi-parameter analysis that combines clinical data, transcriptomic and molecular assays clearly reveals the heterogeneity of meningiomas and distinguishes the intrinsically infiltrative/invasive tumors from the non-infiltrative meningiomas. PMID:21318223

  1. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  2. Optic nerve diameters and perimetric thresholds in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Salgarello, T.; Tamburrelli, C.; Falsini, B.; Giudiceandrea, A.; Colotto, A.

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND--Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a central nervous disorder characterised by abnormally increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure leading to optic nerve compression. An indirect estimate of increased CSF pressure can be obtained by the ultrasonographic determination of optic nerve sheaths diameters. Computerised static perimetry is regarded as the method of choice for monitoring the course of the optic neuropathy in IIH. The aims were to compare the echographic optic nerve diameters (ONDs) and the perimetric thresholds of patients with IIH with those of age-matched controls, and to examine the correlation between these two variables in individual patients with papilloedema. METHODS--Standardised A-scan echography of the mid orbital optic nerve transverse diameters and automated threshold perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) were performed in 20 patients with IIH with variable degree of papilloedema (according to the Frisén scheme) and no concomitant ocular diseases. Echographic and perimetric results were compared with those obtained from 20 age-matched controls. RESULTS--When compared with controls, patients with IIH showed a significant increase in mean ONDs and significantly reduced mean perimetric sensitivities. In individual patients with papilloedema, the transverse ONDs correlated negatively with Humphrey mean deviation values and positively with pattern standard deviation values. CONCLUSION--These results indicate that OND changes in IIH are associated with perimetric threshold losses, and suggest that IIH functional deficits may be related to the degree of distension of optic nerve sheaths as a result of an increased CSF pressure. PMID:8759260

  3. Spectrum of superficial nerve-related tumor and tumor-like lesions: MRI features.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Lee, Pearlene P; Strome, Glenn M; Suh, Kyung Jin; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-04-01

    Superficial soft-tissue masses arising from skin appendages, metastasis, and inflammatory lesions have been widely reported. However, nerve-related superficial mass-like lesions other than peripheral nerve sheath tumors are less commonly described. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of such lesions. In this article, the authors discuss the entire spectrum of these lesions and also outline a systemic diagnostic approach.

  4. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  6. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  7. Primary Intracranial Myoepithelial Neoplasm: A Potential Mimic of Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Choy, Bonnie; Pytel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Myoepithelial neoplasms were originally described in the salivary glands but their spectrum has been expanding with reports in other locations, including soft tissue. Intracranial cases are exceptionally rare outside the sellar region where they are assumed to be arising from Rathke pouch rests. Two cases of pediatric intracranial myoepithelial neoplasm in the interhemispheric fissure and the right cerebral hemisphere are reported here. Imaging studies suggest that the second case was associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Both cases showed typical variation in morphology and immunophenotype between more epithelioid and more mesenchymal features. The differential diagnosis at this particular anatomic location includes meningioma, which can show some overlap in immunophenotype since both tumors express EMA as well as GLUT1. One case was positive for EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One patient is disease free at last follow-up while the other succumbed to the disease within days illustrating the clinical spectrum of these tumors.

  8. Intracranial meningiomas, the VEGF-A pathway, and peritumoral brain oedema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun

    2013-04-01

    Meningiomas are the second-most common intracranial tumours in adults. They are derived from the arachnoid cells, and although approximately 90% of meningiomas are benign, more than half of all meningiomas develop peritumoral brain oedema (PTBE), which increases morbidity. The PTBE can be treated with steroid therapy, but this treatment is not specific, is not always effective, and involves long-term side-effects. Meningiomas are treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic radio-surgery or surgical resection. At the moment surgical resection is the only definite treatment, and the removal of the tumour also removes the PTBE. Based on the localization of the meningioma, surgery can be complicated. Although PTBE around meningiomas is frequent, the mechanisms behind its development are not clearly understood. It is believed that due to tumour growth and local tissue hypoxia, angiogenesis is increased and leads to the formation of PTBE. The angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is believed to be involved in the formation of PTBE around meningiomas, as several studies have found that it is increased in meningiomas with PTBE. VEGF-A is also known as vascular permeability factor due to its ability to increase the permeability of capillaries. Paper I examines the VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels in 101 intracranial meningiomas. The PTBE is quantified on MRI, and capillary length and tumour water content are measured and compared to control brain tissue. Possible co-factors to PTBE like meningioma localization and subtypes are also examined. Forty-three of the patients have primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. The correlation between PTBE or edema index with the VEGF-A protein and mRNA, capillary length, and tumour water content is investigated in these patients. A novel method is used for mRNA quantification. It involves direct amplification of the mRNA with probes and branched DNA in order to produce a chemiluminescence signal

  9. AR42, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, as a potential therapy for vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Oblinger, Janet; Brendel, Victoria; Santarelli, Griffin; Huang, Jie; Akhmametyeva, Elena M.; Burns, Sarah S.; Wheeler, Justin; Davis, Jeremy; Yates, Charles W.; Chaudhury, Abhik R.; Kulp, Samuel; Chen, Ching-Shih; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D. Bradley; Jacob, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal-dominant disease that results in the formation of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs) and multiple meningiomas. Treatment options for NF2-associated tumors are limited, and to date, no medical therapies are FDA approved. The ideal chemotherapeutic agent would inhibit both VS and meningiomas simultaneously. The objectives of this study are (1) to test the efficacy of AR42, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, to inhibit VS and meningioma growth and (2) to investigate this drug's mechanisms of action. Primary cultures of human VS and meningioma cells were established. Nf2-deficient mouse schwannoma and benign human meningioma Ben-Men-1 cells were also cultured. Cells were treated with AR42, and the drug's effects on proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed using a methanethiosulfonate assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Human phospho-kinase arrays and Western blots were used to evaluate the effects of AR42 on intracellular signaling. The in vivo efficacy of AR42 was investigated using schwannoma xenografts. Tumor volumes were quantified using high-field, volumetric MRI, and molecular target analysis was performed using immunohistochemistry. AR42 inhibited the growth of primary human VS and Nf2-deficient mouse schwannoma cells with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 500 nM and 250–350 nM, respectively. AR42 also inhibited primary meningioma cells and the benign meningioma cell line, Ben-Men-1, with IC50 values of 1.5 µM and 1.0 µM, respectively. AR42 treatment induced cell-cycle arrest at G2 and apoptosis in both VS and meningioma cells. Also, AR42 exposure decreased phosphorylated Akt in schwannoma and meningioma cells. In vivo treatment with AR42 inhibited the growth of schwannoma xenografts, induced apoptosis, and decreased Akt activation. The potent growth inhibitory activity of AR42 in schwannoma and meningioma cells suggests that AR42 should be further evaluated as a potential

  10. Improvement of long-term blindness caused by compression from inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma after optic canal decompression: An extremely rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Horikoshi, Tomo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should definitely be considered as an option. PMID:27413579

  11. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  12. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  13. Experimental Investigations of the Lunar Photoelectron Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X.; Robertson, S. H.; Lapanse, C.; Horanyi, M.; Collette, A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation incident upon the dayside lunar surface produces a photoelectron gas that dominates the near-surface plasma environment, with a typical density of 60 cm-3 and a characteristic scale-length of ~1 m. It has traditionally been difficult to produce a photoelectron gas with sufficient density in a laboratory settings to study its properties. In our initial experiments, the characterization of the photoelectron density above a Zr surface (work function W=4.4 eV) illuminated by Xe excimer lamps (peak emission at a wavelength of 172 nm) indicated that a sheath with a Debye length on the order of 10 cm formed. We characterize the photoelectron population above the surface by utilizing an emissive probe to map the electric potential distribution above the surface, and a Langmuir probe to determine the number density and temperature of the photoelectrons. A grid is placed 7.5 cm above the Zr surface to repel photoelectrons emitted from the chamber walls. Emissive probe measurements show a potential dip of about 2 V extending ~1 cm above the zirconium surface. The size of this potential well is dependent on the number of lamps illuminating the surface, as the density of photoelectrons above the surface increases with greater illumination. The electrons in the sheath have a Maxwellian distribution with an electron temperature around 1 eV (maximum energies are expected to be approximately 2.8 eV). We will use this experimental apparatus to characterize the photoelectron sheath above other surfaces; powders, such as CeO2 have similar work functions, but different photoelectric yields. Lunar soil simulants are expected to have approximately an order of magnitude smaller yield than metallic surfaces, which will act to increase the characteristic length of the photoelectron sheath above the surface. The experiments and accompanying computer simulations are used to guide the development of new instrument concepts for future in situ plasma measurements on

  14. Inhibition of nerve conduction by electromagnetic induction of the frog sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparation.

    PubMed

    Wali, F A; Brain, A I

    1989-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic induction (EMI) on impulse conduction and muscle contraction was studied in isolated sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparation of the frog. Electrical stimulation (ES) of the sciatic nerve, at 0.5 Hz with 0.6 V (supramaximal) and 1-ms pulse duration, produced twitch contractions (3.5 +/- 0.4 g tension, mean +/- S.E., n = 8 frogs), which were reduced or blocked by EMI, applied to the nerve via an induction coil, from a d.c. source of 1.5-4 V, at a frequency of 100 min-1, for 2- to 4-min duration. Recovery of the blocked twitches was obtained within 4-5 min, after the cessation of the EMI and washing out the preparation in Ringer solution. The inhibition of the twitch tension by EMI was compared to that produced by an effective concentration of a local anaesthetic, lignocaine (1 microM), which is known to block conduction, by blocking ionic fluxes across the nerve membrane. It is possible that EMI also interferes with the ionic fluxes, and in prolonged duration, may produce changes in the myelin sheath (or the Schwann cells) of the nerve membrane. A comparison of ES with EMI was made, and it was concluded that EMI inhibited electrically induced neuromuscular transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

  15. Microarray Expression Data Identify DCC as a Candidate Gene for Early Meningioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Hussein, Deema; Al-Adwani, Fatima; Karim, Sajjad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Al-Sharif, Mona; Jamal, Awatif; Al-Ghamdi, Fahad; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Bangash, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Adeel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary brain tumors bearing in a minority of cases an aggressive phenotype. Although meningiomas are stratified according to their histology and clinical behavior, the underlying molecular genetics predicting aggressiveness are not thoroughly understood. We performed whole transcript expression profiling in 10 grade I and four grade II meningiomas, three of which invaded the brain. Microarray expression analysis identified deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) as a differentially expressed gene (DEG) enabling us to cluster meningiomas into DCC low expression (3 grade I and 3 grade II tumors), DCC medium expression (2 grade I and 1 grade II tumors), and DCC high expression (5 grade I tumors) groups. Comparison between the DCC low expression and DCC high expression groups resulted in 416 DEGs (p-value < 0.05; fold change > 2). The most significantly downregulated genes in the DCC low expression group comprised DCC, phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C), calmodulin-dependent 70kDa olfactomedin 2 (OLFM2), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 (GSTM5), phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1), sema domain, transmembrane domain (TM) and cytoplasmic domain, (semaphorin) 6D (SEMA6D), and indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT). The most significantly upregulated genes comprised chromosome 5 open reading frame 63 (C5orf63), homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), and basic helix-loop-helix family, member e40 (BHLHE40). Biofunctional analysis identified as predicted top upstream regulators beta-estradiol, TGFB1, Tgf beta complex, LY294002, and dexamethasone and as predicted top regulator effectors NFkB, PIK3R1, and CREBBP. The microarray expression data served also for a comparison between meningiomas from female and male patients and for a comparison between brain invasive and non-invasive meningiomas resulting in a number of significant DEGs and related biofunctions. In conclusion, based on its expression levels, DCC may constitute

  16. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  17. Two Types of Magnetohydrodynamic Sheath Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburaki, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical jets emanating from various galactic nuclei strongly suggest that a double-layered structure, or a spine-sheath structure, is likely to be their common feature. We propose that such a sheath jet structure can be formed magnetohydrodynamically within a valley of the magnetic pressures, which is formed between the peaks due to the poloidal and toroidal components, with the centrifugal force acting on the rotating sheath plasma being balanced by the hoop stress of the toroidal field. The poloidal field concentrated near the polar axis is maintained by a converging plasma flow toward the jet region, and the toroidal field is developed outside the jet cone owing to the poloidal current circulating through the jet. Under such situations, the set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations allows two main types of solutions, at least, in the region far from the footpoint. The first type solution describes the jets of marginally bound nature. This type is realized when the jet temperature decreases like a virial one, and neither the pressure-gradient nor the MHD forces, which are both determined consistently, cannot completely overcome the gravity, even at infinity. The second type is realized under an isothermal situation, and the gravity is cancelled exactly by the pressure-gradient force. Hence, the jets of this type are accelerated purely by the MHD force. It is also suggested that these two types correspond, respectively, to the jets from type I and II radio galaxies in the Fanaroff-Riley classification.

