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Sample records for nested-multiplex pcr detection

  1. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus by e6 nested multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Sotlar, K; Diemer, D; Dethleffs, A; Hack, Y; Stubner, A; Vollmer, N; Menton, S; Menton, M; Dietz, K; Wallwiener, D; Kandolf, R; Bültmann, B

    2004-07-01

    A nested multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay that combines degenerate E6/E7 consensus primers and type-specific primers was evaluated for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68 using HPV DNA-containing plasmids and cervical scrapes (n = 1,525). The performance of the NMPCR assay relative to that of conventional PCR with MY09-MY11 and GP5+-GP6+ primers, and nested PCR with these two primer sets (MY/GP) was evaluated in 495 cervical scrapes with corresponding histologic and cytologic findings. HPV prevalence rates determined with the NMPCR assay were 34.7% (102 of 294) in the absence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 0), 94.2% (113 of 120) in the presence of mild or moderate dysplasia (CIN I/II), and 97.8% (44 of 45) in the presence of severe dysplasia (CIN III). The combination of all four HPV detection methods applied in the study was taken as "gold standard": in all three morphological subgroups the NMPCR assay had significantly (P < 0.0001) higher sensitivities than the MY09-MY11 and GP5+-GP6+ assays and sensitivities comparable or equal to those of the MY/GP assay. All 18 HPV genotypes investigated were detected among the clinical samples. The ratio of high- to low-risk HPV genotypes increased from 4:1 (80 of 103) in CIN 0 to 19:1 (149 of 157) in CIN I to III. Multiple infections were detected in 47.9% (124 of 259) of the patients. In conclusion, the novel NMPCR method is a sensitive and useful tool for HPV DNA detection, especially when exact HPV genotyping and the identification of multiple HPV infections are required.

  2. A novel nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for differential detection of Entamoeba histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash C

    2007-01-01

    Background E. histolytica, a pathogenic amoeba, is indistinguishable in its cyst and trophozoite stages from those of non-pathogenic E. moshkovskii and E. dispar by light microscopy. We have developed a nested multiplex PCR targeting a 16S-like rRNA gene for differential detection of all the three morphologically similar forms of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar simultaneously in stool samples. Results The species specific product size for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar was 439, 553 and 174 bp respectively, which was clearly different for all the three Entamoeba species. The nested multiplex PCR showed a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100% for the demonstration of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples. The PCR was positive for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar in a total of 190 out of 202 stool specimens (94% sensitive) that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture. All the 35 negative control stool samples that were negative for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by microscopy and culture were also found negative by the nested multiplex PCR (100% specific). The result from the study shows that only 34.6% of the patient stool samples that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture, were actually positive for pathogenic E. histolytica and the remaining majority of the stool samples were positive for non-pathogenic E. dispar or E. moshkovskii as demonstrated by the use of nested multiplex PCR. Conclusion The present study reports a new nested multiplex PCR strategy for species specific detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii DNA in stool specimens. The test is highly specific, sensitive and also rapid, providing the results within 12 hours of receiving stool specimens. PMID:17524135

  3. Touchdown nested multiplex PCR detection of Phytophthora cinnamomi and P. cambivora from French and English chestnut grove soils.

    PubMed

    Langrell, Stephen R H; Morel, Olivier; Robin, Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Soil borne Phytophthora cinnamomi and Phytophthora cambivora are considered the most pathogenic species associated with chestnut (Castanea sativa) decline in Europe. Mapping their incidence and distribution from nursery and plantation soils may offer valuable information for limiting spread. As conventional biological baiting and taxonomic confirmation is generally time consuming, labour, logistically and space intensive, we have focused on the development of a specific touchdown nested multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) approach for the simultaneous detection of both species direct from soil. Pre-existing and novel primers, based on Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) sequences, have been evaluated for their specificity and use in a multiplex capacity in various combinations. Coupled to this we have modified a mechanical lysis procedure for DNA extraction from up to 10 g of chestnut under storey soils (ranging from 0.5 to 25 μg DNA g(-1)fresh soil). Using serial dilutions and/or polyvinylpolypyrrolidone chromatography purification, both species have been successfully detected, in artificially and naturally infected soils. Levels of assay detection are comparable to other Phytophthora species where PCR based diagnostic systems have been reported. A qualitative evaluation of this approach against conventional baiting is presented.

  4. FilmArray, an Automated Nested Multiplex PCR System for Multi-Pathogen Detection: Development and Application to Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poritz, Mark A.; Blaschke, Anne J.; Byington, Carrie L.; Meyers, Lindsay; Nilsson, Kody; Jones, David E.; Thatcher, Stephanie A.; Robbins, Thomas; Lingenfelter, Beth; Amiott, Elizabeth; Herbener, Amy; Daly, Judy; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Teng, David H. -F.; Ririe, Kirk M.

    2011-01-01

    The ideal clinical diagnostic system should deliver rapid, sensitive, specific and reproducible results while minimizing the requirements for specialized laboratory facilities and skilled technicians. We describe an integrated diagnostic platform, the “FilmArray”, which fully automates the detection and identification of multiple organisms from a single sample in about one hour. An unprocessed biologic/clinical sample is subjected to nucleic acid purification, reverse transcription, a high-order nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction and amplicon melt curve analysis. Biochemical reactions are enclosed in a disposable pouch, minimizing the PCR contamination risk. FilmArray has the potential to detect greater than 100 different nucleic acid targets at one time. These features make the system well-suited for molecular detection of infectious agents. Validation of the FilmArray technology was achieved through development of a panel of assays capable of identifying 21 common viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. Initial testing of the system using both cultured organisms and clinical nasal aspirates obtained from children demonstrated an analytical and clinical sensitivity and specificity comparable to existing diagnostic platforms. We demonstrate that automated identification of pathogens from their corresponding target amplicon(s) can be accomplished by analysis of the DNA melting curve of the amplicon. PMID:22039434

  5. Comparison of nested-multiplex, Taqman & SYBR Green real-time PCR in diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess in a tertiary health care institute in India

    PubMed Central

    Dinoop, K.P.; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Mandal, Jharna; Swaminathan, R.P.; Narayanan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Amoebiasis is a common parasitic infection caused by Entamoeba histolytica and amoebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of amoebiasis. The aim of this study was to standardise real-time PCR assays (Taqman and SYBR Green) to detect E. histolytica from liver abscess pus and stool samples and compare its results with nested-multiplex PCR. Methods: Liver abscess pus specimens were subjected to DNA extraction. The extracted DNA samples were subjected to amplification by nested-multiplex PCR, Taqman (18S rRNA) and SYBR Green real-time PCR (16S-like rRNA assays to detect E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii). The amplification products were further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was done for nested-multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR and the area under the curve was calculated for evaluating the accuracy of the tests to dignose ALA. Results: In all, 17, 19 and 25 liver abscess samples were positive for E. histolytica by nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green and Taqman real-time PCR assays, respectively. Significant differences in detection of E. histolytica were noted in the real-time PCR assays evaluated (P<0.0001). The nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green real-time PCR and Taqman real-time PCR evaluated showed a positivity rate of 34, 38 and 50 per cent, respectively. Based on ROC curve analysis (considering Taqman real-time PCR as the gold standard), it was observed that SYBR Green real-time PCR was better than conventional nested-multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of ALA. Interpretation & conclusions: Taqman real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA had the highest positivity rate evaluated in this study. Both nested multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR assays utilized were evaluated to give accurate results. Real-time PCR assays can be used as the gold standard in rapid and reliable diagnosis, and appropriate management of amoebiasis, replacing the

  6. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  7. Nested multiplex PCR--a feasible technique to study partial community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in field-growing plant root.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiuli; Zhao, Bin

    2006-08-01

    Plant can be infected by different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the interaction between them within root tissues mainly because different species cannot be distinguished on the basis of fungal structure. Accurate species identification of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonized in plant roots is the cornerstone of mycorrhizal study, yet this fundamental step is impossible through its morphological character alone. For accurate, rapid and inexpensive detection of partial mycorrhizal fungal community in plant roots, a nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed in this study. Five discriminating primers designed based on the variable region of the 5' end of the large ribosomal subunit were used in the experiment for testing their specificity and the sensitivity in nested PCR by using spores from Glomus mosseae (BEG12), Glomus intraradices (BEG141), Scutellospora castaneae (BEG1) and two unidentified Glomus sp. HAUO3 and HAUO4. The feasibility assay of nested multiplex PCR was conducted by use of spore mixture, Astragalus sinicum roots co-inoculated with 4 species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from pot cultures and 15 different field-growing plant roots respectively after analyses of the compatibility of primers. The result indicated that the sensitivity was in the same range as that of the corresponding single PCR reaction. Overall accuracy was 95%. The efficiency and sensitivity of this multiplex PCR procedure provided a rapid and easy way to simultaneously detect several of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungal species in a same plant root system. PMID:16989281

  8. Assignment of the group A rotavirus NSP4 gene into genotypes using a hemi-nested multiplex PCR assay: a rapid and reproducible assay for strain surveillance studies.

