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Sample records for nerve sheath meningioma

  1. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sunita; Lee, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs) grow slowly and, if untreated, patients may have stable visual function for up to several years. Treatment of an ONSM may lead to vision loss (radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy). Therefore, observation is recommended for a patient with ONSM and relatively preserved visual acuity, color vision, pupils, and visual fields. Follow-up every 4 to 6 months initially is recommended extending to annual examinations if visual function and tumor size remain stable for a few years. Neuroimaging can be repeated every 12 months. An undisputed decline in visual function or any intracranial extension warrants treatment of the ONSM. The treatment of choice for a tumor confined to the orbit is stereotactic fractionated radiation. Stereotactic fractionated radiation uses multiple small doses of radiation using tight margins. A reasonable alternative, three-dimensional conformal fractionated radiation uses computed tomography-guided planning but usually requires wider margins. Conventional radiation uses much wider margins and would not be recommended for treatment of ONSM. The radiation can be administered during 5 to 6 weeks in 28 daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy/fraction to a total of 50.4 to 56 Gy. Many patients have improvement or stabilization of their visual function. Gamma knife radiosurgery does not have a role in ONSM because the required dose is toxic to the optic nerve. A tumor that extends intracranially may be treated with fractionated radiation if any vision remains. Surgical excision can be considered for significant intracranial extension but this often leads to complete vision loss in the ipsilateral eye. A blind, disfigured eye also may be treated with en bloc surgical resection of the meningioma.

  2. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size.

  3. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  4. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  5. Analyses on the misdiagnoses of 25 patients with unilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun-Feng; Xia, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Xiang-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Yong; Wen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate clinical features of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) that was misdiagnosed, and to find methods to reduce the misdiagnoses. METHODS Retrospective series study. Twenty-five misdisgnosed patients with unilateral ONSM were collected from Jan. 2008 to Jan. 2015 and the clinical records reviewed. RESULTS Patients were misdiagnosed with acute papillitis most frequently (n=17), immediately followed by optic atrophy (n=8), ischemic optic neuropathy (n=5), acute retrobulbar optic neuritis (n=5), optic disc vasculitis (n=3). For each patient, the minimum frequency of misdiagnoses was once and the maximum was 4 times. As for the lasting time of being misdiagnosed, the shortest was 1.5mo and the longest was 45mo. Twenty-one cases (84%) were once treated with glucocorticoids, and its side effects was found in seventeen patients. Twenty patients (80%) complained with varying degree of vision loss. When a definite diagnosis was made, sixteen cases (64%) showed slight exophthalmos and eighteen cases (72%) had the tubular ONSM. CONCLUSION ONSM without loss obvious exophthalmos is easily misdiagnosed in clinic, and for most of these ONSMs are tubular. PMID:27672598

  6. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  7. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Abouaf, Lucie; Girard, Nicolas; Lefort, Thibaud; D'hombres, Anne; Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain; Mornex, Francoise

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  8. Somatostatin Receptor SPECT/CT using 99mTc Labeled HYNIC-TOC Aids in Diagnosis of Primary Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare, benign and slow growing tumor involving the intra-orbital/intra-canalicular segment of the optic nerve. Untreated, they can potentially lead to visual deterioration. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the gold standard imaging modality for diagnosing the entity. Often, a clinical dilemma exists to narrow the differential diagnosis of an enhancing intra-orbital mass on MR. Molecular imaging provides a high degree of precision in diagnosing meningioma in view of relatively high levels of somatostatin receptor expression by these tumors. The following case demonstrates the potential clinical utility of somatostatin receptor SPECT using 99mTc- labeled HYNIC-TOC in clinical diagnosis of ONSM. PMID:28242992

  9. Intrasellar malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Krayenbühl, N; Heppner, F; Yonekawa, Y; Bernays, R L

    2007-02-01

    Intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) and intrasellar schwannomas are rare tumors. We describe a case of an intrasellar schwannoma with progression to a MPNST, a finding that, although very rare, extends the differential diagnosis of intrasellar lesions.

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease.

  11. Penetration and Splitting of Optic Nerve by Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of the optic nerves is an important issue in the resection of tuberculum sellae meningiomas. We report the case of a patient whose optic nerve was penetrated by a tuberculum sellae meningioma. During surgery, a bulging tumor was found to penetrate the right optic nerve. The tumor was gross totally removed, including tumors bulging through the optic nerve. Two trunks of the split optic nerve were preserved. The penetrated shape of the optic nerve may lead to misjudgment and its damage. Divided trunks of optic nerves are difficult to recognize and may be confused for the tumor capsule, because they may be thinned and seem to contain tumors. In addition, a single trunk may be confused for the whole nerve; thus, the other trunk may be easily damaged if not dissected cautiously. Treatment strategy according to the remnant visual acuity was suggested. PMID:27651874

  12. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  13. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  14. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  15. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE PRAWN NERVE SHEATHS

    PubMed Central

    Doggenweiler, C. F.; Heuser, John E.

    1967-01-01

    The sheaths from freshly teased nerve fibers of the prawn exhibit a positive radial birefringence, consistent with their EM appearance as highly organized laminated structures composed of numerous thin cytoplasmic sheets or laminae bordered by unit membranes and arranged concentrically around the axon. The closely apposed membranes in these sheaths are fragile and often break down into rows of vesicles during fixation. Desmosome-like attachment zones occur in many regions of the sheath. The membranes within these zones resist vesiculation and thereby provide a "control" region for relating the type of vesicles formed in the fragile portions of the sheaths to the specific fixation conditions. It is proposed that during fixation the production of artifactual vesicles is governed by an interplay of three factors: (a) direct chemical action of the fixative on the polar strata of adjacent unit membranes, (b) osmotic forces applied to membranes during fixation, and (c) the pre-existing natural relations between adjacent membranes. It is found that permanganate best preserves the continuity of the membranes but will still produce vesicles if the fixative exerts severe osmotic forces. These results support other reports (19) of the importance of comparing tissues fixed by complementary procedures so that systematic artifacts will not be described as characteristic of the natural state. PMID:4166578

  16. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  17. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of penis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, J; Madan, R; Singh, L; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Roy, S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare variety of soft tissue sarcoma that originates from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of neural crest origin. They have historically been difficult tumours to diagnose and treat. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with a goal to achieve negative margins. Despite aggressive surgery and adjuvant therapy, the prognosis of patients with MPNST remains poor. MPNST arising from penis is a very rare entity; thus, it presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present a case of penile MPNST in a 38-year-old man in the absence of neurofibromatosis treated with surgery followed by post-operative radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions and adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and adriamycin.

  18. [Transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)].

    PubMed

    Nenashev, E A; Cherekaev, V A; Kadasheva, A B; Kozlov, A V; Rotin, D L; Stepanian, M A

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare entity with only 18 cases of trigeminal nerve MPNST described by now and only one report of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into MPNST published up to date. One more case of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve (1st division) tumor into MPNST is demonstrated.

  19. Meningioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... based dye is used to augment the picture. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With this imaging study, a magnetic field ... Accessed Dec. 2, 2013. Pinto PS, et al. Magnetic resonance imaging features of meningioma in children and young adults: ...

  20. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  1. Leptomeningeal metastasis of an intradural malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Stark, Andreas M; Mehdorn, H Maximilian

    2013-08-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are defined as any malignant tumor arising from or differentiating towards the peripheral nerve sheath. Intradural MPNST metastases are very rare. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of leptomeningeal metastasis of a MPNST to the spine and intracranial space. A 56-year-old woman with primary intradural MPNST of the S1 nerve root developed leptomeningeal metastases as well as brain metastases 19 months after diagnosis. The patient had a history of non-Hodgkins lymphoma for which she had received irradiation to the spine 15 years prior to this presentation. She had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 1. Patients with MPNST may also develop leptomeningeal metastases as demonstrated in this patient with intradural post-radiation MPNST.

  2. Aggressive orbital optic nerve meningioma with benign microscopic features: a case report.

    PubMed

    Amoli, F Asadi; Mehrabani, P Mansouri; Tari, A Sadeghi

    2007-12-01

    Primary optic nerve meningiomas occur at lower ages than meningiomas arising from the coverings of the brain and spinal cord. Here we report the case of a 20-year-old female with an aggressive orbital meningioma referred to the Ophthalmology Department of the Farabi Hospital in Tehran. The patient had a history of orbital meningioma from 10 years ago and several surgical resections due to tumor recurrence during these 10 years. On admission, the patient had a large orbital mass and severe proptosis. MRI images revealed a large left orbital mass with optic nerve involvement and extension to the left maxillary sinus, pterygoid fossa and the dura in the floor of the anterior fossa. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mass confirmed tumor recurrence. The patient first received radiotherapy due to the inoperable mass, and the tumor was resected 1.5 month later. Microscopic study showed meningotheliomatous meningioma with extensive involvement of the optic nerve and invasion of the optic disc, sclera and choroid. The interesting aspect of this case was the aggressive behavior of the tumor with intraocular invasion, despite its benign histopathological features, which led to wide exenteration of the eye together with resection of the upper and lower lids.

  3. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF.

  4. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-08-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves. Design A prospective study within-subjects design. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures Cranial nerve identification. Results The group of nine meningiomas was composed of one cavernous sinus, three petroclival, one tuberculum sellae, two sphenoid wing, one olfactory groove, and one temporal floor meningioma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strong, and the contrast with cranial nerves clearly evident. There were one definite olfactory nerve deficit, one transient abducens deficit, and one definite hemiparesis. All lesions were resected (Simpson grades 1 and 2). The analysis of the difference of the delta SF wavelength between the meningiomas and cranial nerve contrast was performed by the Wilcoxon signed rank test and showed p = 0.011. Conclusions The contrast between the enhanced meningiomas and cranial nerves was evident and assisted in the visualization and microsurgical dissection of these structures. The anatomical preservation of these structures was improved using the contrast.

  5. Comparative Oncogenomics for Peripheral Nerve Sheath Cancer Gene Discovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Steven L. Carroll , MD, PhD RECIPIENT: Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, SC 29425 REPORT DATE: June 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...Peripheral Nerve Sheath Cancer Gene Discovery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven L. Carroll 5d...2014, when Dr. Carroll left UAB to assume a position as Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Medical

  6. Therapy of Experimental Nerve Sheath Tumors Using Oncolytic Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Abstract follows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Oncolytic HSV, angiogenesis, MPNST , mouse model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...reliable tumor models for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ). Several existing and novel oncolytic HSV vectors will then be tested on these...from G47A increases cytotoxicity in vitro to human endothelial cells and murine Nfl" MPNST cell lines. Inhibition of MPNST M2 tumor growth in vivo was

  7. Differential expression of angiogenic factors in peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Wasa, Junji; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Shido, Yoji; Hosono, Kozo; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    It is difficult to differentiate some malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) from benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors (BPNST) histologically, and to predict the clinical outcome of patients with MPNST. In this study, the expression of VEGF and MVD were evaluated immunohistochemically in 22 cases of MPNST, 14 of neurofibroma and 19 of schwannoma and correlation of the staining grade of VEGF or MVD and the various clinical factors were analyzed, and statistically evaluated. Levels of VEGF mRNA expression were also determined with real-time RT-PCR. Statistically higher positive staining for VEGF was observed in MPNST compared to neurofibroma (P=0.004) and schwannoma (P<0.001). Even low grade MPNST showed higher VEGF positive staining than neurofibroma. Moreover, high VEGF expression statistically correlated with the poor prognosis of the patients with MPNST (P=0.015). Although MVD in MPNST was significantly higher than that in neurofibroma (P=0.038) and schwannoma (P<0.001), MVD could not predict the prognosis of the patients with MPNST. Although VEGF mRNA expression tended to be higher in MPNST compared to neurofibroma, the difference was not significant. Levels of VEGF protein expression serve as a novel diagnostic and prognostic tools for peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

  8. Optic nerve vascular compression in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Cezar José; Moscovici, Samuel; Dotan, Shlomo; Spektor, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Optic nerve vascular compression in patients with suprasellar tumor is a known entity but is rarely described in the literature. Case Description. We present a unique, well-documented case of optic nerve strangulation by the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient presented with pronounced progressive visual deterioration. Following surgery, there was immediate resolution of her visual deficit. Conclusion. Vascular strangulation of the optic nerve should be considered when facing progressive and/or severe visual field deterioration in patients with tumors proximal to the optic apparatus.

  9. Optic Nerve Vascular Compression in a Patient with a Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi, Cezar José; Moscovici, Samuel; Dotan, Shlomo; Spektor, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Optic nerve vascular compression in patients with suprasellar tumor is a known entity but is rarely described in the literature. Case Description. We present a unique, well-documented case of optic nerve strangulation by the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient presented with pronounced progressive visual deterioration. Following surgery, there was immediate resolution of her visual deficit. Conclusion. Vascular strangulation of the optic nerve should be considered when facing progressive and/or severe visual field deterioration in patients with tumors proximal to the optic apparatus. PMID:25705535

  10. [Intrathoracic giant peripheral nerve sheath tumor during Von Recklinghausen disease].

    PubMed

    Ngabou, U D; Mounguengui, D; Owono Mbouengou, J P; El Wali, A; Nguema Edzang, B; Boguikouma, J B; Tchoua, R; Aziz, N E

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a patient aged 23, admitted for bilateral intrathoracic tumor, including a giant right. Surgery was performed by right sternothoracotomy. After 7 days, she presented an irreversible cardiac arrest. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are rare and aggressive. Their incidence is 0.001% in the general population and 0.16% in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. These tumors are characterized by their risk of recurrence and poor prognosis. The treatment is the surgical resection. We analyze incidence, diagnosis and prognosis of these tumors.

  11. Characterization of the Biomechanical Behavior of the Optic Nerve Sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Wang, Roy; Forte, Taylor E.; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    A major priority in current space medicine research is to characterize the mechanisms in Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a group of ophthalmic changes that occur in some astronauts following long-duration spaceflight [1]. It is hypothesized that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts lead to increases in intracranial pressure (ICP), which drives maladaptive remodeling of the optic nerve sheath (ONS). In this study, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine ONS to better understand the mechanical response of the ONS to increased ICP.

  12. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  13. Study of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Hong, WenMing; Cheng, HongWei; Wang, XiaoJie; Hu, XiaoPeng; Feng, ChunGuo

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are very rare soft tissue sarcomas, usually arising from somatic soft tissues or peripheral nerves. Primary MPNST of the cerebellopontine angle is extremely rare, with only a single case reported so far. Here, we report an unusual case of MPNST in cerebellopontine angle in a 25-year-old man presented with dizziness, left facial numbness, and tinnitus. After hospitalization, the tumor was treated with complete surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Histologically, the tumor showed malignant spindle cells, which were with focal S-100 positivity on immunohistochemistry, and a diagnosis of the MPNST was made. This case is being reported for its rarity and presence in cerebellopontine and illustrated the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of MPNST, which to the best of our knowledge, has not been described before in the soft tissue sarcomas.

  14. Feline cutaneous nerve sheath tumours: histological features and immunohistochemical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mandara, M T; Fabriani, E; Pavone, S; Pumarola, M

    2013-10-01

    Feline cutaneous nerve sheath tumours (CNSTs) are uncommonly reported in the skin, since they are underestimated relative to the more common spindle cell tumours of soft tissue. In this study, 26 nerve sheath tumours selected from 337 skin neoplasms of cats were examined. Histologically, they were classified into malignant (MPNSTs) and benign tumours (BPNSTs) based on degree of cellular atypia and polymorphism as well as mitotic rate and diffuse necrosis. CPNSTs were tipically characterised by Antoni A pattern, in some cases associated with Antoni B pattern. In the malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs) the polymorphism was marked, while it was mild to moderate in the benign forms (BPNSTs). In the MPNSTs the mitotic activity was generally higher than in the BPNSTs. In five cases, including three MPNSTs and two BPNSTs, there were multinucleated giant cells. Necrotic foci occurred in a BPNST and in two MPNSTs, while osseous/chondroid metaplasia was found in two cases. Immunohistochemically, all the tumours showed a marked diffuse vimentin expression. S-100 protein was expressed in 17 cases, including 81.8% of BPNSTs and 57.14% of MPNSTs. Twenty-five tumours expressed NSE and twenty-four cases showed immunoreaction for laminin. Thirteen tumours were positive for GFAP, while five tumours were positive for SMA. PGP 9.5 expression was detected in all cases, except for two MPNSTs. NGFR was expressed in eleven cases, including four MPNSTs and seven BPNSTs. Ki67 was expressed in twenty tumours without any relationship with morphologic malignancy of the neoplasm. In this case series we confirmed neoplastic spindloid cells with wavy cytoplasm arranged in compact areas, with occasional nuclear palisading or whirls, and interchanged with loosely arranged areas, as the morphological features supporting a diagnosis of CPNST. A constant concurrent expression of vimentin, NSE, and laminin might confirm the diagnosis of PNST in the absence of clear S-100 protein

  15. Sarcoma of possible nerve sheath origin in a captive muskrat.

    PubMed

    Borucinska, J D; Trettel, J; Knibbs, D

    2000-07-01

    A captive adult female muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) was found dead without previous signs of disease. At necropsy, abdominal organs were infiltrated with a poorly demarcated, soft, tan tissue. Microscopically this tissue was composed of neoplastic cells assuming two distinct growth characteristics consistent with Antoni A and B patterns. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were pleomorphic, lacked junctional devices, had abundant mitochondria and ergastoplasm, and frequently were closely associated with extracellular collagen. Immunocytochemical examination of tumor cells demonstrated sporadic expression of neuron specific enolase. Microscopic tumor metastases to the myocardium, ascending aorta, lungs and visceral pleura were present. This is the first report of a sarcoma compatible with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a muskrat.

  16. Cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor, triton tumor variant: case report.

    PubMed

    Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Peralta-Olvera, Fabiola; Marhx-Bracho, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Jurado, Rodolfo; De Leon-Bojorge, Beatriz

    2003-01-01

    A case of a cerebral malignant triton tumor in a 3-year-old boy with a 2-month history of frontal headache and no clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis is reported. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large, irregular tumor in the right parietooccipital lobe. A partial surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor was highly cellular and consisted of spindle cells with hyperchromatic and pleomorphic nuclei. Focally, neoplastic cells with rhabdomyoblastic features were found. The immunohistochemical study showed that tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein and CD57, and the rhabdomyoblasts expressed desmin, Myo-D1, and myoglobin. During the postoperative period, a massive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was identified and surgical drainage was performed. The patient worsened and died 10 days after the first surgery. Postmortem study was not authorized. Six cases of cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor have been described; however, primary intraparenchymal malignant triton tumor has not been previously described.

  17. Nerve sheath myxoma of the dorsal paravertebral space

    PubMed Central

    Malkoc, Melih; Ormeci, Tugrul; Keskinbora, Mert; Yılmaz, Adem; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Tanik, Canan Besleyici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nerve sheath myxomas (NSM) are rare benign soft tissue tumors. The dorsal paravertebral placed NMS diagnosis can be difficult. PRESENTATION OF CASE This article presents clinical, radiological findings and treatment of the NSM of the dorsal paravertebral space in a 32-year-old man presented with a right shoulder and back pain for 4 years. DISCUSSION NSM is a rare and benign tumor and that most often occurs in the skin of the head, neck or upper limbs of younger patients. Rare locations such as intracranial, spinal canal, trunk, lower limb and oral cavity were also reported. The appropriate treatment of NSM is surgical excision. Diagnosis is difficult in an uncommon presentation. CONCLUSION Although the most presented case of NMS are dermal tumors, it may also be found extremely rare locations. We conclude that, the definitive treatment of NSM is surgical excision with safe margins even when it is possible. PMID:25462051

  18. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in a sow.

    PubMed

    Resende, Talita P; Pereira, Carlos E R; Vannucci, Fabio A; Araujo, Fernando S; dos Santos, José Lúcio; Cassali, Geovanni D; Damasceno, Karine A; Guedes, Roberto M C

    2015-09-25

    Nodular lung lesions in swine are frequently due to abscesses or granulomatous pneumonia. Although tumours are rarely reported in modern pig farming, they should be considered as a differential diagnosis when nodular lung lesions are found. A first-parity sow exhibiting respiratory signs was euthanized. Several whitish firm nodules, not encapsulated, ranging in diameter from 0.5 to 5 cm were present in all lung lobes. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of dense neoplastic cells, mainly in Antoni types A and B patterns, infiltrative and with development of emboli. All neoplastic cells stained positively by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100 protein, with variable immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and stained negative for cytokeratin. Based on the gross, histological and immunohistochemical features, the tumor was diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  19. Reconstruction of nerve root sheaths for sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhendong; Wu, Haibo; Yen, Ruyu; Zheng, Mei; Chang, Qing; Liu, Isabelle Yisha

    2013-11-01

    This study analyzed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers treated by reconstruction of the nerve root sheaths. The relationships between the cysts and spinal nerve root fibers were examined microscopically, the cysts were partially excised, and the defects were oversewn to reconstruct the nerve root sheaths. The Improved Japanese Orthopedic Association (IJOA) scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function. Thirty-eight patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 41.4 ± 15.57 years. The mean IJOA score was 18.8 ± 1.32 preoperatively and 19.6 ± 0.65 postoperatively, which was a significant difference (t=-3.77, P=0.001). These results indicate a significant improvement in neurological function after surgery. The most significant improvement in neurological function was sensation (z=-2.86, P=0.004), followed by bowel/bladder function (z=-2.31, P=0.02).

  20. Astounding recovery after resection of an intradural nerve sheath tumor in an adult male from Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul; Khan, Saleen; Inamullah, Ovais

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord tumors can be classified as intramedullary, intradural extramedullary, or extradural. The differential diagnosis of spinal cord tumors includes meningiomas, astrocytomas, ependymomas, metastasis, nerve sheath tumors such as schwannomas or neurofibromas, and multiple sclerosis plaques. Radiology can provide clues to the type of tumor, but a pathology evaluation of a specimen is necessary to provide an accurate diagnosis. These tumors can cause a variety of neurological symptoms from spinal cord compression including pain, weakness, and paresthesia. They are treated by surgical resection, with a variety of outcomes possible depending on the severity of the preoperative symptoms, location and extent of the tumor, and efficacy of the surgery performed. Case Description: A 59-year-old male from Vietnam came to the Atlanta Medical Center for evaluation of severe ride sided hemiparesis and paresthesias. He first noticed alterations in his handwriting and quickly deteriorated to the point of being unable to walk or move his right arm. A cervical spinal mass was identified and analyzed on magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical resection was performed under a microscope in a joint operation between an orthopedic surgeon and neurosurgeon. A specimen of the tumor was sent to pathology for further evaluation. Conclusion: The mass was determined to be an intradural extramedullary schwannoma. The severity of the patient's symptoms and the location and size of the tumor made full recovery unlikely and postoperative quadriplegia a real possibility. The tumor was surgically resected, which led surprisingly, however, to a full and prompt resolution of the patient's symptoms. Less than 2 weeks after surgery, the patient was able to walk and had almost fully regained use of his hands. PMID:26425395

  1. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  2. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  3. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases as Targets for Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in NF 1 Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    by interphase cytogenetics (FISH) in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and morphologically similar spindle cell neoplasms . J...Chronic myeloproliferative disorders with rearrangement of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor: a new clinical target for STI571/Glivec...malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and morphologically similar spindle cell neoplasms . J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2002;61:702–709. 8

  4. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases.

  5. Palliative Epineurotomy for Focal Radial Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Andrew David; Davies, Emma; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Lafuente, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the deep branch of the radial nerve distal to the elbow in a dog. The lesion was identified using computed tomography and ultrasonography and confirmed as sarcoma on histopathological analysis of incisional biopsies. Clinical signs dramatically improved following surgical biopsy before recurring three months later. Repeat epineurotomy of the deep branch of the radial nerve resulted in clinical improvement for a further month before signs once again returned. Epineurotomy as a palliative treatment for peripheral nerve sheath tumors has not been previously described, but may have a place in palliation of clinical signs in specific cases of peripheral nerve sheath tumors in which limb amputation is not an option.

  6. Genetic profiling by single-nucleotide polymorphism-based array analysis defines three distinct subtypes of orbital meningioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Mosier, Stacy; Safneck, Janice; Salomao, Diva R; Miller, Neil R; Eberhart, Charles G; Gocke, Christopher D; Batista, Denise A S; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-03-01

    Orbital meningiomas can be classified as primary optic nerve sheath (ON) meningiomas, primary intraorbital ectopic (Ob) meningiomas and spheno-orbital (Sph-Ob) meningiomas based on anatomic site. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based array analysis with the Illumina 300K platform was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 19 orbital meningiomas (5 ON, 4 Ob and 10 Sph-Ob meningiomas). Tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I except for two grade II meningiomas, and one was NF2-associated. We found genomic alterations in 68% (13 of 19) of orbital meningiomas. Sph-Ob tumors frequently exhibited monosomy 22/22q loss (70%; 7/10) and deletion of chromosome 1p, 6q and 19p (50% each; 5/10). Among genetic alterations, loss of chromosome 1p and 6q were more frequent in clinically progressive tumors. Chromosome 22q loss also was detected in the majority of Ob meningiomas (75%; 3/4) but was infrequent in ON meningiomas (20%; 1/5). In general, Ob tumors had fewer chromosome alterations than Sph-Ob and ON tumors. Unlike Sph-Ob meningiomas, most of the Ob and ON meningiomas did not progress even after incomplete excision, although follow-up was limited in some cases. Our study suggests that ON, Ob and Sph-Ob meningiomas are three molecularly distinct entities. Our results also suggest that molecular subclassification may have prognostic implications.

  7. Alterations at chromosome 17 loci in peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lothe, R.A.; Slettan, A.; Saeter, G.

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular genetic changes in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Inactivation of the TP53 gene in l7p has been reported in a few tumors. The MPNST is one of the manifestations of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), suggesting that the NF1 gene in 17q might be important. We present a study of 15 neurofibromas and MPNST from nine individuals. Seven patients had NF1 and six of these developed MPNST. Genetic alterations at nine polymorphic loci on chromosome 17 were examined. Allelic imbalance was detected only in the malignant tumors from NF1 patients (4/6). Complete loss of heterozygosity of 17q loci was found in three of these tumors, all including loci within the NF1 gene. Two of the malignant tumors also showed deletions on 17p. No mutations were detected within exon 5-8 of the TP53 in any of the MPNST, and none of them were TP53 protein-positive using immunostaining with mono- and polyclonal antibodies against TP53. The numbers of chromosome 17 present in each tumor were evaluated by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on interphase nuclei with a centromere-specific probe. A deviation from the disomic status of chromosome 17 was observed in two of the MPNST from NF1 patients. These results support the hypothesis of inactivation of both NF1 gene alleles during development of MPNST in patients with NF1. In contrast to other reports, we did not find evidence for a homozygous mutated condition of the TP53 gene in the same tumors. Finally, FISH analysis was in accordance with the DNA analysis in the deduction of the numbers of chromosome 17 in these tumors. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Direct visualization of improved optic nerve pial vascular supply following tuberculum meningioma resection: case report

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seunggu J.; Magill, Stephen T.; Tarapore, Phiroz E.; Horton, Jonathan C.; McDermott, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculum sellae meningiomas frequently produce visual loss by direct compression from tumor, constriction of the optic nerve (ON) under the falciform ligament, and/or ON ischemia. The authors hypothesized that changes in visual function after tumor removal may be related to changes in blood supply to the ON that might be seen in the pial circulation at surgery. Indocyanine green (ICG) angiography was used to attempt to document these changes at surgery. The first patient in whom the technique was used had a left-sided, 1.4-cm, tuberculum meningioma. Time-lapse comparison of images was done postsurgery, and the comparison of video images revealed both faster initial filling and earlier complete filling of the ON pial circulation, suggesting improved pial blood flow after surgical decompression. In follow-up the patient had significant improvements in both visual acuity and visual fields function. Intraoperative ICG angiography of the ON can demonstrate measurable changes in pial vascular flow that may be predictive of postoperative visual outcome. The predictive value of this technique during neurosurgical procedures around the optic apparatus warrants further investigation in a larger cohort. PMID:26684783

  9. Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor mimicking disc herniation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Cong; Xin, Xiaotang; Liu, Bo; Li, Wei; Yin, Dezhen; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in the sciatic nerve in the pelvic cavity are a rare occurrence and their symptomatology is usually misdiagnosed as intervertebral disc herniation. We herein report the case of a 46-year old woman presenting with pain, hypesthesia and weakness of the left lower extremity due to a giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the sciatic nerve. Prior to being referred to our institution, the patient was misdiagnosed as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and underwent an operation unsuccessfully, as there was little symptomatic improvement 2 months after the surgery. A magnetic resonance imaging examination of the pelvic cavity revealed a tumor of the sciatic nerve. The mass was resected via the posterior approach and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an uncommon cause of sciatica and are commonly misdiagnosed as lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Accurate diagnosis and complete surgical excision prior to metastasis are crucial for effective management of this condition. PMID:27900106

  10. A Rare Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Maxilla Mimicking a Periapical Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Álvares, Pamella; Silva, Luciano; Pereira dos Santos Neto, Alexandrino; Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sayão, Sandra; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a malignant neoplasm that is rarely found in the oral cavity. About 50% of this tumor occurs in patients with neurofibromatosis type I and comprises approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas of head and neck region. Intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla is rare. This article is the first to address malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla presenting as a periapical radiolucency on nonvital endodontically treated teeth in the English medical literature. Surgical approaches to malignant soft tissue tumor vary based on the extent of the disease, age of the patient, and pathological findings. A rare case of intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is reported in a 16-year-old woman. The patient presented clinically with a pain involving the upper left incisors region and with defined unilocular periapical radiolucency lesion involved between the upper left incisors. An incisional biopsy was made. Histological and immunohistochemical examination were positive for S-100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein showed that the lesion was an intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla. Nine years after the surgery, no regional recurrence was observed. PMID:27994888

  11. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  12. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) are aggressive malignancies that arise within peripheral nerves. These tumors occur with increased...and abnormal expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We previously found that MPNSTs express increased levels of the CD44 family...kinase activity (and not increased Ras-GTP) contributes to MPNST cell invasion. We further find that EGFR contributes at least part of the elevated Src

  13. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases as Targets for Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in NF 1 Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    EGFR patterns by interphase cytogenetics (FISH) in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and morphologically similar spindle cell neoplasms ...Armstrong,F., Delsol,G., Dastugue,N. and Brousset,P. (2003) Chronic myeloproliferative disorders with rearrangement of the platelet-derived growth

  14. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation

    PubMed Central

    Murovic, Judith A.; Charles Cho, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with Cyber

  15. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation.

    PubMed

    Murovic, Judith A; Charles Cho, S; Park, Jon

    2010-02-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with Cyber

  16. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  17. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  18. Superficial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from diffuse neurofibroma in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Kuwashiro, Maki; Misago, Noriyuki; Narisawa, Yutaka

    2014-07-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are regarded as sarcomas that arise from peripheral nerves or that display differentiation along the lines of the various elements of the nerve sheath. These tumors occur in deep soft tissues, but superficial primary MPNST with a cutaneous or subcutaneous origin have rarely been reported. A 70-year-old woman presented with a 3-4-year history of a slowly enlarging soft nodule on the left side of her neck. The histopathological diagnosis of the nodule was low-grade MPNST arising from diffuse neurofibroma. There was increased cellularity, but no necrosis or mitotic activity. These histopathological findings pose difficulties in differential diagnosis from a neurofibroma with atypical histological features. We report a rare case of superficial MPNST arising from diffuse neurofibroma associated with underlying occipital bone dysplasia in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient.

  19. Epicardial Ablation: Prevention of Phrenic Nerve Damage by Pericardial Injection of Saline and the Use of a Steerable Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Neven, Kars; Fernandez-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Berruezo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged. PMID:24669108

  20. Epicardial ablation: prevention of phrenic nerve damage by pericardial injection of saline and the use of a steerable sheath.

    PubMed

    Neven, Kars; Fernandez-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Berruezo, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged.

  1. Lost in translation: ambiguity in nerve sheath tumor nomenclature and its resultant treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Jones, Kevin B; Monument, Michael J; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R Lor

    2013-05-08

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance.

  2. Sporadic Multifocal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor-A Rare Presentation: Multifocal MPNST.

    PubMed

    Leena, J B; Fernandes, Hilda; Swethadri, G K

    2013-06-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors(MPNST) are uncommon neoplasms with an incidence of 0.001% in general population. Multifocality is a rare manifestation of MPNST . A case of a 65 year old patient who presented with multiple swellings involving the neck, extremity and back without associated neurofibromatosis is reported for its rarity of presentation.. Diagnosis was made by FNAC and confirmed by peroperative findings and histopathology.

  3. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an...survival rate. We previously found that MPNSTs overexpress the CD44 tranmembrane glycoprotein and that reducing CD44 expression partially inhibits MPNST ...depends on Src kinase and that Src kinase activity promotes MPNST invasion (Su et al., 2003a) . Furthermore, we show that MPNST cell invasion depends on

  4. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNST ) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an...survival rate. We previously found that MPNSTs overexpress the CD44 tranmembrane glycoprotein and that reducing Cc44 expression inhibits MPNST cell...Src kinase. Furthermore, we show that MPNST cell invasion depends on an autocrine loop involving MCF, an MCF activating enzyme (MGFA), and c-Met, all of

  5. Genetic Evaluation of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Archival and prospectively acquired plexiform neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) were collected...evaluated, whereas a relatively small number of MPNSTs have been collected for complete analysis. Immunohistochemical stains have been developed to...distinguish -high-grade versus low-grade MPNSTs and plexiform neurofibromas. The genome of plexiform neurofibromas is relatively stable, compared to the

  6. Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0498 TITLE: Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...for each blot. Glyco-protein D is produced at extraordinarily high levels by our herpes simplex virus, and thus, it is quite common in herpes simplex

  7. [Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation (malignant perineurinoma) of the cervix uteri].

    PubMed

    Dolzhikov, A A; Mukhina, T S

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a case of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation and at the rare site of the cervix uteri in a 57-year-old patient. The diagnosis was established on the basis of extensive immunohistochemical examination, by excluding the similar neoplasms and detecting an immunophenotype characteristic of perineural differentiation. There are data available in the literature on the morphological and immunophenotypical characteristics of this tumor.

  8. Induction of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in European hamsters with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH).

    PubMed

    Ernst, H; Rittinghausen, S; Wahnschaffe, U; Mohr, U

    1987-06-01

    A rate of up to 43% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) was induced in European hamsters (EH) after weekly s.c. administration of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH). The overall neoplastic response in the treated EH was also elevated as compared to the untreated controls. Histologically, the malignant PNST were neurofibrosarcomas and melanotic as well as unpigmented schwannomas. The occurrence of melanotic schwannomas is briefly discussed with regard to the histogenesis of this rare tumor type.

  9. A Vascular Malformation Presenting as a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Vikas; Haldeman, Clayton; Amaefuna, Steve; Hanna, Amgad S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a venous malformation (VM) masquerading as a schwannoma. VMs are thin-walled vascular dilations of various sizes that typically present as soft, compressible, blue masses that are associated with pain or dysesthesia. VMs are commonly found in the head and neck as well as the distal extremities. Notably, slow-flow VMs are hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging, and enhance markedly with contrast. However, VMs tend to be poorly circumscribed and fraught with venous lakes and phleboliths. Conservative therapy and sclerotherapy are the primary treatment options. In this case report, we present a VM presenting near the neurovascular bundle of the upper extremity axilla. Our case is unique in that the patient presented with symptoms and imaging qualities characteristic for a peripheral nerve schwannoma. PMID:28077959

  10. Growth-associated protein 43 in differentiating peripheral nerve sheath tumors from other non-neural spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shen; Chen, Pei-Ling; Lu, Dongsi; Lind, Anne C; Dehner, Louis P

    2014-02-01

    The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a relatively uncommon type of soft tissue sarcoma arising from a peripheral nerve or extraneural soft tissues and showing nerve sheath differentiation. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is one of the most challenging tasks in surgical pathology because of its uncommon type (5-10% soft tissue sarcomas), morphologic resemblance to other spindle cell neoplasms and lack of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical markers. The pathologic diagnosis is more straightforward in the clinical setting of neurofibromatosis-1, but problems are mainly centered on the non-neurofibromatosis-1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. To date, S100 protein is the most widely applied marker in the case of a suspected malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, yet its suboptimal sensitivity and its expression in other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma, clear-cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and monophasic synovial sarcoma, add to the diagnostic conundrum. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), a membrane-associated phosphoprotein expressed in neuronal growth cones and Schwann cell precursors during neural development and axonal regeneration, was applied to a set of nerve sheath and non-nerve sheath spindle cell neoplasms. The findings in this study indicate that GAP43 is expressed in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=18/21; 86%) and demonstrates a sensitivity superior to S100 protein (n=13/21; 62%). GAP43 is also positive in neurofibromas (n=17/18; 94%), schwannomas (n=11/12; 92%) and desmoplastic melanomas (n=7/10; 70%). In contrast, it is negative in the non-desmoplastic spindle cell melanomas (n=20/22; 91%). Of the other non-neural soft tissue sarcomas, GAP43 is non-reactive in most leiomyosarcomas (n=14/16; 88%) and clear-cell sarcomas (n=8/8), and only focally positive in monophasic synovial sarcomas (n=3/7; 43%). GAP43 is seemingly a highly sensitive marker for peripheral nerve

  11. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the eighth cranial nerve arising without prior irradiation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Matthew L; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Glasgow, Amy E; Raghunathan, Aditya; Link, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) of the eighth cranial nerve (CN) are exceedingly rare. To date the literature has focused on MPNSTs occurring after radiation therapy for presumed benign vestibular schwannomas (VSs), while MPNSTs arising without prior irradiation have received little attention. The objectives of the current study are to characterize the epidemiology, clinical presentation, disease course, and outcome using a large national cancer registry database and a systematic review of the English literature. Additionally, a previously unreported case is presented. METHODS The authors conducted an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, a systematic review of the literature, and present a case report. Data from all patients identified in the SEER database with a diagnosis of MPNST involving the eighth CN, without a history of prior radiation, were analyzed. Additionally, all cases reported in the English literature between January 1980 and March 2015 were reviewed. Finally, 1 previously unreported case is presented. RESULTS The SEER registries identified 30 cases between 1992 and 2012. The average incidence was 0.017 per 1 million persons per year (range 0.000-0.0687 per year). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years, and 16 (53%) were women. Thirteen cases were diagnosed upon autopsy. Of the 17 cases diagnosed while alive, the median follow-up was 118 days, with 3 deaths (18%) observed. When compared with the incidence of benign VS, 1041 VSs present for every 1 MPNST arising from the eighth CN. Including a previously unreported case from the authors' center, a systematic review of the English literature yielded 24 reports. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years, 50% were women, and the median tumor size at diagnosis was 3 cm. Eleven patients (46%) reported isolated audiovestibular complaints typical for VS while 13 (54%) exhibited facial paresis or other signs of a more aggressive process

  12. Optic nerve sheath fenestration using a Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    PubMed Central

    Kozub, John; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optic nerve sheath fenestration is an established procedure for relief of potentially damaging overpressure on the optic nerve resulting from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Prior work showed that a mid-IR free-electron laser could be delivered endoscopically and used to produce an effective fenestration. This study evaluates the efficacy of fenestration using a table-top mid-IR source based on a Raman-shifted alexandrite (RSA) laser. Study Design/Materials and Methods Porcine optic nerves were ablated using light from an RSA laser at wavelengths of 6.09, 6.27 and 6.43 μm and pulse energies up to 3 mJ using both free-space and endoscopic beam delivery through 250-μm I.D. hollow-glass waveguides. Waveguide transmission was characterized, ablation thresholds and etch rates were measured, and the efficacy of endoscopic fenestration was evaluated for ex vivo exposures using both optical coherence tomography and histological analysis. Results Using endoscopic delivery, the RSA laser can effectively fenestrate porcine optic nerves. Performance was optimized at a wavelength of 6.09 μm and delivered pulse energies of 0.5-0.8 mJ (requiring 1.5-2.5 mJ to be incident on the waveguide). Under these conditions, the ablation threshold fluence was 0.8 ± 0.2 J/cm2, the ablation rate was 1-4 μm/pulse, and the margins of ablation craters showed little evidence of thermal or mechanical damage. Nonetheless, nominally identical exposures yielded highly variable ablation rates. This led to fenestrations that ranged from too deep to too shallow – either damaging the underlying optic nerve or requiring additional exposure to cut fully through the sheath. Of 48 excised nerves subjected to fenestration at 6.09 μm, 16 ex vivo fenestrations were judged as good, 23 as too deep, and 9 as too shallow. Conclusions Mid-IR pulses from the RSA laser, propagated through a flexible hollow waveguide, are capable of cutting through porcine optic nerve sheaths in

  13. Optic Nerve Sheath as a Novel Mechanical Load on the Globe in Ocular Duction

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The optic nerve (ON) sheath's role in limiting duction has been previously unappreciated. This study employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate this constraint on adduction. Methods High-resolution, surface coil axial MRI was obtained in 11 normal adults, 14 subjects with esotropia (ET) having normal axial length (AL) < 25.8 mm, 13 myopic subjects with ET and mean AL 29.3 ± 3.3 (SD) mm, and 7 subjects with exotropia (XT). Gaze angles and ON lengths were measured for scans employing eccentric lateral fixation in which an ON became completely straightened. Results In all groups, ON straightening occurred only in the adducting, not abducting, eye. Adduction at ON straightening was 26.0 ± 8.8° in normal subjects, not significantly different from XT at 22.2 ± 11.8°. However, there was significant increase in comparable adduction in ET to 36.3 ± 9.3°, and in myopic ET to 33.6 ± 10.7° (P < 0.04). Optic nerve length at straightening was 27.6 ± 2.7 mm in normals, not significantly different from 28.2 ± 2.8 mm in ET and 27.8 ± 2.7 mm in XT. In myopic ET, ON length at straightening was significantly reduced to 24.0 ± 2.9 mm (P < 0.002) and was associated with globe retraction in adduction, suggesting ON tethering. Conclusions Large adduction may exhaust length redundancy in the normally sinuous ON and sheath, so that additional adduction must stretch the sheath and retract or deform the globe. These mechanical effects are most significant in ET with axial myopia, but may also exert traction on the posterior sclera absent strabismus or myopia. Tethering by the ON sheath in adduction is an important, novel mechanical load on the globe. PMID:27082297

  14. Preoperative simulation of the running course of the abducens nerve in a large petroclival meningioma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaichuang; Ikawa, Fusao; Onishi, Shumpei; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Takeda, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishifuro, Minoru; Akiyama, Yuji; Morishige, Mizuki; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2017-04-01

    One of the most important and useful pieces of information in the preoperative evaluation of a large petroclival meningioma is the running course of the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is small and has a long intracranial course, making it prone to compression by the tumor at various anatomical points. In relatively large tumors, it is difficult to confirm the entire course of the abducens nerve, even by heavy T2-thin slice imaging. We report a case of successful preoperative estimation of the course of the abducens nerve that aided in its complete preservation during the resection of a large petroclival tumor.

  15. Pulsatile Dynamics of the Optic Nerve Sheath and Intracranial Pressure: An Exploratory In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Brekken, Reidar; Fieggen, Graham; Selbekk, Tormod

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) may lead to increased stiffness of the optic nerve sheath (ONS). OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for analyzing ONS dynamics from transorbital ultrasound and investigate a potential difference between patients with raised ICP vs normal ICP. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed data from 16 patients (≤12 years old) for whom ultrasound image sequences of the ONS had been acquired from both eyes just before invasive measurement of ICP. Eight patients had an ICP ≥20 mm Hg. The transverse motion on each side of the ONS was estimated from ultrasound, and Fourier analysis was used to extract the magnitude of the displacement corresponding to the heart rate. By calculating the normalized absolute difference between the displacements on each side of the ONS, a measure of ONS deformation was obtained. This parameter was referred to as the deformability index. According to our hypothesis, because deformability is inversely related to stiffness, we expected this parameter to be lower for ICP ≥20 mm Hg compared with ICP <20 mm Hg. The one-sided Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical comparison. RESULTS: The deformability index was significantly lower in the group with ICP ≥20 mm Hg (median value 0.11 vs 0.24; P = .002). CONCLUSION: We present a method for assessment of ONS pulsatile dynamics using transorbital ultrasound imaging. A significant difference was noted between the patient groups, indicating that deformability of the ONS may be relevant as a noninvasive marker of raised ICP. The clinical implications are promising and should be investigated in future clinical studies. ABBREVIATIONS: AUC, area under curve ICP, intracranial pressure ONS, optic nerve sheath ONSD, optic nerve sheath diameter ROC, receiver operating characteristic PMID:26813857

  16. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound and the Diagnosis of Increased Intracranial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Hylkema, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound has been used for almost 30 years in a wide variety of clinical applications and environments. From the austerity of battlefields to the labor and delivery ward, ultrasound has the ability to give clinicians real-time, noninvasive diagnostic imaging. Ultrasound by emergency physicians (and all nonradiologists) has become more prevalent and has been used for examinations such as the transcranial Doppler to evaluate for stroke, cardiac function, FAST and EFAST examinations for trauma, and now increased intracranial pressure (ICP) via Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound (ONSD). The ONSD is a valid and reliable indicator of ICP.

  17. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) of mandible: solving the perplexity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shilpa; Pathak, Jigna; Dekate, Kamlesh; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-03-11

    We present an extremely rare case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) in a 30-year-old woman without associated neurofibromatosis 1. The patient presented with an 8 cm×4 cm lesion extending from 46 to the retro molar region involving the ramus of the right mandible associated with regional paraesthesia. Incisional biopsy revealed spindle cells with vesicular nuclei arranged in fascicles leading to a diagnosis of spindle cell lesion. Posterior segmental mandibulectomy was performed under general anaesthesia. On excisional biopsy, a definitive diagnosis of low-grade MPNST was established on the basis of immunohistochemistry. The patient was then lost to follow-up.

  18. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT.

  19. Giant Sporadic Low Grade Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath (MPNST) of Left Thigh.

    PubMed

    Nikumbh, Dhiraj B; Suryawanshi, K H; Dravid, N V; Patil, T B; Rokade, C M

    2013-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumours (MPNST) are rare spindle- cell sarcomas which are derived from the schwann cells or the pleuripotent cells of the neural crest. MPNSTs are usually located in the peripheral nerve trunk roots, extremities and in the head and neck region. These tumours may arise as sporadic variants or in patients with neurofibromatosis1 (NF1). The estimated incidence of MPNSTs in the patients with NF1is 2-5% as compared to a 0.001% incidence in the general population. Herein, we are reporting a case of a giant sporadic (NF1 independent) low grade MPNST of the left thigh in 65 year female patient, which had a good prognosis.

  20. Effects of pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) on malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs).

    PubMed

    Demestre, Maria; Terzi, Menderes Yusuf; Mautner, Victor; Vajkoczy, Peter; Kurtz, Andreas; Piña, Ana Luisa

    2013-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an inherited genetic disease affecting 1 in 3,500 individuals. A prominent feature of NF1 is the formation of benign tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurofibromas). However, these can become malignant and form highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), which are usually fatal despite aggressive surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recent studies have shown that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) can induce differentiation and inhibit angiogenesis in several kinds of tumours. The present study was designed to determine the in vitro and in vivo effects of PEDF on MPNST angiogenesis and tumour growth. PEDF inhibited proliferation and augmented apoptosis in S462 MPNST cells after 48 h of treatment in culture. In xenografts of S462 MPNST cells in athymic nude mice, PEDF suppressed MPNST tumour burden, due mainly to inhibition of angiogenesis. These results demonstrate for the first time inhibitory effects of PEDF on the growth of human MPNST via induction of anti-angiogenesis and apoptosis. Our results suggest that PEDF could be a novel approach for future therapeutic purposes against MPNST.

  1. Feline peripheral nerve sheath tumors: histologic, immunohistochemical, and clinicopathologic correlation (59 tumors in 53 cats).

    PubMed

    Schulman, F Y; Johnson, T O; Facemire, P R; Fanburg-Smith, J C

    2009-11-01

    Feline peripheral nerve sheath tumors are uncommonly reported, and their clinical behavior has not been well documented. Fifty-nine peripheral nerve sheath tumors were collected from 53 cats. All of the tumors involved skin, subcutis, skeletal muscle, and/or mucous membranes. Histologically, the tumors were composed of compact to loosely arranged streams and fascicles of spindled cells with eosinophilic, often wavy cytoplasmic processes; small to occasionally moderate amounts of collagenous to myxoid matrix; and nuclear palisading. Immunohistochemically, all tumors were positive for vimentin and S-100 protein, 44 of 59 were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and all were negative for muscle specific actin. The tumors fell into 3 histologic categories: 34 benign tumors with Antoni A areas that were S-100 protein and GFAP positive, 9 benign tumors that lacked Antoni A areas and were S-100 protein positive and GFAP negative, and 16 tumors with features of malignancy. Seventy-five percent of these cases involved the head, neck, or limbs. Recurrent tumors were submitted or tumors were reported to have recurred in 9 cases. Tumor recurrence was reported for all 3 of the histologic subtypes. None was documented as having metastasized.

  2. Breast metastases from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the kidney: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Alessio, Ricardo C.; Rajpurkar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are extremely rare soft tissue sarcomas of ectomesenchymal origin. They are commonly seen in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1), but can also occur without a history of NF (isolated MPNST). MPNSTs are most commonly located on the extremities (brachial and sacral plexus), head and neck, and trunk regions and are rarely reported in genitourinary organs. These tumors are aggressive, with a high recurrence rate and distant metastases. MPNST involving the kidney is extremely rare, and review of the literature using PubMed from 2001 to 2014 revealed eight cases of MPNST involving the kidney (seven, primarily involving the kidney and one metastatic MPNST of the kidney). Herein, we describe a case of breast metastases from an MPNST of the kidney without a history of NF-1. The patient was initially diagnosed with a spindle cell neoplasm of the kidney with peripheral nerve sheath differentiation. Eventually, the patient developed a right breast mass that was diagnosed as metastatic MPNST. The patient refused any kind of treatment and died 6 months later in hospice care. PMID:27453670

  3. Optic nerve sheath diameter measurements by CT scan in ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Javed H; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences in optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans of patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) obstruction versus controls. Inpatients 0-15 years with confirmed VPS obstruction requiring neurosurgical intervention were identified using ICD9 codes. ONSDs, orbit, cranium, and foramen magnum sizes were measured on their pre-surgical CT. Controls included cases at times when their VPS was not obstructed and age and gender matched patients with a CT scan done in the emergency room for head trauma (normal CT findings). Paired T-tests were used for both case-control comparisons. In order to compare the optic nerve sheath size more accurately, the ONSD width was divided by the width of the orbit and by the foramen magnum (antero-posterior) length. Twenty patients were identified with 25 events of VPS obstruction. The right ONSD (RON) was chosen to study. RON/orbit width and RON/foramen magnum diameter for the VPS obstruction versus self-controls, were 0.22 and 0.22, compared to 0.19 and 0.18, respectively, for the non-obstructed self-controls (P = .044 and P = .008, respectively). The same measurements for the VPS obstruction versus age and gender matched controls were 0.22 and 0.21 for the VPS obstruction cases, respectively, compared to 0.17 and 0.16, respectively for the age and gender matched controls (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively). This data confirms that the optic nerve diameter increases during a VPS obstruction. ONSD measurements by ultrasound could add to the evaluation for VPS obstruction.