  18. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  19. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore » to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  20. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  1. Microsurgical management of primary jugular foramen meningiomas: a series of 22 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Zhang, Liwei; Zhang, Junting; Wu, Zhen; Xiao, Xinru; Zhou, Dabiao; Jia, Guijun; Jia, Wang

    2016-10-01

    This study summarized clinical manifestations, surgical management, histological grading, and long-term outcome of jugular foramen meningiomas (JFMs). Retrospective study was performed in 22 consecutive patients with primary JFMs from January 2004 to October 2010, enrolling 10 men and 12 women with average age of 39.4 (14-57 years). The most common initial symptom is hearing disorder, followed by lower cranial nerve dysfunctions. The tumor was classified into type I (intracranial) in 1, type II (intracranial) in 15, type IV (intracranial-extracranial) in 6, and none type III (extracranial). Surgical approaches mainly included retrosigmoid in 7, far lateral in 10, and juxtacondylar in 5, with some variations. The gross total resection was achieved in 15 cases and subtotal resection in 7. Fourteen patients (63.6 %) developed new or worse neurological deficits immediately after operation, of whom 11 (78.6 %) got alleviation. Postoperatively, keeping airway patency and prevention from aspiration pneumonia is very important. Nasotracheal intubation is much more tolerated than orotracheal intubation for postoperative patient management. WHO grade 2 was found in four cases (18.2 %) and grade 3 in one. During the average time of follow-up in 83.2 months, only one (grade 3) died of tumor regrowth 20 months after surgery and radiosurgery. Five of 17 patients of grade 1 developed tumor regrowth. Radiosurgery provides a good tumor control for tumor regrowth in grade 1, or postoperative grade 2 tumor. In conclusion, JFMs has a favorable long-term overall survival; however, neurological preservation is still challenging, especially low cranial nerves. PMID:27334626

  2. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  3. Cerebral cavernous malformations associated to meningioma: High penetrance in a novel family mutated in the PDCD10 gene.

    PubMed

    Garaci, Francesco; Marsili, Luisa; Riant, Florence; Marziali, Simone; Cécillon, Michaelle; Pasquarelli, Roberto; Sangiuolo, Federica; Floris, Roberto; Novelli, Giuseppe; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Brancati, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Multiple familial meningiomas occur in rare genetic syndromes, particularly neurofibromatosis type 2. The association of meningiomas and cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been reported in few patients in the medical literature. The purpose of our study is to corroborate a preferential association of CCMs and multiple meningiomas in subjects harbouring mutations in the PDCD10 gene (also known as CCM3). Three members of an Italian family affected by seizures underwent conventional brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast agent including gradient echo (GRE) imaging. The three CCM-causative genes were sequenced by Sanger method. Literature data reporting patients with coexistence of CCMs and meningiomas were reviewed. MRI demonstrated dural-based meningioma-like lesions associated to multiple parenchymal CCMs in all affected individuals. A disease-causative mutation in the PDCD10 gene (p.Gln112PhefsX13) was identified. Based on neuroradiological and molecular data as well as on literature review, we outline a consistent association between PDCD10 mutations and a syndrome of CCMs with multiple meningiomas. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple/familial meningioma syndromes. In case of multiple/familial meningioma the use of appropriate MRI technique may include GRE and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to rule out CCM. By contrast, proper post-gadolinium scans may aid defining dural lesions in CCM patients and are indicated in PDCD10-mutated individuals. PMID:26246098

  4. Cerebral cavernous malformations associated to meningioma: High penetrance in a novel family mutated in the PDCD10 gene

    PubMed Central

    Garaci, Francesco; Marsili, Luisa; Riant, Florence; Marziali, Simone; Cécillon, Michaelle; Pasquarelli, Roberto; Sangiuolo, Federica; Floris, Roberto; Novelli, Giuseppe; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Multiple familial meningiomas occur in rare genetic syndromes, particularly neurofibromatosis type 2. The association of meningiomas and cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been reported in few patients in the medical literature. The purpose of our study is to corroborate a preferential association of CCMs and multiple meningiomas in subjects harbouring mutations in the PDCD10 gene (also known as CCM3). Three members of an Italian family affected by seizures underwent conventional brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast agent including gradient echo (GRE) imaging. The three CCM-causative genes were sequenced by Sanger method. Literature data reporting patients with coexistence of CCMs and meningiomas were reviewed. MRI demonstrated dural-based meningioma-like lesions associated to multiple parenchymal CCMs in all affected individuals. A disease-causative mutation in the PDCD10 gene (p.Gln112PhefsX13) was identified. Based on neuroradiological and molecular data as well as on literature review, we outline a consistent association between PDCD10 mutations and a syndrome of CCMs with multiple meningiomas. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple/familial meningioma syndromes. In case of multiple/familial meningioma the use of appropriate MRI technique may include GRE and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to rule out CCM. By contrast, proper post-gadolinium scans may aid defining dural lesions in CCM patients and are indicated in PDCD10-mutated individuals. PMID:26246098

  5. MicroRNA-224 targets ERG2 and contributes to malignant progressions of meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Maomao; Deng, Xiaodong; Ying, Qi; Jin, Tingyan; Li, Ming; Liang, Chong

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA-224 is overexpressed in various malignant tumors with poor prognosis, which plays a critical role in biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and several developmental and physiological progressions. However, the potential association between miR-224 and clinical outcome in patients with meningiomas remains unknown. Here, we investigate miR-224 expression and biological functions in meningiomas. MiR-224 expression was measured by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in meningioma and normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to exam its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognostic value. The biological effects of miR-224 on the cell proliferation and apoptosis in meningioma cells were examined by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We found the expression levels of miR-224 were significantly higher in meningioma tissues than that in normal brain, positively correlated with advanced pathological grade. Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that meningioma patients with low miR-224 expression exhibited significantly prolonged overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ERG2 was an identical candidate target gene of MiR-224 in vitro. Our results indicated that downregulation of miR-224 suppressed cell growth and resulted in the enhancement of cell apoptosis through activation of the ERG2-BAK-induced apoptosis pathway. Our findings imply the miR-224 expression could predict the overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with meningioma and it might be a promising therapeutic target for treating malignant meningiomas. - Highlights: • MiR-224 expression is correlates with prognosis in meningioma patients. • ERG2 is a novel downstream target of miR-224. • MiR-224 suppressed cell growth and enhanced apoptosis in IOMM-Lee and CH157 cells. • MiR-224 is an upstream regulator of the ERG2

  6. Pseudoprogression in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas and meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Yokoyama, Kunio; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Matsui, Hideki; Ono, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Pseudoprogression has been recognized and widely accepted in the treatment of malignant gliomas, as transient increases in the volume of the enhanced area just after chemoradiotherapy, especially using temozolomide. We experienced a similar phenomenon in the treatment of malignant gliomas and meningiomas using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a cell-selective form of particle radiation. Here, we introduce representative cases and analyze the pathogenesis. Fifty-two cases of malignant glioma and 13 cases of malignant meningioma who were treated by BNCT were reviewed retrospectively mainly via MR images. Eleven of 52 malignant gliomas and 3 of 13 malignant meningiomas showed transient increases of enhanced volume in MR images within 3 months after BNCT. Among these cases, five patients with glioma underwent surgery because of suspicion of relapse. In histology, most of the specimens showed necrosis with small amounts of residual tumor cells. Ki-67 labeling showed decreased positivity compared with previous samples from the individuals. Fluoride-labeled boronophenylalanine PET was applied in four and two cases of malignant gliomas and meningiomas, respectively, at the time of transient increase of lesions. These PET scans showed decreased lesion:normal brain ratios in all cases compared with scans obtained prior to BNCT. With or without surgery, all lesions were decreased or stable in size during observation. Transient increases in enhanced volume in malignant gliomas and meningiomas immediately after BNCT seemed to be pseudoprogression. This pathogenesis was considered as treatment-related intratumoral necrosis in the subacute phase after BNCT. PMID:19289492

  7. Expression of NF2 gene product merlin in arachnoid villi and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, K; Kohda, Y; Matsumoto, T; Park, C; Seto, A; Tohma, Y; Hasegawa, M; Kida, S; Nitta, H; Yamashima, T; Yamashita, J

    1996-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene encodes a novel 595 amino acid protein named merlin. Recently, Ruttledge et al demonstrated inactivation of NF2 gene in approximately 60% of sporadically occurring meningiomas. Merlin is thought to physiologically exist beneath the cell membrane, and to form a part of modulation in signal transduction, for example, information concerning contact inhibition. In NF2-related tumors, it is supposed that the mutation of merlin results in loss of this signal transduction leading to tumorigenesis. In this paper, we investigated the expression of NF2 gene product merlin in arachnoid villi and meningiomas. The immunohistochemical staining of merlin showed a striking contrast between arachnoid villi and meningiomas. In arachnoid cells, merlin was labeled in the whole cytoplasm, but not within the nuclei. In contrast, in meningiomas, immunoreactivity of merlin was mainly seen in the nuclei. These results suggest that arachnoid cells with normal merlin are capable of normal signal transduction, whereas meningioma cells with mutated merlin show impairment of signal transduction which may lead to tumorigenesis.

  8. Long Term Surgical Outcome and Prognostic Factors of Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chi; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Cheng-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Lin, Tzu-Kan; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Yao-Liang; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical and malignant meningiomas are rare. Our aim was to examine the treatment outcomes following surgical resection, and analyze associations between clinical characteristics and overall survival (OS) or relapse free survival (RFS). 102 patients with atypical or malignant meningiomas underwent microsurgical resection between June 2001 and November 2009 were analyzed retrospectively. We compared demographics, clinical characteristics, treatment, and complications. The five-year and ten-year overall survival rates were 93.5% and 83.4%, respectively. Three factors significantly reduced OS: Malignant meningiomas (p < 0.001), which also decreased RFS (p < 0.001); female patients (p = 0.049), and patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) < 70 at diagnosis (p = 0.009). Fifty two patients (51%) experienced tumor relapse. Total resection of tumors significantly impacted RFS (p = 0.013). Tumors located at parasagittal and posterior fossa area lead to higher relapse rate (p = 0.004). Subtotal resection without adjuvant radiotherapy lead to the worst local control of tumor (p = 0.030). An MIB-1 index <8% improved OS and RFS (p = 0.003). Total resection of atypical and malignant meningiomas provided better outcome and local control. Adjuvant radiation therapy is indicated for patients with malignant meningiomas, with incompletely excised tumors; or with tumors in the parasagittal or posterior fossa area. The MIB-1 index of the tumor is an independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome. PMID:27760993

  9. Mitotic Index is an Independent Predictor of Recurrence-Free Survival in Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Sulman, Erik P; Mansouri, Alireza; Zadeh, Gelareh; Wilson, Charmaine D; DeMonte, Franco; Fuller, Gregory N; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2015-05-01

    While World Health Organization (WHO) grading of meningioma stratifies patients according to recurrence risk overall, there is substantial within-grade heterogeneity with respect to recurrence-free survival (RFS). Most meningiomas are graded according to mitotic counts per unit area on hematoxylin and eosin sections, a method potentially confounded by tumor cellularity, as well as potential limitations of accurate mitotic figure detection on routine histology. To refine mitotic figure assessment, we evaluated 363 meningiomas with phospho-histone H3 (Ser10) and determined the mitotic index (number of mitoses per 1000 tumor cells). The median mitotic indices among WHO grade I (n = 268), grade II (n = 84) and grade III (n = 11) tumors were 1, 4 and 12. Classification and regression tree analysis to categorize cut-offs identified three subgroups defined by mitotic indices of 0-2, 3-4 and ≥5, which on univariate analysis were associated with RFS (P < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, mitotic index subgrouped in this manner was significantly associated with RFS (P < 0.01) after adjustment for Simpson grade, WHO grade and MIB-1 index. Mitotic index was then examined within individual WHO grade, showing that for grade I and grade II meningiomas, mitotic index can add additional information to RFS risk. The results suggest that the use of a robust mitotic marker in meningioma could refine risk stratification. PMID:25040885

  10. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  11. Electron microscope and x-ray diffraction studies of the effects of dehydration on the structure of nerve myelin. II. Optic nerve.

    PubMed

    FINEAN, J B

    1960-09-01

    The dehydration of rat optic nerve has been studied by allowing specimens to become partially or fully dried before fixation and preparation for electron microscopy. A correlation is established between electron micrographs of the myelin sheath and corresponding small-angle x-ray diffraction patterns. The modifications of the optic nerve myelin layers during drying were very similar to those described in more detail for the myelin of frog sciatic nerve. The most striking difference was that the system of fine layers characteristic of the fully dried myelin was much more extensive in the case of the optic nerve, and the layer thickness was significantly greater than the corresponding layer in the frog sciatic nerve preparation. The significance of these correlations is discussed.

  12. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  13. The role of water in the structure of peripheral nerve myelin.

