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Sample records for nervous system immune

  1. Autonomic nervous system and immune system interactions.

    PubMed

    Kenney, M J; Ganta, C K

    2014-07-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological, and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsivity of discharges in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating diverse targets. Multiple levels of the neuraxis contribute to cytokine-induced changes in efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve outflows, leading to modulation of peripheral immune responses. The functionality of local sympathoimmune interactions depends on the microenvironment created by diverse signaling mechanisms involving integration between sympathetic nervous system neurotransmitters and neuromodulators; specific adrenergic receptors; and the presence or absence of immune cells, cytokines, and bacteria. Functional mechanisms contributing to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway likely involve novel cholinergic-adrenergic interactions at peripheral sites, including autonomic ganglion and lymphoid targets. Immune cells express adrenergic and nicotinic receptors. Neurotransmitters released by sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve endings bind to their respective receptors located on the surface of immune cells and initiate immune-modulatory responses. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system are instrumental in orchestrating neuroimmune processes, although additional studies are required to understand dynamic and complex adrenergic-cholinergic interactions. Further understanding of regulatory mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous, parasympathetic nervous, and immune systems is critical for understanding relationships between chronic disease

  2. Psychoneuroimmunology--cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Kern, Simone

    2007-05-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively new field of study that investigates interactions between behaviour and the immune system, mediated by the endocrine and nervous systems. The immune and central nervous system (CNS) maintain extensive communication. On the one hand, the brain modulates the immune system by hardwiring sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves (autonomic nervous system) to lymphoid organs. On the other hand, neuroendocrine hormones such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone or substance P regulate cytokine balance. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and immune system-mediated disease.

  3. Central nervous system-immune system interactions: psychoneuroendocrinology of stress and its immune consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P H

    1994-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively new discipline which deals with CNS-immune system interactions. The evidence for such interactions was reviewed, as was the neuroendocrinologic response to stress. Recent evidence indicates that the behavioral, nervous system, and neuroendocrine responses to stress are mediated by hypothalamic CRF, which acts on both the sympathetic nervous system and the HPA axis, resulting in increased levels of corticosteroids, catecholamines, and certain opiates, substances which are generally immunosuppressive. Concentrations of growth hormone and prolactin, which are immunoenhancing, are elevated early during the response to stress but are later suppressed. Although several other neuromediators may also be released with stress, the net effect of a variety of acute stressors is down regulation of the immune system function. In the following minireview, I consider whether stress alters the resistance of the host to infection as well as the immunomodulatory effects of released immune system mediators on the brain. PMID:8141561

  4. HIV Immune Recovery Inflammatory Syndrome and Central Nervous System Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Roza, Thiago Henrique

    2017-04-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a deregulated inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. It is manifested when there is an abrupt change in host immunity from an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive state to a pro-inflammatory state as a result of rapid depletion or removal of factors that promote immune suppression or inhibition of inflammation. The aim of this paper is to discuss and re-interpret the possibility of association of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) with IRIS in the central nervous system (CNS) in a case from Brazil published by Silva-Vergara ML. et al. (Mycopathologia 177:137-141, 6). An AIDS patient who was not receiving medical care developed pulmonary PCM successfully treated with itraconazole. The patient developed central nervous system PCM (NPCM) after starting the ARV therapy with recovery of immunity and control of HIV viral load, although it was not interpreted as IRIS by the authors, it fulfills the criteria for CNS IRIS. This could be the first case of NPCM associated with IRIS described. Although not frequent, IRIS must be considered in PCM patients and HIV, from endemic areas or patients that traveled to endemic areas, receiving ARV treatment and with worsening symptoms.

  5. Sympathetic nervous system influence on the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Maestroni, Georges J M

    2006-06-01

    Our studies focused on the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) influence on dendritic cells (DCs), which play a crucial role in the innate immune response. We found that DCs express a variety of adrenergic receptors (ARs) with alpha1-ARs playing a stimulatory and beta2-ARs an inhibitory effect on DCs migration. beta2-ARs in skin and bone marrow-derived DCs when stimulated by bacterial toll-like receptors (TLRs) agonists respond to norepinephrine (NE) by decreased interleukin-12 (IL-12) and increased IL-10 production which in turn downregulates inflammatory cytokine production and CCR7 expression and thus their migration ability leading to reduced T helper-1 (Th1) priming. We also found that contact sensitizers that may induce a predominant Th1 response, do so by inhibiting the local NE turnover in the skin. The SNS seems therefore to contribute in shaping the information conveyed by DCs to T cells and thus in inducing the appropriate adaptive immune response. In this sense, the SNS physiological influence may allow Th2 priming to fight infections sustained by extracellular pathogens and limit the risk for organ-specific autoimmune reactions associated with excessive Th1 priming and inhibition of T regulatory cell functions. More recently, we found that preconditioning of the skin by beta-adrenergic antagonist and the TLR2 agonist S. Aureus peptidoglycan (PGN) may instruct a Th1 adaptive response to a soluble protein antigen. On the contrary, when the TLR4 agonist E. Coli lipopolysaccharide was used, the presence of the beta-adrenergic antagonist was not effective. These effects were consonant with the pattern of TLRs expression shown by epidermal keratinocytes (EKs) but not by skin DCs. As beta-ARs signaling defects together with S. Aureus infections are thought to serve as initiation and/or persistence factors for numerous Th1-sustained autoimmune inflammatory skin diseases, we might have disclosed at least part of the relevant pathogenetic mechanism.

  6. [When prions use the systems of communication between the immune system and the peripheral nervous system].

    PubMed

    Dorban, Gauthier; Antoine, Nadine; Defaweux, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Prion disease pathogenesis has been largely studied since the inter-species transmissibility of the infectious protein (PrPSc), the oral uptake as natural route of infection and the exceptional implication in a problem of public health were highlighted. Two sequential preclinical stages are observed before the development of irreversible and fatal lesions in the central nervous system: the lymphoinvasion and the neuroinvasion. The first is characterized by the accumulation of PrPSc within lymphoid tissues and the second by PrPSc scattering the peripheral nervous system towards the central nervous system. The mechanisms involved in the communication between the immune and the peripheral nervous system are still debated. Recent studies even suggest that neuroinvasion can occur through the hematogenous route, independently of the peripheral nervous system. This review analyses (i) the role of immune cells, implicated in prion pathogenesis: dendritic cells as PrPSc vehicle, follicular dendritic cells as PrPSc accumulator and nerve fibres as PrPSc driver and (ii) the respective relations they maintain with peripheral nerve fibres to migrate to the brain.

  7. Cortisol and corticosterone in the songbird immune and nervous systems: local vs. systemic levels during development.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kim L; Soma, Kiran K

    2008-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have profound effects on the immune and nervous systems during development. However, circulating GC levels are low neonatally and show little response to stressors. This paradox could be resolved if immune and neural tissues locally synthesize GCs. Here, we measured baseline corticosterone and cortisol levels in plasma, immune organs, and brain regions of developing zebra finches. Steroids were extracted using solid phase-extraction and quantified using specific immunoassays. As expected, corticosterone was the predominant GC in plasma and increased with age. In contrast, cortisol was the predominant GC in immune tissues (bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen) and decreased with age. Cortisol levels in immune tissues were higher than cortisol levels in plasma. In the brain, corticosterone and cortisol levels were similarly low, providing little evidence for local synthesis of GCs in the brain. This is the first study to measure 1) cortisol in the plasma of songbirds, 2) corticosterone or cortisol in the brain of songbirds, and 3) corticosterone or cortisol in the immune system of any species. Despite the prevailing dogma that corticosterone is the primary GC in birds, these results indicate that cortisol is the predominant GC in the immune system of developing zebra finches. These results raise the hypothesis that cortisol is synthesized de novo from cholesterol in the immune system as an "immunosteroid," analogous to neurosteroids synthesized in the brain. Local production of GCs in immune tissues may allow GCs to regulate lymphocyte selection while avoiding the costs of high systemic GCs during development.

  8. Immune System Activation and Depression: Roles of Serotonin in the Central Nervous System and Periphery.

    PubMed

    Robson, Matthew J; Quinlan, Meagan A; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-04-03

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has long been recognized as a key contributor to the regulation of mood and anxiety and is strongly associated with the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although more known for its roles within the central nervous system (CNS), 5-HT is recognized to modulate several key aspects of immune system function that may contribute to the development of MDD. Copious amounts of research have outlined a connection between alterations in immune system function, inflammation status, and MDD. Supporting this connection, peripheral immune activation results in changes in the function and/or expression of many components of 5-HT signaling that are associated with depressive-like phenotypes. How 5-HT is utilized by the immune system to effect CNS function and ultimately behaviors related to depression is still not well understood. This Review summarizes the evidence that immune system alterations related to depression affect CNS 5-HT signaling that can alter MDD-relevant behaviors and that 5-HT regulates immune system signaling within the CNS and periphery. We suggest that targeting the interrelationships between immune and 5-HT signaling may provide more effective treatments for subsets of those suffering from inflammation-associated MDD.

  9. Relevance of Immune-Sympathetic Nervous System Interplay for the Development of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Radkowski, Marek; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has been mostly associated with the 'fight or flight' response and the regulation of cardiovascular function. However, evidence over the past 30 years suggests that SNS may also influence the function of immune cells. In this review we describe the basic research being done in the area of SNS regulation of immune function. Further, we show that the SNS-immune interplay during circadian rhythm may modulate the robustness of the inflammatory response, critical for survival during periods of increased activity. Finally, new concepts of a close relationship between these systems in the pathogenesis of hypertension are discussed.

  10. Stress, the Autonomic Nervous System, and the Immune-kynurenine Pathway in the Etiology of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eunsoo; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system is one of the major neural pathways activated by stress. In situations that are often associated with chronic stress, such as major depressive disorder, the sympathetic nervous system can be continuously activated without the normal counteraction of the parasympathetic nervous system. As a result, the immune system can be activated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These inflammatory conditions have been repeatedly observed in depression. In the search for the mechanism by which the immune system might contribute to depression, the enhanced activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase by pro-inflammatory cytokines has been suggested to play an important role. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway that converts tryptophan to kynurenine. Elevated activity of this enzyme can cause imbalances in downstream kynurenine metabolites. This imbalance can induce neurotoxic changes in the brain and create a vulnerable glial-neuronal network, which may render the brain susceptible to depression. This review focuses on the interaction between stress, the autonomic nervous system and the immune system which can cause imbalances in the kynurenine pathway, which may ultimately lead to major depressive disorder. PMID:27640517

  11. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood–brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:27230462

  12. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Min-Jung; Kwon, Min-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  13. Kynurenines and Multiple Sclerosis: The Dialogue between the Immune System and the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Rajda, Cecilia; Majláth, Zsófia; Pukoli, Dániel; Vécsei, László

    2015-08-06

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which axonal transection takes place in parallel with acute inflammation to various, individual extents. The importance of the kynurenine pathway in the physiological functions and pathological processes of the nervous system has been extensively investigated, but it has additionally been implicated as having a regulatory function in the immune system. Alterations in the kynurenine pathway have been described in both preclinical and clinical investigations of multiple sclerosis. These observations led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets in multiple sclerosis, such as synthetic tryptophan analogs, endogenous tryptophan metabolites (e.g., cinnabarinic acid), structural analogs (laquinimod, teriflunomid, leflunomid and tranilast), indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase inhibitors (1MT and berberine) and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibitors (nicotinylalanine and Ro 61-8048). The kynurenine pathway is a promising novel target via which to influence the immune system and to achieve neuroprotection, and further research is therefore needed with the aim of developing novel drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases.

  14. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dusi, Veronica; Ghidoni, Alice; Ravera, Alice; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Calvillo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the autonomic nervous system. In this paper we will describe the single chemokines more involved in heart diseases; then we will present a comprehensive perspective of them as a complex network connecting the cardiovascular system to both the immune and the autonomic nervous systems. Finally, some recent evidences indicating chemokines as a possible new tool to predict cardiovascular risk will be described. PMID:27242392

  15. Getting nervous about immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Keith W; McCusker, Robert H

    2014-10-01

    Twenty-five years ago, immunologists and neuroscientists had little science of mutual interest. This is no longer the case. Neuroscientists now know that the first formally defined cytokine, IL-1, activates a discrete population of hypothalamic neurons. This interaction leads to the release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal gland, a hormone that has a long history in immunoregulation. Immunologists have been surprised to learn that lymphoid cells synthesize acetylcholine, the first formally recognized neurotransmitter. This neurotransmitter suppresses the synthesis of TNF. These discoveries blur the distinction of neuroscience and immunology as distinct disciplines. There are now 37 formally recognized cytokines and their receptors, and at least 60 classical neurotransmitters plus over 50 neuroactive peptides. These findings explain why both immunologists and neuroscientists are getting nervous about immunity and highlight a real need to apply integrative physiological approaches in biomedical research.

  16. Getting nervous about immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; McCusker, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, immunologists and neuroscientists had little science of mutual interest. This is no longer the case. Neuroscientists now know that the first formally defined cytokine, IL-1, activates a discrete population of hypothalamic neurons. This interaction leads to the release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal gland, a hormone that has a long history in immunoregulation. Immunologists have been surprised to learn that lymphoid cells synthesize acetylcholine, the first formally recognized neurotransmitter. This neurotransmitter suppresses the synthesis of TNF. These discoveries blur the distinction of neuroscience and immunology as distinct disciplines. There are now 37 formally recognized cytokines and their receptors, and at least 60 classical neurotransmitters plus over 50 neuroactive peptides. These findings explain why both immunologists and neuroscientists are getting nervous about immunity and highlight a real need to apply integrative physiological approaches in biomedical research. PMID:24556600

  17. Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kox, Matthijs; van Eijk, Lucas T.; Zwaag, Jelle; van den Wildenberg, Joanne; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Excessive or persistent proinflammatory cytokine production plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. Acute activation of the sympathetic nervous system attenuates the innate immune response. However, both the autonomic nervous system and innate immune system are regarded as systems that cannot be voluntarily influenced. Herein, we evaluated the effects of a training program on the autonomic nervous system and innate immune response. Healthy volunteers were randomized to either the intervention (n = 12) or control group (n = 12). Subjects in the intervention group were trained for 10 d in meditation (third eye meditation), breathing techniques (i.a., cyclic hyperventilation followed by breath retention), and exposure to cold (i.a., immersions in ice cold water). The control group was not trained. Subsequently, all subjects underwent experimental endotoxemia (i.v. administration of 2 ng/kg Escherichia coli endotoxin). In the intervention group, practicing the learned techniques resulted in intermittent respiratory alkalosis and hypoxia resulting in profoundly increased plasma epinephrine levels. In the intervention group, plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased more rapidly after endotoxin administration, correlated strongly with preceding epinephrine levels, and were higher. Levels of proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were lower in the intervention group and correlated negatively with IL-10 levels. Finally, flu-like symptoms were lower in the intervention group. In conclusion, we demonstrate that voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system results in epinephrine release and subsequent suppression of the innate immune response in humans in vivo. These results could have important implications for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive or persistent inflammation, such as autoimmune diseases. PMID:24799686

  18. Inflammation on the Mind: Visualizing Immunity in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a remarkably complex structure that utilizes electrochemical signaling to coordinate activities throughout the entire body. Because the nervous system contains nonreplicative cells, it is postulated that, through evolutionary pressures, this compartment has acquired specialized mechanisms to limit damage. One potential source of damage comes from our immune system, which has the capacity to survey the CNS and periphery for the presence of foreign material. The immune system is equipped with numerous effector mechanisms and can greatly alter the homeostasis and function of the CNS. Degeneration, autoimmunity, and pathogen infection can all result in acute, and sometimes chronic, inflammation within the CNS. Understanding the specialized functionality of innate and adaptive immune cells within the CNS is critical to the design of more efficacious treatments to mitigate CNS inflammatory conditions. Much of our knowledge of CNS-immune interactions stems from seminal studies that have used static and dynamic imaging approaches to visualize inflammatory cells responding to different CNS conditions. This review will focus on how imaging techniques have elevated our understanding of CNS inflammation as well as the exciting prospects that lie ahead as we begin to pursue investigation of the inflamed CNS in real time. PMID:19521688

  19. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells.

    PubMed

    Chavarría, Anahí; Cárdenas, Graciela

    2013-09-02

    Central nervous system (CNS) has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve) and the other resident cells (neurons and glia). These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5, and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells.

  20. Role of Immune Cells in the Course of Central Nervous System Injury: Modulation with Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Jirillo, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells actively participate to the central nervous system (CNS) injury either damaging or protecting neural tissue with release of various mediators. Residential microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages play a fundamental role within the injured CNS and, here, special emphasis will be placed on M1 and M2 macrophages for their different functional activities. On the other hand, peripheral T regulatory (Treg) cells exert antiinflammatory activities in the diseased host. In this respect, activation of Treg cells by nutraceuticals may represent a novel approach to treat neuroinflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids and polyphenols will be described as substances endowed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, taking into account that Treg cells act in the later phase of CNS injury, favoring immune suppression, manipulation of host immune system with both substances requires caution to avoid undesired side effects.

  1. Immune activation in the central nervous system throughout the course of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Robust and dynamic innate and adaptive responses characterize the acute central nervous system (CNS) response to HIV and other viral infections. In a state of chronic infection or viral latency, persistent immune activation associates with pathology in the CNS. Understanding this process is critical, since immune-mediated pathology in non-renewable CNS cells may result in long-term neurologic sequelae for HIV infected individuals. Recent findings In humans, immune activation is reduced by suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but persists at abnormally elevated levels on treatment. CNS immune activation is initiated in acute infection and progressively increases until cART is started. Newly identified characteristics of the CNS immune surveillance network include features of homeostasis and function of brain microglial cells, lymphatic drainage from CNS to cervical lymph nodes, and cells in cerebrospinal fluid associated with neurocognitive impairment. Summary More research is required to determine whether early intervention to reduce infection limits the immunopathology established by sustained immune responses that ultimately fail to resolve infection, and to unravel mechanisms of persistent immune activation during treated HIV so that strategies can be developed to therapeutically protect the brain. PMID:26760827

  2. Tumor immunity within the central nervous system stimulated by recombinant Listeria monocytogenes vaccination.

    PubMed

    Liau, Linda M; Jensen, Eric R; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Sykes, Steven N; Soung, Michael C; Miller, Jeff F; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2002-04-15

    Tumors arising within the central nervous system (CNS) present the immune system with a challenging target, given the heterogeneous nature of these neoplasms and their location within an "immunologically privileged" site. We used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus nucleoprotein (LCMV-NP) as a pseudotumor antigen to investigate recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a tumor vaccine against s.c. and intracerebral challenges with a NP-expressing glioma, 9L-NP. Using Fischer 344 rats, we demonstrate that vaccination with recombinant L. monocytogenes-NP stimulates protection against s.c., but not intracerebral, 9L-NP tumor challenge in an antigen-specific, CD8(+) T-cell-dependent manner. After s.c. tumor rejection, enhanced antitumor immunity is achieved via epitope spreading that permits complete resistance against lethal intracerebral challenge with 9L-NP and with the untransfected parental 9L tumor. Unlike the CD8(+)-dependent immune responses against s.c. 9L-NP tumors, this expanded intracerebral immunity against endogenous tumor-associated antigens is dependent on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the mechanisms of tumor immunity within the brain are different from those elicited against non-CNS tumors. Furthermore, vaccination approaches exploiting the concept of epitope spreading may enhance the efficacy of antitumor immune responses within the immunologically privileged CNS, potentially mediating tumor cell killing through both CD4(+)- and CD8(+)-dependent effector pathways.

  3. Innate immune interactions within the central nervous system modulate pathogenesis of viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sharmila; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system mediates protection against neurotropic viruses that replicate in the central nervous system (CNS). Virus infection within specific cells of the CNS triggers activation of several families of pattern recognition receptors including Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 like receptors, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, and cytosolic DNA sensors. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of how cell-intrinsic host defenses within the CNS modulate infection of different DNA and RNA viruses. PMID:26163762

  4. Blood to brain transport of interleukin links the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J. Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA )

    1991-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are naturally occurring proteins that regulate, and thus link, both the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Since proteins are assumed not to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), it is controversial how this linkage could occur. The authors show here that after iv injection of {sup 125}I-hIL-1{alpha}, radioactivity in the brain eluted on HPLC in the position of the labeled cytokine. In addition, entry was inhibited by unlabeled hIL-1{alpha}. The authors demonstration of a saturable, carrier-mediated system that transports recombinant human IL-1{alpha} in intact form from the blood into the CNS indicates a direct immune-CNS connection.

  5. Up in arms: Immune and nervous system response to sea star wasting disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuess, Lauren E; Eiselord, Morgan E.; Closek, Collin J.; Tracy, Allison M.; Mauntz, Ruth; Gignoux-Wolfsohn, Sarah; Moritsch, Monica M; Yoshioka, Reyn; Burge, Colleen A.; Harvell, Drew; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Roberts, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Echinoderms, positioned taxonomically at the base of deuterostomes, provide an important system for the study of the evolution of the immune system. However, there is little known about the cellular components and genes associated with echinoderm immunity. The 2013–2014 sea star wasting disease outbreak is an emergent, rapidly spreading disease, which has led to large population declines of asteroids in the North American Pacific. While evidence suggests that the signs of this disease, twisting arms and lesions, may be attributed to a viral infection, the host response to infection is still poorly understood. In order to examine transcriptional responses of the sea star Pycnopodia helianthoides to sea star wasting disease, we injected a viral sized fraction (0.2 μm) homogenate prepared from symptomatic P. helianthoides into apparently healthy stars. Nine days following injection, when all stars were displaying signs of the disease, specimens were sacrificed and coelomocytes were extracted for RNA-seq analyses. A number of immune genes, including those involved in Toll signaling pathways, complement cascade, melanization response, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were differentially expressed. Furthermore, genes involved in nervous system processes and tissue remodeling were also differentially expressed, pointing to transcriptional changes underlying the signs of sea star wasting disease. The genomic resources presented here not only increase understanding of host response to sea star wasting disease, but also provide greater insight into the mechanisms underlying immune function in echinoderms.

  6. Up in Arms: Immune and Nervous System Response to Sea Star Wasting Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Colleen A.; Harvell, C. Drew; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Hewson, Ian; Hershberger, Paul K.; Roberts, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Echinoderms, positioned taxonomically at the base of deuterostomes, provide an important system for the study of the evolution of the immune system. However, there is little known about the cellular components and genes associated with echinoderm immunity. The 2013–2014 sea star wasting disease outbreak is an emergent, rapidly spreading disease, which has led to large population declines of asteroids in the North American Pacific. While evidence suggests that the signs of this disease, twisting arms and lesions, may be attributed to a viral infection, the host response to infection is still poorly understood. In order to examine transcriptional responses of the sea star Pycnopodia helianthoides to sea star wasting disease, we injected a viral sized fraction (0.2 μm) homogenate prepared from symptomatic P. helianthoides into apparently healthy stars. Nine days following injection, when all stars were displaying signs of the disease, specimens were sacrificed and coelomocytes were extracted for RNA-seq analyses. A number of immune genes, including those involved in Toll signaling pathways, complement cascade, melanization response, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were differentially expressed. Furthermore, genes involved in nervous system processes and tissue remodeling were also differentially expressed, pointing to transcriptional changes underlying the signs of sea star wasting disease. The genomic resources presented here not only increase understanding of host response to sea star wasting disease, but also provide greater insight into the mechanisms underlying immune function in echinoderms. PMID:26176852

  7. Up in Arms: Immune and Nervous System Response to Sea Star Wasting Disease.

    PubMed

    Fuess, Lauren E; Eisenlord, Morgan E; Closek, Collin J; Tracy, Allison M; Mauntz, Ruth; Gignoux-Wolfsohn, Sarah; Moritsch, Monica M; Yoshioka, Reyn; Burge, Colleen A; Harvell, C Drew; Friedman, Carolyn S; Hewson, Ian; Hershberger, Paul K; Roberts, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    Echinoderms, positioned taxonomically at the base of deuterostomes, provide an important system for the study of the evolution of the immune system. However, there is little known about the cellular components and genes associated with echinoderm immunity. The 2013-2014 sea star wasting disease outbreak is an emergent, rapidly spreading disease, which has led to large population declines of asteroids in the North American Pacific. While evidence suggests that the signs of this disease, twisting arms and lesions, may be attributed to a viral infection, the host response to infection is still poorly understood. In order to examine transcriptional responses of the sea star Pycnopodia helianthoides to sea star wasting disease, we injected a viral sized fraction (0.2 μm) homogenate prepared from symptomatic P. helianthoides into apparently healthy stars. Nine days following injection, when all stars were displaying signs of the disease, specimens were sacrificed and coelomocytes were extracted for RNA-seq analyses. A number of immune genes, including those involved in Toll signaling pathways, complement cascade, melanization response, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were differentially expressed. Furthermore, genes involved in nervous system processes and tissue remodeling were also differentially expressed, pointing to transcriptional changes underlying the signs of sea star wasting disease. The genomic resources presented here not only increase understanding of host response to sea star wasting disease, but also provide greater insight into the mechanisms underlying immune function in echinoderms.

  8. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O; Bechmann, Ingo; Flügel, Alexander; Laman, Jon D; Weller, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into account in describing our present understanding of the anatomical connections of the CNS fluid drainage pathways towards regional lymph nodes and our current concept of immune cell trafficking into the CNS during immunosurveillance and neuroinflammation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid are the two major components that drain from the CNS to regional lymph nodes. CSF drains via lymphatic vessels and appears to carry antigen-presenting cells. Interstitial fluid from the CNS parenchyma, on the other hand, drains to lymph nodes via narrow and restricted basement membrane pathways within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that do not allow traffic of antigen-presenting cells. Lymphocytes targeting the CNS enter by a two-step process entailing receptor-mediated crossing of vascular endothelium and enzyme-mediated penetration of the glia limitans that covers the CNS. The contribution of the pathways into and out of the CNS as initiators or contributors to neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, will be discussed. Furthermore, we propose a clear nomenclature allowing improved precision when describing the CNS-specific communication pathways with the immune system.

  9. [Features of immune proteasome expression in the development of rat central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Orlova, A Sh; Liupina, Iu V; Abaturova, S B; Sharova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Formation of the central nervous system in ontogeny and function in adult mammals are controlled by universal ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic system. The aim of this work was to study the dynamics of expression of immune proteasomes in comparison with the dynamics of ChLA and CLA proteasome and expression of the transcription factor Zif268 in the structures of the brain (cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem) in embryonic (E19, E21 days of embryonic development) and early postnatal (P1, P3, P4, P5, P7, P15 days of post-natal development) development in rats. ChLA and CLA in clarified homogenates of rat brain structures were determined by hydrolysis of fluorogenic commercial oligopeptides Suc-LLVY-AMC and Z-LLG-AMC, respectively. In the cortex and hippocampus of the brain was observed upregulation of immune subunits LMP7 during the active formation of biochemical mediatory structure and efferent neuronal projections at the period P7-P15. In the cerebral cortex during this period ChLA and CLA also are increased. In all structures of the brain the LMP2 immune subunits content was significantly increased at the period P7-P15. Contents of proteolytic constitutive subunit β1 in all structures decreased by P4 compare to P1 levels and was increased on P15 relative to the P1 levels. However, the level of expression of proteolytic constitutive subunit β5 increased in cortex, hippocampus and brainstem from E21 and reached maximum values on P3, P5 and P1, respectively with a sharp decrease to P7 in all studied structures. In all structures expression of LM P2 immune subunits and β1 constitutive subunits increased simultaneously with LMP7 immune subunits and sharply on P15. Also shown a positive correlation of increased expression regulator PA28 and constitutive β5 subunits in the hippocampus during the period P3-P5 and in the brainstem at the period P1-P5. The peculiarity of the studied brain regions during P7-P15 of rat early development is a correlation of expression of

  10. Immune and nervous systems share molecular and functional similarities: memory storage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Habibi, L; Ebtekar, M; Jameie, S B

    2009-04-01

    One of the most complex and important features of both the nervous and immune systems is their data storage and retrieval capability. Both systems encounter a common and complex challenge on how to overcome the cumbersome task of data management. Because each neuron makes many synapses with other neurons, they are capable of receiving data from thousands of synaptic connections. The immune system B and T cells have to deal with a similar level of complexity because of their unlimited task of recognizing foreign antigens. As for the complexity of memory storage, it has been proposed that both systems may share a common set of molecular mechanisms. Here, we review the molecular bases of memory storage in neurons and immune cells based on recent studies and findings. The expression of certain molecules and mechanisms shared between the two systems, including cytokine networks, and cell surface receptors, are reviewed. Intracellular signaling similarities and certain mechanisms such as diversity, memory storage, and their related molecular properties are briefly discussed. Moreover, two similar genetic mechanisms used by both systems is discussed, putting forward the idea that DNA recombination may be an underlying mechanism involved in CNS memory storage.

  11. Increase of oxidation and inflammation in nervous and immune systems with aging and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vida, Carmen; González, Eva M; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    According to the oxidation-inflammation theory of aging, chronic oxidative stress and inflammatory stress situations (with higher levels of oxidant and inflammatory compounds and lower antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses) are the basis of the agerelated impairment of organism functions, including those of the nervous and immune systems, as well as of the neuroimmune communication, which explains the altered homeostasis and the resulting increase of morbidity and mortality. Overproduction of oxidant compounds can induce an inflammatory response, since oxidants are inflammation effectors. Thus, oxidation and inflammation are interlinked processes and have many feedback loops. However, the nature of their potential interactions, mainly in the brain and immune cells, and their key involvement in aging remain unclear. Moreover, in the context of the neuroimmune communication, it has been described that an oxidative-inflammatory situation occurs in subjects with anxiety, and this situation contributes to an immunosenescence, alteration of survival responses and shorter life span. As an example of this, a model of premature aging in mice, in which animals show a poor response to stress and high levels of anxiety, an oxidative stress in their immune cells and tissues, as well as a premature immunosenescence and a shorter life expectancy, will be commented in the present review. This model supports the hypothesis that anxiety can be a situation of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation, especially in brain and immune cells, and this accelerates the rate of aging.

  12. Combining Radiation Therapy with Immune Checkpoint Blockade for Central Nervous System Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Neil M.; Fang, Penny; Logan, Jennifer; Yang, Jinzhong; Jiang, Wen; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly glioblastoma and brain metastases from a variety of disease sites, are difficult to treat despite advances in multimodality approaches consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy (RT). Recent successes of immunotherapeutic strategies including immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) via anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies against aggressive cancers, such as melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, and renal cell carcinoma, have presented an exciting opportunity to translate these strategies for CNS malignancies. Moreover, via both localized cytotoxicity and systemic proinflammatory effects, the role of RT in enhancing antitumor immune response and, therefore, promoting tumor control is being re-examined, with several preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating potential synergistic effect of RT with ICB in the treatment of primary and metastatic CNS tumors. In this review, we highlight the preclinical evidence supporting the immunomodulatory effect of RT and discuss the rationales for its combination with ICB to promote antitumor immune response. We then outline the current clinical experience of combining RT with ICB in the treatment of multiple primary and metastatic brain tumors. Finally, we review advances in characterizing and modifying tumor radioimmunotherapy responses using biomarkers and microRNA (miRNA) that may potentially be used to guide clinical decision-making in the near future. PMID:27774435

  13. Adaptive immune response to viral infections in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    LIBBEY, JANE E.; FUJINAMI, ROBERT S.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the central nervous system (CNS) has been considered to be an immunologically privileged site within the body (Bailey et al., 2006; Galea et al. 2007; Engelhardt, 2008; Prendergast and Anderton, 2009). By definition, immunologically privileged sites, to include the brain, cornea, testis, and pregnant uterus, have a reduced/delayed ability to reject foreign tissue grafts compared to conventional sites within the body, such as skin (Streilein, 2003; Bailey et al., 2006; Carson et al., 2006; Mrass and Weninger, 2006; Kaplan and Niederkorn, 2007). In addition and conversely, tissue grafts prepared from immunologically privileged sites have increased survival, compared to tissue grafts prepared from conventional sites, when implanted at conventional sites (Streilein, 2003). The imune privilege of the CNS has been shown to be confined to the parenchyma, whereas the immune reactivity of the meninges and the ventricles, containing the choroid plexus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the circumventricular organs, is similar to conventionalsites (Carson et al., 2006; Engelhardt, 2006; Galea et al., 2007). This confinement of the imm une privilege to the parenchyma has also been demonstrated for experimental influenza virus infection in which confinement of the infection to the brain parenchyma did not result in efficient immune system priming whereas infection of the CSF elicited a virus-specific immune response comparable to that of intranasal infection (Stevenson et al. 1997). An important functional aspect of immune privilege is that damage due to the immune response and inflammation is limited within sensitive organs containing cell types that regenerate poorly, such as neurons within the brain (Mrass and Weninger, 2006; Galea et al.. 2007; Kaplan and Niederkorn, 2007). PMID:25015488

  14. Deciphering Human Cell-Autonomous Anti-HSV-1 Immunity in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Studer, Lorenz; Smith, Gregory; Notarangelo, Luigi; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common virus that can rarely invade the human central nervous system (CNS), causing devastating encephalitis. The permissiveness to HSV-1 of the various relevant cell types of the CNS, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells, as well as their response to viral infection, has been extensively studied in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, human CNS cell-based models of anti-HSV-1 immunity are of particular importance, as responses to any given neurotropic virus may differ between humans and other animals. Human CNS neuron cell lines as well as primary human CNS neurons, astrocytes, and microglia cells cultured/isolated from embryos or cadavers, have enabled the study of cell-autonomous anti-HSV-1 immunity in vitro. However, the paucity of biological samples and their lack of purity have hindered progress in the field, which furthermore suffers from the absence of testable primary human oligodendrocytes. Recently, the authors have established a human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based model of anti-HSV-1 immunity in neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, astrocytes, and neural stem cells, which has widened the scope of possible in vitro studies while permitting in-depth explorations. This mini-review summarizes the available data on human primary and iPSC-derived CNS cells for anti-HSV-1 immunity. The hiPSC-mediated study of anti-viral immunity in both healthy individuals and patients with viral encephalitis will be a powerful tool in dissecting the disease pathogenesis of CNS infections with HSV-1 and other neurotropic viruses.

  15. Microglia are crucial regulators of neuro-immunity during central nervous system tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Spanos, Jonathan Paul; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is the most devastating manifestation of tuberculosis (TB), with both high mortality and morbidity. Although research has been fueled by the potential therapeutic target microglia offer against neurodegenerative inflammation, their part in TB infection of the CNS has not been fully evaluated nor elucidated. Yet, as both the preferential targets of M. tuberculosis and the immune-effector cells of the CNS, microglia are likely to be key determinants of disease severity and clinical outcomes. Following pathogen recognition, bacilli are internalized and capable of replicating within microglia. Cellular activation ensues, utilizing signaling molecules that may be neurotoxic. Central to initiating, orchestrating and modulating the tuberculous immune response is microglial secretion of cytokines and chemokines. However, the neurological environment is unique in that inflammatory signals, which appear to be damaging in the periphery, could be beneficial by governing neuronal survival, regeneration and differentiation. Furthermore, microglia are important in the recruitment of peripheral immune cells and central to defining the pro-inflammatory milieu of which neurotoxicity may result from many of the participating local or recruited cell types. Microglia are capable of both presenting antigen to infiltrating CD4+ T-lymphocytes and inducing their differentiation—a possible correlate of protection against M. tuberculosis infection. Clarifying the nature of the immune effector molecules secreted by microglia, and the means by which other CNS-specific cell types govern microglial activation or modulate their responses is critical if improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are to be attained. Therefore, this review evaluates the diverse roles microglia play in the neuro-immunity to M. tuberculosis infection of the CNS. PMID:26041993

  16. T-cell-based immunity counteracts the potential toxicity of glutamate in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Schori, H; Yoles, E; Schwartz, M

    2001-10-01

    Injuries to the central nervous system (CNS) evoke self-destructive processes, which eventually lead to a much greater loss of tissue than that caused by the trauma itself. The agents of self-destruction include physiological compounds, such as glutamate, which are essential for the proper functioning of the CNS, but become cytotoxic when their normal concentrations are exceeded. The CNS is equipped with buffering mechanisms that are specific for each compound. Here we show, using Balb/c mice (a strain resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), that after intravitreal injection of any concentration of glutamate (a neurotransmitter that becomes toxic when in excess) or ammonium-ferrous sulfate hexahydrate (which increases the formation of toxic oxygen species), the loss of retinal ganglion cells in mice devoid of mature T cells (nude mice) is significantly greater than in matched wild-type controls. We further show that this outcome can be partially reversed by supplying the T cell-defective mice with splenocytes derived from the wild-type mice. The results suggest that potentially toxic physiological compounds, when present in excessive amounts, can recruit and activate a T-cell-dependent self-protective immune mechanism. This may represent a prototype mechanism for the physiological regulation of potentially destructive CNS events by T-cell-mediated immune activity, when the local buffering mechanisms cannot adequately cope with them.

  17. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization.

  18. Pathogenesis of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome affecting the central nervous system in patients infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Delobel, Pierre; Blancher, Antoine; Massip, Patrice; Marchou, Bruno; Liblau, Roland S; Mars, Lennart T

    2011-04-01

    Anti-retroviral therapy partially restores the immune function of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, thereby drastically reducing morbidity and mortality. However, the clinical condition of a subset of patients on anti-retroviral therapy secondarily deteriorates due to an inflammatory process termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This condition results from the restoration of the immune system that upon activation can be detrimental to the host. Among the various clinical manifestations, central nervous system involvement is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. This review covers the pathogenesis of this novel neuroinflammatory disease, including the nature of the provoking pathogens and the composition and specificity of the evoked immune responses. Our current perception of this neuroinflammatory disease supports therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating immune aggression without dampening the life-saving restoration of the immune response.

  19. Modular and coordinated expression of immune system regulatory and signaling components in the developing and adult nervous system.

    PubMed

    Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Crampton, Sean; McKelvey, Laura; Nolan, Aoife; O'Keeffe, Gerard; Gutierrez, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    During development, the nervous system (NS) is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signaling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult NS. While the involvement of individual immune-related signaling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune-related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the NS. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the NS, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system (IS) genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the NS.

  20. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  1. Interactions between the microbiota, immune and nervous systems in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fung, Thomas C; Olson, Christine A; Hsiao, Elaine Y

    2017-02-01

    The diverse collection of microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, collectively called the gut microbiota, profoundly influences many aspects of host physiology, including nutrient metabolism, resistance to infection and immune system development. Studies investigating the gut-brain axis demonstrate a critical role for the gut microbiota in orchestrating brain development and behavior, and the immune system is emerging as an important regulator of these interactions. Intestinal microbes modulate the maturation and function of tissue-resident immune cells in the CNS. Microbes also influence the activation of peripheral immune cells, which regulate responses to neuroinflammation, brain injury, autoimmunity and neurogenesis. Accordingly, both the gut microbiota and immune system are implicated in the etiopathogenesis or manifestation of neurodevelopmental, psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, depression and Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we discuss the role of CNS-resident and peripheral immune pathways in microbiota-gut-brain communication during health and neurological disease.

  2. Functional programming of the autonomic nervous system by early life immune exposure: implications for anxiety.

    PubMed

    Sominsky, Luba; Fuller, Erin A; Bondarenko, Evgeny; Ong, Lin Kooi; Averell, Lee; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Dunkley, Peter R; Dickson, Phillip W; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal exposure of rodents to an immune challenge alters a variety of behavioural and physiological parameters in adulthood. In particular, neonatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) exposure produces robust increases in anxiety-like behaviour, accompanied by persistent changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity is an important physiological contributor to the generation of anxiety. Here we examined the long term effects of neonatal LPS exposure on ANS function and the associated changes in neuroendocrine and behavioural indices. ANS function in Wistar rats, neonatally treated with LPS, was assessed via analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the adrenal glands on postnatal days (PNDs) 50 and 85, and via plethysmographic assessment of adult respiratory rate in response to mild stress (acoustic and light stimuli). Expression of genes implicated in regulation of autonomic and endocrine activity in the relevant brain areas was also examined. Neonatal LPS exposure produced an increase in TH phosphorylation and activity at both PNDs 50 and 85. In adulthood, LPS-treated rats responded with increased respiratory rates to the lower intensities of stimuli, indicative of increased autonomic arousal. These changes were associated with increases in anxiety-like behaviours and HPA axis activity, alongside altered expression of the GABA-A receptor α2 subunit, CRH receptor type 1, CRH binding protein, and glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. The current findings suggest that in addition to the commonly reported alterations in HPA axis functioning, neonatal LPS challenge is associated with a persistent change in ANS activity, associated with, and potentially contributing to, the anxiety-like phenotype. The findings of this study reflect the importance of changes in the perinatal microbial environment on the ontogeny of physiological processes.

  3. The enkephalinergic nervous system and its immunomodulation on the developing immune system during the ontogenesis of oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Hao; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    Enkephalinergic neuroendocrine-immune regulatory system is one of the most important neuroendocrine-immune systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates for its significant role in the immune regulation. In the present study, the early onset of enkephalinergic nervous system and its immunomodulation on the developing immune system during the ontogenesis of oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated to illustrate the function of neural regulation on the innate immune system in oyster larvae. [Met(5)]-enkephalin (Met-ENK) was firstly observed on the marginal of the dorsal half of D-hinged larvae. Six immune-related molecules, including four PRRs (CgCTL-1, CgCTL-2, CgCTL-4, CgNatterin-3) and two immune effectors (CgTNF-1 and CgEcSOD) were detected in the early developmental stages of trochophore, D-hinged and umbo larvae of oyster. After incubated with [Met(5)]-enkephalin, the mRNA expression level of all the PRRs changed significantly (p < 0.05). In trochophore larvae, the expression level of CgNatterin-3 decreased dramatically (p < 0.05) at 6 h, and the expression level of CgCTL-4 was significantly down-regulated at 3 h and 6 h (p < 0.05), respectively. In D-hinged and umbo larvae, only CgCTL-1 was significantly down-regulated and the differences were significant at 3 h and 6 h (p < 0.05), while the expression level of CgCTL-2 and CgCTL-4 increased significantly at 3 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of immune effectors were up-regulated significantly at 3 h and 6 h in trochophore larvae (p < 0.05). The expression level of CgTNF-1 in both blank and experiment groups was up-regulated but there was no significant difference in D-hinged larvae stage. On the contrary, the expression level of CgEcSOD in D-hinged larvae decreased dramatically at 3 h and 6 h after [Met(5)]-enkephalin incubation (p < 0.05). In umbo larvae, the expression level of CgTNF-1 and CgEcSOD in the experiment group increased significantly at 6 h after [Met(5)]-enkephalin

  4. Role of Neurochemicals in the Interaction between the Microbiota and the Immune and the Nervous System of the Host Organism.

    PubMed

    Oleskin, Alexander V; Shenderov, Boris A; Rogovsky, Vladimir S

    2017-02-22

    This work is concerned with the role of evolutionary conserved substances, neurotransmitters, and neurohormones, within the complex framework of the microbial consortium-immune system-nervous system axis in the human or animal organism. Although the operation of each of these systems per se is relatively well understood, their combined effects on the host organism still await further research. Drawing on recent research on host-produced and microbial low-molecular-weight neurochemicals such as biogenic amines, amino acids, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), we suggest that these mediators form a part of a universal neurochemical "language." It mediates the whole gamut of harmonious and disharmonious interactions between (a) the intestinal microbial consortium, (b) local and systemic immune cells, and (c) the central and peripheral nervous system. Importantly, the ongoing microbiota-host interactivity is bidirectional. We present evidence that a large number of microbially produced low-molecular-weight compounds are identical or homologous to mediators that are synthesized by immune or nervous cells and, therefore, can bind to the corresponding host receptors. In addition, microbial cells specifically respond to host-produced neuromediators/neurohormones because they have adapted to them during the course of many millions of years of microbiota-host coevolution. We emphasize that the terms "microbiota" and "microbial consortium" are to be used in the broadest sense, so as to include, apart from bacteria, also eukaryotic microorganisms. These are exemplified by the mycobiota whose role in the microbial consortium-immune system-nervous system axis researchers are only beginning to elucidate. In light of the above, it is imperative to reform the current strategies of using probiotic microorganisms and their metabolites for treating and preventing dysbiosis-related diseases. The review demonstrates, in the example of novel probiotics (psychobiotics), that many target

  5. Herpes simplex type I (HSV-1) infection of the nervous system: is an immune response a good thing?

    PubMed

    Conrady, Christopher D; Drevets, Douglas A; Carr, Daniel J J

    2010-03-30

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can induce a robust immune response initially thru the activation of pattern recognition receptors and subsequent type I interferon production that then shapes, along with other innate immune components, the adaptive immune response to the insult. While this response is necessary to quell virus replication, drive the pathogen into a "latent" state, and likely hinder viral reactivation, collateral damage can ensue with demonstrable cell death and foci of tissue pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) as a result of the release of inflammatory mediators including reactive oxygen species. Although rare, HSV-1 is the leading cause of frank sporadic encephalitis that, if left untreated, can result in death. A greater understanding of the contribution of resident glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes within the CNS in response to HSV-1 invasion is necessary to identify candidate molecules as targets for therapeutic intervention to reduce unwarranted inflammation coinciding with the maintenance of the anti-viral state.

  6. Central nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  7. Investigation of medico-biological action of intravasular irradiation of blood on the immune system of an organism at some pathological state of the peripheral nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, Victoria A.; Tanina, Raisa M.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the influence of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) on the immune system of the organism at vertebrogenic disorders of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) with a prominent pain syndrome. It has been found that ILIB produces a positive effect on the immunity T-link increasing the proliferative activity of T-lymphocytes, has positive dynamics in clinics, doesn't cause any side or negative effects.

  8. MART-1 adenovirus-transduced dendritic cell immunization in a murine model of metastatic central nervous system tumor.

    PubMed

    Broder, Howard; Anderson, Andrea; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to play a critical role in the initiation of host immune responses against tumor antigens. In this study, a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding the melanoma-associated antigen, MART-1, was used to transduce murine DCs, which were then tested for their ability to activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and induce protective immunity against B16 melanoma tumor cells implanted intracranially. Genetic modifications of murine bone marrow-derived DCs to express MART-1 was achieved through the use of an E1-deficient, recombinant adenovirus vector. Sixty-two C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously with AdVMART-1-transduced DCs (n = 23), untransduced DCs (n = 17), or sterile saline (n = 22). Using the B16 murine melanoma, which naturally expresses the MART-1 antigen, all the mice were then challenged intracranially with viable, unmodified syngeneic B16 tumor cells 7 days later. Splenocytes from representative animals in each group were harvested for standard cytotoxicity (CTL) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. The remaining mice were followed for survival. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with DCs transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding the MART-1 antigen elicited the development of antigen-specific CTL responses. As evidenced by a prolonged survival curve when compared to control-immunized mice with intracranial B16 tumors, AdMART-1-DC vaccination was able to elicit partial protection against central nervous system tumor challenge in vivo.

  9. An Intestinal Organ Culture System Uncovers a Role for the Nervous System in Microbe-Immune Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Yissachar, Nissan; Zhou, Yan; Ung, Lloyd; Lai, Nicole Y; Mohan, James F; Ehrlicher, Allen; Weitz, David A; Kasper, Dennis L; Chiu, Isaac M; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2017-03-09

    Investigation of host-environment interactions in the gut would benefit from a culture system that maintained tissue architecture yet allowed tight experimental control. We devised a microfabricated organ culture system that viably preserves the normal multicellular composition of the mouse intestine, with luminal flow to control perturbations (e.g., microbes, drugs). It enables studying short-term responses of diverse gut components (immune, neuronal, etc.). We focused on the early response to bacteria that induce either Th17 or RORg(+) T-regulatory (Treg) cells in vivo. Transcriptional responses partially reproduced in vivo signatures, but these microbes elicited diametrically opposite changes in expression of a neuronal-specific gene set, notably nociceptive neuropeptides. We demonstrated activation of sensory neurons by microbes, correlating with RORg(+) Treg induction. Colonic RORg(+) Treg frequencies increased in mice lacking TAC1 neuropeptide precursor and decreased in capsaicin-diet fed mice. Thus, differential engagement of the enteric nervous system may partake in bifurcating pro- or anti-inflammatory responses to microbes.

  10. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  11. Differential effects of sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on systemic immune cells after severe experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Mracsko, Eva; Liesz, Arthur; Karcher, Simone; Zorn, Markus; Bari, Ferenc; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-10-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of death in the post-acute phase of stroke. Post-stroke immunodeficiency is believed to result from neurohormonal dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, the differential effects of these neuroendocrine systems on the peripheral immune cells are only partially understood. Here, we determined the impact of the hormones of the SNS and HPA on distinct immune cell populations and characterized their interactions after stroke. At various time points after cortical or extensive hemispheric cerebral ischemia, plasma cortisone, corticosterone, metanephrine and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were measured in mice. Leukocyte subpopulations were flow cytometrically analyzed in spleen and blood. To investigate their differential sensitivity to stress hormones, splenocytes were incubated in vitro with prednisolone, epinephrine and their respective receptor blockers. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) and beta2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) on leukocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry. In vivo effects of GCR and selective β2-AR blockade, respectively, were defined on serum hormone concentrations, lymphopenia and interferon-γ production after severe ischemia. We found elevated cortisone, corticosterone and metanephrine levels and associated lymphocytopenia only after extensive brain infarction. Prednisolone resulted in a 5 times higher cell death rate of splenocytes than epinephrine in vitro. Prednisolone and epinephrine-induced leukocyte cell death was prevented by GCR and β2-AR blockade, respectively. In vivo, only GCR blockade prevented post ischemic lymphopenia whereas β2-AR preserved interferon-γ secretion by lymphocytes. GCR blockade increased metanephrine levels in vivo and prednisolone, in turn, decreased β2-AR expression on lymphocytes. In conclusion, mediators of the SNS and the HPA axis differentially affect the systemic

  12. Obesity induced by a high-fat diet is associated with increased immune cell entry into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Buckman, Laura B; Hasty, Alyssa H; Flaherty, David K; Buckman, Christopher T; Thompson, Misty M; Matlock, Brittany K; Weller, Kevin; Ellacott, Kate L J

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in peripheral tissues caused, in part, by the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes into adipose tissue. Studies in rodent models have also shown increased inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) during obesity. The goal of this study was to determine whether obesity is associated with recruitment of peripheral immune cells into the CNS. To do this we used a bone marrow chimerism model to track the entry of green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled peripheral immune cells into the CNS. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the number of GFP(+) immune cells recruited into the CNS of mice fed a high-fat diet compared to standard chow fed controls. High-fat feeding resulted in obesity associated with a 30% increase in the number of GFP(+) cells in the CNS compared to control mice. Greater than 80% of the GFP(+) cells recruited to the CNS were also CD45(+) CD11b(+) indicating that the GFP(+) cells displayed characteristics of microglia/macrophages. Immunohistochemistry further confirmed the increase in GFP(+) cells in the CNS of the high-fat fed group and also indicated that 93% of the recruited cells were found in the parenchyma and had a stellate morphology. These findings indicate that peripheral immune cells can be recruited to the CNS in obesity and may contribute to the inflammatory response.