  4. Malignant nerve-sheath neoplasms in neurofibromatosis: distinction from benign tumors by using imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.; Wetzel, L.H.

    1987-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve-sheath neoplasms frequently complicate neurofibromatosis causing pain, enlarging masses, or neurologic deficits. However, similar findings sometimes also occur with benign nerve neoplasms. Our study was done retrospectively to determine if imaging techniques can differentiate malignant from benign nerve tumors in neurofibromatosis. Eight patients with symptomatic neoplasms (three benign, five malignant) were studied by CT in eight, MR in six, and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy in seven. Uptake of /sup 67/Ga occurred in all five malignant lesions but not in two benign neoplasms studied. On CT or MR, all eight lesions, including three benign neoplasms, showed inhomogeneities. Of five lesions with irregular, infiltrative margins on CT or MR, four were malignant and one was benign. Of three lesions with smooth margins, one was malignant and two were benign. One malignant neoplasm caused irregular bone destruction. Accordingly, CT and MR could not generally distinguish malignant from benign lesions with certainty. However, both CT and MR provided structural delineation to help surgical planning for both types of lesion. /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy appears promising as a screening technique to identify lesions with malignant degeneration in patients with neurofibromatosis. Any area of abnormal radiogallium uptake suggests malignancy warranting further evaluation by CT or MR. Biopsy of any questionable lesion is essential.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the canine brachial plexus in 18 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Susan; Ehrhart, E J; Gall, David; Klopp, Lisa; Gavin, Patrick; Tucker, Russ; Bagley, Rod; Kippenes, Hege; DeHaan, Constance; Pedroia, Vince; Partington, Beth; Olby, Natasha

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations from 18 dogs with a histologically confirmed peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) of the brachial plexus were assessed retrospectively. Almost half (8/18) had a diffuse thickening of the brachial plexus nerve(s), six of which extended into the vertebral canal. The other 10/18 dogs had a nodule or mass in the axilla (1.2-338 cm3). Seven of those 10 masses also had diffuse nerve sheath thickening, three of which extended into the vertebral canal. The majority of tumors were hyperintense to muscle on T2-weighted images and isointense on T1-weighted images. Eight of 18 PNSTs had only minimal to mild contrast enhancement and many (13/18) enhanced heterogeneously following gadolinium DTPA administration. Transverse plane images with a large enough field of view (FOV) to include both axillae and the vertebral canal were essential, allowing in-slice comparison to detect lesions by asymmetry of structures. Higher resolution, smaller FOV, multiplanar examination of the cervicothoracic spine was important for appreciating nerve root and foraminal involvement. Short tau inversion recovery, T2-weighted, pre and postcontrast T1-weighted pulse sequences were all useful. Contrast enhancement was critical to detecting subtle diffuse nerve sheath involvement or small isointense nodules, and for accurately identifying the full extent of disease. Some canine brachial plexus tumors can be challenging to detect, requiring a rigorous multiplanar multi-pulse sequence MRI examination.

  6. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the third eyelid in a 3-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback

    PubMed Central

    vom Hagen, Franziska; Romkes, Gwendolyna; Kershaw, Olivia; Eule, J Corinna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 3-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented with conjunctivitis, enlargement of the third eyelid and a dorsotemporal deviation of the right eye. A mass within the third eyelid was detected and excised. The histopathologic examination showed a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, which most likely is a neurofibrosarcoma based on immunohistochemistry. PMID:25678975

  7. Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) in an Animal Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath (MPNST) Tumors and Plexiform Neurofibromas (PN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    convection enhanced delivery in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors or plexiform neurofibromas at this time. References Perrin GQ, Fishbein L...2007. 85(6): p. 1347-1357. Perrin GQ, Li H, Fishbein L, et al., An orthotopic xenograft model of intraneural NF1 MPNST suggests a potential

  8. A huge malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with hepatic metastasis arising from retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma.

    PubMed

    Meng, Z H; Yang, Y S; Cheng, K L; Chen, G Q; Wang, L P; Li, W

    2013-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas (GNs) are the rarest and most benign of the neuroblastic tumors. We experienced a case of huge retroperitoneal GN which differentiated into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with hepatic metastasis. The tumor was located in the upper right quarter of the abdomen and pressed the right lobe of the liver, which was initially misdiagnosed as a liver carcinoma. The tumor shared blood supply with the right liver lob and had rich blood supplies from the abdominal aorta, renal artery and hepatic artery. It was also associated with skin pigment and recurrence shortly following resection. Our finding demonstrated that MPNST is a potent invasive malignant tumor and metastasis earlier with very poor prognosis.

  9. An atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumour with pseudoglandular architecture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Volmer, Christelle; Caplier, Laura; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Huet, Hélène; Owen, Roger A; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques

    2010-02-01

    This case describes a subcutaneous soft tissue tumour in a German Shepherd dog. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by proliferating ovoid cells, loosely arranged in a collagenous to myxoid stroma, and by numerous pseudoglandular structures lined by neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were labelled with vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100 antibodies, but not with cytokeratin, desmin and smooth muscle actin antibodies. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells were characterized by numerous mitochondria surrounded by endoplasmic reticulum and contained few secondary lysosomes. This tumour was diagnosed as a subcutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumour (PNST) with pseudoglandular architecture. This case illustrates the morphological diversity of PNST and provides new insight into the differential diagnosis of cutaneous tumours of similar morphology in the dog.

  10. Clinical course of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Rütten, Maja; Ruess-Melzer, Katja; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Lischer, Christoph; Oevermann, Anna; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    A 14-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was admitted with an ulcerating mass on the right thoracic wall. Radiographic and computed tomographic evaluation indicated 2 isolated cutaneous masses without any signs of metastasis. Histology of a Tru-Cut biopsy revealed an anaplastic sarcoma with giant cells. Both tumors were resected with appropriate normal tissue margins. The size of the defect did not allow primary closure of the wound; therefore, a mesh expansion technique was attempted. Three months later, the tiger had to be euthanized due to extensive metastasis to the lungs. Histomorphological features and immunohistochemical results confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. In contrast to domestic animal experience, the tumor had spread extensively to the lungs without local reccurrence in a short period of time. Correct diagnosis requires various immunohistochemical evaluations of the tumor tissue.

  11. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) when increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is suspected. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound since 2009 as a proxy for ICP in non-acute monitoring for space medicine purposes. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before launch. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Our data characterize the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, its longitudinal trends in long-duration spaceflight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased ICP outcomes.

  12. Primary peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the thyroid gland: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Liu, Zengguang; Su, Chang; Guan, Qiang; Wan, Fang; Dong, Bingfei; Bao, Liang; Zhang, Wenxin; Wang, Yinping; Wang, Guimin

    2016-02-01

    Primary peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) of the thyroid gland are rare, with fewer than 30 cases reported in the medical literature to date. Primary PNSTs of the thyroid gland are classified into malignant and benign PNSTs. The benign PNSTs may be further subclassified into neurofibromas and Schwannomas. This is the case report of a 51-year-old male patient presenting with multiple primary PNSTs involving the left lobe of the thyroid gland. The patient underwent total excision of the thyroid gland and the pathological results indicated a Schwannoma with Antoni type A and B cells. The literature was reviewed briefly and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of multiple primary PNSTs of the thyroid gland.

  13. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as orbito temporal lump: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Souvagya; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Mishra, Sanjib; Das, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. The most common anatomical sites include the upper and lower extremities and trunk and less commonly the head and neck. To our knowledge, few patients with a cranial or facial MPNST have been reported. We report such a lesion in a 35-year-old woman who presented with left sided rapidly progressive proptosis and visual loss due to an orbital lump extending up to the temporal lobe. Cranial imaging showed a huge mass invading the orbital wall and temporal bone. The presumptive diagnosis was a malignant orbital tumor. Preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology of the orbital mass came to be neurofibroma. Near total resection of the tumor was done. Histopathology revealed MPNST which was subsequently confirmed on the basis of immunopositivity for S-100. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged 8 days after surgery with an advice to attend cancer institute for possible radiotherapy. PMID:27057226

  14. BNIP3 regulates AT101 [(-)-gossypol] induced death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Niroop; Kohli, Latika; Graham, Christopher D; Klocke, Barbara J; Carroll, Steven L; Roth, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive Schwann cell-derived sarcomas and are the leading cause of mortality in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Current treatment modalities have been largely ineffective, resulting in a high rate of MPNST recurrence and poor five-year patient survival. This necessitates the exploration of alternative chemotherapeutic options for MPNST patients. This study sought to assess the cytotoxic effect of the BH3-mimetic AT101 [(-)-gossypol] on MPNST cells in vitro and to identify key regulators of AT101-induced MPNST cell death. We found that AT101 caused caspase-independent, non-apoptotic MPNST cell death, which was accompanied by autophagy and was mediated through HIF-1α induced expression of the atypical BH3-only protein BNIP3. These effects were mediated by intracellular iron chelation, a previously unreported mechanism of AT101 cytotoxicity.

  15. Synchronous Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouropoulos, Konstantinos; Farmakis, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNSTs) of the prostate are extremely rare. A very unusual case of simultaneous adenocarcinoma and MPNST of the prostate is reported. A 60-year-old Caucasian male presented for annual urologic examination. Digital rectal examination revealed a painless, toughish, and asymmetrically enlarged prostate. Serum prostate-specific antigen was 1 ng/mL. Radiologic examinations demonstrated a large mass, which was arising from the left peripheral lobe of the prostate. The patient underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate which revealed a smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential. Radical retropubic prostatectomy with en bloc removal of the mass and the seminal vesicles was performed and histology demonstrated low-grade MPNST and adenocarcinoma of the prostate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous prostatic adenocarcinoma and MPNST in the English literature. PMID:27872787

  16. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of Prostate: A Rare Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mid-aged male presented with progressive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) for years. Huge prostate with low serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was detected. The specimen from transurethral resection revealed surprising pathology finding as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Considering its huge size (more than 300 gm) and location, we prescribed neoadjuvant chemotherapy firstly. The tumor became regressive and then radical surgical resection was achieved. Adjuvant multimodality treatment including concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and target therapy was given. However, he expired about one year later. MPNST originating from prostate is very rare and seldom reported before. We here present this extremely rare disease and share our treatment experience. PMID:27872789

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms drive the progression of neurofibromas to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Krish; Kliot, Tamara; Piunti, Andrea; Kliot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Thinking Outside the Box: The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a histone methyltransferase complex known to repress gene expression. There is a large body of experimental evidence that supports its role in promoting tumorigenicity by suppressing tumor suppressor genes. Here, we discuss the surprising findings that, in neurofibromas, it may have a completely different role as a tumor suppressor; mutations of PRC2 lead to conversion of benign neurofibromas into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) by de-repressing and thereby activating genes driving cell growth and development. These findings have potentially powerful clinical applications in both diagnosing and treating MPNSTs. Hypothesis: PRC2 loss drives malignant transformation of neurofibromas. PMID:27920939

  18. Multicentric benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors in two related bearded dragons, Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Lemberger, K Y; Manharth, A; Pessier, A P

    2005-07-01

    Multiple subcutaneous masses from two sibling bearded dragons were removed. Nodules were well demarcated, restricted to the subcutis, and soft, white to yellow, resembling adipose tissue. Histologically, the masses were composed of short interlacing streams and bundles of spindle cells, with regions of vague nuclear palisading. Two of the tumors contained a subpopulation of polygonal cells with abundant periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive cytoplasmic granules. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for S100 and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) but negative for desmin and smooth muscle actin. Electron microscopy and reticulin stains demonstrated a continuous basal lamina separating intertwining cells. Histologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features were consistent with a peripheral nerve sheath origin. At 1 year postexcision, local reoccurrence of a single incompletely excised mass from the left shoulder was noted.

  19. Effects of acute controlled changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide on the diameter of the optic nerve sheath: a transorbital ultrasonographic study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, M; Han, J S; Fisher, J A; Chan, V W S; Venkatraghavan, L

    2017-02-08

    Transorbital ultrasonographic measurement of the diameter of the optic nerve sheath is a non-invasive, bed-side examination for detecting raised intracranial pressure. However, the ability of the optic nerve sheath diameter to predict acute changes in intracranial pressures remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the dynamic changes of the optic nerve sheath diameter in response to mild fluctuations in cerebral blood volume induced by changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide. We studied 11 healthy volunteers. End-tidal carbon dioxide was controlled by a model-based prospective end-tidal targeting system (RespirAct™). The volunteers' end-tidal carbon dioxide was targeted and maintained for 10 min each at normocapnia (baseline); hypercapnia (6.5 kPa); normocapnia (baseline 1); hypocapnia (3.9 kPa) and on return to normocapnia (baseline 2). A single investigator repeatedly measured the optic nerve sheath diameter for 10 min at each level of carbon dioxide. With hypercapnia, there was a significant increase in optic nerve sheath diameter, with a mean (SD) increase from baseline 4.2 (0.7) mm to 4.8 (0.8) mm; p < 0.001. On return to normocapnia, the optic nerve sheath diameter rapidly reverted back to baseline values. This study confirms dynamic changes in the optic nerve sheath diameter with corresponding changes in carbon dioxide, and their reversibly with normocapnia.

  20. Optic nerve sheath distention in Leber's optic neuropathy and the significance of the "Wallace mutation".

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Tse, D T; Byrne, S F; Johns, D R; Stone, E M

    1990-12-01

    We recently encountered a 27-year-old man who presented an atypical clinical picture of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: His family history was negative, visual loss continued steadily for over 8 months, circumpapillary microangiopathy was equivocal, the optic discs showed large physiologic cups, and both optic nerve sheaths were notably distended with increased subarachnoid fluid. The latter was confirmed by ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient's asymptomatic brother also showed unimpressive circumpapillary microangiopathy in the fundi. The asymptomatic mother from France was then seen, and she showed classic circumpapillary microangiopathy in the fundi. Studies of mitochondrial DNA showed the classic point mutation at position 11778 as reported by Wallace in all three family members. Another patient previously seen with classic Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy recently had mitochondrial DNA studies along with three other affected family members and five unaffected family members in the maternal lineage. All nine of these individuals were completely normal at the Wallace locus. In fact, sequencing of the entire ND-4 gene from one affected individual revealed it to be perfectly normal at the amino acid level. The importance of obtaining quantitative ultrasonography and the 30 degrees test, and studying mitochondrial DNA in patients suspected of having Leber's optic nerve disease is emphasized.

  1. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST): the clinical implications of cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Katz, Daniela; Lazar, Alexander; Lev, Dina

    2009-10-19

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare malignancy accounting for 3-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Most MPNSTs arise in association with peripheral nerves or deep neurofibromas and may originate from neural crest cells, although the specific cell of origin is uncertain. Approximately half of MPNSTs occur in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), an autosomal dominant disorder with an incidence of approximately one in 3500 persons; the remainder of MPNSTs develop sporadically. In addition to a variety of clinical manifestations, approximately 8-13% of NF1 patients develop MPNSTs, which are the leading cause of NF1-related mortality. Surgical resection is the mainstay of MPNST clinical management. However, because of invasive growth, propensity to metastasise, and limited sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation, MPNST has a guarded to poor prognosis. Five-year survival rates of only 20-50% indicate an urgent need for improved therapeutic approaches. Recent work in this field has identified several altered intracellular signal transduction cascades and deregulated tyrosine kinase receptors, posing the possibility of personalised, targeted therapeutics. However, expanded knowledge of MPNST molecular pathobiology will be needed to meaningfully apply such approaches for the benefit of afflicted patients.

  2. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation. PMID:27588138

  3. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of adrenal gland with heterologus osseous differentiation in a case of Von Recklinghausen's disease.

    PubMed

    Baisakh, Manas R; Mohapatra, Nachiketa; Adhikary, Samiran D; Routray, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) of the adrenal gland is extremely rare. Most of them occur in association with neurofibromatosis, ganglioneuroma or as part of a composite tumor such as pheochromocytoma. Only seven cases of MPNST of the adrenal gland have been reported in the literature till date. Discriminating this entity from other soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the adrenal gland has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Moreover, the tumor size and pattern of expression for certain immunohistochemical markers may serve as independent predictors of aggressiveness. Herein we present a 24-years-old male with features of Von Recklinghausen's disease who presented with large left adrenal gland malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

  4. Schwannoma of the tibial nerve sheath as a cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome--a case study.

    PubMed

    Milnes, Helen L; Pavier, Julian C

    2012-09-01

    A schwannoma is a benign, encapsulated and non-invasive tumour whose origin is derived from Schwann cells. Its incidence in the foot and ankle is rare. The etiology, incidence, clinical presentation, histology, differential diagnoses and surgical treatment are discussed. The authors present a case of a schwannoma of the tibial nerve sheath causing tarsal tunnel syndrome of the foot. The diagnosis in this case was delayed for eight years, which unfortunately is not uncommon with pedal schwannomas.

  5. Survivin Expression and Prognostic Significance in Pediatric Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Boldrin, Daniela; Merlo, Anna; Gambini, Claudio; Ferrari, Andrea; Dall'Igna, Patrizia; Coffin, Cheryl M.; Martines, Annalisa; Bonaldi, Laura; De Salvo, Gian Luca; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are very aggressive malignancies comprising approximately 5–10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. In this study, we focused on pediatric MPNST arising in the first 2 decades of life, as they represent one the most frequent non-rhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcomas in children. In MPNST, several genetic alterations affect the chromosomal region 17q encompassing the BIRC5/SURVIVIN gene. As cancer-specific expression of survivin has been found to be an effective marker for cancer detection and outcome prediction, we analyzed survivin expression in 35 tumor samples derived from young patients affected by sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-associated MPNST. Survivin mRNA and protein expression were assessed by Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, while gene amplification was analyzed by FISH. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of patients. Survivin mRNA was overexpressed in pediatric MPNST and associated to a copy number gain of BIRC5; furthermore, increased levels of transcripts correlated with a higher FNCLCC tumor grade (grade 1 and 2 vs. 3, p = 0.0067), and with a lower survival probability (Log-rank test, p = 0.0038). Overall, these data support the concept that survivin can be regarded as a useful prognostic marker for pediatric MPNST and a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24303016

  6. Primary uterine cervix melanoma resembling malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; Bajetta, Emilio; Buzzoni, Roberto; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Platania, Marco; Del Vecchio, Michele; Ditto, Antonino

    2008-10-01

    A rare variant of malignant melanoma (MM) of the uterine cervix that mimics a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is described. A 43-year-old white woman was admitted to the hospital complaining of genital discharge and vaginal bleeding. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-ovariectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy were performed, and the diagnosis was MPNST, FIGO IIB. Pathological examination showed a diffuse proliferation of amelanotic spindle cells and large, highly atypical, frequently multinucleated, bizarre, and S100-, HMB-45-, vimentin-positive cells. The patient remained disease-free for 43 months, when an abdominal computed tomographic scan showed local polypoid vaginal lesions, with histological features of typical MM. A pathological review was obtained in our institution by a gynecological pathologist, who defined the primary neoplasm in the cervix as an MM, with a pattern of growth histologically simulating an MPNST, metastatic to the vagina. To our knowledge, this is the first report in literature of MM of the uterine cervix resembling MPNST. Despite its rarity, this variant of MM should be considered when a diagnosis of cervix MPNST is made. The histological and immunohistochemical features of these different entities should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  7. Histopathology and clinical outcome of NF1-associated vs. sporadic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Christian; Zils, Ulrich; Peiper, Matthias; Kluwe, Lan; Gotthard, Stefan; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Zurakowski, David; von Deimling, Andreas; Mautner, Victor Felix

    2007-04-01

    The differences in the clinical course and histopathology of sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) were investigated retrospectively. The collective comprised 38 NF1 patients and 14 sporadic patients. NF1 patients were significantly younger at diagnosis (p<0.001) and had a significantly shorter survival time than sporadic patients (median survival 17 months vs. 42 months, Breslow p<0.05). The time interval to local recurrence and metastatic spread was also significantly shorter in NF1 patients (9.4 months vs. 30.0 months, p<0.01; 9.1 months vs. 33.2 months, p<0.001, respectively). In patients with the original histopathological data available (22 NF1 patients, 14 sporadic cases), NF1-associated MPNST showed a significantly higher cellularity compared to sporadic tumors (p<0.001) whereas sporadic MPNST featured a significantly higher pleomorphism (p<0.01). Most importantly, while histopathological variables correlated with French Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer grading in sporadic MPNST, this was not the case for NF1-associated tumors. The differences between NF1-associated and sporadic MPNST in regard to the clinical course and histopathology may reflect some fundamental differences in biology and pathomechanism of the two tumor groups. Our findings indicate the necessity for a separate grading scheme which takes into account the genetic background in NF1 patients.

  8. Trp53 Haploinsufficiency Modifies EGFR-Driven Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahrmann, Eric P.; Moriarity, Branden S.; Otto, George M.; Watson, Adrienne L.; Choi, Kwangmin; Collins, Margaret H.; Wallace, Margaret; Webber, Beau R.; Forster, Colleen L.; Rizzardi, Anthony E.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are genetically diverse, aggressive sarcomas that occur sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome. Reduced TP53 gene expression and amplification/overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene occur in MPNST formation. We focused on determining the cooperativity between reduced TP53 expression and EGFR overexpression for Schwann cell transformation in vitro (immortalized human Schwann cells) and MPNST formation in vivo (transgenic mice). Human gene copy number alteration data, microarray expression data, and TMA analysis indicate that TP53 haploinsufficiency and increased EGFR expression co-occur in human MPNST samples. Concurrent modulation of EGFR and TP53 expression in HSC1λ cells significantly increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Transgenic mice heterozygous for a Trp53-null allele and overexpressing EGFR in Schwann cells had a significant increase in neurofibroma and grade 3 PNST (MPNST) formation compared with single transgenic controls. Histological analysis of tumors identified a significant increase in pAkt expression in grade 3 PNSTs compared with neurofibromas. Array comparative genome hybridization analysis of grade 3 PNSTs identified recurrent focal regions of chromosomal gains with significant enrichment in genes involved in extracellular signal–regulated kinase 5 signaling. Collectively, altered p53 expression cooperates with overexpression of EGFR in Schwann cells to enhance in vitro oncogenic properties and tumorigenesis and progression in vivo. PMID:24832557

  9. Survivin expression and prognostic significance in pediatric malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Alaggio, Rita; Turrini, Riccardo; Boldrin, Daniela; Merlo, Anna; Gambini, Claudio; Ferrari, Andrea; Dall'igna, Patrizia; Coffin, Cheryl M; Martines, Annalisa; Bonaldi, Laura; De Salvo, Gian Luca; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are very aggressive malignancies comprising approximately 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. In this study, we focused on pediatric MPNST arising in the first 2 decades of life, as they represent one the most frequent non-rhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcomas in children. In MPNST, several genetic alterations affect the chromosomal region 17q encompassing the BIRC5/SURVIVIN gene. As cancer-specific expression of survivin has been found to be an effective marker for cancer detection and outcome prediction, we analyzed survivin expression in 35 tumor samples derived from young patients affected by sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-associated MPNST. Survivin mRNA and protein expression were assessed by Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, while gene amplification was analyzed by FISH. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of patients. Survivin mRNA was overexpressed in pediatric MPNST and associated to a copy number gain of BIRC5; furthermore, increased levels of transcripts correlated with a higher FNCLCC tumor grade (grade 1 and 2 vs. 3, p = 0.0067), and with a lower survival probability (Log-rank test, p = 0.0038). Overall, these data support the concept that survivin can be regarded as a useful prognostic marker for pediatric MPNST and a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  10. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase inhibition: A potential treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Kivlin, Christine M; Watson, Kelsey L; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A; Belousov, Roman; Ingram, Davis R; Huang, Kai-Lieh; May, Caitlin D; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Landers, Sharon M; Kalam, Azad Abul; Slopis, John M; McCutcheon, Ian E; Pollock, Raphael E; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres, Keila E

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, first evaluated nearly a decade ago, are primarily used in malignancies with known defects in DNA repair genes, such as alterations in breast cancer, early onset 1/2 (BRCA1/2). While no specific mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), MPNST cells could be effectively targeted with a PARP inhibitor to drive cells to synthetic lethality due to their complex karyotype and high level of inherent genomic instability. In this study, we assessed the expression levels of PARP1 and PARP2 in MPNST patient tumor samples and correlated these findings with overall survival. We also determined the level of PARP activity in MPNST cell lines. In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of the PARP inhibitor AZD2281 (Olaparib) in MPNST cell lines. We observed decreased MPNST cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in vitro at doses similar to, or less than, the doses used in cell lines with established defective DNA repair genes. Furthermore, AZD2281 significantly reduced local growth of MPNST xenografts, decreased the development of macroscopic lung metastases, and increased survival of mice with metastatic disease. Our results suggest that AZD2281 could be an effective therapeutic option in MPNST and should be further investigated for its potential clinical use in this malignancy.

  11. Appropriate modulation of autophagy sensitizes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells to treatment with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Okano, Munehiro; Sakata, Naoki; Ueda, Satoshi; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), very rare in childhood, is a highly aggressive soft-tissue tumor. We experienced a case of a 7-year-old boy with MPNST who was treated with imatinib mesylate (imatinib) after the identification of platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression in his tumor. We were unable to observe clinical benefits of imatinib in this patient. Therefore, cellular reactions of imatinib were investigated in vitro using 3 MPNST cell lines. Imatinib induced cytotoxicity in vitro with variable IC50 values (11.7 to >30 μM). Induction of apoptosis was not a pivotal mechanism in the inhibitory effects. We found that the treatment of MPNST cell lines with imatinib induced autophagy. Suppression of the initiation of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or small interfering RNA (siRNA) against beclin-1 attenuated the imatinib-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, blocking the formation of autophagosomes or the development of autolysosomes using siRNA against microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, or an MEK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) enhanced the imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in MPNST cells. Our data showed that the imatinib-mediated autophagy can function as a cytotoxic mechanism and that appropriate modulation of autophagy may sensitize MPNST cells to imatinib, which in turn may be a novel therapeutic strategy for MPNST.

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor as a cause of chronic cardiac insufficiency in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cardiac insufficiency was associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a cow. An eight-year-old cow developed a progressive condition (over a period of three months) characterized by an enhanced abdominal volume, reluctance to move, a positive jugular pulse, watery diarrhea and death. At necropsy, moderate subcutaneous edema and an enhanced hepatic lobular pattern were observed. A 23x20x11 cm firm, grayish-white mass adhered to and infiltrated the right atrium. Multiple firm, yellowish-white nodules of 0.5 to 12 cm in diameter were diffusely scattered in the epicardium and parietal pericardium. Histologically, the tumor was poorly circumscribed with foci of infiltration of the myocardium. The neoplastic cells had two major histologic patterns, Antoni types A and B. Within occasional foci, pleomorphic cells with an epithelioid appearance were present in addition to multinucleated cells with periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-positive cytoplasmic globules. Foci of cartilaginous and granular differentiations were interspersed among the neoplastic cells. Multiple vessels presented wall hyalinization and tumoral embolus. Large necrotic foci with mineralization and cholesterol clefts were also observed. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for S100 protein, vimentin and neuron-specific enolase labeling. PMID:23369465

  13. Posttraumatic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, J; Avidan, D; Rapp, A

    1985-07-01

    This report concerns three patients with intracranial meningioma developing at the site of an old head injury with skull fracture. These cases, along with literature reports, suggest a causal relationship between head trauma and the subsequent development of meningioma.

  14. [A rare case of nerve-sheath sarcoma with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (malignant triton tumor)].

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Garofalo, A

    2003-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are spindle-cell sarcomas that appear in a setting of neurofibroma or schwannoma or are associated with peripheral nerves or demonstrate nerve sheath differentiation. Malignant triton tumor (MTT) is a subtype of MPNST that also contain tissue with skeletal muscle differentiation (embryonal, plemorphic and botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma). The estimated incidence of MPNSTs in patients with NF1 is 2-5% compared with 0.0001% in the general population and approximately 69% of the reported cases of MTT are associated with von Recklinghausen disease. In July 2002 a 37-year old man was readmitted to the Department of Oncologic Surgery of the S. Camillo-Forlanini Hospital in Rome for both a right-sided retroperitoneal paravertebral not palpable mass, incidentally detected at a follow-up MRI, and a left-sided popliteal mass, discovered at clinical evaluation. Seventeen months before, when the patient underwent surgery at the same Department for both a left-sided paravertebral inferior mediastinal neurofibroma and a right-sided axillary neurofibroma, diagnosis of von Recklinghausen disease (NF1) was made, according to the criteria established by the NIH Consensus Development. Conference on Neurofibromatosis of 1987. A xifopubic laparotomy was performed: the tumor appeared to be localized, well-capsulated and strictly associated to the lumbar and sacral nervous radicles (L4, L5, S1) without evidence of invasion. The tumor was completely resected with sparing of the psoas muscle and the lumbar plexus through a subperineural dissection technique. No intra-operative pathologic examination was performed. Postoperative pathologic findings showed evidence for a trition tumor. The popliteal mass was resected too and resulted to be a neurofibroma just like the tumors resected 17 months before when diagnosis of von Recklinghausen disease was made. The patient was disease free 6 months after initial surgery. Sarcoma arising in anatomic site

  15. Noninvasive and quantitative intracranial pressure estimation using ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-juan; Yao, Yan; Feng, Liang-shu; Wang, Yu-zhi; Zheng, Nan-nan; Feng, Jia-chun; Xing, Ying-qi

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantitatively assess intracranial pressure (ICP) using optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements. We recruited 316 neurology patients in whom ultrasonographic ONSD was measured before lumbar puncture. They were randomly divided into a modeling and a test group at a ratio of 7:3. In the modeling group, we conducted univariate and multivariate analyses to assess associations between ICP and ONSD, age, sex, BMI, mean arterial blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure. We derived the mathematical function “Xing & Wang” from the modelling group to predict ICP and evaluated the function in the test group. In the modeling group, ICP was strongly correlated with ONSD (r = 0.758, p < 0.001), and this association was independent of other factors. The mathematical function was ICP = −111.92 + 77.36 × ONSD (Durbin-Watson value = 1.94). In the test group, a significant correlation was found between the observed and predicted ICP (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean difference between measurements of −0.07 ± 41.55 mmH2O. The intraclass correlation coefficient and its 95%CIs for noninvasive ICP assessments using our prediction model was 0.86 (0.79–0.90). Ultrasonographic ONSD measurements provide a potential noninvasive method to quantify ICP that can be conducted at the bedside. PMID:28169341

  16. Confirmation of mutation landscape of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Sohier, Pierre; Luscan, Armelle; Lloyd, Angharad; Ashelford, Kevin; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Vidaud, Dominique; Ortonne, Nicolas; Pasmant, Eric; Upadhyaya, Meena

    2017-05-01

    The commonest tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called neurofibromas. Malignant transformation of neurofibromas into aggressive MPNSTs may occur with a poor patient prognosis. A cooperative role of SUZ12 or EED inactivation, along with NF1, TP53, and CDKN2A loss-of-function, has been proposed to drive progression to MPNSTs. An exome sequencing analysis of eight MPNSTs, one plexiform neurofibroma, and seven cutaneous neurofibromas was undertaken. Biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene was observed in the plexiform neurofibroma and the MPNSTs, underlining that somatic biallelic NF1 inactivation is likely to be the initiating event for plexiform neurofibroma genesis, although it is unlikely to be sufficient for the subsequent MPNST development. The majority (5/8) of MPNSTs in our analyses demonstrated homozygous or heterozygous deletions of CDKN2A, which may represent an early event following NF1 LOH in the malignant transformation of Schwann cells from plexiform neurofibroma to MPNST. Biallelic somatic alterations of SUZ12 was also found in 4/8 MPNSTs. EED biallelic alterations were detected in 2 of the other four MPNSTs, with one tumor having a homozygous EED deletion. A missense mutation in the chromatin regulator KDM2B was also identified in one MPNST. No TP53 point mutations were found in this study, confirming previous data that TP53 mutations may be relatively rare in NF1-associated MPNSTs. Our study confirms the frequent biallelic inactivation of PRC2 subunits SUZ12 and EED in MPNSTs, and suggests the implication of KDM2B.

  17. Reproducibility and accuracy of optic nerve sheath diameter assessment using ultrasound compared to magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantification of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) by transbulbar sonography is a promising non-invasive technique for the detection of altered intracranial pressure. In order to establish this method as follow-up tool in diseases with intracranial hyper- or hypotension scan-rescan reproducibility and accuracy need to be systematically investigated. Methods The right ONSD of 15 healthy volunteers (mean age 24.5 ± 0.8 years) were measured by both transbulbar sonography (9 – 3 MHz) and 3 Tesla MRI (half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo sequences, HASTE) 3 and 5 mm behind papilla. All volunteers underwent repeated ultrasound and MRI examinations in order to assess scan-rescan reproducibility and accuracy. Moreover, inter- and intra-observer variabilities were calculated for both techniques. Results Scan-rescan reproducibility was robust for ONSD quantification by sonography and MRI at both depths (r > 0.75, p ≤ 0.001, mean differences < 2%). Comparing ultrasound- and MRI-derived ONSD values, we found acceptable agreement between both methods for measurements at a depth of 3 mm (r = 0.72, p = 0.002, mean difference < 5%). Further analyses revealed good inter- and intra-observer reliability for sonographic measurements 3 mm behind the papilla and for MRI at 3 and 5 mm (r > 0.82, p < 0.001, mean differences < 5%). Conclusions Sonographic ONSD quantification 3 mm behind the papilla can be performed with good reproducibility, measurement accuracy and observer agreement. Thus, our findings emphasize the feasibility of this technique as a non-invasive bedside tool for longitudinal ONSD measurements. PMID:24289136

  18. Dissecting the roles of Ephrin-A3 in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor by TALENs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengguang; Liu, Zhendong; Liu, Bo; Liu, Gengyan; Wu, Song

    2015-07-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare and aggressive soft tissue sarcoma for which effective treatments have not yet been established due to poor understanding of its pathogenesis. Our previous study indicated that miR-210-mediated Ephrin-A3 (EFNA3) promotion of proliferation and invasion of MPNST cells plays an important role in MPNST tumorigenesis and progression. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate the roles of EFNA3 in MPNST. Constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and lentiviral vectors were transfected into MPNST ST88-14 (NF1 wild-type) and sNF96.2 (NF1 mutant type) cell lines to obtain gain- and loss-of-function cell lines for the EFNA3 function study. The results showed that the knockout of ENFA3 increased cellular viability and invasiveness of the MPNST cells. However, the adhesion ability of MPNST cells was enhanced or inhibited when EFNA3 was overexpressed or knocked out, respectively. It was also observed that knockout of EFNA3 significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) and the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) compared to that in the control cells, yet the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), GTPase, integrins, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-α) increased significantly. Inversely, overexpression of EFNA3 significantly increased the expression of p-FAK and TNF-α compared to that in the control cells, yet the expression of PI3K, GTPase, integrins, VEGF and HIF-α decreased significantly. The results indicated that EFNA3 serves as a tumor suppressor in MPNST cells and it may play a critical role in the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling and VEGF-associated tumor angiogenesis pathway. These findings may not only facilitate the better understanding of MPNST pathogenesis, but also suggest EFNA3 as a promising target for MPNST treatment.

  19. Neurofibromin specific antibody differentiates malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) from other spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Reuss, David E; Habel, Antje; Hagenlocher, Christian; Mucha, Jana; Ackermann, Ulrike; Tessmer, Claudia; Meyer, Jochen; Capper, David; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Mautner, Victor; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier; Schittenhelm, Jens; Hartmann, Christian; Hagel, Christian; Katenkamp, Kathrin; Petersen, Iver; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; von Deimling, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) derive from the Schwann cell or perineurial cell lineage and occur either sporadically or in association with the tumor syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). MPNST often pose a diagnostic challenge due to their frequent lack of pathognomonic morphological or immunohistochemical features. Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene are found in all NF1-associated and many sporadic MPNST. The presence of NF1 mutation may have the potential to differentiate MPNST from several morphologically similar neoplasms; however, mutation detection is hampered by the size of the gene and the lack of mutational hot spots. Here we describe a newly developed monoclonal antibody binding to the C-terminus of neurofibromin (clone NFC) which was selected for optimal performance in routinely processed formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. NFC immunohistochemistry revealed loss of neurofibromin in 22/25 (88 %) of NF1-associated and 26/61 (43 %) of sporadic MPNST. There was a strong association of neurofibromin loss with deletions affecting the NF1 gene (P < 0.01). In a series of 256 soft tissue tumors of different histotypes NFC staining showed loss of neurofibromin in 2/8 myxofibrosarcomas, 2/12 (16 %) pleomorphic liposarcomas, 1/16 (6 %) leiomyosarcomas, and 4/28 (14 %) unclassified undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas. However, loss of neurofibromin was not observed in 22 synovial sarcomas, 27 schwannomas, 23 solitary fibrous tumors, 14 low-grade fibromyxoid sarcomas, 50 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 27 myxoid liposarcomas, 13 angiosarcomas, 9 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, and 7 epitheloid sarcomas. Immunohistochemistry using antibody NFC may substantially facilitate sarcoma research and diagnostics.

  20. Morphological spectrum of peripheral nerve sheath tumors: An insight into World Health Organization 2013 classification

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Boovalli, Mythri M.; Nathiyal, Velusamy; Venkataramappa, Srinivasamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) are neuroectodermal in origin. Now these tumors are classified under World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of soft tissue and bone 2013. Objective: To study the morphological spectrum of PNST and to study the secondary degenerative changes associated with it. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from January 2010 to June 2015. The gross details of tumor and patient's demographic profiles were reviewed. The hematoxylin and eosin stained slides were reassessed and the lesions were categorized and classified as per the WHO 2013 classification. The tumors were also assessed for secondary degenerative changes. Results: Our study comprised 143 cases of PNST. Age of the patients ranged from 5 to 75 years. 21–30 years is the most common age of occurrence with head and neck being the most common site. The PNSTs observed in the present study were neurofibroma (NF) (61.5%), schwannoma (36%), malignant PNST (2%), and granular cell tumor (0.5%). Nearly 10% of NF fulfilled the criteria for neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Rare tumors such as plexiform schwannoma and granular cell tumor were also observed. Malignant tumors were larger in dimension than benign. Myxoid, cystic, and hyaline changes were commonly associated with benign tumors while necrosis, hemorrhage, and mitotic activity were seen with malignant tumors. Conclusion: This series highlights the pathological variants of PNST along with their morphological changes and NF1 association. It is essential to be familiar with all these variants of PNST for accurate diagnosis as they have varied biological behavior. PMID:27365950

  1. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, Jillian; Fersht, Naomi; Bremner, Fion; Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya; Short, Susan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  2. Meningiomas of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Nijensohn, D E; Araujo, J C; MacCarty, C S

    1975-08-01

    A retrospective review of 12 cases of meningioma of Meckel's cave involving the Gasserian ganglion or the trigeminal posterior root (or both) seen at the Mayo Clinic during a 20-year period suggested three clearly defined clinical groups. One group (the largest) had typical trigeminal neuralgia and an excellent prognosis after the removal of the easily detachable mass that was impinging on the ganglion. A second group, with meningiomas en plaque embedded in the ganglion, had a history of atypical trigeminal face pain without neurological deficit, but the prognosis for pain relief was not as good as in the previous group. A third group had a history of face dysesthesias and pain, objective trigeminal sensory loss, and multiple cranial nerve deficit; these patients had meningiomas with histological signs of mitotic activity and a poor prognosis, with return of intractable pain and recurrence of the tumor.

  3. Giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of thigh in an adolescent with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Hacı Bayram; Serbest, Sancar; Turk, Bilge Aydın; Gumustas, Seyit Ali; Uludag, Abuzer

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare sarcomas of children and adolescents, and they are aggressive tumors with a high rate of local recurrence. We present a 15-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), who had a giant MPNST on the right thigh taking into account the available literature. Diagnosis of MPNST may be delayed in NF1 patients due to confusion with a neurofibroma and/or a plexiform neurofibroma. Malignancy should be considered, especially in cases with big masses, with heterogeneous involvement, or in the presence of cysts or necrotic nodules. The aim of surgical treatment is complete surgical excision. PMID:26604833

  4. Ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter: A point of care test helps in prognostication of Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arnab; Bala, Renu; Saini, Savita

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management to improve patient outcome. Measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter by ultrasound is a well studied modality for noninvasive assessment of ICP. Recent studies have shown it to correlate with invasively measured ICP. We utilized this technique in our ICU and found it to be of great help in guiding patient management and predicting the prognosis. A case series of four patients is reported illustrating its utility in ICU patients.

  5. Epithelioid Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Arising in a Schwannoma, in a Patient with “Neuroblastoma-like” Schwannomatosis and a Novel Germline SMARCB1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jodi M.; O'Hara, Carolyn; Dundas, George; Gilchrist, Dawna; Collins, Mark S.; Eaton, Katherine; Judkins, Alexander R.; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Folpe, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in pre-existing schwannomas are extremely rare. We report an unusual example occurring in a patient with multiple schwannomas (schwannomatosis), all but one of which showed “neuroblastoma-like” histology. By immunohistochemistry, both the epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and the schwannomas showed a complete loss of the Smarcb1 protein. Subsequent genetic evaluation revealed the presence of a novel germline mutation in the SMARCB1/INI1 gene in the patient and three of her children, two of whom were diagnosed with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the brain. PMID:22082606

  6. Verticillin A Inhibits Leiomyosarcoma and Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth via Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zewdu, A; Lopez, G; Braggio, D; Kenny, C; Constantino, D; Bid, HK; Batte, K; Iwenofu, OH; Oberlies, NH; Pearce, CJ; Strohecker, AM; Lev, D; Pollock, RE

    2017-01-01

    Objective The heterogeneity of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) represents a major challenge for the development of effective therapeutics. Comprised of over 50 different histology subtypes of various etiologies, STS subsets are further characterized as either karyotypically simple or complex. Due to the number of genetic anomalies associated with genetically complex STS, development of therapies demonstrating potency against this STS cluster is especially challenging and yet greatly needed. Verticillin A is a small molecule natural product with demonstrated anticancer activity; however, the efficacy of this agent has never been evaluated in STS. Therefore, the goal of this study was to explore verticillin A as a potential STS therapeutic. Methods We performed survival (MTS) and clonogenic analyses to measure the impact of this agent on the viability and colony formation capability of karyotypically complex STS cell lines: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS). The in vitro effects of verticillin A on apoptosis were investigated through annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis and by measuring fluorescently-labeled cleaved caspase 3/7 activity. The impact on cell cycle progression was assessed via cytometric measurement of propidium iodide intercalation. In vivo studies were performed using MPNST xenograft models. Tumors were processed and analyzed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for verticillin A effects on growth (Ki67) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Results Treatment with verticillin A resulted in decreased STS growth and an increase in apoptotic levels after 24 h. 100 nM verticillin A induced significant cellular growth abrogation after 24 h (96.7, 88.7, 72.7, 57, and 39.7% reduction in LMS1, S462, ST88, SKLMS1, and MPNST724, respectively). We observed no arrest in cell cycle, elevated annexin, and a nearly two-fold increase in cleaved caspase 3/7 activity in all MPNST and LMS cell lines. Control normal human Schwann (HSC) and

  7. [Multiple meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Terrier, L-M; François, P

    2016-06-01

    Multiple meningiomas (MMs) or meningiomatosis are defined by the presence of at least 2 lesions that appear simultaneously or not, at different intracranial locations, without the association of neurofibromatosis. They present 1-9 % of meningiomas with a female predominance. The occurrence of multiple meningiomas is not clear. There are 2 main hypotheses for their development, one that supports the independent evolution of these tumors and the other, completely opposite, that suggests the propagation of tumor cells of a unique clone transformation, through cerebrospinal fluid. NF2 gene mutation is an important intrinsic risk factor in the etiology of multiple meningiomas and some exogenous risk factors have been suspected but only ionizing radiation exposure has been proven. These tumors can grow anywhere in the skull but they are more frequently observed in supratentorial locations. Their histologic types are similar to unique meningiomas of psammomatous, fibroblastic, meningothelial or transitional type and in most cases are benign tumors. The prognosis of these tumors is eventually good and does not differ from the unique tumors except for the cases of radiation-induced multiple meningiomas, in the context of NF2 or when diagnosed in children where the outcome is less favorable. Each meningioma lesion should be dealt with individually and their multiple character should not justify their resection at all costs.

  8. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  9. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique Into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara S.; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine physicians recently adopted the use of ultrasonography to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as concomitant with increased intracranial pressure. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound capabilities since 2009 to consider this anatomical measure as a proxy for intracranial pressure in the microgravity environment. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before missions. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Data will be presented characterizing the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, longitudinal trends in-flight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased intracranial pressure outcomes.

  10. Primary hepatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor successfully treated with combination therapy: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Il; Lee, Hyoung Uk; Ahn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jong Eun; Lee, Hyun Yong; Cho, Hyon Doek; Lee, Sang Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in a young female patient, not associated with neurofibromatosis type-I is extremely rare in the liver. A 33-year-old female was admitted with a right flank pain for a weak. The CT scan showed 12.5-cm-sized mass located at the right hepatic lobe. At laparotomy, about 20.0-cm-sized mass was on the right hepatic lobe with attachment to right diaphragmatic pleura. Right hepatic lobe and adherent part of diaphragmatic pleura were resected. On histology and immunohistochemistry, it was diagnosed MPNST. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the right diaphragmatic pleura and adjuvant chemotherapy with adriamycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin were sequentially performed. The prognosis of MPNST is generally poor and it is associated with a highly aggressive course of recurrence, metastases, and death. Our case is probably a first report about combination therapy. PMID:27904856

  11. Temporal Bone Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Vrionis, Fotios D.; Robertson, Jon H.; Gardner, Gale; Heilman, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    Meningiomas involving the temporal bone may originate from arachnoid cell nests present within the temporal bone (intratemporal), but more frequently originate from arachnoid cell nests of the posterior or middle cranial fossa with secondary invasion of the TB (extratemporal). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 13 patients with meningiomas involving the temporal bone who underwent surgery. Tumors of the posterior fossa with only temporal bone hyperostosis, but without invasion, were excluded. Patients presented primarily with otologic symptoms and signs. The tumors originated in the temporal bone (5/13), jugular foramen (4/13), petroclival region (2/13), the asterion (1/13) or the internal auditory meatus (1/13). All of the intratemporal meningiomas had the radiological appearance of en-plaque menigiomas. The tumor extended into the middle ear (11/13), eustachian tube (5/13), and/or the labyrinth (3/13). A gross total resection was achieved in 11 patients and a subtotal resection in 2 patients. The lower cranial nerves were infiltrated by tumor in 4 patients, and were sacrificed. At a mean follow-up of approximately 6 years, 12 patients are currently alive and doing well and 1 died from tumor progression. Six patients showed tumor recurrence and were reoperated on (5/6) or followed conservatively (1/6). Surgical treatment of temporal bone meningiomas is associated with high recurrence rate due to indiscreet tumor margins. Combined surgical approaches (temporal craniotomy and mastoidectomy) by neurosurgical and otological teams are recommended for meningiomas originating in the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3p134-aFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171128

  12. Cytohistologic correlations of 24 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in 17 patients: the Institut Curie experience.

    PubMed

    Klijanienko, Jerzy; Caillaud, Jean-Michel; Lagacé, Réal; Vielh, Philippe

    2002-08-01

    Cytomorphological patterns of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) are insufficiently documented in the literature. Cytological and histological specimens in 24 tumors in 17 patients were correlated. The review of the original cytology reports showed that four (16.6%) tumors were correctly diagnosed, eight (33.3%) were diagnosed as sarcoma not otherwise specified, four (16.7%) as fibrosarcoma, three (12.5%) as synovial sarcoma, three (12.5%) as leiomyosarcoma, and one (4.2%) case each as malignant fibrous histiocytoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. At the review tumors were histologically reclassified as well-differentiated MPNST in 11 (45.9%) cases, anaplastic MPNST in 11 (45.9%) cases, and epithelioid MPNST and malignant Triton tumor in one (4.2%) case each. Cytologically, well-differentiated MPNST were composed of polymorphous oval to round cells, small spindle-shaped cells with wavy and comma-like naked nuclei, and a fibrillary, delicate stroma. Anaplastic MPNST, moreover, were composed of anaplastic giant and polymorphous cells. The malignant Triton tumor was composed of oval to round rhabdomyoblastic cells with eccentric nuclei and the epithelioid MPNST of polymorphous and round, epithelial-like cells. The cytological diagnosis of MPNST may be difficult, especially in anaplastic tumors. The correlation between the cytological features and the clinical information--origin of the tumor from a nerve trunk, a preexisting neurofibroma, patients with known history of neurofibromatosis 1--could be indicative of an MPNST diagnosis.