    PubMed

    FINEAN, J B

    1957-01-25

    In the study of the drying kinetics of nerve fibres, at least five "phases" of water evaporation can be distinguished. A consideration of the accompanying changes in low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns permits a tentative identification of the "phases" and a quantitative interpretation of the data in terms of the water distribution in nerve fibres. These results suggest that the myelin sheath of frog sciatic nerve contains 40 to 50 per cent water, and it is suggested further that the greater part of this water is "organised" in relation to the hydrophilic groups of the lipide and protein components.

  14. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-01

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  15. Sheath structure in electronegative plasmas with finite positive ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palop, J. I. Fernández; Ballesteros, J.; Hernández, M. A.; Crespo, R. Morales; del Pino, S. Borrego

    2004-05-01

    An earlier theoretical work, concerning the sheath structure in electronegative plasmas, is extended to include the effect of the positive ion thermal motion. A significant change is observed in the quantities characterizing the sheath with respect to the cold ion assumption. The sheath is contracted when the positive ion thermal motion is considered causing a decrease in the sheath thickness. The ion saturation current and the floating potential are shown to be distinguished quantities in plasma diagnosis of electronegative plasmas by using plane Langmuir probes.

  16. Onyx Embolization of a Meningioma with a Dysplastic Aneurysmal Anterior Cerebral Artery Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Felbaum, Daniel R; Liu, Ai-Hsi; Armonda, Rocco A

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative embolization of meningiomas can be safely performed using a variety of embolic agents. Most commonly, the vascular supply from branches of the external carotid artery is the target of embolization. In our report, we detail the treatment of a patient with a parafalcine meningioma that received its supply via branches of the anterior cerebral artery. One of the feeder vessels appeared to contain a dysplastic aneurysmal dilatation of the vessel. Due to patient circumstances, embolization was performed using standard microcatheterization techniques to minimize intraoperative blood loss. We report a rare instance of endovascular treatment of a pial vessel to treat an intracranial meningioma using Onyx. PMID:27738575

  17. Preoperative embolization of meningiomas with low-concentration n-butyl cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taiki; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Nishihori, Masahiro; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical safety and efficacy of preoperative embolization of meningiomas with low-concentration n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA). Nineteen cases of hypervascular intracranial meningiomas were treated by preoperative embolization with 14% NBCA, using a wedged superselective catheterization of feeding arteries and reflux-hold-reinjection technique. Clinical data of the patients and radiological and intra-surgical findings were reviewed. All tumors were successfully devascularized without any neurological complications. Marked reduction of tumor staining with extensive NBCA penetration was achieved in 13 cases. Perioperative blood transfusion was only required in two cases. These results indicate that preoperative embolization of meningiomas with low-concentration NBCA is both safe and effective.

  18. A rare intracranial tumor consisting of malignant anaplastic and papillary meningioma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kochanski, Ryan B.; Byrne, Nika; Arvanitis, Leonidas; Bhabad, Sudeep; Byrne, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial tumors with heterogeneous histopathology are a well-described pathologic entity. Pathologically, distinct tumors in direct contact with one another, also known as collision tumors are exceptionally rare, and collision between meningioma subtypes has not been previously described in the literature. Case Description: A 79-year-old female with a history of breast carcinoma presenting with visual and motor deficits and imaging/intraoperative findings consistent with separate, distinct lesions. Histopathologic findings provided evidence for a collision between World Health Organization Grade III anaplastic and papillary meningioma. Conclusion: We report a possible collision tumor between two separate meningioma subtypes based on the unique radiologic, intraoperative, and histopathologic findings. Submission of multiple pathologic specimens during surgical resection is key for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. PMID:26981322

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy in the presence of a metallic skull plate after meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ted; Manepalli, Jothika; Grossberg, George

    2010-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective and safe treatment even in the frail and in the medically ill. A case report of ECT being administered to a patient with a history of a recently resected meningioma and the presence of a metallic skull plate is presented here. The patient has a history of bipolar disorder in remission but had an acute manic episode with psychotic features after resection of suprasellar meningioma. He presented with superimposed delirium that complicated the presentation. Because there was no effective resolution with medications, ECT was administered. This case documents the safe administration of ECT in complicated situations such as these. This case also demonstrates that ECT can be successfully administered in the presence of superimposed delirium and after a recent meningioma resection. Clinical skills and expertise are required to safely and effectively administer ECT in such cases. PMID:19935094

  20. Rarefaction solitons initiated by sheath instability

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2015-09-15

    The instability of the cathode sheath initiated by the cold energetic electron beam is studied by the one-dimensional fluid model. Numerical simulations show the generation of travelling rarefaction solitons at the cathode. It is obtained that the parameters of these solitons strongly depend on the parameters of electron beam. The “stretched” variables are derived using the small-amplitude analysis. These variables are used in order to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of the rarefaction solitons through the plasma with cold energetic electron beam.

  1. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  2. The characteristics of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths: An analysis of the standard sheath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of radio frequency (RF) modulated plasma boundary sheaths are studied on the basis of the so-called ``standard sheath model.'' This model assumes that the applied radio frequency ωRF is larger than the plasma frequency of the ions but smaller than that of the electrons. It comprises a phase-averaged ion model - consisting of an equation of continuity (with ionization neglected) and an equation of motion (with collisional ion-neutral interaction taken into account) - a phase-resolved electron model - consisting of an equation of continuity and the assumption of Boltzmann equilibrium -, and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Previous investigations have studied the standard sheath model under additional approximations, most notably the assumption of a step-like electron front. This contribution presents an investigation and parameter study of the standard sheath model which avoids any further assumptions. The resulting density profiles and overall charge-voltage characteristics are compared with those of the step-model based theories. The authors gratefully acknowledge Efe Kemaneci for helpful comments and fruitful discussions.

  3. Epidural angiomatous meningioma of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; WU, LIANG; YANG, CHENLONG; XU, YULUN

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural angiomatous meningiomas (AMs) are extremely rare lesions. Here, we report on a case of an epidural AM of the thoracic spine with chronic but severe cord compression. The patient underwent a T6-T8 laminectomy through the posterior approach. En bloc resection was achieved, and histopathological examination demonstrated an AM. Delayed paraplegia occurred 4 h postoperatively. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone, hyperbaric oxygen and rehabilitation. Gradually, over the next six months, the bilateral leg strength was improved compared with the preoperative status, and no tumor recurrence was noted. Although epidural AM is extremely rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. A definitive diagnosis is difficult based on magnetic resonance imaging alone due to the nonspecific characteristics of the tumor. Since AM is a histologically benign and highly vascularized tumor, timely gross total resection (GTR) is the most effective treatment. A good clinical outcome may be expected following GTR (Simpson grade I and II resection). PMID:26870233

  4. Frequent NF2 gene transcript mutations in sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, R.H.L.; Groen, N.A.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Hagemeijer, A.; Van Drunen, E.; Bootsma, D.; Koper, J.W.; Avezaat, C.J.J. ); Bianchi, A.B.; Seizinger, B.R. )

    1994-06-01

    The gene for the hereditary disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), which predisposes for benign CNS tumors such as vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas, has been assigned to chromosome 22 and recently has been isolated. Mutations in the NF2 gene were found in both sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas. However, so far only 6 of the 16 exons of the gene have been analyzed. In order to extend the analysis of an involvement of the NF2 gene in the sporadic counterparts of these NF2-related tumors, the authors have used reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification followed by SSCP and DNA sequence analysis to screen for mutations in the coding region of the NF2 gene. Analysis of the NF2 gene transcript in 53 unrelated patients with meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas revealed mutations in 32% of the sporadic meningiomas (n = 44), in 50% of the sporadic vestibular schwannomas (n = 4), in 100% of the tumors found in NF2 patients (n = 2), and in one of three tumors from multiple-meningioma patients. Of the 18 tumors in which a mutation in the NF2 gene transcript was observed and the copy number of chromosome 22 could be established, 14 also showed loss of (parts of) chromosome 22. This suggests that in sporadic meningiomas and NF2-associated tumors the NF2 gene functions as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene. The mutations detected resulted mostly in frameshifts, predicting truncations starting within the N-terminal half of the putative protein. 23 refs., 2 figs. 3 tabs.

  5. Phase II Trials of Erlotinib or Gefitinib in Patients with Recurrent Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Norden, Andrew D.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.; Lieberman, Frank; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2013-01-01

    There are no established treatments for recurrent meningioma when surgical and radiation options are exhausted. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often over-expressed in meningiomas and may promote tumor growth. In open label, single arm phase II studies of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib (NABTC 00-01) and erlotinib (NABTC 01-03) for recurrent malignant gliomas, we included exploratory subsets of recurrent meningioma patients. We have pooled the data and report the results here. Patients with recurrent histologically confirmed meningiomas with no more than 2 previous chemotherapy regimens were treated with gefitinib 500 mg/day or erlotinib 150 mg/day until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Twenty-five eligible patients were enrolled with median age 57 years (range 29–81) and median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 90 (range 60–100). Sixteen patients (64%) received gefitinib and 9 (36%) erlotinib. Eight patients (32%) had benign tumors, 9 (36%) atypical, and 8 (32%) malignant. For benign tumors, the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) was 25%, 12-month PFS (PFS12) 13%, 6-month overall survival (OS6) 63%, and 12-month OS (OS12) 50%. For atypical and malignant tumors, PFS6 was 29%, PFS12 18%, OS6 71%, and OS12 65%. The PFS and OS were not significantly different by histology. There were no objective imaging responses, but 8 patients (32%) maintained stable disease. Although treatment was well-tolerated, neither gefitinib nor erlotinib appear to have significant activity against recurrent meningioma. The role of EGFR inhibitors in meningiomas is unclear. Evaluation of multi-targeted inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with other targeted molecular agents may be warranted. PMID:19562255

  6. Yes-Associated Protein 1 Is Activated and Functions as an Oncogene in Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Baia, Gilson S.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Orr, Brent A.; Lal, Anita; Ho, Janelle S.Y.; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Tihan, Tarik; Mawrin, Christian; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is functionally conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and mammals, and its proposed function is to control tissue homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. The core components are composed of a kinase cascade that culminates with the phosphorylation and inhibition of Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1). Phospho-YAP1 is retained in the cytoplasm. In the absence of Hippo signaling, YAP1 translocates to the nucleus, associates with co-activators TEAD1-4, and functions as a transcriptional factor promoting the expression of key target genes. Components of the Hippo pathway are mutated in human cancers, and deregulation of this pathway plays a role in tumorigenesis. Loss of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene is the most common genetic alteration in meningiomas, and the NF2 gene product, Merlin, acts upstream of the Hippo pathway. Here, we show that primary meningioma tumors have high nuclear expression of YAP1. In meningioma cells, Merlin expression is associated with phosphorylation of YAP1. Using an siRNA transient knockdown of YAP1 in NF2-mutant meningioma cells, we show that suppression of YAP1 impaired cell proliferation and migration. Conversely, YAP1 overexpression led to a strong augment of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth and restriction of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of YAP1 in nontransformed arachnoidal cells led to the development of tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that in meningiomas, deregulation of the Hippo pathway is largely observed in primary tumors and that YAP1 functions as an oncogene promoting meningioma tumorigenesis. PMID:22618028

  7. Differentiation between meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous somatostatin receptor and brain scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haldemann, A.R.; Luescher, D.; Sulzer, M.

    1994-05-01

    Since the differentiation between meningiomas and some other CNS tumors may be difficult in certain localizations, biopsy is mandatory, even in patients with meningiomas who are to be treated with percutaneous radiotherapy alone. The high density of somatostatin receptors (SSR) in meningiomas has led us to compare patients with meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous SSR and brain scintigraphy (BS) using 74 MBq 111In octreotide and 740 MBq 99mTc DTPA injected two hours later. SPECT was performed on a 3-head gamma camera 4 hours after 111In octreotide injection in multiple peak acquisition mode in 35 patients with radiologically documented CNS tumors. In positive scans, a tumor ROI was defined manually in the transverse 111In slice with highest tumor contrast and the identical tumor ROI was transferred to the corresponding 99mTc slice. A SSR to BS index was then calculated from the ratio of 111In to 99mTc counts after normalizing for identical total counts in the slices. in negative scans, the SSR to BS index was set to be 1.0. In 7 meningiomas, the SSR to BS index was 2.64{plus_minus}0.76. In 28 other CNS tumors (7 gliomas I-111, 4 neurinomas, 3 glial reactions, 3 metastases, 3 gliomas IV, 2 ependymomas, 1 chordoma, 1 NHL; plus 4 inoperable, radiologically diagnosed glioblastomas) 1.06{plus_minus}0.13. Thus, a highly significant difference was found between these two groups (p<0.0001). It is concluded that combined SSR and BS allows excellent discrimination between meningiomas and other CNS tumors and may become a non-invasive alternative to biopsy in selected clinical situations.