    PubMed

    Bányai, Krisztián; Bogdán, Agnes; Szücs, György; Arista, Serenella; De Grazia, Simona; Kang, Gagandeep; Banerjee, Indrani; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Buonavoglia, Canio; Martella, Vito

    2009-03-01

    The rotavirus non-structural protein NSP4 has been implicated in a number of biological functions during the rotavirus cellular cycle and pathogenesis, and has been addressed as a target for vaccine development. The NSP4 gene has been classified into six genotypes (A-F). A semi-nested triplex PCR was developed for genotyping the major human NSP4 genotypes (A-C), which are common in human rotavirus strains but are also shared among most mammalian rotavirus strains. A total of 192 previously characterized human strains representing numerous G and P type specificities (such as G1P[8], G1P[4], G2P[4], G3P[3], G3P[8], G3P[9], G4P[6], G4P[8], G6P[4], G6P[9], G6P[14], G8P[10], G8P[14], G9P[8], G9P[11], G10P[11], G12P[6] and G12P[8]) were tested for NSP4 specificity by the collaborating laboratories. An additional 35 animal strains, including the reference laboratory strains SA11 (simian, G3P[2]), NCDV (bovine, G6P[1]), K9 and CU-1 (canine, G3P[3]), together with 31 field isolates (canine, G3P[3]; feline, G3P[9]; porcine, G2P[23], G3P[6], G4P[6], G5P[6], G5P[7], G5P[26], G5P[27], G9P[6] and G9P[7]) were also successfully NSP4-typed. Four human G3P[9] strains and one feline G3P[9] strain were found to possess an NSP4 A genotype, instead of NSP4 C, suggesting a reassortment event between heterologous strains. Routine NSP4 genotyping may help to determine the genomic constellation of rotaviruses of man and livestock, and identify interspecies transmission of heterologous strains. PMID:19208878

  9. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  10. Optimized PCR-based detection of mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Paige L; Bess, Dan

    2011-06-20

    The maintenance of contamination-free cell lines is essential to cell-based research. Among the biggest contaminant concerns are mycoplasma contamination. Although mycoplasma do not usually kill contaminated cells, they are difficult to detect and can cause a variety of effects on cultured cells, including altered metabolism, slowed proliferation and chromosomal aberrations. In short, mycoplasma contamination compromises the value of those cell lines in providing accurate data for life science research. The sources of mycoplasma contamination in the laboratory are very challenging to completely control. As certain mycoplasma species are found on human skin, they can be introduced through poor aseptic technique. Additionally, they can come from contaminated supplements such as fetal bovine serum, and most importantly from other contaminated cell cultures. Once mycoplasma contaminates a culture, it can quickly spread to contaminate other areas of the lab. Strict adherence to good laboratory practices such as good aseptic technique are key, and routine testing for mycoplasma is highly recommended for successful control of mycoplasma contamination. PCR-based detection of mycoplasma has become a very popular method for routine cell line maintenance. PCR-based detection methods are highly sensitive and can provide rapid results, which allows researchers to respond quickly to isolate and eliminate contamination once it is detected in comparison to the time required using microbiological techniques. The LookOut Mycoplasma PCR Detection Kit is highly sensitive, with a detection limit of only 2 genomes per μl. Taking advantage of the highly specific JumpStart Taq DNA Polymerase and a proprietary primer design, false positives are greatly reduced. The convenient 8-tube format, strips pre-coated with dNTPs, and associated primers helps increase the throughput to meet the needs of customers with larger collections of cell lines. Given the extreme sensitivity of the kit, great

  11. [Mutation detection by PCR-TGGE].

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, T; Nishiyama, K; Matsuo, M

    1995-07-01

    The variants in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) heat-labile toxin (LT) gene were detected by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). 15 clinical strains isolated from patients and a wild type strain (B2C) were analyzed after the conventional PCR. Although all PCR products (707bp) corresponded to A-subunit of LT, three strains were the different electrophoretic patterns after silver staining as compared to the wild type. For further electrophoretic analyses, the 707bp region was divided into 4 parts. The different ones were localized in the downstream part (183bp), but each those DNA bands was not so clear than DNA bands in 707bp. The clearer patterns were obtained by using a primer attached GC-clamp. The hetero-duplex assays in TGGE were proceeded by a series of procedures in mixing with the equal quantity of PCR products derived from a variant and a wild type, heat-denaturation and then annealing. TGGE of those mixed samples had 4 bands that were 2 front bands as homo-duplex and 2 slower migration bands as hetero-duplex. To Confirm the site of the mutations, the nucleotide sequences in each 183bp PCR products were decided by dideoxynucleotide-fluorescent dye method. Indeed, two variants were recognized four one-base substitutions without deletions and the one was five. Thus, the difference of migration in TGGE depended on the number and the localization in mutation sites.

  12. Propidium monoazide reverse transcriptase PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus.

    PubMed

    Karim, Mohammad R; Fout, G Shay; Johnson, Clifford H; White, Karen M; Parshionikar, Sandhya U

    2015-07-01

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the public health significance of positive findings are limited. In this study, PMA RT-PCR and RT-qPCR assays were evaluated for selective detection of infectious poliovirus, murine norovirus (MNV-1), and Norwalk virus. Viruses were inactivated using heat, chlorine, and ultraviolet light (UV). Infectious and non-infectious viruses were treated with PMA before RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. PMA RT-PCR was able to differentiate selectively between infectious and heat and chlorine inactivated poliovirus. PMA RT-PCR was able to differentiate selectively between infectious and noninfectious murine norovirus only when inactivated by chlorine. However, PMA RT-PCR could not differentiate infectious Norwalk virus from virus particles rendered non-infectious by any treatment. PMA RT-PCR assay was not able to differentiate between infectious and UV inactivated viruses suggesting that viral capsid damage may be necessary for PMA to enter and bind to the viral genome. PMA RT-PCR on naked MNV-1 and Norwalk virus RNA suggest that PMA RT-PCR can be used to detect intact, potentially infectious MNV-1 and Norwalk viruses and can be used to exclude the detection of free viral RNA by PCR assay. PMID:25796356

  13. Propidium monoazide reverse transcription PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the publ...

  14. Real-time PCR detection chemistry.

    PubMed

    Navarro, E; Serrano-Heras, G; Castaño, M J; Solera, J

    2015-01-15

    Real-time PCR is the method of choice in many laboratories for diagnostic and food applications. This technology merges the polymerase chain reaction chemistry with the use of fluorescent reporter molecules in order to monitor the production of amplification products during each cycle of the PCR reaction. Thus, the combination of excellent sensitivity and specificity, reproducible data, low contamination risk and reduced hand-on time, which make it a post-PCR analysis unnecessary, has made real-time PCR technology an appealing alternative to conventional PCR. The present paper attempts to provide a rigorous overview of fluorescent-based methods for nucleic acid analysis in real-time PCR described in the literature so far. Herein, different real-time PCR chemistries have been classified into two main groups; the first group comprises double-stranded DNA intercalating molecules, such as SYBR Green I and EvaGreen, whereas the second includes fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides. The latter, in turn, has been divided into three subgroups according to the type of fluorescent molecules used in the PCR reaction: (i) primer-probes (Scorpions, Amplifluor, LUX, Cyclicons, Angler); (ii) probes; hydrolysis (TaqMan, MGB-TaqMan, Snake assay) and hybridization (Hybprobe or FRET, Molecular Beacons, HyBeacon, MGB-Pleiades, MGB-Eclipse, ResonSense, Yin-Yang or displacing); and (iii) analogues of nucleic acids (PNA, LNA, ZNA, non-natural bases: Plexor primer, Tiny-Molecular Beacon). In addition, structures, mechanisms of action, advantages and applications of such real-time PCR probes and analogues are depicted in this review.

  15. Specific PCR and real-time PCR assays for detection and quantitation of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'.

    PubMed

    Jawhari, Maan; Abrahamian, Peter; Sater, Ali Abdel; Sobh, Hana; Tawidian, Patil; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Almond witches' broom (AlmWB) is a fast-spreading lethal disease of almond, peach and nectarine associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'. The development of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for the sensitive and specific detection of the phytoplasma is of prime importance for early detection of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and for epidemiological studies. The developed qPCR assay herein uses a TaqMan(®) probe labeled with Black Hole Quencher Plus. The specificity of the PCR and that of the qPCR detection protocols were tested on 17 phytoplasma isolates belonging to 11 phytoplasma 16S rRNA groups, on samples of almond, peach, nectarine, native plants and insects infected or uninfected with the phytoplasma. The developed assays showed high specificity against 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and no cross-reactivity against any other phytoplasma, plant or insect tested. The sensitivity of the developed PCR and qPCR assays was similar to the conventional nested PCR protocol using universal primers. The qPCR assay was further validated by quantitating AlmWB phytoplasma in different hosts, plant parts and potential insect vectors. The highest titers of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' were detected in the phloem tissues of stems and roots of almond and nectarine trees, where they averaged from 10(5) to 10(6) genomic units per nanogram of host DNA (GU/ng of DNA). The newly developed PCR and qPCR protocols are reliable, specific and sensitive methods that are easily applicable to high-throughput diagnosis of AlmWB in plants and insects and can be used for surveys of potential vectors and alternative hosts.

  16. Detection and identification of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages by PCR.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Rossetti, Lia; Reinheimer, Jorge; Carminati, Domenico; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2008-05-01

    A PCR protocol for detection of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages was optimized. PCR was designed taking into account the sequence of the lys gene of temperate bacteriophage Phi-0303 and optimized to obtain a fragment of 222 bp using different Lb. helveticus phages from our collection. PCR was applied to total phage DNA extracted from 53 natural whey starters used for the production of Grana cheese and all gave the expected fragment. The presence of actively growing phages in the cultures was verified by traditional tests. Several PCR products of the lys gene were sequenced and aligned. The resulting sequences showed variable heterogeneity between the phages. PMID:18474137

  17. [Development of PCR methods for detection of EAV infection].

    PubMed

    Brunner; Santschi; Gerber; Burger; Zanoni

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this work was the development of suitable (real-time) RT-PCR techniques for fast and sensitive diagnosis of EAV and for molecular-epidemiological characterisation of viral strains, as an alternative to virus isolation. To this purpose two conventional RT-PCR methods and one real-time RT-PCR were adapted to detect the broadest possible spectrum of viral strains. Several dilutions with Bucyrus strain showed a 100-fold higher sensitivity of real-time RT-PCR and heminested RT-PCR compared to simple RT-PCR. Making use of 11 cell culture supernatants of different EAV isolates and 7 semen samples of positive stallions, the suitability of the techniques could be shown. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences of the newly analysed samples compared with known sequences indicated that more EAV-lineages exist than presently described.