  13. Psychological Stress and the Cutaneous Immune Response: Roles of the HPA Axis and the Sympathetic Nervous System in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jessica M F; Cruser, Desanges; Podawiltz, Alan; Mummert, Diana I; Jones, Harlan; Mummert, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Psychological stress, an evolutionary adaptation to the fight-or-flight response, triggers a number of physiological responses that can be deleterious under some circumstances. Stress signals activate the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Elements derived from those systems (e.g., cortisol, catecholamines and neuropeptides) can impact the immune system and possible disease states. Skin provides a first line of defense against many environmental insults. A number of investigations have indicated that the skin is especially sensitive to psychological stress, and experimental evidence shows that the cutaneous innate and adaptive immune systems are affected by stressors. For example, psychological stress has been shown to reduce recovery time of the stratum corneum barrier after its removal (innate immunity) and alters antigen presentation by epidermal Langerhans cells (adaptive immunity). Moreover, psychological stress may trigger or exacerbate immune mediated dermatological disorders. Understanding how the activity of the psyche-nervous -immune system axis impinges on skin diseases may facilitate coordinated treatment strategies between dermatologists and psychiatrists. Herein, we will review the roles of the HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system on the cutaneous immune response. We will selectively highlight how the interplay between psychological stress and the immune system affects atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

  14. The crustacean central nervous system in focus: subacute neurodegeneration induces a specific innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Chaves da Silva, Paula Grazielle; Corrêa, Clynton Lourenço; de Carvalho, Sergio Luiz; Allodi, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    To date nothing is known about the subacute phase of neurodegeneration following injury in invertebrates. Among few clues available are the results published by our group reporting hemocytes and activated glial cells at chronic and acute phases of the lesion. In vertebrates, glial activation and recruitment of immunological cells are crucial events during neurodegeneration. Here, we aimed to study the subacute stage of neurodegeneration in the crab Ucides cordatus, investigating the cellular/molecular strategy employed 48 hours following ablation of the protocerebral tract (PCT). We also explored the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and histamine in the PCT during this phase of neurodegeneration. Three immune cellular features which seem to characterize the subacute phase of neurodegeneration were revealed by: 1) the recruitment of granulocytes and secondarily of hyalinocytes to the lesion site (inducible NO synthase- and histamine-positive cells); 2) the attraction of a larger number of cells than observed in the acute phase; 3) the presence of activated glial cells as shown by the round shaped nuclei and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. We suggest that molecules released from granulocytes in the acute phase attract the hyalinocytes thus moving the degeneration process to the subacute phase. The importance of our study resides in the characterization of cellular and biochemical strategies peculiar to the subacute stage of the neurodegeneration in invertebrates. Such events are worth studying in crustaceans because in invertebrates this issue may be addressed with less interference from complex strategies resulting from the acquired immune system.

  15. Activation of Innate Immune Responses in the Central Nervous System during Reovirus Myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Schittone, Stephanie A.; Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Reovirus infection of the murine spinal cord (SC) was used as a model system to investigate innate immune responses during viral myelitis, including the activation of glia (microglia and astrocytes) and interferon (IFN) signaling and increased expression of inflammatory mediators. Reovirus myelitis was associated with the pronounced activation of SC glia, as evidenced by characteristic changes in cellular morphology and increased expression of astrocyte and microglia-specific proteins. Expression of inflammatory mediators known to be released by activated glia, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL 5), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), was also significantly upregulated in the SC of reovirus-infected animals compared to mock-infected controls. Reovirus infection of the mouse SC was also associated with increased expression of genes involved in IFN signaling, including IFN-stimulated genes (ISG). Further, reovirus infection of mice deficient in the expression of the IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR−/−) resulted in accelerated mortality, demonstrating that IFN signaling is protective during reovirus myelitis. Experiments performed in ex vivo SC slice cultures (SCSC) confirmed that resident SC cells contribute to the production of at least some of these inflammatory mediators and ISG during reovirus infection. Microglia, but not astrocytes, were still activated, and glia-associated inflammatory mediators were still produced in reovirus-infected INFAR−/− mice, demonstrating that IFN signaling is not absolutely required for these neuroinflammatory responses. Our results suggest that activated glia and inflammatory mediators contribute to a local microenvironment that is deleterious to neuronal survival. PMID:22623770

  16. Adaptive Immunity Is the Key to the Understanding of Autoimmune and Paraneoplastic Inflammatory Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weissert, Robert

    2017-01-01

    There are common aspects and mechanisms between different types of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs), and autoimmune encephalitis (AE) as well as paraneoplastic inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system. To our present knowledge, depending on the disease, T and B cells as well as antibodies contribute to various aspects of the pathogenesis. Possibly the events leading to the breaking of tolerance between the different diseases are of great similarity and so far, only partially understood. Beside endogenous factors (genetics, genomics, epigenetics, malignancy) also exogenous factors (vitamin D, sun light exposure, smoking, gut microbiome, viral infections) contribute to susceptibility in such diseases. What differs between these disorders are the target molecules of the immune attack. For T cells, these target molecules are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules as MHC-bound ligands. B cells have an important role by amplifying the immune response of T cells by capturing antigen with their surface immunoglobulin and presenting it to T cells. Antibodies secreted by plasma cells that have differentiated from B cells are highly structure specific and can have important effector functions leading to functional impairment or/and lesion evolvement. In MS, the target molecules are mainly myelin- and neuron/axon-derived proteins; in NMOSD, mainly aquaporin-4 expressed on astrocytes; and in AE, various proteins that are expressed by neurons and axons. PMID:28386263

  17. Peripheral dendritic cells are essential for both the innate and adaptive antiviral immune response in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christina D.; Hahto, Suzanne M.; Ciavarra, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Intranasal application of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS). However, VSV encephalitis is not invariably fatal, suggesting that the CNS may contain a professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) capable of inducing or propagating a protective antiviral immune response. To examine this possibility, we first characterized the cellular elements that infiltrate the brain as well as the activation status of resident microglia in the brains of normal and transgenic mice acutely ablated of peripheral dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. VSV encephalitis was characterized by a pronounced infiltrate of myeloid cells (CD45highCD11b+) and CD8+ T cells containing a subset that was specific for the immunodominant VSV nuclear protein epitope. This T cell response correlated temporally with a rapid and sustained upregulation of MHC class I expression on microglia, whereas class II expression was markedly delayed. Ablation of peripheral DCs profoundly inhibited the inflammatory response as well as infiltration of virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Unexpectedly, the VSV-induced interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response in the CNS remained intact in DC-deficient mice. Thus, both the inflammatory and certain components of the adaptive primary antiviral immune response in the CNS are dependent on peripheral DCs in vivo. PMID:19264338

  18. Peripheral dendritic cells are essential for both the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Christina D.; Hahto, Suzanne M.; Ciavarra, Richard P.

    2009-04-25

    Intranasal application of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS). However, VSV encephalitis is not invariably fatal, suggesting that the CNS may contain a professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) capable of inducing or propagating a protective antiviral immune response. To examine this possibility, we first characterized the cellular elements that infiltrate the brain as well as the activation status of resident microglia in the brains of normal and transgenic mice acutely ablated of peripheral dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. VSV encephalitis was characterized by a pronounced infiltrate of myeloid cells (CD45{sup high}CD11b{sup +}) and CD8{sup +} T cells containing a subset that was specific for the immunodominant VSV nuclear protein epitope. This T cell response correlated temporally with a rapid and sustained upregulation of MHC class I expression on microglia, whereas class II expression was markedly delayed. Ablation of peripheral DCs profoundly inhibited the inflammatory response as well as infiltration of virus-specific CD8{sup +} T cells. Unexpectedly, the VSV-induced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) response in the CNS remained intact in DC-deficient mice. Thus, both the inflammatory and certain components of the adaptive primary antiviral immune response in the CNS are dependent on peripheral DCs in vivo.

  19. Peripheral dendritic cells are essential for both the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christina D; Hahto, Suzanne M; Ciavarra, Richard P

    2009-04-25

    Intranasal application of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS). However, VSV encephalitis is not invariably fatal, suggesting that the CNS may contain a professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) capable of inducing or propagating a protective antiviral immune response. To examine this possibility, we first characterized the cellular elements that infiltrate the brain as well as the activation status of resident microglia in the brains of normal and transgenic mice acutely ablated of peripheral dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. VSV encephalitis was characterized by a pronounced infiltrate of myeloid cells (CD45(high)CD11b(+)) and CD8(+) T cells containing a subset that was specific for the immunodominant VSV nuclear protein epitope. This T cell response correlated temporally with a rapid and sustained upregulation of MHC class I expression on microglia, whereas class II expression was markedly delayed. Ablation of peripheral DCs profoundly inhibited the inflammatory response as well as infiltration of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. Unexpectedly, the VSV-induced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) response in the CNS remained intact in DC-deficient mice. Thus, both the inflammatory and certain components of the adaptive primary antiviral immune response in the CNS are dependent on peripheral DCs in vivo.

  20. In Vivo Visualization of (Auto)Immune Processes in the Central Nervous System of Rodents.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Litke, Tanja; Flügel, Alexander; Odoardi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The CNS is effectively shielded from the periphery by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which limits the entry of cells and solutes. However, in autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, immune cells can overcome this barrier and induce the formation of CNS inflammatory lesions. Recently, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has made it possible to visualize autoimmune processes in the living CNS in real time. However, along with a high microscopy standard, this technique requires an advanced surgical procedure to access the region of interest. Here, we describe in detail the necessary methodological steps to visualize (auto)immune processes in living rodent tissue. We focus on the procedures to image the leptomeningeal vessels of the thoracic spinal cord during transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in LEW rats (AT EAE) and in active EAE in C57BL/6 mice (aEAE).

  1. Brain and Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as the beating of your heart, the digestion of your food, and yes, even the amount ... functions, like breathing, heart rate, blood pressure, swallowing, digestion, and blinking. previous continue How the Nervous System ...

  2. Developmental maturation of innate immune cell function correlates with susceptibility to central nervous system autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hertzenberg, Deetje; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Kinzel, Silke; Husterer, Veronika; Cravens, Petra D; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hemmer, Bernhard; Brück, Wolfgang; Zamvil, Scott S; Stüve, Olaf; Weber, Martin S

    2013-08-01

    MS is an inflammatory CNS disorder, which typically occurs in early adulthood and rarely in children. Here we tested whether functional maturation of innate immune cells may determine susceptibility to CNS autoimmune disease in EAE. Two-week-old mice were resistant to active EAE, which causes fulminant paralysis in adult mice; this resistance was associated with an impaired development of Th1 and Th17 cells. Resistant, young mice had higher frequencies of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and plasma-cytoid DCs. Furthermore, myeloid APCs and B cells from young mice expressed lower levels of MHC class II and CD40, produced decreased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, and released enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10. When used as APCs, splenocytes from 2-week-old mice failed to differentiate naive T cells into Th1 and Th17 cells irrespective of the T-cell donor's age, and promoted development of Treg cells and Th2 cells instead. Adoptive transfer of adult APCs restored the ability of 2-week-old mice to generate encephalitogenic T cells and develop EAE. Collectively, these findings indicate that the innate immune compartment functionally matures during development, which may be a prerequisite for development of T-cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease.

  3. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  4. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in acquired immune deficiency syndrome mimicking toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Utsuki, Satoshi; Oka, Hidehiro; Abe, Katsutoshi; Osawa, Shigeyuki; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Yasui, Yoshie; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2011-02-01

    A 37-year-old man, a hepatitis B virus carrier due to mother-to-child transmission, had a medical examination in September 2008 in nearby hospitals due to anorexia and weight loss. He was transported to our hospital because computed tomography (CT) detected intracranial lesions, and he had a positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. Head computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple hemorrhagic lesions and enhancement effect, suggesting a thin wall. Also, an enhancement effect was present in the ventricle walls and the subarachnoid space. No accumulation was found in the thallium-201 scintigraphy. The enhancement effect of the ventricle walls and the subarachnoid space disappeared after oral administration of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and calcium folinate, contributing to the diagnosis of an abscess and meningitis due to toxoplasma. However, mass lesions did not reduce. A biopsy was performed on 30 October, and the pathological diagnosis was malignant lymphoma. He died from respiratory function deterioration on 8 November. Lymphoma cells were found in ventricle wall tissue and the subarachnoid space at the autopsy. Toxoplasmosis will typically occur as a brain lesion most commonly in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), whereas malignant lymphoma commonly manifests as a brain neoplastic lesion. However, differentiating between images of these lesions is difficult, so diagnosis by early biopsy is recommended.

  5. Intrathecal Activation as a Typical Immune Response within the Central Nervous System in Angiostrongyliasis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Iglesias-González, Ivonne; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Socarrás-Hernández, Carmen Aleida; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto Juan

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic pathogen that occasionally causes human angiostrongyliasis; its main clinical manifestation is eosinophilic meningitis. This report defines the concept of intrathecal activation of complement as evidence of intrathecal synthesis of major immunoglobulins during this disease. Details are presented of the activation of complement system components in cerebrospinal fluid, and their application to our understanding of this tropical disease, which is emerging in the Western hemisphere. Intrathecal synthesis of at least one of the major immunoglobulins and a wide spectrum of patterns may be observed. Although intrathecal synthesis of C3c is always present, C4 intrathecal synthesis does not occur in every patient. The diversity of intrathecal synthesis and activation of the different complement pathways enables their division into three variant groups (A, B, and C). Variant group A includes the classical and/or lectin pathway and involves two or more major immunoglobulins with C3 and C4 intrathecal synthesis. Variant group B involves C4 in cerebrospinal fluid that comes from blood in the intrathecal activation of the classical pathway. Variant group C includes the alternative pathway. PMID:23390222

  6. The Nervous System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbitt, Cynthia; Carpenter, Molly

    2006-01-01

    For many children, especially those with reading difficulties, a motor-kinesthetic learning activity may be an effective tool to teach complex concepts. With this in mind, the authors developed and tested a game designed to teach fourth- to sixth-grade children some basic principles of nervous system function by allowing the children themselves to…

  7. Imaging nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Fields, Douglas R; Shneider, Neil; Mentis, George Z; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    This unit describes methods for loading ion- and voltage-sensitive dyes into neurons, with a particular focus on the spinal cord as a model system. In addition, we describe the use of these dyes to visualize neural activity. Although the protocols described here concern spinal networks in culture or an intact in vitro preparation, they can be, and have been, widely used in other parts of the nervous system.

  8. Your Brain and Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Your Brain & Nervous System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Brain & Nervous ... The coolest wetsuit? Nope — he needs his cerebellum! Brain Stem Keeps You Breathing — and More Another brain ...

  9. Your Brain and Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Brain & Nervous System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Brain & Nervous ... The coolest wetsuit? Nope — he needs his cerebellum! Brain Stem Keeps You Breathing — and More Another brain ...

  10. Imaging nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Fields, R D; O'Donovan, M J

    2001-05-01

    Optical imaging methods rely upon visualization of three types of signals: (1) intrinsic optical signals, including light scattering and reflectance, birefringence, and spectroscopic changes of intrinsic molecules, such as NADH or oxyhemoglobin; (2) changes in fluorescence or absorbance of voltage-sensitive membrane dyes; and (3) changes in fluorescence or absorbance of calcium-sensitive indicator dyes. Of these, the most widely used approach is fluorescent microscopy of calcium-sensitive dyes. This unit describes protocols for the use of calcium-sensitive dyes and voltage-dependent dyes for studies of neuronal activity in culture, tissue slices, and en-bloc preparations of the central nervous system.

  11. Association between exposure to emissions from the oil and gas industry and pathology of the immune, nervous, and respiratory systems, and skeletal and cardiac muscle in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Cheryl L; Clark, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    To determine potential associations between emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the risk of lesions in the immune, nervous, and respiratory systems of beef calves, researchers examined tissue samples collected from 1,531 cases with exposure data, which included aborted fetuses, stillbirths, and calf mortalities from 203 cow-calf herds, by means of histopathology. The researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds by using air-monitoring data from passive monitors. They used the density of facilities surrounding each pasture as a second measure of exposure. Each tissue was classified by the presence or absence of a series of specified lesions, including those associated with degeneration, necrosis, infection, inflammation, anomaly, lympholysis (for lymphoid tissue), and proliferation (for the respiratory system). Exposure was not associated with the risk of lesions to tissues of either the immune or nervous system in calves that were aborted or died in spring 2002. Exposures to sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were not significantly associated with the risk of lesions to respiratory tissues in calves that were born alive in spring 2002. Increasing postnatal exposures to volatile organic compounds measured as benzene and toluene were associated with increased odds of respiratory lesions. The association between volatile organic compounds measured as benzene and respiratory lesions was significant for calves older than 3 weeks. During gestation, increasing exposure to sulfur dioxide was associated with increased odds of lesions in either the skeletal muscle or myocardium.

  12. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Astrof, Nathan S.; Liu, Jin-Huan; Wang, Jia-huai; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2009-09-15

    Volatile anesthetics (VAs), such as isoflurane, induce a general anesthetic state by binding to specific targets (i.e., ion channels) in the central nervous system (CNS). Simultaneously, VAs modulate immune functions, possibly via direct interaction with alternative targets on leukocytes. One such target, the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), has been shown previously to be inhibited by isoflurane. A better understanding of the mechanism by which isoflurane alters protein function requires the detailed information about the drug-protein interaction at an atomic level. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (I domain) in complex with isoflurane at 1.6 {angstrom}. We discovered that isoflurane binds to an allosteric cavity previously implicated as critical for the transition of LFA-1 from the low- to the high-affinity state. The isoflurane binding site in the I domain involves an array of amphiphilic interactions, thereby resembling a 'common anesthetic binding motif' previously predicted for authentic VA binding sites. These results suggest that the allosteric modulation of protein function by isoflurane, as demonstrated for the integrin LFA-1, might represent a unified mechanism shared by the interactions of volatile anesthetics with targets in the CNS. Crystal structure of isoflurane bound to integrin LFA-1 supports a unified mechanism of volatile anesthetic action in the immune and central nervous systems.

  13. Learning and Memory... and the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Ioana; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The nervous system and the immune system are two main regulators of homeostasis in the body. Communication between them ensures normal functioning of the organism. Immune cells and molecules are required for sculpting the circuitry and determining the activity of the nervous system. Within the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS),…

  14. Nervous System Complexity Baffles Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jeffrey L.

    1982-01-01

    New research findings about how nerve cells transmit signals are forcing researchers to overhaul their simplistic ideas about the nervous system. Topics highlighted include the multiple role of peptides in the nervous system, receptor molecules, and molecules that form ion channels within membranes. (Author/JN)

  15. Noise in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Faisal, A Aldo; Selen, Luc P J; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2008-04-01

    Noise--random disturbances of signals--poses a fundamental problem for information processing and affects all aspects of nervous-system function. However, the nature, amount and impact of noise in the nervous system have only recently been addressed in a quantitative manner. Experimental and computational methods have shown that multiple noise sources contribute to cellular and behavioural trial-to-trial variability. We review the sources of noise in the nervous system, from the molecular to the behavioural level, and show how noise contributes to trial-to-trial variability. We highlight how noise affects neuronal networks and the principles the nervous system applies to counter detrimental effects of noise, and briefly discuss noise's potential benefits.

  16. HCV-Related Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Salvatore; Ferrari, Sergio; Gajofatto, Alberto; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Mariotto, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a wide spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations, affecting different organ systems. Neurological complications occur in a large number of patients and range from peripheral neuropathy to cognitive impairment. Pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for nervous system dysfunction are mainly related to the upregulation of the host immune response with production of autoantibodies, immune complexes, and cryoglobulins. Alternative mechanisms include possible extrahepatic replication of HCV in neural tissues and the effects of circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. PMID:22899946

  17. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  18. Virus Infections in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2013-01-01

    Virus infections usually begin in peripheral tissues and can invade the mammalian nervous system (NS), spreading into the peripheral (PNS) and more rarely the central nervous systems (CNS). The CNS is protected from most virus infections by effective immune responses and multi-layer barriers. However, some viruses enter the NS with high efficiency via the bloodstream or by directly infecting nerves that innervate peripheral tissues, resulting in debilitating direct and immune-mediated pathology. Most viruses in the NS are opportunistic or accidental pathogens, but a few, most notably the alpha herpesviruses and rabies virus, have evolved to enter the NS efficiently and exploit neuronal cell biology. Remarkably, the alpha herpesviruses can establish quiescent infections in the PNS, with rare but often fatal CNS pathology. Here we review how viruses gain access to and spread in the well-protected CNS, with particular emphasis on alpha herpesviruses, which establish and maintain persistent NS infections. PMID:23601101

  19. Transgenic CCL2 expression in the central nervous system results in a dysregulated immune response and enhanced lethality after coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Jonathan A; Fleming, Erica L; Perlman, Stanley

    2013-03-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), a chemoattractant for macrophages, T cells, and cells expressing CCR2, is upregulated during acute and chronic inflammation. CCL2 has been implicated in both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and has been suggested as a target for therapy in some inflammatory disorders. To examine the role of CCL2 during virus infection, we infected mice transgenically expressing CCL2 in the central nervous system (CCL2 Tg) with an attenuated neurotropic coronavirus (rJ2.2 strain of mouse hepatitis virus). Infection of wild-type mice with rJ2.2 results in mild acute encephalitis, followed by a nonlethal, chronic demyelinating disease. Proinflammatory innate and adaptive immune responses mediate virus clearance. In marked contrast, CCL2 Tg mice infected with rJ2.2 ineffectively cleared virus and rapidly succumbed to the infection. CCL2 Tg mice mounted a dysregulated immune response, characterized by augmented accumulation of regulatory Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells and of nitric-oxide- and YM-1-expressing macrophages and microglia, suggestive of mixed M1/M2 macrophage activation. Further, macrophages from infected CCL2 Tg brains relative to non-Tg controls were less activated/mature, expressing lower levels of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), CD86, and CD40. Collectively, these results show that persistent CCL2 overexpression establishes and sustains an immunological milieu that is both inflammatory and immunosuppressive and predisposes mice to a defective immune response to a minimally lethal virus.

  20. Th1 and Th17 cells regulate innate immune responses and bacterial clearance during central nervous system infection.

    PubMed

    Holley, Monica M; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-02-01

    Brain abscesses arise following parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria and are typified by inflammation and edema, which frequently results in a multitude of long-term health problems. The impact of adaptive immunity in shaping continued innate responses during late-stage brain abscess formation is not known but is important, because robust innate immunity is required for effective bacterial clearance. To address this issue, brain abscesses were induced in TCR αβ knockout (KO) mice, because CD4(+) and NKT cells represented the most numerous T cell infiltrates. TCR αβ KO mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance during later stages of infection, which was associated with alterations in neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, as well as perturbations in cytokine/chemokine expression. Adoptive transfer of either Th1 or Th17 cells into TCR αβ KO mice restored bacterial burdens and innate immune cell infiltrates to levels detected in wild-type animals. Interestingly, adoptively transferred Th17 cells demonstrated plasticity within the CNS compartment and induced distinct cytokine secretion profiles in abscess-associated microglia and macrophages compared with Th1 transfer. Collectively, these studies identified an amplification loop for Th1 and Th17 cells in shaping established innate responses during CNS infection to maximize bacterial clearance and differentially regulate microglial and macrophage secretory profiles.

  1. Skin rubdown with a dry towel, 'kanpu-masatsu' is an aerobic exercise affecting body temperature, energy production, and the immune and autonomic nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Takano, Osamu; Tomiyama, Chikako; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Urahigashi, Nobuatsu; Urahigashi, Nobuatsu; Abo, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Skin rubdown using a dry towel (SRDT) to scrub the whole body is a traditional therapy for health promotion. To investigate its mechanism, 24 healthy male volunteers were studied. Body temperature, pulse rate, red blood cells (RBCs), serum levels of catecholamines and cortisol, blood gases (PO(2), sO(2), PCO(2) and pH), lactate and glucose, and the ratio and number of white blood cells (WBCs) were assessed before and after SRDT. After SRDT, pulse rate and body temperature were increased. PO(2), sO(2) and pH were also increased and there was no Rouleaux formation by RBCs. Lactate level tended to increase, whereas that of glucose did not. Adrenaline and noradrenaline levels increased, indicating sympathetic nerve (SN) dominance with increase in granulocytes. WBC number and ratio were divided into two groups according to granulocyte ratio (≤ or < 60%) before SRDT: a normal group and a SN group. Only in the SN group did the granulocyte ratio decrease and the lymphocyte ratio and number increase after SRDT. It is suggested that SRDT is a mild aerobic, systemic exercise that might affect the immune system via the autonomic nervous system.

  2. Human T cell leukemia virus type I and neurologic disease: events in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and central nervous system during normal immune surveillance and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christian; Barmak, Kate; Alefantis, Timothy; Yao, Jing; Jacobson, Steven; Wigdahl, Brian

    2002-02-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been identified as the causative agent of both adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Although the exact sequence of events that occur during the early stages of infection are not known in detail, the initial route of infection may predetermine, along with host, environmental, and viral factors, the subset of target cells and/or the primary immune response encountered by HTLV-I, and whether an HTLV-I-infected individual will remain asymptomatic, develop ATL, or progress to the neuroinflammatory disease, HAM/TSP. Although a large number of studies have indicated that CD4(+) T cells represent an important target for HTLV-I infection in the peripheral blood (PB), additional evidence has accumulated over the past several years demonstrating that HTLV-I can infect several additional cellular compartments in vivo, including CD8(+) T lymphocytes, PB monocytes, dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and resident central nervous system (CNS) astrocytes. More importantly, extensive latent viral infection of the bone marrow, including cells likely to be hematopoietic progenitor cells, has been observed in individuals with HAM/TSP as well as some asymptomatic carriers, but to a much lesser extent in individuals with ATL. Furthermore, HTLV-I(+) CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells can maintain the intact proviral genome and initiate viral gene expression during the differentiation process. Introduction of HTLV-I-infected bone marrow progenitor cells into the PB, followed by genomic activation and low level viral gene expression may lead to an increase in proviral DNA load in the PB, resulting in a progressive state of immune dysregulation including the generation of a detrimental cytotoxic Tax-specific CD8(+) T cell population, anti-HTLV-I antibodies, and neurotoxic cytokines involved in disruption of myelin-producing cells and neuronal degradation

  3. Immunological reaction of the demyelinating Semliki Forest virus with immune serum to glycolipids and its possible importance to central nervous system viral auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, H E; Mehta, S; Gregson, N A; Leibowitz, S

    1984-01-01

    The avirulent demyelinating strain A7(74) of Semliki Forest virus after passage through mouse brain in vivo and mouse brain cell cultures has been shown to react immunologically with immune sera against galactocerebroside, glucocerebroside, total ganglioside and GT1b ganglioside but not against myelin or sulphatide . Semliki Forest virus is known to take host membrane glycolipid into its coat. The importance of the findings is discussed in relation to the production of a possible anti-brain cell auto-immune phenomenon and its implication in a disease such as multiple sclerosis.

  4. Extracellular Vesicles in Physiology, Pathology, and Therapy of the Immune and Central Nervous System, with Focus on Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Therapeutic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Koniusz, Sylwia; Andrzejewska, Anna; Muraca, Maurizio; Srivastava, Amit K.; Janowski, Miroslaw; Lukomska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-surrounded structures released by most cell types. They are characterized by a specific set of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. EVs have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication to transmit biological signals between cells. In addition, pathophysiological roles of EVs in conditions like cancer, infectious diseases and neurodegenerative disorders are well established. In recent years focus has been shifted on therapeutic use of stem cell derived-EVs. Use of stem cell derived-EVs present distinct advantage over the whole stem cells as EVs do not replicate and after intravenous administration, they are less likely to trap inside the lungs. From the therapeutic perspective, the most promising cellular sources of EVs are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are easy to obtain and maintain. Therapeutic activity of MSCs has been shown in numerous animal models and the beneficial paracrine effect of MSCs may be mediated by EVs. The various components of MSC derived-EVs such as proteins, lipids, and RNA might play a specific therapeutic role. In this review, we characterize the role of EVs in immune and central nervous system (CNS); present evidences for defective signaling of these vesicles in neurodegeneration and therapeutic role of EVs in CNS. PMID:27199663

  5. Measures of Autonomic Nervous System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Gastro- intestinal Pupillary Response Respiratory Salivary Amylase Vascular Manipulative Body-Based/ Tension-Release Practices Trauma...Physiological Activities ANS Physiological Activities Cardiac Pupillary Response Catecholamines Respiration Cortisol Salivary Amylase Galvanic Skin...Measures of Autonomic Nervous System Regulation Salivary Amylase Measurement Most measures of salivary amylase

  6. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Drosophila Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shinobu C.; Zipursky, Stephen L.; Benzer, Seymour; Ferrus, Alberto; Shotwell, Sandra L.

    1982-12-01

    A panel of 148 monoclonal antibodies directed against Drosophila neural antigens has been prepared by using mice immunized with homogenates of Drosophila tissue. Antibodies were screened immunohistochemically on cryostat sections of fly heads. A large diversity of staining patterns was observed. Some antigens were broadly distributed among tissues; others were highly specific to nerve fibers, neuropil, muscle, the tracheal system, cell nuclei, photoreceptors, or other structures. The antigens for many of the antibodies have been identified on immunoblots. Monoclonal antibodies that identify specific molecules within the nervous system should prove useful in the study of the molecular genetics of neural development.

  8. The human myelin basic protein gene is included within a 179-kilobase transcription unit: Expression in the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pribyl, T.M.; Campagnoni, C.W.; Kampf, K.; Kashima, T.; Handley, V.W.; Campagnoni, A.T. ); McMahon, J. )

    1993-11-15

    Two human Golli (for gene expressed in the oligodendrocyte lineage)-MBP (for myelin basic protein) cDNAs have been isolated from a human oligodendroglioma cell line. Analysis of these cDNAs has enabled the authors to determine the entire structure of the human Golli-MBP gene. The Golli-MBP gene, which encompasses the MBP transcription unit, is [approx] 179 kb in length and consists of 10 exons, seven of which constitute the MBP gene. The human Golli-MBP gene contains two transcription start sites, each of which gives rise to a family of alternatively spliced transcipts. At least two Golli-MBP transcripts, containing the first three exons of the gene and one or more MBP exons, are produced from the first transcription start site. The second family of transcripts contains only MBP exons and produces the well-known MBPs. In humans, RNA blot analysis revealed that Golli-MBP transcripts were expressed in fetal thymus, spleen, and human B-cell and macrophage cell lines, as well as in fetal spinal cord. These findings clearly link the expression of exons encoding the autoimmunogen/encephalitogen MBP in the central nervous system to cells and tissues of the immune system through normal expression of the Golli-MBP gene. They also establish that this genetic locus, which includes the MBP gene, is conserved among species, providing further evidence that the MBP transcription unit is an integral part of the Golli transcription unit and suggest that this structural arrangement is important for the genetic function and/or regulation of these genes.

  9. Infections of the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vevek; Tucci, Veronica; Galwankar, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Glycemic control is an important aspect of patient care in the surgical Infections of the nervous system are among the most difficult infections in terms of the morbidity and mortality posed to patients, and thereby require urgent and accurate diagnosis. Although viral meningitides are more common, it is the bacterial meningitides that have the potential to cause a rapidly deteriorating condition that the physician should be familiar with. Viral encephalitis frequently accompanies viral meningitis, and can produce focal neurologic findings and cognitive difficulties that can mimic other neurologic disorders. Brain abscesses also have the potential to mimic and present like other neurologic disorders, and cause more focal deficits. Finally, other infectious diseases of the central nervous system, such as prion disease and cavernous sinus thrombosis, are explored in this review. PMID:22837896

  10. Aging changes in the nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004023.htm Aging changes in the nervous system To use the ... spinal cord to every part of your body. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE NERVOUS SYSTEM ...

  11. Neuroimmune interactions: dendritic cell modulation by the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Maisa C; Guereschi, Marcia G; Basso, Alexandre S

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells are of paramount importance bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. Depending on the context, after sensing environmental antigens, commensal microorganisms, pathogenic agents, or antigens from the diet, dendritic cells may drive either different effector adaptive immune responses or tolerance, avoiding tissue damage. Although the plasticity of the immune response and the capacity to regulate itself are considered essential to orchestrate appropriate physiological responses, it is known that the nervous system plays a relevant role controlling immune cell function. Dendritic cells present in the skin, the intestine, and lymphoid organs, besides expressing adrenergic receptors, can be reached by neurotransmitters released by sympathetic fibers innervating these tissues. These review focus on how neurotransmitters from the sympathetic nervous system can modulate dendritic cell function and how this may impact the immune response and immune-mediated disorders.

  12. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J; Eccles, Jacob D; Rouhani, Sherin J; Peske, J David; Derecki, Noel C; Castle, David; Mandell, James W; Lee, Kevin S; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-16

    One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system. The discovery of the central nervous system lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction.

  13. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System A A A ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  14. Lavender and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koulivand, Peir Hossein; Khaleghi Ghadiri, Maryam; Gorji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lavender is traditionally alleged to have a variety of therapeutic and curative properties, ranging from inducing relaxation to treating parasitic infections, burns, insect bites, and spasm. There is growing evidence suggesting that lavender oil may be an effective medicament in treatment of several neurological disorders. Several animal and human investigations suggest anxiolytic, mood stabilizer, sedative, analgesic, and anticonvulsive and neuroprotective properties for lavender. These studies raised the possibility of revival of lavender therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders. In this paper, a survey on current experimental and clinical state of knowledge about the effect of lavender on the nervous system is given. PMID:23573142

  15. Cocaine and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Das, G

    1993-12-01

    Cocaine abuse today has reached greater heights than it did during the first cocaine epidemic in the late nineteenth century. It is estimated that one out of every four Americans has used cocaine and some six million people in the US use it regularly. Although cocaine affects all systems in the body, the central nervous system (CNS) is the primary target. Cocaine blocks the reuptake of neurotransmitters in the neuronal synapses. Almost all CNS effects of cocaine can be attributed to this mechanism. Euphoria, pharmacological pleasure and intense cocaine craving share basis in this system. The effects of cocaine on other organ systems, in addition to its effects on the CNS, account for the majority of the complications associated with cocaine abuse. In this paper, the CNS effects following cocaine administration and their treatment are discussed.

  16. Aquaporin Biology and Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, Buffoli

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the movement of water through cell membranes has been greatly advanced by the discovery of a family of water-specific, membrane-channel proteins: the Aquaporins (AQPs). These proteins are present in organisms at all levels of life, and their unique permeability characteristics and distribution in numerous tissues indicate diverse roles in the regulation of water homeostasis. Phenotype analysis of AQP knock-out mice has confirmed the predicted role of AQPs in osmotically driven transepithelial fluid transport, as occurs in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. Regarding their expression in nervous system, there are evidences suggesting that AQPs are differentially expressed in the peripheral versus central nervous system and that channel-mediated water transport mechanisms may be involved in cerebrospinal fluid formation, neuronal signal transduction and information processing. Moreover, a number of recent studies have revealed the importance of mammalian AQPs in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and have suggested that pharmacological modulation of AQP expression and activity may provide new tools for the treatment of variety of human disorders in which water and small solute transport may be involved. For all the AQPs, new contributions to physiological functions are likely to be discovered with ongoing work in this rapidly expanding field of research. PMID:21119880

  17. Molecular networks related to the immune system and mitochondria are targets for the pesticide dieldrin in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Andrew M; Sarty, Kathleena I; Mercer, Angella; Koh, Jin; Kidd, Karen A; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2017-03-22

    The objectives of this study were to determine the behavioral and molecular responses in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) central nervous system (CNS) following a dietary exposure to the pesticide dieldrin. Zebrafish were fed pellets spiked with 0.03, 0.15, or 1.8μg/g dieldrin for 21days. Behavioral analysis revealed no difference in exploratory behaviors or those related to anxiety. Transcriptional networks for T-cell aggregation and selection were decreased in expression suggesting an immunosuppressive effect of dieldrin, consistent with other studies investigating organochlorine pesticides. Processes related to oxidative phosphorylation were also differentially affected by dieldrin. Quantitative proteomics (iTRAQ) using a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap identified 226 proteins that were different following one or more doses. These proteins included ATP synthase subunits (mitochondrial) and hypoxia up-regulated protein 1 which were decreased and NADH dehydrogenases (mitochondrial) and signal recognition particle 9 which were up-regulated. Thus, proteins affected were functionally associated with the mitochondria and a protein network analysis implicated Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease as diseases associated with altered proteins. Molecular networks related to mitochondrial dysfunction and T-cell regulation are hypothesized to underlie the association between dieldrin and PD. These data contribute to a comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic biomarker framework for pesticide exposures and neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  19. Current trends in autoimmunity and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo; Barin, Jobert G; Rose, Noel R

    2016-12-01

    In the broad field of autoimmunity and clinical immunology, experimental evidence over the past few years have demonstrated several connections between the immune system and the nervous system, both central and peripheral, leading to the definition of neuroimmunology and of an immune-brain axis. Indeed, the central nervous system as an immune-privileged site, thanks to the blood-brain barrier, is no longer a dogma as the barrier may be altered during chronic inflammation with disruptive changes of endothelial cells and tight junctions, largely mediated by adenosine receptors and the expression of CD39/CD73. The diseases that encompass the neuroimmunology field vary from primary nervous diseases such as multiple sclerosis to systemic conditions with neuropsychiatric complications, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or vasculitidies. Despite potentially similar clinical manifestations, the pathogenesis of each condition is different, but the interaction between the ultra-specialized structure that is the nervous system and inflammation mediators are crucial. Two examples come from anti-dsDNA cross-reacting with anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus or the new family of antibody-associated neuronal autoimmune diseases including classic paraneoplastic syndromes with antibodies directed to intracellular antigens (Hu, Yo, Ri) and autoimmune encephalitis. In the case of multiple sclerosis, the T cell paradigm is now complicated by the growing evidence of a B cell involvement, particularly via aquaporin antibodies, and their influence on Th1 and Th17 lineages. Inspired by a productive AARDA-sponsored colloquium among experts we provide a critical review of the literature on the pathogenesis of different immune-mediated diseases with neurologic manifestations and we discuss the basic immunology of the central nervous system and the interaction between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system.

  20. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  1. Sympathetic nervous system and spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, William H.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Orthostatic stability on Earth is maintained through sympathetic nerve activation sufficient to increase peripheral vascular resistance and defend against reductions of blood pressure. Orthostatic instability in astronauts upon return from space missions has been linked to blunted vascular resistance responses to standing, introducing the possibility that spaceflight alters normal function between sympathetic efferent traffic and vascular reactivity. Methods: We evaluated published results of spaceflight and relevant ground-based microgravity simulations in an effort to determine responses of the sympathetic nervous system and consequences for orthostatic stability. Results: Direct microneurographic recordings from humans in space revealed that sympathetic nerve activity is increased and preserved in the upright posture after return to Earth (STS-90). However, none of the astronauts studied during STS-90 presented with presyncope postflight, leaving unanswered the question of whether postflight orthostatic intolerance is associated with blunted sympathetic nerve responses or inadequate translation into vascular resistance. Conclusions: There is little evidence to support the concept that spaceflight induces fundamental sympathetic neuroplasticity. The available data seem to support the hypothesis that regardless of whether or not sympathetic traffic is altered during flight, astronauts return with reduced blood volumes and consequent heightened baseline sympathetic activity. Because of this, the ability to withstand an orthostatic challenge postflight is directly proportional to an astronaut's maximal sympathetic activation capacity and remaining sympathetic reserve.

  2. Neurogenesis in the adult peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Krzysztof; Fornaro, Michele; Geuna, Stefano

    2012-05-15

    Most researchers believe that neurogenesis in mature mammals is restricted only to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the central nervous system. In the peripheral nervous system, neurogenesis is thought to be active only during prenatal development, with the exception of the olfactory neuroepithelium. However, sensory ganglia in the adult peripheral nervous system have been reported to contain precursor cells that can proliferate in vitro and be induced to differentiate into neurons. The occurrence of insult-induced neurogenesis, which has been reported by several investigators in the brain, is limited to a few recent reports for the peripheral nervous system. These reports suggest that damage to the adult nervous system induces mechanisms similar to those that control the generation of new neurons during prenatal development. Understanding conditions under which neurogenesis can be induced in physiologically non-neurogenic regions in adults is one of the major challenges for developing therapeutic strategies to repair neurological damage. However, the induced neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system is still largely unexplored. This review presents the history of research on adult neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system, which dates back more than 100 years and reveals the evidence on the under estimated potential for generation of new neurons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  3. Environmental Chemicals and Nervous System Dysfunction 1

    PubMed Central

    Damstra, Terri

    1978-01-01

    Selected examples of associations between nervous system diseases and exposures to occupational and environmental chemicals have been reviewed. Recent outbreaks of human neurotoxicity from both wellknown and previously unknown toxicants reemphasize the need for the medical community to give increased attention to chemical causes of nervous system dysfunction. PMID:87062

  4. Central nervous system infiltrates are characterized by features of ongoing B cell-related immune activity in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Batoulis, Helena; Wunsch, Marie; Birkenheier, Johannes; Rottlaender, Andrea; Gorboulev, Valentin; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-05-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) lymphoid follicle-like aggregates have been reported in the meninges of patients. Here we investigated the functional relevance of B cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. In chronic EAE, B cell aggregates were characterized by the presence of CXCL13(+) and germinal center CD10(+) B cells. Germline transcripts were expressed in the CNS and particularly related to TH17-associated isotypes. We also observed B cells with restricted VH gene usage that differed from clones found in the spleen. Finally, we detected CNS-restricted spreading of the antigen-specific B cell response towards a myelin and a neuronal autoantigen. These data imply the development of autonomous B cell-mediated autoimmunity in the CNS in EAE - a concept that might also apply to MS itself.

  5. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Harrison, David G

    2014-03-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We and others have shown that mice lacking adaptive immune cells, including recombinase-activating gene-deficient mice and rats and mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension to stimuli such as ANG II, high salt, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Agonistic antibodies to the ANG II receptor, produced by B cells, contribute to hypertension in experimental models of preeclampsia. The central nervous system seems important in immune cell activation, because lesions in the anteroventral third ventricle block hypertension and T cell activation in response to ANG II. Likewise, genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and immune cell activation. Current evidence indicates that the production of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17, and interleukin-6, contribute to hypertension, likely via effects on both the kidney and vasculature. In addition, the innate immune system also appears to contribute to hypertension. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, production of cytokines, and, ultimately, vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to the augmentation of hypertension. Studies of immune cell activation will clearly be useful in understanding this common yet complex disease.

  6. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  7. The immune system and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhu V; Chapleau, Mark W; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral lymphatic system and is proinflammatory, whereas the parasympathetic nerve activity dampens the inflammatory response through α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The neuro-immune synapse is bidirectional as cytokines may enhance the sympathetic activity through their central nervous system action that in turn increases the mobilization, migration and infiltration of immune cells in the end organs. Kidneys may be infiltrated by immune cells and mesangial cells that may originate in the bone marrow and release inflammatory cytokines that cause renal damage. Hypertension is also accompanied by infiltration of the adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue by inflammatory immune cells including macrophages. Increased cytokine production induces myogenic and structural changes in the resistance vessels, causing elevated blood pressure. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension may result from the mechanical afterload and the inflammatory response to resident or migratory immune cells. Toll-like receptors on innate immune cells function as sterile injury detectors and initiate the inflammatory pathway. Finally, abnormalities of innate immune cells and the molecular determinants of their activation that include toll-like receptor, adrenergic, cholinergic and AT1 receptors can define the severity of inflammation in hypertension. These receptors are putative therapeutic targets.

  8. Radiation injury to the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, P.H. ); Leibel, S.A. ); Sneline, G.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is designed to describe to the radiation biologist, radiation oncologist, neurologist, neurosurgeon, medical oncologist, and neuro-oncologist, the current state of knowledge about the tolerance of the nervous system to various kinds of radiation, the mechanisms of radiation injury, and how nervous system tolerance and injury are related to the more general problem of radiation damage to normal tissue of all types. The information collected here should stimulate interest in and facilitate the growing research effort into radiation injury to the nervous system.

  9. [Enteric nervous system and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Paillusson, S; Lebouvier, T; Pouclet, H; Coron, E; Bruley des Varannes, S; Damier, P; Neunlist, M; Derkinderen, P

    2012-06-01

    It has become increasingly evident over the last years that Parkinson's disease is a multicentric neurodegenerative disease that affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. The aims of the present article are to discuss the role of the enteric nervous system lesions in pathology spreading (Braak's hypothesis) and in the gastrointestinal dysfunction encountered in Parkinson's disease. Owing to its accessibility to biopsies, we further discuss the use of the enteric nervous system as an original source of biomarker in Parkinson's disease.

  10. [Functional anatomy of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Krainik, A; Feydy, A; Colombani, J M; Hélias, A; Menu, Y

    2003-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a particular regional functional anatomy. The morphological support of cognitive functions can now be depicted using functional imaging. Lesions of the central nervous system may be responsible of specific symptoms based on their location. Current neuroimaging techniques are able to show and locate precisely macroscopic lesions. Therefore, the knowledge of functional anatomy of the central nervous system is useful to link clinical disorders to symptomatic lesions. Using radio-clinical cases, we present the functional neuro-anatomy related to common cognitive impairments.

  11. Congenital defects of the ruminant nervous system.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kevin E; Streeter, Robert N

    2004-07-01

    Abnormalities of the nervous system are common occurrences among congenital defects and have been reported in most ruminant species. From a clinical standpoint, the signs of such defects create difficulty in arriving at an antemortem etiology through historical and physical examination alone. By first localizing clinical signs to their point of origin in the nervous system, however, a narrower differential list can be generated so that the clinician can pursue a definitive diagnosis. This article categorizes defects of the ruminant nervous system by location of salient clinical signs into dysfunction of one of more of the following regions: cerebrum, cerebellum,and spinal cord. A brief review of some of the more recognized etiologies of these defects is also provided. It is important to make every attempt to determine the cause of nervous system defects because of the impact that an inherited condition would have on a breeding program and for prevention of defects caused by infectious or toxic teratogen exposure.

  12. The polyvagal theory: phylogenetic substrates of a social nervous system.

    PubMed

    Porges, S W

    2001-10-01

    The evolution of the autonomic nervous system provides an organizing principle to interpret the adaptive significance of physiological responses in promoting social behavior. According to the polyvagal theory, the well-documented phylogenetic shift in neural regulation of the autonomic nervous system passes through three global stages, each with an associated behavioral strategy. The first stage is characterized by a primitive unmyelinated visceral vagus that fosters digestion and responds to threat by depressing metabolic activity. Behaviorally, the first stage is associated with immobilization behaviors. The second stage is characterized by the sympathetic nervous system that is capable of increasing metabolic output and inhibiting the visceral vagus to foster mobilization behaviors necessary for 'fight or flight'. The third stage, unique to mammals, is characterized by a myelinated vagus that can rapidly regulate cardiac output to foster engagement and disengagement with the environment. The mammalian vagus is neuroanatomically linked to the cranial nerves that regulate social engagement via facial expression and vocalization. As the autonomic nervous system changed through the process of evolution, so did the interplay between the autonomic nervous system and the other physiological systems that respond to stress, including the cortex, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the neuropeptides of oxytocin and vasopressin, and the immune system. From this phylogenetic orientation, the polyvagal theory proposes a biological basis for social behavior and an intervention strategy to enhance positive social behavior.

  13. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.).

  14. Axonal Elongation into Peripheral Nervous System ``Bridges'' after Central Nervous System Injury in Adult Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Samuel; Aguayo, Albert J.

    1981-11-01

    The origin, termination, and length of axonal growth after focal central nervous system injury was examined in adult rats by means of a new experimental model. When peripheral nerve segments were used as ``bridges'' between the medulla and spinal cord, axons from neurons at both these levels grew approximately 30 millimeters. The regenerative potential of these central neurons seems to be expressed when the central nervous system glial environment is changed to that of the peripheral nervous system.

  15. Disseminated vasculomyelinopathy in the peripheral nervous system mediated by immune complexes (ICs). Immunohistochemical studies of sciatic nerves in chronic serum sickness (CHSS) in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, S; Szablowska-Krajewska, M

    1986-02-01

    Histological examination of 20 sciatic nerves from rabbits with experimental chronic serum sickness (CHSS) revealed patchy vasculitis of the vasa nervorum of various intensity. The vessel lesions ranged from endothelial proliferation to vessel wall necrosis with fibrinoid degeneration and infiltration by lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages and, sporadically, by neutrophils. Perivascularly, there were oedema, chronic infiltrates or small haemorrhages. The myelinated fibres in close relation to the vascular system were focally depleted and features of perivascular demyelination were found. Teased fibres showed paranodal and segmental demyelination, axonal degeneration and, sporadically, remyelination. In all cases, immunofluorescent deposits of bovine serum albumin (BSA), IgG and C3 complement were found in and around some vasa nervorum. Other indirect evidence for immune complex (IC) deposition was provided by ultrastructural examination where vascular and endoneurial osmophilic deposits were found; in 4 cases with paracrystalline organization resembling cryoglobulin component. IC-mediated vasculitis led to blood-nerve barrier impairment and leakage of serum proteins into the endoneurial space. The morphological and immunohistochemical changes in this model which develop after a latency period of 2 or more weeks, strongly resemble those observed in human acquired inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies or in connective tissue diseases.

  16. Distribution of the immune inhibitory molecules CD200 and CD200R in the normal central nervous system and multiple sclerosis lesions suggests neuron-glia and glia-glia interactions.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nathalie; Swaab, Dick F; Hoek, Robert M; Huitinga, Inge

    2009-02-01

    CD200 is a membrane glycoprotein that suppresses immune activity via its receptor, CD200R. CD200-CD200R interactions have recently been considered to contribute to the "immune privileged" status of the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms by which these interactions take place are not well understood in part because there is limited detailed information on the distribution of CD200 and CD200R in the CNS. Here, we used immunohistochemistry to characterize the distinct anatomical and cellular distribution of these molecules in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and controls. CD200 was robustly expressed in gray matter areas including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and spinal cord, where neurons appeared immunopositive. CD200 expression was also detected in oligodendrocytes, but not in astrocytes or microglia. In CNS samples from MS patients, CD200 expression was additionally observed on reactive astrocytes in chronic active plaque centers, despite our previous finding of an overall decrease ofCD200 expression in MS lesions. In contrast to CD200, the immunolocalization pattern of CD200R was very distinct, showing high expression on perivascular macrophages in both gray and white matter. Using flow cytometry, we also found that human primary microglia express low levels of CD200R. These data suggest that CD200-mediated immune suppression may occur not only via neuron-microglia interactions, but also via glia-glia interactions, especially in inflammatory conditions in which an immune-suppressive environment needs to be restored; this may occur as a result of increased CD200 expression on reactive astrocytes.