  8. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... toe-out movements Tests of nerve activity include: Electromyography (EMG, a test of electrical activity in muscles) Nerve ... Peroneal neuropathy. In: Preston DC, Shapiro BE, eds. Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  9. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  10. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  11. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  12. Paranodal dysmyelination in peripheral nerves of Trembler mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Bobrowski-Khoury, Natasha

    2014-04-01

    Subtle defects in paranodes of myelinated nerve fibers can cause significant physiological malfunction. We have investigated myelinated fibers in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the Trembler mouse, a model of CMT-1A neuropathy, for evidence of such defects. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the "transverse bands," which attach the myelin sheath to the axon at the paranodal axoglial junction, are grossly diminished in number in Trembler nerve fibers. Although paranodes often appear to be greatly elongated, it is only a short region immediately adjacent to the node of Ranvier that displays transverse bands. Where transverse bands are missing, the junctional gap widens, thus reducing resistance to short circuiting of nodal action currents during saltatory conduction and increasing the likelihood that axonal K(+) channels under the myelin sheath will be activated. In addition, we find evidence that structural domains in Trembler axons are incompletely differentiated, consistent with diminution in nodal Na channel density, which could further compromise conduction. Deficiency of transverse bands may also increase susceptibility to disruption of the paranodal junction and retraction of the myelin sheath. We conclude that Trembler PNS myelinated fibers display subtle defects in paranodal and nodal regions that could contribute significantly to conduction defects and increased risk of myelin detachment.

  13. Strategic and Technical Considerations for the Endovascular Embolization of Intracranial Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    James, Robert F; Kramer, Daniel R; Page, Paul S; Gaughen, John R; Martin, Lacey B; Mack, William J

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular embolization is a frequently used adjunct to operative resection of meningiomas. Embolization may decrease intraoperative blood loss, operative time, and surgical difficulty associated with resection. The specific clinical applications of this treatment have not been defined clearly. Procedural indications, preferred embolic agent, and latency until tumor resection all differ across operators. It is clear that strategic patient selection, comprehensive anatomic understanding, and sound operative technique are critical to the success of the embolization procedure. This article reviews the management and technical considerations associated with preoperative meningioma embolization. PMID:27012380

  14. Management of Vascular Invasion During Radical Resection of Medial Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kattner, Keith A.; Fukushima, Takanori

    2001-01-01

    Invasive meningiomas involving the medial sphenoid wing are difficult tumors to resect completely. They often have invaded the surrounding arteries at the time of diagnosis making total resection challenging. Attempts at removing these tumors from adherent carotid or middle cerebral arteries have resulted in high complication rates. Nine cases of medial sphenoid wing meningiomas with arterial invasion were operated between March 1994 and August 1998. Total resection was possible in only four cases. Two arterial-related complications occurred during resection with one resulting in permanent hemiplegia. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17167608

  15. Radiation-induced meningiomas after BNCT in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Sogabe, S; Mizobichi, Y; Nakajima, K; Shinji, N; Nakagawa, Y

    2015-12-01

    Of the 180 patients with malignant brain tumors whom we treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) since 1968, only one (0.56%) developed multiple radiation-induced meningiomas. The parasagittal meningioma that had received 42 Gy (w) for BNCT showed more rapid growth on Gd-enhanced MRI scans and more atypical features on histopathologic studies than the temporal convexity tumor that had received 20 Gy (w). Long-term follow up MRI studies are necessary in long-survivors of malignant brain tumors treated by BNCT. PMID:26122975

  16. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of genetic regional heterogeneity in meningiomas1

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Wolfgang K.; Hank, Nicole C.; Preul, Mark C.; Hendricks, William P.; Pueschel, Jeanette; Coons, Stephen W.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the frequency and regional distribution of cells with genetic abnormalities of chromosomes 1, 14, and 22 in meningiomas. This data was evaluated for correlation to the clinical outcome of the patients. Eight defined areas of each of 77 paraffin-embedded meningioma samples (59 grade I, 13 grade II, and 5 grade III) were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization using bacterial artificial chromosome probes localized to chromosomes 1p36.32, 1q25.3, 14q13.3, 14q32.12, 22q11.2, and 22q12.1-3. Chromosome deletion was considered to be regionally heterogeneous if <7 regions showed cells with chromosome deletions. Deletion of 1p occurred in 35% of the grade I tumors. Distribution of cells with 1p deletion was regionally heterogeneous in 25% and homogeneous in 10% of grade I tumors. Distribution of cells with deletion of 1p was regionally heterogeneous in 23% and homogeneous in 69% of the grade II tumors. All grade III meningiomas had homogeneous distribution of cells with deletion of chromosome 1p. Distribution of cells with deletion of 14q was regionally heterogeneous in 27% and homogeneous in 2% of the grade I meningiomas, heterogeneous in 31% and homogeneous in 62% of the grade II tumors, and heterogeneous in 40% and homogeneous in 60% of the grade III meningiomas. Distribution of cells with deletion of 22q was regionally heterogeneous in 15% and homogeneous in 3% of the grade I tumors, heterogeneous in 15% and homogeneous in 31% of grade II tumors, and homogeneous in 20% of the grade III meningiomas. Distribution of cells with trisomy 22q was regionally heterogeneous in 10% of grade I tumors, heterogeneous in 23% of grade II, and homogeneous in 80% of grade III meningiomas. The proportion of patients with a deletion of 22q (either homogeneous or heterogeneous) who had recurrence was greater than the proportion of those without 22q deletion who had recurrence, and deletion of 22q was significantly associated with radiologically detected recurrence (P < 0

  17. Metastatic meningioma: The role of whole‑body diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cabada, Teresa; Bermejo, Rebeca; Bacaicoa, Carmen; Martínez-Peñuela, Ana

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient with a completely resected anaplastic meningioma who developed multiple metastases two years later (subcutaneous tissue near the surgical area, cervical lymph nodes, lung, pleura and bones). The primary tumor and all of the metastases showed a significant restricted diffusion. Whole‑body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed for assessment of the metastases. This case demonstrated the usefulness of this technique in screening extracranial metastases in patients with malignant meningiomas. PMID:22866153

  18. Proteomics Analysis of Brain Meningiomas in Pursuit of Novel Biomarkers of the Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barkhoudarian, Garni; Whitelegge, Julian P; Kelly, Daniel F; Simonian, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of advanced proteomics techniques to identify novel protein markers that contribute to the transformation of benign meningiomas to more aggressive and malignant subtypes. Multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labelling and nano-LCMS was used to identify and quantify the differentially expressed proteins in WHO Grade I, II and III meningioma tissues. The proteins identified will help elucidate the process of transformation to malignancy and may contribute to improved diagnosis and treatment of these aggressive tumors PMID:27019568

  19. Obesity and Risk for Brain/CNS Tumors, Gliomas and Meningiomas: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Perlepe, Christina; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis-Georgios; Sergentanis, Ioannis N.; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13–1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03–1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05–1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28–1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22–2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Dose-response meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumors, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males. PMID:26332834

  20. Intra-operative N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization arrest of uncontrollable hemorrhage during meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    Gordhan, Ajeet

    2016-01-01

    During the surgical resection of a convexity meningioma in a 63-year-old woman, an uncontrollable active hemorrhage from the operative bed was arrested with microcatheter N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization after superselective angiography. To date, an uncontrollable neurosurgical intraprocedural hemorrhage terminated by NBCA embolization has not been previously reported. The embolization risk relative to the benefit needs to be carefully considered prior to the surgical removal of a meningioma. This report emphasizes the potential value of embolization with NBCA for arresting active bleeding intraoperatively.

  1. Endovascular angioplasty before resection of a sphenoidal meningioma with vascular encasement.

    PubMed

    Chivoret, N; Fontaine, D; Lachaud, S; Chau, Y; Sedat, J

    2011-09-01

    We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm. PMID:22005706

  2. Endovascular angioplasty before resection of a sphenoidal meningioma with vascular encasement.

    PubMed

    Chivoret, N; Fontaine, D; Lachaud, S; Chau, Y; Sedat, J

    2011-09-01

    We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm.

  3. Endovascular Angioplasty before Resection of a Sphenoidal Meningioma with Vascular Encasement

    PubMed Central

    Chivoret, N.; Fontaine, D.; Lachaud, S.; Chau, Y.; Sedat, J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm. PMID:22005706

  4. CNS Myelin Sheath Lengths Are an Intrinsic Property of Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bechler, Marie E; Byrne, Lauren; Ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-09-21

    Since Río-Hortega's description of oligodendrocyte morphologies nearly a century ago, many studies have observed myelin sheath-length diversity between CNS regions. Myelin sheath length directly impacts axonal conduction velocity by influencing the spacing between nodes of Ranvier. Such differences likely affect neural signal coordination and synchronization. What accounts for regional differences in myelin sheath lengths is unknown; are myelin sheath lengths determined solely by axons or do intrinsic properties of different oligodendrocyte precursor cell populations affect length? The prevailing view is that axons provide molecular cues necessary for oligodendrocyte myelination and appropriate sheath lengths. This view is based upon the observation that axon diameters correlate with myelin sheath length, as well as reports that PNS axonal neuregulin-1 type III regulates the initiation and properties of Schwann cell myelin sheaths. However, in the CNS, no such instructive molecules have been shown to be required, and increasing in vitro evidence supports an oligodendrocyte-driven, neuron-independent ability to differentiate and form initial sheaths. We test this alternative signal-independent hypothesis--that variation in internode lengths reflects regional oligodendrocyte-intrinsic properties. Using microfibers, we find that oligodendrocytes have a remarkable ability to self-regulate the formation of compact, multilamellar myelin and generate sheaths of physiological length. Our results show that oligodendrocytes respond to fiber diameters and that spinal cord oligodendrocytes generate longer sheaths than cortical oligodendrocytes on fibers, co-cultures, and explants, revealing that oligodendrocytes have regional identity and generate different sheath lengths that mirror internodes in vivo.

  5. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes. PMID:23313191

  6. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  7. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numerous round openings for accommodating optic nerve fiber bundles. GFAP-positive cellular processes also ran transversely in association with collagen and elastin components. The postlaminar region had connective tissues which linked the lamina cribrosa with fibrous sheaths for accommodating nerve bundles in the extraocular optic nerve, where GFAP-positive cells acquired characteristics typical of fibrous astrocytes. These findings indicate that collagen fibrils, as a whole, form a continuous network which serves as a skeletal framework of the optic nerve head for protecting optic nerve fibers from mechanical stress as well as for sustaining blood vessels in the optic nerve. The lamina cribrosa containing elastic fibers are considered to be plastic against the mechanical force affected by elevation

  8. Favorable Outcomes of Pediatric Patients Treated With Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System Who Develop Radiation-Induced Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome of patients treated at the University of Florida who developed meningiomas after radiation to the central nervous system (CNS) for childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 10 patients aged {<=}19 years who received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a meningioma. We report the histology of the radiation-induced meningioma, treatment received, and ultimate outcome among this cohort of patients. Results: Meningioma was diagnosed at a median of 23.5 years after completion of the primary radiation. Fifty percent of second meningiomas were World Health Organization Grade 2 (atypical) or higher. All cases were managed with a single modality: resection alone (n = 7), fractionated radiotherapy (n = 2), and stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 1). The actuarial event-free survival and overall survival rate at 5 years after treatment for a radiation-induced meningioma was 89%. Three patients who underwent resection for retreatment experienced a Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation-induced meningiomas after treatment of pediatric CNS tumors are effectively managed with single-modality therapy. Such late-effect data inform the overall therapeutic ratio and support the continued role of selective irradiation in managing pediatric CNS malignancies.

  9. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  10. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  11. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  12. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  13. A generalized BC for radio-frequency sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    A new radio-frequency (rf) sheath boundary condition (BC) is described and applied to the problem of far field sheaths. The new BC generalizes the one presently used in rf codes to include: (1) an arbitrary magnetic field angle, (2) the full complex impedance, (3) mobile ions, (4) unmagnetized ions, and (5) the magnetic pre-sheath. For a given wave-propagation (macro) problem, root-finding is used to match the impedance of the rf wave with that of the micro-sheath problem. For a model far-field sheath problem, it is shown that the structure of the (multiple) roots with the new BC is similar to that with the capacitive BC, but the location of the resonance changes when the full impedance is used.

  14. Gas insulated transmission line having low inductance intercalated sheath

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1978-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line including an outer sheath, an inner conductor disposed within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas between the inner conductor and the outer sheath. The outer sheath comprises an insulating tube having first and second ends, and having interior and exterior surfaces. A first electrically conducting foil is secured to the interior surface of the insulating tube, is spirally wound from one tube end to the second tube end, and has a plurality of overlapping turns. A second electrically conducting foil is secured to the exterior surface of the insulating tube, and is spirally wound in the opposite direction from the first electrically conducting foil. By winding the foils in opposite directions, the inductances within the intercalated sheath will cancel each other out.

  15. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  16. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  17. Bladder outlet reconstruction: fate of the silicone sheath.