  18. PCR detection of uncultured rumen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Jaime A; Strosová, Lenka; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Kopečný, Jan

    2012-07-01

    16S rRNA sequences of ruminal uncultured bacterial clones from public databases were phylogenetically examined. The sequences were found to form two unique clusters not affiliated with any known bacterial species: cluster of unidentified sequences of free floating rumen fluid uncultured bacteria (FUB) and cluster of unidentified sequences of bacteria associated with rumen epithelium (AUB). A set of PCR primers targeting 16S rRNA of ruminal free uncultured bacteria and rumen epithelium adhering uncultured bacteria was designed based on these sequences. FUB primers were used for relative quantification of uncultured bacteria in ovine rumen samples. The effort to increase the population size of FUB group has been successful in sulfate reducing broth and culture media supplied with cellulose.

  19. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; To, Shing shun Tony; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-11-24

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation.

  20. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; Tony To, Shing-shun; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  1. RT-PCR detection of HIV in Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Bosevska, Golubinka; Panovski, Nikola; Dokić, Eleni; Grunevska, Violeta

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to detect HIV RNA in seropositive patients using RT-PCR method and thus, to establish PCR methodology in the routine laboratory works. The total of 33 examined persons were divided in two groups: 1) 13 persons seropositive for HIV; and 2) 20 healthy persons - randomly selected blood donors that made the case control group. The subjects age was between 25 and 52 years (average 38,5). ELFA test for combined detection of HIV p24 antigen and anti HIV-1+2 IgG and ELISA test for detection of antibodies against HIV-1 and HIV-2, were performed for each examined person. RNA from the whole blood was extracted using a commercial kit based on salt precipitation. Detection of HIV RNA was performed using RT-PCR kit. Following nested PCR, the product was separated by electrophoresis in 1,5 % agarose gel. The result was scored positive if the band of 210bp was visible regardless of intensity. Measures of precaution were taken during all the steps of the work and HIV infected materials were disposed of accordingly. In the group of blood donors ELFA, ELISA and RT-PCR were negative. Assuming that prevalence of HIV infection is zero, the clinical specificity of RT-PCR is 100 %. The analytical specificity of RT-PCR method was tested against Hepatitis C and B, Human Papiloma Virus, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Rubella Virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia trachomatis. None of these templates yielded amplicon. In the group of 13 seropositive persons, 33 samples were analyzed. HIV RNA was detected in 15 samples. ELISA and ELFA test were positive in all samples. Different aliquots of the samples were tested independently and showed the same results. After different periods of storing the RNA samples at -70 masculineC, RT-PCR reaction was identical to the one performed initially. The obtained amplicons were maintained frozen at -20 masculineC for a week and the subsequently performed electrophoresis was identical to the previous one. The reaction is

  2. Simultaneous Detection of Ricin and Abrin DNA by Real-Time PCR (qPCR)

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Eva; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Lange, Mirko; Wölfel, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Ricin and abrin are two of the most potent plant toxins known and may be easily obtained in high yield from the seeds using rather simple technology. As a result, both toxins are potent and available toxins for criminal or terrorist acts. However, as the production of highly purified ricin or abrin requires sophisticated equipment and knowledge, it may be more likely that crude extracts would be used by non-governmental perpetrators. Remaining plant-specific nucleic acids in these extracts allow the application of a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and identification of abrin or ricin genomic material. Therefore, we have developed a duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of ricin and abrin DNA based on the OmniMix HS bead PCR reagent mixture. Novel primers and hybridization probes were designed for detection on a SmartCycler instrument by using 5′-nuclease technology. The assay was thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity. Evaluation of the assay sensitivity by probit analysis demonstrated a 95% probability of detection at 3 genomes per reaction for ricin DNA and 1.2 genomes per reaction for abrin DNA. The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection of ricin and abrin contaminations in a food matrix. PMID:23105972

  3. PCR-mediated detection of acidophilic, bioleaching-associated bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    De Wulf-Durand, P; Bryant, L J; Sly, L I

    1997-01-01

    The detection of acidophilic microorganisms from mining environments by culture methods is time consuming and unreliable. Several PCR approaches were developed to amplify small-subunit rRNA sequences from the DNA of six bacterial phylotypes associated with acidic mining environments, permitting the detection of the target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 fg. PMID:9212441

  4. Rapid Multiplex Nested PCR for Detection of Respiratory Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Lam, W. Y.; Yeung, Apple C. M.; Tang, Julian W.; Ip, Margaret; Chan, Edward W. C.; Hui, Mamie; Chan, Paul K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections can be caused by a heterogeneous group of viruses and bacteria that produce similar clinical presentations. Specific diagnosis therefore relies on laboratory investigation. This study developed and evaluated five groups of multiplex nested PCR assays that could simultaneously detect 21 different respiratory pathogens: influenza A virus (H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1); influenza B virus; parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, 3, 4a, and 4b; respiratory syncytial virus A and B; human rhinoviruses; human enteroviruses; human coronaviruses OC43 and 229E; severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus; human metapneumoviruses; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; Chlamydophila pneumoniae; Legionella pneumophila; and adenoviruses (A to F). These multiplex nested PCRs adopted fast PCR technology. The high speed of fast PCR (within 35 min) greatly improved the efficiency of these assays. The results show that these multiplex nested PCR assays are specific and more sensitive (100- to 1,000-fold) than conventional methods. Among the 303 clinical specimens tested, the multiplex nested PCR achieved an overall positive rate of 48.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.9 to 54.1%), which was significantly higher than that of virus isolation (20.1% [95% CI, 15.6 to 24.6%]) and that of direct detection by immunofluorescence assay (13.5% [95% CI, 9.7 to 17.4%]). The improved sensitivity was partly due to the higher sensitivity of multiplex nested PCR than that of conventional methods in detecting cultivatable viruses. Moreover, the ability of the multiplex nested PCR to detect noncultivatable viruses, particularly rhinoviruses, coronavirus OC43, and metapneumoviruses, contributed a major gain (15.6%) in the overall positive rate. In conclusion, rapid multiplex nested PCR assays can improve the diagnostic yield for respiratory infections to allow prompt interventive actions to be taken. PMID:17804659

  5. Molecular beacon real-time PCR detection of swine viruses.

    PubMed

    McKillen, John; Hjertner, Bernt; Millar, Andrena; McNeilly, Francis; Belák, Sándor; Adair, Brian; Allan, Gordon

    2007-03-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of viral pathogens is critical for the management of the diseases threatening the economic competitiveness of the swine farming industry worldwide. Molecular beacon assays are one type of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology capable of fast, specific, sensitive, and reliable viral detection. In this paper, the development of molecular beacon assays as novel tools for the rapid detection of Aujeszky's disease virus, African swine fever virus, porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine parvovirus is described. The assays are capable of rapidly detecting 2 x 10(1) copies of target and are linear between 2 x 10(9) and 2 x 10(2) copies. They can detect virus specifically in clinical samples such as whole blood, serum and tissue. In comparison to conventional PCR they are either as sensitive or more sensitive. As such these molecular beacon assays represent a powerful tool for the detection of these viruses in swine.

  6. Comparative detection of rabies RNA by NASBA, real-time PCR and conventional PCR.

    PubMed

    Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Phumesin, Patta; Supavonwong, Pornpun; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Intarut, Nirun; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2011-08-01

    Five methods for the RNA detection of rabies virus were directly compared in this study. These included conventional nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with electrochemiluminescence (NASBA-ECL) assay, reverse transcription (RT)-heminested (hn) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and TaqMan real-time RT-PCR using protocols as described previously. The first two methods have been routinely utilised for ante-mortem diagnosis of human rabies in Thailand and other rabies-endemic Asian and African countries. In addition, two real-time NASBA assays based on the use of a NucliSens EasyQ analyser (NASBA-Beacon-EQ) and LightCycler real-time PCR machine (NASBA-Beacon-LC) were studied in parallel. All methods target the N gene, whereas the L gene is used for RT-hnPCR. Using serial dilutions of purified RNA from rabies-infected dog brain tissue to assess sensitivity, all five methods had comparable degrees of sensitivities of detection. However, both real-time NASBA assays had slightly lower sensitivities by 10-fold than the other three assays. This finding was also true (except for TaqMan real-time RT-PCR due to a mismatch between the target and probe sequences) when laboratory-adapted (challenge virus standard-11) virus was used in the assays. Testing on previously NASBA-ECL positive clinical samples from 10 rabies patients (saliva [6] and brain [4]) and 10 rabies-infected dog brain tissues, similar results were obtained among the five methods; real-time NASBA assays yielded false-negative results on 2 saliva samples. None of the assays showed positive results on cerebrospinal fluid specimens of 10 patients without rabies encephalitis. Due to the unavailability of the NASBA-ECL assay, the results show that TaqMan real-time RT-PCR and RT-hnPCR can be useful for ante- and post-mortem diagnosis of rabies.

  7. Detection of adenovirus using PCR and molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    1999-09-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a molecular beacon probe were used for the detection of Adenovirus. A 307 bp DNA fragment from a conserved region of the hexon gene was amplified. The specific molecular beacon was characterized with respect to its efficiency of quenching, and signal to noise ratio by spectrofluorometric analysis of its hybridization with virus specific complementary single stranded oligonucleotide target. Amplification was carried out in the presence of the molecular beacon probe, and the amplified target was detected by measurement of fluorescence signal in the post PCR sample. Separately, a 32P-labeled linear probe (having the same sequence as that of molecular beacon probe) was liquid-phase hybridized with the product of PCR performed in the absence of the molecular beacon. The virus specific target was then detected by electrophoresis of the hybridized product in a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and subsequent autoradiographic analysis. The detection limit of adenovirus by PCR in the presence of the molecular beacon probe was found to be similar to that obtained by labeled linear probe hybridization following PCR.