  17. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  18. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  19. The mechanical control of nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Franze, Kristian

    2013-08-01

    The development of the nervous system has so far, to a large extent, been considered in the context of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. However, there is growing evidence that many biological systems also integrate mechanical information when making decisions during differentiation, growth, proliferation, migration and general function. Based on recent findings, I hypothesize that several steps during nervous system development, including neural progenitor cell differentiation, neuronal migration, axon extension and the folding of the brain, rely on or are even driven by mechanical cues and forces.

  20. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  1. Novel markers identify nervous system components of the holothurian nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Vázquez-Figueroa, Lionel D.; García-Arrarás, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Echinoderms occupy a key position in the evolution of deuterostomes. As such, the study of their nervous system can shed important information on the evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. However, the study of the echinoderm nervous system has lagged behind when compared to that of other invertebrates due to the lack of tools available. In this study, we tested three commercially available antibodies as markers of neural components in holothurians. Immunohistological experiments with antibodies made against the mammalian transcription factors Pax6 and Nurr1, and against phosphorylated histone H3 showed that these markers identified cells and fibers within the nervous system of Holothuria glaberrima. Most of the fibers recognized by these antibodies were co-labeled with the well-known neural marker, RN1. Additional experiments showed that similar immunoreactivity was found in the nervous tissue of three other holothurian species (Holothuria mexicana, Leptosynapta clarki and Sclerodactyla briareus), thus extending our findings to the three orders of Holothuroidea. Furthermore, these markers identified different subdivisions of the holothurian nervous system. Our study presents three additional markers of the holothurian nervous system, expanding the available toolkit to study the anatomy, physiology, development and evolution of the echinoderm nervous system. PMID:24740637

  2. Hydrogels for central nervous system therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Russo, Teresa; Tunesi, Marta; Giordano, Carmen; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The central nervous system shows a limited regenerative capacity, and injuries or diseases, such as those in the spinal, brain and retina, are a great problem since current therapies seem to be unable to achieve good results in terms of significant functional recovery. Different promising therapies have been suggested, the aim being to restore at least some of the lost functions. The current review deals with the use of hydrogels in developing advanced devices for central nervous system therapeutic strategies. Several approaches, involving cell-based therapy, delivery of bioactive molecules and nanoparticle-based drug delivery, will be first reviewed. Finally, some examples of injectable hydrogels for the delivery of bioactive molecules in central nervous system will be reported, and the key features as well as the basic principles in designing multifunctional devices will be described.

  3. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves.

  4. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope.

  5. Embryonic Development of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    de Lahunta, Alexander; Glass, Eric N; Kent, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Ultimately, it is only with an understanding of normal embryologic development that there can be an understanding of why and how a specific malformation develops. Knowing from where and when a specific part of the nervous system develops and what morphogens are at play will enable us to identify undescribed malformation as well as better define causality. The following article reviews the normal embryologic development of the mammalian nervous system and is intended to serve as a foundation for the understanding of the various malformations presented in this issue.

  6. Mechanisms of immunological tolerance in central nervous system inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Mari, Elisabeth R; Moore, Jason N; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that results in a disruption of the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signals in the immune system. Given that central nervous system inflammation can be suppressed by various immunological tolerance mechanisms, immune tolerance has become a focus of research in the attempt to induce long-lasting immune suppression of pathogenic T cells. Mechanisms underlying this tolerance induction include induction of regulatory T cell populations, anergy and the induction of tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells. The intravenous administration of encephalitogenic peptides has been shown to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and induce tolerance by promoting the generation of regulatory T cells and inducing apoptosis of pathogenic T cells. Safe and effective methods of inducing long-lasting immune tolerance are essential for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. By exploring tolerogenic mechanisms, new strategies can be devised to strengthen the regulatory, anti-inflammatory cell populations thereby weakening the pathogenic, pro-inflammatory cell populations.

  7. Autonomic Nervous System in Viral Myocarditis: Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zheng; Li-Sha, Ge; Yue-Chun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis, which is caused by viral infection, can lead to heart failure, malignant arrhythmias, and even sudden cardiac death in young patients. It is also one of the most important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy worldwide. Although remarkable advances in diagnosis and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of viral myocarditis have been gained during recent years, no standard treatment strategies have been defined as yet. Fortunately, recent studies present some evidence that immunomodulating therapy is effective for myocarditis. The immunomodulatory effect of the autonomic nervous system has raised considerable interest over recent decades. Studying the influence on the inflammation and immune system of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems will not only increase our understanding of the mechanism of disease but could also lead to the identification of potential new therapies for viral myocarditis. Studies have shown that the immunomodulating effect of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system is realized by the release of neurotransmitters to their corresponding receptors (catecholamine for α or β adrenergic receptor, acetylcholine for α7 nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptor). This review will discuss the current knowledge of the roles of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system in inflammation, with a special focus on their roles in viral myocarditis.

  8. Central nervous system and computation.

    PubMed

    Guidolin, Diego; Albertin, Giovanna; Guescini, Michele; Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi F

    2011-12-01

    Computational systems are useful in neuroscience in many ways. For instance, they may be used to construct maps of brain structure and activation, or to describe brain processes mathematically. Furthermore, they inspired a powerful theory of brain function, in which the brain is viewed as a system characterized by intrinsic computational activities or as a "computational information processor. "Although many neuroscientists believe that neural systems really perform computations, some are more cautious about computationalism or reject it. Thus, does the brain really compute? Answering this question requires getting clear on a definition of computation that is able to draw a line between physical systems that compute and systems that do not, so that we can discern on which side of the line the brain (or parts of it) could fall. In order to shed some light on the role of computational processes in brain function, available neurobiological data will be summarized from the standpoint of a recently proposed taxonomy of notions of computation, with the aim of identifying which brain processes can be considered computational. The emerging picture shows the brain as a very peculiar system, in which genuine computational features act in concert with noncomputational dynamical processes, leading to continuous self-organization and remodeling under the action of external stimuli from the environment and from the rest of the organism.

  9. Evolving specialization of the arthropod nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; Patel, Nipam H

    2012-06-26

    The diverse array of body plans possessed by arthropods is created by generating variations upon a design of repeated segments formed during development, using a relatively small "toolbox" of conserved patterning genes. These attributes make the arthropod body plan a valuable model for elucidating how changes in development create diversity of form. As increasingly specialized segments and appendages evolved in arthropods, the nervous systems of these animals also evolved to control the function of these structures. Although there is a remarkable degree of conservation in neural development both between individual segments in any given species and between the nervous systems of different arthropod groups, the differences that do exist are informative for inferring general principles about the holistic evolution of body plans. This review describes developmental processes controlling neural segmentation and regionalization, highlighting segmentation mechanisms that create both ectodermal and neural segments, as well as recent studies of the role of Hox genes in generating regional specification within the central nervous system. We argue that this system generates a modular design that allows the nervous system to evolve in concert with the body segments and their associated appendages. This information will be useful in future studies of macroevolutionary changes in arthropod body plans, especially in understanding how these transformations can be made in a way that retains the function of appendages during evolutionary transitions in morphology.

  10. Peripheral nervous system manifestations in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Cojocaru, Manole; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2014-09-01

    The peripheral nervous system refers to parts of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems in a myriad of ways and through a heterogeneous number of mechanisms leading to many different clinical manifestations. As a result, neurological complications of these disorders can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common complication of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement is peripheral neuropathy, with symptoms of numbness, sensory paresthesias, weakness, or gait imbalance. The neuropathy may be multifocal and asymmetric or, less frequently, distal and symmetric.

  11. Measures of Autonomic Nervous System Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Cortisol Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) Gastro- intestinal Pupillary Response Respiratory Salivary Amylase Vascular Manipulative Body-Based...Salivary Amylase Galvanic Skin Response Vascular Gastrointestinal The ANS Measures Table in Appendix A provides a summary of over fifty tools...Measures of Autonomic Nervous System Regulation Salivary Amylase Measurement

  12. Evolution of basal deuterostome nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z

    2015-02-15

    Understanding the evolution of deuterostome nervous systems has been complicated by the by the ambiguous phylogenetic position of the Xenocoelomorpha (Xenoturbellids, acoel flat worms, nemertodermatids), which has been placed either as basal bilaterians, basal deuterostomes or as a sister group to the hemichordate/echinoderm clade (Ambulacraria), which is a sister group of the Chordata. None of these groups has a single longitudinal nerve cord and a brain. A further complication is that echinoderm nerve cords are not likely to be evolutionarily related to the chordate central nervous system. For hemichordates, opinion is divided as to whether either one or none of the two nerve cords is homologous to the chordate nerve cord. In chordates, opposition by two secreted signaling proteins, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Nodal, regulates partitioning of the ectoderm into central and peripheral nervous systems. Similarly, in echinoderm larvae, opposition between BMP and Nodal positions the ciliary band and regulates its extent. The apparent loss of this opposition in hemichordates is, therefore, compatible with the scenario, suggested by Dawydoff over 65 years ago, that a true centralized nervous system was lost in hemichordates.

  13. [Neuropeptide Y and autonomic nervous system].

    PubMed

    Nozdrachev, A D; Masliukov, P M

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) containing 36 amino acid residues belongs to peptides widely spread in the central and peripheral nervous system. NPY and its receptors play an extremely diverse role in the nervous system, including regulation of satiety, of emotional state, of vascular tone, and of gastrointestinal secretion. In mammals, NPY has been revealed in the majority of sympathetic ganglion neurons, in a high number of neurons of parasympathetic cranial ganglia as well as of intramural ganglia of the metasympathetic nervous system. At present, six types of receptors to NPY (Y1-Y6) have been identified. All receptors to NPY belong to the family of G-bound proteins. Action of NPY on peripheral organs-targets is predominantly realized through postsynaptic receptors Y1, Y3-Y5, and presynaptic receptors of the Y2 type. NPY is present in large electron-dense vesicles and is released at high-frequency stimulation. NPY affects not only vascular tone, frequency and strength of heart contractions, motorics and secretion of the gastrointestinal tract, but also has trophic effect and produces proliferation of cells of organs-targets, specifically of vessels, myocardium, and adipose tissue. In early postnatal ontogenesis the percent of the NPY-containing neurons in ganglia of the autonomic nervous system increases. In adult organisms, this parameter decreases. This seems to be connected with the trophic NPY effect on cells-targets as well as with regulation of their functional state.

  14. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  15. The immune system in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is generally attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, the kidney, and the central nervous system. During the past several years, it has become apparent that cells of the innate and adaptive immune system also contribute to this disease. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension, and likely contribute to end-organ damage. We have shown that mice lacking lymphocytes, such as recombinase-activating gene-deficient (RAG-1(-/-)) mice, have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II, increased salt levels, and norepinephrine. Adoptive transfer of T cells restores the blood pressure response to these stimuli. Others have shown that mice with severe combined immunodeficiency have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II. Deletion of the RAG gene in Dahl salt-sensitive rats reduces the hypertensive response to salt feeding. The central nervous system seems to orchestrate immune cell activation. We produced lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle and showed that these block T cell activation in response to angiotensin II. Likewise, we showed that genetic manipulation of reactive oxygen species in the subfornical organ modulates both hypertension and T cell activation. Current evidence indicates that production of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 17, and interleukin 6 contribute to hypertension, likely by promoting vasoconstriction, production of reactive oxygen species, and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. We propose a working hypothesis linking the sympathetic nervous system, immune cells, the production of cytokines, and ultimately vascular and renal dysfunction, leading to augmentation of hypertension.

  16. Therapeutics targeting the inflammasome after central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is part of the early response of the body to deal with tissue damage and infections. Because of the early nature of the innate immune inflammatory response, this inflammatory reaction represents an attractive option as a therapeutic target. The inflammasome is a component of the innate immune response involved in the activation of caspase 1 and the processing of pro-interleukin 1β. In this article, we discuss the therapeutic potential of the inflammasome after central nervous system (CNS) injury and stroke, as well as the basic knowledge we have gained so far regarding inflammasome activation in the CNS. In addition, we discuss some of the therapies available or under investigation for the treatment of brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke.

  17. Therapeutics Targeting the Inflammasome After Central Nervous System Injury

    PubMed Central

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Keane, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is part of the early response of the body to deal with tissue damage and infections. Due to the early nature of the innate immune inflammatory response, this inflammatory reaction represents an attractive option as a therapeutic target. The inflammasome is a component of the innate immune response involved in the activation of caspase-1 and the processing of pro-interleukin-1β. In this article we discuss the therapeutic potential of the inflammasome after central nervous system (CNS) injury and stoke, as well as the basic knowledge we have gained so far regarding inflammasome activation in the CNS. In addition, we discuss some of the therapies available or under investigation for the treatment of brain injury, spinal cord injury and stroke. PMID:26024799

  18. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination.

  19. Gut Commensalism, Cytokines, and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  20. Gravitational Study of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted at 1G are discussed with reference to the role of calcium ions in information processing by the central nervous system. A technique is described which allows thin sections of a mammalian hippocampus to be isolated while maintaining neural activity. Two experiments carried out in hypergravic fields are also addressed; one investigating altered stimulation in the auditory system, the other determining temperature regulation responses in hypergravic fields.

  1. Human immune system variation

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual’s immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases. PMID:27916977

  2. Homarus Americanus Stomatogastric Nervous System Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Anne-Elise; Bierman, Hilary S.

    2009-01-01

    With the goal of understanding how nervous systems produce activity and respond to the environment, neuroscientists turn to model systems that exhibit the activity of interest and are accessible and amenable to experimental methods. The stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the American lobster (Homarus americanus; also know was the Atlantic or Maine lobster) has been established as a model system for studying rhythm generating networks and neuromodulation of networks. The STNS consists of 3 anterior ganglia (2 commissural ganglia and an oesophageal ganglion), containing modulatory neurons that project centrally to the stomatogastric ganglion (STG). The STG contains approximately 30 neurons that comprise two central pattern generating networks, the pyloric and gastric networks that underlie feeding behaviors in crustaceans1,2. While it is possible to study this system in vivo3, the STNS continues to produce its rhythmic activity when isolated in vitro. Physical isolation of the STNS in a dish allows for easy access to the somata in the ganglia for intracellular electrophysiological recordings and to the nerves of the STNS for extracellular recordings. Isolating the STNS is a two-part process. The first part, dissecting the stomach from the animal, is described in an accompanying video article4. In this video article, fine dissection techniques are used to isolate the STNS from the stomach. This procedure results in a nervous system preparation that is available for electrophysiological recordings. PMID:19483669

  3. Autonomic nervous system dysregulation in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feber, Janusz; Ruzicka, Marcel; Geier, Pavel; Litwin, Mieczyslaw

    2014-05-01

    Historically, primary hypertension (HTN) has been prevalent typically in adults. Recent data however, suggests an increasing number of children diagnosed with primary HTN, mainly in the setting of obesity. One of the factors considered in the etiology of HTN is the autonomous nervous system, namely its dysregulation. In the past, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) was regarded as a system engaged mostly in buffering major acute changes in blood pressure (BP), in response to physical and emotional stressors. Recent evidence suggests that the SNS plays a much broader role in the regulation of BP, including the development and maintenance of sustained HTN by a chronically elevated central sympathetic tone in adults and children with central/visceral obesity. Consequently, attempts have been made to reduce the SNS hyperactivity, in order to intervene early in the course of the disease and prevent HTN-related complications later in life.

  4. Neurogenic inflammation and the peripheral nervous system in host defense and immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isaac M; von Hehn, Christian A; Woolf, Clifford J

    2012-07-26

    The peripheral nervous and immune systems are traditionally thought of as serving separate functions. The line between them is, however, becoming increasingly blurred by new insights into neurogenic inflammation. Nociceptor neurons possess many of the same molecular recognition pathways for danger as immune cells, and, in response to danger, the peripheral nervous system directly communicates with the immune system, forming an integrated protective mechanism. The dense innervation network of sensory and autonomic fibers in peripheral tissues and high speed of neural transduction allows rapid local and systemic neurogenic modulation of immunity. Peripheral neurons also seem to contribute to immune dysfunction in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Therefore, understanding the coordinated interaction of peripheral neurons with immune cells may advance therapeutic approaches to increase host defense and suppress immunopathology.

  5. Associations among central nervous, endocrine, and immune activities when positive emotions are elicited by looking at a favorite person.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Kimura, Kenta; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Kanayama, Noriaki; Murakami, Hiroki; Sato, Sayaka; Konagaya, Toshihiro; Nogimori, Tsuyoshi; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2008-03-01

    Recent studies on psychoneuroimmunology have indicated that positive psychological events are related to immune functions; however, limited information is available regarding associations among the central nervous, endocrine, and immune systems when positive emotions are elicited. In the present study, we demonstrated associations among these systems by simultaneously recording brain, endocrine, and immune activities when positive emotions were evoked in participants as they watched films featuring their favorite persons. Interestingly, the activity of peripheral circulating natural killer cells and the peripheral dopamine level were elevated while participants experienced positive emotions, and these values were positively correlated. The following brain regions were significantly activated in the positive condition relative to the control condition: medial prefrontal cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, subcallosal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and cerebellum. Further, covariate analyses indicated that these brain regions were temporally associated with endocrine and immune activities. These results suggest that while an individual experiences positive emotions, the central nervous, endocrine, and immune systems may be interrelated and attraction for favorite persons may be associated with the activation of the innate immune function via the dopaminergic system.

  6. Marine pharmacology in 2003-4: Marine Compounds with Anthelminthic, Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Rodriguez, Abimael D.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    The current marine pharmacology review that covers the peer-reviewed literature during 2003 and 2004 is a sequel to the authors' 1998-2002 reviews, and highlights the preclinical pharmacology of 166 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria. Anthelminthic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 67 marine chemicals. Additionally 45 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as possessing anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 54 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2003-2004, research on the pharmacology of marine natural products which involved investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, the Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United States, contributed numerous chemical leads for the continued global search for novel therapeutic agents with broad spectrum activity. PMID:17392033

  7. Marine pharmacology in 2001–2002: Marine compounds with anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    During 2001–2002, research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals continued to be global in nature involving investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current article, a sequel to the authors’ 1998, 1999 and 2000 marine pharmacology reviews, classifies 106 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria, on the basis of peer-reviewed preclinical pharmacology. Anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 56 marine chemicals. An additional 19 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as to possess anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic effects. Finally, 31 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2001–2002 pharmacological research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads for the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:15919242

  8. Marine pharmacology in 2005–6: Marine Compounds with Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodriguez, Abimael D.; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The review presents the 2005–2006 peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature, and follows a similar format to the authors’ 1998–2004 reviews. The preclinical pharmacology of chemically characterized marine compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is systematically presented. RESULTS Anthelminthic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis and antiviral activities were reported for 78 marine chemicals. Additionally 47 marine compounds were reported to affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as possess anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 58 marine compounds were shown to bind to a variety of molecular targets, and thus could potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. CONCLUSIONS Marine pharmacology research during 2005–2006 was truly global in nature, involving investigators from 32 countries, and the United States, and contributed 183 marine chemical leads to the research pipeline aimed at the discovery of novel therapeutic agents. SIGNIFICANCE Continued preclinical and clinical research with marine natural products demonstrating a broad spectrum of pharmacological activity and will probably result in novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:19303911

  9. Marine pharmacology in 2007-8: Marine compounds with antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the immune and nervous system, and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2011-03-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature in 2007-8 is covered in this review, which follows a similar format to the previous 1998-2006 reviews of this series. The preclinical pharmacology of structurally characterized marine compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis and antiviral activities were reported for 74 marine natural products. Additionally, 59 marine compounds were reported to affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems as well as to possess anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 65 marine metabolites were shown to bind to a variety of receptors and miscellaneous molecular targets, and thus upon further completion of mechanism of action studies, will contribute to several pharmacological classes. Marine pharmacology research during 2007-8 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 26 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 197 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical marine pharmaceuticals pipeline. Sustained preclinical research with marine natural products demonstrating novel pharmacological activities, will probably result in the expansion of the current marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which currently consists of 13 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories.

  10. Marine Pharmacology in 2009–2011: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action †

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998–2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009–2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories. PMID:23880931

  11. Marine pharmacology in 2009-2011: marine compounds with antibacterial, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the immune and nervous systems, and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-07-16

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998-2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009-2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories.

  12. Rebuilding an Immune-Mediated Central Nervous System Disease: Weighing the Pathogenicity of Antigen-Specific versus Bystander T Cells1

    PubMed Central

    McGavern, Dorian B.; Truong, Phi

    2017-01-01

    Although both self- and pathogen-specific T cells can participate in tissue destruction, recent studies have proposed that after viral infection, bystander T cells of an irrelevant specificity can bypass peptide-MHC restriction and contribute to undesired immunopathological consequences. To evaluate the importance of this mechanism of immunopathogenesis, we determined the relative contributions of Ag-specific and bystander CD8+ T cells to the development of CNS disease. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a stimulus for T cell recruitment into the CNS, we demonstrate that bystander CD8+ T cells with an activated surface phenotype can indeed be recruited into the CNS over a chronic time window. These cells become anatomically positioned in the CNS parenchyma, and a fraction aberrantly acquires the capacity to produce the effector cytokine, IFN-β. However, when directly compared with their virus-specific counterparts, the contribution of bystander T cells to CNS damage was insignificant in nature (even when specifically activated). Although bystander T cells alone failed to cause tissue injury, transferring as few as 1000 naive LCMV-specific CD8+ T cells into a restricted repertoire containing only bystander T cells was sufficient to induce immune-mediated pathology and reconstitute a fatal CNS disease. These studies underscore the importance of specific T cells in the development of immunopathology and subsequent disease. Because of highly restrictive constraints imposed by the host, it is more likely that specific, rather than nonspecific, bystander T cells are the active participants in T cell-mediated diseases that afflict humans. PMID:15470017

  13. Regeneration in the nervous system with erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Globally, greater than 30 million individuals are afflicted with disorders of the nervous system accompanied by tens of thousands of new cases annually with limited, if any, treatment options. Erythropoietin (EPO) offers an exciting and novel therapeutic strategy to address both acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. EPO governs a number of critical protective and regenerative mechanisms that can impact apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death pathways through protein kinase B (Akt), sirtuins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, and wingless signaling. Translation of the cytoprotective pathways of EPO into clinically effective treatments for some neurodegenerative disorders has been promising, but additional work is necessary. In particular, development of new treatments with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents such as EPO brings several important challenges that involve detrimental vascular outcomes and tumorigenesis. Future work that can effectively and safely harness the complexity of the signaling pathways of EPO will be vital for the fruitful treatment of disorders of the nervous system.

  14. [Central nervous system malformations: neurosurgery correlates].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-León, Juan C; Betancourt-Fursow, Yaline M; Jiménez-Betancourt, Cristina S

    2013-09-06

    Congenital malformations of the central nervous system are related to alterations in neural tube formation, including most of the neurosurgical management entities, dysraphism and craniosynostosis; alterations of neuronal proliferation; megalencefaly and microcephaly; abnormal neuronal migration, lissencephaly, pachygyria, schizencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, heterotopia and cortical dysplasia, spinal malformations and spinal dysraphism. We expose the classification of different central nervous system malformations that can be corrected by surgery in the shortest possible time and involving genesis mechanisms of these injuries getting better studied from neurogenic and neuroembryological fields, this involves connecting innovative knowledge areas where alteration mechanisms in dorsal induction (neural tube) and ventral induction (telencephalization) with the current way of correction, as well as the anomalies of cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal migration and finally the complex malformations affecting the posterior fossa and current possibilities of correcting them.

  15. Regeneration in the nervous system with erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, greater than 30 million individuals are afflicted with disorders of the nervous system accompanied by tens of thousands of new cases annually with limited, if any, treatment options. Erythropoietin (EPO) offers an exciting and novel therapeutic strategy to address both acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. EPO governs a number of critical protective and regenerative mechanisms that can impact apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death pathways through protein kinase B (Akt), sirtuins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, and wingless signaling. Translation of the cytoprotective pathways of EPO into clinically effective treatments for some neurodegenerative disorders has been promising, but additional work is necessary. In particular, development of new treatments with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents such as EPO brings several important challenges that involve detrimental vascular outcomes and tumorigenesis. Future work that can effectively and safely harness the complexity of the signaling pathways of EPO will be vital for the fruitful treatment of disorders of the nervous system. PMID:26549969

  16. [Nervous system involvement in Madelung's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tolubaev, N S; Gerasimovich, L A; Tolubaeva, N I

    1992-04-01

    Due to proliferation of the fatty tissue in the neck and depending on the degree of compression of the pharynx, larynx, vessels, nerve trunks the patients show, respiratory disorders, swallowing disturbances, dysarthria, stenocardia, neck and occipital pain, scalenus syndrome, cervicobrachialgia, posterior cervical sympathetic syndrome, disorders of the cerebral and spinal blood circulation. Involvement of both the central and peripheral nervous system are observed in Madelung's disease.

  17. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, Kate T.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious causes of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease are underrecognized but potentially treatable. Heightened awareness educed by advanced understanding of the presentations and management of these infections can aid diagnosis and facilitate treatment. In this review, we discuss the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections that affect the PNS. We additionally detail PNS side effects of some frequently used antimicrobial agents. PMID:25360209

  18. Tuberculoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    DeLance, Arthur R; Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C; Clark, Aaron J; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sun, Matthew Z; Bollen, Andrew W; Phillips, Joanna J; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis is among the oldest and most devastating infectious diseases worldwide. Nearly one third of the world's population has active or latent disease, resulting in 1.5 million deaths annually. Central nervous system involvement, while rare, is the most severe form of tuberculosis. Manifestations include tuberculoma and tuberculous meningitis, with the majority of cases occurring in children and immunocompromised patients. Despite advancements in imaging and laboratory diagnostics, tuberculomas of the central nervous system remain a diagnostic challenge due to their insidious nature and nonspecific findings. On imaging studies tuberculous meningitis is characterized by diffuse basal enhancement, but tuberculomas may be indistinguishable from neoplasms. Early diagnosis is imperative, since clinical outcomes are largely dependent on timely treatment. Stereotactic biopsy with histopathological analysis can provide a definitive diagnosis, but is only recommended when non-invasive methods are inconclusive. Standard medical treatment includes rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and streptomycin or ethambutol. In cases of drug resistance, revision of the treatment regimen with second-line agents is recommended over the addition of a single drug to the first-line regimen. Advances in genomics have identified virulent strains of tuberculosis and are improving our understanding of host susceptibility. Neurosurgical referral is advised for patients with elevated intracranial pressure, seizures, or brain or spinal cord compression. This review synthesizes pertinent findings in the literature surrounding central nervous system tuberculoma in an effort to highlight recent advances in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

  19. Rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, D; Behnke-Mursch, J; Weiss, E; Christen, H J; Kühl, J; Lakomek, M; Pekrun, A

    2000-04-01

    Rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system are rare malignancies with a still almost uniformly fatal outcome. There is still no proven curative therapy available. We report our experience with nine patients with central nervous system rhabdoid tumors. Gross complete surgical removal of the tumor was achieved in six patients. Seven patients received intensive chemotherapy. Four of these were treated in addition with both neuroaxis radiotherapy and a local boost directed to the tumor region, while two patients received local radiotherapy only. The therapy was reasonably well tolerated in most cases. Despite the aggressive therapy, eight of the nine patients died from progressive tumor disease, and one patient died from hemorrhagic brain stem lesions of unknown etiology. The mean survival time was 10 months after diagnosis. Conventional treatment, although aggressive, cannot change the fatal prognosis of central nervous system rhabdoid tumors. As these neoplasms are so rare, a coordinated register would probably be a good idea, offering a means of learning more about the tumor's biology and possible strategies of treatment.

  20. LGI proteins in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Linde; Aunin, Eerik; Meijer, Dies; Bermingham, John R

    2013-06-25

    The development and function of the vertebrate nervous system depend on specific interactions between different cell types. Two examples of such interactions are synaptic transmission and myelination. LGI1-4 (leucine-rich glioma inactivated proteins) play important roles in these processes. They are secreted proteins consisting of an LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain and a so-called epilepsy-associated or EPTP (epitempin) domain. Both domains are thought to function in protein-protein interactions. The first LGI gene to be identified, LGI1, was found at a chromosomal translocation breakpoint in a glioma cell line. It was subsequently found mutated in ADLTE (autosomal dominant lateral temporal (lobe) epilepsy) also referred to as ADPEAF (autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features). LGI1 protein appears to act at synapses and antibodies against LGI1 may cause the autoimmune disorder limbic encephalitis. A similar function in synaptic remodelling has been suggested for LGI2, which is mutated in canine Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy. LGI4 is required for proliferation of glia in the peripheral nervous system and binds to a neuronal receptor, ADAM22, to foster ensheathment and myelination of axons by Schwann cells. Thus, LGI proteins play crucial roles in nervous system development and function and their study is highly important, both to understand their biological functions and for their therapeutic potential. Here, we review our current knowledge about this important family of proteins, and the progress made towards understanding their functions.

  1. Metal toxicity in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, T W

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is the principal target for a number of metals. Inorganic compounds of aluminum, arsenic, lead, lithium, manganese, mercury, and thallium are well known for their neurological and behavioral effects in humans. The alkyl derivatives of certain metals--lead, mercury and tin--are specially neurotoxic. Concern over human exposure and in some cases, outbreaks of poisoning, have stimulated research into the toxic action of these metals. A number of interesting hypotheses have been proposed for the mechanism of lead toxicity on the nervous system. Lead is known to be a potent inhibitor of heme synthesis. A reduction in heme-containing enzymes could compromise energy metabolism. Lead may affect brain function by interference with neurotransmitters such as gamma-amino-isobutyric acid. There is mounting evidence that lead interferes with membrane transport and binding of calcium ions. Methylmercury produces focal damage to specific areas in the adult brain. One hypothesis proposes that certain cells are susceptible because they cannot repair the initial damage to the protein sythesis machinery. The developing nervous system is especially susceptible to damage by methylmercury. It has been discovered that microtubules are destroyed by this form of mercury and this effect may explain the inhibition of cell division and cell migration, processes that occur only in the developmental stages. These and other hypotheses will stimulate considerable experimental challenges in the future. PMID:3319566

  2. Swine immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  3. Extracellular vesicles round off communication in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Budnik, Vivian; Ruiz-Cañada, Catalina; Wendler, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such vesicles have also been identified as important factors in the spread of neurodegenerative disorders and brain cancer. These extracellular vesicle functions add a previously unrecognized level of complexity to transcellular interactions within the nervous system. PMID:26891626

  4. [Primary central nervous system lymphoma: pathogenesis and histomorphology].

    PubMed

    Méhes, Gábor

    2017-03-08

    Lymphoproliferative diseases of the central nervous system are rare, diagnostics and treatment are accordingly challenging. Since the introduction of the 2008 WHO lymphoma classification, primary CNS DLBCL - also covering the associated primary ocular (vitreoretinal) lymphoma - is a separate entity. The special localization is related with a series of newly recognized genetic, genomic and immunologic features directing to the strong interaction between transformed lymphoma cells, neural tissue components and the local immune response. Histological differentiation is frequently disabled by the limited sampling opportunities and requires the application of all available hematopathologic technologies including immunohistochemistry, cytology, liquor serology, flow cytometry, fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction with sequencing.

  5. Classical Neurotransmitters and their Significance within the Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veca, A.; Dreisbach, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the chemical compounds involved in the nervous system and their roles in transmitting nerve signals. Discusses acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, histamine, glycine, glutemate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their effects within the nervous system. (CW)

  6. The BIRN Project: Imaging the Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisman, Mark

    2006-05-22

    The grand goal in neuroscience research is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in nervous tissue gives rise to behavior. Experimental advances of the past decades have given the individual neuroscientist an increasingly powerful arsenal for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to nervous systems. Scientists have begun the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling neuroscience data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases and other easily accessed sources. These databases will complement the vast structural and sequence databases created to catalogue, organize and analyze gene sequences and protein products. The general premise of the neuroscience goal is simple; namely that with "complete" knowledge of the genome and protein structures accruing rapidly we next need to assemble an infrastructure that will facilitate acquisition of an understanding for how functional complexes operate in their cell and tissue contexts.

  7. The BIRN Project: Imaging the Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Ellisman, Mark

    2006-05-22

    The grand goal in neuroscience research is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in nervous tissue gives rise to behavior. Experimental advances of the past decades have given the individual neuroscientist an increasingly powerful arsenal for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to nervous systems. Scientists have begun the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling neuroscience data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases and other easily accessed sources. These databases will complement the vast structural and sequence databases created to catalogue, organize and analyze gene sequences and protein products. The general premise of the neuroscience goal is simple; namely that with 'complete' knowledge of the genome and protein structures accruing rapidly we next need to assemble an infrastructure that will facilitate acquisition of an understanding for how functional complexes operate in their cell and tissue contexts.

  8. Immune System 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious Diseases - The Immune System Related Topics on AIDS.gov CD4 Count Viral Load Cancer Opportunistic Infections ... Immune Response (video) Last revised: 08/22/2011 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  9. Chaperone Proteins in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System after Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ousman, Shalina S; Frederick, Ariana; Lim, Erin-Mai F

    2017-01-01

    Injury to axons of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is accompanied by the upregulation and downregulation of numerous molecules that are involved in mediating nerve repair, or in augmentation of the original damage. Promoting the functions of beneficial factors while reducing the properties of injurious agents determines whether regeneration and functional recovery ensues. A number of chaperone proteins display reduced or increased expression following CNS and PNS damage (crush, transection, contusion) where their roles have generally been found to be protective. For example, chaperones are involved in mediating survival of damaged neurons, promoting axon regeneration and remyelination and, improving behavioral outcomes. We review here the various chaperone proteins that are involved after nervous system axonal damage, the functions that they impact in the CNS and PNS, and the possible mechanisms by which they act.

  10. Chaperone Proteins in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Nervous System after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ousman, Shalina S.; Frederick, Ariana; Lim, Erin-Mai F.

    2017-01-01

    Injury to axons of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is accompanied by the upregulation and downregulation of numerous molecules that are involved in mediating nerve repair, or in augmentation of the original damage. Promoting the functions of beneficial factors while reducing the properties of injurious agents determines whether regeneration and functional recovery ensues. A number of chaperone proteins display reduced or increased expression following CNS and PNS damage (crush, transection, contusion) where their roles have generally been found to be protective. For example, chaperones are involved in mediating survival of damaged neurons, promoting axon regeneration and remyelination and, improving behavioral outcomes. We review here the various chaperone proteins that are involved after nervous system axonal damage, the functions that they impact in the CNS and PNS, and the possible mechanisms by which they act. PMID:28270745

  11. Central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus mimicking progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, B R; Neuwelt, C M; London, S S; DeArmond, S J

    1992-01-01

    The case is reported of a patient with central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with features of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) seen clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging. A brain biopsy sample showed microinfarcts. The use of magnetic resonance imaging and IgG synthesis rates in evaluating central nervous system lupus, the co-occurrence of SLE and PML, and the differentiation of these entities by magnetic resonance imaging and by histology are considered. Images PMID:1444628

  12. Sarcoidosis of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Said, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Neurological manifestations of sarcoidosis are relatively rare but constitute a treatable cause of central and peripheral neurological manifestations. Regarding the peripheral nervous system, cranial nerves are predominantly affected, and peripheral facial nerve palsy, often bilateral, is the most common neurological manifestation of sarcoidosis. Multifocal peripheral neuropathy is a rare event in sarcoidosis. In some cases, however, peripheral neuropathy is the presenting manifestation and seemingly the only organ affected. Definite diagnosis of sarcoidosis rests ideally on histological demonstration of sarcoid granulomas in tissue biopsy specimens.

  13. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  14. Did the ctenophore nervous system evolve independently?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph F

    2014-08-01

    Recent evidence supports the placement of ctenophores as the most distant relative to all other animals. This revised animal tree means that either the ancestor of all animals possessed neurons (and that sponges and placozoans apparently lost them) or that ctenophores developed them independently. Differentiating between these possibilities is important not only from a historical perspective, but also for the interpretation of a wide range of neurobiological results. In this short perspective paper, I review the evidence in support of each scenario and show that the relationship between the nervous system of ctenophores and other animals is an unsolved, yet tractable problem.

  15. Histoplasmosis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, V; Wilkins, P; Badve, S; Coppen, M; Lucas, S; Hay, R; Schon, F

    1992-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum infection of the central nervous system is extremely rare in the United Kingdom partly because the organism is not endemic. However, because the organism can remain quiescent in the lungs or the adrenal glands for over 40 years before dissemination, it increasingly needs to be considered in unexplained neurological disease particularly in people who lived in endemic areas as children. In this paper a rapidly progressive fatal myelopathy in an English man brought up in India was shown at necropsy to be due to histoplasmosis. The neurological features of this infection are reviewed. Images PMID:1640242

  16. Microglia: Architects of the Developing Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jeffrey L; Schafer, Dorothy P

    2016-08-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), representing 5-10% of total CNS cells. Recent findings reveal that microglia enter the embryonic brain, take up residence before the differentiation of other CNS cell types, and become critical regulators of CNS development. Here, we discuss exciting new work implicating microglia in a range of developmental processes, including regulation of cell number and spatial patterning of CNS cells, myelination, and formation and refinement of neural circuits. Furthermore, we review studies suggesting that these cellular functions result in the modulation of behavior, which has important implications for a variety of neurological disorders.

  17. Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the physiology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The following topics are presented: regulation of activity; efferent pathways; sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions; neurotransmitters, their receptors and the termination of their activity; functions of the ANS; and the adrenal medullae. In addition, the application of this material to the practice of pharmacy is of special interest. Two case studies regarding insecticide poisoning and pheochromocytoma are included. The ANS and the accompanying case studies are discussed over 5 lectures and 2 recitation sections during a 2-semester course in Human Physiology. The students are in the first-professional year of the doctor of pharmacy program. PMID:17786266

  18. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens. Environmental allergies (to dust mites, for example), seasonal allergies (such as hay fever), drug allergies (reactions to ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Definition: ... Allergies Activity: Immune System Word! Autoimmunity HIV and AIDS ...

  19. Occurrence of nervous system involvement in SIRS.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Hirata, Maria T A; Carvalho, Nise B; Brotto, Mario W I; Scaff, Milberto

    2006-12-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a medical condition in which the all-organ microcirculation is affected including nervous system. We describe neurological findings in 64 patients with SIRS at Hospital das Clínicas of Sao Paulo University School of Medicine; 45.3% were male and 54.7% female; their age ranged from 16 to 95 years old. SIRS was caused by infection in 68.8% of patients, trauma in 10.9%, burns in 7.8%, and elective surgery in 4.7%. The central nervous system involvement occurred in 56.3% of patients and was characterized as encephalopathy in 75%, seizures in 13.9%, non-epileptic myoclonus in 2.8%, and ischemic stroke in 8.3%. The magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid and electroencephalographic changes were unremarkable in encephalopathic patients. Neuromuscular disorders were diagnosed in 43.7%. Critical ill polyneuropathy was characterized in 57.1%, critical ill myopathy in 32.1%, demyelinating neuropathy in 7.2%, and pure motor neuropathy in 3.6%. Nerve and muscle pathological studies dismissed inflammatory abnormalities. The identification of these conditions has important economic implications and may change the critically ill patients' prognosis.

  20. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; de Jong, Eiko K; van Weering, Hilmar R J; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today that chemokine signaling orchestrates the immune system and is widely involved in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. Since the chemokine system offers various targets through which pathology could be influenced, most pharmaceutical companies have chosen this system as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases. Here recent developments concerning the role of chemokines in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as their possible therapeutic relevance are discussed.

  1. Cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obesity.

    PubMed

    Liatis, Stavros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2004-08-01

    The development of obesity is caused by a disturbance of energy balance, with energy intake exceeding energy expenditure. As the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a role in the regulation of both these variables, it has become a major focus of investigation in the fields of obesity pathogenesis. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic drive shown in most of the studies in obese persons might be due to an increase in their levels of circulating insulin. The role of leptin needs further investigation with studies in humans. There is a blunted response of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese subjects after consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal as well as after insulin administration. This might be due to insulin resistance. It is speculated that increased SNS activity in obesity may contribute to the development of hypertension in genetically susceptible individuals. It is also speculated that the increase in cardiac SNS activity under fasting conditions in obesity may be associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  2. Microglia in central nervous system repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xuemei; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that immune cells perform crucial inflammation-related functions including clearing dead tissue and promoting wound healing. Thus, they provide a conducive environment for better neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) injury. However, activated immune cells can also induce secondary damage of intact tissue and inhibit post-injury CNS repair. The inflammation response is due to the microglial production of cytokines and chemokines for the recruitment of peripheral immune cell populations, such as monocytes, neutrophils, dendritic cells and T lymphocytes. Interestingly, microglia and T lymphocytes can be detected at the injured site in both the early and later stages after nerve injury, whereas other peripheral immune cells infiltrate the injured parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord only in the early post-injury phase, and subsequently disappear. This suggests that microglia and T cells may play crucial roles in the post-injury functional recovery of the CNS. In this review, we summarize the current studies on microglia that examined neuronal regeneration and the molecular signalling mechanisms in the injured CNS. Better understanding of the effects of microglia on neural regeneration will aid the development of therapy strategies to enhance CNS functional recovery after injury.

  3. Exploring the Homeostatic and Sensory Roles of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Marques, Pedro Elias; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-01-01

    Immunology developed under the notion of the immune system exists to fight pathogens. Recently, the discovery of interactions with commensal microbiota that are essential to human health initiated a change in this old paradigm. Here, we argue that the immune system has major physiological roles extending far beyond defending the host. Immune and inflammatory responses share the core property of sensing, defining the immune system also as a sensory system. The inference with the immune system collects, interprets, and stores information, while creating an identity of self, places it in close relationship to the nervous system, which suggests that these systems may have a profound evolutionary connection. PMID:27065209

  4. Exploring the Homeostatic and Sensory Roles of the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Marques, Pedro Elias; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-01-01

    Immunology developed under the notion of the immune system exists to fight pathogens. Recently, the discovery of interactions with commensal microbiota that are essential to human health initiated a change in this old paradigm. Here, we argue that the immune system has major physiological roles extending far beyond defending the host. Immune and inflammatory responses share the core property of sensing, defining the immune system also as a sensory system. The inference with the immune system collects, interprets, and stores information, while creating an identity of self, places it in close relationship to the nervous system, which suggests that these systems may have a profound evolutionary connection.

  5. Space exploration, Mars, and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Robert; Solomon, David

    2007-04-01

    When human beings venture back to the moon and then on to Mars in the coming decade or so, we will be riding on the accumulated data and experience from approximately 50 years of manned space exploration. Virtually every organ system functions differently in the absence of gravity, and some of these changes are maladaptive. From a biologic perspective, long duration spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit presents many unique challenges. Astronauts traveling to Mars will live in the absence of gravity for more than 1 year en route and will have to transition between weightlessness and planetary gravitational forces at the beginning, middle, and end of the mission. We discuss some of what is known about the effects of spaceflight on nervous system function, with emphasis on the neuromuscular and vestibular systems because success of a Mars mission will depend on their proper functioning.

  6. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  7. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  8. Choroid plexus in the central nervous system: biology and physiopathology.

    PubMed

    Strazielle, N; Ghersi-Egea, J F

    2000-07-01

    Choroid plexuses (CPs) are localized in the ventricular system of the brain and form one of the interfaces between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS). They are composed of a tight epithelium responsible for cerebrospinal fluid secretion, which encloses a loose connective core containing permeable capillaries and cells of the lymphoid lineage. In accordance with its peculiar localization between 2 circulating fluid compartments, the CP epithelium is involved in numerous exchange processes that either supply the brain with nutrients and hormones, or clear deleterious compounds and metabolites from the brain. Choroid plexuses also participate in neurohumoral brain modulation and neuroimmune interactions, thereby contributing greatly in maintaining brain homeostasis. Besides these physiological functions, the implication of choroid plexuses in pathological processes is increasingly documented. In this review, we focus on some of the novel aspects of CP functions in relation to brain development, transfer of neuro-humoral information, brain/immune system interactions, brain aging, and cerebral pharmaco-toxicology.

  9. [Histoplasmosis of the central nervous system in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Osorio, Natalia; López, Yúrika; Jaramillo, Juan Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a multifaceted condition caused by the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum whose infective spores are inhaled and reach the lungs, the primary organ of infection. The meningeal form, considered one of the most serious manifestations of this mycosis, is usually seen in individuals with impaired cellular immunity such as patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, systemic lupus erythematous or solid organ transplantation, and infants given their immunological immaturity. The most common presentation is self-limited and occurs in immunocompetent individuals who have been exposed to high concentrations of conidia and mycelia fragments of the fungi. In those people, the condition is manifested by pulmonary disorders and late dissemination to other organs and systems. We report a case of central nervous system histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent child.

  10. The immune system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    All organisms are connected in a complex web of relationships. Although many of these are benign, not all are, and everything alive devotes significant resources to identifying and neutralizing threats from other species. From bacteria through to primates, the presence of some kind of effective immune system has gone hand in hand with evolutionary success. This article focuses on mammalian immunity, the challenges that it faces, the mechanisms by which these are addressed, and the consequences that arise when it malfunctions. PMID:27784777

  11. Gravity sensing in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Meike; Hanke, Wolfgang

    2002-07-01

    For human based space research it is of high importance to understand the influence of gravity on the properties of the central nervous system (CNS). Until now it is not much known about how neuronal tissue can sense gravity. The aim of this study was to find out weather and how the CNS, as a complex system, can percept and react to changes in gravity. Neuronal tissue and especially the CNS fulfils all the requirements for excitable media. Consequently, self-organisation, pattern formation and propagating excitation waves as typical events of excitable media have been observed in such tissue. The spreading depression (SD), an excitation depression wave is the most obvious and best described of these phenomena in the CNS. In our experiments we showed that the properties of the SD and therefore the CNS in its properties as an excitable medium reacts very sensitive to changes in gravity.

  12. The evolution of the serotonergic nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Hay-Schmidt, A

    2000-01-01

    The pattern of development of the serotonergic nervous system is described from the larvae of ctenophores, platyhelminths, nemerteans, entoprocts, ectoprocts (bryozoans), molluscs, polychaetes, brachiopods, phoronids, echinoderms, enteropneusts and lampreys. The larval brain (apical ganglion) of spiralian protostomes (except nermerteans) generally has three serotonergic neurons and the lateral pair always innervates the ciliary band of the prototroch. In contrast, brachiopods, phoronids, echinoderms and enteropneusts have numerous serotonergic neurons in the apical ganglion from which the ciliary band is innervated. This pattern of development is much like the pattern seen in lamprey embryos and larvae, which leads the author to conclude that the serotonergic raphe system found in vertebrates originated in the larval brain of deuterostome invertebrates. Further, the neural tube of chordates appears to be derived, at least in part, from the ciliary band of deuterostome invertebrate larvae. The evidence shows no sign of a shift in the dorsal ventral orientation within the line leading to the chordates. PMID:10885511

  13. Exercise and the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qi; Levine, Benjamin D

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a crucial role in the cardiovascular response to acute (dynamic) exercise in animals and humans. During exercise, oxygen uptake is a function of the triple-product of heart rate and stroke volume (i.e., cardiac output) and arterial-mixed venous oxygen difference (the Fick principle). The degree to which each of the variables can increase determines maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max). Both "central command" and "the exercise pressor reflex" are important in determining the cardiovascular response and the resetting of the arterial baroreflex during exercise to precisely match systemic oxygen delivery with metabolic demand. In general, patients with autonomic disorders have low levels of V˙O2max, indicating reduced physical fitness and exercise capacity. Moreover, the vast majority of the patients have blunted or abnormal cardiovascular response to exercise, especially during maximal exercise. There is now convincing evidence that some of the protective and therapeutic effects of chronic exercise training are related to the impact on the autonomic nervous system. Additionally, training induced improvement in vascular function, blood volume expansion, cardiac remodeling, insulin resistance and renal-adrenal function may also contribute to the protection and treatment of cardiovascular, metabolic and autonomic disorders. Exercise training also improves mental health, helps to prevent depression, and promotes or maintains positive self-esteem. Moderate-intensity exercise at least 30 minutes per day and at least 5 days per week is recommended for the vast majority of people. Supervised exercise training is preferable to maximize function capacity, and may be particularly important for patients with autonomic disorders.

  14. [Cytokines and the nervous system: the relationship between seizures and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ramirez, S F; Rosales-Rivera, L Y; Ramirez-Anguiano, A C; Bitzer-Quintero, O K

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. The immune system and the peripheral and central nervous system are in constant communication by means of messengers and signalling molecules released, such as cytokines, neuropeptides, neurohormones and neurotransmitters, among others. Seizures are defined as the transitory appearance of signs and symptoms that trigger an abnormally excessive neuronal activity in the brain. Following seizures the generation of a neuroinflammatory process has been observed to occur, with the consequent release of proinflammatory cytokines and inflammation-mediating molecules, which make the patient more prone to epilepsy. AIM. To offer evidence suggesting and supporting the role of cytokines in the appearance of seizures and in epilepsy, since these molecules have proven to have dual properties. DEVELOPMENT. The central nervous system, by means of the blood-brain barrier, restricts the flow of activated cells and inflammation mediators released from the peripheral system towards the brain parenchyma. Moreover, there is also another series of mechanisms that contributes to the 'selective and modified' immunity of the central nervous system. The purpose of all this series of events is to limit the responses of the immune system at central level, although it has been shown that in the central nervous system they are permanently under the control and regulation of the immune system. CONCLUSIONS. Cytokines in epilepsy play a dual role with pro- and anti-convulsive properties. Seizures do not induce the expression of cytokines only inside the brain, but also peripherally.

  15. Environmentally related disorders of the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.L.; Feldman, R.G.; French, J.G. )

    1990-03-01

    Specific physical and chemical agents found in the workplace and in the general environment are responsible for characteristic pathologic processes within the nervous system. It has been shown that many neurotoxic agents produce a dose-related spectrum of impairment ranging from mild slowing of nerve conducting velocity or prolongation in reaction time to neuropathy and frank encephalopathy. Clinical manifestations are determined by the agent involved, by the dose of exposure, the vulnerability of the cellular target, the ability of the organism to metabolize and excrete the agent, and the ability to repair damage. An occupational history, including evaluation of evidence of specific agents and job history, is a critical component in the clinical management of individuals with suspect neurotoxic disease. Environmentally-induced disorders can be prevented by appropriate environmental controls. Prevention of neurotoxic disease is a complex process requiring continuous involvement of public health agencies and strong scientific research.