    PubMed

    Kropp, B P; Rink, R C; Adams, M C; Keating, M A; Mitchell, M E

    1993-08-01

    The placement of a 1.5 cm. wide silicone sheath around a newly constructed urethra/bladder neck to ensure maintenance of repair length and to facilitate future placement of a sphincter cuff was reported by our institution in 1985. We present our long-term followup and new recommendations for use of the silicone sheath. A total of 15 silicone sheaths was placed between March 1981 and July 1984. Of the sheaths 14 were placed at the time of urinary reconstruction around the Young-Dees-Leadbetter bladder neck repair and 1 was placed after erosion of an artificial urinary sphincter cuff. Of the 15 sheaths 10 have eroded into the urethra and 4 sheaths remain in situ. Another sheath was replaced 2 years after its original insertion with an artificial urinary sphincter cuff. Mean time to erosion was 48.2 months, with a range of 2 to 108 months. Long-term followup of 10 patients revealed that 4 ultimately required ligation of the bladder neck and construction of continent stoma after erosion, 1 is dry after placement of a bulbar artificial urinary sphincter, 2 remain dry after removal of the eroded sheath alone, 2 required bladder neck revision to achieve continence after erosion and the most recent patient remains diverted with a suprapubic tube. All 4 patients with sheaths still remaining are dry without evidence of erosion (mean duration 116 months). These long-term results using a silicone wrap around a newly constructed bladder neck reveal an unacceptably high rate of erosion. Therefore, we no longer recommend or support the use of the silicone sheath in the manner we have described for bladder neck reconstruction. PMID:8326628

  18. A high-throughput kinome screen reveals serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 as a therapeutic target for NF2-deficient meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Roberta L.; James, Marianne F.; DeSouza, Patrick A.; Wagh, Vilas; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Jordan, Justin T.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Plotkin, Scott R.; Gusella, James F.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial adult tumor. All Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2)-associated meningiomas and ~60% of sporadic meningiomas show loss of NF2 tumor suppressor protein. There are no effective medical therapies for progressive and recurrent meningiomas. Our previous work demonstrated aberrant activation of mTORC1 signaling that led to ongoing clinical trials with rapamycin analogs for NF2 and sporadic meningioma patients. Here we performed a high-throughput kinome screen to identify kinases responsible for mTORC1 pathway activation in NF2-deficient meningioma cells. Among the emerging top candidates were the mTORC2-specific target serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In NF2-deficient meningioma cells, inhibition of SGK1 rescues mTORC1 activation, and SGK1 activation is sensitive to dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor AZD2014, but not to rapamycin. PAK1 inhibition also leads to attenuated mTORC1 but not mTORC2 signaling, suggesting that mTORC2/SGK1 and Rac1/PAK1 pathways are independently responsible for mTORC1 activation in NF2-deficient meningiomas. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, we generated isogenic human arachnoidal cell lines (ACs), the origin cell type for meningiomas, expressing or lacking NF2. NF2-null CRISPR ACs recapitulate the signaling of NF2-deficient meningioma cells. Interestingly, we observe increased SGK1 transcription and protein expression in NF2-CRISPR ACs and in primary NF2-negative meningioma lines. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor, AZD2014 is superior to rapamycin and PAK inhibitor FRAX597 in blocking proliferation of meningioma cells. Importantly, AZD2014 is currently in use in several clinical trials of cancer. Therefore, we believe that AZD2014 may provide therapeutic advantage over rapalogs for recurrent and progressive meningiomas. PMID:26219339

  19. Genetic and epigenetic alteration of the NF2 gene in sporadic meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Jesus; Bello, M Josefa; Arjona, Dolores; Alonso, M Eva; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; Amiñoso, Cinthia; de Campos, Jose M; Isla, Alberto; Vaquero, Jesus; Rey, Juan A

    2005-03-01

    The role of the NF2 gene in the development of meningiomas has recently been documented; inactivating mutations plus allelic loss at 22q, the site of this gene (at 22q12), have been identified in both sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 2-associated tumors. Although epigenetic inactivation through aberrant CpG island methylation of the NF2 5' flanking region has been documented in schwannoma (another NF2-associated neoplasm), data on participation of this epigenetic modification in meningiomas are not yet widely available. Using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) plus sequencing, we assessed the presence of aberrant promoter NF2 methylation in a series of 88 meningiomas (61 grade I, 24 grade II, and 3 grade III), in which the allelic constitution at 22q and the NF2 mutational status also were determined by RFLP/microsatellite and PCR-SSCP analyses. Chromosome 22 allelic loss, NF2 gene mutation, and aberrant NF2 promoter methylation were detected in 49%, 24%, and 26% of cases, respectively. Aberrant NF2 methylation with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 22q was found in five cases, and aberrant methylation with NF2 mutation in another; LOH 22q and the mutation were found in 16 samples. The aberrant methylation of the NF2 gene also was the sole alteration in 15 samples, most of which were from grade I tumors. These results indicate that aberrant NF2 hypermethylation may participate in the development of a significant proportion of sporadic meningiomas, primarily those of grade I.

  20. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  1. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Emin Mehmet; Evrensel, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient's vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years) psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient. PMID:27651969

  2. Generation of Noninvasive, Quantifiable, Orthotopic Animal Models for NF2-Associated Schwannoma and Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Burns, Sarah S; Chang, Long-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas and meningiomas are nervous system tumors that can occur sporadically or in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Mutations of the Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene are frequently observed in these tumors. Schwannomas and meningiomas cause significant morbidities, and an FDA-approved medical therapy is currently not available. The development of preclinical animal models that accurately capture the clinical characteristics of these tumors will facilitate the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of these tumors, ultimately leading to more productive clinical trials. Here, we describe the generation of luciferase-expressing NF2-deficient schwannoma and meningioma cells and the use of these cells to establish orthotopic tumor models in immunodeficient mice. The growth of these tumors and their response to treatment can be measured effectively by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and confirmed by small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These and other animal models, such as genetically-engineered models, should substantially advance the investigation of promising therapies for schwannomas and meningiomas. PMID:27259921

  3. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Emin Mehmet; Önen Ünsalver, Bariş; Evrensel, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient's vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years) psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient. PMID:27651969

  4. INI1 mutations in meningiomas at a potential hotspot in exon 9

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, U; Mueller, W; Weber, M; Sévenet, N; Delattre, O; Deimling, A von

    2001-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumours have been shown to carry somatic mutations in the INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5) gene. A considerable fraction of these tumours exhibit allelic losses on chromosome 22. Allelic loss on 22q also is characteristic for meningiomas, however most of these alterations are considered to be associated with mutations of the NF2 gene. We examined a series of 126 meningiomas for alterations in the INI1 gene. Four identical somatic mutations in exon 9 were detected resulting in an exchange of Arg to His in position 377 of INI1. Our observations were reproduced both by using DNA from a new round of extraction and by employing overlapping primers. This mutational hotspot therefore appears to be an important target in the formation of a fraction of meningiomas. In addition, 4 novel polymorphisms of INI1 were characterized. Our data indicate that the INI1 is a second tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 22 that may be important for the genesis of meningiomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161377

  5. Unresectable Recurrent Multiple Meningioma: A Case Report with Radiological Response to Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Ortolá Buigues, Ana; Crespo Hernández, Irene; Jorquera Moya, Manuela; Díaz Pérez, Jose Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Medical treatment of meningiomas is reserved for cases in which surgery and radiotherapy have failed. Given that a high percentage of meningiomas express somatostatin receptors, treatment with somatostatin analogues has been proposed. In addition, these medications have been shown to have an antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effect in vitro. To date, very few cases with clinical response and none with radiological response have been described. The case described here is the first to report a radiological response. A 76-year-old Caucasian male was first diagnosed with unresectable meningioma at age 47. The patient experienced multiple recurrences and underwent three surgeries and radiotherapy over the years from the initial diagnosis. Despite treatment, the disease continued its progression. Based on an Octreoscan positive for tumour uptake, therapy with extended-release somatostatin analogues was started. Although no clinical neurological improvement was observed, magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a discreet but continuous radiological response over time. After >2 years of continuous administration of lanreotide, the patient remains progression free. In highly selected cases, somatostatin analogue treatment for meningioma may be beneficial. Based on our findings, treatment with somatostatin analogues should be maintained longer than previously described before evaluating treatment response. PMID:27721778

  6. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Emin Mehmet; Evrensel, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient's vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years) psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient.

  7. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. PMID:27316567

  8. Dural-Based Cavernoma of the Posterior Cranial Fossa Mimicking a Meningioma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aurora S; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Tubbs, R. Shane; Page, Jeni; Chamiraju, Parthasarathi; Tkachenko, Lara; Rostad, Steven; Newell, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous angiomas usually occur in the parenchyma of both the supra and infratentorial compartments. At times, they can both clinically and radiologically mimic other dural-based lesions. We present a case of a patient with chronic occipital headaches, initially thought to have a meningioma, but proven to be a cavernoma with histological analysis. PMID:27190725

  9. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  10. Recurrence of meningiomas versus proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positivity and AgNOR counting.

    PubMed

    Demirtaş, E; Yilmaz, F; Ovül, I; Oner, K

    1996-01-01

    Meningiomas have a wide range of biological potential and clinical behaviour. Histological findings are helpful in recognizing the malignant potential but often fail to correlate with clinical behaviour. This study attempts to correlate the silver nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) with clinicopathological features of biological activity. Thirty-four completely resected meningiomas were classified as benign [19], atypical [6] and malignant [9]. Forty-eight initial and recurrent tumour materials were investigated for staining of AgNORs and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against PCNA (clone 19A2 and PC10). There were no difference between the recurrent and non-recurrent cases with regards to AgNOR, PC10 and 19A2 values. Also, no significant difference was found between the primary and recurrent tumours. Both PC10 and 19A2 labelling indices (LI) showed a significant difference between benign and malignant meningiomas. The 19A2 LI was 0.56 +/- 0.21 in benign and 2.45 +/- 16 in atypical meningiomas. The 19 A2 counts showed significant difference between benign and atypical tumours but PC10 values failed to show such a correlation AgNOR and PCNA indices were not found to be useful in predicting recurrences compared to the surgical procedure and histopathological criteria.

  11. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  12. Lessons from surgical outcome for intracranial meningioma involving major venous sinus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Moon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-In; Kang, Woo Dae; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial meningiomas involving the major venous sinus (MVS) pose several complication risks upon performing radical resection. Some surgeons consider MVS invasion a contraindication for a complete resection of meningioma, and others suggest total resection followed by venous reconstruction. The aim of the study was to analyze our surgical results and discuss management strategy for intracranial meningiomas involving the MVS. Between 1993 and 2011, 107 patients with intracranial meningiomas involving MVS underwent surgery in our institution. Clinicoradiological features including pathological features and operative findings were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up duration was 60.2 months (range, 6.2–218.2 months). Distributions of tumor cases according to the involved sinus were as follows: 86% parasagittal, 10.3% tentorial, and 3.7% peritorcular. Simpson Grade I/II removal was achieved in 93 of 107 patients (87%). Partially or totally occluded MVS by their meningiomas (Sindou classification IV and V) was found in 39 patients (36%). Progression rate was 12% (13/107) and progression-free survival rates were 89%, 86%, and 80% at 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Sindou classification (IV/V) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 6 month after the surgery (KPS < 90) were predictive factors for progression in our study (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). The resection degree did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.484). Interestingly, there was no progression in patients that underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife radiosurgery for residual tumor. There were no perioperative deaths. Complication rate was 21% with brain swelling being the most common complication. There was no predictive factor for occurrence of postoperative complication in this study. In conclusion, complete tumor resection with sinus reconstruction did not significantly prevent tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma involving MVS

  13. Lessons from surgical outcome for intracranial meningioma involving major venous sinus.

    PubMed

    Han, Moon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Yang, Jung-In; Kang, Woo Dae; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial meningiomas involving the major venous sinus (MVS) pose several complication risks upon performing radical resection. Some surgeons consider MVS invasion a contraindication for a complete resection of meningioma, and others suggest total resection followed by venous reconstruction. The aim of the study was to analyze our surgical results and discuss management strategy for intracranial meningiomas involving the MVS. Between 1993 and 2011, 107 patients with intracranial meningiomas involving MVS underwent surgery in our institution. Clinicoradiological features including pathological features and operative findings were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up duration was 60.2 months (range, 6.2-218.2 months). Distributions of tumor cases according to the involved sinus were as follows: 86% parasagittal, 10.3% tentorial, and 3.7% peritorcular. Simpson Grade I/II removal was achieved in 93 of 107 patients (87%). Partially or totally occluded MVS by their meningiomas (Sindou classification IV and V) was found in 39 patients (36%). Progression rate was 12% (13/107) and progression-free survival rates were 89%, 86%, and 80% at 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Sindou classification (IV/V) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 6 month after the surgery (KPS < 90) were predictive factors for progression in our study (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). The resection degree did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.484). Interestingly, there was no progression in patients that underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife radiosurgery for residual tumor. There were no perioperative deaths. Complication rate was 21% with brain swelling being the most common complication. There was no predictive factor for occurrence of postoperative complication in this study. In conclusion, complete tumor resection with sinus reconstruction did not significantly prevent tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma involving MVS. Considering the