  13. Electrophoresis of polar fluorescent tracers through the nerve sheath labels neuronal populations for anatomical and functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, Matthew D.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2017-01-01

    The delivery of tracers into populations of neurons is essential to visualize their anatomy and analyze their function. In some model systems genetically-targeted expression of fluorescent proteins is the method of choice; however, these genetic tools are not available for most organisms and alternative labeling methods are very limited. Here we describe a new method for neuronal labelling by electrophoretic dye delivery from a suction electrode directly through the neuronal sheath of nerves and ganglia in insects. Polar tracer molecules were delivered into the locust auditory nerve without destroying its function, simultaneously staining peripheral sensory structures and central axonal projections. Local neuron populations could be labelled directly through the surface of the brain, and in-vivo optical imaging of sound-evoked activity was achieved through the electrophoretic delivery of calcium indicators. The method provides a new tool for studying how stimuli are processed in peripheral and central sensory pathways and is a significant advance for the study of nervous systems in non-model organisms. PMID:28084413

  14. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  15. Association of tumor location, extent of resection, and neurofibromatosis status with clinical outcomes for 221 spinal nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Michael; Parsa, Andrew T; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Weinstein, Philip R; Tihan, Tarik; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Intradural extramedullary spine tumors represent two-thirds of all primary spine neoplasms. Approximately half of these are peripheral nerve sheath tumors, mainly neurofibromas and schwannomas. Given the rarity of this disease and, thus, the limited analyses of clinical outcomes, the authors examined the association of tumor location, extent of resection, and neurofibromatosis (NF) status with clinical outcomes. METHODS Patients were identified through a search of the University of California, San Francisco, neuropathology database and a separate review of current procedural terminology codes. Data recorded included patient age, patient sex, clinical presentation, presence of NF, tumor type, tumor location, extent of resection (gross-total resection [GTR] or subtotal resection [STR]), and clinical follow-up. RESULTS Of 221 tumors in 199 patients (mean age 45 years), 53 were neurofibromas, 163 were schwannomas, and 5 were malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The most common presenting symptom was spinal pain (76%), followed by weakness (36%) and sensory abnormalities (34%). Mean symptom duration was 16 months. In terms of spinal location, neurofibromas were more common in the cervical spine (74% vs 27%, p < 0.001), and schwannomas were more common in the thoracic and lumbosacral spine (73% vs 26%, p < 0.001). Rates of GTR were lower for neurofibromas than schwannomas (51% vs 83%, p < 0.001), regardless of location. Rates of GTR were lower for cervical (54%) than thoracic (90%) and lumbosacral (86%) lesions (p < 0.001). NF was associated with lower rates of GTR among all tumors (43% vs 86%, p < 0.001). The mean follow-up time was 32 months. Recurrence/progression was more common for neurofibromas than schwannomas (17% vs 7%, p = 0.03), although the mean time to recurrence/progression did not differ according to tumor type (45 vs 53 months, p = 0.63). As expected, GTR was associated with lower recurrence rates (4% vs 22%, p < 0.001). According to

  16. Comprehensive establishment and characterization of orthoxenograft mouse models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Castellsagué, Joan; Gel, Bernat; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Llatjós, Roger; Blanco, Ignacio; Benavente, Yolanda; Pérez-Sidelnikova, Diana; García-Del Muro, Javier; Viñals, Joan Maria; Vidal, August; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Terribas, Ernest; López-Doriga, Adriana; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Serra, Eduard; Villanueva, Alberto; Lázaro, Conxi

    2015-05-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft-tissue sarcomas that can arise either sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). These aggressive malignancies confer poor survival, with no effective therapy available. We present the generation and characterization of five distinct MPNST orthoxenograft models for preclinical testing and personalized medicine. Four of the models are patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX), two independent MPNSTs from the same NF1 patient and two from different sporadic patients. The fifth model is an orthoxenograft derived from an NF1-related MPNST cell line. All MPNST orthoxenografts were generated by tumor implantation, or cell line injection, next to the sciatic nerve of nude mice, and were perpetuated by 7-10 mouse-to-mouse passages. The models reliably recapitulate the histopathological properties of their parental primary tumors. They also mimic distal dissemination properties in mice. Human stroma was rapidly lost after MPNST engraftment and replaced by murine stroma, which facilitated genomic tumor characterization. Compatible with an origin in a catastrophic event and subsequent genome stabilization, MPNST contained highly altered genomes that remained remarkably stable in orthoxenograft establishment and along passages. Mutational frequency and type of somatic point mutations were highly variable among the different MPNSTs modeled, but very consistent when comparing primary tumors with matched orthoxenografts generated. Unsupervised cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using an MPNST expression signature of ~1,000 genes grouped together all primary tumor-orthoxenograft pairs. Our work points to differences in the engraftment process of primary tumors compared with the engraftment of established cell lines. Following standardization and extensive characterization and validation, the orthoxenograft models were used for initial preclinical drug testing. Sorafenib (a BRAF

  17. Order-disorder phenomena in myelinated nerve sheaths: V. Effects of temperature on rat sciatic and optic nerves, and structural differences between the two types of nerve.

    PubMed

    Mateu, L; Luzzati, V; Vonasek, E; Mateu, E; Villegas, G M; Vargas, R

    1995-01-13

    We describe in this work X-ray scattering and electron microscope studies of rat sciatic and optic nerves as a function of temperature. The scattering experiments were analyzed as described in the previous papers of this series: a variety of parameters were determined, some of which characterize the lattice disorder, others the structure of the motif. The main results are the following. All the parameters determined by the X-ray scattering study vary with temperature and the temperature-dependence is specific for the type of nerve (sciatic or optic). Most of the disorder-related parameters display a minimum or a maximum in the vicinity of physiological temperature (38 degrees C in rat); this observation, strongly supported by the electron microscope study, shows that the degree of organization of myelin is highest near physiological temperature. The structure of the motif, as revealed by the electron density profile, is fairly different in the two types of nerves (in contrast with the assumption made by previous workers); the structure also varies with temperature and the temperature-induced alterations are nerve-type specific. In the two types of nerve the thickness of the lipid bilayer varies with temperature as expected for a lipid-containing system with hydrocarbon chains in the disordered conformation. In sciatic nerve the thickness of the (thinner) cytoplasmic polar layer, which is also the layer most affected by lattice disorder in this type of nerve, decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In optic nerve, in which lattice disorder predominantly affects the extracellular layer, the thickness of both the cytoplasmic and the extracellular layer is barely affected by temperature.

  18. Primary Intraosseous Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Medial Cuneiform: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Saravanaraja; Conway, Sheila A; Pitcher, J David; Temple, H Thomas

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (benign and malignant) usually arise in the soft tissues and are unusual in bone. Intraosseous peripheral nerve sheath tumors are usually benign and constitute approximately 0.2% of all bone tumors. Intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are uncommon and usually result from secondary invasion. Only a few cases of primary intraosseous MPNSTs have been reported in published studies, and these were localized mostly in the mandible (approximately 50%) or maxilla, spine, and, occasionally, in the appendicular skeleton. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of primary intraosseous MPNST involving a midtarsal bone (medial cuneiform). The patient was a 62-year-old female who presented with pain and tenderness but without swelling. Imaging revealed nonspecific findings, and the preoperative computed tomography-guided biopsy findings were consistent with MPNST. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy, followed by wide local excision and allograft reconstruction. At the final follow-up examination (24 months), the graft had been incorporated without evidence of local recurrence or distant disease. The patient with primary intraosseous MPNST of the medial cuneiform described in the present report presented with nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Thus, a high index of suspicion and histopathologic examination, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

  19. KANK1 inhibits cell growth by inducing apoptosis though regulating CXXC5 in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhibin; Shen, Yingjia; Chen, Kenny H.; Mittal, Suresh K.; Yang, Jer-Yen; Zhang, GuangJun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a type of rare sarcomas with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive nature and limited treatment options. Currently there is no targeted-cancer therapy for this type of malignancy. Thus, it is important to identify more cancer driver genes that may serve as targets of cancer therapy. Through comparative oncogenomics, we have found that KANK1 was a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for human MPNSTs. Although KANK1 is known as a cytoskeleton regulator, its tumorigenic function in MPNSTs remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that restoration of KANK1 in human MPNST cells inhibits cell growth both in human cell culture and xenograft mice by increasing apoptosis. Consistently, knockdown of KANK1 in neurofibroma cells promoted cell growth. Using RNA-seq analysis, we identified CXXC5 and other apoptosis-related genes, and demonstrated that CXXC5 is regulated by KANK1. Knockdown of CXXC5 was found to diminish KANK1-induced apoptosis in MPNST cells. Thus, KANK1 inhibits MPNST cell growth though CXXC5 mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that KANK1 may function as a tumor suppressor in human MPNSTs, and thus it may be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:28067315

  20. Multicentric fibromyxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor (multicentric schwannoma) in a dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius): morphopathological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Khordadmehr, M

    2011-11-01

    During postslaughter inspection of a 4-year-old male dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), numerous small nodules to large masses up to 4 cm in diameter were found on the serosal surfaces of forestomachs, large intestines, mesentery, liver, and spleen. Grossly, the masses were discrete, round, smooth, and white to gray that bulged from the serosal layer. Cut surfaces of the masses were discrete, round, white, and relatively homogeneous without any necrotic foci. Histopathologically, the masses were encapsulated and composed of a mixture of round and spindle-shaped cells in loose whorls of neoplastic cells with small elongated hyperchromatic wavy nuclei and a small amount of pale eosinophilic, poorly defined cytoplasm. Masson's trichrome staining showed mild amounts of collagen fibers forming an irregular, loose stroma. In immunohistochemistry, immunoreactivity for the Schwann cell marker (S100) was diffusely positive in the neoplastic cells. The immunoreactivity for CK, c-kit, and CD34 were negative. Ultrastructural examination confirmed the tumor was entirely formed of neoplastic Schwann cells. On the basis of the histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings, the tumors were diagnosed as multicentric fibromyxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor (multicentric schwannoma). This tumor has not been previously recorded in camel worldwide.

  1. Photothermal therapy improves the efficacy of a MEK inhibitor in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Elizabeth E.; Burga, Rachel A.; Li, Chaoyang; Zhu, Yuan; Fernandes, Rohan

    2016-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive tumors with low survival rates and the leading cause of death in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients under 40 years old. Surgical resection is the standard of care for MPNSTs, but is often incomplete and can generate loss of function, necessitating the development of novel treatment methods for this patient population. Here, we describe a novel combination therapy comprising MEK inhibition and nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy (PTT) for MPNSTs. MEK inhibitors block activity driven by Ras, an oncogene constitutively activated in NF1-associated MPNSTs, while PTT serves as a minimally invasive method to ablate cancer cells. Our rationale for combining these seemingly disparate techniques for MPNSTs is based on several reports demonstrating the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy with local PTT. We combine the MEK inhibitor, PD-0325901 (PD901), with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) as PTT agents, to block MEK activity and simultaneously ablate MPNSTs. Our data demonstrate the synergistic effect of combining PD901 with PBNP-based PTT, which converge through the Ras pathway to generate apoptosis, necrosis, and decreased proliferation, thereby mitigating tumor growth and increasing survival of MPNST-bearing animals. Our results suggest the potential of this novel local-systemic combination “nanochemotherapy” for treating patients with MPNSTs.

  2. Combinatorial therapeutic targeting of BMP2 and MEK-ERK pathways in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Sidra; Ge, Yubin; Tainsky, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is challenging not only due to its aggressive and invasive nature, but also limited therapeutic options. Using gene expression profiling, our lab identified BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating MPNSTs. In this study, we explored the therapeutic impact of targeting BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway in conjunction with RAS-MEK-ERK signaling, which is constitutively activated in MPNSTs. Our results indicated that single agent treatment with LDN-193189, a BMP2 Type I receptor inhibitor, did not affect the growth and survival of MPNST cells at biochemically relevant inhibitory concentrations. However, addition of a MEK1/2 inhibitor, selumetinib, to LDN-193189-treated cells resulted in significant inhibition of cell growth and induction of cell death. LDN-193189 at biochemically effective concentrations significantly inhibited motility and invasiveness of MPNST cells, and these effects were enhanced by the addition of selumetinib. Overall, our results advocate for a combinatorial therapeutic approach for MPNSTs that not only targets the growth and survival via inhibition of MEK1/2, but also its malignant spread by suppressing the activation of BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway. Importantly, these studies were conducted in low-passage patient-derived MPNST cells, allowing for an investigation of the effects of the proposed drug treatments in a biologically-relevant context. PMID:27494873

  3. Combinatorial therapeutic targeting of BMP2 and MEK-ERK pathways in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Sidra; Ge, Yubin; Tainsky, Michael A

    2016-08-30

    The clinical management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is challenging not only due to its aggressive and invasive nature, but also limited therapeutic options. Using gene expression profiling, our lab identified BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating MPNSTs. In this study, we explored the therapeutic impact of targeting BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway in conjunction with RAS-MEK-ERK signaling, which is constitutively activated in MPNSTs. Our results indicated that single agent treatment with LDN-193189, a BMP2 Type I receptor inhibitor, did not affect the growth and survival of MPNST cells at biochemically relevant inhibitory concentrations. However, addition of a MEK1/2 inhibitor, selumetinib, to LDN-193189-treated cells resulted in significant inhibition of cell growth and induction of cell death. LDN-193189 at biochemically effective concentrations significantly inhibited motility and invasiveness of MPNST cells, and these effects were enhanced by the addition of selumetinib. Overall, our results advocate for a combinatorial therapeutic approach for MPNSTs that not only targets the growth and survival via inhibition of MEK1/2, but also its malignant spread by suppressing the activation of BMP2-SMAD1/5/8 pathway. Importantly, these studies were conducted in low-passage patient-derived MPNST cells, allowing for an investigation of the effects of the proposed drug treatments in a biologically-relevant context.

  4. Combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine effectively inhibits malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor growth by targeting complementary signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Stephanie N; Turk, Amy N; Byer, Stephanie J; Longo, Jody Fromm; Kappes, John C; Roth, Kevin A; Carroll, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents effective against malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are urgently needed. We recently found that tamoxifen potently impedes xenograft growth. In vitro, tamoxifen inhibits MPNST proliferation and survival in an estrogen receptor-independent manner; these effects are phenocopied by the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. The present study was performed to establish the mechanism of action of tamoxifen in vivo and optimize its therapeutic effectiveness. To determine if tamoxifen has estrogen receptor-dependent effects in vivo, we grafted MPNST cells in castrated and ovariectomized mice; xenograft growth was unaffected by reductions in sex hormones. To establish whether tamoxifen and trifluoperazine additively or synergistically impede MPNST growth, mice xenografted with neurofibromatosis type 1-associated or sporadic MPNST cells were treated with tamoxifen, trifluoperazine, or both drugs for 30 days. Both monotherapies inhibited graft growth by 50%, whereas combinatorial treatment maximally reduced graft mass by 90% and enhanced decreases in proliferation and survival. Kinomic analyses showed that tamoxifen and trifluoperazine have both shared and distinct targets in MPNSTs. In addition, trifluoperazine prevented tamoxifen-induced increases in serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1, a protein linked to tamoxifen resistance. These findings suggest that combinatorial therapy with tamoxifen and trifluoperazine is effective against MPNSTs because these agents target complementary pathways that are essential for MPNST pathogenesis.

  5. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in the spine: a retrospective analysis of clinical and molecular prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Yin, Huabin; Han, Shuai; Yang, Xinhai; Wang, Jing; Huang, Quan; Yan, Wangjun; Zhou, Wang; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-04-01

    Spinal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are relatively rare. There is little information published in the literature regarding this subject. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors that may affect the outcomes of patients with spinal MPNSTs by reviewing 43 patients with spinal MPNST who were treated in our hospital between 2001 and 2012. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic variables relative to patient and tumor characteristics, treatment modality and molecules. All 43 MPNST patients (25 men and 18 women; median age 49 years) underwent surgical resection, of whom 15 patients also underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Local recurrence was found in 21 (48.8 %) patients. Twenty-two (51.2 %) patients died during the follow-up periods with a median survival time of 49 months. The 5-year recurrence and survival rate was 53 and 44 % respectively. The statistical analyses suggested that high-grade malignancy and osteolytic destruction were closely associated with recurrence and death. A total of 38 cases accepted postoperative immunohistochemisty examine. S-100 was identified as an independent factor related to both recurrence and survival, adjusting for clinical factors. In conclusion, we confirmed that malignant grade and osteolytic destruction were the two independent factors for both recurrence and survival, while patients with S-100 protein negative had a higher recurrence rate and a lower survival rate.

  6. [Case of abdominal wall malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor which is difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease].

    PubMed

    Tatenuma, Tomoyuki; Sakata, Ryoko; Sugiura, Shinpei; Tajiri, Takehiro; Gondo, Toshikazu; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are highly malignant soft tissue sarcomas. It is very rare for MPNST to arise in the abdominal wall. We report a case of abdominal wall MPNST that was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease. A 72-year-old woman found a mass of the umbilicus in October 2011. She visited a digestive surgery department in November because it gradually enlarged. Diagnostic imaging suggested a urachal tumor. She was then referred to our clinic. Contrast enhanced CT showed that the 5-cm cystic tumor extended from the umbilicus to abdominal wall. The tumor showed low uptake value in PET-CT. We diagnosed her with a urachal cyst, but could not deny urachal carcinoma. Therefore, we performed surgical resection in January 2012. The pathological diagnosis was MPNST. She has not experienced recurrence for 9 months. MPNST mostly occur in the retroperitoneum close to the spine, extremities, head, and neck. It is very rare for them to occur in the abdominal wall. This is the sixth case including overseas reports. In addition, this is the first case in which it was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease.

  7. Pediatric and adult malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program.

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Goodman, J Clay; New, Pamela; Scheurer, Michael E

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare soft tissue sarcomas that arise predominantly from Schwann cells. Despite the fact that MPNSTs have high local recurrence rates and are generally associated with poor prognosis, little is known about prognostic factors or effective clinical management for this tumor type. The purpose of this study was to describe the distributions of patient and tumor characteristics and to identify predictors of cause-specific survival among MPNST cases reported to SEER between 1973 and 2008. Patient and tumor characteristics were compared between pediatric and adult MPNST cases. Cox regression and tree-based survival analysis were used to examine factors associated with MPNST-related mortality separately among adults and children. A total of 1,315 MPNST cases were isolated from the 1973-2008 SEER dataset. Among pediatric cases, sex, race, and radiation therapy predicted MPNST survival, whereas among adults, tumor site, tumor grade, number of primary tumors, and tumor size were significant predictors. As tumor size at diagnosis/resection may be the only somewhat "modifiable" prognostic factor, future studies should aim to identify biological and social attributes associated with tumor size at diagnosis, separately among individuals with and without NF-1, in order to help identify earlier opportunities for clinical intervention.

  8. Involvement of PACAP/ADNP signaling in the resistance to cell death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells.

    PubMed

    Castorina, Alessandro; Giunta, Salvatore; Scuderi, Soraya; D'Agata, Velia

    2012-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas able to grow under conditions of metabolic stress caused by insufficient nutrients or oxygen. Both pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) have glioprotective potential. However, whether PACAP/ADNP signaling is involved in the resistance to cell death in MPNST cells remains to be clarified. Here, we investigated the involvement of this signaling system in the survival response of MPNST cells against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-evoked death both in the presence of normal serum (NS) and in serum-starved (SS) cells. Results showed that ADNP levels increased time-dependently (6-48 h) in SS cells. Treatment with PACAP38 (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) dose-dependently increased ADNP levels in NS but not in SS cells. PAC(1)/VPAC receptor antagonists completely suppressed PACAP-stimulated ADNP increase and partially reduced ADNP expression in SS cells. NS-cultured cells exposed to H(2)O(2) showed significantly reduced cell viability (~50 %), increased p53 and caspase-3, and DNA fragmentation, without affecting ADNP expression. Serum starvation significantly reduced H(2)O(2)-induced detrimental effects in MPNST cells, which were not further ameliorated by PACAP38. Altogether, these finding provide evidence for the involvement of an endogenous PACAP-mediated ADNP signaling system that increases MPNST cell resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced death upon serum starvation.

  9. Preclinical evaluation of the combination of mTOR and proteasome inhibitors with radiotherapy in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, A S; Baia, G S; Ho, J S Y; Velarde, E; Wong, J; Gallia, G L; Belzberg, A J; Kimura, E T; Riggins, G J

    2014-05-01

    About one half of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) have Neurofibromin 1 (NF1) mutations. NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene essential for negative regulation of RAS signaling. Survival for MPNST patients is poor and we sought to identify an effective combination therapy. Starting with the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin and everolimus, we screened for synergy in 542 FDA approved compounds using MPNST cells with a native NF1 loss in both alleles. We further analyzed the cell cycle and signal transduction. In vivo growth effects of the drug combination with local radiation therapy (RT) were assessed in MPNST xenografts. The synergistic combination of mTOR inhibitors with bortezomib yielded a reduction in MPNST cell proliferation. The combination of mTOR inhibitors and bortezomib also enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of radiation in vitro. In vivo, the combination of mTOR inhibitor (everolimus) and bortezomib with RT decreased tumor growth and proliferation, and augmented apoptosis. The combination of approved mTOR and proteasome inhibitors with radiation showed a significant reduction of tumor growth in an animal model and should be investigated and optimized further for MPNST therapy.

  10. Photothermal therapy improves the efficacy of a MEK inhibitor in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Elizabeth E.; Burga, Rachel A.; Li, Chaoyang; Zhu, Yuan; Fernandes, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive tumors with low survival rates and the leading cause of death in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients under 40 years old. Surgical resection is the standard of care for MPNSTs, but is often incomplete and can generate loss of function, necessitating the development of novel treatment methods for this patient population. Here, we describe a novel combination therapy comprising MEK inhibition and nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy (PTT) for MPNSTs. MEK inhibitors block activity driven by Ras, an oncogene constitutively activated in NF1-associated MPNSTs, while PTT serves as a minimally invasive method to ablate cancer cells. Our rationale for combining these seemingly disparate techniques for MPNSTs is based on several reports demonstrating the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy with local PTT. We combine the MEK inhibitor, PD-0325901 (PD901), with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) as PTT agents, to block MEK activity and simultaneously ablate MPNSTs. Our data demonstrate the synergistic effect of combining PD901 with PBNP-based PTT, which converge through the Ras pathway to generate apoptosis, necrosis, and decreased proliferation, thereby mitigating tumor growth and increasing survival of MPNST-bearing animals. Our results suggest the potential of this novel local-systemic combination “nanochemotherapy” for treating patients with MPNSTs. PMID:27833160

  11. [Diagnostic difficulties in the laryngeal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)].

    PubMed

    Pabiszczak, Maciej; Woźniak, Aldona; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Witold

    2004-01-01

    The malignant tumor deriving from the peripheral nerve sheet, previously described as malignant Schwannoma or neurosarcoma is extremely rare as malignancy localized in the larynx. The half of cases has been developing on the basis of neurofibromatosis in von Recklinghausen disease type I or seldom, type II. The high grade of malignancy end tendency to reccurences and distant metastases is typical for this tumors. The case of 64 year old man with larynx neurosarcoma was presented. The diagnostic difficulties were caused by clinical presentation of the smooth tumor covered by unchanged mucosa and typical histological features of the tumor. The final histological assessment was complemented by positive immunohistochemical reaction (antigens against protein S-100, NSE and PG 9.5).

  12. Monocular nasal hemianopia from atypical sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Rebecca C; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2010-06-01

    Neurogenic monocular nasal field defects respecting the vertical midline are quite uncommon. We report a case of a unilateral nasal hemianopia that was caused by compression of the left optic nerve by a sphenoid wing meningioma. Histological examination revealed that the pathology of the meningioma was consistent with that of an atypical meningioma, which carries a guarded prognosis with increased chance of recurrence. The tumor was debulked surgically, and the patient's visual field defect improved.

  13. Modelling the effects of electric fields on nerve fibres: influence of the myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A G; McIntyre, C C; Grill, W M

    2000-07-01

    The excitation and conduction properties of computer-based cable models of mammalian motor nerve fibres, incorporating three different myelin representations, are compared. The three myelin representations are a perfectly insulating single cable (model A), a finite impedance single cable (model B) and a finite impedance double cable (model C). Extracellular stimulation of the three models is used to study their strength-duration and current-distance (I-X) relationships, conduction velocity (CV) and action potential shape. All three models have a chronaxie time that is within the experimental range. Models B and C have increased threshold currents compared with model A, but each model has slope to the I-X relationship that matches experimental results. Model B has a CV that matches experimental data, whereas the CV of models A and C are above and below the experimental range, respectively. Model C is able to produce a depolarising afterpotential (DAP), whereas models A and B exhibit hyperpolarising afterpotentials. Models A and B are determined to be the preferred models when low-frequency stimulation (< approximately 25 Hz) is used, owing to their efficiency and accurate excitation and conduction properties. For high frequency stimulation (approximately 25 Hz and greater), model C, with its ability to produce a DAP, is necessary accurately to simulate excitation behaviour.

  14. Optimal optic nerve sheath diameter threshold for the identification of elevated opening pressure on lumbar puncture in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Feng, Liangshu; Yao, Yan; Wang, Yuzhi; Chen, Ying; Feng, Jiachun; Xing, Yingqi

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is a non-invasive and rapid method that might be helpful in the identification of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). The use of an ONSD greater than 5 mm on ultrasound as an indicator of increased ICP in a Caucasian population has been studied. However, the cut-off point of this predictor in Chinese patients has not been established. Thus, we conducted this study to identify the ONSD criterion for the detection of elevated opening pressure on lumbar puncture (LP) in a Chinese population and to investigate the influencing factors. This study was a blind cross-sectional study. Patients who presented with suspected increased ICP were included. The opening pressure on LP of each participant was confirmed. We analyzed the clinical differences between the groups of patients with abnormal and normal opening pressures on LP. A receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed to determine the ONSD cut-off point for the identification of abnormal opening pressure on LP. In total, 279 patients were recruited, and 101 patients presented with elevated opening pressure on LP. ONSD was a significant independent predictor of elevated opening pressure on LP (p<0.001). However, no statistical significance was observed regarding the factors that might have affected this relationship including gender, age, body mass index, waistline, head circumference, hypertension and pathological subtype. The ONSD cut-off point for the identification of elevated opening pressure on LP was 4.1 mm; this cut-off yielded a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 92%. ONSD is a strong and accurate predictor of elevated opening pressure on LP. The cut-off point of this predictor in a Chinese population was remarkably lower than that found in a Caucasian population. Thus, ethnic differences should be noted when using the ONSD as an indicator of increased ICP.

  15. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising in diffuse-type neurofibroma: clinicopathologic characterization in a series of 9 cases.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Fletcher, Christopher D M

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse-type neurofibroma, an uncommon variant of neurofibroma, is associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 in ∼60% of cases. Typically presenting in young adults as ill-defined plaque-like dermal/subcutaneous thickening, most cases are located on the trunk or the head and neck region. Malignant transformation is extremely rare. Nine cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising in diffuse-type neurofibroma (identified in consult files) are described, including clinicopathologic features and follow-up. Five patients were male and 4 female, aged 31 to 59 years (median 49 y). All diffuse-type neurofibromas contained Meissner corpuscles, with tumor sizes ranging between 3.6 and 45 cm (median, 7.4 cm). Five patients had a clinical history of neurofibromatosis type 1, and 1 had Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome. Six tumors arose on the trunk and 1 each on the leg, arm, and scalp. Increased cellularity, nuclear atypia, and mitoses (range, 1 to 63/50 high-power fields) indicated transition to MPNST, classified as low grade in 5, intermediate to high grade in 1, and high grade in 3 cases, 1 of which exhibited heterologous angiosarcomatous differentiation. S-100 expression was quite strong and diffuse in the neurofibroma components and less extensive or weaker in MPNST. Follow-up, available for all patients (median, 80.5 mo, except 1 recent case), revealed that 1 patient developed local recurrence after 9 months; 1 with metastases at the time of initial diagnosis died 1 month after tumor resection. All other patients were alive without evidence of disease at 15 to 145 months (median, 83 mo). Diffuse-type neurofibroma may show transformation to MPNST in very rare instances. It is important to be aware of possible malignant change, requiring thorough sampling of resection specimens and long-term clinical follow-up of patients with unexcised lesions.

  16. Primary Intraosseous Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Primary intraosseous meningiomas are a subtype of primary extradural meningiomas. They represent approximately two-thirds of extradural meningiomas and fewer than 2% of meningiomas overall. These tumors originate within the bones of the skull and can have a clinical presentation and radiographic differential diagnosis different from those for intradural meningiomas. Primary intraosseous meningiomas are classified based on location and histopathologic characteristics. Treatment is primarily surgical resection with wide margins if possible. Sparse literature exists regarding the use of adjuvant therapies. The literature regarding primary intraosseous meningiomas consists primarily of clinical case reports and case series. This literature is reviewed and summarized in this article.

  17. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition induces anti-proliferative effect in NF1-associated plexiform neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hivelin, Mikael; Nusbaum, Patrick; Hubas, Arnaud; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Lantieri, Laurent; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Vidaud, Michel; Pasmant, Eric; Chapuis, Nicolas; Parfait, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30-50% of individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 develop benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs). PNFs can undergo malignant transformation to highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in 5-10% of NF1 patients, with poor prognosis. No effective systemic therapy is currently available for unresectable tumors. In tumors, the NF1 gene deficiency leads to Ras hyperactivation causing the subsequent activation of the AKT/mTOR and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways and inducing multiple cellular responses including cell proliferation. In this study, three NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines (90-8, 88-14 and 96-2), STS26T sporadic MPNST cell line and PNF-derived primary Schwann cells were used to test responses to AZD8055, an ATP-competitive “active-site” mTOR inhibitor. In contrast to rapamycin treatment which only partially affected mTORC1 signaling, AZD8055 induced a strong inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in MPNST-derived cell lines and PNF-derived Schwann cells. AZD8055 induced full blockade of mTORC1 leading to an efficient decrease of global protein synthesis. A higher cytotoxic effect was observed with AZD8055 compared to rapamycin in the NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines with IC50 ranging from 70 to 140 nM and antiproliferative effect was confirmed in PNF-derived Schwann cells. Cell migration was impaired by AZD8055 treatment and cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest. Combined effects of AZD8055 and PD0325901 MEK inhibitor as well as BRD4 (BromoDomain-containing protein 4) inhibitors showed a synergistic antiproliferative effect. These data suggest that NF1-associated peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an ideal target for AZD8055 as a single molecule or in combined therapies. PMID:26840085

  18. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition induces anti-proliferative effect in NF1-associated plexiform neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Varin, Jennifer; Poulain, Laury; Hivelin, Mikael; Nusbaum, Patrick; Hubas, Arnaud; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Lantieri, Laurent; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Vidaud, Michel; Pasmant, Eric; Chapuis, Nicolas; Parfait, Béatrice

    2016-06-14

    Approximately 30-50% of individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 develop benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, called plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs). PNFs can undergo malignant transformation to highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in 5-10% of NF1 patients, with poor prognosis. No effective systemic therapy is currently available for unresectable tumors. In tumors, the NF1 gene deficiency leads to Ras hyperactivation causing the subsequent activation of the AKT/mTOR and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways and inducing multiple cellular responses including cell proliferation. In this study, three NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines (90-8, 88-14 and 96-2), STS26T sporadic MPNST cell line and PNF-derived primary Schwann cells were used to test responses to AZD8055, an ATP-competitive "active-site" mTOR inhibitor. In contrast to rapamycin treatment which only partially affected mTORC1 signaling, AZD8055 induced a strong inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in MPNST-derived cell lines and PNF-derived Schwann cells. AZD8055 induced full blockade of mTORC1 leading to an efficient decrease of global protein synthesis. A higher cytotoxic effect was observed with AZD8055 compared to rapamycin in the NF1-null MPNST-derived cell lines with IC50 ranging from 70 to 140 nM and antiproliferative effect was confirmed in PNF-derived Schwann cells. Cell migration was impaired by AZD8055 treatment and cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest. Combined effects of AZD8055 and PD0325901 MEK inhibitor as well as BRD4 (BromoDomain-containing protein 4) inhibitors showed a synergistic antiproliferative effect. These data suggest that NF1-associated peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an ideal target for AZD8055 as a single molecule or in combined therapies.

  19. Meningioma involving Meckel's cave: transpetrosal surgical anatomy and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Choo, Daniel I; Steward, David L; Pensak, Myles L

    2002-09-01

    Meningiomas originating in Meckel's cave (MC) are uncommon lesions that represent 1% of all intracranial meningiomas. Innovations in skull base surgery have enabled resection of these lesions with less morbidity, but require an intimate knowledge of both lesional pathology and regional microneuroanatomy. To review the surgical and clinical considerations involved in the management of MC meningiomas, we retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent transpetrosal resection of primary MC meningiomas between 1984 and 1998. Of 146 patients who underwent transpetrosal removal of meningiomas, 7 were believed to have tumors originating in MC. All 7 patients presented with trigeminal dysfunction, facial pain, and/or headache. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 5 of the 7 patients. Facial hypoesthesia or anesthesia, paralysis of cranial nerve VI, and ophthalmoplegia were among the postoperative complications encountered. Meningiomas of MC represent treatable lesions whose diagnosis requires prompt imaging of patients with trigeminal dysfunction and symptoms of facial pain and headache.

  20. Meningioma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bencze, János; Varkoly, Gréta; Kouhsari, Mahan C; Klekner, Álmos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meningioma accounts for more than 30% of all intracranial tumours. It affects mainly the elderly above the age of 60, at a female:male ratio of 3:2. The prognosis is variable: it is usually favourable with no progression in tumour grade and no recurrence in WHO grade 1 tumours. However, a minority of tumours represent atypical (grade 2) or anaplastic (grade 3) meningiomas; this heterogeneity is also reflected in histopathological appearances. Irrespective of the grade, the size of the tumour and the localisation may have severe, sometimes lethal consequences. Following neurosurgical interventions to remove the tumour, recurrence and progression in WHO grade may occur. Our knowledge on predisposing histomorphological and molecular factors of recurrence is rather limited. These can be classified as I) demographic II) environmental, III) genetic and epigenetic IV) imaging, V) neuropathological, and VI) neurosurgical. In view of the complex background of tumour recurrence, the recognition of often subtle signs of increased risk of recurrence requires close collaboration of experts from several medical specialties. This multidisciplinary approach results in better therapy and fewer complications related to tumour recurrence. PMID:28352788

  1. Posterior Fossa Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Essam A.; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Achilli, Vittorio; Aristegui, Miguel; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Posterior fossa meningioma is the second most common tumor in the cerebellopontine angle. It has a higher rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to acoustic neuroma. Forty posterior fossa meningioma patients managed in our centers were reviewed. Thirty-nine patients were managed surgically with 42 surgical procedures. The approaches used were the translabyrinthine approach in 18 patients (43%), the modified transcochlear in 11 cases (26%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid in 5 cases (12%), the suboccipital in 4 cases (10%), the petro-occipital trassigmoid transcervical in 2 cases (5%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid transtentorial in 1 case (2%), and a subtemporal transtentorial for another case (2%). Facial nerve anatomical integrity was preserved in 87% of procedures but was interrupted in 5 cases, with 4 of the latter subsequently repaired. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 38 cases. A second-stage total tumor removal is planned for the remaining case. There was only one case of perioperative death and no cases of radiological recurrence so far. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4p206-bFigure 5p207-bFigure 5 PMID:17171173

  2. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  3. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival Via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brossier, Nicole M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S.; Byer, Stephanie J.; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators, (guanine nucleotide exchange factors), in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25946318

  4. Effect of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on the Sonographic Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter as a Surrogate for Intracranial Pressure during Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Wook-Jong; Lee, Joonho; Han, Yun A.; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Cho, Seong-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can increase intracranial pressure. Pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position are associated with an increased intracranial pressure. We investigated whether PEEP ventilation could additionally influence the sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter as a surrogate for intracranial pressure during pneumoperitoneum combined with the Trendelenburg position in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Methods After anesthetic induction, 38 patients were randomly allocated to a low tidal volume ventilation (8 ml/kg) without PEEP group (zero end-expiratory pressure [ZEEP] group, n = 19) or low tidal volume ventilation with 8 cmH2O PEEP group (PEEP group, n = 19). The sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter was measured prior to skin incision, 5 min and 30 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position, and at the end of surgery. The study endpoint was the difference in the sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter 5 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position between the ZEEP and PEEP groups. Results Optic nerve sheath diameters 5 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position did not significantly differ between the groups [least square mean (95% confidence interval); 4.8 (4.6–4.9) mm vs 4.8 (4.7–5.0) mm, P = 0.618]. Optic nerve sheath diameters 30 min after pneumoperitoneum and the Trendelenburg position also did not differ between the groups [least square mean (95% confidence interval); 4.5 (4.3–4.6) mm vs 4.5 (4.4–4.6) mm, P = 0.733]. Conclusions An 8 cmH2O PEEP application under low tidal volume ventilation does not induce an increase in the optic nerve sheath diameter during pneumoperitoneum combined with the steep Trendelenburg position, suggesting that there might be no detrimental effects of PEEP on the intracranial pressure during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02516566 PMID:28107408

  5. Meningiomas of Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Delfini, R; Innocenzi, G; Ciappetta, P; Domenicucci, M; Cantore, G

    1992-12-01

    A series of 16 patients with meningiomas of Meckel's cave is reported. Trigeminal neuralgia, typical or atypical, was the initial symptom in 10 patients (62.5%). At admission, trigeminal signs and symptoms were present in 15 patients (93.7%); in 7 patients (43.7%), trigeminal dysfunction was combined with the impairment of other cranial nerves. On retrospective analysis, these patients fall into two clinical groups that differ also in prognosis. Group 1 comprises eight patients with trigeminal signs and symptoms only. These patients had small meningiomas strictly affecting Meckel's cave. Total removal of the tumor was achieved in seven of eight patients, without adjunctive postoperative neurological deficits. In this group, there were no tumor recurrences. Group 2 comprises the other eight patients in whom trigeminal dysfunction was combined with impairment of other cranial nerves. These patients had large tumors arising from Meckel's cave and secondarily invading the cavernous sinus (five patients) or extending into the posterior fossa (two patients) or largely growing into the middle fossa (one patient). Total removal was achieved in only one patient, and a worsening of the preoperative neurological status was observed in four patients; there were three cases of tumor progression. A subtemporal intradural approach (used in the past in every case) is still used for the small tumors of Group 1 with good results. Since 1985, for tumors involving the cavernous sinus, we have employed a frontotemporal craniotomy with extradural clinoidectomy and superior and lateral approach to the cavernous sinus. When the tumor extends toward the posterior fossa, we use a combined temporosuboccipital-transpetrosal approach.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Comprehensive adipocytic and neurogenic tissue microarray analysis of NY-ESO-1 expression - a promising immunotherapy target in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shurell, Elizabeth; Vergara-Lluri, Maria E.; Li, Yunfeng; Crompton, Joseph G.; Singh, Arun; Bernthal, Nicholas; Wu, Hong; Eilber, Fritz C.; Dry, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy targeting cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 shows promise for tumors with poor response to chemoradiation. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) and liposarcomas (LPS) are chemoresistant and have few effective treatment options. Materials Methods Using a comprehensive tissue microarray (TMA) of both benign and malignant tumors in primary, recurrent, and metastatic samples, we examined NY-ESO-1 expression in peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) and adipocytic tumors. The PNST TMA included 42 MPNSTs (spontaneous n = 26, NF1-associated n = 16), 35 neurofibromas (spontaneous n = 22, NF-1 associated n = 13), 11 schwannomas, and 18 normal nerves. The LPS TMA included 48 well-differentiated/dedifferentiated (WD/DD) LPS, 13 myxoid/round cell LPS, 3 pleomorphic LPS, 8 lipomas, 1 myelolipoma, and 3 normal adipocytic tissue samples. Stained in triplicate, NY-ESO-1 intensity and density were scored. Results NY-ESO-1 expression was exclusive to malignant tumors. 100% of myxoid/round cell LPS demonstrated NY-ESO-1 expression, while only 6% of WD/DD LPS showed protein expression, one of which was WD LPS. Of MPNST, 4/26 (15%) spontaneous and 2/16 (12%) NF1-associated MPNSTs demonstrated NY-ESO-1 expression. Strong NY-ESO-1 expression was observed in myxoid/round cell and dedifferentiated LPS, and MPNST in primary, neoadjuvant, and metastatic settings. Conclusions We found higher prevalence of NY-ESO-1 expression in MPNSTs than previously reported, highlighting a subset of MPNST patients who may benefit from immunotherapy. This study expands our understanding of NY-ESO-1 in WD/DD LPS and is the first demonstration of staining in a WD LPS and metastatic/recurrent myxoid/round cell LPS. These results suggest immunotherapy targeting NY-ESO-1 may benefit patients with aggressive tumors resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:27655679

  7. Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) in an Animal Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and Plexiform Neurofibromas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    sheath tumors or plexiform neurofibromas. References: Perrin GQ, Fishbein L, Thomson SA, et al., Plexiform-like neurofibromas develop in the...mouse by intraneural xenograft of an NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line. J Neurosci Res, 2007. 85(6): p. 1347-1357. 3 Perrin GQ, Li H, Fishbein L

  8. [Operative neurosurgery: personal view and historical backgrounds. (5) Meningioma].

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    long time. In case of growth, stereotactic radiosurgery is the first choice and at last would come surgical intervention at the cost of quality of life QOL. Appropriate approaches for meningiomas arising from the incisura tentorii would be either the amygdalohippocampectomy AHE approach namely transSylvian transsulcus circularis approach for their anterior localization or the supracerebellar transtentorial SCTT approach for the posterior localization in the sitting position. In the latter following structures are to be preserved with great care: A. parietooccipitalis, trochlear nerve, Vena Rosenthal and the superior cerebellar artery which could have considerable supply to the tumor. Meningiomas of the falcotentorial junction are managed also with this approach but may necessitate combination of the suboccipital transtentorial approach large upper clivus meningiomas can be removed more effectively by paramedian or lateral suboccipital craniotomy via SCTT approach in the sitting position rather than the subtemporal transpetrosal approach. Clean and wider operative fields in the former approach are emphasized. Special mention is made to transvertebralis (dural) ring approach TVRA for the foramen magnum or lower clivus meningiomas, in which the vertebral artery can be mobilized without performing more extensive far lateral approach. Difficulties of management of recurrent parasagittal meningiomas with the location corresponding to the gyrus paracentralis plus supplementary motor area are to be emphasized. Role of the venous sinus reconstruction is discussed. Difficulties of management of recurrent meningiomas represented by atypical or anaplastic meningiomas WHO grade II or III which can not be managed only by surgical removal is discussed by presenting some example cases. Biological activity of meningiomas in different location can be quite different in multiple recurrent meningiomas. Meningiomas intractable to irradiation and/or chemotherapy are another challenging

  9. Characterizing the immune microenvironment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor by PD-L1 expression and presence of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun S.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Jensen, Sarah; Li, Yunfeng; Dry, Sarah; Nelson, Scott; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Bernthal, Nicholas; Federman, Noah; Tumeh, Paul; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an aggressive sarcoma with few treatment options. Tumor immune state has not been characterized in MPNST, and is important in determining response to immune checkpoint blockade. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), and presence of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in MPNST, and correlate these findings with clinical behavior and outcome. Results PD-L1 staining of at least 1% was seen in 0/20 nerves, 2/68 benign lesions and 9/53 MPNST. Two of 68 benign lesions and 7/53 (13%) MPNST had at least 5% PD-L1 staining. CD8 staining of at least 5% was seen in 1/20 (5%) nerves, 45/68 (66%) benign lesions and 30/53 (57%) MPNST. PD-L1 was statistically more prevalent in MPNST than both nerves and benign lesions (p=0.049 and p=0.008, respectively). Expression of PD-1 was absent in all tissue specimens. There was no correlation of PD-L1 or CD8 expression with disease state (primary versus metastatic) or patient survival. Methods A comprehensive PNST tissue microarray was created from 141 surgical specimens including primary, recurrent, and metastatic MPNST (n=53), neurofibromas (n=57), schwannoma (n=11), and normal nerve (n=20). Cores were stained in triplicate for PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8, and expression compared between tumor types. These data were then examined for survival correlates in 35 patients with primary MPNST. Conclusions MPNST is characterized by low PD-L1 and absent PD-1 expression with significant CD8+ TIL presence. MPNST immune microenvironment does not correlate with patient outcome. PMID:27588404

  10. Triterpenoid saponin flaccidoside II from Anemone flaccida triggers apoptosis of NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors via the MAPK-HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin-tao; Fang, Yin; Cao, Yan; Wu, Feng-hua; Liu, E; Mo, Guo-yan; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive soft tissue neoplasms that are extremely rare and are frequently associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. MPNSTs are typically fatal, and there is no effective treatment so far. In our previous study, we showed that flaccidoside II, one of the triterpenoid saponins isolated from Anemone flaccida Fr. Schmidt, has antitumor potential by inducing apoptosis. In the present study, we found that flaccidoside II inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis in MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and S462. Furthermore, this study provides a mechanism by which the downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways is involved in the apoptotic role of flaccidoside II. This study suggested the potential of flaccidoside II as a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for MPNSTs. PMID:27103823

  11. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-02-23

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development-a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  12. Overexpression of PDGFRA cooperates with loss of NF1 and p53 to accelerate the molecular pathogenesis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ki, D H; He, S; Rodig, S; Look, A T

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive, frequently metastatic sarcomas that are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a prominent inherited genetic disease in humans. Although loss of the NF1 gene predisposes to MPNST induction, relatively long tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional genetic or epigenetic abnormalities are needed for the development of these nerve sheath malignancies. To study the molecular pathways contributing to the formation of MPNSTs in NF1 patients, we used a zebrafish tumor model defined by nf1 loss in a p53-deficient background together with the overexpression of either wild-type or constitutively activated PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) under control of the sox10 neural crest-specific promoter. Here we demonstrate the accelerated onset and increased penetrance of MPNST formation in fish overexpressing both the wild-type and the mutant PDGFRA transgenes in cells of neural crest origin. Interestingly, overexpression of the wild-type PDGFRA was even more potent in promoting transformation than the mutant PDGFRA, which is important because ~78% of human MPNSTs have expression of wild-type PDGFRA, whereas only 5% harbor activating mutations of the gene encoding this receptor. Further analysis revealed the induction of cellular senescence in zebrafish embryos overexpressing mutant, but not wild-type, PDGFRA, suggesting a mechanism through which the oncogenic activity of the mutant receptor is tempered by the activation of premature cellular senescence in an NF1-deficient background. Taken together, our study suggests a model in which overexpression of wild-type PDGFRA associated with NF1 deficiency leads to aberrant activation of downstream RAS signaling and thus contributes importantly to MPNST development—a prediction supported by the ability of the kinase inhibitor sunitinib alone and in combination with the MEK inhibitor trametinib to retard MPNST progression in

  13. Meningiomas of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Matthies, C; Carvalho, G; Tatagiba, M; Lima, M; Samii, M

    1996-01-01

    Meningiomas of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represent a clinically and surgically interesting entity. The opportunity of complete surgical excision and the incidence of impairment of nerval structures largely depend on the tumour biology that either leads to displacement of surrounding structures by an expansive type of growth or to an enveloping of nerval and vascular structures by an en plaque type of growth. As the origin and the direction of growth are very variable, the exact tumour extension in relation to the nerval structures and the tumour origin can be identified sometimes only at the time of surgery. Out of a series of 230 meningiomas of the posterior skull base operated between 1978 and 1993, data of 134 meningiomas involving the cerebellopontine angle are presented. There were 20% male and 80% female patients, age at the time of surgery ranging from 18 to 76 years, on the average 51 years. The clinical presentation was characterized by a predominant disturbance of the cranial nerves V (19%), VII (11%), VIII (67%) and the caudal cranial nerves (6%) and signs of ataxia (28%). 80% of the meningiomas were larger than 30 mm in diameter, 53% led to evident brainstem compression or dislocation and 85% extended anteriorly to the internal auditory canal. Using the lateral suboccipital approach in the majority of cases and a combined presigmoidal or combined suboccipital and subtemporal approaches in either sequence in 5%, complete tumour removal (Simpson I and II) was accomplished in 95% and subtotal tumour removal in 5%. Histologically the meningiotheliomatous type was most common (49%) followed by the mixed type (19%), fibroblastic (16%), psammomatous (7%), hemangioblastic (7%) and anaplastic (2%) types. Major post-operative complications were CSF leakage (8%) requiring surgical revision in 2% and hemorrhage (3%) requiring revision in 2%. While the majority of neurological disturbances showed signs of recovery, facial nerve paresis or paralysis was

  14. Spatially- and temporally-controlled postnatal p53 knockdown cooperates with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene loss to promote malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Hirbe, Angela C; Dahiya, Sonika; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M; Clapp, D Wade; Gutmann, David H

    2016-02-16

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive sarcomas that arise sporadically or in association with the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. In individuals with NF1, MPNSTs are hypothesized to arise from Nf1-deficient Schwann cell precursor cells following the somatic acquisition of secondary cooperating genetic mutations (e.g., p53 loss). To model this sequential genetic cooperativity, we coupled somatic lentivirus-mediated p53 knockdown in the adult right sciatic nerve with embryonic Schwann cell precursor Nf1 gene inactivation in two different Nf1 conditional knockout mouse strains. Using this approach, ~60% of mice with Periostin-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (Periostin-Cre; Nf1(flox/flox) mice) developed tumors classified as low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 6 months). Similarly, ~70% of Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 gene inactivation (GFAP-Cre; Nf1(flox/null) mice) developed low-grade MPNSTs following p53 knockdown (mean, 3 months). In addition, wild-type and Nf1+/- mice with GFAP-Cre-mediated Nf1 loss develop MPNSTs following somatic p53 knockout with different latencies, suggesting potential influences of Nf1+/- stromal cells in MPNST pathogenesis. Collectively, this new MPNST model system permits the analysis of somatically-acquired events as well as tumor microenvironment signals that potentially cooperate with Nf1 loss in the development and progression of this deadly malignancy.

  15. Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) in an Animal Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and Plexiform Neurofibromas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    povidone-iodine swabs or gauzes. 70% alcohol swab or gauze is used to remove the remaining povidone-iodine from the skin. ~100μL 1% lidocaine is...site. A few drops of lidocaine are dropped on the nerve. A 34 Gauge fused silica (WPI) cannula is inserted at a sharp angle (~10°) along the nerve...remove the remaining povidone-iodine from the skin. ~100μL 1% lidocaine is injected along the incision line to ensure adequate analgesia. A 15mm dorsal

  16. Temporal bone meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Hooper, R; Siu, K; Cousins, V

    1990-10-01

    Meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of space-occupying lesions of the temporal bone. Five cases of meningiomas of the temporal bone are described and the literature reviewed. These tumours may stimulate Schwannomas and glomus tumours in their presentation and radiological findings. The tumours were managed by combining standard neurosurgical approaches with temporal bone and skull base techniques.