  8. A strategy for detection of viruses in groundwater by PCR.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, M; Stewart, P; LeChevallier, M

    1999-02-01

    We evaluated the use of the PCR for detection of enteric viruses in groundwater. To do this, we used an improved sample-processing technique and a large-volume amplification protocol. The objective of this study was to use advanced molecular techniques to develop a rapid and simple method which can be used by the water industry for detection of viral contamination in a variety of water samples. The strategy described here fulfills the water industry's need for a rapid, reliable, easily performed method for analyzing groundwater for virus contamination. Viruses were detected after concentration from at least 400 gallons (1,512 liters) of water by a filter adsorption and elution method, which resulted in a concentrate containing viruses. A total of 150 samples were analyzed by performing cell culture assays for enteroviruses and by performing reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses for enteroviruses, hepatitis A virus, and rotavirus. Thirteen samples (8.7%) produced cellular cytopathic effects when the Buffalo green monkey cell line was used. When primers specific for enteroviruses were used in RT-PCR, 40 of 133 samples (30.1%) tested positive for the presence of enterovirus RNA. When hepatitis A virus-specific primers were used, 12 of 139 samples (8.6%) were considered positive for the presence of hepatitis A viral RNA. The RT-PCR analysis performed with rotavirus-specific primers identified 18 of 130 samples (13.8%) that were positive for rotavirus RNA sequences. Our sample-processing technique and large-volume PCR protocol (reaction volume, 300 microliter) resulted in sufficient removal or dilution of inhibitors so that more than 95% of the samples could be assayed by PCR. Because of its sensitivity for detecting viral nucleic acid sequences, PCR analysis should produce more positive results than cell culture analysis. Since either cell culture analysis or PCR can reveal only a "snapshot" of the quality of the groundwater being sampled, PCR seems to be a

  9. Ultrasensitive Antibody Detection by Agglutination-PCR (ADAP)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely used biomarkers for the diagnosis of many diseases. Assays based on solid-phase immobilization of antigens comprise the majority of clinical platforms for antibody detection, but can be undermined by antigen denaturation and epitope masking. These technological hurdles are especially troublesome in detecting antibodies that bind nonlinear or conformational epitopes, such as anti-insulin antibodies in type 1 diabetes patients and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies associated with thyroid cancers. Radioimmunoassay remains the gold standard for these challenging antibody biomarkers, but the limited multiplexability and reliance on hazardous radioactive reagents have prevented their use outside specialized testing facilities. Here we present an ultrasensitive solution-phase method for detecting antibodies, termed antibody detection by agglutination-PCR (ADAP). Antibodies bind to and agglutinate synthetic antigen–DNA conjugates, enabling ligation of the DNA strands and subsequent quantification by qPCR. ADAP detects zepto- to attomoles of antibodies in 2 μL of sample with a dynamic range spanning 5–6 orders of magnitude. Using ADAP, we detected anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies from human patient plasma with a 1000-fold increased sensitivity over an FDA-approved radioimmunoassay. Finally, we demonstrate the multiplexability of ADAP by simultaneously detecting multiple antibodies in one experiment. ADAP’s combination of simplicity, sensitivity, broad dynamic range, multiplexability, and use of standard PCR protocols creates new opportunities for the discovery and detection of antibody biomarkers. PMID:27064772

  10. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/μl of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/μl of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed.

  11. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/μl of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/μl of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed. PMID:24937806

  12. Internally controlled PCR system for detection of airborne microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Usachev, Evgeny V; Agranovski, Igor E

    2012-05-01

    Recently, we reported the outcomes of feasibility studies of a technological approach allowing rapid detection of a wide range of bioaerosols by combining a personal bioaerosol sampler with a real-time PCR technology. The protocol was found suitable for detection of targeted microorganisms within relatively short time periods. Considering the crucial importance of the PCR procedure quality control, the current paper reports the results of the development of an internally controlled PCR system for utilization by the above technology. The suggested strategy is based on utilization of only two fluorescent dyes, which are used respectively for target and internal amplification control (IAC) DNA amplification. A bacteriophage T4 and recombinant phage fd (M13) were used in this research as target and IAC, respectively. The constructed IAC was added directly to the collection liquid of the personal bioaerosol sampler enabling quality control to be present throughout the entire sampling-analysis procedures. For performance evaluation, serial ten-fold dilutions of T4 phage were aerosolized and sampled over a 10 minutes time period. The results showed that T4 phage could be reliably detected at the concentration of around 200 PFU per litre of air over the 10 minutes sampling period. The developed PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and no cross reaction. It is concluded that the recombinant phage fd is suitable for utilization as an internal control enabling to significantly minimize false negative results for bioaerosol detection procedures. PMID:22565862

  13. PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Rimbara, Emiko; Sasatsu, Masanori; Graham, David Y

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen whose primary niche is the human stomach. H. pylori is etiologically associated with gastric inflammation (gastritis), peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Both noninvasive (e.g., urea breath and stool antigen tests) and invasive (gastric biopsy for histology, culture, or PCR) tests are used for diagnosis. PCR detection of H. pylori has been reported using a variety of clinical samples including gastric biopsy, gastric juice, saliva, dental plaque, and stools as well as environmental samples. Whenever possibly, noninvasive tests are preferred over invasive tests. H. pylori are excreted in the stool. Culture from stool is variable whereas stool antigen testing is widely used. Stool consists of a complicated mixture of commensal bacteria and chemicals and often includes inhibitors of PCR. Nevertheless, simple extraction methods are available to efficiently extract DNA from human stools and nested-PCR targeting the 23S rRNA gene have proven to be highly sensitive for the detection of H. pylori. Detection of clarithromycin susceptibility/resistance is important clinically and the mutation of the 23S rRNA gene responsible for resistance can also be detected using stool. This described method can be modified for other clinical samples such as gastric juice or biopsy material.

  14. DETECTION OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI USING A REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of their importance in public health, the detection of fecal enterococci is performed via culturing methods that are time consuming and that are subject to inaccuracies that relate to their culturable status. In order to address these problems, a real time PCR (TaqMan) ...

  15. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  16. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Xia, Qingyan; Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  17. Multiplex PCR Tests for Detection of Pathogens Associated with Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms including culture, biochemical identification, immunoassay and microscopic examination are time consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have as allowed its use as clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex PCR based testing has made its way to gastroenterology diagnostic arena in recent years. In this article we present a review of recent laboratory developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. We will focus on two FDA cleared commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG GPP and Biofire FimArray GI test. These multiplex tests can detect and identify multiple enteric pathogens in one test and provide results within hours. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens. The high negative predictive value of these multiplex tests has led to the suggestion that they be used as screening tools especially in outbreaks. Although the clinical utility and benefit of multiplex PCR test are to be further investigated, implementing these multiplex PCR tests in gastroenterology diagnostic algorithm has the potential to improve diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis. PMID:26004652

  18. Electrochemiluminescence-PCR detection of genetically modified organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Zhu, Debin

    2005-01-01

    The detection methods for genetically modified (GM) components in foods have been developed recently. But many of them are complicated and time-consuming; some of them need to use the carcinogenic substance, and can"t avoid false-positive results. In this study, an electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction (ECL-PCR) method for detection GM tobaccos is proposed. The Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter was amplified by PCR, Then hybridized with a Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR)-labeled and a biotinylated probe. The hybridization products were captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal of the TBR label. Whether the tobaccos contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the ECL signal of CaMV35S promoter. The experiment results show that the detection limit for CaMV35S promoter is 100 fmol, and the GM components can be clearly identified in GM tobaccos. The ECL-PCR method provide a new means in GMOs detection due to its safety, simplicity and high efficiency.

  19. Nested PCR Assay for Detection of Granulocytic Ehrlichiae

    PubMed Central

    Massung, Robert F.; Slater, Kim; Owens, Jessica H.; Nicholson, William L.; Mather, Thomas N.; Solberg, Victoria B.; Olson, James G.

    1998-01-01

    A sensitive and specific nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of granulocytic ehrlichiae. The assay amplifies the 16S rRNA gene and was used to examine acute-phase EDTA-blood and serum samples obtained from seven humans with clinical presentations compatible with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. Five of the seven suspected cases were positive by the PCR assay using DNA extracted from whole blood as the template, compared with a serologic assay that identified only one positive sample. The PCR assay using DNA extracted from the corresponding serum samples as the template identified three positive samples. The sensitivity of the assay on human samples was examined, and the limit of detection was shown to be fewer than 2 copies of the 16S rRNA gene. The application of the assay to nonhuman samples demonstrated products amplified from template DNA extracted from Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in Rhode Island and from EDTA-blood specimens obtained from white-tailed deer in Maryland. All PCR products were sequenced and identified as specific to granulocytic ehrlichiae. A putative variant granulocytic ehrlichia 16S rRNA gene sequence was detected among products amplified from both the ticks and the deer blood specimens. PMID:9542943

  20. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens. PMID:26610309

  1. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens.