  14. Identification of a Gene Essential for Sheathed Structure Formation in Sphaerotilus natans, a Filamentous Sheathed Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium that causes bulking in activated sludge processes, can assume two distinct morphologies, depending on the substrate concentration for growth; in substrate-rich media it grows as single rod-shaped cells, whereas in substrate-limited media it grows as filaments. To identify genes responsible for sheath formation, we carried out transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Of the approximately 20,000 mutants obtained, 7 did not form sheathed structures. Sequencing of the Tn5-flanking regions showed that five of the seven Tn5 insertions converged at the same open reading frame, designated sthA. The deduced amino acids encoded by sthA were found to be homologous to glycosyltransferase, which is known to be involved in linking sugars to lipid carriers during bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene of the wild-type strain by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette also resulted in sheathless growth under either type of nutrient condition. These findings indicate that sthA is a crucial component responsible for sheath formation. PMID:11772646

  15. Organic core-sheath nanowire artificial synapses with femtojoule energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Min, Sung-Yong; Hwang, Hyunsang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Emulation of biological synapses is an important step toward construction of large-scale brain-inspired electronics. Despite remarkable progress in emulating synaptic functions, current synaptic devices still consume energy that is orders of magnitude greater than do biological synapses (~10 fJ per synaptic event). Reduction of energy consumption of artificial synapses remains a difficult challenge. We report organic nanowire (ONW) synaptic transistors (STs) that emulate the important working principles of a biological synapse. The ONWs emulate the morphology of nerve fibers. With a core-sheath-structured ONW active channel and a well-confined 300-nm channel length obtained using ONW lithography, ~1.23 fJ per synaptic event for individual ONW was attained, which rivals that of biological synapses. The ONW STs provide a significant step toward realizing low-energy-consuming artificial intelligent electronics and open new approaches to assembling soft neuromorphic systems with nanometer feature size. PMID:27386556

  16. Effects of normal aging on myelin sheath ultrastructures in the somatic sensorimotor system of rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Liang, Ping; Fu, Han; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have presented qualitative and quantitative data regarding the morphological changes that occur peripherally in myelin sheaths and nerve fibers of rats during their lifespan. However, studies on ultrastructural features of myelinated fibers (MFs) in the central nervous system (CNS) remain limited. In the present study, morphological analyses of the somatic sensorimotor MFs in rats at time‑points between postnatal day 14 and postnatal month (PNM) 26 were conducted using electron microscopy. Significant alterations in the myelin sheath were observed in the sensorimotor system of aging and aged rats, which became aggravated with age. The ultrastructural pattern of myelin lamellae also exhibited age dependence. The transformation of the myelin intraperiod line from complete to incomplete fusion occurred after PNM 5, leading to an expansion of periodicity in myelin lamellae. These pathological changes in the myelin structure occurred very early and showed a significant correlation with age, indicating that myelin was the part of the CNS with the highest susceptibility to the influence of aging, and may be the main target of aging effects. In addition to the myelin breakdown, continued myelin production and remyelination were observed in the aging sensorimotor system, suggesting the presence of endogenous mechanisms of myelin repair.

  17. Rare Parenchyma Meningioma in an Adolescent Female With Cheek Tingling: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenjie; Li, Meirong

    2016-04-01

    The following is a report on a rare parenchyma meningioma and the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. To our knowledge, this was the first characterization of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a parenchyma meningioma. Three days after initial presentation, a 14-year-old female student reported feeling tingling in her cheek, grading 3 to 4 points. Two hours later, the tingling had disappeared. The patient was admitted to hospital with stable vital signs and no abnormal presentations upon physical examination. A routine CT scan of the brain showed a quasicircular region of the left occipital lobe was homogenous hyperdense and an arcualia calcification was found on the lesion's margin and the boundary was ill-defined. Further MRI and contrast-enhanced scanning of the brain showed that a lobulated nidus with abnormal signaling was present in the left occipital lobe and was approximately 1.9 × 2.0 cm. Hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging and a slight hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging was also observed. A short T2 signal appeared on the margin and a few longer T2 edema zones appeared around the nidus, whereas the lesion showed homogenous enhancement. MRS was characterized by a slight or moderate increase of a choline (Cho) peak and a small reduction of the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) peak. After completing the preoperative preparation, the excision of the supratentorial deep lesions was performed on the patient. The pathology led to a diagnosis of a left occipital lobe meningioma, WHO I. The patient was followed-up for 14 months postoperation, and had no reoccurrences. Intraparenchymal meningioma rarely occurs in brain parenchyma, and is characterized by lesions with abundant blood supply and requires a glioma to be identified. MRS is a potential tool for preoperative diagnosis of intraparenchymal meningioma. PMID:27082619

  18. Meningioma and schwannoma risk in adults in relation to family history of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Linet, Martha S.; Black, Peter M.; Fine, Howard A.; Selker, Robert G.; Shapiro, William R.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2004-01-01

    Relatively little is known about factors that contribute to the development of meningioma and vestibular schwannoma, two intracranial nervous system tumors. We evaluated the risk of these tumors in relation to family history of malignant or benign tumors. Incident cases of meningioma (n = 197) or schwannoma (n = 96) were identified at three U.S. referral hospitals between June 1994 and August 1998. Controls (n = 799) admitted to the same hospitals for nonmalignant conditions were matched to cases on age, sex, race/ethnicity, hospital, and proximity of residence to hospital. We found that risk of meningioma was increased among persons reporting a family history of a benign brain tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0–21.0; n = 5) or melanoma (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.2–15.0; n = 5). A family history of breast cancer was associated with an elevated meningioma risk among participants aged 18 to 49 years (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4 –11.0; n = 8) but a reduced risk among older respondents (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1–0.7; n = 3). Family history of cancer did not differ between schwannoma cases and controls, although the statistical power to detect associations was limited. Some relative risk estimates were based on a small number of observations and may have arisen by chance. Inheritance of predisposing genes, shared environmental factors, or both within families with a history of benign brain tumors, melanoma, or possibly breast cancer may be related to altered meningioma risk. PMID:15494094

  19. NY-ESO-1 expression in meningioma suggests a rationale for new immunotherapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Baia, Gilson S; Caballero, Otavia L; Ho, Janelle S Y; Zhao, Qi; Cohen, Tzeela; Binder, Zev A; Salmasi, Vafi; Gallia, Gary L; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Burger, Peter; Strausberg, Robert L; Simpson, Andrew J G; Eberhart, Charles G; Riggins, Gregory J

    2013-11-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice for these tumors. However, a significant number of tumors are not surgically accessible, recur, or become malignant, necessitating the repetition of surgery and sometimes radiation. Chemotherapy is rarely used and is generally not recognized as an effective treatment. Cancer/testis (CT) genes represent a unique class of genes, which are expressed by germ cells, normally silenced in somatic cells, but activated in various cancers. CT proteins can elicit spontaneous immune responses in patients with cancer and this feature makes them attractive targets for immunotherapy-based approaches. We analyzed mRNA expression of 37 testis-restricted CT genes in a discovery set of 18 meningiomas by reverse transcription PCR. The overall frequency of expression of CT genes ranged from 5.6% to 27.8%. The most frequently expressed was NY-ESO-1, in 5 patients (27.8%). We subsequently analyzed NY-ESO-1 protein expression in a larger set of meningiomas by immunohistochemistry and found expression in 108 of 110 cases. In some cases, NY-ESO-1 expression was diffused and homogenous, but in most instances it was heterogeneous. Importantly, NY-ESO-1 expression was positively correlated with higher grade and patients presenting with higher levels of NY-ESO-1 staining had significantly worse disease-free and overall survival. We have also shown that NY-ESO-1 expression may lead to humoral immune response in patients with meningioma. Considering the limited treatment options for patients with meningioma, the potential of NY-ESO-1-based immunotherapy should be explored.

  20. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI differentiation of meningioma from dural metastases: a pilot study with immunohistochemical observations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bronwyn E; Woltjer, Randall L; Prola-Netto, Joao; Nesbit, Gary M; Gahramanov, Seymur; Pham, Thao; Wagner, Jaime; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant dural neoplasms are not reliably distinguished from benign dural neoplasms with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases imaged with ferumoxytol has been attributed to intracellular uptake in macrophages rather than vascular leakage. We compared imaging to histopathology and immunohistochemistry in meningiomas and dural metastases having ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI (FeMRI) and gadolinium-enhanced MRI (GdMRI) in order to correlate enhancement patterns to macrophage presence and vascular state. All patients having extraaxial CNS tumors were retrospectively selected from one of two ongoing FeMRI studies. Enhancement was compared between GdMRI and FeMRI. Diagnoses were confirmed histologically and/or by characteristic imaging. Tumor and vascular histology was reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (a macrophage marker), Connexin-43 (Cx43) (a marker of normal gap junctions), and smooth muscle actin (SMA) as a marker of vascularity, was performed in seven study cases with available tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on archival material from 33 subjects outside of the current study as controls: 20 WHO grade I cases of meningioma and 13 metastatic tumors. Metastases displayed marked delayed enhancement on FeMRI, similar to GdMRI. Four patients with dural metastases and one patient with meningioma showed similar enhancement on FeMRI and GdMRI. Five meningiomas with typical enhancement on GdMRI lacked enhancement on FeMRI. Enhancement on FeMRI was better associated with decreased Cx43 expression than intralesional macrophages. These pilot data suggest that FeMRI may better differentiate metastatic disease from meningiomas than GdMRI, and that differences in tumor vasculature rather than macrophage presence could underlie differences in contrast enhancement. PMID:27393348

  1. CNS myelin sheath is stochastically built by homotypic fusion of myelin membranes within the bounds of an oligodendrocyte process.

    PubMed

    Szuchet, Sara; Nielsen, Lauren L; Domowicz, Miriam S; Austin, Jotham R; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2015-04-01

    Myelin - the multilayer membrane that envelops axons - is a facilitator of rapid nerve conduction. Oligodendrocytes form CNS myelin; the prevailing hypothesis being that they do it by extending a process that circumnavigates the axon. It is pertinent to ask how myelin is built because oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and myelin are compositionally different. To this end, we examined oligodendrocyte cultures and embryonic avian optic nerves by electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy and three-dimensional electron tomography. The results support three novel concepts. Myelin membranes are synthesized as tubules and packaged into "myelinophore organelles" in the oligodendrocyte perikaryon. Myelin membranes are matured in and transported by myelinophore organelles within an oligodendrocyte process. The myelin sheath is generated by myelin membrane fusion inside an oligodendrocyte process. These findings abrogate the dogma of myelin resulting from a wrapping motion of an oligodendrocyte process and open up new avenues in the quest for understanding myelination in health and disease.

  2. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  3. The plasma drag and dust motion inside the magnetized sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Samarian, A.

    2011-05-15

    The motion of micron size dust inside the sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated by self-consistently calculating the charge and various forces acting on the dust. It is shown that the dust trajectory inside the sheath, which is like an Archimedean spiral swinging back and forth between the wall and the plasma-sheath boundary, depends only indirectly on the orientation of the magnetic field. When the Lorentz force is smaller than the collisional momentum exchange, the dust dynamics is insensitive to the obliqueness of the magnetic field. Only when the magnetic field is strong enough, the sheath structure and, thus, the dust dynamics are significantly affected by the field orientation. Balance between the plasma drag, sheath electrostatic field, and gravity plays an important role in determining how far the dust can travel inside the sheath. The dust equilibrium point shifts closer to the wall in the presence of gravity and plasma drag. However, in the absence of plasma drag, dust can sneak back into the plasma if acted only by gravity. The implication of our results to the usability of dust as a sheath probe is discussed.

  4. Nonextensive statistics and the sheath criterion in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-01-15

    The Bohm criterion in an electropositive plasma containing nonextensively distributed electrons and warm ions is investigated by using a steady state two-fluid model. Taking into account the ion-neutral collisions and finite temperature of ions, a modified Bohm criterion is derived which limits both maximum and minimum allowable velocity of ions at the sheath edge (u{sub 0i}). It is found that the degree of nonextensivity of electrons (q) and temperature of positive ions (T{sub i}) affect only the lower limit of the entrance velocity of ions into the sheath while the degree of ion collisionality (α) influences both lower and upper limits of the ion velocities at the sheath edge. In addition, depending on the value of q, it is shown that the minimum velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge can be greater or smaller than its Maxwellian counterpart. Moreover, it is shown that, depending on the values of α and T{sub i}, the positive ions with subsonic velocity may enter the sheath for either q > 1 or −1 < q < 1. Finally, as a practical application, the density distribution of charged particles in the sheath region is studied for different values of u{sub 0i}, and it is shown that monotonical reduction of the positive ion density distribution occurs only when the velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge lies between two above mentioned limits.