  16. The autonomic nervous system and perinatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Milner, R D; De Gasparo, M

    1981-01-01

    The development of the autonomic nervous system in relation to perinatal metabolism is reviewed with particular attention given to the adipocyte, hepatocyte and the A and B cells of the islets of Langerhans. Adrenergic receptors develop in the B cell independently of normal innervation and by the time of birth, in most species studied, the pancreas, liver and adipose tissue respond appropriately to autonomic signals. Birth is associated with a huge surge in circulating catecholamines which is probably responsible for the early postnatal rise in free fatty acids and glucagon concentrations in plasma. beta-Blocking drugs such as propranolol have an adverse effect on fetal growth and neonatal metabolism, being responsible for hypoglycemia and for impairing the thermogenic response to cold exposure. beta-Mimetic drugs are commonly used to prevent premature labour and may help the fetus in other ways, for example, by improving the placental blood supply and the delivery of nutrients by increasing maternal fat and carbohydrate mobilization.

  17. Autonomic complications following central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Ian J

    2008-11-01

    Severe sympathetic overactivity occurs in several conditions that are recognized as medical emergencies. Following central nervous system injury, a small proportion of individuals develop severe paroxysmal sympathetic and motor overactivity. These individuals have a high attendant risk of unnecessary secondary morbidity. Following acquired brain injury, the syndrome is known by a number of names including dysautonomia and sympathetic storm. Dysautonomia is currently a diagnosis of exclusion and often goes unrecognized. The evidence base for management is almost entirely anecdotal in nature; there has been little structured or prospective research. In contrast, the evidence base for autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury is much stronger, with level 1 evidence for many treatment interventions. This review presents a current understanding of each condition and suggests simple management protocols. With the marked disparity in the literature for the two conditions, the main focus is on the literature for dysautonomia. The similarity between these two conditions and the other autonomic emergency conditions is discussed.

  18. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  19. Paraneoplastic disorders of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are rare but can affect any part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) including motor neurons, sensory ganglia, nerve roots, plexuses, cranial and peripheral nerves, and neuromuscular junctions. The type of cancer, lymphoma or solid tumour, is a determinant factor of the underlying mechanism. With solid tumour, antibodies directed to intracellular (anti-Hu or anti-CV2/CRMP5 antibodies) or surface antigens (anti-VGCC,or LGI1 and Caspr2 antibodies) have been identified while with lymphoma, the neuropathy is usually linked to a monoclonal gammopathy. This review discusses the different etiologies and mechanisms of paraneoplastic disorders of the PNS in patients emphasising their evaluation, diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Neuroactive steroids and central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Bäckström, T; Sundström, I; Wahlström, G; Olsson, T; Zhu, D; Johansson, I M; Björn, I; Bixo, M

    2001-01-01

    Steroid hormones are vital for the cell life and affect a number of neuroendocrine and behavioral functions. In contrast to their endocrine actions, certain steroids have been shown to rapidly alter brain excitability and to produce behavioral effects within seconds to minutes. In this article we direct attention to this issue of neuroactive steroids by outlining several aspects of current interest in the field of steroid research. Recent advances in the neurobiology of neuroactive are described along with the impact of advances on drug design for central nervous system (CNS) disorders provoked by neuroactive steriods. The theme was selected in association with the clinical aspects and therapeutical potentials of the neuroactive steroids in CNS disorders. A wide range of topics relating to the neuroactive steroids are outlined, including steroid concentrations in the brain, premenstrual syndrome, estrogen and Alzheimer's disease, side effects of oral contraceptives, mental disorder in menopause, hormone replacement therapy, Catamenial epilepsy, and neuractive steroids in epilepsy treatment.

  1. The sympathetic nervous system in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu

    2013-08-01

    Abundant evidence supports a role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. However, the nature and temporal progression of mechanisms underlying this sympathetically mediated hypertension are incompletely understood. Recent technological advances allowing direct recordings of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in conscious animals, together with direct suppression of RSNA by renal denervation and reflex-mediated global sympathetic inhibition in experimental animals and human subjects have been especially valuable in elucidating these mechanisms. These studies strongly support the concept that increased RSNA is the critical mechanism by which increased central sympathetic outflow initiates and maintains reductions in renal excretory function, causing obesity hypertension. Potential determinants of renal sympathoexcitation and the differential mechanisms mediating the effects of renal-specific versus reflex-mediated, global sympathetic inhibition on renal hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic function are discussed. These differential mechanisms may impact the efficacy of current device-based approaches for hypertension therapy.

  2. Central nervous system nocardiosis in Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Nastaran; Peri, Anna Maria; Righi, Elda; Harris, Patrick; Paterson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nocardia infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is an uncommon but clinically important disease, often occurring in immunocompromised individuals and carrying a high mortality rate. We present 20 cases of microbiologically proven CNS nocardiosis diagnosed in Queensland from 1997 to 2015 and review the literature from 1997 to 2016. Over 50% of cases occurred in immunocompromised individuals, with corticosteroid use posing a particularly significant risk factor. Nine (45%) patients were immunocompetent and 3 had no comorbidities at time of diagnosis. Nocardia farcinica was the most frequently isolated species (8/20) and resistance to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was found in 2 isolates. Overall, 35% of our patients died within 1 year, with the majority of deaths occurring in the first month following diagnosis. Interestingly, of the 7 deaths occurring at 1 year, 6 were attributed to N farcinica with the seventh isolate being unspeciated, suggesting the virulence of the N farcinica strain. PMID:27861348

  3. Calcium pumps in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mata, Ana M; Sepúlveda, M Rosario

    2005-09-01

    Two families of Ca2+ transport ATPases are involved in the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis in the nervous system, the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase that pumps Ca2+ to the extracellular medium and the intracellular sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase that transports Ca2+ from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum. Both types of calcium pumps show precise regulatory properties and they are localized in specific subcellular regions. In this review, we describe the functional and regulatory properties of both families of calcium pumps, their distribution in nerve cells, and their involvement in neurological disorders. The functional characterization of neuronal calcium pumps is very important in order to understand the biochemical processes involved in the maintenance of intracellular calcium in synaptic terminals.

  4. [Idiopathic hypersomnia of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Bové-Ribé, A

    Idiopathic hypersomnia of the central nervous system is a cause of excessive diurnal somnolence which affects 5-10% of the patients who attend sleep clinics for this reason. We describe three male patients who consulted for excessive diurnal somnolence. Nocturnal polysomnographic studies followed by tests for multiple latencies of sleep were done. In all cases there was confirmation of lengthening of the time of nocturnal sleep with normal phases of sleep and an increase in the number of sleep spindles in phase II. Similarly there was an average latency of sleep of less than 10 minutes and fewer than two phases of REM in the multiple latencies test. All patients improved with drugs stimulating vigil, two of them with centramine and the third with methilphenidate. We consider the clinical data the polysomnographic criteria which help to establish the diagnosis.

  5. [Viral infections of human central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Agut, Henri

    2016-01-01

    The viruses that can infect the central nervous system of humans are numerous and form a heterogeneous group with respect to their structural, functional and epidemiological properties. The pathophysiological mechanisms leading to associated neurological diseases, mainly meningitis and encephalitis, also are complex and often intertwined. Overall, neurological clinical symptoms correspond either to acute viral diseases associated with primary infections or to acute, subacute or chronic diseases associated with persistent viral infections. The frequent severity of the clinical situation requires in all cases the practice of virological diagnosis for which the PCR techniques applied to cerebrospinal fluid samples occupy a prominent place. The severity of clinical manifestations justifies the use of prophylactic vaccination when available and antiviral treatment as soon as the causative virus is identified or suspected.

  6. Adenosine receptors and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2009-01-01

    The adenosine receptors (ARs) in the nervous system act as a kind of "go-between" to regulate the release of neurotransmitters (this includes all known neurotransmitters) and the action of neuromodulators (e.g., neuropeptides, neurotrophic factors). Receptor-receptor interactions and AR-transporter interplay occur as part of the adenosine's attempt to control synaptic transmission. A(2A)ARs are more abundant in the striatum and A(1)ARs in the hippocampus, but both receptors interfere with the efficiency and plasticity-regulated synaptic transmission in most brain areas. The omnipresence of adenosine and A(2A) and A(1) ARs in all nervous system cells (neurons and glia), together with the intensive release of adenosine following insults, makes adenosine a kind of "maestro" of the tripartite synapse in the homeostatic coordination of the brain function. Under physiological conditions, both A(2A) and A(1) ARs play an important role in sleep and arousal, cognition, memory and learning, whereas under pathological conditions (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, drug addiction, pain, schizophrenia, depression), ARs operate a time/circumstance window where in some circumstances A(1)AR agonists may predominate as early neuroprotectors, and in other circumstances A(2A)AR antagonists may alter the outcomes of some of the pathological deficiencies. In some circumstances, and depending on the therapeutic window, the use of A(2A)AR agonists may be initially beneficial; however, at later time points, the use of A(2A)AR antagonists proved beneficial in several pathologies. Since selective ligands for A(1) and A(2A) ARs are now entering clinical trials, the time has come to determine the role of these receptors in neurological and psychiatric diseases and identify therapies that will alter the outcomes of these diseases, therefore providing a hopeful future for the patients who suffer from these diseases.

  7. Nervous system involvement in clinical peripheral inflammation: A description of three pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Tabatabaie, Omidreza; Matin, Nassim; Giugno, Giovanni Roberto; Pavone, Piero; Lubrano, Riccardo; Falsaperla, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Latest research data have emphasized the interaction between the nervous and the immune systems. In this regard, it has been demonstrated that the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) secondary to peripheral inflammation may play a key role in this relationship. This assumption is linked to recent findings according to which units that constitute the BBB are not only simply neurologic but have also been reconsidered as "neurovascular" elements, through which immune system molecules are vehiculated within the central nervous system (CNS). Herein, we report two cases of food allergy (FA) and one case of infective gastroenteritis, associated with a spectrum of neurologic disorders involving both the CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), postulating some etiopathogenic hypotheses to explain the link between peripheral inflammation and diseases of the nervous system (NS). Three pediatric cases of secondary NS involvement after gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation of different nature have been reported. The first case highlights the link between FA and CNS; the second one is based on a description of a link between GI infection and CNS involvement while the third one describes the relationship between FA and PNS. The importance of these reports relies on the clinical demonstration of a link between the immune system and the NS. The relationship between immune system and NS seems to have pleiotropic aspects, involving different areas of the NS, such as CNS and PNS, which also seem to be in some way interconnected.

  8. Sialyltransferase regulates nervous system function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Repnikova, Elena; Koles, Kate; Nakamura, Michiko; Pitts, Jared; Li, Haiwen; Ambavane, Apoorva; Zoran, Mark J.; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, sialylated glycans participate in a wide range of biological processes and affect nervous system’s development and function. While the complexity of glycosylation and the functional redundancy among sialyltransferases provide obstacles for revealing biological roles of sialylation in mammals, Drosophila possesses a sole vertebrate-type sialyltransferase, DSiaT, with significant homology to its mammalian counterparts, suggesting that Drosophila could be a suitable model to investigate the function of sialylation. To explore this possibility and investigate the role of sialylation in Drosophila, we inactivated DSiaT in vivo by gene targeting and analyzed phenotypes of DSiaT mutants using a combination of behavioural, immunolabeling, electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches. Our experiments demonstrated that DSiaT expression is restricted to a subset of CNS neurons throughout development. We found that DSiaT mutations result in significantly decreased life span, locomotor abnormalities, temperature-sensitive paralysis and defects of neuromuscular junctions. Our results indicate that DSiaT regulates neuronal excitability and affects the function of a voltage-gated sodium channel. Finally, we showed that sialyltransferase activity is required for DSiaT function in vivo, which suggests that DSiaT mutant phenotypes result from a defect in sialylation of N-glycans. This work provided the first evidence that sialylation has an important biological function in protostomes, while also revealing a novel, nervous system-specific function of α2,6 sialylation. Thus, our data shed light on one of the most ancient functions of sialic acids in metazoan organisms and suggest a possibility that this function is evolutionarily conserved between flies and mammals. PMID:20445073

  9. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  10. Neural regulation of gastrointestinal inflammation: role of the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cervi, Andrea L; Lukewich, Mark K; Lomax, Alan E

    2014-05-01

    The sympathetic innervation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract regulates motility, secretion and blood flow by inhibiting the activity of the enteric nervous system (ENS) and direct vasoconstrictor innervation of the gut microvasculature. In addition to these well-established roles, there is evidence that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) can modulate GI inflammation. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervate lymphoid tissues and immune cells within the GI tract. Furthermore, innate and adaptive immune cells express receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters. Activation of these receptors can affect a variety of important immune cell functions, including cytokine release and differentiation of helper T lymphocyte subsets. This review will consider the neuroanatomical evidence of GI immune cell innervation by sympathetic axons, the effects of blocking or enhancing SNS activity on GI inflammation, and the converse modulation of sympathetic neuroanatomy and function by GI inflammation.

  11. Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Gavito-Higuera, Jose; Mullins, Carola Birgit; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Olivas Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Hakim, Nawar; Palacios, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a threat to especially immunocompromised patients and their development is primarily determined by the immune status of the host. With an increasing number of organ transplants, chemotherapy, and human immunodeficiency virus infections, the number of immunocompromised patients as susceptible hosts is growing and fungal infections of the CNS are more frequently encountered. They may result in meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation, cryptococcoma, and meningeal vasculitis with rapid disease progression and often overlapping symptoms. Although radiological characteristics are often nonspecific, unique imaging patterns can be identified through computer tomography as a first imaging modality and further refined by magnetic resonance imaging. A rapid diagnosis and the institution of the appropriate therapy are crucial in helping prevent an often fatal outcome.

  12. Enterovirus Infections of the Central Nervous System Review

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Ross E.; Tabor-Godwin, Jenna M.; Tsueng, Ginger; Feuer, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) frequently infect the central nervous system (CNS) and induce neurological diseases. Although the CNS is composed of many different cell types, the spectrum of tropism for each EV is considerable. These viruses have the ability to completely shut down host translational machinery and are considered highly cytolytic, thereby causing cytopathic effects. Hence, CNS dysfunction following EV infection of neuronal or glial cells might be expected. Perhaps unexpectedly given their cytolytic nature, EVs may establish a persistent infection within the CNS, and the lasting effects on the host might be significant with unanticipated consequences. This review will describe the clinical aspects of EV-mediated disease, mechanisms of disease, determinants of tropism, immune activation within the CNS, and potential treatment regimes. PMID:21251690

  13. HIV and aging: effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cañizares, Silvia; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J

    2014-02-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, many human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) individuals are reaching advanced age. The proportion of people living with HIV older than 50 years already exceeds 50% in many communities, and is expected to reach this level nationally by 2015. HIV and aging are independently associated with neuropathological changes, but their concurrence may have a more deleterious effect on the central nervous system (CNS). Published data about neurocognitive and neuroimaging markers of HIV and aging are reviewed. Putative factors contributing to neurocognitive impairment and neuroimaging changes in the aging HIV+ brain, such as metabolic disturbances, cardiovascular risk factors, immune senescence, and neuroinflammation, are described. The possible relationship between HIV and some markers of Alzheimer's disease is presented. Current research findings emphasize multiple mechanisms related to HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy that compromise CNS structure and function with advancing age.

  14. HIV and Aging: Effects on the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Cañizares, Silvia; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, many human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) individuals are reaching advanced age. The proportion of people living with HIV older than 50 years already exceeds 50% in many communities, and is expected to reach this level nationally by 2015. HIV and aging are independently associated with neuropathological changes, but their concurrence may have a more deleterious effect on the central nervous system (CNS). Published data about neurocognitive and neuroimaging markers of HIV and aging are reviewed. Putative factors contributing to neurocognitive impairment and neuroimaging changes in the aging HIV+ brain, such as metabolic disturbances, cardiovascular risk factors, immune senescence, and neuroinflammation, are described. The possible relationship between HIV and some markers of Alzheimer’s disease is presented. Current research findings emphasize multiple mechanisms related to HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy that compromise CNS structure and function with advancing age. PMID:24715486

  15. Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System: A Pictorial Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavito-Higuera, Jose; Mullins, Carola Birgit; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Olivas Chacon, Cristina Ivette; Hakim, Nawar; Palacios, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a threat to especially immunocompromised patients and their development is primarily determined by the immune status of the host. With an increasing number of organ transplants, chemotherapy, and human immunodeficiency virus infections, the number of immunocompromised patients as susceptible hosts is growing and fungal infections of the CNS are more frequently encountered. They may result in meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation, cryptococcoma, and meningeal vasculitis with rapid disease progression and often overlapping symptoms. Although radiological characteristics are often nonspecific, unique imaging patterns can be identified through computer tomography as a first imaging modality and further refined by magnetic resonance imaging. A rapid diagnosis and the institution of the appropriate therapy are crucial in helping prevent an often fatal outcome. PMID:27403402

  16. Pathogenesis and immunopathology of systemic and nervous canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Beineke, A; Puff, C; Seehusen, F; Baumgärtner, W

    2009-01-15

    Canine distemper is a worldwide occurring infectious disease of dogs, caused by a morbillivirus, closely related to measles and rinderpest virus. The natural host range comprises predominantly carnivores. Canine distemper virus (CDV), an enveloped, negative-sense RNA virus, infects different cell types, including epithelial, mesenchymal, neuroendocrine and hematopoietic cells of various organs and tissues. CDV infection of dogs is characterized by a systemic and/or nervous clinical course and viral persistence in selected organs including the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid tissue. Main manifestations include respiratory and gastrointestinal signs, immunosuppression and demyelinating leukoencephalomyelitis (DL). Impaired immune function, associated with depletion of lymphoid organs, consists of a viremia-associated loss of lymphocytes, especially of CD4+ T cells, due to lymphoid cell apoptosis in the early phase. After clearance of the virus from the peripheral blood an assumed diminished antigen presentation and altered lymphocyte maturation cause an ongoing immunosuppression despite repopulation of lymphoid organs. The early phase of DL is a sequel of a direct virus-mediated damage and infiltrating CD8+ cytotoxic T cells associated with an up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-12 and a lacking response of immunomodulatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. A CD4+-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells contribute to myelin loss in the chronic phase. Additionally, up-regulation of interferon-gamma and IL-1 may occur in advanced lesions. Moreover, an altered balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors seems to play a pivotal role for the pathogenesis of DL. Summarized, DL represents a biphasic disease process consisting of an initial direct virus-mediated process and immune-mediated plaque

  17. Primary central nervous system posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Sanchez, Amilcar A; Li, Shiyong; Qian, Jiang; Lagoo, Anand; Weir, Edward; Brat, Daniel J

    2004-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent a spectrum ranging from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven polyclonal lymphoid proliferations to EBV+ or EBV- malignant lymphomas. Central nervous system (CNS) PTLDs have not been characterized fully. We reviewed the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of 12 primary CNS PTLDs to define them more precisely. Patients included 10 males and 2 females (median age, 43.4 years) who were recipients of kidney (n = 5), liver (n = 2), heart (n = 2), peripheral blood stem cells (n = 2), or bone marrow (n = 1). All received immunosuppressive therapy. CNS symptoms developed 3 to 131 months (mean, 31 months) after transplantation. By neuroimaging, most showed multiple (3 to 9) intra-axial, contrast-enhancing lesions. Histologic sections showed marked expansion of perivascular spaces by large, cytologically malignant lymphoid cells that were CD45+, CD20+, EBV+ and showed light chain restriction or immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. In distinction to PTLDs in other organ systems, CNS PTLDs were uniformly high-grade lymphomas that fulfilled the World Health Organization criteria for monomorphic PTLDs. Extremely short survival periods were noted for each CNS PTLD that followed peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Survival of others with CNS PTLD varied; some lived more than 2 years.

  18. Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rhailana; Ribeiro, Jéssica; Gupta, Daya S.; Machado, Dionis; Lopes-Júnior, Fernando; Magalhães, Francisco; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Rocha, Kaline; Marinho, Victor; Lima, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Orsini, Marco; Pessoa, Bruno; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Teixeira, Silmar

    2016-01-01

    The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson’s disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. PMID:27127597

  19. Bilastine and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Montoro, J; Mullol, J; Dávila, I; Ferrer, M; Sastre, J; Bartra, J; Jáuregui, I; del Cuvillo, A; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    Antihistamines have been classifed as first or second generation drugs, according to their pharmacokinetic properties, chemical structure and adverse effects. The adverse effects of antihistamines upon the central nervous system (CNS) depend upon their capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and bind to the central H1 receptors (RH1). This in turn depends on the lipophilicity of the drug molecule, its molecular weight (MW), and affinity for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (CNS xenobiotic substances extractor protein). First generation antihistamines show scant affinity for P-gp, unlike the second generation molecules which are regarded as P-gp substrates. Histamine in the brain is implicated in many functions (waking-sleep cycle, attention, memory and learning, and the regulation of appetite), with numerous and complex interactions with different types of receptors in different brain areas. Bilastine is a new H1 antihistamine that proves to be effective in treating allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (seasonal and perennial) and urticaria. The imaging studies made, as well as the objective psychomotor tests and subjective assessment of drowsiness, indicate the absence of bilastine action upon the CNS. This fact, and the lack of interaction with benzodiazepines and alcohol, define bilastine as a clinically promising drug with a good safety profile as regards adverse effects upon the CNS.

  20. Central nervous system tumors in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    De la Torre Mondragón, L; Ridaura Sanz, C; Reyes Mujica, M; Rueda Franco, F

    1993-08-01

    Five hundred and seventy primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors from the Department of Pathology at the National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico City, collected from 1970 to 1989, were histologically reclassified in order to find out their relative incidence as well as their outstanding features. With this, we could establish a frame of reference for our local population, contributing to the epidemiological analysis of these entities. All the tumors were examined independently by two pathologists (C.R. and M.R.), using the classification of Rorke et al. Histological type, patient age and sex, and tumor location were analyzed. CNS tumors were the secondmost frequently encountered solid tumors, after lymphomas, and were increasing in incidence at a rate of 2.2 annually. Children in the age group 0-9 years were most often affected, and there was a predominance of male patients. Astrocytoma and medulloblastoma were the most common tumor types. The infratentorial region was the most frequent tumor location in the 2- to 9-year age group. By contrast, in the under 2-year-olds a supratentorial location was more frequent, and the incidence of germ cell tumors was proportionally high. In general, some histological types seemed to be associated with particular age groups. Although we found primitive neuroectodermal tumors to be the fifth most common at all ages (except for medulloblastoma), many other authors do not report a similar finding.

  1. Environmental effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, G W

    1977-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is designed to respond to the environment and is peculiarly vulnerable to many of the influences found in the environment. Utilizing an anatomical classification (cortex, cerebellum, peripheral nerves) major toxins and stresses are reviewed with selections from recent references. Selective vulnerability of certain areas to particular toxins is apparent at all levels of the CNS, although the amount of damage produced by any noxious agent depends on the age and genetic substrate of the subject. It is apparent that the effects of certain well known and long respected environmental toxins such as lead, mercury, etc., deserve continued surveillance. In addition, the overwhelming impact on the CNS of social damages such as trauma, alcohol, and tobacco cannot be ignored by environmentalists. The effect of the hospital and therapeutic environment has become apparent in view of increased awareness of iatrogenic disorders. The need for particular laboratory tests, for example, examination of CSF and nerve conduction toxicity studies, is suggested. Epidemics such as the recent solvent neuropathies suggest a need for continued animal studies that are chronic, as well as acute evaluations when predicting the potential toxic effects of industrial compounds. PMID:202447

  2. Plants and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carlini, E A

    2003-06-01

    This review article draws the attention to the many species of plants possessing activity on the central nervous system (CNS). In fact, they cover the whole spectrum of central activity such as psychoanaleptic, psycholeptic and psychodysleptic effects, and several of these plants are currently used in therapeutics to treat human ailments. Among the psychoanaleptic (stimulant) plants, those utilized by human beings to reduce body weight [Ephedra spp. (Ma Huang), Paullinia spp. (guaraná), Catha edulis Forssk. (khat)] and plants used to improve general health conditions (plant adaptogens) were scrutinized. Many species of hallucinogenic (psychodysleptic) plants are used by humans throughout the world to achieve states of mind distortions; among those, a few have been used for therapeutic purposes, such as Cannabis sativa L., Tabernanthe iboga Baill. and the mixture of Psychotria viridis Ruiz and Pav. and Banisteriopsis caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) C.V. Morton. Plants showing central psycholeptic activities, such as analgesic or anxiolytic actions (Passiflora incarnata L., Valeriana spp. and Piper methysticum G. Forst.), were also analysed.Finally, the use of crude or semipurified extracts of such plants instead of the active substances seemingly responsible for their therapeutic effect is discussed.

  3. Sympathetic nervous system behavior in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Davy, Kevin P; Orr, Jeb S

    2009-02-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an essential role in the regulation of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Low SNS activity has been suggested to be a risk factor for weight gain and obesity development. In contrast, SNS activation is characteristic of a number of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases that occur more frequently in obese individuals. Until recently, the relation between obesity and SNS behavior has been controversial because previous approaches for assessing SNS activity in humans have produced inconsistent findings. Beginning in the early 1990s, many studies using state of the art neurochemical and neurophysiological techniques have provided important insight. The purpose of the present review is to provide an overview of our current understanding of the region specific alterations in SNS behavior in human obesity. We will discuss findings from our own laboratory which implicate visceral fat as an important depot linking obesity with skeletal muscle SNS activation. The influence of weight change on SNS behavior and the potential mechanisms and consequences of region specific SNS activation in obesity will also be considered.

  4. [Microbiological diagnosis of central nervous system infections].

    PubMed

    Codina, María Gema; de Cueto, Marina; Vicente, Diego; Echevarría, Juan Emilio; Prats, Guillem

    2011-02-01

    The infections of the central nervous system are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Several agents including bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa can invade the CNS. They are different clinical presentations of these infections: meningitis, encephalitis, brain and epidural abscesses and cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections. The clinical course could be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the infecting agent and the location of the infection. The travelling entails a risk of infection by exotic agents of meningo-encephalitis such as robovirus and arbovirus, which require new diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Despite some progress in the treatment of the CNS infections, the mortality is usually high. Rapid diagnosis and emergent interventions are necessary to improve the outcome of those patients, and early and targeted antimicrobial treatment and support measures are of paramount importance for a favourable clinical patient outcome. The antigen detection techniques and particularly those of genetic diagnosis by amplification (PCR and others) have advanced, and improved the diagnostic of those diseases. In this paper the clinical signs and symptoms and diagnostic procedures of CNS infections are presented.

  5. Histology of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Garman, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this article is to assist pathologists inexperienced in examining central nervous system (CNS) sections to recognize normal and abnormal cell types as well as some common artifacts. Dark neurons are the most common histologic artifact but, with experience, can readily be distinguished from degenerating (eosinophilic) neurons. Neuron degeneration stains can be useful in lowering the threshold for detecting neuron degeneration as well as for revealing degeneration within populations of neurons that are too small to show the associated eosinophilic cytoplasmic alteration within H&E-stained sections. Neuron degeneration may also be identified by the presence of associated macroglial and microglial reactions. Knowledge of the distribution of astrocyte cytoplasmic processes is helpful in determining that certain patterns of treatment-related neuropil vacuolation (as well as some artifacts) represent swelling of these processes. On the other hand, vacuoles with different distribution patterns may represent alterations of the myelin sheath. Because brains are typically undersampled for microscopic evaluation, many pathologists are unfamiliar with the circumventricuar organs (CVOs) that represent normal brain structures but are often mistaken for lesions. Therefore, the six CVOs found in the brain are also illustrated in this article.

  6. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour.

  7. Early animal evolution and the origins of nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of early nervous systems is hazardous because we lack good criteria for determining homology between the systems of distant taxa; the timing of the evolutionary events is contested, and thus the relevant ecological and geological settings for them are also unclear. Here I argue that no simple approach will resolve the first issue, but that it remains likely that animals evolved relatively late, and that their nervous systems thus arose during the late Ediacaran, in a context provided by the changing planktonic and benthic environments of the time. The early trace fossil provides the most concrete evidence for early behavioural diversification, but it cannot simply be translated into increasing nervous system complexity: behavioural complexity does not map on a one-to-one basis onto nervous system complexity, both because of possible limitations to behaviour caused by the environment and because we know that even organisms without nervous systems are capable of relatively complex behaviour. PMID:26554037

  8. [Primary central nervous system lymphoma: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Su, Rong-Gang

    2002-04-01

    One case of primary central nervous system lymphoma was reported. The patient received comprehensive therapy, mainly the surgical treatment, with the survival time 12 months, and local recurrence was considered as the major cause of death. The pathology, imagine examination, diagnosis and treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma were discussed.

  9. Extraversion, Neuroticism and Strength of the Nervous System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frigon, Jean-Yves

    1976-01-01

    The hypothesized identity of the dimensions of extraversion-introversion and strength of the nervous system was tested on four groups of nine subjects (neurotic extraverts, stable extraverts, neurotic introverts, stable introverts). Strength of the subjects' nervous system was estimated using the electroencephalographic (EEG) variant of extinction…

  10. A gene catalogue of the amphioxus nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Gutiérrez, Èlia

    2006-01-01

    The elaboration of extremely complex nervous systems is a major success of evolution. However, at the dawn of the post-genomic era, few data have helped yet to unravel how a nervous system develops and evolves to complexity. On the evolutionary road to vertebrates, amphioxus occupies a key position to tackle this exciting issue. Its “simple” nervous system basically consists of a dorsal nerve cord and a diffuse net of peripheral neurons, which contrasts greatly with the complexity of vertebrate nervous systems. Notwithstanding, increasing data on gene expression has faced up this simplicity by revealing a mounting level of cryptic complexity, with unexpected levels of neuronal diversity, organisation and regionalisation of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Furthermore, recent gene expression data also point to the high neurogenic potential of the epidermis of amphioxus, suggestive of a skin-brain track for the evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Here I attempt to catalogue and synthesise current gene expression data in the amphioxus nervous system. From this global point of view, I suggest scenarios for the evolutionary origin of complex features in the vertebrate nervous system, with special emphasis on the evolutionary origin of placodes and neural crest, and postulate a pre-patterned migratory pathway of cells, which, in the epidermis, may represent an intermediate state towards the deployment of one of the most striking innovative features of vertebrates: the neural crest and its derivatives. PMID:16763675

  11. Effects of microgravity on the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Taylor, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in resistance to bacterial and viral infections in Apollo crew members has stimulated interest in the study of immunity and space flight. Results of studies from several laboratories in both humans and rodents have indicated alterations after space flight that include the following immunological parameters: thymus size, lymphocyte blastogenesis, interferon and interleukin production, natural killer cell activity, cytotoxic T-cell activity, leukocyte subset population distribution, response of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factors, and delayed hypersensitivity skin test reactivity. The interactions of the immune system with other physiological systems, including muscle, bone, and the nervous system, may play a major role in the development of these immunological parameters during and after flight. There may also be direct effects of space flight on immune responses.

  12. Melatonin Metabolism in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of melatonin in the central nervous system is of interest for several reasons. Melatonin enters the brain either via the pineal recess or by uptake from the blood. It has been assumed to be also formed in some brain areas. Neuroprotection by melatonin has been demonstrated in numerous model systems, and various attempts have been undertaken to counteract neurodegeneration by melatonin treatment. Several concurrent pathways lead to different products. Cytochrome P450 subforms have been demonstrated in the brain. They either demethylate melatonin to N-acetylserotonin, or produce 6-hydroxymelatonin, which is mostly sulfated already in the CNS. Melatonin is deacetylated, at least in pineal gland and retina, to 5-methoxytryptamine. N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine is formed by pyrrole-ring cleavage, by myeloperoxidase, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and various non-enzymatic oxidants. Its product, N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine, is of interest as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial modulator, downregulator of cyclooxygenase-2, inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, neuronal and inducible NO synthases. Contrary to other nitrosated aromates, the nitrosated kynuramine metabolite, 3-acetamidomethyl-6-methoxycinnolinone, does not re-donate NO. Various other products are formed from melatonin and its metabolites by interaction with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The relative contribution of the various pathways to melatonin catabolism seems to be influenced by microglia activation, oxidative stress and brain levels of melatonin, which may be strongly changed in experiments on neuroprotection. Many of the melatonin metabolites, which may appear in elevated concentrations after melatonin administration, possess biological or pharmacological properties, including N-acetylserotonin, 5-methoxytryptamine and some of its derivatives, and especially the 5-methoxylated kynuramines. PMID:21358968

  13. The role of microbiome in central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-05-01

    Mammals live in a co-evolutionary association with the plethora of microorganisms that reside at a variety of tissue microenvironments. The microbiome represents the collective genomes of these co-existing microorganisms, which is shaped by host factors such as genetics and nutrients but in turn is able to influence host biology in health and disease. Niche-specific microbiome, prominently the gut microbiome, has the capacity to effect both local and distal sites within the host. The gut microbiome has played a crucial role in the bidirectional gut-brain axis that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities, and thus the concept of microbiome-gut-brain axis is emerging. Studies are revealing how diverse forms of neuro-immune and neuro-psychiatric disorders are correlated with or modulated by variations of microbiome, microbiota-derived products and exogenous antibiotics and probiotics. The microbiome poises the peripheral immune homeostasis and predisposes host susceptibility to CNS autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Neural, endocrine and metabolic mechanisms are also critical mediators of the microbiome-CNS signaling, which are more involved in neuro-psychiatric disorders such as autism, depression, anxiety, stress. Research on the role of microbiome in CNS disorders deepens our academic knowledge about host-microbiome commensalism in central regulation and in practicality, holds conceivable promise for developing novel prognostic and therapeutic avenues for CNS disorders.

  14. Aging, the Central Nervous System, and Mobility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mobility limitations are common and hazardous in community-dwelling older adults but are largely understudied, particularly regarding the role of the central nervous system (CNS). This has limited development of clearly defined pathophysiology, clinical terminology, and effective treatments. Understanding how changes in the CNS contribute to mobility limitations has the potential to inform future intervention studies. Methods. A conference series was launched at the 2012 conference of the Gerontological Society of America in collaboration with the National Institute on Aging and the University of Pittsburgh. The overarching goal of the conference series is to facilitate the translation of research results into interventions that improve mobility for older adults. Results. Evidence from basic, clinical, and epidemiological studies supports the CNS as an important contributor to mobility limitations in older adults without overt neurologic disease. Three main goals for future work that emerged were as follows: (a) develop models of mobility limitations in older adults that differentiate aging from disease-related processes and that fully integrate CNS with musculoskeletal contributors; (b) quantify the contribution of the CNS to mobility loss in older adults in the absence of overt neurologic diseases; (c) promote cross-disciplinary collaboration to generate new ideas and address current methodological issues and barriers, including real-world mobility measures and life-course approaches. Conclusions. In addition to greater cross-disciplinary research, there is a need for new approaches to training clinicians and investigators, which integrate concepts and methodologies from individual disciplines, focus on emerging methodologies, and prepare investigators to assess complex, multisystem associations. PMID:23843270

  15. Cancer stem cells in nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Clarke, Ian D; Hide, Takuichiro; Dirks, Peter B

    2004-09-20

    Most current research on human brain tumors is focused on the molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and more recently in solid tumors such as breast cancer suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. Recently, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in human brain tumors of different phenotypes from both children and adults. The finding of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) has been made by applying the principles for cell culture and analysis of normal neural stem cells (NSCs) to brain tumor cell populations and by identification of cell surface markers that allow for isolation of distinct tumor cell populations that can then be studied in vitro and in vivo. A population of brain tumor cells can be enriched for BTSCs by cell sorting of dissociated suspensions of tumor cells for the NSC marker CD133. These CD133+ cells, which also expressed the NSC marker nestin, but not differentiated neural lineage markers, represent a minority fraction of the entire brain tumor cell population, and exclusively generate clonal tumor spheres in suspension culture and exhibit increased self-renewal capacity. BTSCs can be induced to differentiate in vitro into tumor cells that phenotypically resembled the tumor from the patient. Here, we discuss the evidence for and implications of the discovery of a cancer stem cell in human brain tumors. The identification of a BTSC provides a powerful tool to investigate the tumorigenic process in the central nervous system and to develop therapies targeted to the BTSC. Specific genetic and molecular analyses of the BTSC will further our understanding of the mechanisms of brain tumor growth, reinforcing parallels between normal neurogenesis and brain tumorigenesis.

  16. Congenital tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Severino, Mariasavina; Schwartz, Erin S; Thurnher, Majda M; Rydland, Jana; Nikas, Ioannis; Rossi, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Congenital tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are often arbitrarily divided into "definitely congenital" (present or producing symptoms at birth), "probably congenital" (present or producing symptoms within the first week of life), and "possibly congenital" (present or producing symptoms within the first 6 months of life). They represent less than 2% of all childhood brain tumors. The clinical features of newborns include an enlarged head circumference, associated hydrocephalus, and asymmetric skull growth. At birth, a large head or a tense fontanel is the presenting sign in up to 85% of patients. Neurological symptoms as initial symptoms are comparatively rare. The prenatal diagnosis of congenital CNS tumors, while based on ultrasonography, has significantly benefited from the introduction of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging studies. Teratomas constitute about one third to one half of these tumors and are the most common neonatal brain tumor. They are often immature because of primitive neural elements and, rarely, a component of mixed malignant germ cell tumors. Other tumors include astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. Less common histologies include craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas. There is a strong predilection for supratentorial locations, different from tumors of infants and children. Differential diagnoses include spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage that can occur in the presence of coagulation factor deficiency or underlying vascular malformations, and congenital brain malformations, especially giant heterotopia. The prognosis for patients with congenital tumors is generally poor, usually because of the massive size of the tumor. However, tumors can be resected successfully if they are small and favorably located. The most favorable outcomes are achieved with choroid plexus tumors, where aggressive surgical treatment leads to disease-free survival.

  17. Mechanosensitivity in the enteric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma; Schemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) autonomously controls gut muscle activity. Mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) initiate reflex activity by responding to mechanical deformation of the gastrointestinal wall. MEN throughout the gut primarily respond to compression or stretch rather than to shear force. Some MEN are multimodal as they respond to compression and stretch. Depending on the region up to 60% of the entire ENS population responds to mechanical stress. MEN fire action potentials after mechanical stimulation of processes or soma although they are more sensitive to process deformation. There are at least two populations of MEN based on their sensitivity to different modalities of mechanical stress and on their firing pattern. (1) Rapidly, slowly and ultra-slowly adapting neurons which encode compressive forces. (2) Ultra-slowly adapting stretch-sensitive neurons encoding tensile forces. Rapid adaptation of firing is typically observed after compressive force while slow adaptation or ongoing spike discharge occurs often during tensile stress (stretch). All MEN have some common properties: they receive synaptic input, are low fidelity mechanoreceptors and are multifunctional in that some serve interneuronal others even motor functions. Consequently, MEN possess processes with mechanosensitive as well as efferent functions. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that MEN sense and control muscle activity at the same time as servo-feedback loop. The mechanosensitive channel(s) or receptor(s) expressed by the different MEN populations are unknown. Future concepts have to incorporate compressive and tensile-sensitive MEN into neural circuits that controls muscle activity. They may interact to control various forms of a particular motor pattern or regulate different motor patterns independently from each other. PMID:26528136

  18. Is There Anything "Autonomous" in the Nervous System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasia-Filho, Alberto A.

    2006-01-01

    The terms "autonomous" or "vegetative" are currently used to identify one part of the nervous system composed of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and gastrointestinal divisions. However, the concepts that are under the literal meaning of these words can lead to misconceptions about the actual nervous organization. Some clear-cut examples indicate…

  19. Cellular changes in the enteric nervous system during ageing.

    PubMed

    Saffrey, M Jill

    2013-10-01

    The intrinsic neurons of the gut, enteric neurons, have an essential role in gastrointestinal functions. The enteric nervous system is plastic and continues to undergo changes throughout life, as the gut grows and responds to dietary and other environmental changes. Detailed analysis of changes in the ENS during ageing suggests that enteric neurons are more vulnerable to age-related degeneration and cell death than neurons in other parts of the nervous system, although there is considerable variation in the extent and time course of age-related enteric neuronal loss reported in different studies. Specific neuronal subpopulations, particularly cholinergic myenteric neurons, may be more vulnerable than others to age-associated loss or damage. Enteric degeneration and other age-related neuronal changes may contribute to gastrointestinal dysfunction that is common in the elderly population. Evidence suggests that caloric restriction protects against age-associated loss of enteric neurons, but recent advances in the understanding of the effects of the microbiota and the complex interactions between enteric ganglion cells, mucosal immune system and intestinal epithelium indicate that other factors may well influence ageing of enteric neurons. Much remains to be understood about the mechanisms of neuronal loss and damage in the gut, although there is evidence that reactive oxygen species, neurotrophic factor dysregulation and/or activation of a senescence associated phenotype may be involved. To date, there is no evidence for ongoing neurogenesis that might replace dying neurons in the ageing gut, although small local sites of neurogenesis would be difficult to detect. Finally, despite the considerable evidence for enteric neurodegeneration during ageing, and evidence for some physiological changes in animal models, the ageing gut appears to maintain its function remarkably well in animals that exhibit major neuronal loss, indicating that the ENS has considerable

  20. Animal–microbe interactions and the evolution of nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Animals ubiquitously interact with environmental and symbiotic microbes, and the effects of these interactions on animal physiology are currently the subject of intense interest. Nevertheless, the influence of microbes on nervous system evolution has been largely ignored. We illustrate here how taking microbes into account might enrich our ideas about the evolution of nervous systems. For example, microbes are involved in animals' communicative, defensive, predatory and dispersal behaviours, and have likely influenced the evolution of chemo- and photosensory systems. In addition, we speculate that the need to regulate interactions with microbes at the epithelial surface may have contributed to the evolutionary internalization of the nervous system. PMID:26598731

  1. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Orrea Solano, M

    1993-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of the chronic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are reviewed. SLE-CNS dysfunction is broadly divided into neurologic and psychiatric clinical categories. The distinct clinical entities within these broad categories are fully described. Diagnostic criteria employed to verify the presence of SLE-CNS dysfunction, including laboratory serum and cerebral spinal fluid analyses as well as radiologic and other multimodality diagnostic tools, are compared and contrasted with respect to sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Sympathetic neural modulation of the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    One route by which the central nervous system communicates with lymphoid organs in the periphery is through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To study SNS regulation of immune activity in vivo, selective removal of peripheral noradrenergic nerve fibers was achieved by administration of the neurotoxic drug, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), to adult mice. To assess SNS influence on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, uptake of {sup 125}iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}IUdR), a DNA precursor, was measured following 6-OHDA treatment. Sympathectomy prior to epicutaneous immunization with TNCB did not alter draining lymph nodes (LN) cell proliferation, whereas 6-OHDA treatment before footpad immunization with KLH reduced DNA synthesis in popliteal LN by 50%. In mice which were not deliberately immunized, sympathectomy stimulated {sup 125}IUdR uptake inguinal and axillary LN, spleen, and bone marrow. In vitro, these LN and spleen cells exhibited decreased proliferation responses to the T cell mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A), whereas lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IgG secretion was enhanced. Studies examining {sup 51}Cr-labeled lymphocyte trafficking to LN suggested that altered cell migration may play a part in sympathectomy-induced changes in LN cell function.

  3. Immunological Barriers to Stem Cell Therapy in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Tullis, Gregory E.; Kirk, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system is vulnerable to many neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease that result in the extensive loss of neuronal cells. Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into many types of cells, which make them ideal for treating such disorders. Although stem cell therapy has shown some promising results in animal models for many brain disorders it has yet to translate into the clinic. A major hurdle to the translation of stem cell therapy into the clinic is the immune response faced by stem cell transplants. Here, we focus on immunological and related hurdles to stem cell therapies for central nervous system disorders. PMID:25165476

  4. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  5. Evolution of eumetazoan nervous systems: insights from cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Kelava, Iva; Rentzsch, Fabian; Technau, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, have a simple diffuse nervous system. This morphological simplicity and their phylogenetic position make them a crucial group in the study of the evolution of the nervous system. The development of their nervous systems is of particular interest, as by uncovering the genetic programme that underlies it, and comparing it with the bilaterian developmental programme, it is possible to make assumptions about the genes and processes involved in the development of ancestral nervous systems. Recent advances in sequencing methods, genetic interference techniques and transgenic technology have enabled us to get a first glimpse into the molecular network underlying the development of a cnidarian nervous system—in particular the nervous system of the anthozoan Nematostella vectensis. It appears that much of the genetic network of the nervous system development is partly conserved between cnidarians and bilaterians, with Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, and Sox genes playing a crucial part in the differentiation of neurons. However, cnidarians possess some specific characteristics, and further studies are necessary to elucidate the full regulatory network. The work on cnidarian neurogenesis further accentuates the need to study non-model organisms in order to gain insights into processes that shaped present-day lineages during the course of evolution. PMID:26554048

  6. Strategies for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Dwibhashyam, V. S. N. M.; Nagappa, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Treating central nervous system diseases is very challenging because of the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles that impede drug delivery. Physiological barriers like the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier as well as various efflux transporter proteins make the entry of drugs into the central nervous system very difficult. The present review provides a brief account of the blood brain barrier, the P-glycoprotein efflux and various strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:20046703

  7. Disseminated encephalomyelitis-like central nervous system neoplasm in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhui; Bao, Xinhua; Fu, Na; Ye, Jintang; Li, Ting; Yuan, Yun; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2014-08-01

    A malignant neoplasm in the central nervous system with diffuse white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rare in children. It could be misdiagnosed as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. This report presents our experience based on 4 patients (3 male, 1 female; aged 7-13 years) whose MRI showed diffuse lesions in white matter and who were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. All of the patients received corticosteroid therapy. After brain biopsy, the patients were diagnosed with gliomatosis cerebri, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central nervous system lymphoma. We also provide literature reviews and discuss the differentiation of central nervous system neoplasm from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  8. Pharmacotherapy for Adults with Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Schor, Nina F.

    2009-01-01

    Tumors of the adult central nervous system are among the most common and most chemoresistant neoplasms. Malignant tumors of the brain and spinal cord collectively account for approximately 1.3% of all cancers and 2.2% of all cancer-related deaths. Novel pharmacological approaches to nervous system tumors are urgently needed. This review presents the current approaches and challenges to successful pharmacotherapy of adults with malignant tumors of the central nervous system and discusses novel approaches aimed at overcoming these challenges. PMID:19091301

  9. Reorganization of the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G; Zäch, G A

    2000-10-01

    The key strategies on which the discovery of the functional organization of the central nervous system (CNS) under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions have been based included (1) our measurements of phase and frequency coordination between the firings of alpha- and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents in the human spinal cord, (2) knowledge on CNS reorganization derived upon the improvement of the functions of the lesioned CNS in our patients in the short-term memory and the long-term memory (reorganization), and (3) the dynamic pattern approach for re-learning rhythmic coordinated behavior. The theory of self-organization and pattern formation in nonequilibrium systems is explicitly related to our measurements of the natural firing patterns of sets of identified single neurons in the human spinal premotor network and re-learned coordinated movements following spinal cord and brain lesions. Therapy induced cell proliferation, and maybe, neurogenesis seem to contribute to the host of structural changes during the process of re-learning of the lesioned CNS. So far, coordinated functions like movements could substantially be improved in every of the more than 100 patients with a CNS lesion by applying coordination dynamic therapy. As suggested by the data of our patients on re-learning, the human CNS seems to have a second integrative strategy for learning, re-learning, storing and recalling, which makes an essential contribution of the functional plasticity following a CNS lesion. A method has been developed by us for the simultaneous recording with wire electrodes of extracellular action potentials from single human afferent and efferent nerve fibres of undamaged sacral nerve roots. A classification scheme of the nerve fibres in the human peripheral nervous system (PNS) could be set up in which the individual classes of nerve fibres are characterized by group conduction velocities and group nerve fibre diameters. Natural impulse patterns

  10. Neural circuit recording from an intact cockroach nervous system.

    PubMed

    Titlow, Josh S; Majeed, Zana R; Hartman, H Bernard; Burns, Ellen; Cooper, Robin L

    2013-11-04

    The cockroach ventral nerve cord preparation is a tractable system for neuroethology experiments, neural network modeling, and testing the physiological effects of insecticides. This article describes the scope of cockroach sensory modalities that can be used to assay how an insect nervous system responds to environmental perturbations. Emphasis here is on the escape behavior mediated by cerci to giant fiber transmission in Periplaneta americana. This in situ preparation requires only moderate dissecting skill and electrophysiological expertise to generate reproducible recordings of neuronal activity. Peptides or other chemical reagents can then be applied directly to the nervous system in solution with the physiological saline. Insecticides could also be administered prior to dissection and the escape circuit can serve as a proxy for the excitable state of the central nervous system. In this context the assays described herein would also be useful to researchers interested in limb regeneration and the evolution of nervous system development for which P. americana is an established model organism.

  11. Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... Information Page NINDS Epilepsy Information Page NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page ...

  12. [Microglial cells and development of the embryonic central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Legendre, Pascal; Le Corronc, Hervé

    2014-02-01

    Microglia cells are the macrophages of the central nervous system with a crucial function in the homeostasis of the adult brain. However, recent studies showed that microglial cells may also have important functions during early embryonic central nervous system development. In this review we summarize recent works on the extra embryonic origin of microglia, their progenitor niche, the pattern of their invasion of the embryonic central nervous system and on interactions between embryonic microglia and their local environment during invasion. We describe microglial functions during development of embryonic neuronal networks, including their roles in neurogenesis, in angiogenesis and developmental cell death. These recent discoveries open a new field of research on the functions of neural-microglial interactions during the development of the embryonic central nervous system.

  13. Central Nervous System Infections in Patients with Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    both patients had bacteremia with identical microorganisms as isolated from CSF ( Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus...multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii central nervous system infections with intraventricular or intrathecal colistin: case series and literature review. J

  14. Complex Homology and the Evolution of Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the complex evolution of animal nervous systems and discuss the ramifications of this complexity for inferring the nature of early animals. Although reconstructing the origins of nervous systems remains a central challenge in biology, and the phenotypic complexity of early animals remains controversial, a compelling picture is emerging. We now know that the nervous system and other key animal innovations contain a large degree of homoplasy, at least on the molecular level. Conflicting hypotheses about early nervous system evolution are due primarily to differences in the interpretation of this homoplasy. We highlight the need for explicit discussion of assumptions and discuss the limitations of current approaches for inferring ancient phenotypic states. PMID:26746806

  15. The sympathetic nervous system alterations in human hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-03-13

    Several articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as promoters and amplifiers of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in 2 increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves.