  2. [Detection of fish DNA in ruminant feed by PCR amplification].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tetsuya; Kusama, Toyoko; Kadowaki, Koh-ichi

    2006-10-01

    The Japanese Government has prohibited the use of seafood protein, as well as mammalian protein, in ruminant feed. There is an official method to detect meat and bone meal, but no method is yet available to detect fishmeal in ruminant feed. We tried to develop a suitable method to detect fishmeal in ruminant feed, similar to the official method "PCR detection of animal-derived DNA in feed". Our previously reported primers (fishcon5 and fishcon3-1) showed low sensitivity, so we designed new primers based on a DNA sequence from yellowfin tuna mitchondrial DNA. Among the primers, FM5 and FM3 specifically detected fish DNA (sardine, yellowfin tuna, skipjack tuna, chub mackerel, Pacific saury, salmon, rainbow trout, Japanese anchovy, codfish and Japanese horse mackerel) from fish meat, and did not amplify DNA from animals and plants. The sensitivity for detection of the presence of fishmeal in ruminant feed was 0.01-0.001%. PMID:17128872

  3. Large scale multiplex PCR improves pathogen detection by DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Medium density DNA microchips that carry a collection of probes for a broad spectrum of pathogens, have the potential to be powerful tools for simultaneous species identification, detection of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance determinants. However, their widespread use in microbiological diagnostics is limited by the problem of low pathogen numbers in clinical specimens revealing relatively low amounts of pathogen DNA. Results To increase the detection power of a fluorescence-based prototype-microarray designed to identify pathogenic microorganisms involved in sepsis, we propose a large scale multiplex PCR (LSplex PCR) for amplification of several dozens of gene-segments of 9 pathogenic species. This protocol employs a large set of primer pairs, potentially able to amplify 800 different gene segments that correspond to the capture probes spotted on the microarray. The LSplex protocol is shown to selectively amplify only the gene segments corresponding to the specific pathogen present in the analyte. Application of LSplex increases the microarray detection of target templates by a factor of 100 to 1000. Conclusion Our data provide a proof of principle for the improvement of detection of pathogen DNA by microarray hybridization by using LSplex PCR. PMID:19121223

  4. Novel real-time PCR detection assay for Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Hänsel, C.; Mertens, K.; Elschner, M. C.; Melzer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brucella suis is the causative agent of brucellosis in suidae and is differentiated into five biovars (bv). Biovars 1 and 3 possess zoonotic potential and can infect humans, whereas biovar 2 represents the main source of brucellosis in feral and domestic pigs in Europe. Both aspects, the zoonotic threat and the economic loss, emphasize the necessity to monitor feral and domestic pig populations. Available serological or PCR based methods lack sensitivity and specificity. Results Here a bioinformatics approach was used to identify a B. suis specific 17 bp repeat on chromosome II (BS1330_II0657 locus). This repeat is common for B. suis bv 1 to 4 and was used to develop a TaqMan probe assay. The average PCR efficiency was determined as 95% and the limit of detection as 12,5 fg/µl of DNA, equally to 3.7 bacterial genomes. This assay has the highest sensitivity of all previously described B. suis specific PCR assays, making it possible to detect 3-4 bacterial genomes per 1 µl of sample. The assay was tested 100% specific for B. suis and negative for other Brucella spp. and closely related non-Brucella species. Conclusions This novel qPCR assay could become a rapid, inexpensive and reliable screening method for large sample pools of B. suis 1 to 4. This method will be applicable for field samples after validation. PMID:26392898

  5. PCR detection and characterization of type-2 porcine circovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, A L; Lin, L L; Sachvie, C; Grudeski, E; Nayar, G P

    2000-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting porcine circovirus (PCV). The assay readily detected type-2 PCV (PCV-2) and type-1 PCV (PCV-1). The PCR primers were designed based on DNA sequences conserved in all reported PCV genomes. Type 1 PCV and type 2 PCV both produced 438 bp amplification products, which were easily identified and differentiated from one another by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Porcine circovirus was detected in 55% (931/1693) of randomly tested pigs with various clinical signs and lesions, most of which were difficult to differentiate from those associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). The PCR products from all positive clinical samples were identified by RFLP to be only PCV-2; DNA tested by PCR was extracted directly from one or more of lung, mesenteric or mediastinal lymph nodes, and tonsil. Type 2 PCV was also detected in 6% (2/34) of DNA extracted directly from semen of randomly chosen healthy boars. Positive PCR reactions from 554 diseased pigs were characterized by RFLP and categorized into 5 different profiles (A-E), of which 82.8% were PCV-2A (456/554), 3.0% were PCV-2B (17/554), 9.9% were PCV-2C (55/554), 1.1% were PCV-2D (6/554), and 3.2% were PCV-2E (18/554). The complete genomic nucleotide sequences of PCV-2A, B, C, D, and E were determined and found to have at least 95% homology compared with one another and with all other PCV-2 found in the GenBank database. All PCV-2 had less than 76% homology with PCV-1. This PCR assay will hopefully be useful to veterinary diagnostic laboratories for routine testing and surveillance of infection with PCV-2. The RFLP profiling system might be useful for preliminary characterization and identification of PCV isolates and might also benefit studies on the molecular epidemiology of PCV. Images Figure 1. PMID:10680656

  6. Real-time PCR detection of ruminant DNA.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Romero, Luis; Verkaar, Edward L C; Savelkoul, Paul H; Catsburg, Arnold; Aarts, Henk J M; Buntjer, Jaap B; Lenstra, Johannes A

    2004-03-01

    To control the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, several DNA methods have been described for the detection of the species origin of meat and bone meal. Most of these methods are based on the amplification of a mitochondrial DNA segment. We have developed a semiquantitative method based on real-time PCR for detection of ruminant DNA, targeting an 88-bp segment of the ruminant short interspersed nuclear element Bov-A2. This method is specific for ruminants and is able to detect as little as 10 fg of bovine DNA. Autoclaving decreased the amount of detectable DNA, but positive signals were observed in feeding stuff containing 10% bovine material if this had not been rendered in accordance with the regulations, i.e., heated at 134 degrees C for 3 instead of 20 min. PMID:15035372

  7. [Multiplex PCR for detecting genotypes of deletional alpha-thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie-Ying; Liao, Can; Li, Jian; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2004-08-01

    To investigate the clinical application of multiplex PCR in detecting genotypes of deletional alpha-thalassemia in South China and observe the distribution frequency of alpha-globin gene deletion, 145 patients with silent carrier, alpha thalassemia trait or HbH were identified by M-PCR and 1.2% agarose gel electrophoresis. There are 1.3, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 kb bands which indicate --(SEA), -alpha(4.2), alphaalpha and -alpha(3.7), respectively. The results showed that among 145 patients, 100 patients with --(SEA)/alphaalpha (68.9%), 15 with -alpha(3.7)/alphaalpha (10.3%), 8 with -alpha(4.2)/alphaalpha (5.52%), 2 with -alpha(3.7)/-alpha(4.2) (1.38%), 1 with -alpha(3.7)/-alpha(3.7) (0.69%), 1 with -alpha(4.2)/-alpha(4.2) (0.69%), 14 with --(SEA)/-alpha(3.7) (9.65%), 2 with --(SEA)/-alpha(4.2) (1.38%) were found. Two patients prenatal diagnosed were confirmed with Bart's hydrops fetuses. In conclusion, M-PCR analysis is a simple, rapid and accurate method for detection of alpha-thalassemia gene deletion. This technique is helpful in screening, carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis of deletional alpha-thalassemia.

  8. TqPCR: A Touchdown qPCR Assay with Significantly Improved Detection Sensitivity and Amplification Efficiency of SYBR Green qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fang; Yan, Zhengjian; Xia, Yinglin; Wang, Zhongliang; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya K.; Wei, Qiang; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Wang, Xin; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Jiang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The advent of fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has revolutionized the quantification of gene expression analysis in many fields, including life sciences, agriculture, forensic science, molecular diagnostics, and medicine. While SYBR Green-based qPCR is the most commonly-used platform due to its inexpensive nature and robust chemistry, quantifying the expression of genes with low abundance or RNA samples extracted from highly restricted or limited sources can be challenging because the detection sensitivity of SYBR Green-based qPCR is limited. Here, we develop a novel and effective touchdown qPCR (TqPCR) protocol by incorporating a 4-cycle touchdown stage prior to the quantification amplification stage. Using the same cDNA templates, we find that TqPCR can reduce the average Cq values for Gapdh, Rps13, and Hprt1 reference genes by 4.45, 5.47, and 4.94 cycles, respectively, when compared with conventional qPCR; the overall average Cq value reduction for the three reference genes together is 4.95. We further find that TqPCR can improve PCR amplification efficiency and thus increase detection sensitivity. When the quantification of Wnt3A-induced target gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is analyzed, we find that, while both conventional qPCR and TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the relatively abundant target Axin2, only TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the lowly-expressed targets Oct4 and Gbx2. Finally, we demonstrate that the MRQ2 and MRQ3 primer pairs derived from mouse reference gene Tbp can be used to validate the RNA/cDNA integrity of qPCR samples. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that TqPCR may increase detection sensitivity and PCR amplification efficiency. Overall, TqPCR should be advantageous over conventional qPCR in expression quantification, especially when the transcripts of interest are lowly expressed, and/or the availability of total RNA is highly restricted or limited. PMID:26172450

  9. [Detection of bacterial DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)].