  17. Nerve Degeneration and Regeneration Associated with NF1 Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Infiltrating peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are associated with significant neurological deficits and nerve damage. An initial aim of this project is...nerve graft implanted to bridge the gap and restore nerve continuity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS peripheral nerve sheath tumor, neurofibroma, photodynamic...7 1 INTRODUCTION Infiltrating   peripheral  nerve  sheath  tumors  (PNST

  18. Epigenetics of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Murnyák, Balázs; Bognár, László; Klekner, Álmos; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas account for one-third of all adult central nervous system tumours and are divided into three WHO grades. In contrast to the relatively well characterized genetic alterations, our current understanding of epigenetic modifications involved in the meningioma-genesis and progression is rather incomplete. Contrary to genetic alterations, epigenetic changes do not alter the primary DNA sequence and their reversible nature serves as an excellent basis for prevention and development of novel personalised tumour therapies. Indeed, growing body of evidence suggests that disturbed epigenetic regulation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas. Altered DNA methylation, microRNA expression, histone, and chromatin modifications are frequently noted in meningiomas bearing prognostic and therapeutic relevance. In this review we provide an overview on recently identified epigenetic alterations in meningiomas and discuss their role in tumour initiation, progression, and recurrence. PMID:26101774

  19. A novel NF1 mutation in a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait macule in neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tong, H-X; Li, M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, J; Lu, W-Q

    2012-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; OMIM#162200) is a common neurocutaneous disorder that is characterized by multiple café-au-lait, skinfold freckling, Lisch nodules, and neurofibromas. Mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the neurofibromin protein, have been identified as the pathogenic gene of NF1. In this study, we present a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait in NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body, axillary freckling, and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas. He also had a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormalities. The germline mutational analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel missense mutation in exon 13. It is a novel heterozygous nucleotide G>A transition at position 2241 of the NF1 gene. We found no mutation in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor DNA from this patient. This expands the database for NF1 gene mutations in NF1. Its absence in the normal chromosomes suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of giant café-au-lait macule in NF1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

  20. The Challenge of Cancer Genomics in Rare Nervous System Neoplasms: Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors as a Paradigm for Cross-Species Comparative Oncogenomics.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive genomic analyses of common nervous system cancers provide new insights into their pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Although analogous studies of rare nervous system tumors are needed, there are major barriers to performing such studies. Cross-species comparative oncogenomics, identifying driver mutations in mouse cancer models and validating them in human tumors, is a promising alternative. Although still in its infancy, this approach is being applied to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), rare Schwann cell-derived malignancies that occur sporadically, after radiotherapy, and in neurofibromatosis type 1. Studies of human neurofibromatosis type 1-associated tumors suggest that NF1 tumor suppressor loss in Schwann cells triggers cell-autonomous and intercellular changes, resulting in development of benign neurofibromas; subsequent neurofibroma-MPNST progression is caused by aberrant growth factor signaling and mutations affecting the p16(INK4A)-cyclin D1-CDK4-Rb and p19(ARF)-Mdm2-p53 cell cycle pathways. Mice with Nf1, Trp53, and/or Cdkn2a mutations that overexpress the Schwann cell mitogen neuregulin-1 or overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor validate observations in human tumors and, to various degrees, model human tumorigenesis. Genomic analyses of MPNSTs arising in neuregulin-1 and epidermal growth factor receptor-overexpressing mice and forward genetic screens with Sleeping Beauty transposons implicate additional signaling cascades in MPNST pathogenesis. These studies confirm the utility of mouse models for MPNST driver gene discovery and provide new insights into the complexity of MPNST pathogenesis.

  1. EZH2-miR-30d-KPNB1 pathway regulates malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour cell survival and tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingyu; Garnett, Jeannine; Creighton, Chad J; Al Sannaa, Ghadah Abbas; Igram, Davis R; Lazar, Alexander; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Changgong; Pollock, Raphael E

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs), which develop sporadically or from neurofibromatosis, recur frequently with high metastatic potential and poor outcome. The polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) is an important regulator for various human malignancies. However, the function of EZH2 in MPNSTs is unknown. Here we report that the EZH2-miR-30d-KPNB1 signalling pathway is critical for MPNST tumour cell survival in vitro and tumourigenicity in vivo. Up-regulated EZH2 in MPNST inhibits miR-30d transcription via promoter binding activity, leading to enhanced expression of the nuclear transport receptor KPNB1 that is inhibited by miR-30d targeting of KPNB1 3' UTR region. Furthermore, inhibition of EZH2 or KPNB1, or miR-30d over-expression, induces MPNST cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumourigenesis in vivo. More importantly, forced over-expression of KPNB1 rescues MPNST cell apoptosis induced by EZH2 knockdown. Immunohistochemical analyses show that EZH2 and KPNB1 over-expression is observed in human MPNST specimens and is negatively associated with miR-30d expression. Our findings identify a novel signalling pathway involved in MPNST tumourigenesis, and also suggest that EZH2-miR-30d-KPNB1 signalling represents multiple potential therapeutic targetable nodes for MPNST.

  2. The role of MAPK signaling pathway in the Her-2-positive meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Shan; Wang, Shanshan; Tu, Yi; Xiong, Yifeng; Mei, Jinhong; Wang, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are common types of adult nerve system tumors. Although most cases are considered benign, due to its high rate of recurrence and easy malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma they present a puzzle for the current treatment. The HER-2 oncogene has important value for meningioma cells development and progression. So far, little is known about the effect on the exact underlying signal pathway and molecular mechanisms of HER-2-positive meningioma cells. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of HER-2 gene and possible involvement of MAPK signal pathway in human malignant meningioma. We applied q-PCR analysis, immunofluorescence (IF) staining, western blot analysis, animal model, MAPK inhibition, MTT assay and cell invasion analysis for the investigation. The results demonstrated that the downregulation of the expression of HER-2 significantly inhibited cell motility and proliferation of human meningioma cells in vivo. Accordingly, in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of ERK1/2, ERK5, JNK, in the cells with the ERK1/2, ERK5 inhibition, protein expression was markedly suppressed as well as the cell proliferation resistance. No difference was observed in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of JNK. These findings suggest that HER-2 gene can affect the proliferation ability of human meningioma cells in vivo and MAPK signal pathway may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of human meningiomas combinating with HER-2. PMID:27279438

  3. [Early postoperative results of surgical treatment of patients with anterior clinoidal meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Chernov, S V; Rzaev, D A; Kalinovsky, A V; Dmitriev, A B; Kasymov, A R; Zotov, A V; Gormolysova, E V; Uzhakova, E K

    2017-01-01

    Resection of anterior clinoidal meningiomas is a challenging task due to their localization, frequent involvement of the major cerebral arteries and cranial nerves, a high risk of postoperative neurological deficits, and low radicalness of surgery.

  4. TAGLN expression is upregulated in NF1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors by hypomethylation in its promoter and subpromoter regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Gun-Hoo; Lee, Su-Jin; Yim, Hyunee; Han, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyon J; Sohn, Young-Bae; Ko, Jung Min; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2014-10-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) caused by NF1 gene mutation is a commonly inherited autosomal dominant disorder. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), a type of aggressive sarcoma, are a major cause of mortality in NF1 patients. The malignant transformation of benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) to MPNSTs is a marked peculiarity in NF1 patients, yet the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. We found that an actin-associated protein transgelin (SM22) was highly expressed in NF1-deficient MPNST tissues compared to NF1-deficient PN tissues using immunohistological staining and primary cultured MPNST cells in western blot analysis. We further found that this transgelin upregulation was caused by increased transcriptional expression of the TAGLN gene encoding transgelin. Comparison of DNA methylation values in the promoter and subpromoter regions of the TAGLN gene in three types of NF1-deficient primary-cultured cells, derived from an NF1 patient's normal phenotype, a benign PN and MPNST tissues, revealed that the TAGLN gene was hypomethylated in the MPNST cells. Next, to determine the functional role of transgelin in MPNST pathogenesis, we manipulated the TAGLN gene expression and investigated the alteration of the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the normal-phenotypic and malignant tumor cells. The downregulation of TAGLN expression in NF1-deficient MPNST tumor cells through the treatment of the small interfering RNA resulted in a decrease in the RAS activation (GTP-RAS) and the downstream ERK1/2 activation (phosphorylated ERK1/2), while the overexpression of TAGLN in normal-phenotypic NF1-deficient cells caused an increase in RAS and ERK1/2 activation. These results indicate that upregulation of transgelin caused by hypomethylation of the TAGLN gene is closely involved in tumor progression in NF1.

  5. Protein expression of BIRC5, TK1, and TOP2A in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours--A prognostic test after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Matthias; Høland, Maren; Lind, Guro E; Ågesen, Trude H; Skotheim, Rolf I; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Mandahl, Nils; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Mertens, Fredrik; Davidson, Ben; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2015-06-01

    No consensus treatment regime exists beyond surgery for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), and the purpose of the present study was to find new approaches to stratify patients with good and poor prognosis and to better guide therapeutic intervention for this aggressive soft tissue cancer. From a total of 67 MPNSTs from Scandinavian patients with and without neurofibromatosis type 1, 30 MPNSTs were investigated by genome-wide RNA expression profiling and 63 MPNSTs by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis, and selected genes were submitted to analyses of disease-specific survival. The potential drug target genes survivin (BIRC5), thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), and topoisomerase 2-alpha (TOP2A), all encoded on chromosome arm 17q, were up-regulated in MPNST as compared to benign neurofibromas. Each of them was found to be independent prognostic markers on the gene expression level, as well as on the protein level. A prognostic profile was identified by combining the nuclear expression scores of the three proteins. For patients with completely resected tumours only 15% in the high risk group were alive after two years, as compared to 78% in the low risk group. In conclusion, we found a novel protein expression profile which identifies MPNST patients with inferior prognosis even after assumed curative surgery. The tested proteins are drug targets; therefore the expression profile may provide predictive information guiding the design of future clinical trials. Importantly, as the effect is seen on the protein level using IHC, the biomarker panel can be readily implemented in routine clinical testing.

  6. Lipomatous meningioma: A rare subtype of benign metaplastic meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Tanrıverdi, Osman; Özmen, Sevilay Akalp

    2017-01-01

    Lipomatous meningiomas are extremely rare subtypes of benign meningiomas and are classified as metaplastic meningioma in the World Health Organization classification. We present a 77-year-old man presented with the history of a gradually intensifying headache for the last 3 months. A right frontoparietal mass was detected on his cranial magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was operated on via a right frontoparietal craniotomy, and histopathological diagnosis was lipomatous meningioma. Distinctive characteristics of lipomatous meningiomas were discussed with special emphasis to importance of immunohistochemical examinations, particularly for its differentiation from the tumors showing similar histology though having more aggressive character. PMID:28149104

  7. Definitive Embolization of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, B.T.; Lin, E.; Pile-Spellman, J.

    2005-01-01

    Summary This review examines the possible role for definitive embolization as a primary therapy for intracranial meningiomas. Surgery or radiosurgery are currently considered the standard of care for most benign meningiomas. However, each of these carries substantial risks. The perioperative mortality for surgical resection, as reported in large series, is between 3.7-9.4%; these studies report a similarly high rate of new neurological deficits following surgery. The rate of complications from radiosurgery is reported between 2-16% and it may take months to years before improvement in symptoms occurs following this therapy. There are a few reports of treating meningiomas by embolization without subsequent surgery. While these studies include small numbers of patients and have limited follow-up, the initial results are very promising. Given the risks and limitations of surgery and radiosurgery, prospective trials are now needed to determine the safety and efficacy of definitive embolization. PMID:20584499

  8. Optic nerve sheath diameter threshold by ocular ultrasonography for detection of increased intracranial pressure in Korean adult patients with brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Un; Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Lee, Hannah; Han, Jung Ho; Seo, Mingu; Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Cho, Won-Sang; Ryu, Ho Geol; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Jang, Kyung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) seen on ocular US has been associated with increased intracranial pressure (IICP). However, most studies have analyzed normal range of ONSD and its optimal cut-off point for IICP in Caucasian populations. Considering ONSD differences according to ethnicity, previous results may not accurately reflect the association between IICP and ONSD in Koreans. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate normal range of ONSD and its optimal threshold for detecting IICP in Korean patients. This prospective multicenter study was performed for patients with suspected IICP. ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe using a 13-MHz US probe. IICP was defined as significant brain edema, midline shift, compression of ventricle or basal cistern, effacement of sulci, insufficient gray/white differentiation, and transfalcine herniation by radiologic tests. The results of the ONSD are described as the median (25th–75th percentile). The differences of ONSD according to disease entity were analyzed. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to determine the optimal cut-off point for identifying IICP. A total of 134 patients were enrolled. The patients were divided into 3 groups as follows: patients with IICP, n = 81 (60.5%); patients without IICP, n = 27 (20.1%); and control group, n = 26 (19.4%). ONSD in patients with IICP (5.9 mm [5.8–6.2]) is significantly higher than those without IICP (5.2 mm [4.8–5.4]) (P < 0.01) and normal control group (4.9 mm [4.6–5.2]) (P < 0.001). Between patients without IICP and normal control group, the difference of ONSD did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.31). ONSD >5.5 mm yielded a sensitivity of 98.77% (95% CI: 93.3%–100%) and a specificity of 85.19% (95% CI: 66.3%–95.8%). In conclusion, the optimal cut-off point of ONSD for identifying IICP was 5.5 mm. ONSD seen on ocular US can be a feasible method for detection and serial monitoring of ICP in

  9. NF1 deficiency causes Bcl-xL upregulation in Schwann cells derived from neurofibromatosis type 1-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho-Jin; Lee, Su-Jin; Sohn, Young Bae; Jin, Hyun-Seok; Han, Jae-Ho; Kim, Young-Bae; Yim, Hyunee; Jeong, Seon-Yong

    2013-02-01

    Since the bi-allelic inactivation of both neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene alleles (NF1(-/-)) in Schwann cells (SCs) is common in both benign plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), other genetic alterations in SCs may be required for tumor progression of PNs to MPNSTs. We found that the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein is upregulated in MPNST tissues compared to PN tissues from patients with NF1 by immunohistological staining. In addition, we investigated whether Bcl-xL is upregulated in SCs derived from MPNSTs and found a significantly higher Bcl-xL expression level in sNF96.2 MPNST-derived SCs compared to normal human SCs (HSCs). We also discovered that the increased Bcl-xL expression caused an increase in drug resistance to doxorubicin in MPNST-derived SCs. Manipulation of NF1 gene expression levels by treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and overexpression of the neurofibromin GAP-related domain (NF1-GRD) demonstrated that upregulated Bcl-xL expression in MPNST-derived SCs was caused by NF1 deficiency. Treatment with the Erk1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, resulted in a slight increase in Bcl-xL levels in neurofibromin-depleted normal HSCs, indicating that Bcl-xL upregulation in MPNST-derived SCs is mediated by activated Erk1/2, which is a Ras downstream protein regulated by neurofibromin. As the reduction of Bcl-xL expression restored sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in sNF96.2 cells, we examined the effect of the small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 on sNF96.2 cells. A very low dose of ABT-737 combined with doxorubicin synergistically enhanced sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in sNF96.2 cells, suggesting that ABT-737 and doxorubicin may be a good combination to effectively treat NF1-associated MPNSTs with minimal side-effects. Collectively, our results suggest that upregulation of Bcl-xL in MPNST-derived SCs may be caused by the NF1 deficiency

  10. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop in patients with underlying NF1, and usually arise as a result of malignant transformation of a pre-existing plexiform neurofibroma. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities reported in primary MPNST include complex karyotypes with chromosome numbers in the triploid or tetraploid range with recurrent abnormalities of several chromosomes including losses or imbalances. As a prelude to cell biological, pharmacological, and functional studies to investigate pathways and gene(s) associated with multistep tumorigenesis, which includes progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy in MPNST, detailed molecular cytogenetic and genetic analyses of cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent MPNST with underlying NF1 disorder have been performed. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities detected in the primary tumor cell line were similar to those observed in primary cultures of this tumor. Due to the complexity of the rearrangements seen by G-banded karyotype analysis, further characterization of the clonal abnormalities in these three cell lines was performed by molecular cytogenetic techniques, including CGH and SKY. CGH analysis detected recurrent deletions of 9p, 12q21-q32, complete losses of the X-chromosome, and gains of the chromosomal segment 17q25 in all three cell lines. SKY analysis detected extensive clonal abnormalities in these cell lines. The nature and the alterations of the cell cycle regulators, particularly those associated with G1-S checkpoints and known to be deregulated in MPNST, were studied. These cell cycle regulators included those associated with Rb1-cyclin D1 and the p53 pathways. The findings are consistent with the argument that an imbalance between the cyclin activators of CDKs and inhibitory proteins such as p16 result in uncontrollable proliferation in the cell lines, associated with progression of the disease. LOH and expression of the p53 gene in metastatic and recurrent cell

  11. Extracalvarial Meningioma in the Parapharyngeal Space: Presentation, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sirshak; Dutta, Mainak; Ghosh, Saurav Kumar; Sinha, Ramanuj

    2016-01-01

    Extracalvarial meningioma in the cervical region presenting as a parapharyngeal mass lesion is seldom encountered in clinical practice and poses great challenge in its diagnosis and surgical management. In this report, we present a case of extracranial meningioma in a middle-aged person who presented with a large, gradually progressing cervical swelling with multiple cranial nerve pareses. The difficulties in diagnosis and surgical management of this unusual neoplasm in the setting of partial encasement and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein have been discussed, along with the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging providing details of its extent and character. The report emphasizes the need to consider extracalvarial meningioma as a less common but important differential diagnosis of parapharyngeal space neoplasms. PMID:28208895

  12. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  13. Posterior clinoid meningioma: A case report with discussion on terminology and surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Harsimrat Bir S.; Singla, Navneet; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior clinoid process (PCP) meningiomas are rare lesions. In close proximity to these lesions are the perforators from internal carotid artery and the oculomotor nerve, which need to be considered while deciding the appropriate surgical approach. Case Description: We describe a basal frontotemporo-orbito-zygomatic approach with splitting of the sylvian fissure to resect an eccentrically placed PCP meningioma. Conclusion: A basal frontotemporo-orbito-zygomatic approach with splitting of the sylvian fissure is a safe approach to resect an eccentrically placed PCP meningioma. PMID:25722927

  14. Surgical Treatment for Falcotentorial Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang Ki; Hong, Je Beom; Park, Hunho; Moon, Ju Hyung; Chang, Jong Hee; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2016-01-01

    Among intracranial meningiomas, falcotentorial meningiomas, occurring at the junction of the falx cerebri and tentorial dural folds, are extremely rare. Because of their deep location, they are surrounded by critical structures, and have been regarded as one of the most challenging lesions for surgical treatment. In this study, we describe our surgical strategy for falcotentorial meningiomas and provide a review of our experience. PMID:27189300

  15. Third ventricular meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Puxian; Diao, Xingtao; Bi, Zhiyong; Hao, Shuyu; Ren, Xiaohui; Zhang, Junting; Xing, Jun

    2015-11-01

    We report 13 patients with third ventricular meningiomas (TVM) and discuss the clinical, radiological, pathological and surgical features, as well as follow-up of these tumors. TVM are rare intracranial tumors, and because of this, there are few reports in the literature. Of 11,600 intracranial meningiomas that were surgically treated and pathologically confirmed at Beijing Tian Tan Hospital over a period of 10 years (2003-2013), 13 TVM were selected for a retrospective review. We recorded the clinical, radiological, pathological, and surgical data and statistically analyzed the preoperative, postoperative and 6 month postoperative Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) scores. TVM represented 0.11% of intracranial meningiomas. Radiologically, TVM were divided into three groups: anterior (n=3), posterior (n=3), and entire third ventricle (n=7). Three patients (23.1%) were misdiagnosed preoperatively. Total removal was achieved in 61.5% (8/13) of patients, and subtotal resection was achieved in 38.5% (5/13). Pathologically, the tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I in 11 patients (84.6%) and WHO Grade II in two (15.6%). There were no statistically significant differences in the preoperative, postoperative, or 6 month postoperative KPS scores (F=0.814; p=0.401). TVM without dural attachments are rare neoplasms that should be differentiated from choroid plexus papilloma, craniopharyngioma, and pineocytoma. Surgery is the optimal treatment and may result in a favorable prognosis, and understanding of the radiological subtype can help with the choice of surgical approach.

  16. The effects of tumor location on diagnostic criteria for canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) and the markers for distinction between canine MPNSTs and canine perivascular wall tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-07-01

    Canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) occur not only in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) but also in soft tissue and various organs (non-PNS). The most important diagnostic criterion is proof of peripheral nerve sheath origin. This is difficult in non-PNS MPNSTs, and its differential diagnosis is challenging. Canine perivascular wall tumors (PWTs) also commonly arise in soft tissue. Their histopathological features are quite similar to those of canine MPNSTs, making their differential diagnosis challenging. To elucidate whether the morphological features are applicable to diagnose non-PNS MPNSTs and to demonstrate useful markers for distinction between canine MPNSTs and PWTs, the authors examined 30 canine MPNSTs and 31 PWTs immunohistochemically for S100, nestin, NGFR, Olig2, claudin-1, CD57, PRX, α-SMA, desmin, and calponin. Among canine MPNSTs, the PNS tumors displayed significantly higher S100 and Olig2 expression than the non-PNS tumors. The expression levels of the other markers did not differ significantly, suggesting that the same morphological diagnostic criteria are applicable regardless of their location. The PWT cells displayed significantly weaker immunoreactivity than MPNSTs to markers used except α-SMA and desmin. Cluster analysis sorted most canine MPNSTs and PWTs into 2 distinctly different clusters, whereas 3 MPNSTs and 6 PWTs were assigned to the opposing cluster. These 3 MPNSTs were negative for almost all markers, while these 6 PWTs were positive for only neuronal markers. In particular, NGFR and Olig2 were almost negative in the rest of PWT cases. These findings suggest that NGFR and Olig2 are useful to distinguish these 2 tumors.

  17. Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Meningiomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type 2; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  18. Unilateral vocal cord palsy and dysphagia: an unusual presentation of cerebellopontine angle meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Andrew; Douglas, James Andrew; Thompson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours are the most common neoplasms in the posterior fossa, accounting for 5–10% of intracranial tumours. Most CPA tumours are benign, with most being vestibular schwannomas. Meningiomas arising from the jugular foramen are among the rarest of all with very few being described in the literature. Treatment options vary considerably as experience with these tumours is limited. One option is a skull base approach, but this depends on size, location and ability to preserve lower cranial nerve function. This can be extremely challenging and is accompanied by high mortality risk; therefore, a more conservative option must be considered. This case report highlights the difficulty in management of patients with jugular fossa meningiomas, including appropriate investigations, analysis of surgical versus conservative treatment and associated complications. Furthermore, we elaborate the decision-making process pertaining to the tailoring of the surgical route used for the resection of jugular foramen meningiomas. (Jugular Foramen Meningioma, cerebellopontine angle). PMID:26486157

  19. Frontal cutaneous meningioma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Leonor; Coutinho, Ines; Cardoso, José Carlos; Garcia, Helena; Cordeiro, Margarida Robalo

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous meningiomas are rare tumors most commonly located on the scalp. We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with a 2x3 cm tumoral lesion on the forehead. The lesion was hard, adherent and covered by normal skin. Incisional biopsy revelead a proliferation of monomorphic round cells, organized in nests and focally forming pseudovascular spaces. Immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for epithelial antigen membrane and vimentin. Vascular markers, cytokeratins and S100 protein were negative. A brain CT scan did not show any evidence of intracranial meningioma. The authors describe the case of a cutaneous frontal meningioma in probable relation with previous cranioencephalic trauma. PMID:26312695

  20. Intraorbital meningioma: resection through modified orbitozygomatic craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-01-01

    Intraorbital meningiomas are challenging lesions to excise because of their location and the restricted surgical corridor available due to the presence of important neighboring structures. Lesions located in the posterior one-third of the orbit require skull base approaches for their exposure and safe resection. Frontoorbital and modified orbitozygomatic (OZ) craniotomies may facilitate the exposure and resection of masses in the posterior intraorbital space. Specifically, the one-piece modified OZ craniotomy provides many advantages of the "full" OZ craniotomy (which includes a more extensive zygomatic osteotomy). The modified OZ approach minimizes the extent of frontal lobe retraction and provides ample amount of space for the surgeon to exploit all the working angles to resect the tumor. The following video presentation discusses the nuances of technique for resection of an intraorbital meningioma through modified OZ approach and optic nerve decompression. The nuances of technique will be discussed. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/fP5X2QNr5qk.

  1. Case Report: Pulmonary metastases of malignant meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Basunaid, Suhail; Franssen, Frits M.E.; Accord, Ryan; Hamid, Myrurgia Abdul; Mahesh, Shekar; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Schijns, Olaf E.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Meningioma accounts for approximately one-third of primary central nervous system tumors. Most meningiomas are benign, although up to one third are classified as atypical or malignant. We describe a 63-year Caucasian male presenting with pleural metastases from an intracranial meningioma. Distant metastases from meningiomas are infrequently found in clinical practice and mostly are associated with atypical or malignant meningiomas. There is no standard treatment; however surgical resection of both the primary and metastatic lesions is the safest therapy. The overall prognosis of atypical meningiomas is poor. Our patient died one week after discharge from our hospital. PMID:25254095

  2. [Chronic epidural haematoma mimicking meningioma].

    PubMed

    Beculić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Bajtarević, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The study presents a rare case of organised chronic epidural haematoma that imitated a meningioma. A patient was admitted to the Department of Neurology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica due to loss of consciousness and right hemiparesis. Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan had shown an expansive intracranial process in the left parietal region which was radiologically diagnosed as a meningioma. During the operation a linear skull fracture and organised chronic epidural haematoma were found.

  3. Intraparenchymal Angiomatous Meningioma: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Divya; Gogoi, Priyanka; Nazir, Wazid; Tandon, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    Meningioma arises from the arachnoid cap cells of the cerebrum. Intraparenchymal meningiomas or meningiomas without dural attachment are rare. We report a case of 40-year-old male who presented with a history of headache, dizziness and gradual loss of vision since one year. Clinicoradiological diagnosis of a high grade glioma was considered. Tumour was excised and haematoxylin and eosin stained sections revealed a tumour comprised predominantly of variable sized blood vessels showing hyalinization in a background of plump spindle cells with oval vesicular nuclei. In view of these features angiomatous meningioma was suspected. However, to confirm the diagnosis, a panel of immunohistochemical markers including vimentin, EMA and GFAP was done and a final diagnosis of angiomatous meningioma was offered. Angiomatous meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma and even much rarer in the intraparenchymal location. Angiomatous meningioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of highly vascular intraparenchymal brain tumours. PMID:26557529

  4. Intraparenchymal Angiomatous Meningioma: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Divya; Diwaker, Preeti; Gogoi, Priyanka; Nazir, Wazid; Tandon, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Meningioma arises from the arachnoid cap cells of the cerebrum. Intraparenchymal meningiomas or meningiomas without dural attachment are rare. We report a case of 40-year-old male who presented with a history of headache, dizziness and gradual loss of vision since one year. Clinicoradiological diagnosis of a high grade glioma was considered. Tumour was excised and haematoxylin and eosin stained sections revealed a tumour comprised predominantly of variable sized blood vessels showing hyalinization in a background of plump spindle cells with oval vesicular nuclei. In view of these features angiomatous meningioma was suspected. However, to confirm the diagnosis, a panel of immunohistochemical markers including vimentin, EMA and GFAP was done and a final diagnosis of angiomatous meningioma was offered. Angiomatous meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma and even much rarer in the intraparenchymal location. Angiomatous meningioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of highly vascular intraparenchymal brain tumours.

  5. A Pilocytic Astrocytoma Mimicking a Clinoidal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S.; Lehman, Norman L.; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas and meningiomas are benign, primary brain tumors that may involve the optic tract. Classically, the presence of a dural “tail” sign may differentiate a meningioma from other intracranial lesions. In this report, we describe a mass with the typical appearance of a clinoidal meningioma on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but postoperatively diagnosed as a pilocytic astrocytoma. This case illustrates the rare occurrence of a pilocytic astrocytoma mimicking a meningioma on MRI. PMID:24744944

  6. Meningioma after radiotherapy for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Shah, Kalee; Dunkel, Ira J; Reiner, Anne S; Khakoo, Yasmin; Rosenblum, Marc K; Gutin, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Complications of radiation exposure have gained importance with increasing cancer survivorship. Secondary malignancies have been associated with cranial radiation exposure. We present our experience with intracranial radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) and discuss the implications of its presentation and natural history for patient management. Patients diagnosed with meningioma who had received radiation therapy between 1960 and 2014 were identified. Records were retrospectively reviewed for details of radiation exposure, previous malignancies, meningioma subtypes, multiplicity and pathologic descriptions, treatment and follow-up. Thirty patients were diagnosed with RIM. Initial malignancies included acute lymphocytic leukemia (33.3%), medulloblastoma (26.7%) and glioma (16.7%) at a mean age of 8.1years (range 0.04-33years). The mean radiation dose was 34Gy (range 16-60Gy) and latency time to meningioma was 26years (range 8-51years). Twenty-one patients (70%) underwent surgery. Of these, 57.1% of tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I while 42.9% were WHO II (atypical). The mean MIB-1 labeling index for patients with WHO I tumors was 5.44%, with 33.3% exhibiting at least 5% staining. Mean follow-up after meningioma diagnosis was 5.8years. Mortality was zero during the follow-up period. Meningioma is an important long-term complication of therapeutic radiation. While more aggressive pathology occurs more frequently in RIM than in sporadic meningioma, it remains unclear whether this translates into an effect on survival. Further study should be aimed at delineating the risks and benefits of routine surveillance for the development of secondary neoplasms after radiation therapy.

  7. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  8. Totally Ossified Metaplastic Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with a very rare case of totally ossified large thoracic spinal metaplastic meningioma, showing progressing myelopathy is presented. Computed tomographic images showed a large totally ossfied intradural round mass occupying the spinal canal on T9-10 level. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large T9-10 intradural extramedullary mass that was hypointense to spinal cord on T1- and T2-weighted sequences, partial enhancement was apparent after Gadolinium administration. The spinal cord was severely compressed and displaced toward the right at the level of T9-10. Surgical removal of the tumor was successfully accomplished via the posterior midline approach and the histological diagnosis verified an ossified metaplastic meningioma. The clinical neurological symptoms of patient were improved postoperatively. In this article we discuss the surgical and pathological aspects of rare case of spinal totally ossified metaplastic meningioma. PMID:24278660

  9. Characteristics and surgical strategies for posterior clinoid process meningioma: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takase, Hajime; Kawasaki, Takafumi; Tateishi, Kensuke; Yokoyama, Taka-Akira; Murata, Hidetoshi; Kawahara, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and radiological features or characteristics of posterior clinoid process (PCP) meningiomas have rarely been described because of their extreme scarcity and terminological confusion. Therefore, the strategies in the surgical intervention for PCP meningiomas have not been well established. Moreover, the presence of deep and critical neuroanatomical structures and relatively high morbidity, which can be difficult to predict preoperatively, make their surgical excision more challenging. We report two surgical cases of PCP meningioma and discuss the appropriate assessment of preoperative features and surgical strategies with review of the literature. Our study suggests that PCP meningioma may be characterized by the anterior displacement of internal carotid artery, and infero-laterally shifted posterior communicating arteries, and homonymous hemianopsia, a distinctive clinical feature. One of the key issues in PCP meningioma surgery is preservation of the optic nerve. Unlocking the optic nerve by anterior clinoidectomy and dissection, the falciform ligament is the important step to preserve vision for larger tumors. Complication with the perforators is also hazardous of these challenging surgeries than anterior clinoid meningiomas for their specific neuroanatomical structures and might not be feasible to avoid even with additional techniques and critical monitoring. A combination and multi-staged-surgical approach can be options of tailor-made surgical strategy in cases with tumor adhesion to the perforators.

  10. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  11. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment of patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Golanov, A V; Cherekaev, V A; Serova, N K; Pronin, I N; Gorlachev, G E; Kotel'nikova, T M; Podoprigora, A E; Kudriavtseva, P A; Galkin, M V

    2010-01-01

    Medial middle fossa meningiomas are challenging for neurosurgical treatment. Invasion of cranial nerves and vessels leads to high risk of complications after removal of such meningiomas. Currently methods of conformal stereotactic radiation treatment are applied wider and wider for the discussed lesions. During a 3.5-year period 80 patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator "Novalis". In 31 case radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. In majority of patients symptoms included cranial nerve dysfunction: oculomotor disturbances in 62.5%, trigeminal impairment--in 37.5%, visual deficit--in 43.8%, facial nerve palsy--in 1.25%. 74 patients underwent radiotherapy with classical fractioning, 2--in hypofractionated mode and 4 received radiosurgery. In cases of classical fractioning mean marginal dose reached 46.3 Gy during 28-33 fractions, in hypofractioning (7 fractions)--31.5 Gy, in radiosurgery--16.25 Gy. Mean follow-up period was 18.4 months (6-42 months). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of cases (78 patients): in 42 (52.5%) lesion shrinked, in 36 (45%) stabilization was observed. Clinical examination revealed improvement of visual function in 15 patients (18%) and deterioration in 2 (2.5%). No new neuropathies were found. Stereotactic radiation treatment is the method of choice for medial anterior and middle fossa meningiomas due to effective control of tumor progression and minimal rate of complications.

  12. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael . E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G.; Ma, Roy; Lee, Richard; Vollans, Emily; Robar, James; Gete, Ermias; Martin, Monty

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  13. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-01-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma. PMID:27418876

  14. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Moss, S D; Rockswold, G L; Chou, S N; Yock, D; Berger, M S

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  15. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  16. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Angiomatous Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Juyoung; Kong, Doo-Sik; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Angiomatous meningioma is a rare histological subtype of meningioma. Therefore, this specific medical condition is rarely reviewed in the literature. In the present work, we report the clinical and radiological features with postoperative outcomes of angiomatous meningioma. Methods This retrospective study included the patients who were pathologically diagnosed with angiomatous meningioma after surgical resection between February 2010 and September 2015 in our institute. We analyzed the clinical data, radiological manifestation, treatment and prognosis of all patients. Results The 15 patients (5 males and 10 females) were diagnosed with angiomatous meningioma during the study period. The median age of patients at the time of surgery was 63 years (range: 40 to 80 years). According to Simpson classification, 7, 5, and 3 patients achieved Simpson grade I, II, and IV resection, respectively. In the follow-up period, recurrence was noted in one patient. Ten out of the 15 patients showed homogeneous enhancement. Two patients demonstrated cystic changes. There was no occurrence of calcification or hemorrhage in our patients. Characteristically, 14 out of 15 patients showed signal voids of vessels. Significant peritumoral edema was observed in the majority of tumors (67%). Conclusion Angiomatous meningiomas are rare benign meningioma. Brain images of angiomatous meningioma usually demonstrate signal void signs and peritumoral edema. In the present study, angiomatous meningiomas showed good prognosis after surgical resection. PMID:27867918

  17. Osteoblastic meningioma of the fourth ventricle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Tulipan, N; Whetsell, W O

    1989-04-01

    Meningiomas of the fourth ventricle are rare neoplasms. Only meningothelial and fibroblastic subtypes, purportedly arising from the tela choroidea, have been described. In this report we describe clinical, neuroradiological and pathological findings in a 52-year-old man with mild hydrocephalus produced by a large, calcified, osteoblastic meningioma of the fourth ventricle.

  18. Paraventricular meningioma revealed by mental disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hilmani, Said; Houass, Yassine; El Azhari, Abdessamad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventricular meningioma constitutes 2% of intracranial meningioma, representing a challenging disease for neurosurgeons. Although cognitive impairment is one of the major symptoms of ventricular tumors, few studies have reported the details of cognitive impairment before and after their surgical removal. The expected effects on cognitive function should also be considered when choosing a surgical approach. Case Descriptions: We report the case of a large lateral ventricle meningioma revealed by cognitive dysfunction and moderate intellectual disability. The patient underwent subtotal resection of the tumor which had partial improvement in cognitive disorders. It is important to precisely assess neuropsychological function in patients with large brain tumors, and judicious preoperative plan, adequate knowledge of anatomy, and use of correct microsurgical techniques are fundamental in achieving complete resection of paraventricular meningioma with low morbidity. Conclusion: Pre and postoperative precise neuropsychological examinations may identify the potential cognitive impairment and beneficial effects of surgery in patients with large lateral ventricle meningiomas. PMID:28144473

  19. SPECT and PET Imaging of Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue. PMID:22623896

  20. SPECT and PET imaging of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Leondi, Anastasia; Angelidis, George; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical) and grade III (anaplastic) meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue.

  1. Meningioma Genomics: Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Zhang, Michael; Wu, Winona W.; Mei, Yu; Dunn, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent revolution in our understanding of the genetic factors that drive meningioma, punctuating an equilibrium that has existed since Cushing’s germinal studies nearly a century ago. A growing appreciation that meningiomas share similar biologic features with other malignancies has allowed extrapolation of management strategies and lessons from intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms and systemic cancers to meningiomas. These features include a natural proclivity for invasion, frequent intratumoral heterogeneity, and correlation between biologic profile and clinical behavior. Next-generation sequencing has characterized recurrent somatic mutations in NF2, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, SMO, and PIK3CA, which are collectively present in ~80% of sporadic meningiomas. Genomic features of meningioma further associate with tumor location, histologic subtype, and possibly clinical behavior. Such genomic decryption, along with advances in targeted pharmacotherapy, provides a maturing integrated view of meningiomas. We review recent advances in meningioma genomics and probe their potential applications in diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic frontiers. PMID:27458586

  2. Postpartum Regression of a Presumed Cavernous Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Phang, See Yung; Whitfield, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are known to be more common in females than males. They are also known in rare cases to grow in size during pregnancy, which can complicate its management. We describe a 31-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with blurring of her vision and diplopia during the third trimester of her pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small left cavernous sinus meningioma. The patient was treated conservatively until her uncomplicated delivery. A postpartum MRI scan showed complete regression of the suspected meningioma. Currently the patient is contemplating a further pregnancy. PMID:27066285

  3. Frontal cutaneous meningioma--Case report.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Leonor; Coutinho, Ines; Cardoso, José Carlos; Garcia, Helena; Cordeiro, Margarida Robalo

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous meningiomas are rare tumors most commonly located on the scalp. We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with a 2 x 3 cm tumoral lesion on the forehead. The lesion was hard, adherent and covered by normal skin. Incisional biopsy revealed a proliferation of monomorphic round cells, organized in nests and focally forming pseudovascular spaces. Immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for epithelial antigen membrane and vimentin. Vascular markers, cytokeratins and S100 protein were negative. A brain CT scan did not show any evidence of intracranial meningioma. The authors describe the case of a cutaneous frontal meningioma in probable relation with previous cranioencephalic trauma.

  4. Meckel's cave meningiomas with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, G A; Herz, D A; Leeds, N; Strully, K

    1975-06-01

    Two patients with Meckel's Cave meningiomas were initially hospitalized as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Four-vessel angiography was necessary to exclude other causes of bleeding while demonstrating these lesions. Apoplectic presentation in both cases led to early diagnosis and successful surgical therapy. A review of the literature reveals subarachnoid hemorrhage to be a rarity in association with meningiomas. The two patients currently reported are believed to be the only examples on record of hemorrhagic meningiomas arising from the region of Meckel's Cave.

  5. Quantitative and qualitative 5-aminolevulinic acid–induced protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Bekelis, Kimon; Valdés, Pablo A.; Erkmen, Kadir; Leblond, Frederic; Kim, Anthony; Wilson, Brian C.; Harris, Brent T.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Object Complete resection of skull base meningiomas provides patients with the best chance for a cure; however, surgery is frequently difficult given the proximity of lesions to vital structures, such as cranial nerves, major vessels, and venous sinuses. Accurate discrimination between tumor and normal tissue is crucial for optimal tumor resection. Qualitative assessment of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence following the exogenous administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has demonstrated utility in malignant glioma resection but limited use in meningiomas. Here the authors demonstrate the use of ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence guidance in resecting a skull base meningioma and elaborate on the advantages and disadvantages provided by both quantitative and qualitative fluorescence methodologies in skull base meningioma resection. Methods A 52-year-old patient with a sphenoid wing WHO Grade I meningioma underwent tumor resection as part of an institutional review board–approved prospective study of fluorescence-guided resection. A surgical microscope modified for fluorescence imaging was used for the qualitative assessment of visible fluorescence, and an intraoperative probe for in situ fluorescence detection was utilized for quantitative measurements of PpIX. The authors assessed the detection capabilities of both the qualitative and quantitative fluorescence approaches. Results The patient harboring a sphenoid wing meningioma with intraorbital extension underwent radical resection of the tumor with both visibly and nonvisibly fluorescent regions. The patient underwent a complete resection without any complications. Some areas of the tumor demonstrated visible fluorescence. The quantitative probe detected neoplastic tissue better than the qualitative modified surgical microscope. The intraoperative probe was particularly useful in areas that did not reveal visible fluorescence, and tissue from these areas was confirmed as tumor following histopathological

  6. Atypical Growth Pattern of an Intraparenchymal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary nonneuroglial extra-axial neoplasms, which commonly present as spherical or oval masses with a dural attachment. Meningiomas without dural attachment are rare and, according to their locations, are classified into 5 varieties, including intraventricular, deep Sylvain fissure, pineal region, intraparenchymal, or subcortical meningiomas. To the best of our knowledge, intraparenchymal meningioma with cerebriform pattern has never been reported. In this paper, we report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with paroxysmal headaches and progressive loss of vision for 10 months and blindness for 2 weeks. A thorough physical examination revealed loss of bilateral direct and indirect light reflex. No other relevant medical history and neurologic deficits were noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed an irregular mass with a unique cerebriform pattern and extensive peritumoral edema in the parietal-occipital-temporal region of the right cerebral hemisphere. The initial diagnosis was lymphoma. Intraoperatively, the tumor was completely buried in a sulcus in the parietal-occipital-temporal region without connecting to the dura. The histological diagnosis was intracranial meningioma based on pathological examination. Therefore, when an unusual cerebriform growth pattern of a tumor is encountered, an intraparenchymal meningioma should be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:27752384

  7. Retrosigmoid approach for resection of petrous apex meningioma.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Daniel G; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Makonnen, Girma; Zoli, Matteo; Naudy, Cristian; Muto, Jun; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 50-year-old female with a 1-year history of right-side facial numbness, as well as an electric shock-like sensation on the right-side of the face and tongue. She was previously diagnosed with vertigo and trigeminal neuralgia. MRI was obtained showing a large right cerebellopontine angle mass. A retrosigmoid approach was performed and total removal was achieved after dissection of tumor from brainstem and cranial nerves IV, V, VI, VII and VIII. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a meningioma (WHO Grade I). The patient was discharged neurologically intact on the third postoperative day free of complications. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/-tR0FtMiUDg .

  8. Meningiomas with Rhabdoid or Papillary Components : Prognosis and Comparison with Anaplastic Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Kwon; Jung, Shin; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Papillary and rhabdoid meningiomas are pathologically World Health Organization (WHO) grade III. Any correlation between clinical prognosis and pathologic component is not clear. We analyzed the prognoses of patients with meningiomas with a rhabdoid or papillary component compared to those of patients with anaplastic meningiomas. From 1994 to June 2013, 14 anaplastic meningiomas, 6 meningiomas with a rhabdoid component, and 5 meningiomas with papillary component were pathologically diagnosed. We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, extent of removal, adjuvant treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and pathologic features of 14 anaplastic meningiomas (group A), 5 meningiomas with a predominant (≥50%) papillary or rhabdoid component (group B1), and 6 meningiomas without a predominant (<50%) rhabdoid or papillary component (group B2). Homogeneous enhancement on MRI was associated with improved PFS compared to heterogeneous enhancement (p=0.025). Depending on pathology, the mean PFS was 134.9±31.6 months for group A, 46.6±13.4 months for group B1, and 118.7±19.2 months for group B2. The mean OS was 138.5±24.6 months for group A and 59.7±16.8 months for group B1. All recurrent tumors were of the previously diagnosed pathology, except for one tumor from group B1, which recurred as an atypical meningioma without a papillary component. Group B1 tumors showed a more aggressive behavior than group B2 tumors. In group B2 cases, the pathologic findings of non-rhabdoid/papillary portion could be considered for further adjuvant treatment. PMID:27446516

  9. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV–VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion The pattern of cranial nerves IV–VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV–VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV–VI intraoperatively. PMID:28035290

  10. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    PubMed

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  11. Sclerosing Meningioma : Radiological and Clinical Characteristics of 21 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho; Se, Young-Bem; Dho, Yun-Sik; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Objective A rare subtype of meningioma, sclerosing meningioma is not included in the current World Health Organization classification of meningiomas and is classified into the category of other morphological variation subtypes. Sclerosing meningioma is often misdiagnosed to other non-benign meningioma or malignant neoplasm, so it is important to diagnose sclerosing type correctly. We analyzed the radiological and clinical characteristics of a series of sclerosing meningiomas. Methods Twenty-one patients who underwent surgery in one institute with a histopathologically proven sclerosing meningioma were included from 2006 to 2014. Eighteen tumors were diagnosed as a pure sclerosing-type meningioma, and 3 as mixed type. Magnetic resonance image was taken for all patients including contrast enhancement image. Computed tomography (CT) scan was taken for 16 patients. One neuroradiologist and 1 neurosurgeon reviewed all images retrospectively. Results In the all 16 patients with preoperative CT images, higher attenuation was observed in the meningioma than in the brain parenchyma, and calcification was observed in 11 (69%). In 15 of the 21 patients (71%), a distinctive very low signal intensity appeared as a dark color in T2-weighted images. Nine of these 15 tumors (60%) exhibited heterogeneous enhancement, and 6 (40%) exhibited homogeneous enhancement that was unlike the homogeneous enhancing pattern shown by conventional meningiomas. Ten patients had a clear tumor margin without peritumoral edema. Conclusion Although these peculiar radiological characteristics are not unique to sclerosing meningioma, we believe that they are distinctive features that may be helpful for distinguishing sclerosing meningioma from other subtypes. PMID:27847571

  12. Spheno-Orbital Meningioma Resection and Reconstruction: The Role of Piezosurgery and Premolded Titanium Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Susana Heredero; Ferrer, Alicia Dean; Vela, Juan Solivera; Granados, Francisco Alamillos

    2011-01-01

    We present the clinical case of a patient with a spheno-orbital meningioma. Literature review of the treatment options, including the application of piezoelectric or ultrasound surgery and orbital reconstruction after meningioma resection, is also presented. Complete resection was performed by means of a frontotemporal craniotomy and an orbitozygomatic approach. Piezoelectric osteotomy was used around the optic nerve canal and the superior orbital fissure to minimize the damage to soft tissues. Orbital wall reconstruction was done using a titanium mesh previously premolded using a skull model. The superior orbital rim was reconstructed with calvarial bone grafts, and the sphenotemporal bone defect was covered with a titanium mesh cranioplasty. Ultrasonic vibrations to perform osteotomies in craniofacial surgery provide an interesting tool to reduce damage to surrounding soft tissues. Reconstruction of the roof and lateral orbital wall with premolded titanium meshes with a skull model is a safe and easy method to achieve a good orbital reconstruction and to avoid secondary sequelae. PMID:23205170

  13. Surgical management of tuberculum sellae meningioma: role of selective extradural anterior clinoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naoki; Muroi, Carl; Yano, Hirohito; Khan, Nadia; Pangalu, Athina; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro

    2006-06-01

    A retrospective analysis of 32 patients with tuberculum sellae meningiomas who underwent surgery via a unilateral pterional approach was performed. A selective extradural anterior clinoidectomy (SEAC) technique was added in 20 patients. All patients had visual dysfunction preoperatively. Macroscopically complete removal with Simpson grade II was performed in 28 patients (87.5%). The postoperative visual function improved in 25 (78.1%), did not change in 3 (9.4%), and worsened in 4 patients (12.5%). The SEAC technique was effective, especially for removal of the tumour extending into the sellae/pituitary stalk (9 patients), the optic canal (4 patients) and hypothalamus (4 patients) with preservation of the visual and endocrinological function. These results were superior to those of surgery without SEAC technique. This technique is therefore recommended for complete resection of the tuberculum sellae meningiomas extending to the surrounding anatomical structures as the SEAC procedure reduces the risk of intraoperative optic nerve injury considerably.

  14. [Psychopathology and neuro-ophthalmology in meningioma of the olfactory groove].

    PubMed

    Lange, E; Bräunig, K P; Fötzsch, R

    1982-01-01

    In 14 patients with a surgically nad histopathologically verified meningioma of the olfactory nerve groove (OGM) (12 women, 2 men), clinical findings and diagnosis were analysed, especially with respect to neuropathology and psychopathology. The apodictic theorem that an OGM leads to a Foster-Kennedy syndrome as well as to a psychopathological orbital brain syndrome cannot be maintained. The Foster-Kennedy syndrome does not occur in a characteristically high incidence, and psychopathologically an orbital brain syndrome can only be diagnosed in case of an anterior location of the OGM. The more the OGM shows starting point or growth development to or from the anterior chiasmal angle, the more is resembles that psychopathological syndrome that we have found and described for the meningioma of the Tuberculus sellae.

  15. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  16. Case Report: Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by a Minute Meningioma with Hyperostosed Suprameatal Tubercle.

    PubMed

    Ishi, Yukitomo; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Taku; Yokoyama, Yuka; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Echizenya, Sumire; Itamoto, Koji; Echizenya, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle tumors might occasionally provoke trigeminal neuralgia but are usually large enough to be diagnosed radiographically. We present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by a very small meningioma covering the suprameatal tubercle that displayed hyperostosis at the entrance of Meckel's cave and was not obvious on routine magnetic resonance (MR) images. A 72-year-old woman with intractable trigeminal neuralgia in the left V3 territory was referred to our institution. Preoperative imaging studies revealed that the left trigeminal nerve was medially distorted at the entrance of Meckel's cave by a laterally seated bone bulge covered by a minute enhanced lesion. Trigeminal nerve decompression surgery was performed via a retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach. We found a small meningioma that had compressed and flattened the trigeminal nerve root at the entrance of Meckel's cave, which was grossly and totally removed by suprameatal tubercle resection. There was no vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root. The trigeminal neuralgia ceased completely after the operation. Accurate preoperative determination of the causative pathologies is essential to achieve adequate surgical results after microvascular decompression for neurovascular compression syndrome. Because conventional MR sequences are inadequate for the precise interpretation of complex neurovascular anatomy in the cerebellopontine angle and such small tumors can be overlooked on routine MR studies, high-resolution thin-slice MR examinations and careful radiological interpretations are required for correct diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Case Report: Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by a Minute Meningioma with Hyperostosed Suprameatal Tubercle

    PubMed Central

    Ishi, Yukitomo; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Taku; Yokoyama, Yuka; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Echizenya, Sumire; Itamoto, Koji; Echizenya, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle tumors might occasionally provoke trigeminal neuralgia but are usually large enough to be diagnosed radiographically. We present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by a very small meningioma covering the suprameatal tubercle that displayed hyperostosis at the entrance of Meckel's cave and was not obvious on routine magnetic resonance (MR) images. A 72-year-old woman with intractable trigeminal neuralgia in the left V3 territory was referred to our institution. Preoperative imaging studies revealed that the left trigeminal nerve was medially distorted at the entrance of Meckel's cave by a laterally seated bone bulge covered by a minute enhanced lesion. Trigeminal nerve decompression surgery was performed via a retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach. We found a small meningioma that had compressed and flattened the trigeminal nerve root at the entrance of Meckel's cave, which was grossly and totally removed by suprameatal tubercle resection. There was no vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root. The trigeminal neuralgia ceased completely after the operation. Accurate preoperative determination of the causative pathologies is essential to achieve adequate surgical results after microvascular decompression for neurovascular compression syndrome. Because conventional MR sequences are inadequate for the precise interpretation of complex neurovascular anatomy in the cerebellopontine angle and such small tumors can be overlooked on routine MR studies, high-resolution thin-slice MR examinations and careful radiological interpretations are required for correct diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26351448

  18. Transformation of a meningioma with atypical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Deopujari, Chandrashekhar; Karmarkar, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are benign tumors of the central nervous system. They have long term curability if they are excised completely. If not, they can recur after a prolonged period and can lead to increased morbidity during re-surgery. Recurrence is rarely associated with invasiveness. Usually de-differentiation in case of meningiomas is uncommon without any predisposing factors including different genetic mutations or radiation to the involved region. We report a case of a 38-year-old female who was operated for a benign para-sagittal meningioma 8 years back and subsequently developed an invasive recurrence off late. Also this time, the imaging morphology was slightly different for a meningioma and gross as well as microscopic findings were very atypical. Awareness for such cases must be there while dealing with recurrent meningiomas as invasiveness may not always be associated with adverse predisposing factors like radiation. As invasiveness is always a histopathological diagnosis, picking up such features on imaging is a daunting task and if done, can help neurosurgeons prognosticate such invasive recurrences in a better fashion. PMID:27366271

  19. Vein, silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh: a comparative study in peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Lolley, R D; Bose, W J; Bastian, F; Bassam, B; Meyer, F N; Anderson, L D

    1995-09-01

    We investigated three sheathing materials (autogenous vein, silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh) using the rat model. Forty rats were divided into five groups of eight animals each. Group A animals underwent transection of the sciatic nerve but had no repair. In Group B, a standard epineural repair was performed. In Groups C, D, and E, the nerve was repaired as in Group B with the addition of autogenous vein, Silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh sheaths, respectively. Nerve regeneration and function were assessed using sciatic functional index, nerve conduction studies, and light microscopy. Sheathing methods showed no statistically significant advantage to standard epineural repair without a sheath.