  16. Review: Glial lineages and myelination in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    COMPSTON, ALASTAIR; ZAJICEK, JOHN; SUSSMAN, JON; WEBB, ANNA; HALL, GILLIAN; MUIR, DAVID; SHAW, CHRISTOPHER; WOOD, ANDREW; SCOLDING, NEIL

    1997-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, derived from stem cell precursors which arise in subventricular zones of the developing central nervous system, have as their specialist role the synthesis and maintenance of myelin. Astrocytes contribute to the cellular architecture of the central nervous system and act as a source of growth factors and cytokines; microglia are bone-marrow derived macrophages which function as primary immunocompetent cells in the central nervous system. Myelination depends on the establishment of stable relationships between each differentiated oligodendrocyte and short segments of several neighbouring axons. There is growing evidence, especially from studies of glial cell implantation, that oligodendrocyte precursors persist in the adult nervous system and provide a limited capacity for the restoration of structure and function in myelinated pathways damaged by injury or disease. PMID:9061442

  17. Improving and Accelerating Drug Development for Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Altevogt, Bruce M.; Dunlop, John; Gage, Fred H.; Hyman, Steve E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences have placed the field in the position where it is poised to significantly reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. However, drug discovery, development and translation for nervous system disorders still pose many unique challenges. The key scientific challenges can be summarized as follows: mechanisms of disease, target identification and validation, predictive models, biomarkers for patient stratification and as endpoints for clinical trials, clear regulatory pathways, reliability and reproducibility of published data, and data sharing and collaboration. To accelerate nervous system drug development the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders has hosted a series of public workshops that brought together representatives of industry, government (including both research funding and regulatory agencies), academia, and patient groups to discuss these challenges and offer potential strategies to improve the translational neuroscience. PMID:25442933

  18. Source characterization of nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients in healthcare wastewaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anti-depressants and opioids, are important clinically administered pharmaceuticals within healthcare facilities. Concentrations and mass loadings of ten nervous system APIs and three nervous system API metaboli...

  19. Introduction to 'Origin and evolution of the nervous system'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2015-12-19

    In 1665, Robert Hooke demonstrated in Micrographia the power of the microscope and comparative observations, one of which revealed similarities between the arthropod and vertebrate eyes. Utilizing comparative observations, Saint-Hilaire in 1822 was the first to propose that the ventral nervous system of arthropods corresponds to the dorsal nervous system of vertebrates. Since then, studies on the origin and evolution of the nervous system have become inseparable from studies about Metazoan origins and the origins of organ systems. The advent of genome sequence data and, in turn, phylogenomics and phylogenetics have refined cladistics and expanded our understanding of Metazoan phylogeny. However, the origin and evolution of the nervous system is still obscure and many questions and problems remain. A recurrent problem is whether and to what extent sequence data provide reliable guidance for comparisons across phyla. Are genetic data congruent with the geological fossil records? How can we reconcile evolved character loss with phylogenomic records? And how informative are genetic data in relation to the specification of nervous system morphologies? These provide some of the background and context for a Royal Society meeting to discuss new data and concepts that might achieve insights into the origin and evolution of brains and nervous systems.

  20. Uropharmacology: X. Central nervous system stimulants and depressants.

    PubMed

    Bissada, N K; Finkbeiner, A E; Welch, L T

    1979-04-01

    Several drugs that are utilized primarily for their effects on the central nervous system also affect lower urinary tract function. Most of these effects are produced by the action of these drugs on adrenergic and cholinergic receptors or by direct action of lower urinary tract musculature. Central nervous system stimulants and depressants which are known to affect the storage or evacuation role of the lower urinary tract are discussed.

  1. Sympathetic Nervous System, Hypertension, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seravalle, Gino; Grassi, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have clearly shown the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. This short review will be aimed at focusing and discussing the new information collected on two specific clinical conditions such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. The paper will briefly describe the four main mechanisms that represent the common link between these two pathophysiological conditions and that through the sympathetic nervous system contribute to increase the cardiovascular risk.

  2. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  3. Differential responses of components of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter conveys several concepts and points of view about the scientific and medical significance of differential alterations in activities of components of the autonomic nervous system in stress and disease. The use of terms such as "the autonomic nervous system," "autonomic failure," "dysautonomia," and "autonomic dysfunction" imply the existence of a single entity; however, the autonomic nervous system has functionally and neurochemically distinctive components, which are reflected in differential responses to stressors and differential involvement in pathophysiologic states. One can conceptualize the autonomic nervous system as having at least five components: the sympathetic noradrenergic system, the sympathetic cholinergic system, the parasympathetic cholinergic system, the sympathetic adrenergic system, and the enteric nervous system. Evidence has accumulated for differential noradrenergic vs. adrenergic responses in various situations. The largest sympathetic adrenergic system responses are seen when the organism encounters stressors that pose a global or metabolic threat. Sympathetic noradrenergic system activation dominates the responses to orthostasis, moderate exercise, and exposure to cold, whereas sympathetic adrenergic system activation dominates those to glucoprivation and emotional distress. There seems to be at least as good a justification for the concept of coordinated adrenocortical-adrenomedullary responses as for coordinated adrenomedullary-sympathoneural responses in stress. Fainting reactions involve differential adrenomedullary hormonal vs. sympathetic noradrenergic activation. Parkinson disease entails relatively selective dysfunction of the sympathetic noradrenergic system, with prominent loss of noradrenergic nerves in the heart, yet normal adrenomedullary function. Allostatic load links stress with degenerative diseases, and Parkinson disease may be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load.

  4. Global research priorities for infections that affect the nervous system.

    PubMed

    John, Chandy C; Carabin, Hélène; Montano, Silvia M; Bangirana, Paul; Zunt, Joseph R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2015-11-19

    Infections that cause significant nervous system morbidity globally include viral (for example, HIV, rabies, Japanese encephalitis virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus and chikungunya virus), bacterial (for example, tuberculosis, syphilis, bacterial meningitis and sepsis), fungal (for example, cryptococcal meningitis) and parasitic (for example, malaria, neurocysticercosis, neuroschistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths) infections. The neurological, cognitive, behavioural or mental health problems caused by the infections probably affect millions of children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. However, precise estimates of morbidity are lacking for most infections, and there is limited information on the pathogenesis of nervous system injury in these infections. Key research priorities for infection-related nervous system morbidity include accurate estimates of disease burden; point-of-care assays for infection diagnosis; improved tools for the assessment of neurological, cognitive and mental health impairment; vaccines and other interventions for preventing infections; improved understanding of the pathogenesis of nervous system disease in these infections; more effective methods to treat and prevent nervous system sequelae; operations research to implement known effective interventions; and improved methods of rehabilitation. Research in these areas, accompanied by efforts to implement promising technologies and therapies, could substantially decrease the morbidity and mortality of infections affecting the nervous system in low- and middle-income countries.

  5. The glia of the adult Drosophila nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Malte C.; Jung, Christophe; Batelli, Sara; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2017-01-01

    Glia play crucial roles in the development and homeostasis of the nervous system. While the GLIA in the Drosophila embryo have been well characterized, their study in the adult nervous system has been limited. Here, we present a detailed description of the glia in the adult nervous system, based on the analysis of some 500 glial drivers we identified within a collection of synthetic GAL4 lines. We find that glia make up ∼10% of the cells in the nervous system and envelop all compartments of neurons (soma, dendrites, axons) as well as the nervous system as a whole. Our morphological analysis suggests a set of simple rules governing the morphogenesis of glia and their interactions with other cells. All glial subtypes minimize contact with their glial neighbors but maximize their contact with neurons and adapt their macromorphology and micromorphology to the neuronal entities they envelop. Finally, glial cells show no obvious spatial organization or registration with neuronal entities. Our detailed description of all glial subtypes and their regional specializations, together with the powerful genetic toolkit we provide, will facilitate the functional analysis of glia in the mature nervous system. GLIA 2017 GLIA 2017;65:606–638 PMID:28133822

  6. Holothurian Nervous System Diversity Revealed by Neuroanatomical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Lázaro-Peña, María I.; Vázquez-Figueroa, Lionel D.; Díaz-Balzac, Roberto J.; García-Arrarás, José E.

    2016-01-01

    The Echinodermata comprise an interesting branch in the phylogenetic tree of deuterostomes. Their radial symmetry which is reflected in their nervous system anatomy makes them a target of interest in the study of nervous system evolution. Until recently, the study of the echinoderm nervous system has been hindered by a shortage of neuronal markers. However, in recent years several markers of neuronal and fiber subpopulations have been described. These have been used to identify subpopulations of neurons and fibers, but an integrative study of the anatomical relationship of these subpopulations is wanting. We have now used eight commercial antibodies, together with three antibodies produced by our group to provide a comprehensive and integrated description and new details of the echinoderm neuroanatomy using the holothurian Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) as our model system. Immunoreactivity of the markers used showed: (1) specific labeling patterns by markers in the radial nerve cords, which suggest the presence of specific nerve tracts in holothurians. (2) Nerves directly innervate most muscle fibers in the longitudinal muscles. (3) Similar to other deuterostomes (mainly vertebrates), their enteric nervous system is composed of a large and diverse repertoire of neurons and fiber phenotypes. Our results provide a first blueprint of the anatomical organization of cells and fibers that form the holothurian neural circuitry, and highlight the fact that the echinoderm nervous system shows unexpected diversity in cell and fiber types and their distribution in both central and peripheral nervous components. PMID:26987052

  7. Global research priorities for infections that affect the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Carabin, Hélène; Montano, Silvia M.; Bangirana, Paul; Zunt, Joseph R.; Peterson, Phillip K.

    2015-01-01

    Infections that cause significant nervous system morbidity globally include viral (for example, HIV, rabies, Japanese encephalitis virus, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus and chikungunya virus), bacterial (for example, tuberculosis, syphilis, bacterial meningitis and sepsis), fungal (for example, cryptococcal meningitis) and parasitic (for example, malaria, neurocysticercosis, neuroschistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths) infections. The neurological, cognitive, behavioural or mental health problems caused by the infections probably affect millions of children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. However, precise estimates of morbidity are lacking for most infections, and there is limited information on the pathogenesis of nervous system injury in these infections. Key research priorities for infection-related nervous system morbidity include accurate estimates of disease burden; point-of-care assays for infection diagnosis; improved tools for the assessment of neurological, cognitive and mental health impairment; vaccines and other interventions for preventing infections; improved understanding of the pathogenesis of nervous system disease in these infections; more effective methods to treat and prevent nervous system sequelae; operations research to implement known effective interventions; and improved methods of rehabilitation. Research in these areas, accompanied by efforts to implement promising technologies and therapies, could substantially decrease the morbidity and mortality of infections affecting the nervous system in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26580325

  8. Holothurian Nervous System Diversity Revealed by Neuroanatomical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A; Lázaro-Peña, María I; Vázquez-Figueroa, Lionel D; Díaz-Balzac, Roberto J; García-Arrarás, José E

    2016-01-01

    The Echinodermata comprise an interesting branch in the phylogenetic tree of deuterostomes. Their radial symmetry which is reflected in their nervous system anatomy makes them a target of interest in the study of nervous system evolution. Until recently, the study of the echinoderm nervous system has been hindered by a shortage of neuronal markers. However, in recent years several markers of neuronal and fiber subpopulations have been described. These have been used to identify subpopulations of neurons and fibers, but an integrative study of the anatomical relationship of these subpopulations is wanting. We have now used eight commercial antibodies, together with three antibodies produced by our group to provide a comprehensive and integrated description and new details of the echinoderm neuroanatomy using the holothurian Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) as our model system. Immunoreactivity of the markers used showed: (1) specific labeling patterns by markers in the radial nerve cords, which suggest the presence of specific nerve tracts in holothurians. (2) Nerves directly innervate most muscle fibers in the longitudinal muscles. (3) Similar to other deuterostomes (mainly vertebrates), their enteric nervous system is composed of a large and diverse repertoire of neurons and fiber phenotypes. Our results provide a first blueprint of the anatomical organization of cells and fibers that form the holothurian neural circuitry, and highlight the fact that the echinoderm nervous system shows unexpected diversity in cell and fiber types and their distribution in both central and peripheral nervous components.

  9. TH1/TH2 cytokines in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sredni-Kenigsbuch, Dvora

    2002-06-01

    For the past 20 years it has become increasingly evident that cytokines play an important role in both the normal development of the brain, acting as neurotrophic factors, and in brain injuries. Although cytokines and their receptors are synthesized and expressed in the brain (normally at low levels), increased cytokine production levels are now associated with various neurological disorders. T lymphocytes are the cells responsible for coordinating the immune response and a major source of cytokines. Different cytokines induce different subsets of T cells or have different effects on proliferation within a particular subset. Recent studies suggest that the immune response is in fact regulated by the balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines. These two pathways are often mutually exclusive, the one resulting in protection and the other in progression of disease. Various studies describe the function and production of proinflammatory cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) and their role in health and disease. Inflammation is upregulated following activation of Th1 cells, whereas Th2 cells may play a significant role in downregulating Th1 proinflammatory responses in those instances in which there is overproduction of Th2 cytokines. Although both Th1 and Th2 cytokines may influence CNS functioning, most studies have so far dealt with proinflammatory cytokines, probably because they directly affect CNS cells and are thought to be implicated in CNS pathology. It is of interest that endogenous glucocorticoids also control Th1-Th2 balance, favoring Th2 cell development. This review presents the evidence that cytokines have important functions in the CNS, both during development and as a part of brain pathology. In particular, the author highlighted recent work that supports a major role for the so-called inflammatory cytokines, Th1, and the anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines.

  10. Role of the autonomic nervous system in rat liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cunshuan; Zhang, Xinsheng; Wang, Gaiping; Chang, Cuifang; Zhang, Lianxing; Cheng, Qiuyan; Lu, Ailing

    2011-05-01

    To study the regulatory role of autonomic nervous system in rat regenerating liver, surgical operations of rat partial hepatectomy (PH) and its operation control (OC), sympathectomy combining partial hepatectomy (SPH), vagotomy combining partial hepatectomy (VPH), and total liver denervation combining partial hepatectomy (TDPH) were performed, then expression profiles of regenerating livers at 2 h after operation were detected using Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. It was shown that the expressions of 97 genes in OC, 230 genes in PH, 253 genes in SPH, 187 genes in VPH, and 177 genes in TDPH were significantly changed in biology. The relevance analysis showed that in SPH, genes involved in stimulus response, immunity response, amino acids and K(+) transport, amino acid catabolism, cell adhesion, cell proliferation mediated by JAK-STAT, Ca(+), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor, cell growth and differentiation through JAK-STAT were up-regulated, while the genes involved in chromatin assembly and disassembly, and cell apoptosis mediated by MAPK were down-regulated. In VPH, the genes associated with chromosome modification-related transcription factor, oxygen transport, and cell apoptosis mediated by MAPK pathway were up-regulated, but the genes associated with amino acid catabolism, histone acetylation-related transcription factor, and cell differentiation mediated by Wnt pathway were down-regulated. In TDPH, the genes related to immunity response, growth and development of regenerating liver, cell growth by MAPK pathway were up-regulated. Our data suggested that splanchnic and vagal nerves could regulate the expressions of liver regeneration-related genes.

  11. [Necrotizing systemic sarcoidosis with pulmonary and central nervous system involvement].

    PubMed

    Ríos Fernández, R; Callejas-Rubio, J L; Guerrero Fernández, M; Serrano Falcón, M M; Ortego-Centeno, N

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease which diagnosis depends on the presence of nonnecrotizing granulomas in the biopsy. However there are variants such as necrotizing sarcoidal granulomas or nodular sarcoidosis which have atypical findings and make difficult the differential diagnosis with other infectious processes. We describe a case of a man who develops granulomas with extensive necrosis in a systemic sarcoidosis that affected the lung and the central nervous system. This finding made us to make the diagnosis of tuberculosis and delay the specific treatment.

  12. STIM and ORAI proteins in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stromal interaction molecules (STIM) 1 and 2 are sensors of the calcium concentration in the endoplasmic reticulum. Depletion of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores activates STIM proteins which, in turn, bind and open calcium channels in the plasma membrane formed by the proteins ORAI1, ORAI2, and ORAI3. The resulting store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), mostly controlled by the principal components STIM1 and ORAI1, has been particularly characterized in immune cells. In the nervous system, all STIM and ORAI homologs are expressed. This review summarizes current knowledge on distribution and function of STIM and ORAI proteins in central neurons and glial cells, i.e. astrocytes and microglia. STIM2 is required for SOCE in hippocampal synapses and cortical neurons, whereas STIM1 controls calcium store replenishment in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In microglia, STIM1, STIM2, and ORAI1 regulate migration and phagocytosis. The isoforms ORAI2 and ORAI3 are candidates for SOCE channels in neurons and astrocytes, respectively. Due to the role of SOCE in neuronal and glial calcium homeostasis, dysfunction of STIM and ORAI proteins may have consequences for the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26218135

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antiretrovirals in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    HIV-positive patients may be effectively treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy and such a strategy is associated with striking immune recovery and viral load reduction to very low levels. Despite undeniable results, the central nervous system (CNS) is commonly affected during the course of HIV infection, with neurocognitive disorders being as prevalent as 20-50 % of treated subjects. This review discusses the pathophysiology of CNS infection by HIV and the barriers to efficacious control of such a mechanism, including the available data on compartmental drug penetration and on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. In the reviewed articles, a high variability in drug transfer to the CNS is highlighted with several mechanisms as well as methodological issues potentially influencing the observed results. Nevirapine and zidovudine showed the highest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to plasma ratios, although target concentrations are currently unknown for the CNS. The use of the composite CSF concentration effectiveness score has been associated with better virological outcomes (lower HIV RNA) but has been inconsistently associated with neurocognitive outcomes. These findings support the CNS effectiveness of commonly used highly antiretroviral therapies. The use of antiretroviral drugs with increased CSF penetration and/or effectiveness in treating or preventing neurocognitive disorders however needs to be assessed in well-designed prospective studies.

  14. HCV-related central and peripheral nervous system demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered.

  15. Prolactin: Friend or Foe in Central Nervous System Autoimmune Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta

    2016-01-01

    The higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) in females, along with the modulation of disease activity observed during pregnancy and the post-partum period, has suggested a hormonal influence in MS. Even if prolactin (PRL) does not belong to the sex hormones family, its crucial role in female reproduction and lactation has prompted great efforts to understand if PRL could represent a gender factor in the pathogenesis of MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for this disease. Extensive literature has documented a remarkable immune-stimulating potential for this hormone, indicating PRL as a disease-promoting factor in MS and EAE. However, recent work has pointed out that PRL is endowed with important neuroprotective and remyelinating properties and has encouraged a reinterpretation of the involvement of this hormone in MS. In this review we summarize both the protective functions that PRL exerts in central nervous system tissue as well as the inflammatory activity of this hormone in the context of autoimmune responses against myelin. Last, we draw future lines of research that might help to better clarify the impact of PRL on MS pathology. PMID:27918427

  16. HCV-Related Central and Peripheral Nervous System Demyelinating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Monaco, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with a large spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs), mostly immunologic/rheumatologic in nature owing to B-cell proliferation and clonal expansion. Neurological complications are thought to be immune-mediated or secondary to invasion of neural tissues by HCV, as postulated in transverse myelitis and encephalopathic forms. Primarily axonal neuropathies, including sensorimotor polyneuropathy, large or small fiber sensory neuropathy, motor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, or overlapping syndrome, represent the most common neurological complications of chronic HCV infection. In addition, a number of peripheral demyelinating disorders are encountered, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, the Lewis-Sumner syndrome, and cryoglobulin-associated polyneuropathy with demyelinating features. The spectrum of demyelinating forms also includes rare cases of iatrogenic central and peripheral nervous system disorders, occurring during treatment with pegylated interferon. Herein, we review HCV-related demyelinating conditions, and disclose the novel observation on the significantly increased frequency of chronic demyelinating neuropathy with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies in a cohort of 59 consecutive patients recruited at our institution. We also report a second case of neuromyelitis optica with serum IgG autoantibody against the water channel aquaporin-4. The prompt recognition of these atypical and underestimated complications of HCV infection is of crucial importance in deciding which treatment option a patient should be offered. PMID:25198705

  17. Reactions of the nervous system to magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholodov, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    This magnetobiological survey considers sensory, nervous, stress and genetic effects of magnetic fields on man and animals. It is shown that the nervous system plays an important role in the reactions of the organism to magnetic fields; the final biological effect is a function of the strength of the magnetic fields, the gradient, direction of the lines of force, duration and location of the action, and the functional status of the organism.

  18. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  19. Prion Disease and the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Barry M.; Mabbott, Neil A.

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a unique category of infectious protein-misfolding neurodegenerative disorders. Hypothesized to be caused by misfolding of the cellular prion protein these disorders possess an infectious quality that thrives in immune-competent hosts. While much has been discovered about the routing and critical components involved in the peripheral pathogenesis of these agents there are still many aspects to be discovered. Research into this area has been extensive as it represents a major target for therapeutic intervention within this group of diseases. The main focus of pathological damage in these diseases occurs within the central nervous system. Cells of the innate immune system have been proven to be critical players in the initial pathogenesis of prion disease, and may have a role in the pathological progression of disease. Understanding how prions interact with the host innate immune system may provide us with natural pathways and mechanisms to combat these diseases prior to their neuroinvasive stage. We present here a review of the current knowledge regarding the role of the innate immune system in prion pathogenesis. PMID:23342365

  20. Designing and Implementing Nervous System Simulations on LEGO Robots

    PubMed Central

    Blustein, Daniel; Rosenthal, Nikolai; Ayers, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to use the commercially available LEGO Mindstorms NXT robotics platform to test systems level neuroscience hypotheses. The first step of the method is to develop a nervous system simulation of specific reflexive behaviors of an appropriate model organism; here we use the American Lobster. Exteroceptive reflexes mediated by decussating (crossing) neural connections can explain an animal's taxis towards or away from a stimulus as described by Braitenberg and are particularly well suited for investigation using the NXT platform.1 The nervous system simulation is programmed using LabVIEW software on the LEGO Mindstorms platform. Once the nervous system is tuned properly, behavioral experiments are run on the robot and on the animal under identical environmental conditions. By controlling the sensory milieu experienced by the specimens, differences in behavioral outputs can be observed. These differences may point to specific deficiencies in the nervous system model and serve to inform the iteration of the model for the particular behavior under study. This method allows for the experimental manipulation of electronic nervous systems and serves as a way to explore neuroscience hypotheses specifically regarding the neurophysiological basis of simple innate reflexive behaviors. The LEGO Mindstorms NXT kit provides an affordable and efficient platform on which to test preliminary biomimetic robot control schemes. The approach is also well suited for the high school classroom to serve as the foundation for a hands-on inquiry-based biorobotics curriculum. PMID:23728477

  1. Marine Pharmacology in 2000: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune, and Nervous Systems and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    During 2000 research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals involved investigators from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Phillipines, Singapore, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current review, a sequel to the authors’ 1998 and 1999 reviews, classifies 68 peer-reviewed articles on the basis of the reported preclinical pharmacologic properties of marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi, and bacteria. Antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antituberculosis, or antiviral activity was reported for 35 marine chemicals. An additional 20 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous system, and to possess anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant properties. Finally, 23 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus could potentially contribute to several pharmacologic classes. Thus, as in 1998 and 1999, during 2000 pharmacologic research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads to the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents in the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:14583811

  2. The immune self: a selectionist theory of recognition, learning, and remembering within the immune system.

    PubMed

    Kradin, R L

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, I have briefly explored metaphors shared by the immune and nervous systems and shown that this exercise can lead to the elucidation of common principles of organization, as well as to predictions concerning how the immune system functions. Metaphor itself undoubtedly reflects the way in which we categorize and retrieve information 44], so it is not surprising that the deep processes of language tend to sample information from related data categories. Although the nervous and immune systems are obviously not the same and metaphors are indeed just that, my primary goal has been to suggest that by virtue of their having evolved in parallel over millions of years, the nervous and immune systems currently use the same archetypal principles and strategies to address related challenges in information processing and retrieval. Ultimately, nature is conservative. One need only look at a tree, a river, the airways, or the vascular bed in order to see how a fractal pattern of repetitive dichotomous branching has been used by each, in order to optimize the transport of fluids over large distances [45]. While each system has had to adopt different materials in order to solve the problem, the shape of their solutions is remarkably alike. In the immune and nervous systems, the elements used to produce optimal functional responses are also quite different, but again the solutions have been achieved by comparable strategies. I am certain that these two great systems of information processing, each responding with vastly different kinetics, will prove to be far more integrally interdependent than has been previously recognized. For example, should a swift response by the immune system be required in an overwhelming invasion by microbial pathogens, the immune system may be able to cooperate with the rapidly reacting nervous system to rid the host of the invaders. In this regard, we have shown that the beta-adrenergic hormone epinephrine rapidly increases the traffic of

  3. Immunotherapy for cancer in the central nervous system: Current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Binder, David C; Davis, Andrew A; Wainwright, Derek A

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and still remains incurable. Although immunotherapeutic vaccination against GBM has demonstrated immune-stimulating activity with some promising survival benefits, tumor relapse is common, highlighting the need for additional and/or combinatorial approaches. Recently, antibodies targeting immune checkpoints were demonstrated to generate impressive clinical responses against advanced melanoma and other malignancies, in addition to showing potential for enhancing vaccination and radiotherapy (RT). Here, we summarize the current knowledge of central nervous system (CNS) immunosuppression, evaluate past and current immunotherapeutic trials and discuss promising future immunotherapeutic directions to treat CNS-localized malignancies.

  4. The function of NOD-like receptors in central nervous system diseases.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangxi; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2016-12-28

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are critical cytoplasmic pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that play an important role in the host innate immune response and immunity homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that NLRs are involved in a wide range of inflammatory diseases, including cancer, metabolic diseases, and autoimmune disorders. Recent studies have indicated that the proteins of the NLR family are linked with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS), and psychological diseases. In this review, we mainly focus on the role of NLRs and the underlying signaling pathways in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Immunotherapy for cancer in the central nervous system: Current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Binder, David C.; Davis, Andrew A.; Wainwright, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and still remains incurable. Although immunotherapeutic vaccination against GBM has demonstrated immune-stimulating activity with some promising survival benefits, tumor relapse is common, highlighting the need for additional and/or combinatorial approaches. Recently, antibodies targeting immune checkpoints were demonstrated to generate impressive clinical responses against advanced melanoma and other malignancies, in addition to showing potential for enhancing vaccination and radiotherapy (RT). Here, we summarize the current knowledge of central nervous system (CNS) immunosuppression, evaluate past and current immunotherapeutic trials and discuss promising future immunotherapeutic directions to treat CNS-localized malignancies. PMID:27057463

  6. 3D printed nervous system on a chip.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Lancaster, Karen Z; Hogue, Ian B; Meng, Fanben; Kong, Yong Lin; Enquist, Lynn W; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-04-21

    Bioinspired organ-level in vitro platforms are emerging as effective technologies for fundamental research, drug discovery, and personalized healthcare. In particular, models for nervous system research are especially important, due to the complexity of neurological phenomena and challenges associated with developing targeted treatment of neurological disorders. Here we introduce an additive manufacturing-based approach in the form of a bioinspired, customizable 3D printed nervous system on a chip (3DNSC) for the study of viral infection in the nervous system. Micro-extrusion 3D printing strategies enabled the assembly of biomimetic scaffold components (microchannels and compartmented chambers) for the alignment of axonal networks and spatial organization of cellular components. Physiologically relevant studies of nervous system infection using the multiscale biomimetic device demonstrated the functionality of the in vitro platform. We found that Schwann cells participate in axon-to-cell viral spread but appear refractory to infection, exhibiting a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.4 genomes per cell. These results suggest that 3D printing is a valuable approach for the prototyping of a customized model nervous system on a chip technology.

  7. 3D Printed Nervous System on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blake N.; Lancaster, Karen Z.; Hogue, Ian B.; Meng, Fanben; Kong, Yong Lin; Enquist, Lynn W.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bioinspired organ-level in vitro platforms are emerging as effective technologies for fundamental research, drug discovery, and personalized healthcare. In particular, models for nervous system research are especially important, due to the complexity of neurological phenomena and challenges associated with developing targeted treatment of neurological disorders. Here we introduce an additive manufacturing-based approach in the form of a bioinspired, customizable 3D printed nervous system on a chip (3DNSC) for the study of viral infection in the nervous system. Micro-extrusion 3D printing strategies enabled the assembly of biomimetic scaffold components (microchannels and compartmented chambers) for the alignment of axonal networks and spatial organization of cellular components. Physiologically relevant studies of nervous system infection using the multiscale biomimetic device demonstrated the functionality of the in vitro platform. We found that Schwann cells participate in axon-to-cell viral spread but appear refractory to infection, exhibiting a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.4 genomes per cell. These results suggest that 3D printing is a valuable approach for the prototyping of a customized model nervous system on a chip technology. PMID:26669842

  8. Monophyletic Origin of the Metazoan Nervous System: Characterizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Russell; Beckenbach, Andrew

    In the absence of additional cases to be studied, our understanding of the likelihood of intelligent life evolving elsewhere in the universe must be framed within the context of the evolution of intelligence on this planet. Towards this end a valid model of the evolution of animal life, and in particular of the nervous system, is key. Models which describe the development of complexity within the nervous system can be positively misleading if they are not grounded in an accurate model of the true relationships of the animal phyla. If fact the evolution of animal life at its earliest stages, from protists to the sponges, Cnidaria, and Ctenophora and onward to the bilateral animal phyla is poorly characterized. Recently numerous phylogenies of the early animal radiation have been published based upon DNA sequence data, with conflicting and poorly supported results. A polyphyletic origin for the animal nervous system has been implied by the results of several studies, which would lead to the conclusion that some characteristics of the nervous systems of higher and lower animals could be convergent. We show that an equally parsimonious interpretation of the molecular sequence data published thus far is that it reflects rapid speciation events early in animal evolution among the classical ``diploblast'' phyla, as well as accelerated DNA sequence divergence among the higher animals. This could be interpreted as support for a classical phylogeny of the animal kingdom, and thus of a strictly monophyletic origin for the nervous system.

  9. Evolution of flatworm central nervous systems: Insights from polyclads

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Sigmer Y.; Carolina Bonilla, E.; Marcela Bolaños, D.; Carbayo, Fernando; Litvaitis, Marian K.; Brown, Federico D.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous systems of flatworms have diversified extensively as a consequence of the broad range of adaptations in the group. Here we examined the central nervous system (CNS) of 12 species of polyclad flatworms belonging to 11 different families by morphological and histological studies. These comparisons revealed that the overall organization and architecture of polyclad central nervous systems can be classified into three categories (I, II, and III) based on the presence of globuli cell masses -ganglion cells of granular appearance-, the cross-sectional shape of the main nerve cords, and the tissue type surrounding the nerve cords. In addition, four different cell types were identified in polyclad brains based on location and size. We also characterize the serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous systems in the cotylean Boninia divae by immunocytochemistry. Although both neurotransmitters were broadly expressed, expression of serotonin was particularly strong in the sucker, whereas FMRFamide was particularly strong in the pharynx. Finally, we test some of the major hypothesized trends during the evolution of the CNS in the phylum by a character state reconstruction based on current understanding of the nervous system across different species of Platyhelminthes and on up-to-date molecular phylogenies. PMID:26500427

  10. Nongenomic Actions of Adrenal Steroids in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Evanson, Nathan K.; Herman, James P.; Sakai, Randall R.; Krause, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are released by the adrenal cortex in response to stress and hydromineral imbalance. Historically, adrenocorticosteroid actions are attributed to effects on gene transcription. More recently, however, it has become clear that genome-independent pathways represent an important facet of adrenal steroid actions. These hormones exert nongenomic effects throughout the body, but a significant portion of their actions are specific to the central nervous system. These actions are mediated by a variety of signalling pathways, and lead to physiologically meaningful events in vitro and in vivo. Here we review nongenomic effects of adrenal steroids in the central nervous system at the levels of behaviour, neural system activity, individual neurone activity, and subcellular signalling activity. A clearer understanding of adrenal steroid activity in the central nervous system will lead to a better ability both to treat human disease, and to reduce side-effects of steroid treatments already in use. PMID:20367759

  11. The alpha-herpesviruses: molecular pathfinders in nervous system circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrand, Mats I.; Enquist, L.W.; Pomeranz, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Several neuroinvasive viruses can be used to study the mammalian nervous system. In particular, infection by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an α-herpesvirus with broad host range, reveals chains of functionally connected neurons in the nervous systems of a variety of mammals. The specificity of PRV trans-neuronal spread has been established in several systems. One attenuated strain, PRV-Bartha, causes a reduced inflammatory response and also spreads only from infected post- to pre-synaptic neurons. We review the basics of PRV tracing and then discuss new developments and novel approaches that have enabled a more detailed understanding of the architecture of the nervous system. As questions and techniques evolve in the field of neuroscience, advances in PRV tracing will certainly follow. PMID:18280208

  12. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF−/−) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF−/− mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection. PMID:28280495

  13. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF(-/-)) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF(-/-) mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection.

  14. Manganese Homeostasis in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica MB; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25982296

  15. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C.; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine–immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic–pituitary–immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic–pituitary–immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine–immune

  16. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine-immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine-immune network.

  17. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  18. CCL2, but not its receptor, is essential to restrict immune privileged central nervous system-invasion of Japanese encephalitis virus via regulating accumulation of CD11b(+) Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a re-emerging zoonotic flavivirus that poses an increasing threat to global health and welfare due to rapid changes in climate and demography. Although the CCR2-CCL2 axis plays an important role in trafficking CD11b(+) Ly-6C(hi) monocytes to regulate immunopathological diseases, little is known about their role in monocyte trafficking during viral encephalitis caused by JEV infection. Here, we explored the role of CCR2 and its ligand CCL2 in JE caused by JEV infection using CCR2- and CCL2-ablated murine models. Somewhat surprisingly, the ablation of CCR2 and CCL2 resulted in starkly contrasting susceptibility to JE. CCR2 ablation induced enhanced resistance to JE, whereas CCL2 ablation highly increased susceptibility to JE. This contrasting regulation of JE progression by CCR2 and CCL2 was coupled to central nervous system (CNS) infiltration of Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and Ly-6G(hi) granulocytes. There was also enhanced expression of CC and CXC chemokines in the CNS of CCL2-ablated mice, which appeared to induce CNS infiltration of these cell populations. However, our data revealed that contrasting regulation of JE in CCR2- and CCL2-ablated mice was unlikely to be mediated by innate natural killer and adaptive T-cell responses. Furthermore, CCL2 produced by haematopoietic stem cell-derived leucocytes played a dominant role in CNS accumulation of Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in infected bone marrow chimeric models, thereby exacerbating JE progression. Collectively, our data indicate that CCL2 plays an essential role in conferring protection against JE caused by JEV infection. In addition, blockage of CCR2, but not CCL2, will aid in the development of strategies for prophylactics and therapeutics of JE.

  19. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  20. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD.

  1. Spatiotemporal development of the embryonic nervous system of Saccoglossus kowalevskii.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Doreen; Casey, Elena Silva

    2014-02-01

    Defining the organization and temporal onset of key steps in neurogenesis in invertebrate deuterostomes is critical to understand the evolution of the bilaterian and deuterostome nervous systems. Although recent studies have revealed the organization of the nervous system in adult hemichordates, little attention has been paid to neurogenesis during embryonic development in this third major phylum of deuterostomes. We examine the early events of neural development in the enteropneust hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii by analyzing the expression of 11 orthologs of key genes associated with neurogenesis in an expansive range of bilaterians. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) and RT-PCR, we follow the course of neural development to track the transition of the early embryonic diffuse nervous system to the more regionalized midline nervous system of the adult. We show that in Saccoglossus, neural progenitor markers are expressed maternally and broadly encircle the developing embryo. An increase in their expression and the onset of pan neural markers, indicate that neural specification occurs in late blastulae - early gastrulae. By mid-gastrulation, punctate expression of markers of differentiating neurons encircling the embryo indicate the presence of immature neurons, and at the end of gastrulation when the embryo begins to elongate, markers of mature neurons are expressed. At this stage, expression of a subset of neuronal markers is concentrated along the trunk ventral and dorsal midlines. These data indicate that the diffuse embryonic nervous system of Saccoglossus is transient and quickly reorganizes before hatching to resemble the adult regionalized, centralized nervous system. This regionalization occurs at a much earlier developmental stage than anticipated indicating that centralization is not linked in S. kowalevskii to a lifestyle change of a swimming larva metamorphosing to a crawling worm-like adult.

  2. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  3. Neuroinflammation of the central and peripheral nervous system: an update.

    PubMed

    Stüve, O; Zettl, U

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory disorders of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) are common, and contribute substantially to physical and emotional disability of affected individuals. Often, the afflicted are young and in their active years. In the past, physicians and scientists often had very little to offer in terms of diagnostic precision and therapeutic effectiveness. During the past two decades, both of these relative shortcomings have clearly improved. Some of the recent developments in clinical neuroimmunology are illustrated in this special edition of Clinical and Experimental Immunology.

  4. Herpes virus infection of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Among the human herpes viruses, three are neurotropic and capable of producing severe neurological abnormalities: herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Both the acute, primary infection and the reactivation from the site of latent infection, the dorsal sensory ganglia, are associated with severe human morbidity and mortality. The peripheral nervous system is one of the major loci affected by these viruses. The present review details the virology and molecular biology underlying the human infection. This is followed by detailed description of the symtomatology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, course, therapy, and prognosis of disorders of the peripheral nervous system caused by these viruses.

  5. Benefits and risks of folic acid to the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E

    2002-01-01

    During three decades of neurological practice I have witnessed a remarkable change in attitudes to the benefits and risks of folic acid therapy in nervous system disorders. In the 1960s all that was known and taught was that folic acid was harmful to the nervous system, especially in precipitating or exacerbating the neurological complications of vitamin B12 deficiency. So deeply held was this view that the possibility of neuropsychological benefits from this vitamin was initially viewed with considerable scepticism.1 PMID:11971038

  6. Novel RNA modifications in the nervous system: form and function.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, John S; Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Blanco, Sandra; Li, Jin Billy; Meyer, Kate; Pollock, Jonathan; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka

    2014-11-12

    Modified RNA molecules have recently been shown to regulate nervous system functions. This mini-review and associated mini-symposium provide an overview of the types and known functions of novel modified RNAs in the nervous system, including covalently modified RNAs, edited RNAs, and circular RNAs. We discuss basic molecular mechanisms involving RNA modifications as well as the impact of modified RNAs and their regulation on neuronal processes and disorders, including neural fate specification, intellectual disability, neurodegeneration, dopamine neuron function, and substance use disorders.

  7. Brain-computer interface after nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Burns, Alexis; Adeli, Hojjat; Buford, John A

    2014-12-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) has proven to be a useful tool for providing alternative communication and mobility to patients suffering from nervous system injury. BCI has been and will continue to be implemented into rehabilitation practices for more interactive and speedy neurological recovery. The most exciting BCI technology is evolving to provide therapeutic benefits by inducing cortical reorganization via neuronal plasticity. This article presents a state-of-the-art review of BCI technology used after nervous system injuries, specifically: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, and disorders of consciousness. Also presented is transcending, innovative research involving new treatment of neurological disorders.

  8. Neuroinflammation of the central and peripheral nervous system: an update

    PubMed Central

    Stüve, O; Zettl, U

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory disorders of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) are common, and contribute substantially to physical and emotional disability of affected individuals. Often, the afflicted are young and in their active years. In the past, physicians and scientists often had very little to offer in terms of diagnostic precision and therapeutic effectiveness. During the past two decades, both of these relative shortcomings have clearly improved. Some of the recent developments in clinical neuroimmunology are illustrated in this special edition of Clinical and Experimental Immunology. PMID:24384012

  9. IL-10-dependent Tr1 cells attenuate astrocyte activation and ameliorate chronic central nervous system inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lior; Cunha, Andre Pires Da; Madi, Asaf; Beynon, Vanessa; Yang, Zhiping; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Prat, Alexandre; Sobel, Raymond A.; Kobzik, Lester; Lassmann, Hans; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    See Winger and Zamvil (doi:10.1093/brain/aww121) for a scientific commentary on this article. The innate immune system plays a central role in the chronic central nervous system inflammation that drives neurological disability in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, for which there are no effective treatments. The mucosal immune system is a unique tolerogenic organ that provides a physiological approach for the induction of regulatory T cells. Here we report that nasal administration of CD3-specific antibody ameliorates disease in a progressive animal model of multiple sclerosis. This effect is IL-10-dependent and is mediated by the induction of regulatory T cells that share a similar transcriptional profile to Tr1 regulatory cells and that suppress the astrocyte inflammatory transcriptional program. Treatment results in an attenuated inflammatory milieu in the central nervous system, decreased microglia activation, reduced recruitment of peripheral monocytes, stabilization of the blood–brain barrier and less neurodegeneration. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis and potentially other types of chronic central nervous system inflammation. PMID:27246324

  10. Autoantibodies in traumatic brain injury and central nervous system trauma.

    PubMed

    Raad, M; Nohra, E; Chams, N; Itani, M; Talih, F; Mondello, S; Kobeissy, F

    2014-12-05

    Despite the debilitating consequences and the widespread prevalence of brain trauma insults including spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), there are currently few effective therapies for most of brain trauma sequelae. As a consequence, there has been a major quest for identifying better diagnostic tools, predictive models, and directed neurotherapeutic strategies in assessing brain trauma. Among the hallmark features of brain injury pathology is the central nervous systems' (CNS) abnormal activation of the immune response post-injury. Of interest, is the occurrence of autoantibodies which are produced following CNS trauma-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and released into peripheral circulation mounted against self-brain-specific proteins acting as autoantigens. Recently, autoantibodies have been proposed as the new generation class of biomarkers due to their long-term presence in serum compared to their counterpart antigens. The diagnostic and prognostic value of several existing autoantibodies is currently being actively studied. Furthermore, the degree of direct and latent contribution of autoantibodies to CNS insult is still not fully characterized. It is being suggested that there may be an analogy of CNS autoantibodies secretion with the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, in which case, understanding and defining the role of autoantibodies in brain injury paradigm (SCI and TBI) may provide a realistic prospect for the development of effective neurotherapy. In this work, we will discuss the accumulating evidence about the appearance of autoantibodies following brain injury insults. Furthermore, we will provide perspectives on their potential roles as pathological components and as candidate markers for detecting and assessing CNS injury.

  11. Persisting Rickettsia typhi Causes Fatal Central Nervous System Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Stefanie; Moderzynski, Kristin; Kuehl, Svenja; Richardt, Ulricke; Fleischer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsioses are emerging febrile diseases caused by obligate intracellular bacteria belonging to the family Rickettsiaceae. Rickettsia typhi belongs to the typhus group (TG) of this family and is the causative agent of endemic typhus, a disease that can be fatal. In the present study, we analyzed the course of R. typhi infection in C57BL/6 RAG1−/− mice. Although these mice lack adaptive immunity, they developed only mild and temporary symptoms of disease and survived R. typhi infection for a long period of time. To our surprise, 3 to 4 months after infection, C57BL/6 RAG1−/− mice suddenly developed lethal neurological disorders. Analysis of these mice at the time of death revealed high bacterial loads, predominantly in the brain. This was accompanied by a massive expansion of microglia and by neuronal cell death. Furthermore, high numbers of infiltrating CD11b+ macrophages were detectable in the brain. In contrast to the microglia, these cells harbored R. typhi and showed an inflammatory phenotype, as indicated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, which was not observed in the periphery. Having shown that R. typhi persists in immunocompromised mice, we finally asked whether the bacteria are also able to persist in resistant C57BL/6 and BALB/c wild-type mice. Indeed, R. typhi could be recultivated from lung, spleen, and brain tissues from both strains even up to 1 year after infection. This is the first report demonstrating persistence and reappearance of R. typhi, mainly restricted to the central nervous system in immunocompromised mice. PMID:26975992

  12. Exosome-mediated inflammasome signaling after central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Brand, Frank; Adamczak, Stephanie; Lee, Stephanie W; Perez-Barcena, Jon; Wang, Michael Y; Bullock, M Ross; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a response against harmful effects of diverse stimuli and participates in the pathogenesis of brain and spinal cord injury (SCI). The innate immune response plays a role in neuroinflammation following CNS injury via activation of multiprotein complexes termed inflammasomes that regulate the activation of caspase 1 and the processing of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. We report here that the expression of components of the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor protein-1 (NLRP-1) inflammasome, apoptosis speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase 1 are significantly elevated in spinal cord motor neurons and cortical neurons after CNS trauma. Moreover, NLRP1 inflammasome proteins are present in exosomes derived from CSF of SCI and traumatic brain-injured patients following trauma. To investigate whether exosomes could be used to therapeutically block inflammasome activation in the CNS, exosomes were isolated from embryonic cortical neuronal cultures and loaded with short-interfering RNA (siRNA) against ASC and administered to spinal cord-injured animals. Neuronal-derived exosomes crossed the injured blood-spinal cord barrier, and delivered their cargo in vivo, resulting in knockdown of ASC protein levels by approximately 76% when compared to SCI rats treated with scrambled siRNA. Surprisingly, siRNA silencing of ASC also led to a significant decrease in caspase 1 activation and processing of IL-1β after SCI. These findings indicate that exosome-mediated siRNA delivery may be a strong candidate to block inflammasome activation following CNS injury. We propose the following signaling cascade for inflammasome activation in peripheral tissues after CNS injury: CNS trauma induces inflammasome activation in the nervous system and secretion of exosomes containing inflammasome protein cargo into cerebral spinal fluid. The inflammasome containing exosomes then fuse with target

  13. Modelling of pathologies of the nervous system by the example of computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilov, V. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Syryamkin, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper puts forward principles of action of devices operating similarly to the nervous system and the brain of biological systems. We propose an alternative method of studying diseases of the nervous system, which may significantly influence prevention, medical treatment, or at least retardation of development of these diseases. This alternative is to use computational and electronic models of the nervous system. Within this approach, we represent the brain in the form of a huge electrical circuit composed of active units, namely, neuron-like units and connections between them. As a result, we created computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems, which are based on the principles of functioning of biological nervous systems that we have put forward. Our models demonstrate reactions to external stimuli and their change similarly to the behavior of simplest biological organisms. The models possess the ability of self-training and retraining in real time without human intervention and switching operation/training modes. In our models, training and memorization take place constantly under the influence of stimuli on the organism. Training is without any interruption and switching operation modes. Training and formation of new reflexes occur by means of formation of new connections between excited neurons, between which formation of connections is physically possible. Connections are formed without external influence. They are formed under the influence of local causes. Connections are formed between outputs and inputs of two neurons, when the difference between output and input potentials of excited neurons exceeds a value sufficient to form a new connection. On these grounds, we suggest that the proposed principles truly reflect mechanisms of functioning of biological nervous systems and the brain. In order to confirm the correspondence of the proposed principles to biological nature, we carry out experiments for the study of processes of

  14. Modelling of pathologies of the nervous system by the example of computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shumilov, V. N. Syryamkin, V. I. Syryamkin, M. V.

    2015-11-17

    The paper puts forward principles of action of devices operating similarly to the nervous system and the brain of biological systems. We propose an alternative method of studying diseases of the nervous system, which may significantly influence prevention, medical treatment, or at least retardation of development of these diseases. This alternative is to use computational and electronic models of the nervous system. Within this approach, we represent the brain in the form of a huge electrical circuit composed of active units, namely, neuron-like units and connections between them. As a result, we created computational and electronic models of elementary nervous systems, which are based on the principles of functioning of biological nervous systems that we have put forward. Our models demonstrate reactions to external stimuli and their change similarly to the behavior of simplest biological organisms. The models possess the ability of self-training and retraining in real time without human intervention and switching operation/training modes. In our models, training and memorization take place constantly under the influence of stimuli on the organism. Training is without any interruption and switching operation modes. Training and formation of new reflexes occur by means of formation of new connections between excited neurons, between which formation of connections is physically possible. Connections are formed without external influence. They are formed under the influence of local causes. Connections are formed between outputs and inputs of two neurons, when the difference between output and input potentials of excited neurons exceeds a value sufficient to form a new connection. On these grounds, we suggest that the proposed principles truly reflect mechanisms of functioning of biological nervous systems and the brain. In order to confirm the correspondence of the proposed principles to biological nature, we carry out experiments for the study of processes of

  15. Systemic interleukin 12 displays anti-tumour activity in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Kishima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Miyao, Y.; Mabuchi, E.; Tamura, K.; Tamura, M.; Sasaki, M.; Hakakawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    In various systemic cancers, interleukin 12 (IL-12) induces anti-tumour immunity mediated by T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. To determine whether IL-12 has anti-tumour activity against malignant gliomas in the central nervous system (CNS), which is considered to be an immunologically privileged site, we treated mice with meningeal gliomatosis by intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration of recombinant murine IL-12. Although untreated mice revealed symptoms, such as body weight loss or paraplegia as a result of the meningeal gliomatosis within 8 days after tumour inoculation, 80% of the mice treated with IL-12 at 0.5 microg i.p. were cured. Many lymphocytes, mostly CD4+ and CD8+ cells, infiltrated to the tumours of IL-12-treated mice. The numbers of these cells increased in the cervical lymph nodes, into which the cerebrospinal fluid drains, and there they secreted a considerable amount of interferon-gamma. Mice cured by IL-12 rejected subcutaneous or i.t. rechallenge with their original glioma cells, but the same mice were not able to reject other syngeneic tumour cells. These results indicate that the immune system recognizes malignant glioma cells in the subarachnoid space of the CNS and that systemic IL-12 may produce effective anti-tumour activity and long-lasting tumour-specific immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9716025

  16. Overview of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Medina, Kay L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is designed to execute rapid, specific, and protective responses against foreign pathogens. To protect against the potentially harmful effects of autoreactive escapees that might arise during the course of the immune response, multiple tolerance checkpoints exist in both the primary and secondary lymphoid organs. Regardless, autoantibodies targeting neural antigens exist in multiple neurologic diseases. The goal of this introductory chapter is to provide a foundation of the major principles and components of the immune system as a framework to understanding autoimmunity and autoimmune neurologic disorders. A broad overview of: (1) innate mechanisms of immunity and their contribution in demyelinating diseases; (2) B and T lymphocytes as effector arms of the adaptive immune response and their contribution to the pathophysiology of neurologic diseases; and (3) emerging therapeutic modalities for treatment of autoimmune disease is provided.