  5. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  6. Ion Dynamics Model for Collisionless Radio Frequency Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T.R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full scale reactor model based on fluid equations is widely used to analyze high density plasma reactors. It is well known that the submillimeter scale sheath in front of a biased electrode supporting the wafer is difficult to resolve in numerical simulations, and the common practice is to use results for electric field from some form of analytical sheath model as boundary conditions for full scale reactor simulation. There are several sheath models in the literature ranging from Child's law to a recent unified sheath model [P. A. Miller and M. E. Riley, J. Appl. Phys. 82, 3689 (1997)l. In the present work, the cold ion fluid equations in the radio frequency sheath are solved numerically to show that the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux inside the sheath, commonly ignored in analytical models, is important in determining the electric field and ion energy at the electrode. Consequently, a semianalytical model that includes the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux is developed for use as boundary condition in reactor simulations. This semianalytical model is shown to yield results for sheath properties in close agreement with numerical solutions.

  7. Solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges: a lesion distinct from fibrous meningioma. A clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, S S; Scheithauer, B W; Nascimento, A G; Hirose, T; Davis, D H

    1996-08-01

    Seven solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) of the meninges are presented and their clinicopathologic features are compared with those of 64 fibrous meningiomas (FM). Patients with SFT included 5 females and 2 males age 47 to 73 years. The dura-based tumors involved the parasagittal region (1), tentorium (2), cerebellopontine angle (2), and spinal region (2). One each showed invasion of brain and of a spinal nerve root. Of four SFTs with at least 1-year follow-up, one subtotally resected example recurred. No tumors metastasized. All consisted of spindle cells disposed in fascicles between prominent, eosinophilic bands of collagen. Whorls and storiform cell arrangements were lacking. Mitoses ranged from 1 to 7/10 400 x fields. MIB-1 labeling indices ranged from 1% to 18% (mean 4%). All were PAS negative and showed strong immunoreactivity for vimentin and CD34. Of cases studied, half were estrogen and all were progesterone receptor immunopositive. The majority (72%) of FMs occurred in females and most (72%) were supratentorial. Recurrence was noted in 15%. Mitotic activity varied from 0 to 3 mitoses per 10 400 x fields (mean < 1). MIB-1 labeling indices ranged from 1% to 5% (mean 1.5%). Unlike SFT, FMs were glycogen-containing and variously exhibited a storiform pattern (13 of 20), psammoma body formation (9 of 20), and calcification of collagen (4 of 20). Immunoreactivities included vimentin (100%), focal to patchy EMA (80%), S-100 protein (80%), collagen IV (25%), and patchy, mild-to-moderate CD34 staining (60%). Of cases studied, nearly half were estrogen and all were progesterone receptor staining positive. Meningeal SFTs represent a distinct morphologic entity, the morphologic and immunohistochemical features of which differ from those of FM and suggest a histogenetic relationship to pleural SFT. Although a minority histologically appear to be low grade malignant, our limited experience suggests that they behave in a benign fashion. The classification of mesenchymal

  8. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of the Sheath of Phormidium uncinatum

    PubMed Central

    Hoiczyk, Egbert

    1998-01-01

    The sheath of the filamentous, gliding cyanobacterium Phormidium uncinatum was studied by using light and electron microscopy. In thin sections and freeze fractures the sheath was found to be composed of helically arranged carbohydrate fibrils, 4 to 7 nm in diameter, which showed a substantial degree of crystallinity. As in all other examined motile cyanobacteria, the arrangement of the sheath fibrils correlates with the motion of the filaments during gliding motility; i.e., the fibrils formed a right-handed helix in clockwise-rotating species and a left-handed helix in counterclockwise-rotating species and were radially arranged in nonrotating cyanobacteria. Since sheaths could only be found in old immotile cultures, the arrangement seems to depend on the process of formation and attachment of sheath fibrils to the cell surface rather than on shear forces created by the locomotion of the filaments. As the sheath in P. uncinatum directly contacts the cell surface via the previously identified surface fibril forming glycoprotein oscillin (E. Hoiczyk and W. Baumeister, Mol. Microbiol. 26:699–708, 1997), it seems reasonable that similar surface glycoproteins act as platforms for the assembly and attachment of the sheaths in cyanobacteria. In P. uncinatum the sheath makes up approximately 21% of the total dry weight of old cultures and consists only of neutral sugars. Staining reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that the fibrillar component is a homoglucan that is very similar but not identical to cellulose which is cross-linked by the other detected monosaccharides. Both the chemical composition and the rigid highly ordered structure clearly distinguish the sheaths from the slime secreted by the filaments during gliding motility. PMID:9683490

  9. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  10. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  11. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  12. Absence of Debye sheaths due to secondary electron emission.

    PubMed

    Campanell, M D; Khrabrov, A V; Kaganovich, I D

    2012-06-22

    A bounded plasma where the hot electrons impacting the walls produce more than one secondary on average is studied via particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that no classical Debye sheath or space-charge-limited sheath exists. Ions are not drawn to the walls and electrons are not repelled. Hence the unconfined plasma electrons travel unobstructed to the walls, causing extreme particle and energy fluxes. Each wall has a positive charge, forming a small potential barrier or "inverse sheath" that pulls some secondaries back to the wall to maintain the zero current condition.

  13. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  14. Electron-Hose Instability in an Annular Plasma Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.

    1999-07-08

    A relativistic electron beam propagating through an annular plasma sheath is subject to a transverse plasma-electron coupled electrostatic instability. From the linearized fluid equations, the beam-sheath interaction is resolved into three coupled equations. The corresponding wakefield is computed and the asymptotic linear evolution is noted. For illustration, numerical examples are given for a plasma accelerator employing such a sheath. While the coasting beam scalings are quite severe at low energy, single-bunch instability growth can in fact be reduced to nil, for a very high-gradient accelerator.

  15. Absence of Debye Sheaths Due to Secondary Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    M.D. Campanell, A. Khrabrov and I. D. Kaganovich

    2012-05-11

    A bounded plasma where the hot electrons impacting the walls produce more than one secondary on average is studied via particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that no classical Debye sheath or space-charge limited sheath exists. Ions are not drawn to the walls and electrons are not repelled. Hence the unconfined plasma electrons travel unobstructed to the walls, causing extreme particle and energy fluxes. Each wall has a positive charge, forming a small potential barrier or "inverse sheath" that pulls some secondaries back to the wall to maintain the zero current condition.

  16. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  17. Measurement of sheath thickness at a floating potential

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Oh, Se-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-02-15

    In a cylindrical Langmuir probe measurement, ion current is collected from the surface of the sheath surrounded at probe tip, not at the surface of the probe tip. By using this, the sheath thickness can be obtained, if we know some unknown parameters, such as ion current, plasma density, and electron temperature. In this paper, we present a method to measure sheath thickness by using a wave cutoff method and a floating harmonic method. The measured result is in a good agreement with Allen-Boyd-Reynolds theory.

  18. Measurement of sheath thickness at a floating potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Oh, Se-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-02-01

    In a cylindrical Langmuir probe measurement, ion current is collected from the surface of the sheath surrounded at probe tip, not at the surface of the probe tip. By using this, the sheath thickness can be obtained, if we know some unknown parameters, such as ion current, plasma density, and electron temperature. In this paper, we present a method to measure sheath thickness by using a wave cutoff method and a floating harmonic method. The measured result is in a good agreement with Allen-Boyd-Reynolds theory.

  19. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at Mid Forearm Level

    PubMed Central

    Dusad, Tarun; Meena, D.S.; Saini, Narendra; Sharma, Yogesh; Khurana, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Schwannomas are also known as neurilemmoma that usually originate from Schwann cells located in the peripheral nerve sheaths. It usually occurs in the age group of 20 to 70 years. These are the commonest tumors of the peripheral nerves, 5% of which occur in the adults and 19% of the tumors occur in upper extremities. Schwannomas are generally presented as an asymptomatic mass. Discomfort may be the only presenting complaint of the patient. Paresthesia may be elicited on tapping the swelling. Magnetic resonanceimaging, and ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old male came to our hospital for a lump located at the volar side of the right mid forearm for 10 years with discomfort and paresthesia in median nerve distribution of hand which appeared in last two years. Total excision was performed for the lesion. Histopathological examination of the mass revealed typical features of schwannoma. At two months follow-up, the patient was symptom free with mild paresthesia in his index and middle fingers. Conclusion: Benign tumours involving peripheral nerves of the upper extremity are uncommon. Schwannomas are theoretically removable because they repulse fascicular groups without penetrating them, thus allowing their enucleation while preserving nerve continuity, as reported in our patient.

  20. Cell-mediated immune response of patients with meningiomas defined in vitro by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test.

    PubMed Central

    Pees, H W; Seidel, B

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CTX) of meningioma patients was assessed postoperatively by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test. Autologous and allogeneic tumour cells were used for prelabelling with isotope and peripheral blood lymphocytes added in a ratio of 200:1. After 60 hg the plates were washed and residual CMP counted. Control target cells consisted of normal skin fibroblasts. CTX was calculated in percentage reduction compared to cultures incubated with control lymphocytes. Specific CTX on meningioma cells (i.e. not destroying control cells) greater than 20% was considered 'positive' if significant at P less than 0-05. Fifteen of twenty-three meningiomas showed specific CTX (65%). Among eight CNS tumours of different type and thirteen non-malignant diseases and normals only three (14%) were specifically cytotoxic for meningioma cells. A cross-reaction could be demonstrated between autologous and allogeneic meningioma target cells. However, no activity of lymphocytes from patients with meningiomas on glioblastoma cells and foetal brain tissue could be found at the ratio used for evaluation. Evidence is presented indicating that a cellular immune response as measured in the microcytotoxic test may be dependent on a residual or recurrent tumour in the body. PMID:1277580

  1. The neurofibromatosis 2 tumor suppressor gene product, merlin, regulates human meningioma cell growth by signaling through YAP.

    PubMed

    Striedinger, Katherine; VandenBerg, Scott R; Baia, Gilson S; McDermott, Michael W; Gutmann, David H; Lal, Anita

    2008-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of schwannomas and meningiomas. Several studies have examined the ability of the NF2 gene product, merlin, to function as a tumor suppressor in diverse cell types; however, little is known about merlin growth regulation in meningiomas. In Drosophila, merlin controls cell proliferation and apoptosis by signaling through the Hippo pathway to inhibit the function of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. The Hippo pathway is conserved in mammals. On the basis of these observations, we developed human meningioma cell lines matched for merlin expression to evaluate merlin growth regulation and investigate the relationship between NF2 status and Yes-associated protein (YAP), the mammalian homolog of Yorkie. NF2 loss in meningioma cells was associated with loss of contact-dependent growth inhibition, enhanced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation due to increased S-phase entry. In addition, merlin loss in both meningioma cell lines and primary tumors resulted in increased YAP expression and nuclear localization. Finally, siRNA-mediated reduction of YAP in NF2-deficient meningioma cells rescued the effects of merlin loss on cell proliferation and S-phase entry. Collectively, these results represent the first demonstration that merlin regulates cell growth in human cancer cells by suppressing YAP.

  2. Usefulness of PRESTO magnetic resonance imaging for the differentiation of schwannoma and meningioma in the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Tomogane, Yusuke; Mori, Kanji; Izumoto, Shuichi; Kaba, Keizo; Ishikura, Reiichi; Ando, Kumiko; Wakata, Yuki; Fujita, Shigekazu; Shirakawa, Manabu; Arita, Norio

    2013-01-01

    The principles of echo-shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique employs an MR sequence that sensitively detects susceptibility changes in the brain. The effectiveness of PRESTO MR imaging was examined for distinguishing between cerebellopontine angle (CPA) schwannomas and meningiomas in 24 patients with CPA tumors, 12 with vestibular schwannomas, and 12 with meningiomas. Histopathological study of surgical specimens showed that 11 of the 12 schwannomas contained hemosiderin deposits and all had microhemorrhages. One meningioma contained hemosiderin deposits and two involved microhemorrhages. Abnormal vessel proliferation, and dilated and thrombosed vessels were observed in all schwannomas and in 4 meningiomas. In addition to MR imaging with all basic sequences, PRESTO MR imaging and computed tomography were performed. PRESTO imaging showed significantly more schwannomas (n = 12) than meningiomas (n = 2) exhibited intratumoral spotty signal voids which were isointense to air in the mastoid air cells (p < 0.001). These spotty signal voids were significantly associated with histopathologically demonstrated hemosiderin deposits (p < 0.001), microhemorrhages (p < 0.01), and abnormal vessels (p < 0.04). The visualization of spotty signal voids on PRESTO images is useful to distinguish schwannomas from meningiomas.