  20. Intraventricular meningioma after cranial irradiation for childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ney, Douglas E; Huse, Jason T; Dunkel, Ira J; Steinherz, Peter G; Haque, Sofia; Khakoo, Yasmin

    2010-10-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common brain tumors in adults. They are most commonly located over the cerebral convexities and are infrequently found in an intraventricular location. Ionizing cranial radiation is a risk factor for late occurrence of meningiomas within the radiation field. While pathologic grading of meningiomas is straightforward, significant variability often exists between pathologists in applying standard grading criteria. This has implications for prognosis. Radiation-induced meningiomas may also have predilection to recur. The authors describe a case of an intraventricular meningioma occurring 23 years after cranial irradiation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  1. Peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1985-05-01

    In treating the three main surgical problems of peripheral nerves--nerve sheath tumors, entrapment neuropathies, and acute nerve injuries--the overriding consideration is the preservation and restoration of neurologic function. Because of this, certain other principles may need to be compromised. These include achieving a gross total excision of benign tumors, employing conservative therapy as long as a disease process is not clearly progressing, and delaying repair of a nerve transection until the skin wound has healed. Only three pathophysiologic processes need be considered: neurapraxia (focal segmental dymyelination), axonotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that does not disrupt fascicles of nerve fibers), and neurotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that interrupts fascicles). With nerve sheath tumors and entrapment neuropathies, the goal is minimize the extent to which neurapraxia progresses to axonotmesis. The compressive force is relieved without carrying out internal neurolysis, a procedure that is poorly tolerated, presumably because a degree of nerve ischemia exists with any long-standing compression. When the nerve has sustained blunt trauma (through acute compression, percussion, or traction), the result can be a total loss of function and an extensive neuroma-in-continuity (scarring within the nerve). However, the neural pathophysiology may amount to nothing more than axonotmesis. Although this lesion, in time, leads to full and spontaneous recovery, it must be differentiated from the neuroma-in-continuity that contains disrupted fascicles requiring surgery. Finally, with open nerve transection, the priority is to match the fascicles of the proximal stump with those of the distal stump, a goal that is best achieved if primary neurorrhaphy is carried out.

  2. Intraspinal meningioma with malignant transformation and distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Shido, Yoji; Go, Yoshida; Arima, Hideyuki; Kanbara, Shunsuke; Hirose, Takanori; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meningioma is typically considered to be a benign tumor. Malignant transformation and metastasis of meningiomas are rare. Moreover, most meningiomas are intracranial, and there are few reports on intraspinal meningiomas. This report aimed to describe the clinical features and pathological findings of a case of malignant transformation and distant metastasis of intraspinal meningioma, with a review of the literature. A 44-year-old man with a bilateral lower limb paresis was diagnosed with an intradural extramedullary tumor of the thoracic spine. Primary tumor resection was performed, and the histological findings revealed atypical meningioma. The meningioma recurred 2 years after the primary surgery, and a second resection was performed, but only partial resection was possible because of decreased motor evoked potential. At age 48, the patient’s lower limb weakness returned, and a third resection was performed, and the histological finding remained atypical meningioma. At age 54, the tumor increased and stereotactic irradiation was performed. At age 60, the patient was diagnosed with metastatic tumors of the rib, lumbar vertebra, cervical spine, and sacrum. Biopsy of the rib metastatic tumor was performed, and the histological findings revealed anaplastic meningioma. This case is the first report of an intraspinal meningioma that transformed from atypical to anaplastic meningioma with distant hematogenous metastasis. PMID:28303067

  3. Radiosurgical planning of meningiomas: compromises with conformity.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jeremy G; Walton, Lee; Vaughan, Paul; Malik, Irfan; Radatz, Matthias; Kemeny, Andras

    2004-01-01

    The radiosurgical planning of meningiomas frequently necessitates compromises between irradiating tumour and risking damage to adjacent structures. In selected cases, we resolved this by excluding part of the tumour from the prescription isodose volume. Most of these compromises or 'suboptimal' plans achieved growth control. Growth control could not be related to conformity indices or to various measures of the radiation dose received by the meningioma. Examining recurrences, 75% arose from dura outside the original treatment field. These findings are discussed in terms of dose prescription protocols and the use of conformity indices in planning. The importance of the dural origin of meningiomas is well established in surgical practice, as reflected by Simpson's grades, but may be equally significant in radiosurgical practice.

  4. Contemporary Endovascular Embolotherapy for Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Dubel, Gregory J.; Ahn, Sun Ho; Soares, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative endovascular tumor embolization has been used for 40 years. Meningiomas are the most common benign intracranial tumor in which preoperative embolization has been most extensively described in the literature. Advocates of embolization report that it reduces operative blood-loss, and softens the tumor, thus making surgery safer and easier. Opponents suggest that it adds additional risk and cost for patients without controlled studies showing conclusive benefit. The literature suggests a 3 to 6% neurological complication rate related to embolization. The combined external and internal carotid artery blood supply and complex anastomoses of the meninges can make embolization challenging. Positive outcomes require thorough knowledge of the pertinent vascular anatomy, familiarity with the neurovascular equipment and embolics, and meticulous technique. There remains debate on several aspects of embolization, including tumors most appropriate for embolization, embolic agent of choice, ideal size of embolic, and the choice of vessel(s) to embolize. This detailed review of pertinent vascular anatomy, embolization technique, results, and complications should allow practitioners to maximize treatment outcomes in this setting. PMID:24436548

  5. Glioblastoma induction after radiosurgery for meningioma.

    PubMed

    Yu, J S; Yong, W H; Wilson, D; Black, K L

    2000-11-04

    A 70-year-old woman developed a glioblastoma in the irradiated field 7 years after stereotactic radiosurgery for meningioma. Glioma induction has been previously reported after external beam radiation for leukaemia, pituitary adenoma, tinea capitus, and meningioma. This radiosurgery-induced malignancy may portend further reports of tumour induction. The theoretical risk of tumour induction by low doses of radiation to normal neural tissue after radiosurgery is now confirmed. Reports of additional cases of radiosurgery-induced tumours might temper the use of this increasingly used technique for benign surgically accessible lesions.

  6. Meningioma after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Rosenstein, M; Figura, J H

    1999-08-01

    The most common second primary tumors after treatment of childhood Hodgkin's disease are leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and thyroid cancer. Although intracranial meningioma has been reported after radiotherapy to the scalp for benign conditions and for intracranial primary brain tumors, this appears to be an extremely rare sequelae of treatment for Hodgkin's disease. The authors describe a 15-year-old boy who underwent radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and in whom a meningioma developed in the posterior fossa 27 years later.

  7. Meningiomas of the velum interpositum: surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lozier, Alan P; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2003-07-15

    Meningiomas of the third ventricle are a rare subtype of pineal region tumor that arise from the posterior portion of the velum interpositum, the double layer of pia mater that forms the roof of the third ventricle. The authors review the literature concerning these meningiomas and present a case in which the lesion was resected via the supracerebellar-infratentorial approach. The relationship of the tumor to the deep venous system and the splenium of the corpus callosum guides the selection of the most advantageous surgical approach. Posterior displacement of the internal cerebral veins demonstrated on preoperative imaging provides a strong rationale for use of the supracerebellar-infratentorial approach.

  8. Giant velum interpositum meningioma in a child.

    PubMed

    Moiyadi, Aliasgar V; Shetty, Prakash

    2012-07-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare, but are relatively more often seen in children. Large size at presentation often obscures anatomical details. A particular subset of such tumors arising from the velum interpositum pose a significant surgical challenge. Thorough preoperative imaging, especially with respect to the course of the deep venous structures, provides useful evidence as to the origin. Preservation of venous anatomy at surgery is vital. We describe a 3-year-old girl with a giant velum interpositum meningioma that was completely excised with excellent outcome. This is probably the youngest such case reported.

  9. A neurogenic tumor containing a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) component with loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/p16: a case report showing progression from a neurofibroma to a high-grade MPNST.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is a stepwise process that involves the alteration of many cell cycle regulators and the double inactivation of the NF1 gene. Inactivation of the TP53 gene and deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene are known to play an important role in the process. Herein, we present a 19-year-old man with a familial history of neurofibromatosis type 1, in whom the tumor arose from the intercostal nerve and showed 3 components: a neurofibroma, a low-grade MPNST, and a high-grade MPNST. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene were observed in both the low-grade and the high-grade MPNST. In contrast to low-grade MPNSTs, high-grade MPNSTs generally tend to lose expression of p16 and harbor homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene in low-grade MPNST in our case might be related to its progression to high-grade MPNST. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study correlating the p16 expression status and CDKN2A/p16 gene alteration in low-grade MPNSTs.

  10. Discrimination between spinal extradural meningioma and both intra and extradural meningioma: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meningiomas are common spinal tumor and mostly located at intradura. Recurrence rate after surgery for extradural meningioma was higher than intradural meningioma. A patient with intra and extradural spinal meningioma was treated and discussed its features and clinical management. A 41-year-old woman noted numbness of bilateral legs, gait disturbance, and mild bladder disturbance for over the two-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass at T8-9 involving the dura mater from the left side. Intraoperatively, ultrasonography showed extradural tumor suppress the dura from the left side and no subarachnoid space. Therefore, it was difficult to diagnose the tumor was located at only extradural or both intra and extradural. The extradural tumor was resected as much as possible, then ultrasonography was performed for the second time. The spinal cord was decompressed and subarachnoid space was appeared with intradural tumor. The dura mater was opened in the midline for intradural exploration, and the intradural tumor appeared beside the spinal cord. The dura mater with attachment to the tumor was rescected. To prevent a recurrence, ultrasonography after removing extradural tumor is recommended to detect intra dural tumor and invasion of tumor into dura mater. In such case, removing only extradural meningioma is not enough, and gross total resection including intradural meningioma and dura mater is required. PMID:28303070

  11. Discrimination between spinal extradural meningioma and both intra and extradural meningioma: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-02-01

    Meningiomas are common spinal tumor and mostly located at intradura. Recurrence rate after surgery for extradural meningioma was higher than intradural meningioma. A patient with intra and extradural spinal meningioma was treated and discussed its features and clinical management. A 41-year-old woman noted numbness of bilateral legs, gait disturbance, and mild bladder disturbance for over the two-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass at T8-9 involving the dura mater from the left side. Intraoperatively, ultrasonography showed extradural tumor suppress the dura from the left side and no subarachnoid space. Therefore, it was difficult to diagnose the tumor was located at only extradural or both intra and extradural. The extradural tumor was resected as much as possible, then ultrasonography was performed for the second time. The spinal cord was decompressed and subarachnoid space was appeared with intradural tumor. The dura mater was opened in the midline for intradural exploration, and the intradural tumor appeared beside the spinal cord. The dura mater with attachment to the tumor was rescected. To prevent a recurrence, ultrasonography after removing extradural tumor is recommended to detect intra dural tumor and invasion of tumor into dura mater. In such case, removing only extradural meningioma is not enough, and gross total resection including intradural meningioma and dura mater is required.

  12. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma or Recurrent or Progressive Meningioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-09

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  13. Successful CyberKnife Irradiation of 1000 cc Hemicranial Meningioma: 6-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Golanov, Andrey V.; Antipina, Natalia; Gorlachev, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are common benign tumors with accepted treatment approaches and usually don't challenge healthcare specialists. We present a case of a huge unresectable hemicranial meningioma, which was successfully treated with hypofractionated irradiation. A male patient, sixty-two years of age, suffered for over 12 years from headaches, facial deformity, right eye displacement, right eye movement restriction, right-sided ptosis, and facial hypoesthesia. MRI and CT studies revealed an extended hemicranial meningioma. Prior to irradiation, the patient underwent four operations. Eventually, the tumor was irradiated with the CyberKnife in August 2009. Tumor volume composed 1085 cc. The mean dose of 35.3 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions (31.5 Gy at 72% isodose line comprising 95% of tumor volume). The patient was followed during six years and experienced only mild (Grade 1-2 CTCAE) acute skin and mucosa reactions. During the follow-up period, we observed target volume shrinkage for 17% (for 26% after excluding hyperostosis) and regression of intracranial hypertension signs. Due to the extreme volume and complex shape of the tumor, spreading along the surface of the hemisphere as well as an optic nerve involvement, the case presented would not be generally considered suitable for irradiation, especially for hypofractionation. We regard this clinical situation not as a treatment recommendation, but as a demonstration of the underestimated possibilities of hypofractionation regimen and CyberKnife system, both of which are limited with our habit of conventional treatments. PMID:26719827

  14. Successful CyberKnife Irradiation of 1000 cc Hemicranial Meningioma: 6-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Galkin, Mikhail; Golanov, Andrey V; Antipina, Natalia; Gorlachev, Gennady

    2015-11-20

    Meningiomas are common benign tumors with accepted treatment approaches and usually don't challenge healthcare specialists. We present a case of a huge unresectable hemicranial meningioma, which was successfully treated with hypofractionated irradiation. A male patient, sixty-two years of age, suffered for over 12 years from headaches, facial deformity, right eye displacement, right eye movement restriction, right-sided ptosis, and facial hypoesthesia. MRI and CT studies revealed an extended hemicranial meningioma. Prior to irradiation, the patient underwent four operations. Eventually, the tumor was irradiated with the CyberKnife in August 2009. Tumor volume composed 1085 cc. The mean dose of 35.3 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions (31.5 Gy at 72% isodose line comprising 95% of tumor volume). The patient was followed during six years and experienced only mild (Grade 1-2 CTCAE) acute skin and mucosa reactions. During the follow-up period, we observed target volume shrinkage for 17% (for 26% after excluding hyperostosis) and regression of intracranial hypertension signs. Due to the extreme volume and complex shape of the tumor, spreading along the surface of the hemisphere as well as an optic nerve involvement, the case presented would not be generally considered suitable for irradiation, especially for hypofractionation. We regard this clinical situation not as a treatment recommendation, but as a demonstration of the underestimated possibilities of hypofractionation regimen and CyberKnife system, both of which are limited with our habit of conventional treatments.

  15. SU11657 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Meningioma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie Bois, Angelika Zabel-du; Ranai, Gholamreza; Trinh, Thuy; Unterberg, Andreas; Debus, Juergen; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Abdollahi, Amir; Huber, Peter E.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of the multireceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU11657 (primarily vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor) in combination with irradiation in freshly isolated primary human meningioma cells. Methods and Materials: Tumor specimens were obtained from meningioma patients undergoing surgery at the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. For the present study only cells up to passage 6 were used. Benign and atypical meningioma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with SU11657 alone and in combination with 6-MV photons (0-10 Gy). Clonogenic survival and cell proliferation were determined alone and in coculture assays to determine direct and paracrine effects. Results: Radiation and SU11657 alone reduced cell proliferation in atypical and benign meningioma cells as well as in HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner. SU11657 alone also reduced clonogenic survival of benign and atypical meningioma cells. SU11657 increased radiosensitivity of human meningioma cells in clonogenic survival and cell number/proliferation assays. The anticlonogenic and antiproliferative effects alone and the radiosensitization effects of SU11657 were more pronounced in atypical meningioma cells compared with benign meningioma cells. Conclusion: Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors like SU11657 are capable of amplifying the growth inhibitory effects of irradiation in meningioma cells. These data provide a rationale for further clinical evaluation of this combination concept, especially in atypical and malignant meningioma patients.

  16. [Cytogenetic aberrations in histologically benign infiltratively growing sphenoid wing meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A; Bekiashev, A Kh; Sycheva, R V

    2007-01-01

    Meningiomas of the sphenoid wing (SW) frequently show an invasive pattern of growth and cause destruction of the adjacent structures. As a result, the rate of recurrent SW meningiomas is as high as 30%. Cytogenetic investigations showed no aberrations specific to invasively growing meningiomas. During this study, the authors evaluated 10 invasive and 5 non-invasive SW meningiomas via comparative genome hybridization (CGH) (matrix CGH), by using the gene chips of GenoSensor Array micromatrixes. The mean number of aberrations in the tumor cells was much greater in case of invasive meningiomas (67.4 versus 40.5 in case of non-invasive SW meningiomas. Furthermore, in invasive SW meningiomas, there were frequently losses in loci 1p, 6q, and 14q and gains in loci 15q and 10, which had been predetermined as molecular markers of stepwise progression of meningioma. Thus, the presence of a complex cytogenetic profile and progression-associated chromosome aberrations in benign SW meningiomas is linked with the increase of their invasive potential. Due to the fact that there are no well-defined adjuvant therapy regimens for recurring meningiomas at present, the revealed genomic aberrations may become potential targets for searching for drugs and a therapeutic intervention in future.

  17. Spinal metastases from pituitary hemangiopericytic meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Masih, A.S.; McComb, R.D.

    1987-10-01

    A rare, previously irradiated, recurrent malignant angioblastic meningioma of the pituitary, hemangiopericytic type, was locally controlled by a new endocurietherapy technique that allows delivery of very high (10,000 cGy), sharply localized irradiation. Rather than succumbing to the local tumor recurrence, as would otherwise be expected, the patient developed distant spinal metastases several years later.

  18. Paraclinoid aneurysm concealed by sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Petrecca, Kevin; Sirhan, Denis

    2009-02-01

    The coexistence of brain tumours and aneurysms is rare. In all previously reported cases the aneurysm was detectable by angiography. We report here a case in which a paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm was coexistent and concealed from angiographic detection by an adjacent parasellar meningioma.

  19. Occipital Falcine Anaplastic Hemangiopericytoma Mimicking Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanesen, Davendran; Kandasamy, Regunath; Idris, Zamzuri

    2016-01-01

    The rarity of hemangiopericytoma (HPC) and its controversial histological classification result in its frequent misdiagnosis and thus make the treatment quite challenging. It is often difficult to distinguish these tumors from meningiomas based on clinical features and radiological findings. This is a case report of a man, diagnosed clinically and radiologically as meningioma, which turned out to be anaplastic HPC on histological examination. A 30-year-old man presented with 3 months of progressively worsening of headache and blurring of vision. Clinical examination revealed the right homonymous hemianopia with reduced visual acuity and papilledema bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated and heterogenous extraaxial lesion attached to the occipital falx. It measured 9.0 cm (AP) × 5.5 cm (W) × 5.8 cm (CC) and expands bilaterally with major bulk on the left. An occipital craniotomy followed by a subtotal tumor excision was only achieved due to profuse bleeding intraoperatively. Histopathology confirmed an anaplastic HPC (WHO Grade 3). The importance of differentiation between HPCs and meningiomas cannot be overemphasized. A preoperative correct diagnosis is difficult, but it is important that it should be made. Multilobulated (mushroom appearance), prominent internal signal voids, relatively narrow dural attachment, and lytic destruction without calcifications are useful findings to distinguish HPCs from meningiomas. PMID:28163517

  20. Occipital Falcine Anaplastic Hemangiopericytoma Mimicking Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kanesen, Davendran; Kandasamy, Regunath; Idris, Zamzuri

    2016-12-01

    The rarity of hemangiopericytoma (HPC) and its controversial histological classification result in its frequent misdiagnosis and thus make the treatment quite challenging. It is often difficult to distinguish these tumors from meningiomas based on clinical features and radiological findings. This is a case report of a man, diagnosed clinically and radiologically as meningioma, which turned out to be anaplastic HPC on histological examination. A 30-year-old man presented with 3 months of progressively worsening of headache and blurring of vision. Clinical examination revealed the right homonymous hemianopia with reduced visual acuity and papilledema bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated and heterogenous extraaxial lesion attached to the occipital falx. It measured 9.0 cm (AP) × 5.5 cm (W) × 5.8 cm (CC) and expands bilaterally with major bulk on the left. An occipital craniotomy followed by a subtotal tumor excision was only achieved due to profuse bleeding intraoperatively. Histopathology confirmed an anaplastic HPC (WHO Grade 3). The importance of differentiation between HPCs and meningiomas cannot be overemphasized. A preoperative correct diagnosis is difficult, but it is important that it should be made. Multilobulated (mushroom appearance), prominent internal signal voids, relatively narrow dural attachment, and lytic destruction without calcifications are useful findings to distinguish HPCs from meningiomas.

  1. Paraneoplastic symptoms caused by extracranial meningioma metastases?

    PubMed Central

    Mindermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are only few reports on distant metastases of cranial meningiomas WHO I. In one-third of the cases, distant metastases seem to be clinically silent. This is the first case of distant metastases which may have manifested with a paraneoplastic syndrome. Case Description: A 52-year-old white male patient was diagnosed with distant metastases to the bones and liver 11 and 12 years following craniotomy and removal of a tentorial meningioma WHO I. At that time, the patient had developed paresthesia, unsteady gait, and a slight cognitive impairment, which in retrospect had no other explanation than that of a paraneoplastic syndrome. Eighteen years following craniotomy, a small intracranial tumor rest is under control following two single session radiosurgery treatments. At present, the patient has a multitude of bone and liver metastases, which seem to cause his paraneoplastic symptoms. Conclusion: Screening for malignancies in patients with paraneoplastic symptoms and a history of cranial meningioma should include screening for distant metastases from the meningioma. PMID:28168092

  2. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  3. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  4. [Primary osteolytic intraosseous meningioma of the occipital bone].

    PubMed

    Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel; Marcelo-Zamorano, María Bella; Fernández-Alarcón, Luis; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Primary intraosseous meningiomas are considered extradural meningiomas when no dural attachment is present. Most of them arise from the cranial bones and can present either as an osteoblastic or an osteolytic lesion. Osteolytic intraosseous meningiomas are the rarest and very few cases have been reported. Given that many of these may develop signs of malignancy, early histological confirmation is important in order to ensure appropriate treatment. The recommended therapy is surgery, with complete resection whenever possible. We present the case of a large primary intraosseous osteolytic meningioma within the occipital bone, which was completely excised five years ago, currently presenting no signs of recurrence.

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  6. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  7. Electromagnetic induction between axons and their schwann cell myelin-protein sheaths.

    PubMed

    Goodman, G; Bercovich, D

    2013-12-01

    Two concepts have long dominated vertebrate nerve electrophysiology: (a) Schwann cell-formed myelin sheaths separated by minute non-myelinated nodal gaps and spiraling around axons of peripheral motor nerves reduce current leakage during propagation of trains of axon action potentials; (b) "jumping" by action potentials between successive nodes greatly increases signal conduction velocity. Long-held and more recent assumptions and issues underlying those concepts have been obscured by research emphasis on axon-sheath biochemical symbiosis and nerve regeneration. We hypothesize: mutual electromagnetic induction in the axon-glial sheath association, is fundamental in signal conduction in peripheral and central myelinated axons, explains the g-ratio and is relevant to animal navigation.

  8. Treatment recommendations for primary extradural meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin; Hughes, Betsy; Oleson, James; Reardon, David; McLendon, Roger; Adamson, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas (PEMs) represent about 2% of all meningiomas and are often encountered by non-neurosurgeons. These lesions typically present as enlarging, painless, benign masses that can be surgically cured. Imaging is critical for defining involvement of adjacent structures; however, diagnosis depends on classic histologic patterns. Treatment for benign PEMs (WHO I) consists of resection with wide margins, whereas adjuvant therapy after resection of atypical (WHO II) or malignant (WHO III) PEMs should be considered. By using the collective experience from our comprehensive cancer center, including neuro-oncologists, neuroradiologists, and neurosurgeons, in addition to a complete literature review, the authors have established treatment guidelines not previously reported. This manuscript describes key features of these challenging tumors to aid in diagnosis, presents the largest published review of all reported PEMs (n = 163), and provides salient treatment guidelines to surgeons unfamiliar with these challenging tumors.

  9. Tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma: an unusual location.

    PubMed

    Calişaneller, Tarkan; Ozen, Ozlem; Altinörs, Nur; Caner, Hakan

    2008-07-01

    A 60-year-old female was admitted to our clinic complaining of a long-lasting headache. Cranial magnetic resonance imagining examination of the patient revealed a 22x24 mm extra-axial, well-demarcated, mass lesion based on the left tentorium. The patient underwent a craniotomy and the tumor was totally excised with the adjacent tentorium. The histopathological examination of the tumor complied with the diagnosis of schwannoma. The rest of the clinical course was uneventful and the patient was released from the hospital without any neurological deficit. Intracranial schwannomas can rarely originate from atypical dural locations and radiological techniques are not always helpful in distinguishing tentorial schwannoma from tentorial meningioma. We presented a patient with a tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma and discussed the current literature.

  10. Olfactory groove meningiomas: approaches and complications.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires de; Tahara, Adriana; Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Simm, Renata; Silva, Arnaldo Neves da; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfatt; Panagopoulos, Alexandros Theodoros; Zicarelli, Carlos Alexandre; Silva, Pedro Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM) account for 4.5% of all intracranial meningiomas. We report 21 patients with OGMs. Tumors were operated on using three surgical approaches: bifrontal (7 patients), fronto-pterional (11 patients) and fronto-orbital (3 patients). Total tumor removal (Simpson Grade 1) was achieved in 13 patients and Simpson II in 8 patients. Perioperative mortality was 4.76%. The average size of the OGM was 4.3+/-1.1cm. The overall recurrence rate was 19%. We preferred to use the pterional approach, which provides quick access to the tumor with less brain exposure. It also allows complete drainage of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid, providing a good level of brain relaxation during surgery. However, for long, thin tumors, hemostasis can be difficult using this approach.

  11. Association of Morbidity with Extent of Resection and Cavernous Sinus Invasion in Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas*

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Michael E.; Cheng, Jason S.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sughrue, Michael E.; Clark, Aaron; Kane, Ari J.; Aranda, Derick; McDermott, Michael; Barani, Igor J.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Sphenoid wing meningiomas (SWMs) typically are histologically benign, insidious lesions, but the propensity of these tumors for local invasion makes disease control very challenging. In this review, we assess whether the degree of resection and extent of cavernous sinus invasion affects morbidity, mortality, and recurrence in patients with SWM. A comprehensive search of the English-language literature was performed. Patients were stratified according to extent of resection and extent of cavernous sinus invasion, and tumor recurrence rate, morbidity, and mortality were analyzed. A total of 23 studies and 131 patients were included. Overall recurrence and surgical mortality rate were 11% and 2%, respectively (average follow-up = 65 months). Cranial nerve III palsy was significantly associated with incompletely versus completely resected SWMs (7 to 0%) as well as meningiomas with cavernous sinus invasion versus no sinus invasion (14 vs. 0%). No significant difference in tumor recurrence rate was noted between these groups. In conclusion, complete excision of SWMs is always recommended whenever possible, but surgeons should acknowledge that there is nonetheless a chance of recurrence and should weigh this against the risk of causing cranial nerve injuries. PMID:23372999

  12. Foramen Magnum Meningioma: Dysphagia of Atypical Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Matthew W.; Mobley, Bret C.; Cheng, Walter W.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We present a case of a foramen magnum meningioma that highlights the importance of the neurologic exam when evaluating a patient with dysphagia. A 58-year-old woman presented with an 18-month history of progressive dysphagia, chronic cough and 30-pound weight loss. Prior gastroenterologic and laryngologic workup was unrevealing. Results Her neurologic examination revealed an absent gag reflex, decreased sensation to light touch on bilateral distal extremities, hyperreflexia, and tandem gait instability. Repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy was normal, whereas laryngoscopy and video fluoroscopy revealed marked hypopharyngeal dysfunction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 3.1 × 2.7 × 2.9 cm foramen magnum mass consistent with meningioma. The patient underwent neurosurgical resection of her mass with near complete resolution of her neurologic symptoms. Pathology confirmed diagnosis of a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. Conclusion CNS pathology is an uncommon but impressive cause of dysphagia. Our case demonstrates the importance of a thorough neurologic survey when evaluating such a patient. PMID:18080720

  13. Collision Tumor Composed of Meningioma and Cavernoma.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Jens; Neher, Markus; Schrey, Michael; Wünsch, Peter H; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    A true collision tumor is a rare entity composed of two histologically distinct neoplasms coinciding in the same organ. This paper reports a unique case of cerebral collision tumor consisting of two benign components. On the first hand, meningioma which is usually a benign lesion arising from the meningothelial cell in the arachnoidal membrane. On the other, cerebral cavernoma which is a well-circumscribed, benign vascular hamartoma within the brain. To our knowledge, there is no previously documented case of cerebral collision tumor consisting of two benign components. A 56-year-old Caucasian male suffered in 2002 from an atypical meningioma WHO II° located in the left lateral ventricle. Three years after the tumor extirpation, the patient suffered from a hematoma in the fourth ventricle due to a recurrently haemorrhaged cavernoma. In 2008, a recurrence of the tumor in the left lateral ventricle was discovered. Additionally, another tumor located in the quadrigeminal lamina was detected. After surgical resection of the tumor in the left lateral ventricle, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a collision tumor consisting of components of a meningioma WHO II° and a cavernoma. Postoperatively, no adjuvant treatment was needed and no tumor recurrence is discovered up to the present. A possible explanation for the collision of those two different tumors may be migration of tumor cells mediated by the cerebrospinal fluid. After 5-years of follow-up, there is no sign of any tumor recurrence; therefore, surgical tumor removal without adjuvant therapy seems to be the treatment of choice.

  14. Allergy reduces the risk of meningioma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-fei; Ji, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Li, Shou-wei; Yan, Chang-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common brain tumours; however, little is known regarding their aetiology. The data are inconsistent concerning atopic disease and the risk of developing meningioma. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between allergic conditions and the risk of developing meningioma. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Web of SCI from Jan 1979 to Feb 2016. Two investigators independently selected the relevant articles according to the inclusion criteria. Eight case-control studies and 2 cohort studies were included in the final analysis, comprising 5,679 meningioma cases and 55,621 control subjects. Compared with no history of allergy, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for allergic conditions was 0.81 (0.70–0.94) for meningioma in a random-effects meta-analysis. Inverse correlations of meningioma occurrence were also identified for asthma and eczema, in which the pooled ORs were 0.78 (0.70–0.86) and 0.78 (0.69–0.87), respectively. A reduced risk of meningioma occurrence was identified in hay fever; however, the association was weak (0.88, 95% CI = 0.78–0.99). The source of this heterogeneity could be the various confounding variables in individual studies. Overall, the current meta-analysis indicated that allergy reduced the risk of developing meningiomas. Large cohort studies are required to investigate this relationship. PMID:28071746

  15. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  16. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  17. Fast-Growing Meningioma in a Woman Undergoing Fertility Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Elashaal, Abdurrahim

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas have long been known to be associated with sexual hormones. We discuss here the case of a woman with a huge meningioma that rapidly grew over the course of a couple years while the patient was simultaneously taking fertility treatments. There is substantial evidence suggesting that fertility treatments can fuel the growth of meningiomas. The potential risks should be considered in women with a previous or family history of meningiomas who plan to undergo fertility treatment. These patients need to be evaluated and a screening imaging of brain MRI (Magnetic Resonant Imaging) should be offered in the middle or toward the end of such a treatment to control and prevent complications of these meningiomas. PMID:28116188

  18. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  19. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities.

  20. Collision Tumor Composed of Meningioma and Cavernoma

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Jens; Neher, Markus; Schrey, Michael; Wünsch, Peter H.; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    A true collision tumor is a rare entity composed of two histologically distinct neoplasms coinciding in the same organ. This paper reports a unique case of cerebral collision tumor consisting of two benign components. On the first hand, meningioma which is usually a benign lesion arising from the meningothelial cell in the arachnoidal membrane. On the other, cerebral cavernoma which is a well-circumscribed, benign vascular hamartoma within the brain. To our knowledge, there is no previously documented case of cerebral collision tumor consisting of two benign components. A 56-year-old Caucasian male suffered in 2002 from an atypical meningioma WHO II° located in the left lateral ventricle. Three years after the tumor extirpation, the patient suffered from a hematoma in the fourth ventricle due to a recurrently haemorrhaged cavernoma. In 2008, a recurrence of the tumor in the left lateral ventricle was discovered. Additionally, another tumor located in the quadrigeminal lamina was detected. After surgical resection of the tumor in the left lateral ventricle, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a collision tumor consisting of components of a meningioma WHO II° and a cavernoma. Postoperatively, no adjuvant treatment was needed and no tumor recurrence is discovered up to the present. A possible explanation for the collision of those two different tumors may be migration of tumor cells mediated by the cerebrospinal fluid. After 5-years of follow-up, there is no sign of any tumor recurrence; therefore, surgical tumor removal without adjuvant therapy seems to be the treatment of choice. PMID:28061500

  1. Intradural Extramedullary Tuberculoma Mimicking En Plaque Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Dae Moo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Chae, Soo Uk

    2010-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with tuberculosis meningitis developed acute paraplegia and sensory disturbances 5 weeks after receiving conventional antituberculous therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary long segmental mass mimicking en plaque meningioma at the T2-T6 vertebrae levels. Prompt surgical decompression was performed. A histology examination of the mass revealed a tuberculoma. After surgery, the patient showed improved motor power and a normal bladder function. Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord is rare complication of tuberculosis meningitis, which can occur as a response to conventional antituberculous therapy. PMID:21119945

  2. Meningioma and cavernous angioma following childhood radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Akshay D; Mahore, Amit S; Zade, Bhooshan P; Jalali, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation has been a part of multimodality management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). With optimum treatment and the resultant long-term cure rates, long-term side effects of radiation including radiation-induced neoplasms have been increasingly unearthed. We report a rare case of development of both a meningioma and a cavernous angioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation as a part of treatment of ALL. Regular follow-up and high index of suspicion for late radiation sequelae after treatment are therefore justifiable in leukemia survivors with history of prophylactic cranial irradiation.

  3. High incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Shintani, T; Hayakawa, N; Hoshi, M; Sumida, M; Kurisu, K; Oki, S; Kodama, Y; Kajikawa, H; Inai, K; Kamada, N

    1999-03-01

    Since the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, high incidences of leukemia, thyroid cancer and other tumors have been reported as atomic bomb-induced tumors. We investigated the incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. Sixty-eight patients surgically treated for meningioma who had been within 2.0 km of the hypocenter of the explosion were identified. Six hundred and seven non-exposed patients with meningioma were also studied. Treatment dates were from 1975 to 1992. The incidences of meningioma among 68 subjects within 2.0 km and 607 non-exposed patients were 8.7 and 3.0 cases per 10(5) persons per year, respectively. The incidences of meningioma among the survivors of Hiroshima in 5-year intervals since 1975 were 5.3, 7.4, 10.1, and 14.9, respectively. The incidences of meningioma classified by distances from the hypocenter of 1.5-2.0 km, 1.0-1.5 km and less than 1.0 km were 6.3, 7.6 and 20.0, respectively. The incidences of meningioma classified by doses to the brain of 0-0.099 Sv, 0.1-0.99 Sv and more than 1.0 Sv were 7.7, 9.2 and 18.2, respectively. The incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors has increased since 1975. There was a significant correlation between the incidence and the dose of radiation to the brain. The present findings strongly suggest that meningioma is one of the tumors induced by atomic bombing in Hiroshima.

  4. Postoperative Analgesia Using Psoas Sheath Block Versus Three-in-One Block in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    were blocked and two cases where all nerves were blocked. Key Words: Regional Anesthesia; Lumbar Plexus Block, Postoperative Pain Management; Pre...and sciatic(Lumbar4-Sacral3). A "psoas sheath block" and a "three-in-one block" are two techniques used to block the lumbar plexus from which the...nerve blockade Operational definition. A regional anesthetic technique used to block transmission of the nerves of the lumbar plexus including the

  5. Imaging diagnosis--hyperostosis associated with meningioma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Miyu; Heller, Heidi L Barnes; Bischoff, Matthew G; Looper, Jayme; Bacmeister, Cynthia X

    2007-01-01

    A 5-year-old neutered male Beagle mix dog had a 5-day history of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Before the seizures, the dog had a 1-2-month history of progressive right hemiparesis. In computed tomography images, a presumed extraaxial mass with hyperostosis and destruction of the skull covering the mass were identified. Surgical excision was performed and the histopathologic diagnosis was meningioma. Hyperostosis is frequently associated with feline meningioma, but this report documents that hyperostosis may also occur secondary to meningioma in the dog.

  6. ['Histrionic personality disorder with regression and conversion': a meningioma].

    PubMed

    Oude Elberink, A M L; Oudijn, M S; Kwa, V I H; Van, H L

    2011-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman, who was believed to be suffering from histrionic personality disorder with regression and conversion, was finally diagnosed with a frontal meningioma. Patients with meningiomas can present with a variety of psychiatric symptoms, sometimes even before neurological symptoms occur. The diagnosis is often delayed because the symptoms are misleading and it is difficult to modify a psychiatric diagnosis once this has been made. Discussion focuses on the characteristic signs of a meningioma, the reasons for delays in diagnosis and the indications for brain-imaging on psychiatric patients.

  7. Leptomeningeal Dissemination of Intraventricular Rhabdoid Meningioma: Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Ihsan; Eren, Suat; Levent, Akin; Kantarci, Mecit; Kurt, Ali; Okay, Onder Hilmi

    A 20-year-old male patient was admitted to our clinic with a 1-year history of headache. The patient's systemic-neurological examination and laboratory findings were normal. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. Imaging findings showed calcified intraventricular mass and subependymal and gyral nodular lesions. There was a slight increase in ventricular volume. Surgical treatment was performed. Pathological specimens revealed the diagnosis of rhabdoid meningioma. Leptomeningeal dissemination refers to diffuse seeding of the leptomeninges by tumor metastases. To our knowledge, leptomeningeal dissemination of intraventricular rhabdoid meningioma is very rare in the literature. We aimed to discuss imaging findings and differential diagnosis of leptomeningeal dissemination of rhabdoid meningioma.

  8. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  9. Dust in the magnetized sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Samarian, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2007-09-15

    In the present work the structure of the magnetized sheath is investigated in the multifluid framework. The ambient magnetic field is assumed parallel to the wall and the effect of the plasma magnetization, plasma ionization, and plasma-neutral collisions on the sheath is examined. It is shown that the width of the non-neutral boundary layer is dependent on the collision frequencies as well as on the plasma magnetization. The size of the sheath layer can decrease with the increase in magnetic field. The increase in the ion-neutral collision can also adversely affect the sheath size. The equilibrium and levitation of the dust particles in a collisional magnetized sheath are shown to depend on the collision frequencies and on the magnetization. Further, the increase in the collision or magnetization invariably leads to the presence of the positively charged grains near the plasma wall suggesting that the grain levitation inside the charged layer is implicitly dependent on the plasma parameters in a nontrivial way.

  10. Fractionated radiotherapy and radiosurgery of intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Biau, J; Khalil, T; Verrelle, P; Lemaire, J-J

    2015-06-19

    This review focuses on the role of radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in the management of intracranial meningiomas, which are the most common benign intracranial tumors. Whenever feasible, surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment in effective health care treatment where modern radiotherapy plays an important role. Irradiation can be proposed as first-line treatment, as adjuvant treatment, or as a second-line treatment after recurrence. Stereotactic radiosurgery consists of delivering, a high-dose of radiation with high precision, to the tumor in a single-fraction with a minimal exposure of surrounding healthy tissue. Stereotactic radiosurgery, especially with the gamma knife technique, has reached a high level of success for the treatment of intracranial meningiomas with excellent local control and low morbidity. However, stereotactic radiosurgery is limited by tumor size,<3-4cm, and location, i.e. reasonable distance from the organs at risk. Fractionated radiation therapy is an interesting alternative (5 to 6weeks treatment time) for large inoperable tumors. The results of fractionated radiation therapy seem encouraging as regards both local control and morbidity although long-term prospective studies are still needed.

  11. Relationship between myelin sheath diameter and internodal length in axons of the anterior medullary velum of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Butt, A M; Berry, M

    1995-11-01

    Relations between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths were measured in whole mounts of osmium stained intact anterior medullary velum (AMV) from glutaraldehyde perfused adult rats. The AMV is a sheet of CNS tissue which roofs the IVth ventricle and contains fascicles of myelinated fibres which arise mainly from the nucleus of the IVth cranial nerve. These fibers displayed a broad range of myelin sheath external diameters and internodal lengths, from < 1-12 microns and 50-750 microns, respectively. Myelin sheath external diameter was a measurement of the axonal diameter plus the thickness of its myelin sheath, while internodal length was measured as the distance between consecutive nodes. There was a broadly linear relationship between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths, with the smaller diameter sheaths tending to have shorter internodes than the larger. However, the correlation was weak and for any given diameter myelin sheaths displayed considerable variation in their internodal lengths. The smallest diameter myelin sheaths, < 4 microns, consistently had shorter internodes than predicted by a linear regression and, in an analysis of consecutive internodes in single fibres, the slope was flattened in fibres with a diameter > 4 microns. Our results indicated that small and large calibre fibres may have different myelin sheath diameter-internodal length interrelations.

  12. Functional outcome of patients with benign meningioma treated by 3D conformal irradiation with a combination of photons and protons

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Georges . E-mail: noel@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bollet, Marc A.; Calugaru, Valentin; Feuvret, Loic; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dhermain, Frederic; Ferrand, Regis; Boisserie, Gilbert; Beaudre, Anne; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Habrand, Jean-Louis

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and tolerance of external fractionated combination of photon and proton radiation therapy (RT) for intracranial benign meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 51 patients with intracranial meningiomas of the base of the skull were treated with a combination of photon and proton RT. Median total dose was 60.6 cobalt Gy equivalent (54-64). One hundred eight eye-related symptoms were collected; 80 other symptoms were noted and followed up. Results: Mean follow-up was 25.4 months. Acute tolerance was excellent. Out of the 108 eye-related symptoms, 106 (96%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported for 73 (68.8%) of them. Out of the 88 other miscellaneous symptoms, 81 (92%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported in 54 cases (67%). Median time to improvement ranged from 1 to 24 months after completion of the radiotherapy, depending on the symptom. We did not observe any worsening of primary clinical signs. Radiologically, 1 patient relapsed 4 months after the end of irradiation. Pathology revealed a malignant (Grade 3) transformation of the initial Grade 1 meningioma. Four-year local control and overall survival rates were, respectively, 98% and 100%. Stabilization of the tumor was observed in 38 cases (72%), volume reduction in 10 cases (20%), and intratumor necrosis in 3 cases. Two patients complained of Grade 3 side effects: 1 unilateral hearing loss requiring aid and 1 case of complete pituitary deficiency. Conclusion: These results stressed the clinical efficacy of fractionated-associated photon-proton RT in the treatment of meningiomas, especially on cranial nerve palsies, without severe toxicity in almost all patients.

  13. Primary intrathoracic meningioma: histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of two cases.

    PubMed

    Falleni, M; Roz, E; Dessy, E; Del Curto, B; Braidotti, P; Gianelli, U; Pietra, G G

    2001-08-01

    Meningiomas are common, usually benign slow-growing neoplasms of the central nervous system thought to arise from meningocytes capping arachnoid villi. Primary ectopic meningiomas are exceedingly rare extracranial and extraspinal tumors of controversial origin; they are usually limited to the head and neck region or to the paravertebral soft tissues. Only one mediastinal ectopic meningioma and few pulmonary ectopic meningiomas have been described in the literature until now. Because of their rarity and their intriguing pathogenesis, we report here a second case of primary mediastinal meningioma and an additional case of primary pulmonary meningioma. Their possible origin and differential diagnosis are discussed.

  14. Progress on Quantitative Modeling of rf Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; Kohno, H.; Wright, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    A new quantitative approach for computing the rf sheath potential is described, which incorporates plasma dielectric effects and the relative geometry of the magnetic field and the material boundaries. The new approach uses a modified boundary condition ("rf sheath BC") that couples the rf waves and the sheaths at the boundary. It treats the sheath as a thin vacuum region and matches the fields across the plasma-vacuum boundary. When combined with the Child-Langmuir Law (relating the sheath width and sheath potential), the model permits a self-consistent determination of the sheath parameters and the rf electric field at the sheath-plasma boundary. Semi-analytic models using this BC predict a number of general features, including a sheath voltage threshold, a dimensionless parameter characterizing rf sheath effects, and the existence of sheath plasma waves with an associated resonance. Since the sheath BC is nonlinear and dependent on geometry, computing the sheath potential numerically is a challenging computational problem. Numerical results will be presented from a new parallel-processing finite-element rf wave code for the tokamak scrape-off layer (called "rfSOL"). The code has verified the physics predicted by analytic theory in 1D, and extended the solutions into model 2D geometries. The numerical calculations confirm the existence of multiple roots and hysteresis effects, and parameter studies have been carried out. Areas for future work will be discussed.

  15. Giant pediatric intraventricular meningioma: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Munjal, Satyashiva; Vats, Atul; Kumar, Jitendra; Srivastava, Amit; Mehta, Veer Singh

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare in the pediatric population. These tumors are often large in size and aggressive in behavior when they occur in children. The management of these tumors is a surgical challenge. PMID:27857790

  16. Foster Kennedy Syndrome Due to Meningioma Growth during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porcel, Federico; Hughes, Ian; Anderson, Douglas; Lee, John; Biller, José

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the olfactory groove may cause unilateral optic atrophy with contralateral papilledema and anosmia (Foster Kennedy syndrome). We describe a case of a young pregnant woman with Foster Kennedy syndrome due to an olfactory groove meningioma. PMID:24273529

  17. Association of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Mahvish; Irlam, John; Mohamed, Iman

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has provided compelling evidence that a subset of hyperplastic polyps may be associated with a risk of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer with extracolonic manifestation is usually seen in a hereditary syndrome setting, but some association with meningioma has been reported. The association of colorectal cancer with hyperplastic polyposis and meningioma is extremely rare. This report in a 57-year-old female with no family history of colon cancer or polyps, could be the first case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma. Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome was diagnosed as per WHO criteria at the time of colon cancer diagnosis. Within 4 months of colon cancer diagnosis she developed seizures. Imaging of the brain revealed meningioma of the left cerebellopontine angle. The patient underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy.

  18. Single-fraction Radiosurgery for Presumed Intracranial Meningiomas: Efficacy and Complications From a 22-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the rate of tumor control and factors associated with radiation-related complications after single-fraction radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with imaging defined intracranial meningiomas. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 251 patients (192 women, 59 men) having SRS for imaging-defined intracranial meningiomas between 1990 and 2008. Excluded were patients with radiation-induced tumors, meningiomatosis, or neurofibromatosis. The mean patient age was 58.6 {+-} 13.4 years. The majority of tumors involved the skull base/tentorium (n = 210, 83.7%). The mean treatment volume was 7.7 {+-} 6.2 cm{sup 3}; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.8 {+-} 2.0 Gy. Follow-up (mean, 62.9 {+-} 43.9 months) was censored at last evaluation (n = 224), death (n = 22), or tumor resection (n = 5). Results: No patient died from tumor progression or radiation-related complications. Tumor size decreased in 181 patients (72.1%) and was unchanged in 67 patients (26.7%). Three patients (1.2%) had in-field tumor progression noted at 28, 145, and 150 months, respectively. No patient had a marginal tumor progression. The 3- and 10-year local control rate was 99.4%. One patient had distant tumor progression at 105 months and underwent repeat SRS. Thirty-one patients (12.4%) had either temporary (n = 8, 3.2%) or permanent (n = 23, 9.2%) symptomatic radiation-related complications including cranial nerve deficits (n = 14), headaches (n = 5), hemiparesis (n = 5), new/worsened seizure (n = 4), cyst-formation (n = 1), hemifacial spasm (n = 1), and stroke (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year complication rates were 8.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Radiation-related complications were associated with convexity/falx tumors (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.1, p = 0.009) and increasing tumor volume (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.0-1.1, p = 0.04) on multivariate analysis. No patient developed a radiation-induced tumor. Conclusions: Single-fraction SRS at the used dose range provides a high rate of tumor control for

  19. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  20. Cystic Meningioma Simulating Arachnoid Cyst: Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Docampo; Nadia, Gonzalez; Claudio, Vazquez; Carlos, Morales; Eduardo, Gonzalez-Toledo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show an unusual case of meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst on CT scan and MRI, diagnosed in a 63-year-old woman evaluated for headache and vision disorders. The meningioma shown is predominantly cystic with a small mural nodule enhancing after gadolinium and exhibiting diffusion restriction. Cystic portion of the tumor is hypodense on CT, and evidences fluid signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. PMID:25057425

  1. Multimodal optical analysis of meningioma and comparison with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Marc; Poulon, Fanny; Varlet, Pascale; Chretien, Fabrice; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Pages, Mélanie; Ibrahim, Ali; Pallud, Johan; Dezamis, Edouard; Abi-Lahoud, Georges; Nataf, François; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Abi-Haidar, Darine

    2017-02-01

    Meningioma is the most frequent primary central nervous system tumor. The risk of recurrence and the prognosis are correlated with the extent of the resection that ideally encompasses the infiltrated dura mater and, if required, the infiltrated bone. No device can deliver real-time intraoperative histopathological information on the tumor environment to help the neurosurgeon to achieve a gross total removal. This study assessed the abilities of nonlinear microscopy to provide relevant and real-time data to help resection of meningiomas. Nine human meningioma samples (four World Health Organization Grade I, five Grade II) were analyzed using different optical modalities: spectral analysis and imaging, lifetime measurements, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, fluorescence emitted under one- and two-photon excitation and the second-harmonic generation signal imaging using a multimodal setup. Nonlinear microscopy produced images close to histopathology as a gold standard. The second-harmonic generation signal delineated the collagen background and two-photon fluorescence underlined cell cytoplasm. The matching between fluorescence images and Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was possible in all cases. Grade I meningioma emitted less autofluorescence than Grade II meningioma and Grade II meningioma exhibited a distinct lifetime value. Autofluorescence was correlated with the proliferation rates and seemed to explain the observed differences between Grade I and II meningiomas. This preliminary multimodal study focused on human meningioma samples confirms the potential of tissue autofluorescence analysis and nonlinear microscopy in helping intraoperatively neurosurgeons to reach the actual boundaries of the tumor infiltration. Correspondence between H&E staining (top pictures) and the two-photon fluorescence imaging (bottom pictures).