  17. The renin-angiotensin system and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1977-04-01

    One of several factors affecting the secretion of renin by the kidneys is the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic input is excitatory and is mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the membranes of the juxtaglomerular cells. Stimulation of sympathetic areas in the medulla, midbrain and hypothalamus raises blood pressure and increases renin secretion, whereas stimulation of other parts of the hypothalamus decreases blood pressure and renin output. The centrally active alpha-adrenergic agonist clonidine decreases renin secretion, lowers blood pressure, inhibits ACTH and vasopressin secretion, and increases growth hormone secretion in dogs. The effects on ACTH and growth hormone are abolished by administration of phenoxybenzamine into the third ventricle, whereas the effect on blood pressure is abolished by administration of phenoxybenzamine in the fourth ventricle without any effect on the ACTH and growth hormone responses. Fourth ventricular phenoxybenzamine decreases but does not abolish the inhibitory effect of clonidine on renin secretion. Circulating angiotensin II acts on the brain via the area postrema to raise blood pressure and via the subfornical organ to increase water intake. Its effect on vasopressin secretion is debated. The brain contains a renin-like enzyme, converting enzyme, renin substrate, and angiotensin. There is debate about the nature and physiological significance of the angiotensin II-generating enzyme in the brain, and about the nature of the angiotensin I and angiotensin II that have been reported to be present in the central nervous system. However, injection of angiotensin II into the cerebral ventricles produces drinking, increased secretion of vasopressin and ACTH, and increased blood pressure. The same responses are produced by intraventricular renin. Angiotensin II also facilitates sympathetic discharge in the periphery, and the possibility that it exerts a similar action on the adrenergic neurons

  18. Immunocytochemical Detection of Acetylcholine in the Rat Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffard, M.; McRae-Degueurce, A.; Souan, Marie Laure

    1985-07-01

    A specific antibody to acetylcholine was raised and used as a marker for cholinergic neurons in the rat central nervous system. The acetylcholine conjugate was obtained by a two-step immunogen synthesis procedure. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to test the specificity and affinity of the antibody in vitro; the results indicated high affinity. A chemical perfusion mixture of allyl alcohol and glutaraldehyde was used to fix the acetylcholine in the nervous tissue. Peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry showed many acetylcholine-immunoreactive cells and fibers in sections from the medial septum region.

  19. Central nervous system blastomycosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, M Casey; Taylor, Susan M; Kerr, Moira E

    2009-09-01

    An adult golden retriever was presented for progressive neurologic dysfunction. Clinical examination suggested brainstem disease. Blastomycosis was diagnosed based on fine-needle aspiration cytology of a normal sized lymph node and a positive blastomycosis urine antigen test. Systemic blastomycosis with neurologic involvement was confirmed at necropsy.

  20. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Sexual Differentiation in the Mammalian Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Forger, Nancy G.; Strahan, J. Alex; Castillo-Ruiz, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientists are likely to discover new sex differences in the coming years, spurred by the National Institutes of Health initiative to include both sexes in preclinical studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying sex differences in the mammalian nervous system, based primarily on work in rodents. Cellular mechanisms examined include neurogenesis, migration, the differentiation of neurochemical and morphological cell phenotype, and cell death. At the molecular level we discuss evolving roles for epigenetics, sex chromosome complement, the immune system, and newly identified cell signaling pathways. We review recent findings on the role of the environment, as well as genome-wide studies with some surprising results, causing us to rethink often-used models of sexual differentiation. We end by pointing to future directions, including an increased awareness of the important contributions of tissues outside of the nervous system to sexual differentiation of the brain. PMID:26790970

  1. Brain Facts: A Primer on the Brain and Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Joseph, Ed.

    This booklet describes only a glimpse of what is known about the nervous system, brain disorders, and the exciting avenues of research that promise new therapies for many of the most devastating neurological and psychiatric diseases. The neuron, brain development, sensation and perception, learning and memory, movement, advances and challenges in…

  2. The Role of Central Nervous System Plasticity in Tinnitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus is a vexing disorder of hearing characterized by sound sensations originating in the head without any external stimulation. The specific etiology of these sensations is uncertain but frequently associated with hearing loss. The "neurophysiogical" model of tinnitus has enhanced appreciation of central nervous system (CNS) contributions.…

  3. Central Auditory Nervous System Dysfunction in Echolalic Autistic Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherby, Amy Miller; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The results showed that all the Ss had normal hearing on the monaural speech tests; however, there was indication of central auditory nervous system dysfunction in the language dominant hemisphere, inferred from the dichotic tests, for those Ss displaying echolalia. (Author)

  4. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  5. THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ALTERATIONS IN HUMAN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-01-01

    A number of articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as “promoters” and “amplifiers” of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in two increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  6. The Nervous System, Science (Experimental): 5363.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Alan; And Others

    This unit of instruction was designed as an intensive in-depth study of the nervous impulse, neurons, brain, spinal cord, and sensory organs. Also included is a study of the endocrine system in its role of maintaining homeostasis. The booklet lists the relevant state-adopted texts and states the performance objectives for the unit. It provides an…

  7. Aberrant nerve fibres within the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D

    1992-01-01

    Three cases of aberrant nerve fibres in the spinal cord and medulla oblongata are described. The literature on these fibres is discussed and their possible role in regeneration. Different views on the possibility of regeneration or functional recovery of the central nervous system are mentioned in the light of recent publications, which are more optimistic than before.

  8. Parasitic Central Nervous System Infections in Immunocompromised Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melanie; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Immunosuppression due to therapy after transplantation or associated with HIV infection increases susceptibility to various central nervous system (CNS) infections. This article discusses how immunosuppression modifies the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of selected parasitic CNS infections, with a focus on toxoplasmosis, Chagas disease, neurocysticercosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. PMID:15824993

  9. Nervous System Development and Pattern Preference in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Diana S.; Gerrity, Kathleen M.

    This study examined behavioral correlates of the rapid central nervous system changes occurring in the first 4 months of life. It was hypothesized that during the early months of infancy, visual preference would occur as a function of quantitative dimensions of the stimuli (size) which could be mediated at a subcortical level. It was further…

  10. Pediatric central nervous system infections and inflammatory white matter disease.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Mary T; Licht, Daniel J

    2005-08-01

    This article reviews the immunology of the central nervous system and the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of children with viral or parainfectious encephalitis. The emphasis is on the early recognition of treatable causes of viral encephalitis (herpes simplex virus), and the diagnosis and treatment of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis are described in detail. Laboratory and imaging findings in the two conditions also are described.

  11. Nodal signalling and asymmetry of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Signore, Iskra A; Palma, Karina; Concha, Miguel L

    2016-12-19

    The role of Nodal signalling in nervous system asymmetry is still poorly understood. Here, we review and discuss how asymmetric Nodal signalling controls the ontogeny of nervous system asymmetry using a comparative developmental perspective. A detailed analysis of asymmetry in ascidians and fishes reveals a critical context-dependency of Nodal function and emphasizes that bilaterally paired and midline-unpaired structures/organs behave as different entities. We propose a conceptual framework to dissect the developmental function of Nodal as asymmetry inducer and laterality modulator in the nervous system, which can be used to study other types of body and visceral organ asymmetries. Using insights from developmental biology, we also present novel evolutionary hypotheses on how Nodal led the evolution of directional asymmetry in the brain, with a particular focus on the epithalamus. We intend this paper to provide a synthesis on how Nodal signalling controls left-right asymmetry of the nervous system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  12. Nociception and role of immune system in pain.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Ahmed, Ahad S

    2015-09-01

    Both pain and inflammation are protective responses. However, these self-limiting conditions (with well-established negative feedback loops) become pathological if left uncontrolled. Both pain and inflammation can interact with each other in a multi-dimensional manner. These interactions are known to create an array of 'difficult to manage' pathologies. This review explains in detail the role of immune system and the related cells in peripheral sensitization and neurogenic inflammation. Various neuro-immune interactions are analyzed at peripheral, sensory and central nervous system levels. Innate immunity plays a critical role in central sensitization and in establishing acute pain as chronic condition. Moreover, inflammatory mediators also exhibit psychological effects, thus contributing towards the emotional elements associated with pain. However, there is also a considerable anti-inflammatory and analgesic role of immune system. This review also attempts to enlist various novel pharmacological approaches that exhibit their actions through modification of neuro-immune interface.

  13. Portable Immune-Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mishra, Saroj K.

    1995-01-01

    Portable immune-assessment system developed for use in rapidly identifying infections or contaminated environment. System combines few specific fluorescent reagents for identifying immune-cell dysfunction, toxic substances, buildup of microbial antigens or microbial growth, and potential identification of pathogenic microorganisms using fluorescent microplate reader linked to laptop computer. By using few specific dyes for cell metabolism, DNA/RNA conjugation, specific enzyme activity, or cell constituents, one makes immediate, onsite determination of person's health or of contamination of environment.

  14. The Nervous Systems of Basally Branching Nemertea (Palaeonemertea)

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Patrick; Loesel, Rudi; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of studies have been published dealing with the anatomy of the nervous system in different spiralian species. The only nemertean species investigated in this context probably shows derived characters and thus the conditions found there are not useful in inferring the relationship between nemerteans and other spiralian taxa. Ingroup relationships within Nemertea are still unclear, but there is some agreement that the palaeonemerteans form a basal, paraphyletic grade. Thus, palaeonemertean species are likely the most informative when comparing with other invertebrate groups. We therefore analyzed the nervous system of several palaeonemertean species by combining histology and immunostaining. 3D reconstructions based on the aligned slices were performed to get an overall impression of the central nervous system, and immunohistochemistry was chosen to reveal fine structures and to be able to compare the data with recently published results. The insights presented here permit a first attempt to reconstruct the primary organization of the nemertean nervous system. This comparative analysis allows substantiating homology hypotheses for nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This study also provides evidence that the nemertean brain primarily consists of two lobes connected by a strong ventral commissure and one to several dorsal commissures. During nemertean evolution, the brain underwent continuous compartmentalization into a pair of dorsal and ventral lobes interconnected by commissures and lateral tracts. Given that this conclusion can be corroborated by cladistic analyses, nemerteans should share a common ancestor with spiralians that primarily have a simple brain consisting of paired medullary, frontally commissurized and reinforced cords. Such an organization resembles the situation found in presumably basally branching annelids or mollusks. PMID:23785478

  15. [Radiation-induced tumors of the nervous system in man].

    PubMed

    Hubert, D; Bertin, M

    1993-11-01

    The risk of developing a tumor of the nervous system in humans is analysed in several studies of populations, exposed to ionising radiation for medical reasons, or exposed to military or occupational radiation. The main data come from series of patients who underwent radiotherapy during childhood: a high incidence of tumors of the nervous system is found after irradiation of one to a few grays as treatment of a benign disease (especially tinea capitis), as well as after irradiation at higher doses of a few tens of grays for the treatment of cancer (in particular cerebral irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia). The type of radiation-induced tumors is variable, but meningioma is more frequent after low doses and glioma and sarcoma after higher doses used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. A dose-effect relationship appeared between the risk of tumor of the nervous system and the radiation dose. The risk was higher when radiation was delivered at a younger age. Much less data are available after radiotherapy in the adulthood, but an increased risk of cerebral tumor appears in the series of ankylosing spondylitis patients. As for the exposures to radiodiagnosis exams, the main problem is the risk of cerebral tumor in children whose mother has undergone abdominal or pelvic X-rays during pregnancy. No risk of neurologic tumor was found in the A-bomb survivors irradiated at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation has been incriminated in the first radiologists exposed to high doses. In nuclear industry workers, the results of epidemiological studies are contradictory and at the present time it is not possible to link their radiologic exposure with a risk of tumor of the nervous system. In populations living near nuclear plants, mortality due to tumors of the nervous system was not increased.

  16. The nervous systems of basally branching nemertea (palaeonemertea).

    PubMed

    Beckers, Patrick; Loesel, Rudi; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of studies have been published dealing with the anatomy of the nervous system in different spiralian species. The only nemertean species investigated in this context probably shows derived characters and thus the conditions found there are not useful in inferring the relationship between nemerteans and other spiralian taxa. Ingroup relationships within Nemertea are still unclear, but there is some agreement that the palaeonemerteans form a basal, paraphyletic grade. Thus, palaeonemertean species are likely the most informative when comparing with other invertebrate groups. We therefore analyzed the nervous system of several palaeonemertean species by combining histology and immunostaining. 3D reconstructions based on the aligned slices were performed to get an overall impression of the central nervous system, and immunohistochemistry was chosen to reveal fine structures and to be able to compare the data with recently published results. The insights presented here permit a first attempt to reconstruct the primary organization of the nemertean nervous system. This comparative analysis allows substantiating homology hypotheses for nerves of the peripheral nervous system. This study also provides evidence that the nemertean brain primarily consists of two lobes connected by a strong ventral commissure and one to several dorsal commissures. During nemertean evolution, the brain underwent continuous compartmentalization into a pair of dorsal and ventral lobes interconnected by commissures and lateral tracts. Given that this conclusion can be corroborated by cladistic analyses, nemerteans should share a common ancestor with spiralians that primarily have a simple brain consisting of paired medullary, frontally commissurized and reinforced cords. Such an organization resembles the situation found in presumably basally branching annelids or mollusks.

  17. Cystatins in Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Magister, Špela; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins comprise a large superfamily of related proteins with diverse biological activities. They were initially characterised as inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases, however, in recent years some alternative functions for cystatins have been proposed. Cystatins possessing inhibitory function are members of three families, family I (stefins), family II (cystatins) and family III (kininogens). Stefin A is often linked to neoplastic changes in epithelium while another family I cystatin, stefin B is supposed to have a specific role in neuredegenerative diseases. Cystatin C, a typical type II cystatin, is expressed in a variety of human tissues and cells. On the other hand, expression of other type II cystatins is more specific. Cystatin F is an endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor, selectively expressed in immune cells, suggesting its role in processes related to immune response. Our recent work points on its role in regulation of dendritic cell maturation and in natural killer cells functional inactivation that may enhance tumor survival. Cystatin E/M expression is mainly restricted to the epithelia of the skin which emphasizes its prominent role in cutaneous biology. Here, we review the current knowledge on type I (stefins A and B) and type II cystatins (cystatins C, F and E/M) in pathologies, with particular emphasis on their suppressive vs. promotional function in the tumorigenesis and metastasis. We proposed that an imbalance between cathepsins and cystatins may attenuate immune cell functions and facilitate tumor cell invasion. PMID:23386904

  18. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  19. [The liver and the immune system].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2015-07-26

    The liver is known to be the metabolic centre of the organism and is under the control of the central nervous system. It has a peculiar tissue structure and its anatomic localisation defines it as part of the immune system having an individual role in the defence of the organism. The determinant of its particular tissue build-up is the sinusoid system. In addition to hepatocytes, one cell row "endothelium", stellate cells close to the external surface, Kupffer cells tightly to its inner surface, as well as dendritic cells and other cell types (T and B lymphocytes, natural killer and natural killer T-cells, mast cells, granulocytes) are present. The multitudes and variety of cells make it possible to carry out the tasks according to the assignment of the organism. The liver is a member of the immune system having immune cells largely in an activated state. Its principal tasks are the assurance of the peripheral immune tolerance of the organism with the help of the haemopoetic cells and transforming growth factor-β. The liver takes part in the determination of the manner of the non-specific immune response of the organism. In addition to acute phase reaction of the organism, the liver has a role in the adaptive/specific immune response. These functions include retardation of the T and B lymphocytes and the defence against harmful pathogens. With the collaboration of transforming growth factor-β, immunoglobulins and their subclasses are inhibited just as the response of the T lymphocytes. The only exception is the undisturbed immunoglobulin A production. Particularly important is the intensive participation of the liver in the acute phase reaction of the organism, which is organised and guided by the coordinated functions of the cortico-hypothalamo-hypophysis-adrenal axis. Beside cellular elements, hormones, adhesion molecules, chemokines and cytokines are also involved in the cooperation with the organs. Acute phase reactants play a central role in these processes

  20. Heterotopic ossification after central nervous system trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M. P.; Torres, S. J.; Mehta, S.; Ahn, J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) is a disorder of aberrant bone formation affecting one in five patients sustaining a spinal cord injury or traumatic brain injury. Ectopic bone forms around joints in characteristic patterns, causing pain and limiting movement especially around the hip and elbow. Clinical sequelae of neurogenic heterotopic ossification include urinary tract infection, pressure injuries, pneumonia and poor hygiene, making early diagnosis and treatment clinically compelling. However, diagnosis remains difficult with more investigation needed. Our pathophysiological understanding stems from mechanisms of basic bone formation enhanced by evidence of systemic influences from circulating humor factors and perhaps neurological ones. This increasing understanding guides our implementation of current prophylaxis and treatment including the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and surgery and, importantly, should direct future, more effective ones. PMID:23610702

  1. Fine-tuning the central nervous system: microglial modelling of cells and synapses.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Anna L; Menezes, João R L; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-10-19

    Microglia constitute as much as 10-15% of all cells in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and are the only glial cells that do not arise from the neuroectoderm. As the principal CNS immune cells, microglial cells represent the first line of defence in response to exogenous threats. Past studies have largely been dedicated to defining the complex immune functions of microglial cells. However, our understanding of the roles of microglia has expanded radically over the past years. It is now clear that microglia are critically involved in shaping neural circuits in both the developing and adult CNS, and in modulating synaptic transmission in the adult brain. Intriguingly, microglial cells appear to use the same sets of tools, including cytokine and chemokine release as well as phagocytosis, whether modulating neural function or mediating the brain's innate immune responses. This review will discuss recent developments that have broadened our views of neuro-glial signalling to include the contribution of microglial cells.

  2. Fighting the Monster: Applying the Host Damage Framework to Human Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Panackal, Anil A.; Williamson, Kim C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Boulware, David R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The host damage-response framework states that microbial pathogenesis is a product of microbial virulence factors and collateral damage from host immune responses. Immune-mediated host damage is particularly important within the size-restricted central nervous system (CNS), where immune responses may exacerbate cerebral edema and neurological damage, leading to coma and death. In this review, we compare human host and therapeutic responses in representative nonviral generalized CNS infections that induce archetypal host damage responses: cryptococcal menigoencephalitis and tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, pneumococcal meningitis, and cerebral malaria. Consideration of the underlying patterns of host responses provides critical insights into host damage and may suggest tailored adjunctive therapeutics to improve disease outcome. PMID:26814182

  3. Molecular clocks and the early evolution of metazoan nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    The timing of early animal evolution remains poorly resolved, yet remains critical for understanding nervous system evolution. Methods for estimating divergence times from sequence data have improved considerably, providing a more refined understanding of key divergences. The best molecular estimates point to the origin of metazoans and bilaterians tens to hundreds of millions of years earlier than their first appearances in the fossil record. Both the molecular and fossil records are compatible, however, with the possibility of tiny, unskeletonized, low energy budget animals during the Proterozoic that had planktonic, benthic, or meiofaunal lifestyles. Such animals would likely have had relatively simple nervous systems equipped primarily to detect food, avoid inhospitable environments and locate mates. The appearance of the first macropredators during the Cambrian would have changed the selective landscape dramatically, likely driving the evolution of complex sense organs, sophisticated sensory processing systems, and diverse effector systems involved in capturing prey and avoiding predation. PMID:26554040

  4. Molecular clocks and the early evolution of metazoan nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Wray, Gregory A

    2015-12-19

    The timing of early animal evolution remains poorly resolved, yet remains critical for understanding nervous system evolution. Methods for estimating divergence times from sequence data have improved considerably, providing a more refined understanding of key divergences. The best molecular estimates point to the origin of metazoans and bilaterians tens to hundreds of millions of years earlier than their first appearances in the fossil record. Both the molecular and fossil records are compatible, however, with the possibility of tiny, unskeletonized, low energy budget animals during the Proterozoic that had planktonic, benthic, or meiofaunal lifestyles. Such animals would likely have had relatively simple nervous systems equipped primarily to detect food, avoid inhospitable environments and locate mates. The appearance of the first macropredators during the Cambrian would have changed the selective landscape dramatically, likely driving the evolution of complex sense organs, sophisticated sensory processing systems, and diverse effector systems involved in capturing prey and avoiding predation.

  5. Quest for the basic plan of nervous system circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    The basic plan of nervous system organization has been investigated since classical antiquity. The first model centered on pneumas pumped from sensory nerves through the ventricular system and out motor nerves to muscles. It was popular well into the seventeenth century and diverted attention from the organization of brain parenchyma itself. Willis focused on gray matter production and white matter conduction of pneumas in 1664, and by the late nineteenth century a clear cellular model of nervous system organization based on sensory, motor, and association neuron classes transmitting nerve impulses was elaborated by Cajal and his contemporaries. Today, revolutionary advances in experimental pathway tracing methods, molecular genetics, and computer science inspire systems neuroscience. Seven minimal requirements are outlined for knowledge management systems capable of describing, analyzing, and modeling the basic plan of nervous system circuitry in general, and the plan evolved for vertebrates, for mammals, and ultimately for humans in particular. The goal remains a relatively simple, easy to understand model analogous to the one Harvey elaborated in 1628 for circulation in the cardiovascular system. As Cajal wrote in 1909, “To extend our understanding of neural function to the most complex human physiological and psychological activities, it is essential that we first generate a clear and accurate view of the structure of the relevant centers, and of the human brain itself, so that the basic plan—the overview—can be grasped in the blink of an eye.” PMID:17267046

  6. Quest for the basic plan of nervous system circuitry.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Larry W

    2007-10-01

    The basic plan of nervous system organization has been investigated since classical antiquity. The first model centered on pneumas pumped from sensory nerves through the ventricular system and out motor nerves to muscles. It was popular well into the 17th century and diverted attention from the organization of brain parenchyma itself. Willis focused on gray matter production and white matter conduction of pneumas in 1664, and by the late 19th century a clear cellular model of nervous system organization based on sensory, motor, and association neuron classes transmitting nerve impulses was elaborated by Cajal and his contemporaries. Today, revolutionary advances in experimental pathway tracing methods, molecular genetics, and computer science inspire systems neuroscience. Seven minimal requirements are outlined for knowledge management systems capable of describing, analyzing, and modeling the basic plan of nervous system circuitry in general, and the plan evolved for vertebrates, for mammals, and ultimately for humans in particular. The goal remains a relatively simple, easy to understand model analogous to the one Harvey elaborated in 1628 for blood circulation in the cardiovascular system. As Cajal wrote in 1909, "To extend our understanding of neural function to the most complex human physiological and psychological activities, it is essential that we first generate a clear and accurate view of the structure of the relevant centers, and of the human brain itself, so that the basic plan--the overview--can be grasped in the blink of an eye."

  7. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  8. [VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS AND DISEASES OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VESSELS].

    PubMed

    Kazanova, A S; Lavrov, V F; Zverev, V V

    2015-01-01

    Systemized data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of VZV-vasculopathy--a disease, occurring due to damage of arteries of the central nervous system by Varicella Zoster virus, are presented in the review. A special attention in the paper is given to the effect of vaccine prophylaxis of chicken pox and herpes zoster on the frequency of development and course of VZV-vasculopathy.

  9. Central nervous system involvement of polyarteritis nodosa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Altinok, D; Yildiz, Y T; Ruşen, E; Eryilmaz, M; Tacal, T

    2001-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotizing vasculitis involving small and medium-sized arteries and it affects multiple organ systems in the body Central nervous system (CNS) involvement appears less frequently, and usually develops after the disease is established. Although aneurysms are common in visceral arteries in PAN, intracranial aneurysms are uncommon and have been documented rarely. This case is reported to raise awareness among radiologists as it has characteristic and rare, if not specific, imaging findings of CNS involvement of PAN.

  10. Functional structure and dynamics of the human nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of an effort to define the directions needed to take in extending pilot models is reported. These models are needed to perform closed-loop (man-in-the-loop) feedback flight control system designs and to develop cockpit display requirements. The approach taken is to develop a hypothetical working model of the human nervous system by reviewing the current literature in neurology and psychology and to develop a computer model of this hypothetical working model.

  11. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  12. [Psychoneuroimmunology--regulation of immunity at the systemic level].

    PubMed

    Boranić, Milivoj; Sabioncello, Ante; Gabrilovac, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Innate and acquired immune reactions are controlled by their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, ie. by an array of cytokines that mediate communication among cells of the immune system itself and with other cells and tissues, e. g. in areas of inflammation. In addition, the immune system is also subjected to systemic regulation by the vegetative and endocrine systems since immune cells express receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones. Neuroendocrine signals may enhance or suppress the immune reaction, accelerate or slow it, but do not affect specificity. Various stressful factors, including the psychosocial ones, affect immunity. In turn, cytokines generated by the immune system influence hormonal secretion and central nervous system, producing specific behavioral changes (the "sickness behavior") accompanying infectious and inflammatory diseases. That includes somnolence, loss of apetite, depression or anxiety and decrease of cognitive abilities, attention and memory. Local immune systems in skin and mucosa are also subjected to systemic neuroendocrine regulation and possess intrinsic neuroregulatory networks as well. These mechanisms render skin and respiratory and digestive tracts responsive to various forms of stress. Examples are neurodermitis, asthma and ulcerative colitis. In children, the immune and the neuroendocrine systems are still developing, particularly in fetal, neonatal and early infant periods, and exposure to stressful experiences at that time may result in late consequences in the form of deficient immunity or greater risks for allergic or autoimmune reactions. Recognition of the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms in regulation of immunity helps us understand alterations and disturbances of immune reactions under the influence of stressful factors but so far has not produced reliable therapeutic implications. Psychosocial interventions involving the child and its family may be useful.

  13. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-05

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  14. Pharmacologic action of oseltamivir on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ishii, K; Hamamoto, H; Sasaki, T; Ikegaya, Y; Yamatsugu, K; Kanai, M; Shibasaki, M; Sekimizu, K

    2008-02-01

    Oseltamivir, an antiviral drug used for the treatment of influenza, contains the L-glutamic acid motif in its chemical structure. We focused on this structural characteristic of oseltamivir and examined the pharmacologic effects of the drug on the nervous system in invertebrate and vertebrate animal models. Injection of oseltamivir or L-glutamic acid into silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae induced muscle relaxation. Oseltamivir and L-glutamic acid inhibited kainate-induced rapid muscle contraction, but neither drug affected insect cytokine paralytic peptide-induced slow muscle contraction. In the mammalian system, mice (Mus musculus) treated intracerebrally with oseltamivir developed convulsive seizures. Hydrolyzed oseltamivir, the active form containing a carboxylic acid, evoked epileptiform firing of hippocampal neurons in rat (Rattus norvegicus) organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. These results are the first to demonstrate that oseltamivir exerts pharmacologic effects on the nervous system in insects and mammals.

  15. [Pleasure, pain and affectivity in the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Houdart, R

    1999-01-01

    Affectivity plays an essential role in human life. It gives life its quality, and is responsible for what human beings have always considered to be main endeavor happiness. Still, looking for its description or organisation, in physiology or neurology, treatises is fruitless; there only one of its components is described pain, with no mention of pleasure. We wish to show, here, first, that pain and pleasure, depend of a same function, of which they are, of sorts, both extremities, and which in nothing but the most primitive function of the nervous system, and secondly, that this function in one of the components of an "affectivity center", which has its organisation in the limbic system. This center, integrating all the informations that arrives to the nervous system, triggers to each of them neuro-vegetative and neuro-hormonal informations that are "felt" by the organism, and thus transforms the information in a subjective feeling.

  16. Vulnerable periods and processes during central nervous system development.

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, P M

    1994-01-01

    The developing central nervous system (CNS) is the organ system most frequently observed to exhibit congenital abnormalities. While the developing CNS lacks a blood brain barrier, the characteristics of known teratogens indicate that differential doses to the developing vs mature brain are not the major factor in differential sensitivity. Instead, most agents seem to act on processes that occur only during development. Thus, it appears that the susceptibility of the developing brain compared to the mature one depends to a great extent on the presence of processes sensitive to disruption. Yet cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation characterize many other developing organs, so the difference between CNS and other organs must depend on other properties of the developing CNS. The most important of these is probably the fact that nervous system development takes much longer than development of other organs, making it subject to injury over a longer period. PMID:7925182

  17. Multigenic control of thyroid hormone functions in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Jacques; Celi, Francesco S.; Ng, Lily; Forrest, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Summary Thyroid hormone (TH) has a remarkable range of actions in the development and function of the nervous system. A multigenic picture is emerging of the mechanisms that specify these diverse functions in target tissues. Distinct responses are mediated by α and β isoforms of TH receptor which act as ligand-regulated transcription factors. Receptor activity can be regulated at several levels including that of uptake of TH ligand and the activation or inactivation of ligand by deiodinase enzymes in target tissues. Processes under the control of TH range from learning and anxiety-like behaviour to sensory function. At the cellular level, TH controls events as diverse as axonal outgrowth, hippocampal synaptic activity and the patterning of opsin photopigments necessary for colour vision. Overall, TH coordinates this variety of events in both central and sensory systems to promote the function of the nervous system as a complete entity. PMID:18448240

  18. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  19. Autopolyreactivity Confers a Holistic Role in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Avrameas, S

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we summarize and discuss some key findings from the study of naturally occurring autoantibodies. The B-cell compartment of the immune system appears to recognize almost all endogenous and environmental antigens. This ability is accomplished principally through autopolyreactive humoral and cellular immune receptors. This extended autopolyreactivity (1) along immunoglobulin gene recombination contributes to the immune system's ability to recognize a very large number of self and non-self constituents; and (2) generates a vast immune network that creates communication channels between the organism's interior and exterior. Thus, the immune system continuously evolves depending on the internal and external stimuli it encounters. Furthermore, this far-reaching network's existence implies activities resembling those of classical biological factors or activities that modulate the function of other classical biological factors. A few such antibodies have already been found. Another important concept is that natural autoantibodies are highly dependent on the presence or absence of commensal microbes in the organism. These results are in line with past and recent findings showing the fundamental influence of the microbiota on proper immune system development, and necessitate the existence of a host-microbe homeostasis. This homeostasis requires that the participating humoral and cellular receptors are able to recognize self-antigens and commensal microbes without damaging them. Autopolyreactive immune receptors expressing low affinity for both types of antigens fulfil this role. The immune system appears to play a holistic role similar to that of the nervous system.

  20. Is Ghrelin Synthesized in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Agustina; López Soto, Eduardo J.; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perelló, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide that acts via its specific receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR-1a), and regulates a vast variety of physiological functions. It is well established that ghrelin is predominantly synthesized by a distinct population of endocrine cells located within the gastric oxyntic mucosa. In addition, some studies have reported that ghrelin could also be synthesized in some brain regions, such as the hypothalamus. However, evidences of neuronal production of ghrelin have been inconsistent and, as a consequence, it is still as a matter of debate if ghrelin can be centrally produced. Here, we provide a comprehensive review and discussion of the data supporting, or not, the notion that the mammalian central nervous system can synthetize ghrelin. We conclude that no irrefutable and reproducible evidence exists supporting the notion that ghrelin is synthetized, at physiologically relevant levels, in the central nervous system of adult mammals. PMID:28294994

  1. Fiber optic in vivo imaging in the mammalian nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amit D; Jung, Juergen C; Flusberg, Benjamin A; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    The compact size, mechanical flexibility, and growing functionality of optical fiber and fiber optic devices are enabling several new modalities for imaging the mammalian nervous system in vivo. Fluorescence microendoscopy is a minimally invasive fiber modality that provides cellular resolution in deep brain areas. Diffuse optical tomography is a non-invasive modality that uses assemblies of fiber optic emitters and detectors on the cranium for volumetric imaging of brain activation. Optical coherence tomography is a sensitive interferometric imaging technique that can be implemented in a variety of fiber based formats and that might allow intrinsic optical detection of brain activity at a high resolution. Miniaturized fiber optic microscopy permits cellular level imaging in the brains of behaving animals. Together, these modalities will enable new uses of imaging in the intact nervous system for both research and clinical applications. PMID:15464896

  2. High-throughput screening in the C. elegans nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kinser, Holly E; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-06-03

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model organism in the field of neurobiology. The wiring of the C. elegans nervous system has been entirely mapped, and the animal's optical transparency allows for in vivo observation of neuronal activity. The nematode is also small in size, self-fertilizing, and inexpensive to cultivate and maintain, greatly lending to its utility as a whole-animal model for high-throughput screening (HTS) in the nervous system. However, the use of this organism in large-scale screens presents unique technical challenges, including reversible immobilization of the animal, parallel single-animal culture and containment, automation of laser surgery, and high-throughput image acquisition and phenotyping. These obstacles require significant modification of existing techniques and the creation of new C. elegans-based HTS platforms. In this review, we outline these challenges in detail and survey the novel technologies and methods that have been developed to address them.

  3. Nanoneuromedicines for Degenerative, Inflammatory, and Infectious Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Bronich, Tatiana; Ghaisas, Shivani; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Liu, Xinming; McMillan, JoEllyn; Mosley, R. Lee; Narasimhan, Balaji; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in nanoneuromedicine has grown rapidly due to the immediate need for improved biomarkers and therapies for psychiatric, developmental, traumatic, inflammatory, infectious and degenerative nervous system disorders. These, in whole or in part, are a significant societal burden due to growth in numbers of affected people and in disease severity. Lost productivity of the patient and his or her caregiver, and the emotional and financial burden cannot be overstated. The need for improved health care, treatment and diagnostics are immediate. A means to such an end is nanotechnology. Indeed, recent developments of health-care enabling nanotechnologies and nanomedicines range from biomarker discovery including neuroimaging to therapeutic applications for degenerative, inflammatory and infectious disorders of the nervous system. This review focuses on the current and future potential of the field to positively affect clinical outcomes. PMID:25645958

  4. Neurogenesis during development of the vertebrate central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Paridaen, Judith TML; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    During vertebrate development, a wide variety of cell types and tissues emerge from a single fertilized oocyte. One of these tissues, the central nervous system, contains many types of neurons and glial cells that were born during the period of embryonic and post-natal neuro- and gliogenesis. As to neurogenesis, neural progenitors initially divide symmetrically to expand their pool and switch to asymmetric neurogenic divisions at the onset of neurogenesis. This process involves various mechanisms involving intrinsic as well as extrinsic factors. Here, we discuss the recent advances and insights into regulation of neurogenesis in the developing vertebrate central nervous system. Topics include mechanisms of (a)symmetric cell division, transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, and signaling pathways, using mostly examples from the developing mammalian neocortex. PMID:24639559

  5. Enrico Sereni: research on the nervous system of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    De Leo, A

    2008-01-01

    This essay focuses on a paradigmatic moment in neurobiological studies of invertebrates: the research on the nervous system of cephalopods carried out by Enrico Sereni at the Naples Zoological Station between 1925 and 1931. Although he remained unknown on the historiographic scenario, probably due to his early death, he contributed to Italian science of the first half of the twentieth century. In my paper particular attention will be given to Sereni's study on the pigmentary-effector, neurohumoral, and peripheral nervous systems, since they also accounted for the historical foundation of the experimental vein that, through the years, would lead John Zachary Young, Sereni's follower, to the most well-known discovery of the giant nerve fibers.

  6. Central nervous system histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ignacio; Minces, Pablo; De Cristofano, Analía M; Negroni, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Neurohistoplasmosis is a rare disease, most prevalent in immunosuppressed patients, secondary to disseminated disease with a high mortality rate when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. We report a previously healthy 12 year old girl, from a bat infested region of Tucuman Province, Argentine Republic, who developed meningoencephalitis due to Histoplasma capsulatum. Eighteen months prior to admission the patient started with headaches and intermittent fever. The images of the central nervous system showed meningoencephalitis suggestive of tuberculosis. She received antibiotics and tuberculostatic medications without improvement. Liposomal amphotericin B was administered for six weeks. The patient's clinical status improved remarkably. Finally the culture of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for micelial form of Histoplasma capsulatum. The difficulties surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of neurohistoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients are discussed in this manuscript, as it also intends to alert to the presence of a strain of Histoplasma capsulatum with affinity for the central nervous system.

  7. Music and Autonomic Nervous System (Dys)function

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Thayer, Julian F.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a wealth of evidence for the involvement of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in health and disease and the ability of music to affect ANS activity, few studies have systematically explored the therapeutic effects of music on ANS dysfunction. Furthermore, when ANS activity is quantified and analyzed, it is usually from a point of convenience rather than from an understanding of its physiological basis. After a review of the experimental and therapeutic literatures exploring music and the ANS, a “Neurovisceral Integration” perspective on the interplay between the central and autonomic nervous systems is introduced, and the associated implications for physiological, emotional, and cognitive health are explored. The construct of heart rate variability is discussed both as an example of this complex interplay and as a useful metric for exploring the sometimes subtle effect of music on autonomic response. Suggestions for future investigations using musical interventions are offered based on this integrative account. PMID:21197136

  8. Neurotropic Enterovirus Infections in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsing-I; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are a group of positive-sense single stranded viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. Most enteroviruses infect humans from the gastrointestinal tract and cause mild symptoms. However, several enteroviruses can invade the central nervous system (CNS) and result in various neurological symptoms that are correlated to mortality associated with enteroviral infections. In recent years, large outbreaks of enteroviruses occurred worldwide. Therefore, these neurotropic enteroviruses have been deemed as re-emerging pathogens. Although these viruses are becoming large threats to public health, our understanding of these viruses, especially for non-polio enteroviruses, is limited. In this article, we review recent advances in the trafficking of these pathogens from the peripheral to the central nervous system, compare their cell tropism, and discuss the effects of viral infections in their host neuronal cells. PMID:26610549

  9. Is Ghrelin Synthesized in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed

    Cabral, Agustina; López Soto, Eduardo J; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perelló, Mario

    2017-03-15

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide that acts via its specific receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR-1a), and regulates a vast variety of physiological functions. It is well established that ghrelin is predominantly synthesized by a distinct population of endocrine cells located within the gastric oxyntic mucosa. In addition, some studies have reported that ghrelin could also be synthesized in some brain regions, such as the hypothalamus. However, evidences of neuronal production of ghrelin have been inconsistent and, as a consequence, it is still as a matter of debate if ghrelin can be centrally produced. Here, we provide a comprehensive review and discussion of the data supporting, or not, the notion that the mammalian central nervous system can synthetize ghrelin. We conclude that no irrefutable and reproducible evidence exists supporting the notion that ghrelin is synthetized, at physiologically relevant levels, in the central nervous system of adult mammals.

  10. Neurotropic Enterovirus Infections in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsing-I; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2015-11-24

    Enteroviruses are a group of positive-sense single stranded viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. Most enteroviruses infect humans from the gastrointestinal tract and cause mild symptoms. However, several enteroviruses can invade the central nervous system (CNS) and result in various neurological symptoms that are correlated to mortality associated with enteroviral infections. In recent years, large outbreaks of enteroviruses occurred worldwide. Therefore, these neurotropic enteroviruses have been deemed as re-emerging pathogens. Although these viruses are becoming large threats to public health, our understanding of these viruses, especially for non-polio enteroviruses, is limited. In this article, we review recent advances in the trafficking of these pathogens from the peripheral to the central nervous system, compare their cell tropism, and discuss the effects of viral infections in their host neuronal cells.

  11. Measurement of autophagy flux in the nervous system in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, K; Valenzuela, V; Matus, S; Nassif, M; Oñate, M; Fuentealba, Y; Encina, G; Irrazabal, T; Parsons, G; Court, F A; Schneider, B L; Armentano, D; Hetz, C

    2013-01-01

    Accurate methods to measure autophagic activity in vivo in neurons are not available, and most of the studies are based on correlative and static measurements of autophagy markers, leading to conflicting interpretations. Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process involved in the degradation of diverse cellular components including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy impairment is emerging as a relevant factor driving neurodegeneration in many diseases. Moreover, strategies to modulate autophagy have been shown to provide protection against neurodegeneration. Here we describe a novel and simple strategy to express an autophagy flux reporter in the nervous system of adult animals by the intraventricular delivery of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into newborn mice. Using this approach we efficiently expressed a monomeric tandem mCherry-GFP-LC3 construct in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system, allowing the measurement of autophagy activity in pharmacological and disease settings. PMID:24232093

  12. Autoimmune disorders affecting both the central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kamm, Christoph; Zettl, Uwe K

    2012-01-01

    Various case series of patients with autoimmune demyelinating disease affecting both the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS), either sequentially or simultaneously, have been reported for decades, but their frequency is considerably lower than that of the "classical" neurological autoimmune diseases affecting only either CNS or PNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or Guillain-Barré-Syndrome (GBS), and attempts to define or even recognize the former as a clinical entity have remained elusive. Frequently, demyelination started with CNS involvement with subsequent PNS pathology, in some cases with a relapsing-remitting course. Three potential mechanisms for the autoimmune etiology of these conditions can be discussed: (I) They could be caused by a common autoimmunological reactivity against myelin antigens or epitopes present in both the central and peripheral nervous system; (II) They could be due to a higher general susceptibility to autoimmune disease, which in some cases may have been caused or exacerbated by immunomodulatory treatment, e.g. b-interferon; (III) Their co-occurrence might be coincidental. Another example of an autoimmune disease variably involving the central or peripheral nervous system or both is the overlapping and continuous clinical spectrum of Fisher syndrome (FS), as a variant of GBS, and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis (BBE). Recent data from larger patient cohorts with demonstration of common autoantibodies, antecedent infections, and results of detailed clinical, neuroimaging and neurophysiological investigations suggest that these three conditions are not separate disorders, but rather form a continuous spectrum with variable central and peripheral nervous system involvement. We herein review clinical and paraclinical data and therapeutic options of these disorders and discuss potential underlying common vs. divergent immunopathogenic mechanisms.

  13. Atypical presentation of pheochromocytoma: Central nervous system pseudovasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rupala, Ketankumar; Mittal, Varun; Gupta, Rajiv; Yadav, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma has atypical presentation in 9%–10% of patients. Atypical presentations include myocardial infarction, renal failure, and rarely cerebrovascular events. Various etiologies for central nervous system (CNS) involvement in pheochromocytoma have been described in the literature. A rare association of CNS vasculitis-like features has been described with pheochromocytoma. We report a rare case of pheochromocytoma detected on evaluation for CNS vasculitis-like symptoms. PMID:28197038

  14. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments to remove fluid and mucus from the respiratory system are often needed. Outlook (Prognosis) Factors that may ... immunocompromised host Images Pneumococci organism Lungs The lungs Respiratory system References Donnelly JP, Blijlevens NMA, van der Velden ...

  15. FoxO Proteins in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Acute as well as chronic disorders of the nervous system lead to significant morbidity and mortality for millions of individuals globally. Given the ability to govern stem cell proliferation and differentiated cell survival, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the forkhead box class O (FoxO) are increasingly being identified as potential targets for disorders of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and auditory neuronal disease. FoxO proteins are present throughout the body, but they are selectively expressed in the nervous system and have diverse biological functions. The forkhead O class transcription factors interface with an array of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B (Akt), serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase (SgK), IκB kinase (IKK), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (S. cerevisiae) (SIRT1), growth factors, and Wnt signaling that can determine the activity and integrity of FoxO proteins. Ultimately, there exists a complex interplay between FoxO proteins and their signal transduction pathways that can significantly impact programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy as well as the development of clinical strategies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26171319

  16. Functional roles of neuropeptides in the insect central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nässel, D. R.

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequencing project we can begin to appreciate the extent of the complexity in the components involved in signal transfer and modulation in the nervous system of an animal with reasonably complex behavior. Of all the different classes of signaling substances utilized by the nervous system, the neuropeptides are the most diverse structurally and functionally. Thus peptidergic mechanisms of action in the central nervous system need to be analyzed in the context of the neuronal circuits in which they act and generalized traits cannot be established. By taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetics and the presence of identifiable neurons, it has been possible to interfere with peptidergic signaling in small populations of central neurons and monitor the consequences on behavior. These studies and experiments on other insects with large identifiable neurons, permitting cellular analysis of signaling mechanisms, have outlined important principles for temporal and spatial action of neuropeptides in outputs of the circadian clock and in orchestrating molting behavior. Considering the large number of neuropeptides available in each insect species and their diverse distribution patterns, it is to be expected that different neuropeptides play roles in most aspects of insect physiology and behavior.

  17. Centralization of the deuterostome nervous system predates chordates.

    PubMed

    Nomaksteinsky, Marc; Röttinger, Eric; Dufour, Héloïse D; Chettouh, Zoubida; Lowe, Chris J; Martindale, Mark Q; Brunet, Jean-François

    2009-08-11

    The origin of the chordate central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. One theory is that a CNS was present in the first bilaterian and that it gave rise to both the ventral cord of protostomes and the dorsal cord of deuterostomes. Another theory proposes that the chordate CNS arose by a dramatic process of dorsalization and internalization from a diffuse nerve net coextensive with the skin of the animal, such as enteropneust worms (Hemichordata, Ambulacraria) are supposed to have. We show here that juvenile and adult enteropneust worms in fact have a bona fide CNS, i.e., dense agglomerations of neurons associated with a neuropil, forming two cords, ventral and dorsal. The latter is internalized in the collar as a chordate-like neural tube. Contrary to previous assumptions, the greater part of the adult enteropneust skin is nonneural, although elements of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are found there. We use molecular markers to show that several neuronal types are anatomically segregated in the CNS and PNS. These neuroanatomical features, whatever their homologies with the chordate CNS, imply that nervous system centralization predates the evolutionary separation of chordate and hemichordate lineages.

  18. Gross anatomy and development of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Catala, Martin; Kubis, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The nervous system is divided into the central nervous system (CNS) composed of the brain, the brainstem, the cerebellum, and the spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system (PNS) made up of the different nerves arising from the CNS. The PNS is divided into the cranial nerves III to XII supplying the head and the spinal nerves that supply the upper and lower limbs. The general anatomy of the PNS is organized according to the arrangement of the fibers along the rostro-caudal axis. The control of the development of the PNS has been unravelled during the last 30 years. Motor nerves arise from the ventral neural tube. This ventralization is induced by morphogenetic molecules such as sonic hedgehog. In contrast, the sensory elements of the PNS arise from a specific population of cells originating from the roof of the neural tube, namely the neural crest. These cells give rise to the neurons of the dorsal root ganglia, the autonomic ganglia and the paraganglia including the adrenergic neurons of the adrenals. Furthermore, the supportive glial Schwann cells of the PNS originate from the neural crest cells. Growth factors as well as myelinating proteins are involved in the development of the PNS.

  19. Heterogeneity of nervous system mitochondria: location, location, location!

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Janet M

    2009-08-01

    Mitochondrial impairments have been associated with many neurological disorders, from inborn errors of metabolism or genetic disorders to age and environmentally linked diseases of aging (DiMauro S., Schon E.A. 2008. Mitochondrial disorders in the nervous system. Annu. Rev., Neurosci. 31, 91-123.). In these disorders, specific nervous system components or brain regions appear to be initially more susceptible to the triggering event or pathological process. Such regional variation in susceptibility to multiple types of stressors raises the possibility that inherent differences in mitochondrial function may mediate some aspect of pathogenesis. Regional differences in the distribution or number of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzyme activities, enzyme expression levels, mitochondrial genes or availability of necessary metabolites become attractive explanations for selective vulnerability of a nervous system structure. While regionally selective mitochondrial vulnerability has been documented, regional variations in other cellular and tissue characteristics may also contribute to metabolic impairment. Such environmental variables include high tonic firing rates, neurotransmitter phenotype, location of mitochondria within a neuron, or the varied tissue perfusion pressure of different cerebral arterial branches. These contextual variables exert regionally distinct regulatory influences on mitochondria to tune their energy production to local demands. Thus to understand variations in mitochondrial functioning and consequent selective vulnerability to injury, the organelle must be placed within the context of its cellular, functional, developmental and neuroanatomical environment.

  20. Gangliosides in the Nervous System: Biosynthesis and Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Robert K.; Ariga, Toshio; Yanagisawa, Makoto; Zeng, Guichao

    Gangliosides, abundant in the nervous system, are known to play crucial modulatory roles in cellular recognition, interaction, adhesion, and signal transduction, particularly during early developmental stages. The expression of gangliosides in the nervous system is developmentally regulated and is closely related to the differentiation state of the cell. Ganglioside biosynthesis occurs in intracellular organelles, from which gangliosides are transported to the plasma membrane. During brain development, the ganglioside composition of the nervous system undergoes remarkable changes and is strictly regulated by the activities of glycosyltransferases, which can occur at different levels of control, including glycosyltransferase gene transcription and posttranslational modification. Genes for glycosyltransferase involved in ganglioside biosynthesis have been cloned and classified into families of glycosyltransferases based on their amino acid sequence similarities. The donor and acceptor substrate specificities are determined by enzymatic analysis of the glycosyltransferase gene products. Cell-type specific regulation of these genes has also been studied. Gangliosides are degraded by lysosomal exoglycosidases. The action of these enzymes occurs frequently in cooperation with activator proteins. Several human diseases are caused by defects of degradative enzymes, resulting in massive accumulation of certain glycolipids, including gangliosides in the lysosomal compartment and other organelles in the brain and visceral organs. Some of the representative lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) caused by the accumulation of lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes will be discussed.

  1. Effects of snake venom polypeptides on central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey; Utkin, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    The nervous system is a primary target for animal venoms as the impairment of its function results in the fast and efficient immobilization or death of a prey. There are numerous evidences about effects of crude snake venoms or isolated toxins on peripheral nervous system. However, the data on their interactions with the central nervous system (CNS) are not abundant, as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impedes penetration of these compounds into brain. This updated review presents the data about interaction of snake venom polypeptides with CNS. Such data will be described according to three main modes of interactions: - Direct in vivo interaction of CNS with venom polypeptides either capable to penetrate BBB or injected into the brain. - In vitro interactions of cell or sub-cellular fractions of CNS with crude venoms or purified toxins. - Indirect effects of snake venoms or their components on functioning of CNS under different conditions. Although the venom components penetrating BBB are not numerous, they seem to be the most suitable candidates for the leads in drug design. The compounds with other modes of action are more abundant and better studied, but the lack of the data about their ability to penetrate BBB may substantially aggravate the potentials for their medical perspectives. Nevertheless, many such compounds are used for research of CNS in vitro. These investigations may give invaluable information for understanding the molecular basis of CNS diseases and thus lay the basis for targeted drug design. This aspect also will be outlined in the review.

  2. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  3. Oligodendrocyte-microglia cross-talk in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura; Kipp, Markus; van der Valk, Paul; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) is exemplified by cross-talk between glia and neurons shown to be essential for maintaining homeostasis. While microglia are actively modulated by neurons in the healthy brain, little is known about the cross-talk between oligodendrocytes and microglia. Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells in the CNS, are essential for the propagation of action potentials along axons, and additionally serve to support neurons by producing neurotrophic factors. In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, oligodendrocytes are thought to be the victims. Here, we review evidence that oligodendrocytes also have strong immune functions, express a wide variety of innate immune receptors, and produce and respond to chemokines and cytokines that modulate immune responses in the CNS. We also review evidence that during stress events in the brain, oligodendrocytes can trigger a cascade of protective and regenerative responses, in addition to responses that elicit progressive neurodegeneration. Knowledge of the cross-talk between microglia and oligodendrocytes may continue to uncover novel pathways of immune regulation in the brain that could be further exploited to control neuroinflammation and degeneration.