    PubMed

    Höfler, G

    1994-01-01

    Enzymatic amplification of DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a very sensitive and rapid way of detecting specific DNA sequences. Bacterial DNA can be detected in a wide variety of samples provided at least partial sequence information is available. For a great number of bacteria PCR detection methods have been published. Most important for the pathologist are mycobacteriae (M. tuberculosis, avium, etc.). Borellia burgdorferi, Listeria monozytogenes and chlamydiae (Ce. trachomatis, C. psittaci). Fresh or fixed paraffin embedded tissues, exfoliated cells, whole blood, serum, sputum, urine, ascites or pleural fluid etc. can be analyzed. The time needed to perform the analysis varies between 5 hours and 2 days mostly depending on the DNA extraction method. Several potential pitfalls have to be avoided. The most common problem is contamination of reagents with target DNA. Amplification of DNA from biological samples may be prevented by enzyme inhibitors (salts, proteins). This problem can at least partially be avoided by changing the DNA purification method. Several additional problems may arise if bacterial DNA has to be amplified. Bacterial walls may have to be disrupted using heat or detergent for accessibility of target DNA. Positive results have to be judged carefully. Unlike the situation in retroviral infections with the virus sometimes present in the absence of disease, in the majority of bacterial infections the presence of bacteria signals manifest disease. A possible exception may be the finding of mycobacterial DNA in sarcoidosis patients who can be treated with steroids without provoking tuberculosis. PCR is especially useful in situations where rapid results are necessary or only fixed tissue is available.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7533972

  10. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  11. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  12. Detection of Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Jenny; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2011-07-01

    The thermophilic actinomycete species Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula has been associated with the exogen allergic alveolitis (EAA). EAA is caused by the inhalation of high amounts of airborne spores that can be found for example in environments of agricultural production, compost facilities, mushroom cultivation rooms, or rooms with technical air moistening. Because of the medical relevance of S. rectivirgula, a reliable detection system is needed. Therefore, a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primer system was designed, targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the type strain S. rectivirgula DSM 43747(T) and six other S. rectivirgula reference strains. Our investigation showed that S. rectivirgula presumably own four operons of the 16S rRNA gene, which has to be considered for estimation of cell equivalents. Furthermore, the DNA recovery efficiency from these strains was tested in combination with bioaerosol or material sample as well as the influence of non-target DNA to the recovery rate. Results showed a recovery DNA efficiency of 7-55%. The recovery rate of DNA in a mixture with non-target DNA resulted in ∼87%. In summary, a high amplification efficiency using real-time PCR was found, for which estimated concentrations revealed cell numbers of 2.7 × 10(5) cells m(-3) in bioaerosol and 2.8 × 10(6) cells g(-1) fw(-1) in material samples from a duck house. The specificity of the new developed quantification system was shown by generation of two clone libraries from bioarosol samples, from a duck house, and from a composting plant. Totally, the results clearly show the specificity and practicability of the established qPCR assay for detection of S. rectivirgula.

  13. PCR and Genotyping for HPV in Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradyot; Patne, Shashikant C U; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Mohan; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Gulati, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To devise nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NMPCR) protocol for detection of mucosal human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and typing of HPV-16 and -18 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of carcinoma cervix (CaCx). Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: NMPCR was done for simultaneous detection of HPV, targeting 134 bp L1 capsid gene employing GP+/mGP+ primers and typing of genotypes-16 and -18, targeting E6/E7 gene from 34 FFPE tissue blocks of CaCx and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Detection of 142 bp consensus sequence of L1 capsid gene was performed by nested PCR employing MY/GP+ primers. Sequencing of selected PCR amplicons of the later protocol obtained from control cell line DNA and 5 select samples were done for validation of the NMPCR protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Calculation of percentage from the Microsoft Excel Software. Results: Of 26 FFPE samples of CaCx, 17 (65.3%) samples were found positive for HPV by NMPCR. Amplicons of 142 bp L1 capsid gene employing MY/GP+ primers were observed in 11 (42.3%) samples of CaCx. Nearly 25% samples of CIN were positive for HPV. On sequence analysis, it was observed that the sample typed as HPV-16 by NMPCR was found to be the same on sequencing of amplicons obtained after MY/GP+ nested PCR. Conclusions: This study indicates the usefulness of our NMPCR protocol for detection of mucosal HPVs and typing of HPV-16 and -18 from FFPE tissue samples of CaCx. The NMPCR protocol may be used to detect HPV and type common genotypes-16 and -18 in fresh tissue of cervical biopsy or scrape samples for screening of CaCx. PMID:27621560

  14. PCR and Genotyping for HPV in Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradyot; Patne, Shashikant C U; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Mohan; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Gulati, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To devise nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NMPCR) protocol for detection of mucosal human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and typing of HPV-16 and -18 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of carcinoma cervix (CaCx). Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: NMPCR was done for simultaneous detection of HPV, targeting 134 bp L1 capsid gene employing GP+/mGP+ primers and typing of genotypes-16 and -18, targeting E6/E7 gene from 34 FFPE tissue blocks of CaCx and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Detection of 142 bp consensus sequence of L1 capsid gene was performed by nested PCR employing MY/GP+ primers. Sequencing of selected PCR amplicons of the later protocol obtained from control cell line DNA and 5 select samples were done for validation of the NMPCR protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Calculation of percentage from the Microsoft Excel Software. Results: Of 26 FFPE samples of CaCx, 17 (65.3%) samples were found positive for HPV by NMPCR. Amplicons of 142 bp L1 capsid gene employing MY/GP+ primers were observed in 11 (42.3%) samples of CaCx. Nearly 25% samples of CIN were positive for HPV. On sequence analysis, it was observed that the sample typed as HPV-16 by NMPCR was found to be the same on sequencing of amplicons obtained after MY/GP+ nested PCR. Conclusions: This study indicates the usefulness of our NMPCR protocol for detection of mucosal HPVs and typing of HPV-16 and -18 from FFPE tissue samples of CaCx. The NMPCR protocol may be used to detect HPV and type common genotypes-16 and -18 in fresh tissue of cervical biopsy or scrape samples for screening of CaCx.

  15. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  16. Sensitive simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in semen by multiplex-PCR and of HPV by single PCR.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, Fabrícia; Medina, Fabiana Soares; Abreu, André Luelsdorf Pimenta de; Irie, Mary Mayumi Taguti; Esquiçati, Isis Baroni; Malagutti, Natália; Vasconcellos, Vinícius Rodrigo Bulla; Discacciati, Michele Garcia; Bonini, Marcelo Gialluisi; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may impair sperm parameters and functions thereby promoting male infertility. To date limited molecular studies were conducted to evaluate the frequency and type of such infections in semen Thus, we aimed at conceiving and validating a multiplex PCR (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the following STD pathogens in semen: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes virus simplex (HSV) -1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum; We also investigated the potential usefulness of this M-PCR assay in screening programs for semen pathogens. In addition, we aimed: to detect human Papillomavirus (HPV) and genotypes by single PCR (sPCR) in the same semen samples; to determine the prevalence of the seven STDs, HPV and co-infections; to assess the possibility that these infections affect semen parameters and thus fertility. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR were extremely high including agreement (99.2%), sensitivity (100.00%), specificity (99.70%), positive (96.40%) and negative predictive values (100.00%) and accuracy (99.80%). The prevalence of STDs was very high (55.3%). Furthermore, associations were observed between STDs and changes in semen parameters, highlighting the importance of STD detection in semen. Thus, this M-PCR assay has great potential for application in semen screening programs for pathogens in infertility and STD clinics and in sperm banks.

  17. An improved, PCR-based strategy for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, G; Nishiya, A S; Sabino, E C; Chamone, D F; Saez-Alquézar, A

    1999-10-01

    Attempts were made to improve the PCR-based detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood samples, primarily for screening blood donors. Samples were obtained from candidate donors who were reactive in one or two of three serological tests for Chagas disease (and therefore considered 'indeterminate') or in all three tests (3+). Each sample was then examined using three different, PCR-based techniques: 'PCR-I' (in which the target DNA is a nuclear repetitive sequence); 'PCR-II' [amplifying a conserved region of the T. cruzi kinetoplast DNA (kDNA)]; and 'PCR-III' (a new strategy in which the target kDNA is amplified by 'nested' PCR). Among the samples from 3+ individuals, PCR-I, PCR-II and PCR-III amplified two (3.8%) out of 52, four (4.5%) out of 88, and 27 (25.7%) out of 105 samples tested, respectively. Seven, 69 and 70 samples from 'indeterminate' subjects were tested by PCR-I, PCR-II and PCR-III, respectively; there was not a single positive result by PCR-I or PCR-II, but three (4.3%) of the samples tested by PCR-III were positive. In a reconstruction experiment, in conditions in which PCR-I and PCR-II could not detect 10,000 parasites/ml, PCR-III was able to detect one parasite/ml. Although all three PCR-based strategies examined had rather poor sensitivities, PCR-III was far more sensitive than PCR-I or PCR-II. PMID:10715696

  18. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  19. PCR detection of Neospora caninum in water buffalo foetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, Clementina; Lucibelli, Maria Gabriella; Borriello, Giorgia; De Carlo, Esterina; Martucciello, Alessandra; Schiavo, Lorena; Gallo, Amalia; Bove, Francesca; Corrado, Federica; Girardi, Santa; Amoroso, Maria Grazia; Ďegli Uberti, Barbara; Galiero, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    The seroprevalence of Neospora caninum was surveyed by an ELISA kit on two water buffalo herds of Southern Italy. Seropositive samples were detected in 47% and 59% of individuals, respectively, thus indicating high level of exposure to the parasite even if the possibility of vertical transmission cannot be excluded. Tissue samples collected from three aborted fetuses from the same herds were investigated for N. caninum presence by PCR assays targeting the 18S and the Nc5 DNA sequences, respectively. Both methods have shown the presence of N. caninum DNA in heart and brain. Sequencing of the Nc5 genomic DNA confirmed the presence of N. caninum in the samples; phylogenetic analysis of the obtained sequences showed high homology among the Neospora recovered from different samples. The present study suggests an important role of N. caninum as a possible abortive agent for water buffaloes.

  20. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors.