  2. Integrated genomic analyses of de novo pathways underlying atypical meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Youngblood, Mark W.; Clark, Victoria E.; Coşkun, Süleyman; Henegariu, Octavian; Duran, Daniel; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Kaulen, Leon D.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Abraham, Brian J.; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Timmer, Marco; Goldbrunner, Roland; Omay, S. Bülent; Baranoski, Jacob; Baran, Burçin; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Bai, Hanwen; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Schramm, Johannes; Moliterno, Jennifer; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A.; Günel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign brain tumours, with a potential for becoming atypical or malignant. On the basis of comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses, we compared benign meningiomas to atypical ones. Here, we show that the majority of primary (de novo) atypical meningiomas display loss of NF2, which co-occurs either with genomic instability or recurrent SMARCB1 mutations. These tumours harbour increased H3K27me3 signal and a hypermethylated phenotype, mainly occupying the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding sites in human embryonic stem cells, thereby phenocopying a more primitive cellular state. Consistent with this observation, atypical meningiomas exhibit upregulation of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of the PRC2 complex, as well as the E2F2 and FOXM1 transcriptional networks. Importantly, these primary atypical meningiomas do not harbour TERT promoter mutations, which have been reported in atypical tumours that progressed from benign ones. Our results establish the genomic landscape of primary atypical meningiomas and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28195122

  3. Morphology of human intracardiac nerves: an electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    PAUZIENE, NERINGA; PAUZA, DAINIUS H.; STROPUS, RIMVYDAS

    2000-01-01

    Since many human heart diseases involve both the intrinsic cardiac neurons and nerves, their detailed normal ultrastructure was examined in material from autopsy cases without cardiac complications obtained no more than 8 h after death. Many intracardiac nerves were covered by epineurium, the thickness of which was related to nerve diameter. The perineurial sheath varied from nerve to nerve and, depending on nerve diameter, contained up to 12 layers of perineurial cells. The sheaths of the intracardiac nerves therefore become progressively attenuated during their course in the heart. The intraneural capillaries of the human heart differ from those in animals in possessing an increased number of endothelial cells. A proportion of the intraneural capillaries were fenestrated. The number of unmyelinated axons within unmyelinated nerve fibres was related to nerve diameter, thin cardiac nerves possessing fewer axons. The most distinctive feature was the presence of stacks of laminated Schwann cell processes unassociated with axons that were more frequent in older subjects. Most unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibres showed normal ultrastructure, although a number of profiles displayed a variety of different axoplasmic contents. Collectively, the data provide baseline information on the normal structure of intracardiac nerves in healthy humans which may be useful for assessing the degree of nerve damage both in autonomic and sensory neuropathies in the human heart. PMID:11117629

  4. Hemiparkinsonism secondary to sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kleib, A-S; Sid'Ahmed, E; Salihy, S-M; Boukhrissi, N; Diagana, M; Soumaré, O

    2016-10-01

    We describe the case of a 41 year-old woman who presented with a slight slowness of the right hand movement, which began four months prior to admission. Neurological examination showed slight rest tremor of the right hand, moderate bradykinesia and rigidity. She had been taking medication for Parkinson's disease, but without any benefit. The patient underwent a gadolinium-enhanced brain MRI, which showed a large left sphenoid wing meningioma with surrounding edema compressing the basal ganglia. Total excision of tumor was performed. The right hemiparkinsonian signs were completely resolved. This rare case underlines the significance of neuroimaging in patients presenting with Parkinson's disease especially in those patients with a relatively younger age at onset or unresponsive to medication.

  5. Do mesothelin/MUC16 interactions facilitate adenocarcinoma metastases to intracranial meningiomas?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mahlon D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas have been shown to express mesothelin, a high affinity binding site for MUC16, a transmembrane protein on adenocarcinoma cells. The mechanisms underlying adenocarcinoma metastases to meningiomas may provide insight into tumor-to-tumor metastases and adenocarcinoma metastases to leptomeningeal cells. Methods: Two meningiomas containing metastases from adenocarcinomas were identified and evaluated immunohistochemically for the expression and localization of mesothelin and MUC16. Results: Both meningiomas show extensive mesothelin immunoreactivity, and the adenocarcinomas metastatic to the meningiomas show mesothelin and MUC16 immunoreactivity at the interface with meningioma. Conclusions: Interactions between MUC16 and/or mesothelin on the cell membrane of adenocarcinoma cells with mesothelin on meningioma cells may facilitate adenocarcinoma metastases to meningiomas and possibly the leptomeninges. PMID:28144481

  6. Cavernous sinus meningiomas: imaging and surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Sindou, Marc; Nebbal, Mustapha; Guclu, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas which are by definition those meningiomas which originate from the parasellar region are difficult skull base tumors to deal with. For deciding the most appropriate surgical strategy, surgeons need detailed preoperative neuroimaging. The vicinity of the tumor with the vital and highly functional neurovascular structures, tumor extensions into the basal cisterns and skull base structures, and the arterial vascularization and venous drainage pathways, as they shape operative strategy, are important preoperative data to take into account. Thin section CT scan with bone windows, 3D spiral CT reconstruction, MRI, MR angiography, and DSA performed with selective arteriography including late venous phases give those required detailed informations about the tumor and its relation with neurovascular and bony structures. The type of craniotomy and complementary osteotomy and the usefulness of an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with unroofing the optic canal can be decided from preoperative neuroimaging. Data collected also help in determining whether extensive exposure of the middle cranial fossa is necessary to ensure substantial devascularization of the tumor and whether proximal control of the internal carotid artery (ICA) at its intrapetrosal portion might be useful. Study of the capacity of blood supply of the Willis circle is wise for deciding the need and way of performing an extra-intracranial bypass together with tumor removal. Currently the concept of operating only the tumors with extracavernous extensions and to limit resection to only their extracavernous portions is the most accepted way of treating these tumors. It was that strategy that was adopted in the senior author's 220-patient series.Radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy may complement surgery or can be only reserved for growing remnants.

  7. Cranial nerve assessment in posterior fossa tumors with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA).

    PubMed

    Mikami, Takeshi; Minamida, Yoshihiro; Yamaki, Toshiaki; Koyanagi, Izumi; Nonaka, Tadashi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2005-10-01

    Steady-state free precession is widely used for ultra-fast cardiac or abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work was to assess fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and to evaluate its efficacy for depiction of the cranial nerve affected by the tumor. Twenty-three consecutive patients with posterior fossa tumors underwent FIESTA sequence after contrast agent administration, and then displacement of the cranial nerve was evaluated. The 23 patients with posterior fossa tumor consisted of 12 schwannomas, eight meningiomas, and three cases of epidermoid. Except in the cases of epidermoid, intensity of all tumors increased on FIESTA imaging of the contrast enhancement. In the schwannoma cases, visualization of the nerve became poorer as the tumor increased in size. In cases of encapsulated meningioma, all the cranial nerves of the posterior fossa were depicted regardless of location. The ability to depict the nerves was also significantly higher in meningioma patients than in schwannoma patients (P<0.05). In cases of epidermoid, extension of the tumors was depicted clearly. Although the FIESTA sequence offers similar contrast to other heavily T2-weighted sequences, it facilitated a superior assessment of the effect of tumors on cranial nerve anatomy. FIESTA sequence was useful for preoperative simulations of posterior fossa tumors.

  8. Generalized sheath criterion for arbitrary degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we study the generalized sheath criterion for plasmas with an arbitrary degree of electron degeneracy and temperature, ranging from the classical dilute regime to the fully degenerate quantum plasmas. The latter may be relevant to warm dense matter and/or laboratory high energy density matter or even astrophysical stellar plasmas. The hydrostatic one dimensional model is used to establish the generalized Bohm's criterion for sheath entrance ion speed limits, and the small amplitude theory of the sheath problem, which accurately describes the sheath parameters for lower ion acoustic Mach numbers, is developed. Our results indicate that the sheath characteristic parameters such as electrostatic potential and density profiles, as well as the wall potential and the sheath length, are significantly affected by plasma parameters such as the ion and electron temperature and number densities in the plasma region. In particular, there are fundamental differences between sheath structures of the dilute classical plasmas and those of dense quantum ones.

  9. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CAVERNOUS SINUS SURGERY FOR MENINGIOMAS AND RESULTANT COMMON OPHTHALMIC COMPLICATIONS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHLAMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Cavernous sinus surgery is considered neurosurgically feasible. A systematic review of patients undergoing cavernous sinus procedures for meningioma was undertaken to determine whether cavernous sinus surgery could be performed with an acceptable level of iatrogenic-induced dysfunction. Methods Fifty-six patients undergoing 57 cavernous sinus surgical procedures performed by a single senior neurosurgeon were systematically evaluated to determine the consequences of surgery. Quantitative assessment of afferent (acuity, fields, pupil) and efferent function was stressed. Results Five of 20 patients (25%) with preoperative optic nerve dysfunction improved, but vision worsened in 6 (30%), including 4 (20%) whose vision deteriorated to no light perception. Four (11%) of 37 patients developed newly acquired optic neuropathy. No patients with preoperative third nerve palsies (19) cleared, although one improved. All 57 patients had evidence of some cranial nerve dysfunction (III, IV, V, or VI) immediately after surgery. Eight patients with long-term follow-up had complete sixth nerve palsies (7 preoperatively), and 4 had complete third nerve dysfunction (none in patients normal preoperatively). Nine (16%) had evidence of aberrant regeneration of the third nerve, and 12 (21%) developed neurotrophic keratitis. Conclusions Cavernous sinus surgery results in transient worsening of third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerve function. Cavernous sinus surgery carries a high risk of worsening ocular motor disorders and producing new ones. Preexisting cranial nerve dysfunction (other than optic nerve) rarely improves. Patients and physicians should be aware of the potential for ophthalmic complications in addition to the more generalized risks of neurosurgery (eg, cerebrospinal fluid leak, infection, stroke). PMID:18427624

  10. Chapter 2: Development of the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Suleyman; Odaci, Ersan; Unal, Bunyami; Sahin, Bunyamin; Fornaro, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Normal function of the peripheral nerve (PN) is based on morphological integrity and relationship between axons, Schwann cells, and connective sheaths, which depends on the correct development of all these components. Most of the relevant studies in this field were carried out using animal models, since reports on the development of the human PNs from the time of prenatal formation to postnatal development are limited as it is quite difficult to find many nerves in fetuses. In this review paper, we will address the main developmental stages of axons, Schwann cells, and connective tissue sheaths in PNs. Knowledge on the development of PNs and their main components is important for the study of nerve repair and regeneration. This knowledge can be helpful for designing innovative treatment strategies since, like with other organs, the development and regeneration processes share many biological features.

  11. Telomerase activity in human brain tumors: astrocytoma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-05-01

    Somatic cells do not have telomerase activity but immortalized cell lines and more than 85 % of the cancer cells show telomerase activation to prevent the telomere from progressive shortening. The activation of this enzyme has been found in a variety of human tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, but only few studies on telomerase activity in human brain tumors have been reported. Here, we evaluated telomerase activity in different grades of human astrocytoma and meningioma brain tumors. In this study, assay for telomerase activity performed on 50 eligible cases consisted of 26 meningioma, 24 astrocytoma according to the standard protocols. In the brain tissues, telomerase activity was positive in 39 (65 %) of 50 patients. One sample t test showed that the telomerase activity in meningioma and astrocytoma tumors was significantly positive entirely (P < 0.001). Also, grade I of meningioma and low grades of astrocytoma (grades I and II) significantly showed telomerase activity. According to our results, we suggest that activation of telomerase is an event that starts mostly at low grades of brain including meningioma and astrocytoma tumors.

  12. Microsurgical treatment of tentorial meningiomas: Report of 30 patients

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Tahara, Adriana; de Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tentorial meningiomas represent about 5% of intracranial meningiomas. This article reviews our recent institutional series of patients with tentorial meningiomas, proposes a simplified classification and analyzes postoperative evolution, discussing the salient features in the management of these patients. Methods: From 1998 to 2005, 30 patients (22 female and 8 male) with tentorial meningiomas were operated at our institution. Thirteen patients had tumor restricted to the infratentorial space; 12, to the supratentorial space; and in 5 cases, the tumor involved both compartments. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 8 years. A total of 35 surgical procedures were performed in 30 patients, where 26 procedures were performed through a single approach (2, ITSC; 10, RS; 5, SOIH; 5, ST; and 4, TT); and 9, through combined approaches (7, ITSC/ SOIH; and 2, RS/ST). Results: Simpson I resection was achieved in 17 patients. Tumors involving both compartments, involving the petrous sinus, and attached to the torcula limited complete resection. Twenty-two out of 30 patients were able to return to their regular life with no or minimal neurological sequelae. Most frequent complications in our series were shunt dependence, CSF fistulae, diffuse brain injury and visual field defects. Overall, our series revealed 3% mortality and 23% morbidity. Conclusion: Tentorial meningiomas are associated with significant morbidity related to the nervous and vascular structures surrounding the tumor. Partial tumor removal may be necessary in some cases. PMID:20847917

  13. Pediatric intraventricular meningioma: A series of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Chinmaya; Pasricha, Ribhav; Gurjar, Hitesh; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Meningiomas in children is a rare occurrence. Primary intraventricular meningiomas (IVMs) are even rarer with reported incidence of 0.5%–5% of all meningiomas. The aim of the study was to describe the demographic profile, location, surgical approach, complications, and histopathology of six pediatric patients with IVM. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all intraventricular tumors operated at our Institute from January 2010 till July 2015. Patients' clinical details and follow-up were obtained from hospital records and scans were obtained from picture archiving and communication system. Results: We found 6 pediatric patients (age ≤18 years) with histopathologically proven IVM. The mean age in this series was 14.6 years. Tumor was most commonly approached through the superior parietal lobule in this series. Gross total excision was achieved in all patients. The blood loss in the series was in the range of 600–2000 ml with a mean of 1100 ml. All were grade 1 meningioma on histopathological examination. Transitional meningioma was the most common histological subtype. None of the patients had a recurrence at last follow-up. Conclusions: Pediatric IVMs are rare tumors. They tend to have a male preponderance in contrast to adults which have a preference for females. Parietooccipital transcortical, transcallosal approach, middle/inferior temporal gyrus approach are the described techniques to tackle such tumors depending on the location of such tumors. Surgeons should watch out for massive blood loss during surgery, especially via the parietooccipital transcortical approach. PMID:27857785

  14. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  15. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, ERBB2 and KIT in adult soft tissue sarcomas: a clinicopathologic study of 281 cases. Cancer 103: 1881-90...TERMS miRNA microarrays, expression profiling, tissue microarrays Immunohistochemistry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...features of the transition of NF to MPNST (see 3rd annual report). We hypothesize that microRNA ( miRNA ) expression differences, as yet unstudied in

  16. Primary intraosseous atypical inflammatory meningioma presenting as a lytic skull lesion: Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Sangita; Agarwal, Swapnil; Khurana, Nita; Pandey, P N

    2016-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas of the skull comprise 1% of all meningiomas, and lytic skull meningiomas are still rarer and are said to be more aggressive. We present a case of 38-year-old male with an extradural tumor which on histopathological examination showed features of inflammatory atypical meningioma (WHO Grade II). The intense inflammatory nature of osteolytic primary intraosseous meningioma has not been reported before. This entity deserves special mention because of the need for adjuvant therapy and proper follow-up.

  17. Risk factors for meningiomas in men in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Preston-Martin, S; Yu, M C; Henderson, B E; Roberts, C

    1983-05-01

    A case-control study among men in Los Angeles County was conducted to investigate further the causes of intracranial meningiomas. Meningioma patients and a neighbor of each one were interviewed about past experiences that might be associated with tumor development. Analysis of information from the 105 matched pairs showed an association with meningioma occurrence for various factors relating to head trauma and head X-rays: 1) ever boxed as a sport [odds ratio (OR) = 2.0, P = 0.03], 2) had a serious head injury (OR = 1.9, P = 0.01), and 3) had X-ray treatment to the head before 20 years of age and/or had five or more full mouth dental X-ray series before 1945 (OR = 3.5, P = 0.02). Of the 105 subjects, 72 (69%) had a history of exposure to at least one of these factors.

  18. Meningioma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Akin, Erin Y; Baumgartner, Wes A; Lee, Jung Keun; Beasley, Michaela J

    2013-09-01

    A 17-yr-old female ovariectomized Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented dead on arrival to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The tiger was a resident of a sanctuary for big cats and had a history of juvenile-onset blindness of unknown cause. The tiger suffered two seizures the morning of presentation and expired shortly after resolution of the second seizure. Gross necropsy findings included a meningioma attached to the left frontal bone and associated with the left frontal lobe. Histologically, the mass was composed of meningothelial cells arising from the meninges, forming whorls and streams. Cells often formed syncytia and psammoma bodies were present. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, S100, and cytokeratin, but negative for GFAP. All findings were consistent with a meningioma. This is the first documentation of a meningioma in a Bengal tiger.

  19. Brachytherapy in the treatment of recurrent aggressive falcine meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Almefty, Kaith K; Abolfotoh, Mohammad; Arvold, Nils D; Devlin, Phillip M; Reardon, David A; Loeffler, Jay S; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent aggressive falcine meningiomas are uncommon tumors that recur despite receiving extensive surgery and radiation therapy (RT). We have utilized brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in two such patients with a unique implantation technique. Both patients had recurrence of WHO Grade II falcine meningiomas despite multiple prior surgical and RT treatments. Radioactive I-125 seeds were made into strands and sutured into a mesh implant, with 1 cm spacing, in a size appropriate to cover the cavity and region of susceptible falcine dura. Following resection the vicryl mesh was implanted and fixed to the margins of the falx. Implantation in this interhemispheric space provides good dose conformality with targeting of at-risk tissue and minimal radiation exposure to normal neural tissues. The patients are recurrence free 31 and 10 months after brachytherapy treatment. Brachytherapy was an effective salvage treatment for the recurrent aggressive falcine meningiomas in our two patients.

  20. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, A B; Shalit, M N; Cohen, M L; Zandbank, U; Reichenthal, E

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  1. Risk factors for meningiomas in men in Los Angeles County

    SciTech Connect

    Preston-Martin, S.; Yu, M.C.; Henderson, B.E.; Roberts, C.

    1983-05-01

    A case-control study among men in Los Angeles County was conducted to investigate further the causes of intracranial meningiomas. Meningioma patients and a neighbor of each one were interviewed about past experiences that might be associated with tumor development. Analysis of information from the 105 matched pairs showed an association with meningioma occurrence for various factors relating to head trauma and head X-rays: 1) ever boxed as a sport (odds ratio (OR) . 2.0, P . 0.03), 2) had a serious head injury (OR . 1.9, P . 0.01), and 3) had X-ray treatment to the head before 20 years of age and/or had five or more full mouth dental X-ray series before 1945 (OR . 3.5, P . 0.02). Of the 105 subjects, 72 (69%) had a history of exposure to at least one of these factors.

  2. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-07-15

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed.

  3. Meningiomas involving the anterior clinoid process.

    PubMed

    Risi, P; Uske, A; de Tribolet, N

    1994-01-01

    We report a series of 34 clinoidal meningiomas treated surgically and analyse the results according to cavernous sinus involvement. Fifteen tumours extended into the cavernous sinus. Only four of these could be resected completely, and global outcome was improved or stable in 10 cases. Overall, 20 tumours had a total resection and 14 had a partial resection. Complete removal of the sphenoid wing, including the anterior clinoid and part of the planum sphenoidale, allows early devascularization of the tumour and minimizes brain retraction when associated with resection of the zygomatic arch. The most frequent postoperative complication was transient CSF leak, occurring in three patients. Two patients died postoperatively, and three suffered permanent complications. There was no recurrence after total removal, but five patients showed signs of progressive tumour growth after partial removal, treated by radiotherapy in three and by surgery in two cases. Twenty patients showed preoperative visual impairment. Outcome of vision was improved or stable in 13 (68%) and worse in six cases (32%). We suggest that progressive visual impairment should lead to aggressive surgical treatment, especially when complete resection of cavernous sinus involvement can be performed.

  4. APOBEC3B expression in human leptomeninges and meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mahlon D.; Reeder, Jay E.; O'Connell, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-editing enzymes of the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme (APOBEC) family have been associated with somatic mutation in cancer. However, the role of APOBEC catalytic subunit 3B (APOBEC3B) editing in the pathogenesis of base substitutions in meningiomas is unknown. In the present study, the expression of APOBEC3B was examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analyses in five fetal and one adult human leptomeninges and 38 meningiomas. Genomic DNA was sequenced using the Illumina Tru-Seq Cancer Panel. Three meningioma primary cultures were also established and treated with cerebrospinal fluid form patients without neurological disease or platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), prior to evaluation of APOBEC3B expression. By western blotting, APOBEC3B was revealed to be present in 100% of the fetal leptomeninges, and in 88% of World Health Organization grade I, 100% of grade II and 83% of grade III meningiomas tested, but was not different between grades. RT-qPCR revealed no difference in the mRNA expression of APOBEC3B between grades. Sequencing revealed no elevated levels of the C>T mutations that are characteristic of APOBEC3B editing of genomic DNA. Treatment with cerebrospinal fluid and PDGF-BB had no effect on APOBEC3B protein expression in the leptomeningeal or meningioma cells. These findings suggest that the mutations associated with increased APOBEC3B expression may not be central to the pathogenesis of meningiomas. PMID:28101245

  5. O9.07COGNITIVE IMPROVEMENT AFTER MENINGIOMA SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Meskal, I.; Gehring, K.; van der Linden, S.; Rutten, G.-J.; Sitskoorn, M.

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of brain tumour patients has cognitive impairments. Most studies have focussed on patients with glioma. Meningioma patients have been infrequently studied; we found only seven studies in the literature. Most of these studies lack preoperative measurements, a priori limiting conclusions on the impact of surgery on cognition. We examined cognitive functioning in 100 meningioma patients prior to, and three months after surgery. This study is part of a larger and prospective study in our hospital in which craniotomy patients are routinely tested with a computerized screening battery of neuropsychological tests (i.e., CNS Vital Signs). Testing takes approximately 30 - 45 minutes and results in quantified scores on the domains of memory, psychomotor speed, reaction time, complex attention, cognitive flexibility, processing speed, and executive functioning. For this study we applied stringent exclusion criteria to minimize possible cognitive effects of comorbidity (eg, we excluded patients with a history of intracranial treatment or major neurological disease) and this left us with a group of 68 patients. Average diameter of meningioma was 4.3 cm. Both before and after surgery, meningioma patients showed significantly lower scores on all cognitive domains in comparison with healthy controls. Three months after surgery, significantly improved test performances were found on all cognitive domains, with the exception of psychomotor speed and reaction time. To gain insight in individual test performance, the number of patients scoring ‘low’ or ‘very low’ (i.e, 1.5 and 2 SD below average) was counted. The percentage of these patients decreased from 69% before surgery to 44% three months after surgery. We conclude that (1) cognitive impairments are already present in the majority of untreated meningioma patients, (2) surgery improves these impairments, and (3) a computerized test battery seems an adequate (and time-efficient) clinical instrument

  6. Intraosseous meningioma: a rare tumor reconstructed with porous polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Kucukyuruk, Baris; Biceroglu, Huseyin; Abuzayed, Bashar; Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Sanus, Galip Zihni

    2010-05-01

    A 45-year-old woman described the pain and the swelling at the left frontoparietal region. No significant findings were noted on physical examination, except a heterogeneous palpable lesion at the described region. Computed tomographic scan revealed an expansive bone lesion with homogeneous density, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed similar findings with no contrast enhancement. The lesion was totally resected, and cranioplasty with a porous polyethylene sheet (Medpor Biomaterial; Porex Surgical, Newnan, GA) was achieved. Histopathologic examination revealed an intraosseous meningioma. As far as we know, this case is the first case, in which total excision of the interosseous meningioma is followed by reconstruction with Medpor.

  7. Anterior clinoidal meningioma coincidental with bilateral intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulos, D; Magras, I; Balogiannis, I; Polyzoidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence of aneurysms and brain tumors is a rare occurrence. Coincidence is highest in patients with meningiomas rather than other types of tumors. We report a case in which a meningioma of the left anterior clinoid process was coexisting with a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. While the right MCA aneurysm was detected preoperatively, the left ACA aneurysm was not detectable, being concealed by the major finding of the region. This report focuses on pitfalls of diagnosis and questions the surgical planning in aneurysms concealed by coincidental brain tumors. PMID:24391419

  8. Anterior clinoidal meningioma coincidental with bilateral intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulos, D; Magras, I; Balogiannis, I; Polyzoidis, K

    2011-10-01

    Coexistence of aneurysms and brain tumors is a rare occurrence. Coincidence is highest in patients with meningiomas rather than other types of tumors. We report a case in which a meningioma of the left anterior clinoid process was coexisting with a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. While the right MCA aneurysm was detected preoperatively, the left ACA aneurysm was not detectable, being concealed by the major finding of the region. This report focuses on pitfalls of diagnosis and questions the surgical planning in aneurysms concealed by coincidental brain tumors.

  9. Incidental finding of meningioma on C11-PIB PET.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Jaeseung; Lee, Jae-Hong

    2012-02-01

    As a healthy volunteer for amyloid imaging study, a 83-year-old woman with no history of neurologic or psychiatric illness underwent carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) PET, which showed focal increased PIB binding in the right anterior temporal region. This focal PIB uptake turned out to be a mass lesion on MRI, which was consistent with a benign meningioma. This is the first case report on the incidentally found intracranial meningioma by PIB PET scan, highlighting the excellent sensitivity of PIB radiotracer in detecting brain amyloid deposition.

  10. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  11. Effects of melatonin on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2011-05-01

    In the available literature, there are thousands of studies on peripheral nerve regeneration using many nerves of several animals at different ages with various types of lesions and different methods of evaluation at certain time of follow-up. Despite many experimental data and clinical observations, there is still no ideal treatment method enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration. In clinical practice, various types of surgical nerve repair techniques do not frequently result in complete recovery due to neuroma formation, lipid peroxidative damage, ischemia and other factors. Recently, a number of neuroscientists demonstrated that pineal neurohormone melatonin (MLT) has an effect on the morphologic features of the nerve tissue, suggesting its neuroprotective, free radical scavenging, antioxidative, and analgesic effects in degenerative diseases of peripheral nerves. At present, it is widely accepted that MLT has a useful effect on axon length and sprouting after traumatic events to peripheral nerves. Our studies using various experimental injury models clearly suggest positive effects of MLT on the number of axons, thickness of myelin sheath by inhibition of collagen accumulation and neuroma formation following traumatic events to peripheral nerves, myelination of developing peripheral nerve after intrauterine ethanol exposure. Nevertheless, further experimental and randomized controlled clinical studies are vital to identify the clinical use of MLT hormone. This is an overview of recent patents and current literature in terms of the effects of MLT on peripheral nerve regeneration based on a critical analysis of electrophysiological, biochemical and light and electron microscopic findings, in addition to functional observations.

  12. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Review Date 6/1/2015 ...

  13. Gamma Knife radiosurgery of olfactory groove meningiomas provides a method to preserve subjective olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Gande, Abhiram; Kano, Hideyuki; Bowden, Gregory; Mousavi, Seyed H; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-02-01

    Anosmia is a common outcome after resection of olfactory groove meningioma(s) (OGM) and for some patients represents a significant disability. To evaluate long term tumor control rates and preservation of subjective olfaction after Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of OGM. We performed a retrospective chart review and telephone assessments of 41 patients who underwent GK SRS between 1987 and 2008. Clinical outcomes were stratified by full, partial or no subjective olfaction, whereas tumor control was assessed by changes in volume greater or lesser than 25%. The median clinical and imaging follow-up were 76 and 65 months, respectively. Prior to SRS, 19 (46%) patients had surgical resections and two (5%) had received fractionated radiation therapy. Twenty four patients (59%) reported a normal sense of smell, 12 (29%) reported a reduced sense of smell and five (12%) had complete anosmia. The median tumor volume was 8.5 cm(3) (range 0.6-56.1), the mean radiation dose at the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 10-20) and the median estimated dose to the olfactory nerve was 5.1 Gy (range 1.1-18.1). At follow-up, 27 patients (66%) reported intact olfaction (three (7%) described return to a normal sense of smell), nine (22%) described partial anosmia, and five (12%) had complete anosmia. No patient reported deterioration in olfaction after SRS. Thirteen patients (32%) showed significant tumor regression, 26 (63%) had no further growth and two (5%) had progressed. The progression free tumor control rates were 97% at 1 year and 95% at 2, 10 and 20 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in three (7%) patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery provided both long term tumor control and preservation of olfaction.

  14. The treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas: evolution of a modern approach.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Daniel R; Flores, Bruno C; Lewis, Jeremy J; Barnett, Samuel L

    2013-12-01

    Cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSMs) are challenging lesions for the skull base neurosurgeon to manage given their close association with cranial nerves II-VI and the internal carotid artery. In the 1980s and early 1990s, with advancements in microsurgical techniques, increasing knowledge of the relevant microsurgical neuroanatomy, and the advent of advanced skull base surgical approaches, the treatment of CSMs involved attempts at gross-total resection (GTR). Initial fervor for a surgical cure waned, however, as skull base neurosurgeons demonstrated the limits of complete resection in this region, the ongoing issue of potential tumor recurrences, and the unacceptably high cranial nerve and vascular morbidity associated with this strategy. The advent of radiosurgery and its documented success for tumor growth control and limited morbidity in cavernous lesions has helped to shift the treatment goals for CSMs from GTR to tumor control and symptom relief while minimizing treatment- and lesion-associated morbidity. The authors review the relevant microanatomy of the cavernous sinus with anatomical and radiographic correlates, as well as the various treatment options. A modernized, multimodality treatment algorithm to guide management of these lesions is proposed.

  15. Retrosigmoid approach for resection of petroclival meningioma.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Ambekar, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    This video describes the classic retrosigmoid approach for the resection of petroclival lesions. In this procedure, a careful dissection of the tumor within the arachnoid plane from the neurovascular structures is described. The key steps in the procedure are outlined, and include positioning, tumor devascularization, decompression, dissection from lower cranial nerves, IV, V cranial nerves and the VII-VIII complex and from the brainstem and closure of the dura, bone flap and the incision. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/DmutL7dBOxI .

  16. [Prognostic factors in elderly patient meningioma].

    PubMed

    Villalpando-Navarrete, Edgar; Rosas-Peralta, Víctor Hugo; Sandoval-Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: frecuentemente debe tomarse una decisión terapéutica para el manejo del meningioma en el paciente geriátrico. El presente estudio analiza factores pronósticos, así como la escala Clinical- Radiological Grading Score (CRGS) como auxiliar para la decisión terapéutica. Métodos: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo entre 2009 y 2010. La población estudiada fue de 28 pacientes mayores de 65 años de edad. Se analizaron factores clínicos, imagenológicos e histopatológicos. Se utilizó la prueba chi cuadrada y la exacta de Fisher para variables cuantitativas y U de Mann-Whitney para variables cualitativas. Resultados: la mortalidad global a los 3, 6 y 12 meses de seguimiento fue del 7.14, 10.71 y 14.28 %, respectivamente. El análisis reveló que el estado funcional con la escala de Karnofsky (p = 0.02), la localización de la lesión (p = 0.002), el grado de malignidad histopatológico (p = 0.038) y una puntuación menor de 10 en la escala CRGS (p = 0.003) se asocian con un mal pronóstico. Conclusión: el manejo neuroquirúrgico del paciente geriátrico es una posibilidad terapéutica con un pronóstico favorable en pacientes con una puntuación igual o mayor de 10 y en aquellos con un adecuado estado funcional.

  17. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981 ± 83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251 ± 32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p < 0.01). In addition, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were higher and distal motor latency values were lower in the Nanofiber conduit group compared to the Microfiber group. This study demonstrated the impact of fibre size on peripheral nerve regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs.

  18. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu protein expression in meningiomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are common slow-growing primary central nervous system tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid and spinal cord. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or HER2/neu (also known as c-erbB2) is a 185-kD transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity expressed in meningiomas and various other tumors. It can be used in targeted therapy for HER2/neu positive meningiomas. Aim: To correlate the expression of HER2/neu protein in meningiomas with gender, location, histological subtypes, and grade. Materials and Methods: It was 3½ years prospective (March 2010–October 2011) and retrospective (May 2008–February 2010) study of histopathologically diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal meningiomas. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the computerized hospital information system. Immunohistochemistry for HER2/neu protein was performed along with scoring. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to look for any association of HER2/neu with gender, location, grade, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas at 5% level of significance. Results: A total of 100 cases of meningiomas were found during the study period. Of which, 80 were Grade I, 18 were Grade II, and 2 were Grade III meningiomas as per the World Health Organization 2007 criteria. The female-male ratio was 1.9:1 and the mean age was 47.8 years. HER2/neu protein was expressed in 75% of Grade I and 72.2% of Grade II and none of Grade III meningiomas. About 72.7% brain invasive meningiomas showed HER2/neu immunopositivity. Conclusion: HER2/neu protein was expressed in 73% of meningiomas. Statistically significant difference of HER2/neu expression was not seen between females and males of Grade I and Grade II/III meningiomas, intracranial and spinal tumors, Grade I and Grade II/III cases, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas. PMID:27695231

  19. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  20. Thorotrast induced adhesive arachnoiditis associated with meningioma and schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M W; Powell, H C; Wagner, M; Niwayama, G

    1978-05-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis, a meningioma and a schwannoma were found at autopsy in a 56 year old man who had undergone Thorotrast myelography 33 years previously. Thorotrast was demonstrated in tissue sections by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, radioautography, and x-ray spectrometry.

  1. TERT Promoter Mutations and Risk of Recurrence in Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Felix; Schrimpf, Daniel; Olar, Adriana; Koelsche, Christian; Reuss, David; Bissel, Juliane; Kratz, Annekathrin; Capper, David; Schefzyk, Sebastian; Hielscher, Thomas; Wang, Qianghu; Sulman, Erik P; Adeberg, Sebastian; Koch, Arend; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Brehmer, Stefanie; Schittenhelm, Jens; Becker, Albert; Brokinkel, Benjamin; Schmidt, Melissa; Ull, Theresa; Gousias, Konstantinos; Kessler, Almuth Friederike; Lamszus, Katrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mawrin, Christian; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Simon, Matthias; Ketter, Ralf; Paulus, Werner; Aldape, Kenneth D; Herold-Mende, Christel; von Deimling, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification and grading system attempts to predict the clinical course of meningiomas based on morphological parameters. However, because of high interobserver variation of some criteria, more reliable prognostic markers are required. Here, we assessed the TERT promoter for mutations in the hotspot regions C228T and C250T in meningioma samples from 252 patients. Mutations were detected in 16 samples (6.4% across the cohort, 1.7%, 5.7%, and 20.0% of WHO grade I, II, and III cases, respectively). Data were analyzed by t test, Fisher's exact test, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazard model. All statistical tests were two-sided. Within a mean follow-up time in surviving patients of 68.1 months, TERT promoter mutations were statistically significantly associated with shorter time to progression (P < .001). Median time to progression among mutant cases was 10.1 months compared with 179.0 months among wild-type cases. Our results indicate that the inclusion of molecular data (ie, analysis of TERT promoter status) into a histologically and genetically integrated classification and grading system for meningiomas increases prognostic power. Consequently, we propose to incorporate the assessment of TERT promoter status in upcoming grading schemes for meningioma.

  2. Prolonged cerebral "luxury perfusion" after removal of a convexity meningioma.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L D; Selker, R G

    1979-04-01

    Following total removal of a convexity meningioma, serial computerized tomographic scans disclosed massive hemispheric contrast enhancement compatible with "luxury perfusion". Maximum enhancement occurred one month following the operation and resolved two months postoperatively. Luxury perfusion appeared to be associated with slowly resolving cerebral edema.

  3. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition: possible role in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Pecina-Slaus, Nives; Cicvara-Pecina, Tatjana; Kafka, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchimal transition (EMT) is a process involved in invasion and metastasis of tumors. The occurrence of EMT during tumor progression resembles the developmental scenario and sheds light on important mechanisms for the initial step of metastasis - invasion where noninvasive tumor cells acquire motility and ultimately disseminate to distant organs. The hallmark of EMT is the loss of expression of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The numerous reports by many authors as well as our own results indicate that E-cadherin plays a role in CNS tumors - meningiomas. Our studies showed that 73 % of meningiomas had downregulation of E-cadherin. Moreover, loss of heterozygosity of E-cadherin was observed in 32 % of meningiomas. Bound to E-cadherin in adherens junctions is beta-catenin, whose translocation to the nucleus is yet another molecular event involved in EMT. In our study beta-catenin was progressively upregulated from meningothelial to atypical, while 60 % of anaplastic meningiomas showed upregulation and nuclear localization of the protein. The elucidation of molecular mechanisms that govern EMT will offer new approaches and targets to restrain metastasis.

  4. Rectal carcinoid tumor metastasis to a skull base meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jennifer; Gupta, Amit; Badve, Chaitra; Cohen, Mark L; Wolansky, Leo J

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that most frequently develop in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs and have high potential for metastasis. Metastasis to the brain is rare, but to another intracranial tumor is extremely rare. Of the intracranial tumors, meningiomas are the most common to host metastases, which may be related to its rich vascularity and E-cadherin expression. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with active chemotherapy-treated neuroendocrine carcinoma who presented with left-sided facial numbness, headaches, and blurry vision. Initial imaging revealed a 1 cm irregular dural-based left petrous apex mass suggestive of a meningioma that was re-imaged four months later as a rapidly enlarging, extra-axial, mass extending into the cavernous sinus, effacing Meckel’s cave that resembled a trigeminal schwannoma. Pathology revealed a carcinoid tumor metastatic to meningioma. While the mass displayed characteristic imaging findings of a schwannoma, rapid growth in the setting of known active malignancy should prompt the clinician to consider mixed pathology from metastatic disease or a more aggressive meningioma. PMID:26825133

  5. Dental X-rays and Risk of Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Elizabeth B.; Calvocoressi, Lisa; Bondy, Melissa L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wrensch, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Context Ionizing radiation is a consistently identified and potentially modifiable risk factor for meningioma, the most frequently reported primary brain tumor in the United States. Objective To examine the association between dental x-rays, the most common artificial source of ionizing radiation, and risk of intra-cranial meningioma. Design and Setting Population-based case-control study design. Participants The study includes 1433 intra-cranial meningioma cases aged 29-79 years diagnosed among residents of the states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, North Carolina, the San Francisco Bay Area and eight Houston, Texas counties between May 1, 2006 and April 28, 2011 and 1350 controls that were frequency-matched on age, sex and geography. Main Outcome Measure The association of intra-cranial meningioma diagnosis with self-report of bitewing, full-mouth, and panorex dental x-rays. Results Over a lifetime, cases were more than twice (Odds ratio (OR) = 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-2.9) as likely as controls to report having ever had a bitewing exam. Regardless of the age at which the films were received, persons who reported receiving bitewing films on a yearly or greater frequency had an elevated risk with odds ratios of 1.4 (95%CI: 1.0-1.8), 1.6 (95%CI: 1.2-2.0), 1.9 (95%CI: 1.4-2.6), and 1.5 (95%CI: 1.1-2.0) for ages <10, 10-19, 20-49, and 50+ years, respectively. Increased risk of meningioma was also associated with panorex films taken at a young age or on a yearly or greater frequency with persons reporting receiving such films under the age of 10 years at 4.9 times (95%CI: 1.8-13.2) increased risk of meningioma. No association was appreciated with location of tumor above or below the tentorium. Conclusion Exposure to some dental x-rays performed in the past, when radiation exposure was greater than in the current era, appears to be associated with increased risk of intra-cranial meningioma. As with all sources of artificial ionizing radiation, considered

  6. Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Meningioma: The Effect of Gender

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Elizabeth B.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Calvocoressi, Lisa; Bondy, Melissa L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of studies have reported on the association between smoking and meningioma risk, with inconsistent findings. We examined the effect of gender on the association between cigarette smoking and risk of intra-cranial meningioma in a large population-based, case-control study. Methods The data includes 1433 intra-cranial meningioma cases aged 29–79 years diagnosed among residents of the states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, North Carolina, the San Francisco Bay Area and eight Texas counties between May 1, 2006 and April 28, 2011 and 1349 controls that were frequency-matched on age, sex and geography. The data are analyzed separately and in a meta-analysis with six previously reported studies. Results Female cases who reported having ever smoked were at significantly decreased risk of intra-cranial meningioma (Odds ratio (OR) = 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7–0.9) in contrast to male cases who were at increased risk (OR:1.3, 95%CI: 1.0–1.7). Similar findings were noted for current and past smokers. Smoking-induced risk for females did not vary by menopausal status. For males, increased duration of use (p = 0.04) as well as increasing number of pack-years (p = 0.02) was associated with elevated risk. A meta-analysis including 2614 cases and 1,179,686 controls resulted in an OR for ever smoking of 0.82 (95%CI: 0.68–0.98) for women and 1.39 (95%CI: 1.08–1.79) for men. Conclusion The association of cigarette smoking and meningioma case status varies significantly by gender with women at reduced risk and men at greater risk. Impact Whether the observed differences are associated with a hormonal etiology will require additional investigation. PMID:22473761

  7. Emergency decompressive craniectomy after removal of convexity meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Domenicucci, Maurizio; Paolini, Sergio; Mancarella, Cristina; Tola, Serena; D’Elia, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Seferi, Arsen; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Convexity meningiomas are benign brain tumors that are amenable to complete surgical resection and are associated with a low complication rate. The aim of this study was to identify factors that result in acute postoperative neurological worsening after the removal of convexity meningiomas. Methods: Clinical evaluation and neuroradiological analysis of patients who underwent removal of a supratentorial convexity meningioma were reviewed. Patients were selected when their postoperative course was complicated by acute neurological deterioration requiring decompressive craniectomy. Results: Six patients (mean age: 43.3 years) underwent surgical removal of a supratentorial convexity meningioma. Brain shift (mean: 9.9 mm) was evident on preoperative imaging due to lesions of varying size and perilesional edema. At various times postoperatively, patient consciousness worsened (up to decerebrate posture) with contralateral paresis and pupillary anisocoria. Computed tomography revealed no postoperative hematoma, however, did indicate increased brain edema and ventricular shift (mean: 12 mm). Emergency decompressive craniectomy and brief ventilator assistance were performed in all patients. Ischemia of the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery occurred in 3 patients and hydrocephalus occurred in 2 patients. Outcome was good in 2, fair in 2, 1 patient had severe disability, and 1 patient died after 8 months. Conclusions: Brain shift on preoperative imaging is a substantial risk factor for postoperative neurological worsening in young adult patients after the removal of convexity meningiomas. Emergency decompressive craniectomy must be considered because it is effective in most cases. Other than consciousness impairment, there is no reliable clinical landmark to guide the decision to perform decompressive craniectomy; however, brain ischemia may have already occurred. PMID:27857859

  8. Expression and clinical value of EGFR in human meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Backer-Grøndahl, Thomas; Ytterhus, Borgny; Granli, Unn S.; Lydersen, Stian; Gulati, Sasha; Torp, Sverre H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors in humans that frequently recur despite having a predominantly benign nature. Even though these tumors have been shown to commonly express EGFR/c-erbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor), results from previous studies are uncertain regarding the expression of either intracellular or extracellular domains, cellular localization, activation state, relations to malignancy grade, and prognosis. Aims This study was designed to investigate the expression of the intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR and of the activated receptor as well as its ligands EGF and TGFα in a large series of meningiomas with long follow-up data, and investigate if there exists an association between antibody expression and clinical and histological data. Methods A series of 186 meningiomas consecutively operated within a 10-year period was included. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemically analyzed with antibodies targeting intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR, phosphorylated receptor, and EGF and TGFα. Expression levels were recorded as a staining index (SI). Results Positive immunoreactivity was observed for all antibodies in most cases. There was in general high SIs for the intracellular domain of EGFR, phosphorylated EGFR, EGF, and TGFα but lower for the extracellular domain. Normal meninges were negative for all antibodies. Higher SIs for the phosphorylated EGFR were observed in grade II tumors compared with grade I (p = 0.018). Survival or recurrence was significantly decreased in the time to recurrence analysis (TTR) with high SI-scores of the extracellular domain in a univariable survival analysis (HR 1.152, CI (1.036–1.280, p = 0.009)). This was not significant in a multivariable analysis. Expression of the other antigens did not affect survival. Conclusion EGFR is overexpressed and in an activated state in human meningiomas. High levels of ligands also support this growth factor

  9. Preliminary Results of Helical Tomotherapy in Patients with Complex-Shaped Meningiomas Close to the Optic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Schiappacasse, Luis Cendales, Ricardo; Sallabanda, Kita; Schnitman, Franco; Samblas, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common benign intracranial tumor. Meningiomas close to the optic pathway represent a treatment challenge both for surgery and radiotherapy. The aim of this article is to describe early results of helical tomotherapy treatment in complex-shaped meningiomas close to the optic pathway. Twenty-eight patients were consecutively treated. All patients were immobilized with a thermoplastic head mask and planned with the aid of a magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion. All treatments included daily image guidance. Pretreatment symptoms and acute toxicity were recorded. Median age was 57.5 years, and 92.8% patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status scale {<=}1. The most common localizations were the sella turcica, followed by the cavernous sinus and the sphenoid. The most common symptoms were derived from cranial nerve deficits. Tomotherapy was administered as primary treatment in 35.7% of patients, as an adjuvant treatment in 32.4%, and as a rescue treatment after postsurgical progression in 32.1% patients. Most patients were either inoperable or Simpson IV. Total dose varied between 5000 and 5400 cGy; fractionation varied between 180 and 200 cGy. Median dose to the planning target volume was 51.7 Gy (range, 50.2-55.9 Gy). Median coverage index was 0.89 (range, 0.18-0.97). Median homogeneity index was 1.05 (range, 1-1.12). Acute transient toxicity was grade 1 and included headache in 35.7% patients, ocular pain/dryness in 28.5%, and radiation dermatitis in 25%. Thus far, with a maximal follow-up of 3 years, no late effects have been seen and all patients have a radiological stabilization of the disease. Helical tomotherapy offered a safe and effective therapeutic alternative for patients with inoperable or subtotally resected complex-shaped meningiomas close to the optic pathway. Acceptable coverage and homogeneity indexes were achieved with appropriate values for maximal doses delivered to the eyes, lenses

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Meningiomas for the Identification of Surrogate Protein Markers

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Samridhi; Ray, Sandipan; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Sridhar, Epari; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common non-glial tumors of the brain and spine. Pathophysiology and definite histological grading of meningiomas are frequently found to be deceptive due to their unusual morphological features and locations. Here for the first time we report a comprehensive serum proteomic analysis of different grades of meningiomas by using multiple quantitative proteomic and immunoassay-based approaches to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and identify grade specific protein signatures. In silico functional analysis revealed modulation of different vital physiological pathways including complement and coagulation cascades, metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins, immune signaling, cell growth and apoptosis and integrin signaling in meningiomas. ROC curve analysis demonstrated apolipoprotein E and A-I and hemopexin as efficient predictors for meningiomas. Identified proteins like vimentin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein B and A-I and antithrombin-III, which exhibited a sequential increase in different malignancy grades of meningiomas, could serve as potential predictive markers. PMID:25413266

  11. Clinicopathologic correlation of retinal to choroidal venous collaterals of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Green, W R; Talamo, J H; Hoyt, W F; Johnson, R N; McDonald, H R

    1991-08-01

    An optic nerve meningioma developed in an elderly woman and was followed for 13 years until her death. The optic nerve was initially normal. Over time it became swollen and then atrophic and developed retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals. Five hundred serial sections were prepared through the optic nerve and for approximately 1.5 mm superiorly and inferiorly to the optic nerve to trace the course of the collaterals that were seen ophthalmoscopically and angiographically in the optic nerve head. This clinicopathologic study shows clearly that the abnormal channels are, in fact, retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals (bypass channels). Four collaterals extended around the end of Bruch's membrane at the optic nerve head. Two more collaterals extended through the retinal pigment epithelium to become continuous with a subretinal pigment epithelial neovascular membrane, the vessels of which connected with the choroidal vessels through a defect in Bruch's membrane.

  12. Interactions of Glial Proteins from the Regenerating Goldfish (C. auratus) Optic Nerve with Retinotectal Axons,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    regenerating goldfish optic nerve with retinotectal.. 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Michael A. Deaton, Susan E. Bock, and John A. Freeman 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...nerve sheath cells during development. Soc Neurosci 1983; 9: Abstr No. 17.33. 26. Ignatius MJ, Gebicke- Harter PJ, Skene JHP, Schilling JW, Weisgraber

  13. Case report: late aggressive meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, M E; Drumea, K; Guilbord, J N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Kuten, A

    1995-10-01

    The clinical, radiological and pathological findings in a 28-year-old female patient who developed aggressive meningioma 20 years after prophylatic cranial irradiation (PCI) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are described here. Only four cases of late atypical/aggressive meningioma following PCI were detected in a thorough search of the literature. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and PCI, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumour, including aggressive meningioma.

  14. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    SciTech Connect

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  15. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    DOE PAGES

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; ...

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperaturemore » plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.« less

  16. The Anatomic Relationship of the Tibial Nerve to the Common Peroneal Nerve in the Popliteal Fossa: Implications for Selective Tibial Nerve Block in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Eric R.; Vydyanathan, Amaresh; Gritsenko, Karina; Shaparin, Naum; Singh, Nair; Downie, Sherry A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. A recently described selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease presents a viable alternative to sciatic nerve block for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In this two-part investigation, we describe the effects of a tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease. Methods. In embalmed cadavers, after the ultrasound-guided dye injection the dissection revealed proximal spread of dye within the paraneural sheath. Consequentially, in the clinical study twenty patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty received the ultrasound-guided selective tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease, which also resulted in proximal spread of local anesthetic. A sensorimotor exam was performed to monitor the effect on the peroneal nerve. Results. In the cadaver study, dye was observed to spread proximal in the paraneural sheath to reach the sciatic nerve. In the clinical observational study, local anesthetic was observed to spread a mean of 4.7 + 1.9 (SD) cm proximal to popliteal crease. A negative correlation was found between the excess spread of local anesthetic and bifurcation distance. Conclusions. There is significant proximal spread of local anesthetic following tibial nerve block at the popliteal crease with possibility of the undesirable motor blocks of the peroneal nerve. PMID:28260964

  17. Xanthomatous posterior pyramid meningioma in a 2-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Germanò, A; Galatioto, S; La Rosa, G; Caffo, M; Cardia, E

    1997-07-01

    Meningiomas are common lesions in adults but unusual in infancy and meningiomas located in the posterior cranial fossa are even more rare. Metaplastic changes of meningothelial meningiomas can lead to the rarely observed xanthomatous form. We describe the case of a posterior pyramid xanthomatous meningioma in a 2-year-old girl. After detailed neuroradiological evaluation, the histological diagnosis was confirmed with the aid of immunohistochemical evaluation. A critical case evaluation in the light of the more recent literature, the surgical strategy and technique, and an immunohistological hypothesis are reported.