  4. Platinum-based chemotherapy: gastrointestinal immunomodulation and enteric nervous system toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Vanesa; Sakkal, Samy; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2015-02-15

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatment of colorectal cancer is challenged by severe gastrointestinal side effects, which include nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea. These symptoms can persist long after the treatment has been ceased. An emerging concept is the ability of platinum-based drugs to stimulate immunity, which is in contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents that are immunosuppressive. Here, we review the immunomodulatory aspects of platinum-based anticancer chemotherapeutics and their impact on gastrointestinal innervation. Given the bidirectional communication between the enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal immune system; exploring the consequences of platinum-induced immunogenicity will facilitate better understanding of gut dysfunction caused by chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that the development of future successful chemotherapeutics should rely on targeting the mechanisms underlying long-term gastrointestinal side effects.

  5. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  6. [AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ITS IMBALANCE IN NEURO INTENSIVE CARE UNIT].

    PubMed

    Popugaev, K A; Lubnin, A Yu; Zabelin, M V; Samoylov, A S

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) provides homeostasis due to the innervation of the secretory glands, smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. Higher centers of the ANS (primarily the hypothalamus, some centers of the brain stem and limbic system) form a integrative network, which plays a key role in coordinating the functioning of the endocrine, immune system and other parts of the central nervous system. Intracranial centers of the ANS are responsible for the consciousness, behavioral, emotional, and other components of the higher nervous activity. Thus, the significance of the ANS can't be overestimated. At the same time today in neurointensive care there are no clear criteria for ANS dysfunction, we don't have universally recognized monitoring facilities for ANS and approaches to targeted therapy of its disorders. This paradox is even more important as in the pathogenesis of some critical conditions such as neurogenic pulmonary edema, stunned myocardium, cardiomyopathy Takotsubo lies precisely ANS imbalance. This review devoted to the ANS and some problems associated with its imbalance.

  7. Central nervous system dysfunction in obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Head, Geoffrey A; Lim, Kyungjoon; Barzel, Benjamin; Burke, Sandra L; Davern, Pamela J

    2014-09-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is a major mechanism underlying both human and experimental models of obesity-related hypertension. While insulin and the adipokine leptin have long been thought to contribute to obesity-related neurogenic mechanisms, the evidence is now very strong that they play a major role, shown particularly in animal studies using selective receptor antagonists. There is not just maintenance of leptin's sympatho-excitatory actions as previously suggested but considerable amplification particularly in renal sympathetic nervous activity. Importantly, these changes are not dependent on short-term elevation or reduction in plasma leptin or insulin, but require some weeks to develop indicating a slow "neural adaptivity" within hypothalamic signalling. These effects can be carried across generations even when offspring are raised on a normal diet. A better understanding of the underlying mechanism should be a high research priority given the prevalence of obesity not just in the current population but also for future generations.

  8. Fourier domain OCT imaging of American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    In this pilot study we demonstrate results of structural Fourier domain OCT imaging of the nervous system of Periplaneta americana L. (American cockroach). The purpose of this research is to develop an OCT apparatus enabling structural imaging of insect neural system. Secondary purpose of the presented research is to develop methods of the sample preparation and handling during the OCT imaging experiments. We have performed imaging in the abdominal nerve cord excised from the American cockroach. For this purpose we have developed a Fourier domain / spectral OCT system operating at 820 nm wavelength range.

  9. Control of adaptive immunity by the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections are recognized by the innate immune system both to elicit immediate defense and to generate long-lasting adaptive immunity. To detect and respond to vastly different groups of pathogens, the innate immune system uses several recognition systems that rely on sensing common structural and functional features associated with different classes of microorganisms. These recognition systems determine microbial location, viability, replication and pathogenicity. Detection of these features by recognition pathways of the innate immune system is translated into different classes of effector responses though specialized populations of dendritic cells. Multiple mechanisms for the induction of immune responses are variations on a common design principle wherein the cells that sense infections produce one set of cytokines to induce lymphocytes to produce another set of cytokines, which in turn activate effector responses. Here we discuss these emerging principles of innate control of adaptive immunity. PMID:25789684

  10. [Electroencephalography and the general physiology of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Wyss, O A

    1974-01-01

    The contributions of electro-encephalography to the general physiology of the nervous system - studies based on 50 years of experimental and clinical research on the EEG of animals and man - have established irrefutable facts underlying present-day concepts in neurophysiology. This conclusion holds true, even if allowance must be made with regard to the alpha-rhythm, reasons having been given to suppose that this phenomenon is in reality, partially or entirely, an ocular tremor phenomenon (Lippold). The fundamental principles of neuronal activity such as (1) the electrogenesis of gray matter, i.e., the electric current and membrane potential aspects of the existence and the functioning of nerve cells and neuronal aggregates, (2) the rhythmicity and periodicity of nervous activity in single cells or networks of neurones, (3) the synchronization of such nervous activity due, at the site of its source, to electric interaction between neurones belonging together and 'beating in unison', and (4) the autonomous automaticity of nerve cells and nerve centres as being the basic feature of neuronal activity, are among the prominent topics dealt with in this report. Particular attention is paid to the autonomy-concept of nervous activity, a concept ofter forgotten, neglected or discarded from physiological thinking, although life of any kind, in any type of living system, can only be understood if spontaneous existence and activity are accepted for living matter. In this respect the EEG has contributed in a large measure to save the physiology of our period from the materialism which prevailed at the beginning of the century and which threatens once more to emerge towards its end.

  11. Pediatric Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors of the Central Nervous System Differentially Express Granzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; van Hecke, Wim; Spliet, Wim G. M.; Villacorta Hidalgo, José; Fisch, Paul; Broekhuizen, Roel; Bovenschen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background Central nervous system (CNS) primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are malignant primary brain tumors that occur in young infants. Using current standard therapy, up to 80% of the children still dies from recurrent disease. Cellular immunotherapy might be key to improve overall survival. To achieve efficient killing of tumor cells, however, immunotherapy has to overcome cancer-associated strategies to evade the cytotoxic immune response. Whether CNS-PNETs can evade the immune response remains unknown. Methods We examined by immunohistochemistry the immune response and immune evasion strategies in pediatric CNS-PNETs. Results Here, we show that CD4+, CD8+, γδ-T-cells, and Tregs can infiltrate pediatric CNS-PNETs, although the activation status of cytotoxic cells is variable. Pediatric CNS-PNETs evade immune recognition by downregulating cell surface MHC-I and CD1d expression. Intriguingly, expression of SERPINB9, SERPINB1, and SERPINB4 is acquired during tumorigenesis in 29%, 29%, and 57% of the tumors, respectively. Conclusion We show for the first time that brain tumors express direct granzyme inhibitors (serpins) as a potential mechanism to overcome cellular cytotoxicity, which may have consequences for cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26963506

  12. Insulin-like growth factors in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2012-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play an integral role in development, growth, and survival. This article details the current understanding of the effects of IGFs in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) during health and disease, and introduces how the IGF system regulates PNS development and impacts growth and survival of PNS cells. Also discussed are implications of IGF signaling in neurodegeneration and the status and prospects of IGF therapies for PNS conditions. There is substantial support for the application of IGF therapies in the treatment of PNS injury and disease.

  13. Hepatic Control of Energy Metabolism via the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although the human liver comprises approximately 2.8% of the body weight, it plays a central role in the control of energy metabolism. While the biochemistry of energy substrates such as glucose, fatty acids, and ketone bodies in the liver is well understood, many aspects of the overall control system for hepatic metabolism remain largely unknown. These include mechanisms underlying the ascertainment of its energy metabolism status by the liver, and the way in which this information is used to communicate and function together with adipose tissues and other organs involved in energy metabolism. This review article summarizes hepatic control of energy metabolism via the autonomic nervous system. PMID:27592630

  14. Vestigial expression in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Guss, Kirsten A; Mistry, Hemlata; Skeath, James B

    2008-09-01

    The Drosophila central nervous system is an excellent model system in which to resolve the genetic and molecular control of neuronal differentiation. Here we show that the wing selector vestigial is expressed in discrete sets of neurons. We track the axonal trajectories of VESTIGIAL-expressing cells in the ventral nerve cord and show that these cells descend from neuroblasts 1-2, 5-1, and 5-6. In addition, along the midline, VESTIGIAL is expressed in ventral unpaired median motorneurons and cells that may descend from the median neuroblast. These studies form the requisite descriptive foundation for functional studies addressing the role of vestigial during interneuron differentiation.

  15. Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system in dogs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W B

    1998-08-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are important causes of seizures in dogs. Specific diseases include canine distemper, rabies, cryptococcosis, coccidioidomycosis, toxoplasmosis, neosporosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis, and pug dog encephalitis. Inflammatory disorders should be considered when a dog with seizures has persistent neurological deficits, suffers an onset of seizures at less than 1 or greater than 5 years of age, or exhibits signs of systemic illness. A thorough history, examination, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid are important in the diagnosis of inflammatory diseases. However, even with extensive diagnostic testing, a specific etiology is identified in less than two thirds of dogs with inflammatory diseases of the CNS.

  16. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  17. Comparison of three neurotropic viruses reveals differences in viral dissemination to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Luethy, Lauren N; Erickson, Andrea K; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Ikizler, Mine; Dermody, Terence S; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses initiate infection in peripheral tissues prior to entry into the central nervous system (CNS). However, mechanisms of dissemination are not completely understood. We used genetically marked viruses to compare dissemination of poliovirus, yellow fever virus 17D (YFV-17D), and reovirus type 3 Dearing in mice from a hind limb intramuscular inoculation site to the sciatic nerve, spinal cord, and brain. While YFV-17D likely entered the CNS via blood, poliovirus and reovirus likely entered the CNS by transport through the sciatic nerve to the spinal cord. We found that dissemination was inefficient in adult immune-competent mice for all three viruses, particularly reovirus. Dissemination of all viruses was more efficient in immune-deficient mice. Although poliovirus and reovirus both accessed the CNS by transit through the sciatic nerve, stimulation of neuronal transport by muscle damage enhanced dissemination only of poliovirus. Our results suggest that these viruses access the CNS using different pathways.

  18. Comparison of three neurotropic viruses reveals differences in viral dissemination to the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, Lauren N.; Erickson, Andrea K; Jesudhasan, Palmy R.; Ikizler, Mine; Dermody, Terence S.; Pfeiffer, Julie K.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses initiate infection in peripheral tissues prior to entry into the central nervous system (CNS). However, mechanisms of dissemination are not completely understood. We used genetically marked viruses to compare dissemination of poliovirus, yellow fever virus 17D (YFV-17D), and reovirus type 3 Dearing in mice from a hind limb intramuscular inoculation site to the sciatic nerve, spinal cord, and brain. While YFV-17D likely entered the CNS via blood, poliovirus and reovirus likely entered the CNS by transport through the sciatic nerve to the spinal cord. We found that dissemination was inefficient in adult immune-competent mice for all three viruses, particularly reovirus. Dissemination of all viruses was more efficient in immune-deficient mice. Although poliovirus and reovirus both accessed the CNS by transit through the sciatic nerve, stimulation of neuronal transport by muscle damage enhanced dissemination only of poliovirus. Our results suggest that these viruses access the CNS using different pathways. PMID:26479325

  19. Energetics and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Reiches, Meredith W.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Moore, Sophie E.; Ellison, Peter T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: The human immune system is an ever-changing composition of innumerable cells and proteins, continually ready to respond to pathogens or insults. The cost of maintaining this state of immunological readiness is rarely considered. In this paper we aim to discern a cost to non-acute immune function by investigating how low levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) relate to other energetic demands and resources in adolescent Gambian girls. Methodology: Data from a longitudinal study of 66 adolescent girls was used to test hypotheses around investment in immune function. Non-acute (under 2 mg/L) CRP was used as an index of immune function. Predictor variables include linear height velocity, adiposity, leptin, and measures of energy balance. Results: Non-acute log CRP was positively associated with adiposity (β = 0.16, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.17) and levels of the adipokine leptin (β = 1.17, P = 0.006, R2 = 0.09). CRP was also negatively associated with increased investment in growth, as measured by height velocity (β = −0.58, P < 0.001, R2 = 0.13) and lean mass deposition β = −0.42, P = 0.005, R2 = 0.08). Relationships between adiposity and growth explained some, but not all, of this association. We do not find that CRP was related to energy balance. Conclusions and implications: These data support a hypothesis that investment in non-acute immune function is facultative, and sensitive to energetic resources and demands. We also find support for an adaptive association between the immune system and adipose tissue. PMID:28003312

  20. Priming in Systemic Plant Immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wang, Lin; Glazebrook, Jane; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2009-01-01

    Upon local infection, plants possess inducible systemic defense responses against their natural enemies. Bacterial infection results in the accumulation to high levels of the mobile metabolite C9-dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid in the vascular sap of Arabidopsis. Azelaic acid confers local and systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae. The compound primes plants to strongly accumulate salicylic acid (SA), a known defense signal, upon infection. Mutation of a gene induced by azelaic acid (AZI1) results in the specific loss in plants of systemic immunity triggered by pathogen or azelaic acid and of the priming of SA induction. AZI1, a predicted secreted protein, is also important for generating vascular sap that confers disease resistance. Thus, azelaic acid and AZI1 comprise novel components of plant systemic immunity involved in priming defenses.

  1. Regulation of autonomic nervous system in space and magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Petrov, V. M.; Chernikova, A. G.

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field and magnetic storms are known to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. The main ``targets'' for geomagnetic perturbations are the central nervous system and the neural regulation of vascular tone and heart rate variability. This paper presents the data about effect of geomagnetic fluctuations on human body in space. As a method for research the analysis of heart rate variability was used, which allows evaluating the state of the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of the autonomic nervous system, vasomotor center and subcortical neural centers activity. Heart rate variability data were analyzed for 30 cosmonauts at the 2-nd day of space flight on transport spaceship Soyuz (32nd orbit). There were formed three groups of cosmonauts: without magnetic storm (n=9), on a day with magnetic storm (n=12) and 1-2 days after magnetic storm (n=9). The present study was the first to demonstrate a specific impact of geomagnetic perturbations on the system of autonomic circulatory control in cosmonauts during space flight. The increasing of highest nervous centers activity was shown for group with magnetic storms, which was more significant on 1-2 days after magnetic storm. The use of discriminate analysis allowed to classify indicated three groups with 88 % precision. Canonical variables are suggested to be used as criterions for evaluation of specific and non-specific components of cardiovascular reactions to geomagnetic perturbations. The applied aspect of the findings from the present study should be emphasized. They show, in particular, the need to supplement the medical monitoring of cosmonauts with predictions of probable geomagnetic perturbations in view of the prevention of unfavorable states appearances if the adverse reactions to geomagnetic perturbations are added to the tension experienced by regulatory systems during various stresses situations (such as work in the open space).

  2. Measuring cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity in children.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Aimée E; van Lien, René; van Eijsden, Manon; Gemke, Reinoud J B J; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; de Geus, Eco J

    2013-04-29

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls mainly automatic bodily functions that are engaged in homeostasis, like heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration and renal function. The ANS has two main branches: the sympathetic nervous system, preparing the human body for action in times of danger and stress, and the parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the resting state of the body. ANS activity can be measured invasively, for instance by radiotracer techniques or microelectrode recording from superficial nerves, or it can be measured non-invasively by using changes in an organ's response as a proxy for changes in ANS activity, for instance of the sweat glands or the heart. Invasive measurements have the highest validity but are very poorly feasible in large scale samples where non-invasive measures are the preferred approach. Autonomic effects on the heart can be reliably quantified by the recording of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in combination with the impedance cardiogram (ICG), which reflects the changes in thorax impedance in response to respiration and the ejection of blood from the ventricle into the aorta. From the respiration and ECG signals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia can be extracted as a measure of cardiac parasympathetic control. From the ECG and the left ventricular ejection signals, the preejection period can be extracted as a measure of cardiac sympathetic control. ECG and ICG recording is mostly done in laboratory settings. However, having the subjects report to a laboratory greatly reduces ecological validity, is not always doable in large scale epidemiological studies, and can be intimidating for young children. An ambulatory device for ECG and ICG simultaneously resolves these three problems. Here, we present a study design for a minimally invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in children, using a validated ambulatory device (1-5), the VU University Ambulatory Monitoring System (VU

  3. Immunosenescence of microglia and macrophages: impact on the ageing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rawji, Khalil S; Mishra, Manoj K; Michaels, Nathan J; Rivest, Serge; Stys, Peter K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-03-01

    Ageing of the central nervous system results in a loss of both grey and white matter, leading to cognitive decline. Additional injury to both the grey and white matter is documented in many neurological disorders with ageing, including Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. Accompanying neuronal and glial damage is an inflammatory response consisting of activated macrophages and microglia, innate immune cells demonstrated to be both beneficial and detrimental in neurological repair. This article will propose the following: (i) infiltrating macrophages age differently from central nervous system-intrinsic microglia; (ii) several mechanisms underlie the differential ageing process of these two distinct cell types; and (iii) therapeutic strategies that selectively target these diverse mechanisms may rejuvenate macrophages and microglia for repair in the ageing central nervous system. Most responses of macrophages are diminished with senescence, but activated microglia increase their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines while diminishing chemotactic and phagocytic activities. The senescence of macrophages and microglia has a negative impact on several neurological diseases, and the mechanisms underlying their age-dependent phenotypic changes vary from extrinsic microenvironmental changes to intrinsic changes in genomic integrity. We discuss the negative effects of age on neurological diseases, examine the response of senescent macrophages and microglia in these conditions, and propose a theoretical framework of therapeutic strategies that target the different mechanisms contributing to the ageing phenotype in these two distinct cell types. Rejuvenation of ageing macrophage/microglia may preserve neurological integrity and promote regeneration in the ageing central nervous system.

  4. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  5. Applications of Nanotechnology to the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumling, James P., II

    Nanotechnology and nanomaterials, in general, have become prominent areas of academic research. The ability to engineer at the nano scale is critical to the advancement of the physical and medical sciences. In the realm of physical sciences, the applications are clear: smaller circuitry, more powerful computers, higher resolution intruments. However, the potential impact in the fields of biology and medicine are perhaps even grander. The implementation of novel nanodevices is of paramount importance to the advancement of drug delivery, molecular detection, and cellular manipulation. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development of nanotechnology for applications in neuroscience. The nervous system provides unique challenges and opportunities for nanoscale research. This thesis discusses some background in nanotechnological applications to the central nervous system and details: (1) The development of a novel calcium nanosenser for use in neurons and astrocytes. We implemented the calcium responsive component of Dr. Roger Tsien's Cameleon sensor, a calmodulin-M13 fusion, in the first quantum dot-based calcium sensor. (2) The exploration of cell-penetrating peptides as a delivery mechanism for nanoparticles to cells of the nervous system. We investigated the application of polyarginine sequences to rat primary cortical astrocytes in order to assess their efficacy in a terminally differentiated neural cell line. (3) The development of a cheap, biocompatible alternative to quantum dots for nanosensor and imaging applications. We utilized a positively charged co-matrix to promote the encapsulation of free sulforhodamine B in silica nanoparticles, a departure from conventional reactive dye coupling to silica matrices. While other methods have been invoked to trap dye not directly coupled to silica, they rely on positively charged dyes that typically have a low quantum yield and are not extensively tested biologically, or they implement reactive dyes bound

  6. Enteric nervous system development: migration, differentiation, and disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jonathan I; Heuckeroth, Robert O

    2013-07-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic innervation of the bowel and is the most neurochemically diverse branch of the peripheral nervous system, consisting of two layers of ganglia and fibers encircling the gastrointestinal tract. The ENS is vital for life and is capable of autonomous regulation of motility and secretion. Developmental studies in model organisms and genetic studies of the most common congenital disease of the ENS, Hirschsprung disease, have provided a detailed understanding of ENS development. The ENS originates in the neural crest, mostly from the vagal levels of the neuraxis, which invades, proliferates, and migrates within the intestinal wall until the entire bowel is colonized with enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDCs). After initial migration, the ENS develops further by responding to guidance factors and morphogens that pattern the bowel concentrically, differentiating into glia and neuronal subtypes and wiring together to form a functional nervous system. Molecules controlling this process, including glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor RET, endothelin (ET)-3 and its receptor endothelin receptor type B, and transcription factors such as SOX10 and PHOX2B, are required for ENS development in humans. Important areas of active investigation include mechanisms that guide ENCDC migration, the role and signals downstream of endothelin receptor type B, and control of differentiation, neurochemical coding, and axonal targeting. Recent work also focuses on disease treatment by exploring the natural role of ENS stem cells and investigating potential therapeutic uses. Disease prevention may also be possible by modifying the fetal microenvironment to reduce the penetrance of Hirschsprung disease-causing mutations.

  7. Neuroactive steroids and the peripheral nervous system: An update.

    PubMed

    Giatti, Silvia; Romano, Simone; Pesaresi, Marzia; Cermenati, Gaia; Mitro, Nico; Caruso, Donatella; Tetel, Marc J; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Melcangi, Roberto C

    2015-11-01

    In the present review we summarize observations to date supporting the concept that neuroactive steroids are synthesized in the peripheral nervous system, regulate the physiology of peripheral nerves and exert notable neuroprotective actions. Indeed, neuroactive steroids have been recently proposed as therapies for different types of peripheral neuropathy, like for instance those occurring during aging, chemotherapy, physical injury and diabetes. Moreover, pharmacological tools able to increase the synthesis of neuroactive steroids might represent new interesting therapeutic strategy to be applied in case of peripheral neuropathy.

  8. Clinical implications of thyroid hormones effects on nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormones have an important role throughout prenatal and postnatal nervous system development. They are involved in several processes such as neurogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination, synaptogenesis, etc., as shown in many cases of deficiency like congenital hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia. Those pathologies if untreated could lead to severe damages in cognitive, motor, neudoendocrine functions among other effects. Some could be reversed after adequate supplementation of thyroid hormones at birth, however there are other cellular processes highly sensitive to low levels of thyroid hormones and lasting a limited period of time during which if thyroid hormone action is lacking or deficient, the functional and structural damages would produce permanent defects.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of disorders of the central nervous system, spine, neck, and nasopharynx. The book offers guidance in performing and interpreting MRI studies for specific clinical problems. Included are more than 800 images showing pathologic findings for various disorders and demonstrating how abnormalities detected in MRI scans can aid both in differential diagnosis and in clinical staging. The book summarizes the basic principles of MRI and describes the major equipment components and contrast agents. A review of the principles and potential applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy is also included.

  10. Current and future imaging of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ohana, M; Moser, T; Moussaouï, A; Kremer, S; Carlier, R Y; Liverneaux, P; Dietemann, J-L

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) imaging is usually carried out by ultrasound and MRI. Thanks to its wide availability and excellent spatial resolution, ultrasound is a mature investigation with clearly established indications, particularly in entrapment syndromes and tumors. MRI is generally a second-line examination, which provides decisive additional information thanks to its excellent contrast resolution and its multiplanar abilities. This review describes the current methods for imaging the PNS, concentrating on acquisition techniques, normal results and basic pathological semiology. Ongoing and future developments are described in order to underline the forthcoming changes in this very dynamic field of musculoskeletal radiology.

  11. Language disorders in children with central nervous system injury

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Children with injury to the central nervous system (CNS) exhibit a variety of language disorders that have been described by members of different disciplines, in different journals, using different descriptors and taxonomies. This paper is an overview of language deficits in children with CNS injury, whether congenital or acquired after a period of normal development. It first reviews the principal CNS conditions associated with language disorders in childhood. It then describes a functional taxonomy of language, with examples of the phenomenology and neurobiology of clinical deficits in children with CNS insults. Finally, it attempts to situate language in the broader realm of cognition and in current theoretical accounts of embodied cognition. PMID:20397297

  12. Area 51: How do Acanthamoeba invade the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Emes, Richard; Elsheikha, Hany; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2011-05-01

    Acanthamoeba granulomatous encephalitis generally develops as a result of haematogenous spread, but it is unclear how circulating amoebae enter the central nervous system (CNS) and cause inflammation. At present, the mechanisms which Acanthamoeba use to invade this incredibly well-protected area of the CNS and produce infection are not well understood. In this paper, we propose two key virulence factors: mannose-binding protein and extracellular serine proteases as key players in Acanthamoeba traversal of the blood-brain barrier leading to neuronal injury. Both molecules should provide excellent opportunities as potential targets in the rational development of therapeutic interventions against Acanthamoeba encephalitis.

  13. [Metastasis tumors of the central nervous system: molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Bello, M Josefa; González-Gómez, P; Rey, J A

    2004-12-01

    Metastases in the nervous system represent an important and growing problem in the clinical practice, being the cause of a great mortality in the developed countries. This article reviews the few data available on the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, leading to oncogene activation, inactivation of tumour suppressor genes, not only by the classical mechanisms, but also by the tumour cell epigenetic balance alteration. We conclude that all this knowledge will lead in the future to a better diagnosis, treatment and clinic evolution of these patients.

  14. Feeling good: autonomic nervous system responding in five positive emotions.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Michelle N; Neufeld, Samantha L; Yeung, Wan H; Moser, Stephanie E; Perea, Elaine F

    2011-12-01

    Although dozens of studies have examined the autonomic nervous system (ANS) aspects of negative emotions, less is known about ANS responding in positive emotion. An evolutionary framework was used to define five positive emotions in terms of fitness-enhancing function, and to guide hypotheses regarding autonomic responding. In a repeated measures design, participants viewed sets of visual images eliciting these positive emotions (anticipatory enthusiasm, attachment love, nurturant love, amusement, and awe) plus an emotionally neutral state. Peripheral measures of sympathetic and vagal parasympathetic activation were assessed. Results indicated that the emotion conditions were characterized by qualitatively distinct profiles of autonomic activation, suggesting the existence of multiple, physiologically distinct positive emotions.

  15. [Extranuclear functions of protein sumoylation in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Martin, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications play essential roles in many aspects of cellular functions and therefore in the maintenance of cell integrity. These protein modifications are involved at all stages of neuronal communication within the central nervous system. Sumoylation is a reversible post-translational protein modification that consists in the covalent labelling of a small protein called SUMO to lysine residues of selected target proteins. Sumoylation is a well characterized regulator of nuclear functions and has recently emerged as a key factor for numerous extranuclear processes. Furthermore, sumoylation has recently been shown to modulate synaptic transmission and is also implicated in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Central nervous system tuberculosis: pathophysiology and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Deepak; Narang, Jayant; Yanamandala, Rama; Lawande, Malini; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    With the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic, the incidence of tuberculosis, including central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis, has increased in developed countries. It is no longer a disease confined to underdeveloped and developing countries. The imaging appearance has become more complex with the onset of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Imaging plays an important role in the early diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. This article presents an extensive review of typical and atypical imaging appearances of intracranial tuberculosis, and discusses pathogenesis, patterns of involvement, and advances in imaging of intracranial tuberculosis.

  17. Current approaches for drug delivery to central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sharif; Akaike, Toshihiro; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2010-12-01

    Brain, the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate, plays the most vital role in every function of human body. However, many neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infections of the brain become more prevalent as populations become older. In spite of the major advances in neuroscience, many potential therapeutics are still unable to reach the central nervous system (CNS) due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is formed by the tight junctions within the capillary endothelium of the vertebrate brain. This results in the capillary wall behaving as a continuous lipid bilayer and preventing the passage of polar and lipid insoluble substances. Several approaches for delivering drugs to the CNS have been developed to enhance the capacity of therapeutic molecules to cross the BBB by modifying the drug itself, or by coupling it to a vector for receptor-mediated, carrier mediated or adsorption-mediated transcytosis. The current challenge is to develop drug delivery systems that ensure the safe and effective passage of drugs across the BBB. This review focuses on the strategies and approaches developed to enhance drug delivery to the CNS.

  18. Effects of melatonin on nervous system aging: neurogenesis and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarlak, Golmaryam; Jenwitheesuk, Anorut; Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2013-09-20

    Neural aging as a progressive loss of function involves central and peripheral post-mitotic neurons and neural stem cells (NSCs). It promotes neurodegeneration, impairs neurogenesis, and can be considered a cause of cognitive impairment and sensory and motor deficits in the elderly. Age-related morphological atrophic changes and cellular alterations are addressed by neural aging mechanisms. Neurogenesis declines during aging through several mechanisms such as an increase in quiescence state, changes in lineage fate, telomerase dysfunction, the failure of the DNA repair system, increased apoptosis, and the impairment of self-renewal. The self-renewal transcriptional factor Sox2 has been correlated with retrotransposon L1 and certain cell-cycle- and epigenetic-related factors, which are sometimes considered age-related factors in NSC aging. As neurogenesis decreases, non-mitotic neurons undergo neurodegeneration by oxidative stress, sirtuin, insulin signaling and mTOR alteration, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein misfolding and aggregation. As neurodegeneration and impaired neurogenesis promote the nervous system aging process, the identification of neuronal anti-aging is required to raise life expectancy. The role of melatonin in increasing neurogenesis and protecting against neurodegeneration has been investigated. Here, we review nervous system aging that is correlated with mechanisms of neurodegeneration and the impairment of neurogenesis and evaluate the effects of melatonin on these processes.

  19. The effect of octopamine on the locust stomatogastric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rand, David; Knebel, Daniel; Ayali, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) is a prominent neuromodulator of invertebrate nervous systems, influencing multiple physiological processes. Among its many roles in insects are the initiation and maintenance of various rhythmic behaviors. Here, the neuromodulatory effects of OA on the components of the locust stomatogastric nervous system were studied, and one putative source of OA modulation of the system was identified. Bath application of OA was found to abolish the endogenous rhythmic output of the fully isolated frontal ganglion (FG), while stimulating motor activity of the fully isolated hypocerebral ganglion (HG). OA also induced rhythmic movements in a foregut preparation with intact HG innervation. Complex dose-dependent effects of OA on interconnected FG-HG preparations were seen: 10(-5) M OA accelerated the rhythmic activity of both the HG and FG in a synchronized manner, while 10(-4) M OA decreased both rhythms. Intracellular stimulation of an identified octopaminergic dorsal unpaired median neuron in the subesophageal ganglion was found to exert a similar effect on the FG motor output as that of OA application. Our findings suggest a mechanism of regulation of insect gut patterns and feeding-related behavior during stress and times of high energy demand.

  20. Ion Channels as Drug Targets in Central Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waszkielewicz, A.M; Gunia, A; Szkaradek, N; Słoczyńska, K; Krupińska, S; Marona, H

    2013-01-01

    Ion channel targeted drugs have always been related with either the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, or the cardiovascular system. Within the CNS, basic indications of drugs are: sleep disorders, anxiety, epilepsy, pain, etc. However, traditional channel blockers have multiple adverse events, mainly due to low specificity of mechanism of action. Lately, novel ion channel subtypes have been discovered, which gives premises to drug discovery process led towards specific channel subtypes. An example is Na+ channels, whose subtypes 1.3 and 1.7-1.9 are responsible for pain, and 1.1 and 1.2 – for epilepsy. Moreover, new drug candidates have been recognized. This review is focusing on ion channels subtypes, which play a significant role in current drug discovery and development process. The knowledge on channel subtypes has developed rapidly, giving new nomenclatures of ion channels. For example, Ca2+ channels are not any more divided to T, L, N, P/Q, and R, but they are described as Cav1.1-Cav3.3, with even newer nomenclature α1A-α1I and α1S. Moreover, new channels such as P2X1-P2X7, as well as TRPA1-TRPV1 have been discovered, giving premises for new types of analgesic drugs. PMID:23409712

  1. GABA-ergic neurons in the leach central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    GABA is a candidate for an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the leech central nervous system because of the well-documented inhibitory action of GABA in other invertebrates. To demonstrate that GABA meets the criteria used to identify a substance as a neurotransmitter, the author examined GABA metabolism and synaptic interactions of inhibitory motor neurons in two leech species, Hirudo medicinalis and Haementeria ghilianii. Segmental ganglia of the leech ventral nerve cord and identified inhibitors have the capacity to synthesize GABA when incubated in the presence of the precursor glutamate. Application of GABA to cell bodies of excitatory motor neurons or muscle fibers innervated by the inhibitors hyperpolarizes the membrane potential of the target cell and activates a chloride ion conductance channel, similar to the inhibitory membrane response following intracellular stimulation of the inhibitor. Bicuculline methiodide (5 x 10/sup -5/M), GABA receptor antagonist, blocks reversibly the response to applied GABA and the inhibitory synaptic inputs onto the postsynaptic neurons or muscle fibers without interfering with their excitatory inputs. Furthermore, the inhibitors are included among approximately 25 neurons per segmental ganglion that take up GABA by a high affinity uptake system, as revealed by /sup 3/H-GABA-autoradiography. The development of the capacities to synthesize and to take up GABA were examined in leech embryos. The embryos are able to synthesize GABA at early stages of the development of the nervous system, before any neurons have extended neutrites.

  2. Autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins are elevated in sera of flight crew members: biomarkers for nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Abou-Donia, Mohamed B; Abou-Donia, Martha M; ElMasry, Eman M; Monro, Jean A; Mulder, Michel F A

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study reports the results of assays performed to detect circulating autoantibodies in a panel of 7 proteins associated with the nervous system (NS) in sera of 12 healthy controls and a group of 34 flight crew members including both pilots and attendants who experienced adverse effects after exposure to air emissions sourced to the ventilation system in their aircrafts and subsequently sought medical attention. The proteins selected represent various types of proteins present in nerve cells that are affected by neuronal degeneration. In the sera samples from flight crew members and healthy controls, immunoglobin (IgG) was measured using Western blotting against neurofilament triplet proteins (NFP), tubulin, microtubule-associated tau proteins (tau), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and glial S100B protein. Significant elevation in levels of circulating IgG-class autoantibodies in flight crew members was found. A symptom-free pilot was sampled before symptoms and then again afterward. This pilot developed clinical problems after flying for 45 h in 10 d. Significant increases in autoantibodies were noted to most of the tested proteins in the serum of this pilot after exposure to air emissions. The levels of autoantibodies rose with worsening of his condition compared to the serum sample collected prior to exposure. After cessation of flying for a year, this pilot's clinical condition improved, and eventually he recovered and his serum autoantibodies against nervous system proteins decreased. The case study with this pilot demonstrates a temporal relationship between exposure to air emissions, clinical condition, and level of serum autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins. Overall, these results suggest the possible development of neuronal injury and gliosis in flight crew members anecdotally exposed to cabin air emissions containing organophosphates. Thus, increased

  3. Immune System as a Sensory System

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Igor M.; Dresser, D.

    2010-01-01

    As suggested by the well-known gestalt concept the immune system can be regarded as an integrated complex system, the functioning of which cannot be fully characterized by the behavior of its constituent elements. Similar approaches to the immune system in particular and sensory systems in general allows one to discern similarities and differences in the process of distinguishing informative patterns in an otherwise random background, thus initiating an appropriate and adequate response. This may lead to a new interpretation of difficulties in the comprehension of some immunological phenomena. PMID:21686066

  4. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J.; Eccles, Jacob D.; Rouhani, Sherin J.; Peske, J. David; Derecki, Noel C.; Castle, David; Mandell, James W.; Kevin, S. Lee; Harris, Tajie H.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the CNS is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the CNS undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1–3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the CNS remain poorly understood4–6. In searching for T cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the CSF, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the CNS. The discovery of the CNS lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and shed new light on the etiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction. PMID:26030524

  5. The Role of Serotonin beyond the Central Nervous System during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Junhua; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a well-known neurotransmitter that plays vital roles in neural activities and social behaviors. Clinically, deficiency of serotonin is linked with many psychiatric disorders. Interestingly, a large proportion of serotonin is also produced outside the central nervous system (CNS). There is increasing evidence demonstrating important roles of serotonin in the peripheral tissues. Here, we will describe the multiple biological functions of serotonin in hematopoietic system, such as development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), differentiation of hematopoietic cells, maintenance of vascular system, and relationship with hematological diseases. The roles of serotonin in inflammatory responses mediated by hematopoietic cells as well as in liver regeneration are also discussed. Our recent understandings of the impact of serotonin on hematopoietic system, immune responses, and tissue regeneration support utilization of serotonin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hematological diseases and organ repair in clinic. PMID:28348520

  6. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  7. Dietary Glutamate: Interactions With the Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Xia, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Digestion of dietary protein elevates intraluminal concentrations of glutamate in the small intestine, some of which gain access to the enteric nervous system (ENS). Glutamate, in the central nervous system (CNS), is an excitatory neurotransmitter. A dogma that glutamatergic neurophysiology in the ENS recapitulates CNS glutamatergic function persists. We reassessed the premise that glutamatergic signaling in the ENS recapitulates its neurotransmitter role in the CNS. Methods Pharmacological analysis of actions of receptor agonists and antagonists in concert with immunohistochemical localization of glutamate transporters and receptors was used. Analysis focused on intracellularly-recorded electrical and synaptic behavior of ENS neurons, on stimulation of mucosal secretion by secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus and on muscle contractile behavior mediated by musculomotor neurons in the myenteric plexus. Results Immunoreactivity for glutamate was expressed in ENS neurons. ENS neurons expressed immunoreactivity for the EAAC-1 glutamate transporter. Neither L-glutamate nor glutamatergic receptor agonists had excitatory actions on ENS neurons. Metabotropic glutamatergic receptor agonists did not directly stimulate neurogenic mucosal chloride secretion. Neither L-glutamate nor the metabotropic glutamatergic receptor agonist, aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD), changed the mean amplitude of spontaneously occurring contractions in circular or longitudinal strips of intestinal wall from either guinea pig or human small intestinal preparations. Conclusions Early discoveries, for excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission in the CNS, inspired enthusiasm that investigation in the ENS would yield discoveries recapitulating the CNS glutamatergic story. We found this not to be the case. PMID:24466444

  8. Golgi, Cajal, and the Fine Structure of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Towards the middle of the twentieth century, neuroanatomy was on the decline. It was revived by the development of two new methods. One was the Nauta-Gygax method, which selectively stained nerve fibers that had been caused to degenerate by experimental lesions. This allowed connections between various parts of the nervous system to be better determined. The second was electron microscopy, which allowed the structure of neurons and the synapses between them to be examined in detail, and eventually this led to a revival of the Golgi impregnation methods. This occurred in the 1970s because of the desire of electron microscopists to determine the origins of the neuronal profiles they encountered in electron micrographs of various parts of the central nervous system. Eventually this led to the development of Golgi/EM techniques, whereby individual impregnated neurons could first be characterized by light microscopy and then thin sectioned for detailed analyses. Examining the axon terminals of such impregnated neurons, especially those in the cerebral cortex, for the first time revealed details of intercellular connections and allowed neuronal circuits to be postulated. However, Golgi/EM had only a brief, but fruitful existence. It was soon superceded by intracellular filling techniques, which allowed the added dimension that the physiological properties of identified neurons could also be determined. PMID:17270274

  9. Spectral Mixing in Nervous Systems: Experimental Evidenceand Biologically Plausible Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinfeld, D.; Mehta, S. B.

    The ability to compute the difference frequency for two periodic signals depends on a nonlinear operation that mixes those signals. Behavioral and psychophysical evidence suggest that such mixing is likely to occur in the vertebrate nervous system as a means to compare rhythmic sensory signals, such as occurs in human audition, and as a means to lock an intrinsic rhythm to a sensory input. Electrophysiological data from electroreceptors in the immobilized electric fish and somatosensory cortex in the anesthetized rat yield direct evidence for such mixing, providing a neurological substrate for the modulation and demodulation of rhythmic neuronal signals. We consider an analytical model of spectral mixing that makes use of the threshold characteristics of neuronal firing and which has features consistent with the experimental observations. This model serves as a guide for constructing circuits that isolate given mixture components. In particular, such circuits can generate nearly pure difference tones from sinusoidal inputs without the use of band-pass filters, in analogy to an image-reject mixer in communications engineering. We speculate that such computations may play a role in coding of sensory input and feedback stabilization of motor output in nervous systems.

  10. Skin biopsies in the assessment of the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous punch biopsies are widely used to evaluate nociceptive C fibers in patients with suspected small-fiber neuropathy. Recent advances in immunohistochemical techniques and interest in cutaneous autonomic innervation has expanded the role of skin biopsy in the evaluation of the peripheral nervous system. The dermal layers of the skin provide a unique window into the structural evaluation of the autonomic nervous system. Peripheral adrenergic and cholinergic fibers innervate a number of cutaneous structures, such as sweat glands and arrector pili muscles, and can easily be seen with punch skin biopsies. Skin biopsies allow for both regional sampling, in diseases with patchy distribution, and the opportunity for repeated sampling in progressive disorders. The structural evaluation of cutaneous autonomic innervation is still in its scientific infancy, with a number of different methodologies and techniques that will require standardization and widespread acceptance before becoming a standard of care. Future studies of autonomic innervation in acquired, hereditary, neurodegenerative, or autoimmune disorders will be necessary to determine the clinical utility of skin biopsy in these disease states.

  11. The origin and evolution of chordate nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Linda Z.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 40 years, comparisons of developmental gene expression and mechanisms of development (evodevo) joined comparative morphology as tools for reconstructing long-extinct ancestral forms. Unfortunately, both approaches typically give congruent answers only with closely related organisms. Chordate nervous systems are good examples. Classical studies alone left open whether the vertebrate brain was a new structure or evolved from the anterior end of an ancestral nerve cord like that of modern amphioxus. Evodevo plus electron microscopy showed that the amphioxus brain has a diencephalic forebrain, small midbrain, hindbrain and spinal cord with parts of the genetic mechanisms for the midbrain/hindbrain boundary, zona limitans intrathalamica and neural crest. Evodevo also showed how extra genes resulting from whole-genome duplications in vertebrates facilitated evolution of new structures like neural crest. Understanding how the chordate central nervous system (CNS) evolved from that of the ancestral deuterostome has been truly challenging. The majority view is that this ancestor had a CNS with a brain that gave rise to the chordate CNS and, with loss of a discrete brain, to one of the two hemichordate nerve cords. The minority view is that this ancestor had no nerve cord; those in chordates and hemichordates evolved independently. New techniques such as phylostratigraphy may help resolve this conundrum. PMID:26554041

  12. Engineering Biomaterial Properties for Central Nervous System Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Christopher John

    Biomaterials offer unique properties that are intrinsic to the chemistry of the material itself or occur as a result of the fabrication process; iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, which enables controlled heating in the presence of an alternating magnetic field, and a hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material provides minimally invasive placement of a fibrous, artificial extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. Utilization of these unique properties towards central nervous system disease and dysfunction requires a thorough definition of the properties in concert with full biological assessment. This enables development of material-specific features to elicit unique cellular responses. Iron oxide nanoparticles are first investigated for material-dependent, cortical neuron cytotoxicity in vitro and subsequently evaluated for alternating magnetic field stimulation induced hyperthermia, emulating the clinical application for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy in glioblastoma treatment. A hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material is first applied to a rat brain to evaluate biomaterial interface astrocyte accumulation as a function of hybrid material composition. The hybrid material is then utilized towards increasing functional engraftment of dopaminergic progenitor neural stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, these two scenarios display the role of material property characterization in development of biomaterial strategies for central nervous system repair and regeneration.

  13. Pediatric Hashimoto's encephalopathy with peripheral nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Mankad, Kshitij; Polizzi, Agata; Sugawara, Yuji; Granata, Francesca; David, Emanuele; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Tortorella, Gaetano; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-06-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a syndrome of encephalopathy associated with elevated concentration of circulating serum anti-thyroid antibodies usually responsive to steroid therapy. We report a 13-year-old girl with Hashimoto encephalopathy and peripheral nervous system involvement. The child had experienced high-grade pyrexia, global headache and sleeplessness. After admission she had an ileus with a distended urinary bladder, hallucinations and cognitive impairment. She had reduced deep tendon reflexes and distal sensory deficiency. Anti-thyroglobulin antibodies were raised at 2121 IU/mL (normal, 0-40) and the anti-thyroperoxidase was high at 886 IU/mL (normal, 0-50). Progressive neurological and psychiatric remission was noted after i.v. methylprednisolone. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed complete resolution of the foci of signal abnormality previously yielded. This case report is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to describe peripheral nervous system involvement in a child with a diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  14. Sexual dysfunction in patients with peripheral nervous system lesions.

    PubMed

    Podnar, Simon; Vodušek, David B

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders may cause sexual dysfunction (SD) in patients of both genders. These disorders include mainly polyneuropathies (particularly those affecting the autonomic nervous system (ANS)) and localized lesions affecting the innervation of genital organs. Impaired neural control may produce a malfunction of the genital response consisting of loss of genital sensitivity, erectile dysfunction, loss of vaginal lubrication, ejaculation disorder, and orgasmic disorder. In addition, there is often a loss of desire which actually has a complex pathogenesis, which goes beyond the mere loss of relevant nerve function. In patients who have no manifest health problems - particularly men with erectile dysfunction - one should always consider the possibility of an underlying polyneuropathy; in patients with SD after suspected denervation lesions of the innervation of genital organs within the lumbosacral spinal canal and in the pelvis, clinical neurophysiologic testing may clarify the PNS involvement. SD can alter self-esteem and lower patients' quality of life; opening up a discussion on sexual issues should be a part of the management of patients with PNS disorders. They may greatly benefit from counseling, education on coping strategies, and specific treatments.

  15. Glycobiology of ion transport in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nowycky, Martha C; Wu, Gusheng; Ledeen, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system is richly endowed with large transmembrane proteins that mediate ion transport, including gated ion channels as well as energy-consuming pumps and transporters. Transport proteins undergo N-linked glycosylation which can affect expression, location, stability, and function. The N-linked glycans of ion channels are large, contributing between 5 and 50 % of their molecular weight. Many contain a high density of negatively charged sialic acid residues which modulate voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Changes in the size and chemical composition of glycans are responsible for developmental and cell-specific variability in the biophysical and functional properties of many ion channels. Glycolipids, principally gangliosides, exert considerable influence on some forms of ion transport, either through direct association with ion transport proteins or indirectly through association with proteins that activate transport through appropriate signaling. Examples of both pumps and ion channels have been revealed which depend on ganglioside regulation. While some of these processes are localized in the plasma membrane, ganglioside-regulated ion transport can also occur at various loci within the cell including the nucleus. This chapter will describe ion channel and ion pump structures with a focus on the functional effects of glycosylation on ion channel availability and function, and effects of alterations in glycosylation on nervous system function. It will also summarize highlights of the research on glycolipid/ganglioside-mediated regulation of ion transport.

  16. The origin and evolution of chordate nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z

    2015-12-19

    In the past 40 years, comparisons of developmental gene expression and mechanisms of development (evodevo) joined comparative morphology as tools for reconstructing long-extinct ancestral forms. Unfortunately, both approaches typically give congruent answers only with closely related organisms. Chordate nervous systems are good examples. Classical studies alone left open whether the vertebrate brain was a new structure or evolved from the anterior end of an ancestral nerve cord like that of modern amphioxus. Evodevo plus electron microscopy showed that the amphioxus brain has a diencephalic forebrain, small midbrain, hindbrain and spinal cord with parts of the genetic mechanisms for the midbrain/hindbrain boundary, zona limitans intrathalamica and neural crest. Evodevo also showed how extra genes resulting from whole-genome duplications in vertebrates facilitated evolution of new structures like neural crest. Understanding how the chordate central nervous system (CNS) evolved from that of the ancestral deuterostome has been truly challenging. The majority view is that this ancestor had a CNS with a brain that gave rise to the chordate CNS and, with loss of a discrete brain, to one of the two hemichordate nerve cords. The minority view is that this ancestor had no nerve cord; those in chordates and hemichordates evolved independently. New techniques such as phylostratigraphy may help resolve this conundrum.

  17. Role of the autonomic nervous system in modulating cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mark J; Zipes, Douglas P

    2014-03-14

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis. Decades of research has contributed to a better understanding of the anatomy and physiology of cardiac autonomic nervous system and provided evidence supporting the relationship of autonomic tone to clinically significant arrhythmias. The mechanisms by which autonomic activation is arrhythmogenic or antiarrhythmic are complex and different for specific arrhythmias. In atrial fibrillation, simultaneous sympathetic and parasympathetic activations are the most common trigger. In contrast, in ventricular fibrillation in the setting of cardiac ischemia, sympathetic activation is proarrhythmic, whereas parasympathetic activation is antiarrhythmic. In inherited arrhythmia syndromes, sympathetic stimulation precipitates ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death except in Brugada and J-wave syndromes where it can prevent them. The identification of specific autonomic triggers in different arrhythmias has brought the idea of modulating autonomic activities for both preventing and treating these arrhythmias. This has been achieved by either neural ablation or stimulation. Neural modulation as a treatment for arrhythmias has been well established in certain diseases, such as long QT syndrome. However, in most other arrhythmia diseases, it is still an emerging modality and under investigation. Recent preliminary trials have yielded encouraging results. Further larger-scale clinical studies are necessary before widespread application can be recommended.

  18. Detection of BMAA in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Berntzon, L; Ronnevi, L O; Bergman, B; Eriksson, J

    2015-04-30

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an extremely devastating neurodegenerative disease with an obscure etiology. The amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) produced by globally widespread phytoplankton has been implicated in the etiology of human motor neuron diseases [corrected]. BMAA was recently proven to be present in Baltic Sea food webs, ranging from plankton to larger Baltic Sea organisms, some serving as important food items (fish) for humans. To test whether exposure to BMAA in a Baltic Sea setting is reflected in humans, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals suffering from ALS were analyzed, together with sex- and age-matched individuals not inflicted with ALS. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), in conjunction with diagnostic transitions revealed BMAA in three (12%) of the totally 25 Swedish individuals tested, with no preference for those suffering from ALS. The three BMAA-positive samples were all retrieved from the CSF, while BMAA was not detected in the blood. The data show that BMAA, potentially originating from Baltic Sea phytoplankton, may reach the human central nervous system, but does not lend support to the notion that BMAA is resident specifically in ALS-patients. However, while dietary exposure to BMAA may be intermittent and, if so, difficult to detect, our data provide the first demonstration of BMAA in the central nervous system of human individuals ante mortem quantified with UHPLC-MS/MS, and therefore calls for extended research efforts.

  19. Targeted Temperature Management in Pediatric Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Newmyer, Robert; Mendelson, Jenny; Pang, Diana; Fink, Ericka L.