  1. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Rachel V.; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples. PMID:27686415

  2. Modified COLD-PCR for detection of minor microorganisms in wine samples during the fermentation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Masaki, Kazuo; Mizuno, Akihiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami

    2014-05-01

    The detection of low-abundant microorganism is difficult when in a sample in which a specific microorganism represents an overwhelming majority using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. A modified CO-amplification at Lower Denaturation temperature PCR (mCOLD-PCR) method was developed to detect low-abundant microorganisms using a double-strand RNA probe to inhibit the amplification of the sequence of a major microorganism. Combining the mCOLD-PCR and downstream application (e.g., denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and next-generation sequencing (NGS)), low-abundant microorganisms were detected more efficiently, even when a specific microorganism represents an overwhelming majority of the sample. We demonstrated that mCOLD-PCR-DGGE enabled us to detect Schizosaccharomyces pombe in a model sample coexisting with 10,000 times as many Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When mCOLD-PCR-DGGE was applied in the microbiota analysis of a fermenting white wine, Candida sp. and Cladosporium sp., which were not detected by conventional PCR, were detected. According to the NGS analysis after mCOLD-PCR of a fermenting red wine, the detection ratio of Saccharomyces was decreased dramatically, and the detection ratios of other microorganisms and the numbers of genera detected were increased compared with the conventional PCR. Thus, the application of mCOLD-PCR will reveal comprehensive microbiota of fermented foods, beverages, and so on.

  3. Microfluidics-Based PCR for Fusion Transcript Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The microfluidic technology allows the production of network of submillimeter-size fluidic channels and reservoirs in a variety of material systems. The microfluidic-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows automated multiplexing of multiple samples and multiple assays simultaneously within a network of microfluidic channels and chambers that are co-ordinated in controlled fashion by the valves. The individual PCR reaction is performed in nanoliter volume, which allows testing on samples with limited DNA and RNA. The microfluidics devices are used in various types of PCR such as digital PCR and single molecular emulsion PCR for genotyping, gene expression, and miRNA expression. In this chapter, the use of a microfluidics-based PCR for simultaneous screening of 14 known fusion transcripts in patients with leukemia is described. PMID:26843050

  4. Microfluidics-Based PCR for Fusion Transcript Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The microfluidic technology allows the production of network of submillimeter-size fluidic channels and reservoirs in a variety of material systems. The microfluidic-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows automated multiplexing of multiple samples and multiple assays simultaneously within a network of microfluidic channels and chambers that are co-ordinated in controlled fashion by the valves. The individual PCR reaction is performed in nanoliter volume, which allows testing on samples with limited DNA and RNA. The microfluidics devices are used in various types of PCR such as digital PCR and single molecular emulsion PCR for genotyping, gene expression, and miRNA expression. In this chapter, the use of a microfluidics-based PCR for simultaneous screening of 14 known fusion transcripts in patients with leukemia is described.

  5. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis.

  6. Performance of two real-time PCR assays for hepatitis B virus DNA detection and quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kania, Dramane; Ottomani, Laure; Meda, Nicolas; Peries, Marianne; Dujols, Pierre; Bolloré, Karine; Rénier, Wendy; Viljoen, Johannes; Ducos, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-06-01

    In-house developed real-time PCR (qPCR) techniques could be useful conjunctives to the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in resource-limited settings with high prevalence. Two qPCR assays (qPCR1 and qPCR2), based on primers/probes targeting conserved regions of the X and S genes of HBV respectively, were evaluated using clinical samples of varying HBV genotypes, and compared to the commercial Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV Test v2.0. The lower detection limit (LDL) was established at 104 IU/ml for qPCR1, and 91 IU/ml for qPCR2. Good agreement and correlation were obtained between the Roche assay and both qPCR assays (r = 0.834 for qPCR1; and r = 0.870 for qPCR2). Differences in HBV DNA load of > 0.5 Log10 IU/ml between the Roche and the qPCR assays were found in 49/122 samples of qPCR1, and 35/122 samples of qPCR2. qPCR1 tended to underestimate HBV DNA quantity in samples with a low viral load and overestimate HBV DNA concentration in samples with a high viral load when compared to the Roche test. Both molecular tools that were developed, used on an open real-time PCR system, were reliable for HBV DNA detection and quantitation. The qPCR2 performed better than the qPCR1 and had the additional advantage of various HBV genotype detection and quantitation. This low cost quantitative HBV DNA PCR assay may be an alternative solution when implementing national programmes to diagnose, monitor and treat HBV infection in low- to middle-income countries where testing for HBV DNA is not available in governmental health programmes.

  7. Novel primers and PCR protocols for the specific detection and quantification of Sphingobium suberifaciens in situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogen causing corky root on lettuce, Sphingobium suberifaciens, is recalcitrant to standard epidemiological methods. Primers were selected from 16S rDNA sequences useful for the specific detection and quantification of S. suberifaciens. Conventional (PCR) and quantitative (qPCR) PCR protocols...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED PCR-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF PHYTOPHTHORA CACTORUM IN STRAWBERRY PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific and rapid plant pathogen detection methods can aid in strawberry disease management decisions. PCR-based diagnostics for Phytophthora cactorum and other strawberry pathogens are hindered by PCR inhibitors and lack of species-specific PCR primers. We developed a DNA extraction and purificati...

  9. Effects of prolonged chlorine exposures upon PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of low doses of free chlorine on the detection by qPCR of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cells by qPCR in tap water was monitored. H. pylori target sequences (within suspended, intact cells at densities of 102 to 103 cells /ml) were rendered undetectable by qPCR an...

  10. PCR detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.F.; Luneau, A.; Cao, W.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods based on the 16S rRNA genes of Mycobacterium sp. PYR-1 and Mycobacterium sp. PAH135, known PAH-degrading bacteria, were developed. An efficient mycobacterial cell lysis procedure was used for the PCR assay. The PCR methods were positive with the target species, but negative for the other 45 bacterial species tested including other Mycobacterium spp. The PCR sensitivity for pure cultures was 20 cells for Mycobacterium sp. PAH135 and 200 cells for Mycobacterium sp. PYR-1. The PCR with a simple sample preparation procedure was used to monitor Mycobacterium sp. PYR-1 cell concentrations in soil slurries amended with [{sup 14}C]pyrene. The pyrene mineralization correlated with the Mycobacterium PYR-1 cell concentrations in the soil slurries. When the PCR titer (the maximum dilution for positive PCR results) reached 10{sup -4}-10{sup -5} at 5-1O days incubation, approximately 50% of the [{sup 14}C]pyrene had been mineralized to {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. However, without inoculation with Mycobacterium PYR-1 cells, both the sterile and nonsterile soils had negative PCR results and no pyrene mineralization. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    STAGGEMEIER, Rodrigo; BORTOLUZZI, Marina; HECK, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; SPILKI, Fernando Rosado; ALMEIDA, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  12. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Bortoluzzi, Marina; Heck, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively.

  13. Development of a novel immuno-PCR for detection of avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Quan; Zhang, Jianjun; Shao, Hongxia; Wan, Zhimin; Tian, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jialiang; Pang, Mayun; Qian, Kun; Gao, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Qin, Aijian; Ye, Jianqiang

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an important pathogen for various neoplasms, including lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid neoplasms, and it causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry. Several efficient methods for the detection of ALV have been reported. However, these previously developed approaches are based on either PCR or immunoassays. Here, we used a proximity ligation technique and combined PCR with the immunoassay to develop a novel immuno-PCR (Im-PCR) approach for the detection of ALV. Our data showed that the Im-PCR had high specificity and sensitivity to ALV. The Im-PCR method selectively reacted to ALV but not to the other avian viruses tested. The limit of detection of Im-PCR could reach 0.5 TCID50. Moreover, the results of Im-PCR were in agreement with results from commercial ELISA when the clinical cloaca samples were used for ALV detection. The present results demonstrate that the novel Im-PCR method can be efficiently applied to detect ALV in a clinical setting. Our data also highlight that Im-PCR may have promising applications in the diagnosis of pathogens.

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of Feline immunodeficiency virus using an insulated isothermal PCR-based assay with a point-of-need PCR detection platform.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca Penrose; Kania, Stephen A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important infectious agent of cats. Clinical syndromes resulting from FIV infection include immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections, and neoplasia. In our study, a 5' long terminal repeat/gag region-based reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) was developed to amplify all known FIV strains to facilitate point-of-need FIV diagnosis. The RT-iiPCR method was applied in a point-of-need PCR detection platform--a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted RT-iiPCR results from nucleic acids within 1 hr. Limit of detection 95% of FIV RT-iiPCR was calculated to be 95 copies standard in vitro transcription RNA per reaction. Endpoint dilution studies with serial dilutions of an ATCC FIV type strain showed that the sensitivity of lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent was comparable to that of a reference nested PCR. The established reaction did not amplify any nontargeted feline pathogens, including Felid herpesvirus 1, feline coronavirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline leukemia virus, Mycoplasma haemofelis, and Chlamydophila felis. Based on analysis of 76 clinical samples (including blood and bone marrow) with the FIV RT-iiPCR, test sensitivity was 97.78% (44/45), specificity was 100.00% (31/31), and agreement was 98.65% (75/76), determined against a reference nested-PCR assay. A kappa value of 0.97 indicated excellent correlation between these 2 methods. The lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent, deployed on a user-friendly portable device, has potential utility for rapid and easy point-of-need detection of FIV in cats. PMID:26185125

  15. A quantitative TaqMan PCR assay for the detection of Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucas M; Amorim, Aline T; Martins, Hellen Braga; Rezende, Izadora Souza; Barbosa, Maysa Santos; Lobão, Tassia Neves; Campos, Guilherme B; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2013-12-27

    Ureaplasma diversum in veterinary studies is an undesirable microbe, which may cause infection in bulls and may result in seminal vesiculitis, balanopostitis, and alterations in spermatozoids, whereas in cows, it may cause placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion, and birth of weak calves. U. diversum is released through organic secretions, especially semen, preputial and vaginal mucus, conjunctival secretion, and milk. The aim of the present study was to develop a TaqMan probe, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and quantification of U. diversum from genital swabs of bovines. Primers and probes specific to U. diversum 16S rRNA gene were designed. The specificity, detection limit, intra- and inter-assay variability of qPCR to detect this ureaplasma was compared with the results of the conventional PCR assay (cPCR). Swabs of vaginal mucus from 169 cows were tested. The qPCR assay detected as few as 10 copies of U. diversum and was 100-fold more sensitive than the cPCR. No cross-reactivity with other Mollicutes or eubacteria was observed. U. diversum was detected in 79 swabs (46.42%) by qPCR, while using cPCR it was detected in 42 (25%) samples. The difference in cPCR and qPCR ureaplasma detection between healthy and sick animals was not statistically significant. But the U. diversum load in samples from animals with genital disorders was higher than in healthy animals. The qPCR assay developed herein is highly sensitive and specific for the detection and quantification of U. diversum in vaginal bovine samples.