  18. The Contemporary Role of Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common intracranial tumors in adults. The mainstay of treatment has been extirpation. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important option in the management of inaccessible, recurrent, or residual benign meningiomas. Image guidance and a steep dose fall off are critical features. SRS offers durable tumor control for grade I meningiomas with a low incidence of complications or neurologic deficits. Neurologic function is generally preserved or improved. Complications are relatively rare. For many, the risk to benefit ratio seems favorable compared with treatment alternatives. We present a short review of the literature on SRS for intracranial meningiomas.

  19. Radiographic Pearls in the Evaluation of an Extradural Thoracic Meningioma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nakhla, Jonathan P; Yassari, Reza; Kinon, Merritt D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common of adult spinal tumors. Spinal meningiomas account for up to 45% of all intradural spinal tumors in adults and up to 25% of all spinal tumors. While spinal meningiomas are traditionally classified as intradural lesions, up to 14% may have an extradural component. Preoperative evaluation and directed use of imaging techniques are key in these rare but observed cases, to accurately diagnose and direct therapy. In this report, the authors present a case of a 61-year-old female with an incidentally found, exclusively extradural thoracic meningioma treated with surgical resection, highlighting key radiographic pearls in the evaluation of these uncommon lesions. PMID:28357163

  20. Increased expression of the immune modulatory molecule PD-L1 (CD274) in anaplastic meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ziming; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Aizer, Ayal A.; McHenry, Allison R.; Sun, Heather H.; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Viramontes, Omar; Machaidze, Revaz; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Reardon, David A.; Dunn, Ian F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ligon, Keith L.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Alexander, Brian M.; Agar, Nathalie Y.; Rodig, Scott J.; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Santagata, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    There are no effective medical treatments for WHO grade III (anaplastic) meningioma. Patients with this high-grade malignancy have a median survival of less than two years. Therapeutics that modulate the mechanisms that inhibit local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are showing significant and durable clinical responses in patients with treatment refractory high-grade tumors. We examined the immune infiltrate of 291 meningiomas including WHO grade I-III meningiomas using immunohistochemistry and we examined the expression of PD-L1 mRNA by RNAscope in situ hybridization and PD-L1 protein by immunohistochemistry. In meningioma, the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are predominantly T cells. In anaplastic meningioma, there is a sharp decrease in the number of T cells, including the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and cells expressing PD-1 and there is also an increase in the number of FOXP3 expressing immunoregulatory (Treg) cells. PD-L1 expression is increased in anaplastic meningioma – both mRNA and protein. Using patient derived meningioma cell, we confirm that PD-L1 is expressed in meningioma cells themselves, and not solely in infiltrating immune cells. This work indicates that high-grade meningioma harbor an immunosuppressive tumor microenviroment and that increased Treg cells and elevated PD-L1 may contribute to the aggressive phenotype of these tumors. PMID:25609200

  1. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  2. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  3. Rectus sheath abscess after laparoscopic appendicectomy

    PubMed Central

    Golash, Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Port site wound infection, abdominal wall hematoma and intraabdominal abscess formation has been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. We describe here a rectus sheath abscess which occurred three weeks after the laparoscopic appendicectomy. It was most likely the result of secondary infection of the rectus sheath hematoma due to bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the inferior epigastric arteries or a direct tear of the rectus muscle. As far as we are aware this complication has not been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:21124654

  4. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. The onset and rate of myelination in six peripheral and autonomic nerves of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, K; Friede, R L

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was carried out of the numbers of myelinated fibres in 6 nerves of the rat for 7 age groups from birth to 73 weeks. The hypoglossal nerve and the mandibular branch of the facial nerve had short and early myelination periods, essentially complete by the second week. The glossopharyngeal nerve and the sympathetic rami communicantes myelinated late and over a protracted period. Myelination of the rami communicantes continued up to 20 weeks, followed by a marked loss of fibres in the 73 week animals. Intercostal and saphenous nerves had intermediary patterns. There was evidence of subpopulations myelinating at different times. Measurements of myelin sheath thickness showed variations of relative sheath thickness with age, between nerves and for subpopulations of nerves. Late myelination corresponded to relatively thin myelin sheaths. Statistical two-stage-density cluster analysis by computer was used for analysing complex fibre populations. The developmental changes of three subpopulations of the intercostal nerve are documented. Nerves also differed in their rates of axon growth. The increment in axon calibre was small and late for sympathetic fibres. Intercostal and facial nerve fibres had rapid axon growth with different growth rates for subpopulations. PMID:3248966

  6. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  7. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  8. Carotid sheath haematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jayanthi; Badkur, D S; Arora, Arneet

    2009-10-01

    Carotid sheath haematoma is a rare finding, sometimes the only injury found in cases of manual strangulation without any associated external or internal injury to the neck. One such rare case is reported in an 8 year old female victim where presence of carotid sheath haematoma not only helped to ascertain the cause of death but also helped in the reconstruction of mechanism of infliction of force on the neck.

  9. Lipoma arborescens of the biceps tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    White, Eric A; Omid, Reza; Matcuk, George R; Domzalski, Jerome T; Fedenko, Alexander N; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Forrester, Deborah M; Patel, Dakshesh B

    2013-10-01

    Lipoma arborescens, described as lipomatous infiltration and distention of synovial villi resulting in a frond-like appearance, most frequently affects the suprapatellar recess of the knee. While there have been reports of this entity involving the upper extremity joints, bursa, and tendon sheaths, we present the first reported case of lipoma arborescens isolated to the biceps tendon sheath. We describe imaging and histologic findings with clinical correlation.

  10. Intraventricular lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Bo; Wang, Wen-Jun; Xu, Song-Bai; Xu, Bao-Feng; Yu, Ying; Ma, Hongxi; Zhang, Xian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma (LPM) is one of the rarest variants of meningioma and those LPMs that arise in the intraventricular space are even rarer. LPMs are classified as grade I (benign) tumors with a low proliferative rate and diagnosis is made through the histological identification of high numbers of inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and plasma cells) in the resected tumor tissue. In the current case, magnetic resonance imaging of a 37-year-old woman who presented at our neurosurgery department following a generalized tonic-clonic seizure revealed a partially mortified intraventricular mass, which had caused pronounced peritumoral edema and had a relatively rough surface. Surgical resection was performed. Histological analysis revealed large numbers of inflammatory cells, confirming the diagnosis of LPM, but also indicated that the lesion was positive for the proliferation marker Ki-67. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging 3 months after surgery revealed no residual tumor or recurrence.

  11. Occupational risks for meningiomas of the CNS in Sweden.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J K; Thomas, T L; Stone, B J; Blot, W J; Malker, H S; Wiener, J A; Ericsson, J L; Malker, B K

    1987-01-01

    Using the Cancer-Environment Registry of Sweden, which links cancer incidence (1961 to 1979) with census information (1960) for all employed individuals in Sweden, a systematic, population-based assessment was made of the occurrence of meningiomas of the CNS according to industrial and occupational classifications. Statistically significant standardized incidence ratios (SIR) between 5 and 6 for meningioma were observed among glass, porcelain, or ceramic workers of both sexes. SIRs of similar magnitude were also found for men employed in the headwear fabrication and book publishing industries. Significantly elevated two- to three-fold risks were observed for men employed in health care, railroad and trolley construction, sheet and plate metal fabrication, and as moving equipment operators. Some of the findings of this descriptive survey may have arisen as a result of multiple comparisons, but several are consistent with earlier observations for brain cancer from other countries and deserve further study.

  12. Radiation Treatment for WHO Grade II and III Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Brastianos, Priscilla K; Loeffler, Jay S

    2013-09-02

    The treatment of meningiomas is tailored to their histological grade. While World Health Organization (WHO) grade I lesions can be treated with either surgery or external beam radiation, WHO Grade II and III lesions often require a combination of the two modalities. For these high-grade lesions, conventional external beam radiation is delivered to either the residual tumor or the surgical resection margin. The optimal timing of radiation, either immediately following surgical resection or at the time of recurrence, is yet to be determined. Additionally, another method of radiation delivery, brachytherapy, can be administered locally at the time of surgery for recurrent lesions. Altogether, the complex nature of WHO grade II and III meningiomas requires careful treatment planning and delivery by a multidisciplinary team.

  13. Gene expression profiles of metabolic aggressiveness and tumor recurrence in benign meningioma.

    PubMed

    Serna, Eva; Morales, José Manuel; Mata, Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, José; San Miguel, Teresa; Gil-Benso, Rosario; Lopez-Gines, Concha; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Around 20% of meningiomas histologically benign may be clinically aggressive and recur. This strongly affects management of meningioma patients. There is a need to evaluate the potential aggressiveness of an individual meningioma. Additional criteria for better classification of meningiomas will improve clinical decisions as well as patient follow up strategy after surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between gene expression profiles and new metabolic subgroups of benign meningioma with potential clinical relevance. Forty benign and fourteen atypical meningioma tissue samples were included in the study. We obtained metabolic profiles by NMR and recurrence after surgery information for all of them. We measured gene expression by oligonucleotide microarray measurements on 19 of them. To our knowledge, this is the first time that distinct gene expression profiles are reported for benign meningioma molecular subgroups with clinical correlation. Our results show that metabolic aggressiveness in otherwise histological benign meningioma proceeds mostly through alterations in the expression of genes involved in the regulation of transcription, mainly the LMO3 gene. Genes involved in tumor metabolism, like IGF1R, are also differentially expressed in those meningioma subgroups with higher rates of membrane turnover, higher energy demand and increased resistance to apoptosis. These new subgroups of benign meningiomas exhibit different rates of recurrence. This work shows that benign meningioma with metabolic aggressiveness constitute a subgroup of potentially recurrent tumors in which alterations in genes regulating critical features of aggressiveness, like increased angiogenesis or cell invasion, are still no predominant. The determination of these gene expression biosignatures may allow the early detection of clinically aggressive tumors.

  14. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  15. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  16. Dust particle dynamics in magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, the structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated, and dynamics of a dust particle embedded in the sheath is elaborated. To simulate the sheath, a weakly collisional two-fluid model is implemented. For various magnitudes and directions of the magnetic field and chamber pressures, different plasma parameters including the electron and ion densities, ion flow velocity, and electric potential are calculated. A complete set of forces acting on the dust particle originating from the electric field in the sheath, the static magnetic field, gravity, and ion and neutral drags is taken into account. Through the trapping potential energy, the particle stable and unstable equilibria are studied while the particle is stationary inside the sheath. Other features such as the possibility of the dust levitation and trapping in the sheath, and the effect of the Lorentz force on the charged dust particle motion are also examined. An interesting feature is captured for the variation of the particle charge as a function of the magnetic field magnitude.

  17. Combinatorial Therapy Approaches for NF2-Deficient Meningiomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    compounds, an inhibitor targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR ( Everolimus ), 2 inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth...the inhibitors: Everolimus , Gleevec, Sunitinib and Tandutinib are promising for potential for therapeutic treatments of NF2 mutant meningioma cells...tumorigenic in Athymic nude mice (Figure 4C). The drugs Everolimus and Gleevec, selected on Taks#1 were chosen to begin the preclinical testing

  18. Combinatorial Therapy Approaches for NF2-Deficient Meningiomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    a firefly Luciferase construct, under the control of the spleen focus forming virus promoter, via lentiviral transfection, as previously described...Platform (SARRP) to precisely deliver localized radiation to xenografts. Briefly, NF2 mutant meningioma cells were implanted orthotopically into...an in-house developed precision small animal radiation device (Wong, J et al, 2008). This technology is capable of delivery of high intensity and

  19. An Osteolytic Meningioma en Plaque of the Sphenoid Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin-Uk; Yoo, Jae-Chul

    2008-01-01

    Meningioma en plaque (MEP) is a rare tumor characterized more by its clinical and biological behavior than its histological appearance. Hyperostosis of the skull is one of the characteristic signs of MEP. This bony change can produce clinical symptoms and signs in MEP by pressing against adjacent structures. The authors report a rare case of an osteolytic MEP extending from the sphenoid wing into the orbital wall, middle fossa, and temporalis muscle. PMID:19096543

  20. Rosai-Dorfman disease mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manish S; Padua, Michelle De; Jha, Ajaya N

    2005-03-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with a single generalized tonic-clonic seizure. MRI revealed an enhancing, dural-based, left lateral sphenoid wing lesion suggestive of a meningioma. At microsurgical excision, the lesion was firm and relatively avascular. The histopathological report revealed S-100 positive histiocytic proliferation with lymphophagocytosis (emperipolesis) characteristic of the Rosai-Dorfman disease. The case and its management are discussed.

  1. MR imaging of primary tumors of trigeminal nerve and Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Yuh, W T; Wright, D C; Barloon, T J; Schultz, D H; Sato, Y; Cervantes, C A

    1988-09-01

    MR imaging features of 11 primary tumors of the trigeminal nerve and Meckel's cave were analyzed. The tumors consisted of two trigeminal schwannomas, five meningiomas, one lipoma, and three epidermoid tumors. The trigeminal schwannomas had homogeneously decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Three of the five meningiomas had signal intensity similar to that of surrounding brain on both T1- and T2-weighted images. One meningioma had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The other had relatively low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images owing to heavy calcification demonstrated on CT. The lipoma had homogeneous signal intensity that was isointense with orbital and subcutaneous fat on both T1- and T2-weighted images. The epidermoid tumors had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and markedly increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In addition, the epidermoids had an insinuating growth pattern and minimal mass effect. The extent of involvement in the trigeminal nerve distribution was well demonstrated in each case. Because of its multiplanar capability, exquisite anatomic detail, and characteristic tissue signal intensity, we conclude that MR is helpful in the differential diagnosis of primary tumors of the trigeminal nerve and Meckel's cave and in the evaluation of tumor involvement for preoperative planning.

  2. Infiltrated Embolization of Meningioma with Dilute Cyanoacrylate Glue

    PubMed Central

    OHNISHI, Hiroyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru; MURAO, Kenichi; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; TAKAHASHI, Kenkichi; OHNISHI, Hideyuki; KUROIWA, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    We describe the efficacy and technical aspects of infiltrated preoperative embolization of meningioma by penetration of very dilute glue. In this method, a 13% n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-lipiodol mixture is injected extremely slowly from the middle meningeal artery (MMA) in a similar manner to plug and push injection of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer mixed with tantalum and dimethyl sulfoxide (Onyx®) after the tortuous side feeders are proximally embolized. The glue is infiltrated into small tumor arteries and extends to inaccessible feeders from deep meningeal arteries. Since 2011, we have used this technique in the embolization of 32 cases preoperatively diagnosed with meningioma. Intratumoral embolization was possible in 30 cases (94%), and a greater than 50% reduction in contrast area of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging (T1-WI) was achieved in 18 cases (56%). Two cases achieved complete devascularization, showing a remarkable shrinkage in tumor size after embolization. If excessive reflux of embolization and the resulting migration of glue into normal arteries is achieved, this method provides extremely effective devascularization on surgical extirpation. It might also be applicable to surgically untreatable meningiomas as a semi-radical treatment option. PMID:27646010

  3. What Is It? A Rare Presentation of a Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Connor; Harrington, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary extracranial meningiomas are rare manifestations of a central nervous system tumor. This article presents a case study of a soft-tissue primary extracranial tumor in the temporal region that was initially diagnosed as melanoma at an outside institution and whose definitive diagnosis proved difficult prior to successful excision. Methods: Temporal muscle biopsy, ultrasound-guided biopsy, and computed tomography were conducted at an outside institution prior to the patient's presentation to our care. Upon presenting to our institution a positron emission tomographic scan was then conducted prior to excision. After excision, the mass was sent to pathology and further immunohistochemistry was conducted. To ensure the mass was completely excised, magnetic resonance imaging was performed after its removal. Results: A 3 × 3-cm mass was excised in its entirety from the patient's temporal region and sent to pathology for immunohistochemistry and mutation testing. It proved to have the most common mutation for a primary extracranial meningioma, a neurofibromatosis type 2 frameshift. Conclusion: The presentation of a primary extracranial meningioma in the temporal region is a rare finding. Because of its slow-growing nature and generally asymptomatic presentation, it can be misdiagnosed. Utilization of radiological imaging is essential both pre- and postoperatively in order for its identification and complete excision. PMID:28101291

  4. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  5. Meningiomas in children: A study of 18 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nirav; Bhagwati, Sanat; Parulekar, Geeta

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intracranial meningiomas are rare tumors in children accounting for 0.4-4.6% of all primary brain tumors in the age group of 0-18 years. Objective: To retrospectively analyze the epidemiological profile, clinical features, radiological findings, type of excision, histopathological findings, and overall management profile of these patients. Materials and Methods: Eighteen consecutive cases of meningioma in patients under 18 years of age admitted and operated at our institute between the years 1974-2005 were included in this study. Results: The mean age of patient at presentation to our hospital was 12.81 years. The male to female ratio was 1.57:1. The median preoperative duration of symptoms was 1.2 years. An increased incidence was seen in patients with neurofibromatosis. Intraventricular and skull base locations were common. Total tumor excision was achieved in all cases. Conclusion: A higher incidence of atypical and aggressive meningiomas is seen in children. Children with complete resection and a typical benign histology have a good prognosis. PMID:21887184

  6. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  7. Subtle clinical signs of a meningioma in an adult: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common brain tumor in the adult population. This case report describes the epidemiology, the clinical presentation as well as the current treatment options for this condition. Case presentation A 49 year-old man attended a chiropractic clinic with non-specific chronic low back pain. Upon the history taking and the systems review, he reported a loss of both smell and taste for which investigations conducted by two different otolaryngologists did not yield a specific diagnosis. The patient was referred to a neurologist who ordered a computer tomography scan that eventually revealed a compression brain tumor. Brain tumors can produce a large variety of clinical presentations, such as upper motor neuron lesion symptoms, altered consciousness or vital functions which are easy to identify. However, subtle signs, such as those presented in this case, can be neglected. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of uncommon clinical presentations including cranial nerve or neurological dysfunction and refer their patient to a specialist when detected. PMID:24490991

  8. Corneal edema induced by cold in trigeminal nerve palsy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorgaard, G.L.; Holland, E.J.; Krachmer, J.H.

    1987-05-15

    We examined a 34-year-old man who complained of decreased visual acuity in the right eye when exposed to cold environmental temperatures. Although examination at room temperature was unremarkable, he developed prominent unilateral corneal edema of the right eye when placed in a cold room at 4 C. Corneal thickness increased from 525 to 789 microns in the affected eye. Further examination disclosed a right-sided trigeminal nerve palsy. He was eventually found to have a 3 X 2-cm tentorial ridge meningioma on the right.

  9. Fetal anatomy of the human carotid sheath and structures in and around it.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Naritomo; Hayashi, Shogo; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Kitano, Hiroya

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find basic rules governing the morphological development of the typical neurovascular sheath. We carried out histological examination of 15 paraffin-embedded mid-term fetuses at 9-25 weeks of gestation (three fetuses each at 9, 12, 15, 20, and 25 weeks). As the result, the vagus nerve showed a high propensity to change its topographical relationship with the common carotid artery (CCA) during 9-20 weeks of gestation: that is, from a primitive ventral course to a final dorsal course. The adventitia of the great arteries, which was distinct from other fascial structures, became evident by 15 weeks. The carotid sheath appeared at and after 20 weeks: it was clearly separated from the prevertebral lamina of the deep cervical fasciae, but fused with the pretracheal lamina covering the strap muscles. Thus the carotid sheath, as well as the topographical relationships of structures within it, seems to become established much later than the prevertebral and pretracheal laminae of the deep cervical fasciae. However, the adventitia of the cervical great arteries consistently becomes evident much earlier than the sheath, and it seems to be regarded as one of the basic components of the fetal deep cervical fasciae.

  10. Unusual presentations of intracranial meningiomas: Report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Shruti; Gandhi, Jatin Sundersham; Gupta, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas at extracranial sites are uncommon clinical presentations. They may present in the form of benign, slow.growing masses or may exhibit aggressive malignant behavior. We report two cases of intracranial meningiomas presenting at extracranial sites that are, at the sinonasal tract/external auditory canal and as a neck mass. The clinical presentations, histopathological features and appropriate management are discussed.

  11. Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Meningiomas with Reference to Proliferative Markers p53 and Ki-67

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Meningiomas are slow growing primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours attached to the duramater, which arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid. Grading of meningioma based on histological findings assisted with supplementary immunohistochemical studies, predicts the prognosis of meningioma with good precision. Aim To evaluate proliferative markers and correlate with various histological subtypes and grade. Materials and Methods A total of 224 meningiomas, diagnosed between January1995 and October 2011were graded according to WHO 2007 criteria. Immunostaining for p53 and Ki-67 markers were performed on 100 cases. Results There was female predominance. There were 194 Grade I, 24 Grade II and 6 Grade III meningiomas. Brain invasion noted in 18(8%) meningiomas predominantly in grade III followed by grade II. Recurrence was seen in 7 (3.1%) cases, most common in psammomatous followed by angiomatous meningioma. Immunostaining showed p53 positivity in 72.5% of grade I, 83.3% of grade II and all the cases of grade III tumours. Ki-67 Labelling Index (LI) consistently increased from grade I to grade III tumours. Conclusion p53 and Ki-67 LI correlated well with increasing histological grade and biological behaviour of meningioma. PMID:26894073

  12. Type I Cutaneous Meningioma (Rudimentary Meningocele) With Intradural Attachment to the Phylum Terminale.

    PubMed

    Mazloom, Sean E; Holliday, Alex C; Coman, Garrett C; Chavan, Rahul N; Kolodney, Michael S; Grider, Douglas J

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous meningiomas (CM) are a small subset of meningiomas, further classified into three subtypes. The authors present a 15-year-old male with a symptomatic congenital type I CM and describe the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an extraspinal lumbar type I CM with intradural attachment to the phylum terminale.

  13. Association of tamoxifen with meningioma: a population-based study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that hormone therapy may play an important role in the development of meningioma. However, it is unclear whether medication with tamoxifen can prevent meningioma. Our study cohort included all women who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1961 and 2010, and a total of 227 535 women were identified with breast cancer with a median age at diagnosis of 63 years. Women diagnosed with breast cancer after 1987 were defined as tamoxifen exposed; those diagnosed with breast cancer before or during 1987 were defined as not exposed to tamoxifen. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to calculate the risk of subsequent meningioma. Of these women, 223 developed meningioma. For women without tamoxifen exposure, the risk of meningioma was significantly increased, with an SIR of 1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.30-1.81); the risk was not increased in those with tamoxifen exposure (SIR=1.06, 95% confidence interval 0.84-1.32). The increased risk of meningioma in women without tamoxifen exposure persisted during 10 years of follow-up. In this historical cohort study, we found that women diagnosed with breast cancer but not treated with tamoxifen had an increased incidence of meningioma, whereas the incidence was close to that of the general population in patients treated with tamoxifen. This suggests that tamoxifen may prevent the development of meningioma.

  14. Radiation-induced meningioma after treatment for pituitary adenoma: Case report and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Partington, M.D.; Davis, D.H. )

    1990-02-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas are becoming increasingly well-recognized. We report a case of a 35-year-old man who developed a suprasellar meningioma 9 years after receiving a radiation dose of 4480 cGy for a pituitary adenoma. The literature is also reviewed. 10 references.

  15. A rare case of atypical skull base meningioma with perineural spread

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Henry; Morley, Simon; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atypical meningioma is a rare cause of perineural tumour spread. In this report, we present the case of a 46-year-old female with an atypical meningioma of the skull base demonstrating perineural tumour spread. We describe the imaging features of this condition and its distinguishing features from other tumours exhibiting perineural spread. PMID:27200171

  16. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Idiopathic Optic Perineuritis using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Ik Soo; Jung, Jae Ho; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Seo, Je Hyun; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Hee-Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the effect of idiopathic Optic perineuritis on the retinal nerve fiber layer, and determine the ability of optical coherence tomography to evaluate retinal nerve fiber loss after idiopathic Optic perineuritis. Four patients were assessed in this study. In all cases, average retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in the affected eye in comparison with the normal reference value and with the value for the contralateral normal eye at 12 months after the onset of optic perineuritis. Our study revealed that retinal nerve fiber layer loss occurs in idiopathic optic nerve sheath inflammation. PMID:27928329

  17. Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma with invasion of bone: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Dhruba J.; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, R. S.; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacyte-rich (LPR) meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma, which is characterized by conspicuous infiltration of plasma cells and lymphocytes and a variable proportion of meningothelial elements, and is classified as a grade I tumor in World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of central nervous system. The origin and biological behavior of this rare variant of meningioma is still not clear. Till date, very few cases of LPR meningioma have been reported globally. Here, we are presenting a case of right parietal convexity LPR meningioma with invasion of bone in a 32-year-old male patient, who presented to us with complaints of focal seizures and weakness in left upper limb. PMID:27695559

  18. Spinal metaplastic meningioma with osseous differentiation in the ventral thoracic spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Kentaro; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ichimura, Kouichi; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Ossified meningioma is classified histologically as a phenotype of metaplastic meningioma, and it is extremely rare. There are only 12 cases involving ossified spinal meningiomas in the literature. We present the case of a 61-year-old female with a primary tumor within the ventral spinal canal at T12. Although we performed a total tumor excision using an ultrasonic bone aspirator, a temporary deterioration of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was observed during curettage with a Kerrison rongeur. The neurologic findings worsened immediately after surgery. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a metaplastic meningioma with osseous differentiation. In order to avoid spinal cord injury, great care must be taken when removing an ossified meningioma located on the ventral spinal cord.

  19. Spinal meningioma containing bone: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Mohammad; Usmani, Nida; Ahmad, Faiz U; Salmani, Sueba; Sharma, Manish S

    2009-01-01

    Meningiomas constitute about 25% of primary spinal tumours and 1% to 5% of them are calcified. Ossification is a rare event and is rarely reported. Here, the case of a 40-year-old woman who had dorsal spinal cord meningioma (globular variety) at the T6 vertebral level is reported; the meningioma showed a nidus of T2 weighting hypointensity on MRI as well as a bony chip inside the tumour intraoperatively. The tumour was successfully resected. Though the aetiology of ossification in the meningioma is not well known, metaplasia of arachnoid cells/dystrophic calcification may be the cause. Ossified meningiomas are more difficult to resect than the usual variety. Hypointensity inside tumour in T2-weighted images of MRI should make the surgeon suspicious of this condition, which may in some cases complicate tumour resection. PMID:21686426

  20. Brain meningioma with initial manifestation similar to cervical radiculopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Hong, Chang-Zern; Wu, Wei-Ting; Li, Kun-Ta; Chou, Li-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common benign brain tumors, and are characterized by slow growth and a long asymptomatic period. Once the tumor becomes symptomatic, the various presentations may be related to the location and compression of adjacent structures. Meningioma is primarily treated through surgical intervention, and thus earlier diagnosis is likely to result in better prognosis. The symptoms of the meningioma may mimic other diseases, making precise diagnosis difficult, which will then delay treatment. We report a case of brain meningioma that showed initial signs and symptoms similar to cervical radiculopathy. The symptoms extended gradually, and the ultimate diagnosis of meningioma was confirmed based on brain-image studies. After brain-tumor excision, postoperation radiotherapy, and aggressive rehabilitation, the patient was able to perform better in daily activities. PMID:25028552

  1. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  2. Attic construction with sheathing-applied insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    Two years of study at a building research laboratory have been applied to cathedralized residential attic construction. Cathedralized attics are rafter-framed or truss-framed attics with flat ceilings in which the insulation is placed against the underside of the roof sheathing rather than on top of the ceiling drywall. The potential benefits of sheathing-applied insulation are considerable and are due to the fact that the attic space becomes part of the conditioned volume. Concern is often expressed that moisture damage may occur in the sheathing. The intent of the current study was to address those concerns. This study allowed an assessment of the performance of cathedralized ceilings, given the following construction variables: (1) ventilation vs. no ventilation, (2) continuous air chute construction vs. stuffed insulation construction, and (3) opens joints in exposed kraft facing vs. taped joints. The results were compared to a concurrent study of the performance of cathedral ceilings with sloped ceiling drywall. The results show that having an air chute that ensures an air gap between the sheathing and the top of the insulation is the critical factor. Ventilation and the taping of joints were minor determinants of the moisture performance of the sheathing. These results are consistent with the results of normal cathedral ceiling construction performance.

  3. Fibrin Glue Injection for Cavernous Sinus Hemostasis Associated with Cranial Nerve Deficit: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavanaiepour, Daryoush; Jernigan, Sarah; Abolfotoh, Mohamad; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin glue injection has been used to control intraoperative cavernous sinus (CS) venous bleeding. There have been no reported complications related to this maneuver. We present a case where a patient developed a sensory trigeminal nerve deficit after injection of fibrin glue into the posterior CS during resection of a petrosal meningioma. We believe that this deficit was due to the compression of the trigeminal ganglion similar to balloon compression procedures. Although fibrin glue injection may achieve satisfactory cavernous sinus homeostasis, the volume and rate of injection should be kept in mind to avoid a compressive lesion on traversing cranial nerves and surrounding structures, or retrograde filling of the venous tributaries. PMID:26251815

  4. Biodegradable magnesium wire promotes regeneration of compressed sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-han; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) wire has been shown to be biodegradable and have anti-inflammatory properties. It can induce Schwann cells to secrete nerve growth factor and promote the regeneration of nerve axons after central nervous system injury. We hypothesized that biodegradable Mg wire may enhance compressed peripheral nerve regeneration. A rat acute sciatic nerve compression model was made, and AZ31 Mg wire (3 mm diameter; 8 mm length) bridged at both ends of the nerve. Our results demonstrate that sciatic functional index, nerve growth factor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, and tyrosine receptor kinase A mRNA expression are increased by Mg wire in Mg model. The numbers of cross section nerve fibers and regenerating axons were also increased. Sciatic nerve function was improved and the myelinated axon number was increased in injured sciatic nerve following Mg treatment. Immunofluorescence histopathology showed that there were increased vigorous axonal regeneration and myelin sheath coverage in injured sciatic nerve after Mg treatment. Our findings confirm that biodegradable Mg wire can promote the regeneration of acute compressed sciatic nerves. PMID:28197200

  5. Peripheral nerve surgery--today and looking ahead.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1986-04-01

    The trend in peripheral nerve surgery is toward earlier definitive treatment of the lesion, based on the optimal use of preoperative and intraoperative electrodiagnostic techniques. Newer diagnostic tools include computed tomography (CT) and thermography. Knowledge is still being gained about the technology and limitations of the autogenous nerve grafts that are being used to overcome nerve gaps. The technique of nerve anastomosis is undergoing rapid improvement, and better methods have been developed for identifying motor and sensory fascicles at the time of operation. Research activity into the problem of nerve damage produced at the time of trimming nerve stumps promises to change to the technology of nerve repair in the near future. For benign nerve sheath tumors (schwannoma, neurofibroma), the trend is away from nerve excision and in the direction of tumor enucleation. Histologic methods for diagnosing malignant nerve tumors have been improved, making it possible to embark on radical excision with less hesitation. The pain syndromes (causalgia, phantom limb pain, and stump pain) that may follow nerve injury continue to present a problem in management, but steady progress is being made toward a rational program of management. A more distant prospect is for pharmacologic and electrophysiologic methods to accelerate axonal regeneration.

  6. Biodegradable magnesium wire promotes regeneration of compressed sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Han; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) wire has been shown to be biodegradable and have anti-inflammatory properties. It can induce Schwann cells to secrete nerve growth factor and promote the regeneration of nerve axons after central nervous system injury. We hypothesized that biodegradable Mg wire may enhance compressed peripheral nerve regeneration. A rat acute sciatic nerve compression model was made, and AZ31 Mg wire (3 mm diameter; 8 mm length) bridged at both ends of the nerve. Our results demonstrate that sciatic functional index, nerve growth factor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, and tyrosine receptor kinase A mRNA expression are increased by Mg wire in Mg model. The numbers of cross section nerve fibers and regenerating axons were also increased. Sciatic nerve function was improved and the myelinated axon number was increased in injured sciatic nerve following Mg treatment. Immunofluorescence histopathology showed that there were increased vigorous axonal regeneration and myelin sheath coverage in injured sciatic nerve after Mg treatment. Our findings confirm that biodegradable Mg wire can promote the regeneration of acute compressed sciatic nerves.

  7. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  8. Effect of surface pore structure of nerve guide conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Jin Rae; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Lee, Jin Ho

    2013-03-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with different surface pore structures (nano-porous inner surface vs. micro-porous inner surface) but similar physical and chemical properties were fabricated by rolling the opposite side of asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membranes. The effect of the pore structure on peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGCs was investigated using a sciatic nerve defect model of rats. The nerve fibers and tissues were shown to have regenerated along the longitudinal direction through the NGC with a nano-porous inner surface (Nanopore NGC), while they grew toward the porous wall of the NGC with a micro-porous inner surface (Micropore NGC) and, thus, their growth was restricted when compared with the Nanopore NGC, as investigated by immunohistochemical evaluations (by fluorescence microscopy with anti-neurofilament staining and Hoechst staining for growth pattern of nerve fibers), histological evaluations (by light microscopy with Meyer's modified trichrome staining and Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscopy for the regeneration of axon and myelin sheath), and FluoroGold retrograde tracing (for reconnection between proximal and distal stumps). The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) immobilized on the pore surfaces of the NGCs on nerve regeneration was not so significant when compared with NGCs not containing immobilized NGF. The NGC system with different surface pore structures but the same chemical/physical properties seems to be a good tool that is used for elucidating the surface pore effect of NGCs on nerve regeneration.

  9. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-01-01

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair. PMID:25206505

  10. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit for repair of injured sciatic nerve: A mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhao, Changfu; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangyao; Luo, Min

    2013-07-25

    Tensile stress and tensile strain directly affect the quality of nerve regeneration after bridging nerve defects by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation and autogenous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve injury. This study collected the sciatic nerve from the gluteus maximus muscle from fresh human cadaver, and established 10-mm-long sciatic nerve injury models by removing the ischium, following which poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts were transplanted. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the axon and myelin sheath were torn, and the vessels of basilar membrane were obstructed in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit-repaired sciatic nerve following tensile testing. There were no significant differences in tensile tests with autogenous nerve graft-repaired sciatic nerve. Following poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit transplantation for sciatic nerve repair, tensile test results suggest that maximum tensile load, maximum stress, elastic limit load and elastic limit stress increased compared with autogenous nerve grafts, but elastic limit strain and maximum strain decreased. Moreover, the tendencies of stress-strain curves of sciatic nerves were similar after transplantation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits or autogenous nerve grafts. Results showed that after transplantation in vitro for sciatic nerve injury, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits exhibited good intensity, elasticity and plasticity, indicating that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduits are suitable for sciatic nerve injury repair.

  11. Numbness after Transradial Cardiac Catheterization: the Results from a Nerve Conduction Study of the Superficial Radial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho-Jun; Kim, Ji-Young; Han, Jae Deok; Lee, Hyun Jong; Kim, Je Sang; Park, Jin Sik; Choi, Rak Kyeong; Choi, Young Jin; Shim, Won-Heum; Kwon, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Numbness on the hand occurs infrequently after a transradial cardiac catheterization (TRC). The symptom resembles that of neuropathy. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence, the predicting factors and the presence of neurological abnormalities of numbness, using a nerve conduction study (NCS). Subjects and Methods From April to December 2013, all patients who underwent a TRC were prospectively enrolled. From among these, the patients who experienced numbness on the ipsilateral hand were instructed to describe their symptoms using a visual analogue scale; subsequently, NCSs were performed on these patients. Results Of the total 479 patients in the study sample, numbness occurred in nine (1.8%) following the procedure. The NCS was performed for eight out of the nine patients, four (50%) of which had an abnormal NCS result at the superficial radial nerve. A larger sheath and history of myocardial infarction (p=0.14 and 0.08 respectively) tended towards the occurrence of numbness; however, only the use of size 7 French sheaths was an independent predictor for the occurrence of numbness (odds ratio: 5.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-28.58, p=0.042). The symptoms disappeared for all patients but one, within four months. Conclusion A transient injury of the superficial radial nerve could be one reason for numbness after a TRC. A large sheath size was an independent predictor of numbness; therefore, large sized sheaths should be used with caution when performing a TRC. PMID:27014346

  12. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  13. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  14. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  15. The rehabilitation outcome of spinal meningioma induced proprioception deficit.

    PubMed

    Tai, Wen-Chin; Pong, Ya-Ping; Yeh, Hsiang-Chun; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lau, Yiu-Chung

    2005-10-01

    Chronic non-traumatic myelopathy developed in a woman who presented symptoms of gait ataxia, right leg motor weakness, dysesthesia and urinary difficulty. Clinical evaluation revealed right leg weakness and global anesthesia as well as temperature, vibratory and proprioception sensation loss below the T-9 level and deep tendon hyperreflexia over the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-intramedullary meningioma at the T-9 level. Following microscopic subtotal excision of the tumor, the patient underwent satisfactory rehabilitation programs with outstanding outcomes presented using the neurological scoring system, functional balance grade, postural analysis of Baropodometry screen and single leg standing time.

  16. Venous Air Embolism during Elective Craniotomy for Parasagittal Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nazaruddin, W H W; Asmah, Z; Saedah, A

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 59 year old man who developed venous air embolism (VAE) during an elective craniotomy for parasagittal meningioma resection. The surgery was done in the supine position with slightly elevated head position. VAE was provisionally diagnosed by sudden decreased in the end tidal carbon dioxide pressure from 34 to 18 mmHg, followed by marked hypotension and atrial fibrillation. Prompt central venous blood aspiration, aggressive resuscitation and inotropic support managed to stabilize the patient. Post operatively, he was admitted in neuro intensive care unit and made a good recovery without serious complications.

  17. Gain of chromosome arm 1q in atypical meningioma correlates with shorter progression-free survival

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M.; Mohapatra, G.; Betensky, R.A.; Keohane, C.; Louis, D.N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas have moderately high recurrence rates; even for completely resected tumours, approximately one-third will recur. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) may aid local control and improve survival, but carries the risk of side effects. More accurate prediction of recurrence risk is therefore needed for patients with atypical meningioma. Previously, we used high-resolution array CGH to identify genetic variations in 47 primary atypical meningiomas and found that approximately 60% of tumors show gain of 1q at 1q25.1 and 1q25.3 to 1q32.1 and that 1q gain appeared to correlate with shorter progression-free survival. This study aimed to validate and extend these findings in an independent sample. Methods 86 completely resected atypical meningiomas (with 25 recurrences) from two neurosurgical centres in Ireland were identified and clinical follow up was obtained. Utilizing a dual-colour interphase FISH assay, 1q gain was assessed using BAC probes directed against 1q25.1 and 1q32.1. Results The results confirm the high prevalence of 1q gain at these loci in atypical meningiomas. We further show that gain at 1q32.1 and age each correlate with progression-free survival in patients who have undergone complete surgical resection of atypical meningiomas. Conclusions These independent findings suggest that assessment of 1q copy number status can add clinically useful information for the management of patients with atypical meningiomas. PMID:21988727

  18. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  19. A new texture and shape based technique for improving meningioma classification.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Kiran; Arooj, Arshia; Majeed, Hammad

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decade, computer-aided diagnosis is rapidly growing due to the availability of patient data, sophisticated image acquisition tools and advancement in image processing and machine learning algorithms. Meningiomas are the tumors of brain and spinal cord. They account for 20% of all the brain tumors. Meningioma subtype classification involves the classification of benign meningioma into four major subtypes: meningothelial, fibroblastic, transitional, and psammomatous. Under the microscope, the histology images of these four subtypes show a variety of textural and structural characteristics. High intraclass and low interclass variabilities in meningioma subtypes make it an extremely complex classification problem. A number of techniques have been proposed for meningioma subtype classification with varying performances on different subtypes. Most of these techniques employed wavelet packet transforms for textural features extraction and analysis of meningioma histology images. In this article, a hybrid classification technique based on texture and shape characteristics is proposed for the classification of meningioma subtypes. Meningothelial and fibroblastic subtypes are classified on the basis of nuclei shapes while grey-level co-occurrence matrix textural features are used to train a multilayer perceptron for the classification of transitional and psammomatous subtypes. On the whole, average classification accuracy of 92.50% is achieved through the proposed hybrid classifier; which to the best of our knowledge is the highest.

  20. Radiation-induced meningiomas: a shadow in the success story of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Joanna; Pääkkö, Eija; Harila, Marika; Herva, Riitta; Tuominen, Juho; Koivula, Antero; Lanning, Marjatta; Harila-Saari, Arja

    2009-10-01

    While the prognosis of acute childhood leukemia has improved, long-term survivors are increasingly experiencing late effects of the treatment. Cranially irradiated survivors are predisposed to the development of CNS tumors. Our aim was to describe the incidence of secondary brain tumors and to define the significance of treatment-related risk factors and host characteristics in a cohort of childhood leukemia survivors. Our cohort consisted of 60 consecutive cranially irradiated adult survivors of childhood leukemia treated in Oulu University Hospital (Oulu, Finland); MRI of the brain was performed on 49. The sites of the tumors, their histology, and details of the leukemia treatment were determined. Of the 49 patients, 11 (22%) 1-8 years of age at the time of diagnosis developed meningioma later in life, while no other brain tumors were seen. In this cohort, the development of meningioma seemed to show undisputable linkage with long latency periods (mean, 25 years; range, 14-34 years) and an increasing incidence 20 years after the treatment (47%). Three patients had multiple meningiomas, two had recurrent disease, and one had an atypical meningioma. Age at the time of irradiation, gender, or cumulative doses of chemotherapeutic agents showed no significant association with the development of meningiomas. The high incidence of meningiomas in this study was associated with long follow-up periods. Although the cohort is small, it seems probable that the increasing incidence of meningioma will shadow the future of cranially irradiated leukemia survivors. Systematic brain imaging after the treatment is therefore justifiable.

  1. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  2. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    von Hilchen, Christian M; Bustos, Alvaro E; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo.

  3. Meningioma recurrence: the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of current screening.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Jane; Fernandes, Helen

    2010-02-01

    Scanning of post-operative meningioma patients to detect tumour recurrence is common practice. There are however no guidelines for how often this should be performed for meningiomas of differing Simpson Grades of surgical removal and World Health Organisation (WHO) histological grades. A literature search reveals no studies investigating its role in post-operative care. The objective of this study was to determine current post-operative scanning use, in particular its timing and frequency in relation to meningioma recurrence rate. We performed a retrospective analysis of the surgical records of patients that underwent meningioma excision between 1998 and 2003 in Addenbrookes Hospital, and their follow-up scans up to 9 years post-surgery. Age at surgery, Simpson grade of surgical removal, tumour location, WHO histological grade, post-surgical radiotherapy, dates of meningioma recurrences, and dates of post-operative CT and MRI scans up to present, were recorded for each patient. A total of 283 records were analysed. Using logistic regression we found that WHO grade and post-surgical radiotherapy were the strongest predictors of meningioma recurrence. We found that timing and frequency of scans between patients of the same stage and grade is highly variable. Data suggests that the role for regular short term post-operative scanning of WHO grade 1 meningioma patients, a group that form the bulk of meningioma patients, is limited, and should only be performed in select, clinically indicated cases. A time and cost analysis reveals that significant savings can be made by adopting this policy. Data from a greater number of patients with WHO grade 2 and 3 meningiomas needs to analysed before definite conclusions can be made about the regularity of post-operative scanning in these patients. Our audit study has revealed an opportunity for significant monetary and time savings to be made without any compromise of patient care.

  4. Molecular typing of Meningiomas by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Surgical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most frequent intracranial tumors. The majority is benign slow-growing tumors but they can be difficult to treat depending on their location and size. While meningiomas are well delineated on magnetic resonance imaging by their uptake of contrast, surgical limitations still present themselves from not knowing the extent of invasion of the dura matter by meningioma cells. The development of tools to characterize tumor tissue in real or near real time could prevent recurrence after tumor resection by allowing for more precise surgery, i.e. removal of tumor with preservation of healthy tissue. The development of ambient ionization mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of tissue and its implementation in the surgical decision-making workflow carry the potential to fulfill this need. Here, we present the characterization of meningioma and dura mater by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to validate the technique for the molecular assessment of surgical margins and diagnosis of meningioma from surgical tissue in real-time. Nine stereotactically resected surgical samples and three autopsy samples were analyzed by standard histopathology and mass spectrometry imaging. All samples indicated a strong correlation between results from both techniques. We then highlight the value of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the molecular subtyping/subgrouping of meningiomas from a series of forty genetically characterized specimens. The minimal sample preparation required for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry offers a distinct advantage for applications relying on real-time information such as surgical decision-making. The technology here was tested to distinguish meningioma from dura mater as an approach to precisely define surgical margins. In addition we classify meningiomas into fibroblastic and meningothelial subtypes and more notably recognize meningiomas with NF2 genetic aberrations. PMID

  5. Latero-terminal neurorrhaphy without removal of the epineural sheath. Experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, F; Trindade, J C; Hoshino, K; Mazzoni Neto, A

    1992-01-01

    Termino-lateral neurorrhaphies have been used up to the beginning of this century. After this period, they have no longer been reported. We tested the efficacy of a new type of latero-terminal neurorrhaphy and evaluated the role of the epineural sheath. A group of 10 rats had the fibular nerve sectioned and the distal ending was sutured to the lateral face of the tibial nerve without removing the epineurium. All experiments were made on the right side, the left one remaining untouched in half of the animals of each group. The other half were denervated by sectioning and inverting the endings of the fibular nerves. In this way, tibial cranial muscles were either normal or denervated in the left side and reinnervated through latero-terminal neurorrhaphy in the right side. After 7.7 months, the animals were subjected to electrophysiological tests, sacrificed, and the nerves and muscles were taken for histological exams. A response of the tibial cranial muscle was obtained in 75% of the animals. The distal ending of the fibular nerve showed an average of 498 nerve fibers. The average areas of the reinnervated tibial cranial muscles were (mu 2):841.30 for M2n and 1798.33 for M2d. We concluded that the termino-lateral neurorrhaphy was functional, conducting electrical stimuli and allowing the passage of axons from the lateral surface of a healthy nerve, to reconstitute the distal segment of a sectioned nerve. The presence of the epineurium was no impediment to axonal regeneration or to the passage of electrical stimuli.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    PubMed

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  7. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  12. Re-innervation of facial nerve territory using a composite hypoglossal nerve--muscle autograft--facial nerve bridge. An experimental model in sheep.

    PubMed

    Drew, S J; Fullarton, A C; Glasby, M A; Mountain, R E; Murray, J A

    1995-04-01

    The hypoglossal nerve has been used both entirely and in part to repair the facial nerve. Using the partial technique it may be difficult to obtain sufficient length and a free interposed graft is then required to extend the hypoglossal element. In six sheep the facial nerve was excised between its emergence from the stylomastoid foramen and its bifurcation in the parotid gland. The hypoglossal nerve was exposed and split longitudinally producing a limb which was reflected towards the distal stump of the facial nerve. This left a gap of 4-5 cm which was bridged with a freeze-thawed coaxially aligned skeletal muscle autograft. The sheep were examined at 8 months. Laser doppler blood-flow studies showed the blood-flow distal to the graft to be about 25% of that at an equivalent site on the normal side. Peak nerve conduction velocities were also reduced on the repaired side but stimulation of the proximal hypoglossal nerve was nevertheless capable of causing adequate contraction of both facial and tongue muscles. Histological comparison of the repaired facial nerves with equivalent sites on the normal side showed a reduction in mean axon and fibre diameters with normal myelin sheath thickness for the regenerated axon sizes. All of these features are to be expected in a regenerated nerve and are consistent with a good level of recovery of function.

  13. Sphenoid wing meningioma behavior on 11C-PiB and 18F-FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Hernan; Bergamo, Yanina; Paz, Santiago; Sanchez, Flavio; Vazquez, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Two patients with mild cognitive impairment underwent C-PiB and F-FDG brain PET. Both patients had previously gone through a contrast-enhanced MRI scan that revealed extra-axial tumors next to the sphenoid wing, suggestive of meningiomas. C-PiB PET images showed a highly increased uptake by the extra-axial masses. These 2 cases represent 1.2% of our C-PiB population (n = 163). No meningioma was found with negative C-PiB uptake. The F-FDG concentration was not increased within the lesions. C-PiB could be used as a meningioma marker.

  14. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  15. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  16. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  17. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group.

  18. Sheath waves observed on OEDIPUS A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Balmain, K. G.; Bantin, C. C.; Hulbert, G. W.

    1995-01-01

    An important novel feature of the tethered sounding rocket experiment OEDIPUS A (Observations of Electric-field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma—A Unique Strategy) was its direct excitation and detection of electromagnetic waves on conductors in space plasmas. We present quantitative evidence about sheath waves excited in the ionosphere by a high-frequency transmitter on one end of the 1-km tether and detected by a synchronized receiver on the other end. An important characteristic of sheath waves is their sequence of sharply defined passbands and stop bands in the frequency range 0.1-5 MHz. The lowest passband is between 0.1 MHz and the plasma frequency near 2 MHz, the bandwidth where existing theory predicts sheath waves. Resonance fringes in this band have been scaled to determine the phase and group refractive indices of sheath waves. These agree reasonably well with the theory, considering the approximations therein. Passbands and stop bands observed in the range between 2 and 5 MHz are not expected on the basis of the current theory. In this range, band limits have clear signatures of the interaction of the tether fields with electrostatic cyclotron waves. Finite wire moment method modeling of the payload shows that in the low-frequency passband, RF coupling along the tether is increased by 20 dB over vacuum conditions. Similarly, isolation is greater than vacuum isolation in the stop bands. Because sheath waves at frequencies up to 2 MHz are guided efficiently along conductors in plasma, they are a significant design issue in the electromagnetic compatibility of avionics at frequencies up to HF on large metal space structures.

  19. [A case of Mycobacterium fortuitum meningitis following surgery for meningioma].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Keita; Suenaga, Akihito; Motomura, Masakatsu; Fukuda, Taku; Ooe, Nobuharu; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2006-07-01

    A 57-year-old woman had undergone surgery for meningioma. After the surgery, she suffered from repeated fever and headache. One year after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for further examination. Cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) findings indicated bacterial meningitis infection. Germ culture, acid-fast bacterium culture, PCR for mycobacteriosis and cryptococcus antigens as well as cytological examination of CSF were checked repeatedly. However, all examinations were negative and etiology was unknown. We treated with many anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-tubercular drugs, but CSF findings were not improved. We repeated CSF examination and finally Mycobacterium fortuitum (M. fortuitum) was isolated. Clarithromycin (CAM) was started for M. fortuitum meningitis. After drug sensitivity testing, levofloxacin (LVFX), which was effective against M. fortuitum, was added to CAM, after which clinical and CSF findings improved dramatically. M. fortuitum rarely causes CNS infection. Several English literatures on M. fortuitum meningitis after traumatic injury and surgery have been published. Its CSF findings distinctly resemble those of bacterial meningitis, but are resistant to the usual antituberculosis drugs. We reported a case of M. fortuitum meningitis associated with surgery for meningioma.