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Acute central nervous system conditions due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury (TBI), status epilepticus, and central nervous system infection/inflammation, are a leading cause of death and disability in childhood. There is a critical need for effective neuroprotective therapies to improve outcome targeting distinct disease pathology. Fever, defined as patient temperature > 38°C, has been clearly shown to exacerbate brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia (HT) is an intervention using targeted temperature management that has multiple mechanisms of action and robust evidence of efficacy in multiple experimental models of brain injury. Prospective clinical evidence for its neuroprotective efficacy exists in narrowly-defined populations with hypoxic-ischemic injury outside of the pediatric age range while trials comparing hypothermia to normothermia after TBI have failed to demonstrate a benefit on outcome but consistently demonstrate potential use in decreasing refractory intracranial pressure. Data in children from prospective, randomized controlled trials using different strategies of targeted temperature management for various outcomes are few but a large study examining HT versus controlled normothermia to improve neurological outcome in cardiac arrest is underway. PMID:26042193

  20. Probing disorders of the nervous system using reprogramming approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Justin K; Kiskinis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    The groundbreaking technologies of induced pluripotency and lineage conversion have generated a genuine opportunity to address fundamental aspects of the diseases that affect the nervous system. These approaches have granted us unrestricted access to the brain and spinal cord of patients and have allowed for the study of disease in the context of human cells, expressing physiological levels of proteins and under each patient's unique genetic constellation. Along with this unprecedented opportunity have come significant challenges, particularly in relation to patient variability, experimental design and data interpretation. Nevertheless, significant progress has been achieved over the past few years both in our ability to create the various neural subtypes that comprise the nervous system and in our efforts to develop cellular models of disease that recapitulate clinical findings identified in patients. In this Review, we present tables listing the various human neural cell types that can be generated and the neurological disease modeling studies that have been reported, describe the current state of the field, highlight important breakthroughs and discuss the next steps and future challenges. PMID:25925386

  1. Signaling Mechanisms Regulating Myelination in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    AHRENDSEN, Jared T.; MACKLIN, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    The precise and coordinated production of myelin is essential for proper development and function of the nervous system. Diseases that disrupt myelin, including multiple sclerosis (MS), cause significant functional disability. Current treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory component of the disease, thereby preventing damage resulting from demyelination. However, therapies are not yet available to improve natural repair processes after damage has already occurred. A thorough understanding of the signaling mechanisms that regulate myelin generation will improve our ability to enhance repair. In this review, we summarize the positive and negative regulators of myelination, focusing primarily on central nervous system myelination. Axon-derived signals, extracellular signals from both diffusible factors and the extracellular matrix, and intracellular signaling pathways within myelinating oligodendrocytes are discussed. Much more is known about the positive regulators that drive myelination, while less is known about the negative regulators that shift active myelination to myelin maintenance at the appropriate time. Therefore, we also provide new data on potential negative regulators of CNS myelination. PMID:23558589

  2. ATR maintains select progenitors during nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngsoo; Shull, Erin RP; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier; Katyal, Sachin; Enriquez-Rios, Vanessa; Zhao, Jingfeng; Russell, Helen R; Brown, Eric J; McKinnon, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The ATR (ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and rad3-related) checkpoint kinase is considered critical for signalling DNA replication stress and its dysfunction can lead to the neurodevelopmental disorder, ATR-Seckel syndrome. To understand how ATR functions during neurogenesis, we conditionally deleted Atr broadly throughout the murine nervous system, or in a restricted manner in the dorsal telencephalon. Unexpectedly, in both scenarios, Atr loss impacted neurogenesis relatively late during neural development involving only certain progenitor populations. Whereas the Atr-deficient embryonic cerebellar external germinal layer underwent p53- (and p16Ink4a/Arf)-independent proliferation arrest, other brain regions suffered apoptosis that was partially p53 dependent. In contrast to other organs, in the nervous system, p53 loss did not worsen the outcome of Atr inactivation. Coincident inactivation of Atm also did not affect the phenotype after Atr deletion, supporting non-overlapping physiological roles for these related DNA damage-response kinases in the brain. Rather than an essential general role in preventing replication stress, our data indicate that ATR functions to monitor genomic integrity in a selective spatiotemporal manner during neurogenesis. PMID:22266795

  3. Role of metallothionein-III following central nervous system damage.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Javier; Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, Mercedes; Camats, Jordi; Molinero, Amalia; Campbell, Iain L; Palmiter, Richard D; Hidalgo, Juan

    2003-06-01

    We evaluated the physiological relevance of metallothionein-III (MT-III) in the central nervous system following damage caused by a focal cryolesion onto the cortex by studying Mt3-null mice. In normal mice, dramatic astrogliosis and microgliosis and T-cell infiltration were observed in the area surrounding the lesioned tissue, along with signs of increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. There was also significant upregulation of cytokines/growth factors such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 alpha/beta, and IL-6 as measured by ribonuclease protection assay. Mt3-null mice did not differ from control mice in these responses, in sharp contrast to results obtained in Mt1- Mt2-null mice. In contrast, Mt3-null mice showed increased expression of several neurotrophins as well as of the neuronal sprouting factor GAP-43. Thus, unlike MT-I and MT-II, MT-III does not affect the inflammatory response elicited in the central nervous system by a cryoinjury, nor does it serve an important antioxidant role, but it may influence neuronal regeneration during the recovery process.

  4. Interleukin-1β in Central Nervous System Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute inflammation is a self-limiting, complex biological response mounted to combat pathogen invasion, to protect against tissue damage, and to promote tissue repair should it occur. However, unabated inflammation can be deleterious and contribute to injury and pathology. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a prototypical “pro-inflammatory” cytokine, is essential to cellular defense and tissue repair in nearly all tissues. With respect to brain, however, studies suggest that IL-1β has pleiotrophic effects. It acts as a neuromodulator in the healthy central nervous system (CNS), has been implicated in the pathogenic processes associated with a number of CNS maladies, but may also provide protection to the injured CNS. Here, we will review the physiological and pathophysiological functions of IL-1β in the central nervous system with regard to synaptic plasticity. With respect to disease, emphasis will be placed on stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease where the ultimate injurious or reparative effects of IL-1β appear to depend on time, concentration and environmental milieu. PMID:26082912

  5. Methamphetamine: Effects on the brain, gut and immune system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Monica D; Tangalakis, Kathy; Antonipillai, Juliana; Stojanovska, Lily; Nurgali, Kulmira; Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2017-03-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful central nervous system stimulant which elevates mood, alertness, energy levels and concentration in the short-term. However, chronic use and/or at higher doses METH use often results in psychosis, depression, delusions and violent behavior. METH was formerly used to treat conditions such as obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but now is primarily used recreationally. Its addictive nature has led to METH abuse becoming a global problem. At a cellular level, METH exerts a myriad of effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems, immune system and the gastrointestinal system. Here we present how these effects might be linked and their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the long term, this pathway could be targeted therapeutically to protect people from the ill effects of METH use. This model of METH use may also provide insight into how gut, nervous and immune systems might break down in other conditions that may also benefit from therapeutic intervention.

  6. TASK1 modulates inflammation and neurodegeneration in autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Stefan; Göbel, Kerstin; Melzer, Nico; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Simon, Ole J.; Weishaupt, Andreas; Budde, Thomas; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Bendszus, Martin; Wiendl, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    We provide evidence that TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channel 1 (TASK1), a member of the family of two-pore domain potassium channels relevant for setting the resting membrane potential and balancing neuronal excitability that is expressed on T cells and neurons, is a key modulator of T cell immunity and neurodegeneration in autoimmune central nervous system inflammation. After induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an experimental model mimicking multiple sclerosis, TASK1−/− mice showed a significantly reduced clinical severity and markedly reduced axonal degeneration compared with wild-type controls. T cells from TASK1−/− mice displayed impaired T cell proliferation and cytokine production, while the immune repertoire is otherwise normal. In addition to these effects on systemic T cell responses, TASK1 exhibits an independent neuroprotective effect which was demonstrated using both a model of acutely prepared brain slices cocultured with activated T cells as well as in vitro cultivation experiments with isolated optic nerves. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid and inhibitor of TASK channels, reduced outward currents and inhibited effector functions of T cells (IFN-γ production and proliferation); an effect completely abrogated in TASK1−/− mice. Accordingly, preventive blockade of TASK1 significantly ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after immunization. Therapeutic application of anandamide significantly reduced disease severity and was capable of lowering progressive loss of brain parenchymal volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. These data support the identification and characterization of TASK1 as potential molecular target for the therapy of inflammatory and degenerative central nervous system disorders. PMID:19570851

  7. Diverse Roles of Neurotensin Agonists in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mona; Li, Zhimin; Smith, Kristin; Fredrickson, Paul; Richelson, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide that is found in the central nervous system (CNS) and the gastrointestinal tract. NT behaves as a neurotransmitter in the brain and as a hormone in the gut. Additionally, NT acts as a neuromodulator to several neurotransmitter systems including dopaminergic, sertonergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic systems. Due to its association with such a wide variety of neurotransmitters, NT has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several CNS disorders such as schizophrenia, drug abuse, Parkinson’s disease (PD), pain, central control of blood pressure, eating disorders, as well as, cancer and inflammation. The present review will focus on the role that NT and its analogs play in schizophrenia, endocrine function, pain, psychostimulant abuse, and PD. PMID:23526754

  8. Detrimental impact of hyperlipidemia on the peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Song; Cao, Xu; He, Rongzhen; Xiong, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Recently, epidemiological studies on the etiology of peripheral neuropathies have revealed that hyperlipidemia is a novel risk factor. Plasma lipid levels were confirmed to be associated with the incidence of many peripheral neuropathies including axonal distal polyneuropathy, vision and hearing loss, motor nerve system lesions and sympathetic nerve system dysfunction. Moreover, different lipid components such as cholesterol, triacylglycerols and lipoprotein are involved in the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. This review aimed to discuss the effect of hyperlipidemia on the peripheral nervous system and its association with peripheral neuropathies. Furthermore, a detailed discussion focusing on the explicit mechanisms related to hyperlipidemia-induced peripheral neuropathies is presented here. These mechanisms, including intracellular oxidative stress, inflammatory lesions, ischemia and dysregulation of local lipid metabolism, share pathways and interact mutually. In addition, we examined current information on clinical trials to prevent and treat peripheral neuropathies caused by hyperlipidemia, with a predictive discussion regarding the orientation of future investigations. PMID:25774180

  9. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  10. Immune Evasion, Immunopathology and the Regulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Gabriele; Cornet, Stéphane; Faivre, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Costs and benefits of the immune response have attracted considerable attention in the last years among evolutionary biologists. Given the cost of parasitism, natural selection should favor individuals with the most effective immune defenses. Nevertheless, there exists huge variation in the expression of immune effectors among individuals. To explain this apparent paradox, it has been suggested that an over-reactive immune system might be too costly, both in terms of metabolic resources and risks of immune-mediated diseases, setting a limit to the investment into immune defenses. Here, we argue that this view neglects one important aspect of the interaction: the role played by evolving pathogens. We suggest that taking into account the co-evolutionary interactions between the host immune system and the parasitic strategies to overcome the immune response might provide a better picture of the selective pressures that shape the evolution of immune functioning. Integrating parasitic strategies of host exploitation can also contribute to understand the seemingly contradictory results that infection can enhance, but also protect from, autoimmune diseases. In the last decades, the incidence of autoimmune disorders has dramatically increased in wealthy countries of the northern hemisphere with a concomitant decrease of most parasitic infections. Experimental work on model organisms has shown that this pattern may be due to the protective role of certain parasites (i.e., helminths) that rely on the immunosuppression of hosts for their persistence. Interestingly, although parasite-induced immunosuppression can protect against autoimmunity, it can obviously favor the spread of other infections. Therefore, we need to think about the evolution of the immune system using a multidimensional trade-off involving immunoprotection, immunopathology and the parasitic strategies to escape the immune response. PMID:25436882

  11. Drug transport into the central nervous system: using newer findings about the blood-brain barriers.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2012-06-01

    The blood-brain barriers (BBBs) represent one of the biggest challenges for the effective delivery of drugs today. Discoveries made in the last 30 years offer new strategies for central nervous system (CNS) drug development, but have yet to be fully incorporated into the field. Here, we examine seven recently discovered aspects of the BBB and how they have been or could be developed for drug delivery. These areas are brain-to-blood (efflux) transporters, immune cell trafficking into the brain under physiologic conditions, mechanisms by which antibodies can access the CNS, Trojan horse delivery systems, blood-to-brain transport systems for biologicals, lectin interactions and ligand modifications that enhance BBB penetration, and secretory capacities of cells comprising the BBBs.

  12. Targeting of prion-infected lymphoid cells to the central nervous system accelerates prion infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prions, composed of a misfolded protein designated PrPSc, are infectious agents causing fatal neurodegenerative diseases. We have shown previously that, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, prion-infected mice succumb to disease significantly earlier than controls, concomitant with the deposition of PrPSc aggregates in inflamed white matter areas. In the present work, we asked whether prion disease acceleration by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis results from infiltration of viable prion-infected immune cells into the central nervous system. Methods C57Bl/6 J mice underwent intraperitoneal inoculation with scrapie brain homogenates and were later induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inoculation of MOG35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant supplemented with pertussis toxin. Spleen and lymph node cells from the co-induced animals were reactivated and subsequently injected into naïve mice as viable cells or as cell homogenates. Control groups were infected with viable and homogenized scrapie immune cells only with complete Freund's adjuvant. Prion disease incubation times as well as levels and sites of PrPSc deposition were next evaluated. Results We first show that acceleration of prion disease by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis requires the presence of high levels of spleen PrPSc. Next, we present evidence that mice infected with activated prion-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis viable cells succumb to prion disease considerably faster than do mice infected with equivalent cell extracts or other controls, concomitant with the deposition of PrPSc aggregates in white matter areas in brains and spinal cords. Conclusions Our results indicate that inflammatory targeting of viable prion-infected immune cells to the central nervous system accelerates prion disease propagation. We also show that in the absence of such targeting it is the load of PrPSc in the inoculum that determines the

  13. Convection-enhanced delivery to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lonser, Russell R; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Morrison, Paul F; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a bulk flow-driven process. Its properties permit direct, homogeneous, targeted perfusion of CNS regions with putative therapeutics while bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Development of surrogate imaging tracers that are co-infused during drug delivery now permit accurate, noninvasive real-time tracking of convective infusate flow in nervous system tissues. The potential advantages of CED in the CNS over other currently available drug delivery techniques, including systemic delivery, intrathecal and/or intraventricular distribution, and polymer implantation, have led to its application in research studies and clinical trials. The authors review the biophysical principles of convective flow and the technology, properties, and clinical applications of convective delivery in the CNS.

  14. Development-Inspired Reprogramming of the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka shared the Nobel Prize for the exciting demonstration that the identity of differentiated cells is not irreversibly determined but can be changed back to a pluripotent state under appropriate instructive signals. The principle that differentiated cells can revert to an embryonic state and even be converted directly from one cell-type into another not only turns fundamental principles of development on their head but also has profound implications for regenerative medicine. Replacement of diseased tissue with newly reprogrammed cells and modeling of human disease are concrete opportunities. Here, we focus on the central nervous system to consider whether and how reprogramming of cell identity may impact regeneration and modeling of a system historically considered immutable and hardwired. PMID:24482482

  15. Evolution and regeneration of the planarian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Umesono, Yoshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2009-04-01

    More than 100 years ago, early workers realized that planarians offer an excellent system for regeneration studies. Another unique aspect of planarians is that they occupy an interesting phylogenetic position with respect to the nervous system in that they possess an evolutionarily primitive brain structure and can regenerate a functional brain from almost any tiny body fragment. Recent molecular studies have revisited planarian regeneration and revealed key information about the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying brain regeneration in planarians. One of our great advances was identification of a gene, nou-darake, which directs the formation of a proper extrinsic environment for pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into brain cells in the planarian Dugesia japonica. Our recent findings have provided mechanistic insights into stem cell biology and also evolutionary biology.

  16. Control of Prosthetic Hands via the Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Cordella, Francesca; Barone, Roberto; Romeo, Rocco Antonio; Bellingegni, Alberto Dellacasa; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Davalli, Angelo; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ranieri, Federico; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Zollo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to provide a critical review of the literature on the technological issues on control and sensorization of hand prostheses interfacing with the Peripheral Nervous System (i.e., PNS), and their experimental validation on amputees. The study opens with an in-depth analysis of control solutions and sensorization features of research and commercially available prosthetic hands. Pros and cons of adopted technologies, signal processing techniques and motion control solutions are investigated. Special emphasis is then dedicated to the recent studies on the restoration of tactile perception in amputees through neural interfaces. The paper finally proposes a number of suggestions for designing the prosthetic system able to re-establish a bidirectional communication with the PNS and foster the prosthesis natural control. PMID:27092041

  17. Development-inspired reprogramming of the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-01-31

    In 2012, John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka shared the Nobel Prize for the demonstration that the identity of differentiated cells is not irreversibly determined but can be changed back to a pluripotent state under appropriate instructive signals. The principle that differentiated cells can revert to an embryonic state and even be converted directly from one cell type into another not only turns fundamental principles of development on their heads but also has profound implications for regenerative medicine. Replacement of diseased tissue with newly reprogrammed cells and modeling of human disease are concrete opportunities. Here, we focus on the central nervous system to consider whether and how reprogramming of cell identity may affect regeneration and modeling of a system historically considered immutable and hardwired.

  18. Visual computing model for immune system and medical system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Cao, Xinxue; Xiong, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Natural immune system is an intelligent self-organizing and adaptive system, which has a variety of immune cells with different types of immune mechanisms. The mutual cooperation between the immune cells shows the intelligence of this immune system, and modeling this immune system has an important significance in medical science and engineering. In order to build a comprehensible model of this immune system for better understanding with the visualization method than the traditional mathematic model, a visual computing model of this immune system was proposed and also used to design a medical system with the immune system, in this paper. Some visual simulations of the immune system were made to test the visual effect. The experimental results of the simulations show that the visual modeling approach can provide a more effective way for analyzing this immune system than only the traditional mathematic equations.

  19. Autonomic nervous system correlates in movement observation and motor imagery

    PubMed Central

    Collet, C.; Di Rienzo, F.; El Hoyek, N.; Guillot, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature offering a better understanding of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) correlates in motor imagery (MI) and movement observation. These are two high brain functions involving sensori-motor coupling, mediated by memory systems. How observing or mentally rehearsing a movement affect ANS activity has not been extensively investigated. The links between cognitive functions and ANS responses are not so obvious. We will first describe the organization of the ANS whose main purposes are controlling vital functions by maintaining the homeostasis of the organism and providing adaptive responses when changes occur either in the external or internal milieu. We will then review how scientific knowledge evolved, thus integrating recent findings related to ANS functioning, and show how these are linked to mental functions. In turn, we will describe how movement observation or MI may elicit physiological responses at the peripheral level of the autonomic effectors, thus eliciting autonomic correlates to cognitive activity. Key features of this paper are to draw a step-by step progression from the understanding of ANS physiology to its relationships with high mental processes such as movement observation or MI. We will further provide evidence that mental processes are co-programmed both at the somatic and autonomic levels of the central nervous system (CNS). We will thus detail how peripheral physiological responses may be analyzed to provide objective evidence that MI is actually performed. The main perspective is thus to consider that, during movement observation and MI, ANS activity is an objective witness of mental processes. PMID:23908623

  20. Neuroendocrine–Immune Systems Response to Environmental Stressors in the Cephalopod Octopus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Di Cosmo, Anna; Polese, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Under a continuous changing environment, animals are challenged with stresses and stimuli which demanding adaptation at behavioral and physiological levels. The adaptation strategies are finely regulated by animal nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. Although it's been established by now the usage of integrative approach to the study the endocrine and nervous systems (neuroendocrine), yet our understanding of how they cooperate with the immune system remains far from complete. The possible role that immune system plays as a component of the network has only been recognized recently. Octopus vulgaris is an important member of cephalopods and is considered as a model species, with considerable information about the neuroendocrine and immune systems. In the current review, we anticipate to shed light on the complexity and cross talk among the three systems and how they cooperate in setting physiological response to stresses-stimuli in O. vulgaris as a target species and primary example. PMID:27733834

  1. Immunological memory within the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Joseph C; Ugolini, Sophie; Vivier, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Immune memory has traditionally been the domain of the adaptive immune system, present only in antigen-specific T and B cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for immunological memory in lower organisms (which are not thought to possess adaptive immunity) and within specific cell subsets of the innate immune system. A special focus will be given to recent findings in both mouse and humans for specificity and memory in natural killer (NK) cells, which have resided under the umbrella of innate immunity for decades. The surprising longevity and enhanced responses of previously primed NK cells will be discussed in the context of several immunization settings. PMID:24674969

  2. Reciprocal Relationships Between the Immune and Central Nervous System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    possit ility that growth hormone may also reverse the immunosuppressive effects of TGF-02 and glucocorticoids on macrophage activation. The...for certain bacterial infections and neoplastic diseases. We are now trying to obtain adequate quantities of recombinant human growth hormone and...adrenal hormones, growth hormone , prolactin and gonadotrophie hormones. Ar pointed out in the first section of this report, these hormones modulate the

  3. Contribution of semaphorins to the formation of the peripheral nervous system in higher vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tomoyuki; Taniguchi, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of proteins characterized by sema domains and play a key role not only in the formation of neural circuits, but in the immune system, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and bone metabolism. To date, 15 semaphorins have been reported to be involved in the formation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in higher vertebrates. A number of experiments have revealed their functions in the PNS, where they act mainly as axonal guidance cues (as repellents or attractants). Semaphorins also play an important role in the migration of neurons and formation of sensory-motor connections in the PNS. This review summarizes recent knowledge regarding the functions of higher vertebrate semaphorins in the formation of the PNS.

  4. Contribution of semaphorins to the formation of the peripheral nervous system in higher vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tomoyuki; Taniguchi, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Semaphorins are a large family of proteins characterized by sema domains and play a key role not only in the formation of neural circuits, but in the immune system, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and bone metabolism. To date, 15 semaphorins have been reported to be involved in the formation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in higher vertebrates. A number of experiments have revealed their functions in the PNS, where they act mainly as axonal guidance cues (as repellents or attractants). Semaphorins also play an important role in the migration of neurons and formation of sensory-motor connections in the PNS. This review summarizes recent knowledge regarding the functions of higher vertebrate semaphorins in the formation of the PNS. PMID:27715392

  5. Development of the nervous system in hatchlings of Spadella cephaloptera (Chaetognatha), and implications for nervous system evolution in Bilateria.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Verena; Perez, Yvan; Müller, Carsten H G; Lacalli, Thurston; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2011-06-01

    Chaetognaths (arrow worms) play an important role as predators in planktonic food webs. Their phylogenetic position is unresolved, and among the numerous hypotheses, affinities to both protostomes and deuterostomes have been suggested. Many aspects of their life history, including ontogenesis, are poorly understood and, though some aspects of their embryonic and postembryonic development have been described, knowledge of early neural development is still limited. This study sets out to provide new insights into neurogenesis of newly hatched Spadella cephaloptera and their development during the following days, with attention to the two main nervous centers, the brain and the ventral nerve center. These were examined with immunohistological methods and confocal laser-scan microscopic analysis, using antibodies against tubulin, FMRFamide, and synapsin to trace the emergence of neuropils and the establishment of specific peptidergic subsystems. At hatching, the neuronal architecture of the ventral nerve center is already well established, whereas the brain and the associated vestibular ganglia are still rudimentary. The development of the brain proceeds rapidly over the next 6 days to a state that resembles the adult pattern. These data are discussed in relation to the larval life style and behaviors such as feeding. In addition, we compare the larval chaetognath nervous system and that of other bilaterian taxa in order to extract information with phylogenetic value. We conclude that larval neurogenesis in chaetognaths does not suggest an especially close relationship to either deuterostomes or protostomes, but instead displays many apomorphic features.

  6. Zinc in the central nervous system: From molecules to behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2012-01-01

    The trace metal zinc is a biofactor that plays essential roles in the central nervous system across the lifespan from early neonatal brain development through the maintenance of brain function in adults. At the molecular level, zinc regulates gene expression through transcription factor activity and is responsible for the activity of dozens of key enzymes in neuronal metabolism. At the cellular level, zinc is a modulator of synaptic activity and neuronal plasticity in both development and adulthood. Given these key roles, it is not surprising that alterations in brain zinc status have been implicated in a wide array of neurological disorders including impaired brain development, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, and mood disorders including depression. Zinc has also been implicated in neuronal damage associated with traumatic brain injury, stroke, and seizure. Understanding the mechanisms that control brain zinc homeostasis is thus critical to the development of preventive and treatment strategies for these and other neurological disorders. PMID:22473811

  7. Antibody staining of the central nervous system in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sean T; Hidalgo, Alicia; de Belle, J Steven; Keshishian, Haig

    2012-02-01

    The Drosophila nervous system provides a valuable model for studying various aspects of brain development and function. The postembryonic Drosophila brain is especially useful, because specific neuron types derive from specific progenitors at specific times. Elucidating the means by which diverse neuron types derive from a limited number of progenitors can contribute significantly to our understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms involved in developmental neurobiology. Antibody-labeling techniques are particularly useful for examining the Drosophila brain. These methods generally use primary antibodies specific to a protein or a structure of interest and a fluorescently labeled or enzyme-coupled secondary antibody to detect the primary antibodies. Immunofluorescence methods allow for simultaneous probing for multiple antigens using different fluorophores, as well as high-resolution confocal examination of deep structures. This protocol describes general procedures for antibody labeling of neural tissue from Drosophila, as well as visualization techniques for fluorescent and enzyme-linked probes.

  8. Infiltration of central nervous system in adult acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Pippard, M J; Callender, S T; Sheldon, P W

    1979-01-01

    Out of 64 consecutive unselected patients with acute myeloid leukaemia studied during 1973-6, five developed clinical evidence of spread to the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroradiological examination showed cerebral deposits in three, in whom rapid symptomatic relief was obtained with radiotherapy. In two of these patients who developed solid intracranial deposits haematological remission could be reinduced or maintained; they were still alive 86 and 134 weeks later. When patients presented with spread to the CNS complicating generalised uncontrolled leukaemia they had short survivals. CNS infiltration may respond dramatically to appropriate treatment provided that it is not associated with generalised uncontrolled leukaemia, which has a poor prognosis. In view of this, routine "prophylaxis" of the CNS in adult acute myeloid leukaemia does not seem justified at present. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 PMID:283873

  9. Fractals in the nervous system: conceptual implications for theoretical neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    This essay is presented with two principal objectives in mind: first, to document the prevalence of fractals at all levels of the nervous system, giving credence to the notion of their functional relevance; and second, to draw attention to the as yet still unresolved issues of the detailed relationships among power-law scaling, self-similarity, and self-organized criticality. As regards criticality, I will document that it has become a pivotal reference point in Neurodynamics. Furthermore, I will emphasize the not yet fully appreciated significance of allometric control processes. For dynamic fractals, I will assemble reasons for attributing to them the capacity to adapt task execution to contextual changes across a range of scales. The final Section consists of general reflections on the implications of the reviewed data, and identifies what appear to be issues of fundamental importance for future research in the rapidly evolving topic of this review.

  10. Neuronal Chemokines: Versatile Messengers In Central Nervous System Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemokines are generally found under both physiological and pathological conditions. Whereas many reports describe chemokine expression in astrocytes and microglia and their role in the migration of leukocytes into the CNS, only few studies describe chemokine expression in neurons. Nevertheless, the expression of neuronal chemokines and the corresponding chemokine receptors in CNS cells under physiological and pathological conditions indicates that neuronal chemokines contribute to CNS cell interaction. In this study, we review recent studies describing neuronal chemokine expression and discuss potential roles of neuronal chemokines in neuron–astrocyte, neuron–microglia, and neuron–neuron interaction. PMID:17952658

  11. Homeoprotein signaling in the developing and adult nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Signaling classically involves the secretion of diverse molecules that bind specific cellsurface receptors and engage intracellular transduction cascades. Some exceptions, namely lipophilic agents, can cross plasma membranes to bind intracellular receptors and be carried to the nucleus to regulate transcription. Homeoprotein transcription factors are among the few proteins with such a capacity. Here, we review the signaling activities of homeoproteins in the developing and adult nervous system, with particular emphasis on axon/cell migration and postnatal critical periods of cerebral cortex plasticity. We also describe homeoprotein non-cell autonomous mechanisms and explore how this “novel” signaling pathway impacts emerging research in brain development and physiology. In this context, we explore hypotheses on the evolution of signaling, the role of homeoproteins as early morphogens, and their therapeutic potential for neurological and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25741720

  12. Building global capacity for brain and nervous system disorders research

    PubMed Central

    Cottler, Linda B.; Zunt, Joseph; Weiss, Bahr; Kamal, Ayeesha Kamran; Vaddiparti, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    The global burden of neurological, neuropsychiatric, substance-use and neurodevelopmental disorders in low- and middle-income countries is worsened, not only by the lack of targeted research funding, but also by the lack of relevant in-country research capacity. Such capacity, from the individual to the national level, is necessary to address the problems within a local context. As for many health issues in these countries, the ability to address this burden requires development of research infrastructure and a trained cadre of clinicians and scientists who can ask the right questions, and conduct, manage, apply and disseminate research for practice and policy. This Review describes some of the evolving issues, knowledge and programmes focused on building research capacity in low- and middle-income countries in general and for brain and nervous system disorders in particular. PMID:26580329

  13. Pathogen-inspired drug delivery to the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Rebecca L; Cacaccio, Joseph; Wrabel, Eileen; Schwartz, Mary E; Coleman, Timothy P; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2014-01-01

    For as long as the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been evolving to exclude bloodborne agents from the central nervous system (CNS), pathogens have adopted a multitude of strategies to bypass it. Some pathogens, notably viruses and certain bacteria, enter the CNS in whole form, achieving direct physical passage through endothelial or neuronal cells to infect the brain. Other pathogens, including bacteria and multicellular eukaryotic organisms, secrete toxins that preferentially interact with specific cell types to exert a broad range of biological effects on peripheral and central neurons. In this review, we will discuss the directed mechanisms that viruses, bacteria, and the toxins secreted by higher order organisms use to enter the CNS. Our goal is to identify ligand-mediated strategies that could be used to improve the brain-specific delivery of engineered nanocarriers, including polymers, lipids, biologically sourced materials, and imaging agents. PMID:25610755

  14. Is Bone a Target-Tissue for the Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    García-Castellano, José M; Díaz-Herrera, Pilar; Morcuende, José A

    2000-01-01

    Bone cells respond in specific ways to various hormones and growth factors, but the biology of skeletal innervation and its physiologic significance in bone metabolism is poorly understood. With the introduction of immunohistochemical staining techniques and new molecular biology tools, the knowledge in this field has significantly improved. In this review, we update current understanding of the effects of neuropeptides on bone metabolism, specifically vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP). In addition, new information concerning the role of growth factors, such as neurotrophins, is also discussed. There is strong evidence to suggest that bone can be a target of the nervous system. Further investigations in this field will allow us to answer questions related to pre-natal development, bone growth, fracture healing, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis or neoplasias of mesoderm origin. PMID:10934625

  15. Noncongenital central nervous system infections in children: radiology review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Jorge Humberto Davila; Rantes, Claudia Isabel Lazarte; Arbelaez, Andres; Restrepo, Feliza; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are a very common worldwide health problem in childhood with significant morbidity and mortality. In children, viruses are the most common cause of CNS infections, followed by bacterial etiology, and less frequent due to mycosis and other causes. Noncomplicated meningitis is easier to recognize clinically; however, complications of meningitis such as abscesses, infarcts, venous thrombosis, or extra-axial empyemas are difficult to recognize clinically, and imaging plays a very important role on this setting. In addition, it is important to keep in mind that infectious process adjacent to the CNS such as mastoiditis can develop by contiguity in an infectious process within the CNS. We display the most common causes of meningitis and their complications.

  16. MicroRNAs in central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Néstor F; Cruz-Reséndiz, Mónica S; Flores-Herrera, Héctor; García-López, Guadalupe; Molina-Hernández, Anayansi

    2014-01-01

    During early and late embryo neurodevelopment, a large number of molecules work together in a spatial and temporal manner to ensure the adequate formation of an organism. Diverse signals participate in embryo patterning and organization synchronized by time and space. Among the molecules that are expressed in a temporal and spatial manner, and that are considered essential in several developmental processes, are the microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review, we highlight some important aspects of the biogenesis and function of miRNAs as well as their participation in ectoderm commitment and their role in central nervous system (CNS) development. Instead of giving an extensive list of miRNAs involved in these processes, we only mention those miRNAs that are the most studied during the development of the CNS as well as the most likely mRNA targets for each miRNA and its protein functions.

  17. Regenerative Therapies for Central Nervous System Diseases: a Biomaterials Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Roger Y; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a limited capacity to spontaneously regenerate following traumatic injury or disease, requiring innovative strategies to promote tissue and functional repair. Tissue regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, have demonstrated promising results in experimental animal models, but have been difficult to translate clinically. The efficacy of cell therapy, which involves stem cell transplantation into the CNS to replace damaged tissue, has been limited due to low cell survival and integration upon transplantation, while delivery of therapeutic molecules to the CNS using conventional methods, such as oral and intravenous administration, have been limited by diffusion across the blood–brain/spinal cord-barrier. The use of biomaterials to promote graft survival and integration as well as localized and sustained delivery of biologics to CNS injury sites is actively being pursued. This review will highlight recent advances using biomaterials as cell- and drug-delivery vehicles for CNS repair. PMID:24002187

  18. Therapeutic approaches of magnetic nanoparticles for the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent one of the fastest growing areas of concern requiring urgent medical attention. Treatment of CNS ailments is hindered owing to different physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which limits the accessibility of potential drugs. With the assistance of a nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategy, the problems could be overcome. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have proven immensely useful as drug carriers for site-specific delivery and as contrast agents owing to their magnetic susceptibility and biocompatibility. By utilizing MNPs, diagnosis and treatment of CNS diseases have progressed by overcoming the hurdles of the BBB. In this review, the therapeutic aspect and the future prospects related to the theranostic approach of MNPs are discussed.

  19. Implication of coumarins towards central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Cordell, Geoffrey A; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Budzyńska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins are widely distributed, plant-derived, 2H-1-benzopyran-2-one derivatives which have attracted intense interest in recent years as a result of their diverse and potent pharmacological properties. Particularly, their effects on the central nervous system (CNS) have been established. The present review discusses the most important pharmacological effects of natural and synthetic coumarins on the CNS, including their interactions with benzodiazepine receptors, their dopaminergic and serotonergic affinity, and their ability to inhibit cholinesterases and monoamine oxidases. The structure-activity relationships pertaining to these effects are also discussed. This review posits that natural or synthetic coumarins have the potential for development in the therapy of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, schizophrenia, anxiety, epilepsy, and depression.

  20. Zinc in the central nervous system: From molecules to behavior.

    PubMed

    Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Levenson, Cathy W

    2012-01-01

    The trace metal zinc is a biofactor that plays essential roles in the central nervous system across the lifespan from early neonatal brain development through the maintenance of brain function in adults. At the molecular level, zinc regulates gene expression through transcription factor activity and is responsible for the activity of dozens of key enzymes in neuronal metabolism. At the cellular level, zinc is a modulator of synaptic activity and neuronal plasticity in both development and adulthood. Given these key roles, it is not surprising that alterations in brain zinc status have been implicated in a wide array of neurological disorders including impaired brain development, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and mood disorders including depression. Zinc has also been implicated in neuronal damage associated with traumatic brain injury, stroke, and seizure. Understanding the mechanisms that control brain zinc homeostasis is thus critical to the development of preventive and treatment strategies for these and other neurological disorders.

  1. The expression of SEIPIN in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Xie, Beibei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Shaoshi; Zhang, Yumei; Paxinos, George; Yang, Hongyuan; Liang, Huazheng

    2016-11-01

    Immunohistochemical staining was used to investigate the expression pattern of SEIPIN in the mouse central nervous system. SEIPIN was found to be present in a large number of areas, including the motor and somatosensory cortex, the thalamic nuclei, the hypothalamic nuclei, the mesencephalic nuclei, some cranial motor nuclei, the reticular formation of the brainstem, and the vestibular complex. Double labeling with NeuN antibody confirmed that SEIPIN-positive cells in some nuclei were neurons. Retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord revealed that SEIPIN-positive neurons in the motor and somatosensory cortex and other movement related nuclei project to the mouse spinal cord. The present study found more nuclei positive for SEIPIN than shown using in situ hybridization and confirmed the presence of SEIPIN in neurons projecting to the spinal cord. The results of this study help to explain the clinical manifestations of patients with Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (Bscl2) gene mutations.

  2. Pyrimidine derivatives as potential agents acting on central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Deep, Aakash; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Pyrimidine and its derivatives are present in many of the bioactive aromatic compounds that are of wide interest because of their diverse biological and clinical applications. The utility of pyrimidines as synthon for various biologically active compounds has given impetus to these studies. The review article aims to review the work reported on pharmacological activities of central nervous system (CNS) such as anticonvulsant and antidepressant, which created interest among researchers to synthesize variety of pyrimidine and their derivatives. The present study shows, objective of the work can be summarized as pyrimidine derivative constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. These observations have been given novel idea for the development of new pyrimidine derivative that possess varied biological activities. This article aims to review the recent works on pyrimidine moiety together with the biological potential during the past year.

  3. Role of radiology in central nervous system stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, E A C; Young, V E L; Hogarth, K M; Quaghebeur, G

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) stimulation is becoming increasingly prevalent. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proven to be an invaluable treatment for movement disorders and is also useful in many other neurological conditions refractory to medical treatment, such as chronic pain and epilepsy. Neuroimaging plays an important role in operative planning, target localization and post-operative follow-up. The use of imaging in determining the underlying mechanisms of DBS is increasing, and the dependence on imaging is likely to expand as deep brain targeting becomes more refined. This article will address the expanding role of radiology and highlight issues, including MRI safety concerns, that radiologists may encounter when confronted with a patient with CNS stimulation equipment in situ. PMID:25715044

  4. Oligodendrocyte precursors migrate along vasculature in the developing nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Niu, Jianqin; Munji, Roeben; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chang, Junlei; Zhang, Haijing; Tien, An-Chi; Kuo, Calvin J; Chan, Jonah R; Daneman, Richard; Fancy, Stephen P J

    2016-01-22

    Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons in the central nervous system and develop from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that must first migrate extensively during brain and spinal cord development. We show that OPCs require the vasculature as a physical substrate for migration. We observed that OPCs of the embryonic mouse brain and spinal cord, as well as the human cortex, emerge from progenitor domains and associate with the abluminal endothelial surface of nearby blood vessels. Migrating OPCs crawl along and jump between vessels. OPC migration in vivo was disrupted in mice with defective vascular architecture but was normal in mice lacking pericytes. Thus, physical interactions with the vascular endothelium are required for OPC migration. We identify Wnt-Cxcr4 (chemokine receptor 4) signaling in regulation of OPC-endothelial interactions and propose that this signaling coordinates OPC migration with differentiation.

  5. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie

    2014-02-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals.

  6. Fractals in the Nervous System: Conceptual Implications for Theoretical Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    This essay is presented with two principal objectives in mind: first, to document the prevalence of fractals at all levels of the nervous system, giving credence to the notion of their functional relevance; and second, to draw attention to the as yet still unresolved issues of the detailed relationships among power-law scaling, self-similarity, and self-organized criticality. As regards criticality, I will document that it has become a pivotal reference point in Neurodynamics. Furthermore, I will emphasize the not yet fully appreciated significance of allometric control processes. For dynamic fractals, I will assemble reasons for attributing to them the capacity to adapt task execution to contextual changes across a range of scales. The final Section consists of general reflections on the implications of the reviewed data, and identifies what appear to be issues of fundamental importance for future research in the rapidly evolving topic of this review. PMID:21423358

  7. Primary large-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; McClatchey, K.D.; Amendola, M.A.; Gebarski, S.S.

    1986-06-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare disease. Seven patients were seen and treated at the University of Michigan Medical Center between January 1969 and December 1983. All patients had histologically proven diagnoses of large cell lymphoma with clinical and radiologic evidence of involvement limited to the CNS. Five of seven patients received postoperative radiation therapy, two of whom have had apparent local control at 1- and 2-year follow-up. The two patients without postoperative radiation died of local recurrence 2 and 3 months following subtotal resection. These poor results suggest that adjuvant therapy may be required for improved control of this type of extranodal lymphoma.

  8. The logistics of myelin biogenesis in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Snaidero, Nicolas; Simons, Mikael

    2017-02-07

    Rapid nerve conduction depends on myelin, but not all axons in the central nervous system (CNS) are myelinated to the same extent. Here, we review our current understanding of the biology of myelin biogenesis in the CNS. We focus on how the different steps of myelination are interconnected and how distinct patterns of myelin are generated. Possibly, a "basal" mode of myelination is laying the groundwork in areas devoted to basic homeostasis early in development, whereas a "targeted" mode generates myelin in regions controlling more complex tasks throughout adulthood. Such mechanisms may explain why myelination progresses in some areas according to a typical chronological and topographic sequence, while in other regions it is regulated by environmental stimuli contributing to interindividual variability of myelin structure. GLIA 2017.

  9. Developmental and pathological angiogenesis in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Mario; Chang, Junlei; Zhang, Haijing

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, in the central nervous system (CNS) is seen both as a normal physiological response as well as a pathological step in disease progression. Formation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an essential step in physiological CNS angiogenesis. The BBB is regulated by a neurovascular unit (NVU) consisting of endothelial and perivascular cells as well as vascular astrocytes. The NVU plays a critical role in preventing entry of neurotoxic substances and regulation of blood flow in the CNS. In recent years, research on numerous acquired and hereditary disorders of the CNS has increasingly emphasized the role of angiogenesis in disease pathophysiology. Here, we discuss molecular mechanisms of CNS angiogenesis during embryogenesis as well as various pathological states including brain tumor formation, ischemic stroke, arteriovenous malformations, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24760128

  10. [Imaging diagnosis of central nervous system malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Kan, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    With a typical case, imaging diagnosis of central nervous system malignant lymphoma is not difficult. High density on non contrast CT, periventricular location, homogenous contrast enhancement, iso- to hypointensity to gray matter on T(2) weighted MR imaging and high intensity on diffusion weighted MR imaging are characteristic findings. Hemorrhage is rare. When a patient is immunocompromised, irregular ring enhancement is noted on enhanced study. Intravascular lymphomatois is a rare type of lymphoma. A variety of imaging findings are reported. Differential diagnosis are many. Most difficult to distinguish is a tumefactive multiple sclerosis. Most of the reported cases of tumefactive multiple sclerosis are diagnosed by brain biopsy when the brain tumor, especially malignant lymphoma is suspected. CLIPPERS (chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids) has been recently identified. However, there still remains whether CLIPPERS is an actual new disease entity or represents overlapping disease.

  11. Targeting protein kinases in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Laura K.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Watterson, D. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are a growing drug target class in disorders in peripheral tissues, but the development of kinase-targeted therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases remains a challenge, largely owing to issues associated specifically with CNS drug discovery. However, several candidate therapeutics that target CNS protein kinases are now in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. We review candidate compounds and discuss selected CNS protein kinases that are emerging as important therapeutic targets. In addition, we analyse trends in small-molecule properties that correlate with key challenges in CNS drug discovery, such as blood–brain barrier penetrance and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, and discuss the potential of future approaches that will integrate molecular-fragment expansion with pharmacoinformatics to address these challenges. PMID:19876042

  12. Central nervous system infections caused by varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Francisco J; Gilarranz, Raúl; Hernández, Melisa; Ramos, Diana; Pena, María José

    2016-08-01

    We carried out a clinical and epidemiological study of adult patients with varicella-zoster virus central nervous system infection diagnosed by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-six patients were included. Twelve (46.2 %) patients were diagnosed with meningitis and fourteen (53.8 %) with meningoencephalitis. Twelve (46.2 %) had cranial nerves involvement (mainly the facial (VII) and vestibulocochlear (VIII) nerves), six (23.1 %) had cerebellar involvement, fourteen (53.8 %) had rash, and four (15.4 %) developed Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Three (11.5 %) patients had sequelae. Length of stay was significantly lower in patients diagnosed with meningitis and treatment with acyclovir was more frequent in patients diagnosed with meningoencephalitis. We believe routine detection of varicella-zoster virus, regardless of the presence of rash, is important because the patient may benefit from a different clinical management.

  13. Intranasal delivery of biologics to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Thorne, Robert G

    2012-05-15

    Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases is very difficult due to the blood-brain barrier's (BBB) ability to severely restrict entry of all but small, non-polar compounds. Intranasal administration is a non-invasive method of drug delivery which may bypass the BBB to allow therapeutic substances direct access to the CNS. Intranasal delivery of large molecular weight biologics such as proteins, gene vectors, and stem cells is a potentially useful strategy to treat a variety of diseases/disorders of the CNS including stroke, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and psychiatric disorders. Here we give an overview of relevant nasal anatomy and physiology and discuss the pathways and mechanisms likely involved in drug transport from the nasal epithelium to the CNS. Finally we review both pre-clinical and clinical studies involving intranasal delivery of biologics to the CNS.

  14. Outcomes of persons with blastomycosis involving the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jonathan W; Wuerz, Terry; Embil, John M; Del Bigio, Marc R; McDonald, Patrick J; Krawitz, Sherry

    2013-06-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungus which is potentially life-threatening if central nervous system (CNS) dissemination occurs. Sixteen patients with proven or probable CNS blastomycosis are presented. Median duration of symptoms was 90 days; headache and focal neurologic deficit were the most common presenting symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) consistently demonstrated an abnormality, compared to 58% of computed tomography scans. Tissue culture yielded the pathogen in 71% of histology-confirmed cases. All patients who completed treatment of an amphotericin B formulation and extended azole-based therapy did not relapse. Initial nonspecific symptoms lead to delayed diagnosis of CNS blastomycosis. A high index of suspicion is necessary if there is history of contact with an area where B. dermatitidis is endemic. Diagnostic tests should include MRI followed by biopsy for tissue culture and pathology. Optimal treatment utilizes a lipid-based amphotericin B preparation with an extended course of voriconazole.

  15. Tuberculous Panophthalmitis with Lymphadenitis and Central Nervous System Tuberculoma

    PubMed Central

    Srichatrapimuk, Sirawat; Wattanatranon, Duangkamon

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious infectious disease that spreads globally. The ocular manifestations of TB are uncommon and diverse. TB panophthalmitis has been rarely reported. Here, we described a 38-year-old Thai man presenting with panophthalmitis of the right eye. Further investigation showed that he had concurrent TB lymphadenitis and central nervous system (CNS) tuberculoma, as well as HIV infection, with a CD4 cell count of 153 cells/mm3. Despite the initial response to antituberculous agents, the disease had subsequently progressed and enucleation was required. The pathological examination revealed acute suppurative granulomatous panophthalmitis with retinal detachment. Further staining demonstrated acid-fast bacilli in the tissue. Colonies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were obtained from tissue culture. He was treated with antiretroviral agents for HIV infection and 12 months of antituberculous agents. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of TB in the differential diagnosis of endophthalmitis and panophthalmitis, especially in regions where TB is endemic. PMID:27051539

  16. Neuropathic Pain in Animal Models of Nervous System Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tian, David H.; Perera, Chamini J.; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a frequent chronic presentation in autoimmune diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), causing significant individual disablement and suffering. Animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) mimic many aspects of MS and GBS, respectively, and are well suited to study the pathophysiology of these autoimmune diseases. However, while much attention has been devoted to curative options, research into neuropathic pain mechanisms and relief has been somewhat lacking. Recent studies have demonstrated a variety of sensory abnormalities in different EAE and EAN models, which enable investigations of behavioural changes, underlying mechanisms, and potential pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain associated with these diseases. This review examines the symptoms, mechanisms, and clinical therapeutic options in these conditions and highlights the value of EAE and EAN animal models for the study of neuropathic pain in MS and GBS. PMID:23737643

  17. Leptin sustains spontaneous remyelination in the adult central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Ken; Muramatsu, Rieko; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2017-01-01

    Demyelination is a common feature of many central nervous system (CNS) diseases and is associated with neurological impairment. Demyelinated axons are spontaneously remyelinated depending on oligodendrocyte development, which mainly involves molecules expressed in the CNS environment. In this study, we found that leptin, a peripheral hormone secreted from adipocytes, promoted the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Leptin increased the OPC proliferation via in vitro phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK); whereas leptin neutralization inhibited OPC proliferation and remyelination in a mouse model of toxin-induced demyelination. The OPC-specific leptin receptor long isoform (LepRb) deletion in mice inhibited both OPC proliferation and remyelination in the response to demyelination. Intrathecal leptin administration increased OPC proliferation. These results demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism by which leptin sustained OPC proliferation and remyelination in a pathological CNS. PMID:28091609

  18. Central nervous system syndromes in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alissa J; Fishman, Jay A

    2014-10-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have a high incidence of central nervous system (CNS) complications, including both focal and diffuse neurologic deficits. In the immunocompromised host, the initial clinical evaluation must focus on both life-threatening CNS infections and vascular or anatomic lesions. The clinical signs and symptoms of CNS processes are modified by the immunosuppression required to prevent graft rejection. In this population, these etiologies often coexist with drug toxicities and metabolic abnormalities that complicate the development of a specific approach to clinical management. This review assesses the multiple risk factors for CNS processes in solid organ transplant recipients and establishes a timeline to assist in the evaluation and management of these complex patients.

  19. Neuroinvasion and Inflammation in Viral Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schroten, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses can cause devastating central nervous system (CNS) infections, especially in young children and the elderly. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) have been described as relevant sites of entry for specific viruses as well as for leukocytes, which are recruited during the proinflammatory response in the course of CNS infection. In this review, we illustrate examples of established brain barrier models, in which the specific reaction patterns of different viral families can be analyzed. Furthermore, we highlight the pathogen specific array of cytokines and chemokines involved in immunological responses in viral CNS infections. We discuss in detail the link between specific cytokines and chemokines and leukocyte migration profiles. The thorough understanding of the complex and interrelated inflammatory mechanisms as well as identifying universal mediators promoting CNS inflammation is essential for the development of new diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:27313404

  20. Excitability tuning of axons in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ohura, Shunsuke; Kamiya, Haruyuki

    2016-05-01

    The axon is a long neuronal process that originates from the soma and extends towards the presynaptic terminals. The pioneering studies on the squid giant axon or the spinal cord motoneuron established that the axon conducts action potentials faithfully to the presynaptic terminals with self-regenerative processes of membrane excitation. Recent studies challenged the notion that the fundamental understandings obtained from the study of squid giant axons are readily applicable to the axons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). These studies revealed that the functional and structural properties of the CNS axons are much more variable than previously thought. In this review article, we summarize the recent understandings of axon physiology in the mammalian CNS due to progress in the subcellular recording techniques which allow direct recordings from the axonal membranes, with emphasis on the hippocampal mossy fibers as a representative en passant axons typical for cortical axons.