  3. Vaccination for invasive canine meningioma induces in situ production of antibodies capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Brian M; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Seiler, Charles E; Goulart, Michelle R; SantaCruz, Karen S; Schutten, Melissa M; Meints, Joyce P; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Faissler, Dominik; Chen, Wei; Hunt, Matthew A; Olin, Michael R; Ohlfest, John R

    2013-05-15

    Malignant and atypical meningiomas are resistant to standard therapies and associated with poor prognosis. Despite progress in the treatment of other tumors with therapeutic vaccines, this approach has not been tested preclinically or clinically in these tumors. Spontaneous canine meningioma is a clinically meaningful but underutilized model for preclinical testing of novel strategies for aggressive human meningioma. We treated 11 meningioma-bearing dogs with surgery and vaccine immunotherapy consisting of autologous tumor cell lysate combined with toll-like receptor ligands. Therapy was well tolerated, and only one dog had tumor growth that required intervention, with a mean follow up of 585 days. IFN-γ-elaborating T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of 2 cases, but vaccine-induced tumor-reactive antibody responses developed in all dogs. Antibody responses were polyclonal, recognizing both intracellular and cell surface antigens, and HSP60 was identified as one common antigen. Tumor-reactive antibodies bound allogeneic canine and human meningiomas, showing common antigens across breed and species. Histologic analysis revealed robust infiltration of antibody-secreting plasma cells into the brain around the tumor in posttreatment compared with pretreatment samples. Tumor-reactive antibodies were capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity to autologous and allogeneic tumor cells. These data show the feasibility and immunologic efficacy of vaccine immunotherapy for a large animal model of human meningioma and warrant further development toward human trials.

  4. Cellulose/soy protein composite-based nerve guidance conduits with designed microstructure for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Li; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Yanteng; Li, Ke; Tong, Zan; Yi, Li; Wang, Xiong; Li, Yinping; Tian, Weiqun; He, Xiaohua; Zhao, Min; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Objective. The objective of this work was to develop nerve guidance conduits from natural polymers, cellulose and soy protein isolate (SPI), by evaluating the effects of cellulose/SPI film-based conduit (CSFC) and cellulose/SPI sponge-based conduit (CSSC) on regeneration of nerve defects in rats. Approach. CSFC and CSSC with the same chemical components were fabricated from cellulose and SPI. Effects of CSSC and CSFC on regeneration of the defective nerve were comparatively investigated in rats with a 10 mm long gap in sciatic nerve. The outcomes of peripheral nerve repair were evaluated by a combination of electrophysiological assessment, Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing, double NF200/S100 immunofluorescence analysis, toluidine blue staining, and electron microscopy. The probable molecular mechanism was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. Main results. Compared with CSFC, CSSC had 2.69 times higher porosity and 5.07 times higher water absorption, thus ensuring much higher permeability. The nerve defects were successfully bridged and repaired by CSSC and CSFC. Three months after surgery, the CSSC group had a higher compound muscle action potential amplitude ratio, a higher percentage of positive NF200 and S100 staining, and a higher axon diameter and myelin sheath thickness than the CSFC group, showing the repair efficiency of CSSC was higher than that of CSFC. qPCR analysis indicated the mRNA levels of nerve growth factor, IL-10, IL-6, and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) were higher in the CSSC group. This also indicated that there was better nerve repair with CSSC due to the higher porosity and permeability of CSSC providing a more favourable microenvironment for nerve regeneration than CSFC. Significance. A promising nerve guidance conduit was developed from cellulose/SPI sponge that showed potential for application in the repair of nerve defect. This work also suggests that nerve guidance conduits with better repair efficiency

  5. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-21

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  6. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  7. Plasma sheath multipath analysis and its effect on GNSS navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongxing; Xi, Xiaoli; Song, Zhongguo; Liu, Jiangfan

    2015-11-01

    When hypersonic vehicle reenters the Earth's atmosphere, the plasma sheath will be generated by its collision with ambient air that would affect global navigation satellite system (GNSS). In order to understand such effects, the transmission coefficient of the plasma sheath has been investigated using the numerical method before. But this is found to be insufficient, for besides the attenuation on the signal energy, the multipath effect between the plasma sheath and the vehicle surface is also a serious factor, which may result in errors in pseudorange measurement and carrier phase measurement of GNSS receiver and finally affect the positioning accuracy. The multipath of the plasma sheath is analyzed by finite-difference time-domain method combined with further signal processing, and a simulation platform is established to verify this effects on positioning performance. Simulation results indicate the degradation of positioning performance when these multipath signals were present, causing position error with several meters to tens of meters.

  8. 32. DETAIL OF GEARS LOOKING NORTH WITH SHEATHING REMOVED AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL OF GEARS LOOKING NORTH WITH SHEATHING REMOVED AND SHAFT OF KING GEAR BEYOND - Caleb Crosby Threshing Barn, Noeton (moved to Norris Dam State Park, Lake City), Morristown, Hamblen County, TN

  9. Morphological analysis of the sheathed flagellum of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It was recently shown that B. melitensis is flagellated. However, the flagellar structure remains poorly described. Findings We analyzed the structure of the polar sheathed flagellum of B. melitensis by TEM analysis and demonstrated that the Ryu staining is a good method to quickly visualize the flagellum by optical microscopy. The TEM analysis demonstrated that an extension of the outer membrane surrounds a filament ending by a club-like structure. The ΔftcR, ΔfliF, ΔflgE and ΔfliC flagellar mutants still produce an empty sheath. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the flagellum of B. melitensis has the characteristics of the sheathed flagella. Our results also suggest that the flagellar sheath production is not directly linked to the flagellar structure assembly and is not regulated by the FtcR master regulator. PMID:21143933

  10. Porous protective solid phase micro-extractor sheath

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Randich, Erik

    2005-03-29

    A porous protective sheath for active extraction media used in solid phase microextraction (SPME). The sheath permits exposure of the media to the environment without the necessity of extending a fragile coated fiber from a protective tube or needle. Subsequently, the sheath can pierce and seal with GC-MS septums, allowing direct injection of samples into inlet ports of analytical equipment. Use of the porous protective sheath, within which the active extraction media is contained, mitigates the problems of: 1) fiber breakage while the fiber is extended during sampling, 2) active media coating loss caused by physical contact of the bare fiber with the sampling environment; and 3) coating slough-off during fiber extension and retraction operations caused by rubbing action between the fiber and protective needle or tube.

  11. Solitary fibrous tumor surrounding the carotid sheath.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that are mostly found arising from the pleura. Although SFTs recently have been reported in other regions, they are rare in the head and neck and have often been misdiagnosed due to their rarity. SFTs are benign in most cases. Clinically, SFTs usually manifest as well-circumscribed, slow-growing, smooth and painless masses. Symptoms are often minimal, although they may include sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, change of voice or trismus. CT-Scan and MRI are the most sensitive imaging procedures used. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion. Because recurrences have been noted up to 30 years after surgery, long-term follow up is mandatory. In this article, we present a case of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space in a 20-year-old man, involving the carotid sheath, treated by surgical excision with no recurrence after 1 year. The clinical presentation, surgical management and pathological findings are described.

  12. Safety and efficacy of ureteral access sheaths.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua M; Yiee, Jenny; Park, Sangtae

    2007-02-01

    The ureteral access sheath (UAS) was introduced as a means of passing a flexible ureteroscope. Although the device was initially lauded for its ability to facilitate ureteroscopic access, passage was difficult and risked ureteral injury, and the UAS fell out of favor until the development of a new generation of devices that was easier to insert. The UAS should be advanced under fluoroscopy over a stiff guidewire, and the surgeon should ensure copious hydration of all inner and outer surfaces. Use of the UAS is purported to improve irrigant flow and visibility. The UAS can induce transient ureteral ischemia and promote an acute inflammatory response, but it also prevents potentially harmful elevations in intrarenal pressure. Unequivocal data are not yet available to suggest that UAS use during ureteroscopy protects or harms the upper urinary tract. The UAS also has the potential to improve stone-free rates by allowing passive egress or active retrieval of fragments. A large prospective study is needed to unequivocally determine if UAS use is superior in terms of stone-free rates. Cost studies reported to favor UAS use, although a formal cost-effectiveness analysis has not been performed. Further study is needed before routine use of the UAS can be recommended.

  13. The impact of frequency mixing on sheath properties: Ion energy distribution and Vdc/Vrf interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Steven; Hoffman, Daniel; Yang, Jang-Gyoo; Paterson, Alex; Holland, John

    2005-05-01

    A dual frequency rf sheath is analyzed using a simple rf sheath model to study the interaction between the two driving rf currents and their effect on sheath parameters. A symmetric rf discharge with defined electron density and dc sheath potential is modeled using a sharp boundary sheath approximation. Three results of this study are reported: (1) reproduction of trends in ion energy distribution functions predicted and measured in previous studies, (2) a frequency-mixing-dependent relationship between the dc sheath potential and applied rf potential, and (3) an additional asymmetry in the ion energy distribution function generated by the intermodulation components resulting from the nonlinear sheath.

  14. Use of an introducer sheath for colonic stent placement.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Miguel A; Mainar, Antonio; Tejero, Eloy; Alfonso, Eduardo; Gimeno, María José; Herrera, Marcos

    2002-09-01

    We describe a technical modification of Wallstent implantation for the treatment of malignant rectosigmoid and descending colonic obstructions. The modification is the routine placement of an introducer sheath via the rectum before stent implantation in order to straighten the rectosigmoid region. This device facilitates catheter and guide wire manipulations and obtaining specimen biopsies for histopathological studies. The introducer sheath has been used without complications in 21 consecutive patients.

  15. Plasma sheath effects on ion collection by a pinhole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Snyder, David B.

    1993-01-01

    This work presents tables to assist in the evaluation of pinhole collection effects on spacecraft. These tables summarize results of a computer model which tracks particle trajectories through a simplified electric field in the plasma sheath. A technique is proposed to account for plasma sheath effects in the application of these results and scaling rules are proposed to apply the calculations to specific situations. This model is compared to ion current measurements obtained by another worker, and the agreement is very good.

  16. Sheath fold development around slip surfaces subject to general shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Senderak, Barbara; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Sheath folds are cone-shaped structures, which typically develop in high-strain shear zones in a variety of geological settings. When observed in the cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction, sheath folds display characteristic elliptical closed contours. The aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour is commonly used for the classification and quantitative analysis. Alsop and Holdsworth (2006) showed that the outermost aspect ratio observed in the natural sheath folds varies between 1 and 7. Previous work on sheath folds development around slip surfaces focused on simple shear deformation (Reber et al., 2013). The aspect ratio developing under such conditions exhibits values larger than the ones observed in nature. Therefore, we investigate sheath fold development around slip surfaces under general shear conditions, in which a shortening component acts in the direction parallel to the shearing plane and perpendicular to the simple shear direction. In our models, the out-of-plane shortening is accommodated by 1) extension in the shear direction only or by 2) uniform extension perpendicular to the shortening direction (dilation). On one hand, the pure shear deformation leads to a decrease of the aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour of the developed sheath folds. On the other hand, it also modifies the slip surface size and orientation, which promotes development of sheath folds with larger aspect ratios. The numerical simulations show that the latter effect is minor and, for the two tested scenarios, we generate sheath folds with the aspect ratios of the outermost ellipse that favourably compare to the range observed in nature.

  17. Sheath ionization model of beam emissions from large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, S. T.; Cohen, H. A.; Bhavnani, K. H.; Tautz, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of the charging of a spacecraft emitting electron and ion beams has been applied to the case of large spacecraft. In this model, ionization occurs in the sheath due to the return current. Charge neutralization of spherical space charge flow is examined by solving analytical equations numerically. Parametric studies of potential large spacecraft are performed. As in the case of small spacecraft, the ions created in the sheath by the returning current play a large role in determining spacecraft potential.

  18. Microscopic and submicroscopic studies on the peripheral nerve and the skeletal muscle of the female. cadaver found in the Han Tomb No.1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Feng, W H; Boa, Y H; Xue, J N; Ying, Y S

    1979-09-01

    The present paper deals with the microscopic and submicroscopic structures of the peripheral nerve of the lumbar plexus and the skeletal muscle of the m. psoas major of the ancient female cadaver buried about 2100 years ago, which was excavated from the Han Tomb No. 1 at Mawangdui (Mawangtui) near Changsha, Hunan Province. The connective tissues in the peripheral nerve and the skeletal muscle of the ancient cadaver were found well preserved. Under the electron microscope were observed the characteristic periodic bands of the collagenous fibrils as well as some axons and degenerated myelin sheath in the lumbar plexus. And in some of the better preserved nerve fibers, their axons and myelin sheaths are readily discernible. In the m. psoas major, cross striations are clearly visible in some muscle fibers. The remains of a blood vessel with only their connective tissues left were observed in the nerve of the lumbar plexus. Bacterial spores appeared in the two tissues.

  19. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  20. Cryotherapy and nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Drez, D; Faust, D C; Evans, J P

    1981-01-01

    Ice application is one of the most extensively used treatments for athletic injuries. Frostbite is a recognized danger. Five cases of nerve palsy resulting from ice application are reported here. These palsies were temporary. They usually resolve spontaneously without any significant sequelae. This complication can be avoided by not using ice for more than 30 minutes and by guarding superficial nerves in the area.