  20. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Pragmatical Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-11-01

    Most plasmas have very thin sheath compared with plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculation of plasma and sheath. Bohm criterion provides boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy is reported. Additional information on the subject will be posted in http://www.pppl.gov/pub/report/2002/ http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/ Work supported by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory through a University Research Support Program.

  1. Measurement of the sheath capacitance of a planar probe

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Young-Kwang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-10-15

    The sheath capacitance was measured on a planar probe dc-biased with respect to the plasma potential using the phase sensitive detection method in the region separated from the rf discharge plasmas by an immersed grid. It was observed that the sheath capacitance was negative when the collecting electrode of the probe was positioned downward toward the grid and biased near the plasma potential. This indicates that a double sheath had built up near the probe electrode. This tendency can be explained by the sheath capacitance, which is calculated using Poisson's equation with a non-zero electrical field and an ion velocity condition at the sheath edge.

  2. Laminin targeting of a peripheral nerve-highlighting peptide enables degenerated nerve visualization

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael A.; Gross, Larry A.; Friedman, Beth; Adams, Stephen R.; Crisp, Jessica L.; Hussain, Timon; Frei, Andreas P.; Novy, Karel; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2016-01-01

    Target-blind activity-based screening of molecular libraries is often used to develop first-generation compounds, but subsequent target identification is rate-limiting to developing improved agents with higher specific affinity and lower off-target binding. A fluorescently labeled nerve-binding peptide, NP41, selected by phage display, highlights peripheral nerves in vivo. Nerve highlighting has the potential to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating intraoperative nerve identification, reducing accidental nerve transection, and facilitating repair of damaged nerves. To enable screening of molecular target-specific molecules for higher nerve contrast and to identify potential toxicities, NP41’s binding target was sought. Laminin-421 and -211 were identified by proximity-based labeling using singlet oxygen and by an adapted version of TRICEPS-based ligand-receptor capture to identify glycoprotein receptors via ligand cross-linking. In proximity labeling, photooxidation of a ligand-conjugated singlet oxygen generator is coupled to chemical labeling of locally oxidized residues. Photooxidation of methylene blue–NP41-bound nerves, followed by biotin hydrazide labeling and purification, resulted in light-induced enrichment of laminin subunits α4 and α2, nidogen 1, and decorin (FDR-adjusted P value < 10−7) and minor enrichment of laminin-γ1 and collagens I and VI. Glycoprotein receptor capture also identified laminin-α4 and -γ1. Laminins colocalized with NP41 within nerve sheath, particularly perineurium, where laminin-421 is predominant. Binding assays with phage expressing NP41 confirmed binding to purified laminin-421, laminin-211, and laminin-α4. Affinity for these extracellular matrix proteins explains the striking ability of NP41 to highlight degenerated nerve “ghosts” months posttransection that are invisible to the unaided eye but retain hollow laminin-rich tubular structures. PMID:27791138

  3. The effects of testosterone deficiency on the structural integrity of the penile dorsal nerve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armagan, A; Hatsushi, K; Toselli, P

    2008-01-01

    Androgens play a vital role in erectile function and are known to have a neuroprotective role in the nervous system. This study investigated, in a rat model, the effects of testosterone deprivation and replacement on the morphology of the dorsal nerve of the rat penis at the light microscopy level. Two weeks after castration, male rats were infused with vehicle alone or 44 mug of testosterone for 2 weeks. Age-matched, sham-operated control animals were used for comparisons. Penile tissue samples were removed for histological analyses. The following parameters were assessed: (1) total myelin sheath thickness; (2) density of nerve fibers; and (3) axon cross-sectional area per nerve fiber. Castration resulted in a significant increase in axon cross-sectional area compared to that of the control and testosterone-treated animals (6.97+/-0.59 microm(2) per fiber in control animals to 14.32+/-0.44 microm(2) per fiber in castrated animals). Qualitatively, there were signs of nerve degeneration, particularly myelin sheath degeneration, in all sample groups. We did not observe statistically significant changes in myelin sheath thickness. There was a trend of reduced nerve density. Nerve degeneration was not quantified since this study was performed at the light microscopic level. This study suggests that testosterone has a neuroprotective role in the nerve fibers of the dorsal nerve and testosterone deficiency may lead to different forms of nerve degeneration resulting in anatomic alterations, thus contributing to erectile dysfunction.

  4. Surgical treatment and radiation therapy of frontal lobe meningiomas in 7 dogs.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Ane; Moissonnier, Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Devauchelle, Patrick; Blot, Stéphane

    2011-07-01

    The cases of 7 adult dogs with generalized seizures managed by surgical excision and radiation therapy for frontal lobe meningiomas were reviewed. The neurological examination was unremarkable in 6 of the 7 dogs. Five dogs were operated on using a bilateral transfrontal sinus approach and 2 using a unilateral sinotemporal approach to the frontal lobe. One dog was euthanized 14 d after surgery; radiation therapy was initiated 3 wk after surgery in the remaining 6 dogs. Long-term follow-up consisted of neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) scan after radiation therapy. The mean survival time for dogs that had surgery and radiation therapy was 18 mo after surgery. Frontal lobe meningiomas have been associated with poor prognosis. However, the surgical approaches used in these cases, combined with radiation therapy, allow a survival rate for frontal lobe meningiomas similar to that for meningiomas located over the cerebral convexities.

  5. Malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma: Neuropathology, molecular pathology, and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J

    2015-10-01

    Meningioma is a common adult intracranial tumor, and while several cases are considered benign, a subset is malignant with biologically aggressive behavior and is refractory to current treatment strategies of combined surgery and radiotherapy. Anaplastic meningiomas are quite aggressive and correspond to a World Health Organization (WHO) Grade III tumor. This highly aggressive phenotype mandates the need for more efficacious therapies. Designing rational therapies for treatment will have its foundation in the biologic understanding of involved genes and molecular pathways in these types of tumors. Anaplastic meningiomas (WHO Grade III) can arise from malignant transformation of lower grade (WHO Grade I/II) tumors, however there is an incomplete understanding of specific genetic drivers of malignant transformation in these tumors. Here, the current understanding of anaplastic meningiomas is reviewed in the context of human neuropathologic specimens and small animal models.

  6. Meningioma: The role of a foreign body and irradiation in tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, J.; Silberstein, H.J.; Salner, A.L.; Uphoff, D.F. )

    1991-07-01

    A case of meningioma is reported. At the age of 18 years, the patient had undergone insertion of a Torkildsen shunt through a posteroparietal burr hole for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to a tumor of the pineal region, of which no biopsy had been made. After the hydrocephalus was relieved, he underwent irradiation of the tumor. Thirty years later, he was treated for an intracranial meningioma wrapped around the shunt. The tumor followed the shunt in all of its intracranial course. Microscopy disclosed pieces of the shunt tube within the meningioma. The role of a foreign body and irradiation in the induction of meningiomas is discussed, and a comprehensive review of the literature is presented. 47 references.

  7. Benign Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Presenting with an Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Frič, Radek; Hald, John K.; Antal, Ellen-Ann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECT We report an unusual case of a benign lateral sphenoid wing meningioma that presented with, and was masked by, an acute intracerebral hemorrhage. CASE REPORT A 68-year-old woman was admitted after sudden onset of coma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage, without any underlying vascular pathology on CT angiography. During the surgery, we found a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma with intratumoral bleeding that extended into the surrounding brain parenchyma. RESULTS We removed the hematoma and resected the tumor completely in the same session. The histopathological classification of the tumor was a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. The patient recovered very well after surgery, without significant neurological sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Having reviewed the relevant references from the medical literature, we consider this event as an extremely rare presentation of a benign sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient without any predisposing medical factors. The possible mechanisms of bleeding from this tumor type are discussed. PMID:27127413

  8. Hormone-dependent shrinkage of a sphenoid wing meningioma after pregnancy: case report.

    PubMed

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Freyschlag, Christian F; Stockhammer, Günter; Taucher, Susanne; Maier, Hans; Thomé, Claudius; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are known to be associated with female sex hormones. Worsening neurological symptoms or newly diagnosed meningiomas have been described in the context of elevated levels of sex hormones, for example, in pregnancy. To the authors' knowledge, tumor shrinkage after the normalization of hormones has not been described, even if it is known that neurological deficits due to meningioma compression may improve after giving birth. A 32-year-old female patient presented with severe headache and vision disturbances at the end of her second pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extended mass at the lateral left-sided sphenoid wing that was suspected to be a meningioma. After delivery, the patient's symptoms improved, and MRI obtained 2 months postpartum showed significant shrinkage of the lesion. Significant tumor shrinkage can occur after pregnancy. Thus, repeat imaging is indicated in these patients.

  9. High-dose radiation-induced meningiomas following acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Salvati, M; Cervoni, L; Artico, M

    1996-05-01

    The authors review three personal cases of patients who developed cerebral meningiomas following high-dose radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two patients were female and one male. Their ages when the leukemia appeared were between 11 and 15 years. All patients were treated with a course of prophylactic irradiation to the neuraxis for a total dose of 24 Gy. After an average interval of 10.4 years, all three patients presented a meningioma; histologically, one was meningothelial and two were fibrous. All three meningiomas presented atypical features. At follow-up 1, 4, and 4 years respectively after surgery, none of these patients presents neurological deficits or neuroradiological signs of recurrence. Forty-nine cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma are also reviewed.

  10. Genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways targeted

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Ruiz, Laura; Miranda, David; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are usually considered to be benign central nervous system tumors; however, they show heterogenous clinical, histolopathological and cytogenetic features associated with a variable outcome. In recent years important advances have been achieved in the identification of the genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways involved. Thus, monosomy 22, which is often associated with mutations of the NF2 gene, has emerged as the most frequent alteration of meningiomas; in addition, several other genes (e.g. AKT1, KLF4, TRAF7, SMO) and chromosomes have been found to be recurrently altered often in association with more complex karyotypes and involvement of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the current knowledge about the most relevant genes involved and the signaling pathways targeted by such alterations. In addition, we summarize those proposals that have been made so far for classification and prognostic stratification of meningiomas based on their genetic/genomic features. PMID:25965831

  11. Benchmarking sheath subgrid boundary conditions for macroscopic-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, T. G.; Smithe, D. N.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of sheaths near metallic or dielectric-coated wall materials in contact with a plasma is ubiquitous, often giving rise to physical phenomena (sputtering, secondary electron emission, etc) which influence plasma properties and dynamics both near and far from the material interface. In this paper, we use first-principles PIC simulations of such interfaces to formulate a subgrid sheath boundary condition which encapsulates fundamental aspects of the sheath behavior at the interface. Such a boundary condition, based on the capacitive behavior of the sheath, is shown to be useful in fluid simulations wherein sheath scale lengths are substantially smaller than scale lengths for other relevant physical processes (e.g. radiofrequency wavelengths), in that it enables kinetic processes associated with the presence of the sheath to be numerically modeled without explicit resolution of spatial and temporal sheath scales such as electron Debye length or plasma frequency.

  12. Structural characterization of highly branched glucan sheath from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Koichi; Kaida, Rumi; Hayashi, Takahisa; Takabe, Keiji; Watanabe, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Wood rotting basidiomycetes produce extracellular mucilaginous sheaths interfacing fungal hyphae and plant biomass. While the versatility of these fungal sheaths has been addressed, sheaths generated by selective white-rot fungi remain poorly understood. To fill this gap, the sheath produced by the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, which degrades lignin while inflicting limited cellulose damage, was analyzed in this study. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the sheath formed three days after inoculation into a beech wood slice on an agar plate and was embedded at the interface between fungal hyphae and wood cell walls. The sheath's chemical structure was evaluated from fungus cultures in a liquid medium containing [U-(13)C6]-d-glucose and beech wood slices. Compositional analysis, methylation analysis, and (13)C NMR demonstrated that the sheath mainly consisted of a comb-like β-1,6-glucopyranose residue-branched β-1,3-glucan, which is advantageous to retain water and extracellular secondary metabolites.

  13. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  14. Growth of a progesterone receptor-positive meningioma in a female patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, T; Crowley, R K; Farrell, M; MacNally, S; Govender, P; Feeney, J; Gibney, J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Meningioma growth has been previously described in patients receiving oestrogen/progestogen therapy. We describe the clinical, radiological, biochemical and pathologic findings in a 45-year-old woman with congenital adrenal hyperplasia secondary to a defect in the 21-hydroxylase enzyme who had chronic poor adherence to glucocorticoid therapy with consequent virilisation. The patient presented with a frontal headache and marked right-sided proptosis. Laboratory findings demonstrated androgen excess with a testosterone of 18.1 nmol/L (0–1.5 nmol) and 17-Hydroxyprogesterone >180 nmol/L (<6.5 nmol/L). CT abdomen was performed as the patient complained of rapid-onset increasing abdominal girth and revealed bilateral large adrenal myelolipomata. MRI brain revealed a large meningioma involving the right sphenoid wing with anterior displacement of the right eye and associated bony destruction. Surgical debulking of the meningioma was performed and histology demonstrated a meningioma, which stained positive for the progesterone receptor. Growth of meningioma has been described in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy, in women receiving contraceptive therapy and in transsexual patients undergoing therapy with high-dose oestrogen and progestogens. Progesterone receptor positivity has been described previously in meningiomas. 17-Hydroxyprogesterone is elevated in CAH and has affinity and biological activity at the progesterone receptor. Therefore, we hypothesise that patients who have long-standing increased adrenal androgen precursor concentrations may be at risk of meningioma growth. Learning points: Patients with long-standing CAH (particularly if not optimally controlled) may present with other complications, which may be related to long-standing elevated androgen or decreased glucocorticoid levels. Chronic poor control of CAH is associated with adrenal myelolipoma and adrenal rest tissue tumours. Meningiomas are sensitive to

  15. Expression of cell adhesion molecules and doublecortin in canine anaplastic meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ide, T; Uchida, K; Suzuki, K; Kagawa, Y; Nakayama, H

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion into the surrounding nervous tissue is one of the histologic hallmarks of anaplastic meningiomas. To identify other possible markers for aggression in canine meningiomas, the relationship between histologic features and the expression of molecules involved in cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and invasion was examined. Immunohistochemistry for epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), neural cadherin (N-cadherin), β-catenin, doublecortin (DCX), and Ki-67 was performed for 55 cases of canine meningioma. DCX was preferentially expressed in tumor cells invading the brain parenchyma (12 of 14 cases), suggesting its involvement in the invasion process. Regardless of the histologic type, E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression was observed in 31 of 55 and 44 of 55 cases, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between DCX and N-cadherin expression and a significant negative correlation between E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression, suggesting that decreased E-cadherin and increased N-cadherin expression induce DCX expression. Typical membranous β-catenin expression was observed in 10 of 55 cases, whereas nuclear translocation was observed in 33 cases. Nuclear β-catenin expression was frequently found in anaplastic meningiomas (12 of 14 cases). The Ki-67 labeling indices were significantly higher in anaplastic meningiomas than in other types. These findings indicate that the expression of N-cadherin and DCX and the nuclear translocation of β-catenin are closely associated with the presence of invasion and anaplasia in canine meningiomas. Notably, granular cell meningiomas were negative for almost all the molecules examined, suggesting that they have a different tumor biology than other meningiomas.

  16. Diagnosing necrotic meningioma: a distinctive imaging pattern in diffusion MRI and MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arie, Gal; Serlin, Yonatan; Ivens, Sebastian; Benifla, Mony; Cagnano, Emanuela; Melamed, Israel; Merkin, Vladimir; Shelef, Ilan

    2017-02-01

    The differential diagnosis of necrotic meningiomas includes brain abscess and malignant neoplasms. We report and discuss hereby the work-up of two patients diagnosed with necrotic meningioma using diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resective surgery, and histopathology. The purpose of the present article is to add to the scant literature on the use of advanced imaging modalities in the routine investigation of brain lesions and their utility in arriving at the final diagnosis.

  17. A novel mutation of the FAT2 gene in spinal meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Genshu; Kishimoto, Koji; Mitsuya, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas may be classified as neurofibromin 2 (NF2)-associated and non-NF2 meningiomas depending on the presence or absence of molecular alterations in the NF2 gene. One of the characteristic histological features of meningiomas is the whorl formation of neoplastic arachnoid cells. NF2 is a human homolog of the Drosophila gene, Merlin (Mer). In humans, NF2 is the gene responsible for the disease neurofibromatosis type II, which results in the development of brain tumors, including acoustic neurinoma and meningioma. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of spinal meningioma. It was hypothesized that the whorl formation of meningiomas may occur as a result of a disturbance in the planar cell polarity (PCP) of arachnoid cells, thus, genes understood to govern PCP signaling were analyzed for alterations. Whole exome sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing validation was performed for the analysis of spinal meningioma tissue obtained from a 42-year-old Japanese female. The sequencing identified a nonsynonymous mutation of c.3597G>C, resulting in p.Q1199H, in the FAT atypical cadherin 2 (FAT2) gene. FAT2 is homologous to the Drosophila Fat (Ft) gene, which belongs to the cadherin superfamily. Drosophila Fat is involved in PCP, tumor suppression and Hippo (Hpo) signaling, which is associated with Mer. Taken together, the results of the present study concluded that human FAT2 may function as a key molecule that governs not only PCP, but also NF2-Hpo signaling in arachnoid cells; thus, a mutation in this gene may result in spinal meningioma. PMID:27900010

  18. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  19. Impaired health-related quality of life in meningioma patients-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zamanipoor Najafabadi, Amir H; Peeters, Marthe C M; Dirven, Linda; Lobatto, Daniel J; Groen, Justus L; Broekman, Marieke L D; Peerdeman, Saskia M; Peul, Wilo C; Taphoorn, Martin J B; van Furth, Wouter R

    2016-12-29

    While surgical and radiotherapeutic improvements increased life expectancy of meningioma patients, little is known about these patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Therefore, the objectives of this systematic review were to assess HRQoL in meningioma patients, the methodological quality of the used questionnaires (COSMIN criteria), and the reporting level of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in the included studies (International Society of Quality of Life Research criteria).Nineteen articles met our inclusion criteria. HRQoL was measured with 13 different questionnaires, 3 validated in meningioma patients. According to our predefined cutoff, HRQoL data were reported sufficiently in 5 out of 19 studies. Both findings hamper interpretation of the PRO results.In general, meningioma patients reported clinically worse HRQoL than healthy controls. Although meningioma patients had better HRQoL than glioma patients, this difference was not clinically relevant. Radiotherapy seemed to improve some domains of HRQoL in the short term, while HRQoL decreased to pre-radiotherapy levels in the long term. Tumor resection increased HRQoL, but long-term follow-up showed persistent reduced HRQoL compared with healthy controls. These results suggest an impaired HRQoL in meningioma patients, even years after anti-tumor treatment. Results of this systematic review warrant high quality prospective studies, better instruments to assess HRQoL, and improved level of reporting for this group of patients.

  20. The heterogeneity of meningioma revealed by multiparameter analysis: infiltrative and non-infiltrative clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gay, Emmanuel; Lages, Elodie; Ramus, Claire; Guttin, Audrey; El Atifi, Michèle; Dupré, Isabelle; Bouamrani, Ali; Salon, Caroline; Ratel, David; Wion, Didier; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Tumor invasion or infiltration of adjacent tissues is the source of clinical challenges in diagnosis as well as prevention and treatment. Among brain tumors, infiltration of the adjacent tissues with diverse pleiotropic mechanisms is frequently encountered in benign meningiomas. We assessed whether a multiparametric analysis of meningiomas based on data from both clinical observations and molecular analyses could provide a consistent and accurate appraisal of invasive and infiltrative phenotypes and help determine the diagnosis of these tumors. Tissue analyses of 37 meningiomas combined enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) assays of two different protein biomarkers (thrombospondin 1 and a phosphorylated form of vimentin) as well as gene expression analyses with oligonucleotide micro-arrays. Up to four different clinical and molecular parameters were then examined for tumor classification. From this study, we were able to cluster 36 out of the 37 tumors into two different subsets corresponding to infiltrative/invasive and non-infiltrative tumors. In addition, meningiomas that invade brain and those that infiltrate the neighboring skull bone exhibited no distinguishable molecular features. Our multi-parameter analysis that combines clinical data, transcriptomic and molecular assays clearly reveals the heterogeneity of meningiomas and distinguishes the intrinsically infiltrative/invasive tumors from the non-infiltrative meningiomas.

  1. Co-occurrence of Pituitary Adenoma with Suprasellar and Olfactory Groove Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kai-Zheong; Goldschlager, Tony; Chandra, Ronil V.; Hall, Jonathan; Uren, Brent; Pullar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The co-existence of pituitary adenoma and meningioma is extremely rare. It is even rarer in patients with no previous known risk factors for either tumour. Here, we present a case of synchronous non-functioning pituitary adenoma with suprasellar and olfactory groove meningiomas in a patient without previous irradiation. Methods: The tumours were diagnosed on MRI in the 65-year-old patient who presented with patchy visual deficits. The decision was made to undergo surgery for resection of the suprasellar meningioma and the pituitary adenoma, leaving the small olfactory groove meningioma intact. Extended endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was performed. Results: Macroscopic clearance was achieved for pituitary macroadenoma and suprasellar meningioma. Postoperatively, visual field tsting and pituitary axis hormonal levels were normal. The pituitary macroadenoma was confirmed to be a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. The meningioma was diagnosed to be of WHO grade 1. Conclusion: The rationale for choosing such management option, including its risks and benefits in this challenging patient is discussed. PMID:27872697

  2. Group I Paks as therapeutic targets in NF2-deficient meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Sergio G.; Campbell, David A.; Ong, Christy C.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D. Bradley; Yang, Zeng-jie; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of multiple tumors in the central nervous system, most notably schwannomas and meningiomas. Mutational inactivation of NF2 is found in 40–60% of sporadic meningiomas, but the molecular mechanisms underlying malignant changes of meningioma cells remain unclear. Because group I p21-activated kinases (Paks) bind to and are inhibited by the NF2-encoded protein Merlin, we assessed the signaling and anti-tumor effects of three group-I specific Pak inhibitors - Frax597, 716 and 1036 - in NF2−/− meningiomas in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model. We found that these Pak inhibitors suppressed the proliferation and motility of both benign (Ben-Men1) and malignant (KT21-MG1) meningiomas cells. In addition, we found a strong reduction in phosphorylation of Mek and S6, and decreased cyclin D1 expression in both cell lines after treatment with Pak inhibitors. Using intracranial xenografts of luciferase-expressing KT21-MG1 cells, we found that treated mice showed significant tumor suppression for all three Pak inhibitors. Similar effects were observed in Ben-Men1 cells. Tumors dissected from treated animals exhibited an increase in apoptosis without notable change in proliferation. Collectively, these results suggest that Pak inhibitors might be useful agents in treating NF2-deficient meningiomas. PMID:25596744

  3. Large/giant meningiomas of posterior third ventricular region: falcotentorial or velum interpositum?

    PubMed

    Behari, Sanjay; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Kumar, Ashish; Mehrotra, Anant; Srivastava, Arun K; Sahu, Rabi N; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K

    2014-01-01

    Surgical excision of rare, large-to-giant posterior third ventricular (PTV) meningiomas [including velum-interpositum meningiomas (VIM; postero-superior venous complex displacement; without falco-tentorial attachment) and falco-tentorial meningiomas (FTM; falco-tentorial attachment; displacing major veins antero-inferiorly)] is extremely challenging. To study the management nuances in the excision of large-to-giant PTV meningiomas. Tertiary care referral center. Four patients with large (>3 cm; n = 2) and giant (>5 cm; n = 2) meningiomas (FTM = 2; VIM = 2, mean tumor size = 4.9 cm) underwent occipital transtentorial approach (OTT) for tumor excision. One also underwent a second-stage supracerebellar infratentorial (SCIT) approach. The side of approach was determined by lateral tumor extension and venous displacement (right = 3, left = 1). Near-total removal or subtotal excision (<10% remaining) with radiotherapy was performed in 2 patients each, respectively. At follow-up (mean: 14.75 months), clinical improvement without tumor recurrence/re-growth was achieved. Extent of excision was determined by position of great vein of Galen; tumor attachment to falco-tentorium or major veins; its consistency; its lateral and inferior extent; and, presence of a good tumor-neuraxial arachnoidal plane. OTT is the preferable approach for large-to-giant meningiomas as it provides a wider corridor and better delineation of tumor-neurovascular arachnoidal interface.

  4. Chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for 30 mm goat peroneal nerve defect

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiyuan; Wei, Yujun; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In the current research, to find if the combination of chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can be used to bridge 30 mm long peroneal nerve defects in goats, 15 animals were separated into BM-MNC group (n = 5), vehicle group (n = 5), and autologous nerve graft group (n = 5). 12 months after the surgery, animals were evaluated by behavioral observation, magnetic resonance imaging tests, histomorphological and electrophysiological analysis. Results revealed that animals in BM-MNC group and autologous nerve graft group achieved fine functional recovery; magnetic resonance imaging tests and histomorphometry analysis showed that the nerve defect was bridged by myelinated nerve axons in those animals. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning myelinated axon density, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and peroneal nerve action potential. Animals in vehicle group failed to achieve significant functional recovery. The results indicated that chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells have strong potential in bridging long peripheral nerve defects and could be applied in future clinical trials. PMID:28287100

  5. Chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for 30 mm goat peroneal nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiyuan; Wei, Yujun; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang

    2017-03-13

    In the current research, to find if the combination of chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can be used to bridge 30 mm long peroneal nerve defects in goats, 15 animals were separated into BM-MNC group (n = 5), vehicle group (n = 5), and autologous nerve graft group (n = 5). 12 months after the surgery, animals were evaluated by behavioral observation, magnetic resonance imaging tests, histomorphological and electrophysiological analysis. Results revealed that animals in BM-MNC group and autologous nerve graft group achieved fine functional recovery; magnetic resonance imaging tests and histomorphometry analysis showed that the nerve defect was bridged by myelinated nerve axons in those animals. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning myelinated axon density, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and peroneal nerve action potential. Animals in vehicle group failed to achieve significant functional recovery. The results indicated that chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells have strong potential in bridging long peripheral nerve defects and could be applied in future clinical trials.

  6. Continuum-kinetic approach to sheath simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, Petr; Hakim, Ammar; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2016-10-01

    Simulations of sheaths are performed using a novel continuum-kinetic model with collisions including ionization/recombination. A discontinuous Galerkin method is used to directly solve the Boltzmann-Poisson system to obtain a particle distribution function. Direct discretization of the distribution function has advantages of being noise-free compared to particle-in-cell methods. The distribution function, which is available at each node of the configuration space, can be readily used to calculate the collision integrals in order to get ionization and recombination operators. Analytical models are used to obtain the cross-sections as a function of energy. Results will be presented incorporating surface physics with a classical sheath in Hall thruster-relevant geometry. This work was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0193.

  7. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  8. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury.

  9. Glucose utilization by intracranial meningiomas as an index of tumor aggressivity and probability of recurrence: a PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Di Chiro, G.; Hatazawa, J.; Katz, D.A.; Rizzoli, H.V.; De Michele, D.J.

    1987-08-01

    Seventeen patients with intracranial meningiomas were studied with positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-FDG) to assess the glucose utilization of these tumors. Four meningiomas followed for 3-5 years after PET-FDG and surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. These tumors had significantly lower glucose utilization rates (1.9 mg/dl/min +/- 1.0) than 11 recurrent or regrowing meningiomas (4.5 mg/dl/min +/- 1.96). The glucose metabolic rates of meningiomas correlated with tumor growth, as estimated from changes in tumor size on repeated computed tomographic scans. Histopathologically, a syncytial (atypical) meningioma had the highest glucose utilization rate, followed by a papillary meningioma and an angioblastic meningioma. Individual transitional and syncytial (typical) meningiomas showed marked differences in glucose metabolism despite similar microscopic appearance. Glucose utilization rate appears to be at least as reliable as histologic classification and other proposed criteria for predicting the behavior and recurrence of intracranial meningiomas.

  10. Visceral and bone metastases of a WHO grade 2 meningioma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Paix, A; Waissi, W; Antoni, D; Adeduntan, R; Noël, G

    2017-02-22

    Meningiomas represent the most common tumours of the central nervous system in adults. Risk factors include ionizing radiation, female hormones exposure, head trauma, cell phone use, breast cancer and family history of meningioma. Despite complete surgical resection, natural history of meningiomas often includes local recurrence but very few metastatic meningiomas have been reported. Here, we report the case of a metastatic meningioma. A 43-year-old woman was firstly treated for a symptomatic parietal meningioma WHO grade II by surgical resection followed by an irradiation of the surgical bed. After surgical resection and irradiation, the patient recovered incompletely. Two months after the end of the radiation treatment, the patient presented at the emergency unit for sciatic pain revealing bone metastases that has been histologically confirmed. Moreover, imaging led to the diagnosis of liver and lungs metastasis. Despite lack of guidelines for metastatic meningioma, few treatments have been used and published for recurrent and multiple meningioma management. In case studies, some partial responses have been seen with mifepristone and improved progression-free survival rates have been obtained with hydroxyurea and sunitinib. Metastasis in meningioma is very uncommon and no specific management has been described. Hydroxyurea, sunitinib and mifepristone could be options if no clinical trial data is available.

  11. Experimental Observation of Sheath-presheath Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kella, Vara Prasad; Ghosh, Joydeep; Sharma, Devendra; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Instabilities in the Sheath-presheath regime are most important phenomena that can affect the plasma-wall interaction. These instabilities can modify the particle flow velocities and distribution functions in that regime. In this present work, instabilities exists in the sheath-presheath in a low temperature plasma are observed. Experiments are carried in single ion species argon plasma and multi ion species Ar-He plasma. Experiments are carried in a stainless steel chamber with filament discharge plasma. Sheath is produced around a stainless steel grid at center of the chamber. Fluctuations from the grid and cylindrical Langmuir probe are recorded. Langmuir probe is used to get the floating potential fluctuations from presheath and bulk plasma as well. In single ion species argon plasma, there are two instabilities observed namely ion-ion counter streaming instability through mesh grid and ion acoustic instability respectively arises in the presheath. In case of multi-ion Ar-He plasma, two stream instability also explored. The neutral pressure threshold for the sustain of these instabilities also observed.

  12. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  13. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore » to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  14. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  15. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  16. Electron Sheaths and Non-ambipolar Diffusion in Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-10-01

    Electron sheaths were first predicted by Langmuir in 1929 when he stated that, ``with a large area, A, an anode sheath is a positive ion sheath, but that as A decreases, a point is reached where the positive ion sheath disappears and it is replaced by an electron sheath.''. We show that electron sheath formation near a positive anode depends on the anode area, Aa, as well as the area available for ion loss, Ai. When Aa/Ai< (me/mi)^1/2, the electron sheath potential monotonically decreases from the anode to the bulk plasma. When the anode is larger than this, a potential dip forms in the electron sheath to reduce the electron current lost to the anode. This potential dip is necessary to preserve global current balance and when it is present, total non-ambipolar diffusion can occur where all electrons are lost from the plasma through an electron sheath and all positive ions are lost elsewhere. Additional measurements were carried out to identify the transition from positive (ion) to negative (electron) sheaths. Data were taken in low-pressure argon plasma generated by hot filaments and confined in a multidipole chamber. I. Langmuir, Physical Review. 33, 954 (1929).

  17. Neurofibrosarcoma of the radial nerve in von Recklinghausen's disease with metastatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, R A

    1978-01-01

    A case of von Recklinghausen's disease with multiple neurofibromatosis is described in which death was caused by intracerebral haemorrhage due to metastatic angiosarcoma. The primary site was a peripheral nerve tumour which, on microscopic examination, showed both angiosarcoma and neurofibrosarcoma with transitional zones between the two. This is interpreted as another example of divergent differentiation in malignant nerve sheath tumours, and the case is compared with the two similar examples found in the literature. Images PMID:96219

  18. [The structure of the optic nerve in experimental glaucoma and in the means for its treatment].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V F; Mikheeva, E A; Karelina, V E; Alekseev, V N

    2000-01-01

    Using light and electron microscopy disorders of structure of the optic nerve were studied in rabbits with adrenaline induced glaucoma and after the action of antioxidants (Emoxipine, Erisode) used for preventive and medical purposes. Changes in glaucoma and after administration of drugs in axons and their myelinated sheath were similar but differently pronounced in right and left eye of the same animal. Positive effect of Erisode used for preventive and medical purposes was noted. Emoxipine enhanced the disturbances in optic nerve structure.

  19. Resolution of paroxysmal hemicrania after resection of intracranial meningioma.

    PubMed

    Dafer, Rima M; Hocker, Sara; Kumar, Ragasri; McGee, Jan; Jay, Walter M

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal hemicrania is a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia first described in 1976, characterized by episodic attacks of excruciating unilateral periorbital and temporal stabbing, pulsatile, craw-like, or boring headaches lasting 2 - 30 minutes, accompanied by autonomic features, and alleviated by indomethacin. Paroxysmal hemicrania is divided into an episodic or chronic form, depending on the duration and frequency of the attacks. We describe a case of paroxysmal hemicrania in a patient with a contralateral anterior clinoid meningioma, which resolved after tumor resection. Most cases of autonomic cephalgias are primary headaches and not caused by underlying intracranial structural lesions. Based on our patient and a literature review of secondary causes of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, we recommend that all patients with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias including paroxysmal hemicrania undergo neuroimaging studies. The preferred neuro-radiologic procedure should be a cranial MRI to exclude underlying structural intracranial lesions, particularly in the sellar and parasellar regions.

  20. Intracranial meningioma with polygonal granular cell appearance in a Chihuahua.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Ohnishi, Yumi; Matsunaga, Satoru; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Uetsuka, Koji

    2008-05-01

    A menigioma with polygonal granular cell proliferation in an 11-year and 8-month-old male Chihuahua is described. The tumor was observed under the dura matter of the right cerebrum. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of solid growth foci of small- or large- sized polygonal cells, with pale-stained nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and fine granular to foamy eosinophilic cytoplasm. Some of the proliferating cells contained variable amounts of cytoplasmic PAS-positive granules. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin and S-100 protein. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells contained vesicular structures with a few small round-shaped bodies in the cytoplasm. We diagnosed the case as canine meningioma with granular cell appearance.

  1. Rare Intradural Cervical Nerve Root Metastasis of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Elena; Hanna, George; Gospodarev, Vadim; Raghavan, Ravi; Ghostine, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Intradural extramedullary nerve root metastasis is extremely unusual with only a handful of cases reported, and it presents most commonly in the thoracic and lumbosacral regions. We report the first case of metastasis to a ventral cervical nerve root in a patient with low-grade follicular thyroid carcinoma thought to be in remission for several years. Histopathology demonstrated malignant transformation and invasion of the nerve root. This case underscores that any history of malignancy regardless of staging, grading, or remission status should raise the suspicion of metastasis as it can mimic other spine and nerve sheath tumors and represent malignant transformation. Gross total resection can be safely achieved with intraoperative neuromonitoring and result in improved function; however, treatment is likely palliative. PMID:28018768

  2. Strain differences in the branching of the sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Rupp, A; Schmahl, W; Lederer, W; Matiasek, K

    2007-06-01

    The sciatic nerve in the rat is the site most often used for peripheral nerve regeneration studies. The length of sciatic nerve available for research, however, depends on the point at which the sciatic nerve divides into the peroneal and tibial nerves. In the present study, the hind limbs of 150 adult male rats of five different strains (Sprague-Dawley, Fischer 344, Wistar-Han, Lewis and Nude) were analysed with regard to femur length, the point at which the sciatic nerve divides into the tibial and peroneal nerves, and where these are surrounded by the same epineurium, and the point at which they are encased in individual epineurial sheaths. The results indicate that the lengths of sciatic nerve are fairly constant in all strains of rats. In absolute terms, they amount to about one-third of the length of the femur for stretches of undivided sciatic nerve, and up to nearly half of the femur length for stretches where the tibial and peroneal nerves are already present, but are still enclosed by the same epineurium. In 61.7% of the hind limbs examined in Fischer rats, however, no sciatic nerve could be seen as such, but only in the form of its successors surrounded by the separate epineuria. This makes it highly advisable not to use male adult Fischer rats in peripheral nerve regeneration studies with the sciatic nerve as the point of focus.

  3. Improvement of long-term blindness caused by compression from inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma after optic canal decompression: An extremely rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Horikoshi, Tomo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should definitely be considered as an option. PMID:27413579

  4. Simulation study of the magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G.; Mehdipour, H.; Zahed, H.

    2009-10-15

    Numerical solutions of stationary multifluid equations are used to study the formation and properties of the magnetized sheath near the boundary of a dusty plasma. The impacts of the strength of the magnetic field, the dust and plasma number densities, and the electron temperature on the sheath structure and spatial distributions of various quantities are investigated. It is shown that for a given angle of incidence of the magnetic field, there is a threshold magnetic field intensity above which some kind of large regular inhomogeneities develop on the spatial profile of the dust particles. The sheath thickness, the electron and ion number densities, and the absolute dust charge are strongly affected by the variation in the dust number density. The sheath demonstrates a nonlinear dependence on the electron temperature; as the electron temperature rises, the sheath first is broadened and the absolute wall potential decreases but then at higher temperatures the sheath becomes narrower and the absolute wall potential increases.

  5. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  6. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  7. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  8. Microarray Expression Data Identify DCC as a Candidate Gene for Early Meningioma Progression.

    PubMed

    Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Hussein, Deema; Al-Adwani, Fatima; Karim, Sajjad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Al-Sharif, Mona; Jamal, Awatif; Al-Ghamdi, Fahad; Baeesa, Saleh S; Bangash, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Adeel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary brain tumors bearing in a minority of cases an aggressive phenotype. Although meningiomas are stratified according to their histology and clinical behavior, the underlying molecular genetics predicting aggressiveness are not thoroughly understood. We performed whole transcript expression profiling in 10 grade I and four grade II meningiomas, three of which invaded the brain. Microarray expression analysis identified deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) as a differentially expressed gene (DEG) enabling us to cluster meningiomas into DCC low expression (3 grade I and 3 grade II tumors), DCC medium expression (2 grade I and 1 grade II tumors), and DCC high expression (5 grade I tumors) groups. Comparison between the DCC low expression and DCC high expression groups resulted in 416 DEGs (p-value<0.05; fold change>2). The most significantly downregulated genes in the DCC low expression group comprised DCC, phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C), calmodulin-dependent 70kDa olfactomedin 2 (OLFM2), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 (GSTM5), phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1), sema domain, transmembrane domain (TM) and cytoplasmic domain, (semaphorin) 6D (SEMA6D), and indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT). The most significantly upregulated genes comprised chromosome 5 open reading frame 63 (C5orf63), homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), and basic helix-loop-helix family, member e40 (BHLHE40). Biofunctional analysis identified as predicted top upstream regulators beta-estradiol, TGFB1, Tgf beta complex, LY294002, and dexamethasone and as predicted top regulator effectors NFkB, PIK3R1, and CREBBP. The microarray expression data served also for a comparison between meningiomas from female and male patients and for a comparison between brain invasive and non-invasive meningiomas resulting in a number of significant DEGs and related biofunctions. In conclusion, based on its expression levels, DCC may constitute a

  9. Combined treatment by octreotide and everolimus: Octreotide enhances inhibitory effect of everolimus in aggressive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Graillon, Thomas; Defilles, Céline; Mohamed, Amira; Lisbonis, Christophe; Germanetti, Anne-Laure; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Adetchessi, Tarek; Fuentes, Stéphane; Metellus, Philippe; Dufour, Henry; Enjalbert, Alain; Barlier, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Treatment for recurrent and aggressive meningiomas remains an unmet medical need in neuro-oncology, and chemotherapy exhibits limited clinical activity, if any. Merlin expression, encoded by the NF2 gene, is lost in a majority of meningiomas, and merlin is a negative regulator of mTORC1. The sst2 somatostatin receptor, targeted by octreotide, is highly expressed in meningiomas. To investigate new therapeutic strategies, we evaluated the activity of everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), BKM-120 and BEZ-235 (new Pi3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors), octreotide and a combined treatment (octreotide plus everolimus), on cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and cell cycle proteins, respectively. The in vitro study was conducted on human meningioma primary cells extracted from fresh tumors, allowing the assessment of somatostatin analogs at the concentration levels used in patients. The results were correlated to WHO grades. Further, everolimus decreased cell viability of human meningiomas, but concomitantly, induced Akt activation, reducing the antiproliferative effect of the drug. The new Pi3K inhibitors were not more active than everolimus alone, limiting their clinical relevance. In contrast, a clear cooperative inhibitory effect of octreotide and everolimus was observed on cell proliferation in all tested meningiomas, including WHO grades II-III. Octreotide not only reversed everolimus-induced Akt phosphorylation but also displayed additive and complementary effects with everolimus on downstream proteins involved in translation (4EB-P1), and controlling cell cycle (p27Kip1 and cyclin D1). We have demonstrated a co-operative action between everolimus and octreotide on cell proliferation in human meningiomas, including aggressive ones, establishing the basis for a clinical trial.

  10. Global epigenetic profiling identifies methylation subgroups associated with recurrence-free survival in meningioma.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Wilson, Charmaine D; Zadeh, Gelareh; DeMonte, Franco; Jones, David T W; Pfister, Stefan M; Sulman, Erik P; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2017-03-01

    Meningioma is the most common primary brain tumor and carries a substantial risk of local recurrence. Methylation profiles of meningioma and their clinical implications are not well understood. We hypothesized that aggressive meningiomas have unique DNA methylation patterns that could be used to better stratify patient management. Samples (n = 140) were profiled using the Illumina HumanMethylation450BeadChip. Unsupervised modeling on a training set (n = 89) identified 2 molecular methylation subgroups of meningioma (MM) with significantly different recurrence-free survival (RFS) times between the groups: a prognostically unfavorable subgroup (MM-UNFAV) and a prognostically favorable subgroup (MM-FAV). This finding was validated in the remaining 51 samples and led to a baseline meningioma methylation classifier (bMMC) defined by 283 CpG loci (283-bMMC). To further optimize a recurrence predictor, probes subsumed within the baseline classifier were subject to additional modeling using a similar training/validation approach, leading to a 64-CpG loci meningioma methylation predictor (64-MMP). After adjustment for relevant clinical variables [WHO grade, mitotic index, Simpson grade, sex, location, and copy number aberrations (CNAs)] multivariable analyses for RFS showed that the baseline methylation classifier was not significant (p = 0.0793). The methylation predictor, however, was significantly associated with tumor recurrence (p < 0.0001). CNAs were extracted from the 450k intensity profiles. Tumor samples in the MM-UNFAV subgroup showed an overall higher proportion of CNAs compared to the MM-FAV subgroup tumors and the CNAs were complex in nature. CNAs in the MM-UNFAV subgroup included recurrent losses of 1p, 6q, 14q and 18q, and gain of 1q, all of which were previously identified as indicators of poor outcome. In conclusion, our analyses demonstrate robust DNA methylation signatures in meningioma that correlate with CNAs and stratify patients by recurrence

  11. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion in human meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, J C; Hsiao, Y Y; Teng, L J; Shun, C T; Chen, C T; Goldman, C K; Kao, M C

    1999-02-01

    Previously, we induced vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular permeability factor (VEGF/VPF) secretion in glioma cell lines by using physiologic concentrations of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). We hypothesized that VEGF/VPF might enhance the blood supply required for the unregulated growth of tumors, and that it acts as the central mediator of tumor angiogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether the expression of VEGF/VPF by meningiomas is regulated by growth factors or sex hormones. By means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of CH-157MN meningioma cell supernatants, we demonstrated that EGF and bFGF similarly induce VEGF secretion by CH-157MN meningioma cells. At the maximum concentrations of EGF (50 ng/mL) and bFGF (50 ng/mL) used in this study, VEGF secretion was induced to 140% to 160% above baseline constitutive secretion. PDGF-BB homodimer did not enhance VEGF secretion significantly. Estradiol (up to 10(-7) mol/L), progesterone (up to 10(-5) mol/L), or testosterone (up to 10(-5) mol/L) did not stimulate or inhibit VEGF secretion in CH-157MN meningioma cells (p > 0.05). Furthermore, we demonstrated that dexamethasone decreased VEGF secretion to 32% of baseline constitutive secretion. This might explain the effect of corticosteroids in alleviating peritumoral brain edema in meningiomas. These results suggest that VEGF secretion in CH-157MN meningioma cells is mainly regulated by growth factors and corticosteroids, but not by sex hormones. Understanding the regulation of VEGF/VPF secretion in meningiomas might contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy.

  12. Microarray Expression Data Identify DCC as a Candidate Gene for Early Meningioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Hussein, Deema; Al-Adwani, Fatima; Karim, Sajjad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Al-Sharif, Mona; Jamal, Awatif; Al-Ghamdi, Fahad; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Bangash, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Adeel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary brain tumors bearing in a minority of cases an aggressive phenotype. Although meningiomas are stratified according to their histology and clinical behavior, the underlying molecular genetics predicting aggressiveness are not thoroughly understood. We performed whole transcript expression profiling in 10 grade I and four grade II meningiomas, three of which invaded the brain. Microarray expression analysis identified deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) as a differentially expressed gene (DEG) enabling us to cluster meningiomas into DCC low expression (3 grade I and 3 grade II tumors), DCC medium expression (2 grade I and 1 grade II tumors), and DCC high expression (5 grade I tumors) groups. Comparison between the DCC low expression and DCC high expression groups resulted in 416 DEGs (p-value < 0.05; fold change > 2). The most significantly downregulated genes in the DCC low expression group comprised DCC, phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C), calmodulin-dependent 70kDa olfactomedin 2 (OLFM2), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 (GSTM5), phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1), sema domain, transmembrane domain (TM) and cytoplasmic domain, (semaphorin) 6D (SEMA6D), and indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT). The most significantly upregulated genes comprised chromosome 5 open reading frame 63 (C5orf63), homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), and basic helix-loop-helix family, member e40 (BHLHE40). Biofunctional analysis identified as predicted top upstream regulators beta-estradiol, TGFB1, Tgf beta complex, LY294002, and dexamethasone and as predicted top regulator effectors NFkB, PIK3R1, and CREBBP. The microarray expression data served also for a comparison between meningiomas from female and male patients and for a comparison between brain invasive and non-invasive meningiomas resulting in a number of significant DEGs and related biofunctions. In conclusion, based on its expression levels, DCC may constitute

  13. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  14. Nondestructive testing of metallic sheath for internally cooled superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    McClung, R.W.; Cook, K.V.; Dodd, C.V.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    For quality assurance in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program, we developed ultrasonic and eddy-current techniques to examine the JBK-75 alloy sheath for superconducting cable for a large magnet. Ultrasound was used to examine the strip before forming into the sheath, and eddy currents were used to examine the seam weld after the sheath had been formed around the cable.

  15. Steerable sheath technology in the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jubin; Wong, Kelvin C K; Ginks, Matthew R; Bashir, Yaver; Betts, Timothy R; Rajappan, Kim

    2013-12-01

    Steerable sheaths have been shown to reduce procedure time in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), where catheter positioning and stability is typically challenging. This review critically addresses and highlights the recent developments in design of sheaths used to manipulate the ablation catheter and how these developments may impact on the ablation procedure itself, in particular the likelihood of first-time success. Patents relating to steerable sheaths are reviewed and discussed to gauge potential future developments in this area.

  16. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  17. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  18. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Automatic morphometry of nerve histological sections.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Cuisenaire, O; Denef, J F; Delbeke, J; Macq, B; Veraart, C

    2000-04-15

    A method for the automatic segmentation, recognition and measurement of neuronal myelinated fibers in nerve histological sections is presented. In this method, the fiber parameters i.e. perimeter, area, position of the fiber and myelin sheath thickness are automatically computed. Obliquity of the sections may be taken into account. First, the image is thresholded to provide a coarse classification between myelin and non-myelin pixels. Next, the resulting binary image is further simplified using connected morphological operators. By applying semantic rules to the zonal graph axon candidates are identified. Those are either isolated or still connected. Then, separation of connected fibers is performed by evaluating myelin sheath thickness around each candidate area with an Euclidean distance transformation. Finally, properties of each detected fiber are computed and false positives are removed. The accuracy of the method is assessed by evaluating missed detection, false positive ratio and comparing the results to the manual procedure with sampling. In the evaluated nerve surface, a 0.9% of false positives was found, along with 6.36% of missed detections. The resulting histograms show strong correlation with those obtained by manual measure. The noise introduced by this method is significantly lower than the intrinsic sampling variability. This automatic method constitutes an original tool for morphometrical analysis.

  20. MMP19 expression in the human optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chirco, Kathleen R.; Hazlewood, Ralph J.; Miller, Kathy; Workalemahu, Grefachew; Jampol, Lee M.; Lesser, G. Robert; Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Fingert, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The defining feature of glaucoma is excavation of the optic nerve head; however, the mechanism of this loss of tissue is not well understood. We recently discovered a copy number variation upstream of matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP19) in a large, autosomal dominant pedigree with a congenital malformation of the optic disc called cavitary optic disc anomaly (CODA). Patients with CODA have abnormal optic discs that exhibit an excavated shape similar to cupping seen in glaucoma. The goal of this study is to characterize the localization of MMP19 within the human optic nerve. Methods The MMP19 protein in the optic nerve was evaluated with western blot analysis and with immunohistochemistry in sagittal and en face/cross sections of optic nerves obtained from healthy human donor eyes. Results The MMP19 protein was detected in the human optic nerve, retina, and RPE/choroid with western blot analysis, with highest expression in the retina and the optic nerve. Using immunohistochemistry, MMP19 was localized within the optic nerve to the extracellular space within the septa that separate bundles of optic nerve axons into fascicles. The presence of MMP19 within the optic nerve septa was further confirmed by the colocalization of MMP19 to this structure with type IV collagen. Strong labeling of MMP19 was also detected in the arachnoid layer of the optic nerve sheath. Finally, immunohistochemistry of the optic nerve cross sections demonstrated that MMP19 shows a peripheral to central gradient, with more abundant labeling along the edges of the optic nerve and in the arachnoid layer than in the center of the nerve. Conclusions Abundant MMP19 was detected in the optic nerve head, the primary site of pathology in patients with CODA. The localization of MMP19 to the optic nerve septa is consistent with its predicted secretion and accumulation within the extracellular spaces of this tissue. Moreover, the lateral localization of MMP19 observed in the optic nerve cross