  16. Nested PCR detection of malaria directly using blood filter paper samples from epidemiological surveys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nested PCR is considered a sensitive and specific method for detecting malaria parasites and is especially useful in epidemiological surveys. However, the preparation of DNA templates for PCR is often time-consuming and costly. Methods A simplified PCR method was developed to directly use a small blood filter paper square (2 × 2 mm) as the DNA template after treatment with saponin. This filter paper-based nested PCR method (FP-PCR) was compared to microscopy and standard nested PCR with DNA extracted by using a Qiagen DNA mini kit from filter paper blood spots of 204 febrile cases. The FP-PCR technique was further applied to evaluate malaria infections in 1,708 participants from cross-sectional epidemiological surveys conducted in Myanmar and Thailand. Results The FP-PCR method had a detection limit of ~0.2 parasites/μL blood, estimated using cultured Plasmodium falciparum parasites. With 204 field samples, the sensitivity of the FP-PCR method was comparable to that of the standard nested PCR method, which was significantly higher than that of microscopy. Application of the FP-PCR method in large cross-sectional studies conducted in Myanmar and Thailand detected 1.9% (12/638) and 6.2% (66/1,070) asymptomatic Plasmodium infections, respectively, as compared to the detection rates of 1.3% (8/638) and 0.04% (4/1,070) by microscopy. Conclusion This FP-PCR method was much more sensitive than microscopy in detecting Plasmodium infections. It drastically increased the detection sensitivity of asymptomatic infections in cross-sectional surveys conducted in Thailand and Myanmar, suggesting that this FP-PCR method has a potential for future applications in malaria epidemiology studies. PMID:24884761

  17. Molecular-beacon multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Gubala, Aneta J; Proll, David F

    2006-09-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR assay was developed using molecular beacons for the detection of Vibrio cholerae by targeting four important virulence and regulatory genes. The specificity and sensitivity of this assay, when tested with pure culture and spiked environmental water samples, were high, surpassing those of currently published PCR assays for the detection of this organism.

  18. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports.

  19. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports. PMID:22649939

  20. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  1. Application of quantitative PCR for the detection of microorganisms in water.

    PubMed

    Botes, Marelize; de Kwaadsteniet, Michéle; Cloete, Thomas Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of microorganisms in water due to contamination is a health risk and control thereof is a necessity. Conventional detection methods may be misleading and do not provide rapid results allowing for immediate action. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method has proven to be an effective tool to detect and quantify microorganisms in water within a few hours. Quantitative PCR assays have recently been developed for the detection of specific adeno- and polyomaviruses, bacteria and protozoa in different water sources. The technique is highly sensitive and able to detect low numbers of microorganisms. Quantitative PCR can be applied for microbial source tracking in water sources, to determine the efficiency of water and wastewater treatment plants and act as a tool for risk assessment. Different qPCR assays exist depending on whether an internal control is used or whether measurements are taken at the end of the PCR reaction (end-point qPCR) or in the exponential phase (real-time qPCR). Fluorescent probes are used in the PCR reaction to hybridise within the target sequence to generate a signal and, together with specialised systems, quantify the amount of PCR product. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR) is a more sensitive technique that detects low copy number RNA and can be applied to detect, e.g. enteric viruses and viable microorganisms in water, and measure specific gene expression. There is, however, a need to standardise qPCR protocols if this technique is to be used as an analytical diagnostic tool for routine monitoring. This review focuses on the application of qPCR in the detection of microorganisms in water.

  2. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)--based tool for detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris in soil.

    PubMed

    Saragih, Syaiful Amri; Takemoto, S; Hisamoto, Y; Fujii, M; Sato, H; Kamata, N

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR using a primer pair CM2946F/CM3160R was developed for specific detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris from soil. Standard curves were obtained for genomic DNA and DNA extracts from autoclaved soil with a certain dose of C. militaris suspension. C. militaris was detected from two forest soil samples out of ten that were collected when fruit bodies of C. militaris were found. This method seemed effective in detection of C. militaris in the soil and useful for rapid and reliable quantification of C. militaris in different ecosystems. PMID:25446034

  3. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)--based tool for detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris in soil.

    PubMed

    Saragih, Syaiful Amri; Takemoto, S; Hisamoto, Y; Fujii, M; Sato, H; Kamata, N

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR using a primer pair CM2946F/CM3160R was developed for specific detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris from soil. Standard curves were obtained for genomic DNA and DNA extracts from autoclaved soil with a certain dose of C. militaris suspension. C. militaris was detected from two forest soil samples out of ten that were collected when fruit bodies of C. militaris were found. This method seemed effective in detection of C. militaris in the soil and useful for rapid and reliable quantification of C. militaris in different ecosystems.

  4. [Research progress of real-time quantitative PCR method for group A rotavirus detection].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Qing; Li, Dan-Di; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Group A rotavirus is one of the most significant etiological agents which causes acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children worldwide. So far, several method which includes electron microscopy (EM), enzyme immunoassay (EIA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)and Real-time Quantitative PCR has been established for the detection of rotavirus. Compared with other methods, Real-time quantitative PCR have advantages in specificity, sensitivity, genotyping and quantitative accuracy. This article shows a overview of the application of real-time quantitative PCR technique to detecte group A rotavirus.

  5. Analytical Sensitivity Comparison between Singleplex Real-Time PCR and a Multiplex PCR Platform for Detecting Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jayme; Fowler, Nisha; Walmsley, Mary Louise; Schmidt, Terri; Scharrer, Jason; Kowaleski, James; Grimes, Teresa; Hoyos, Shanann; Chen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex PCR methods are attractive to clinical laboratories wanting to broaden their detection of respiratory viral pathogens in clinical specimens. However, multiplexed assays must be well optimized to retain or improve upon the analytic sensitivity of their singleplex counterparts. In this experiment, the lower limit of detection (LOD) of singleplex real-time PCR assays targeting respiratory viruses is compared to an equivalent panel on a multiplex PCR platform, the GenMark eSensor RVP. LODs were measured for each singleplex real-time PCR assay and expressed as the lowest copy number detected 95–100% of the time, depending on the assay. The GenMark eSensor RVP LODs were obtained by converting the TCID50/mL concentrations reported in the package insert to copies/μL using qPCR. Analytical sensitivity between the two methods varied from 1.2–1280.8 copies/μL (0.08–3.11 log differences) for all 12 assays compared. Assays targeting influenza A/H3N2, influenza A/H1N1pdm09, influenza B, and human parainfluenza 1 and 2 were most comparable (1.2–8.4 copies/μL, <1 log difference). Largest differences in LOD were demonstrated for assays targeting adenovirus group E, respiratory syncytial virus subtype A, and a generic assay for all influenza A viruses regardless of subtype (319.4–1280.8 copies/μL, 2.50–3.11 log difference). The multiplex PCR platform, the GenMark eSensor RVP, demonstrated improved analytical sensitivity for detecting influenza A/H3 viruses, influenza B virus, human parainfluenza virus 2, and human rhinovirus (1.6–94.8 copies/μL, 0.20–1.98 logs). Broader detection of influenza A/H3 viruses was demonstrated by the GenMark eSensor RVP. The relationship between TCID50/mL concentrations and the corresponding copy number related to various ATCC cultures is also reported. PMID:26569120

  6. Improved detection of episomal Banana streak viruses by multiplex immunocapture PCR.

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Grégoire; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Acina, Isabelle; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Banana streak viruses (BSV) are currently the main viral constraint to Musa germplasm movement, genetic improvement and mass propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and implement BSV detection strategies that are both reliable and sensitive, such as PCR-based techniques. Unfortunately, BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs) are present in the genome of Musa balbisiana. They interfere with PCR-based detection of episomal BSV in infected banana and plantain, such as immunocapture PCR. Therefore, a multiplex, immunocapture PCR (M-IC-PCR) was developed for the detection of BSV. Musa sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) primers were selected and used in combination with BSV species-specific primers in order to monitor possible contamination by Musa genomic DNA, using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, immunocapture conditions were optimized in order to prevent Musa DNA from interfering with episomal BSV DNA during the PCR step. This improved detection method successfully allowed the accurate, specific and sensitive detection of episomal DNA only from distinct BSV species. Its implementation should benefit PCR-based detection of viruses for which homologous sequences are present in the genome of their hosts, including transgenic plants expressing viral sequences.

  7. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in blood culture by a single PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan-King, M; Baldeh, I; Adegbola, R; Omosigho, C; Usen, S O; Oparaugo, A; Greenwood, B M

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed to screen blood cultures from children in The Gambia with suspected pneumonia for the simultaneous detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. Analysis of 295 blood cultures showed that PCR detected the organisms in all samples positive by culture in two samples infected with H. influenzae type b and four samples infected with S. pneumoniae that were culture negative, indicating that this method is sensitive for detecting these organisms in blood cultures. PMID:8818907

  8. A PCR-ELISA for detecting Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Zhao, Shaohua; Hall, Robert; Meng, Jianghong

    2002-03-01

    A sensitive and specific PCR-ELISA was developed to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in food. The assay was based on the incorporation of digoxigenin-labeled dUTP and a biotin-labeled primer specific for Shiga toxin genes during PCR amplification. The labeled PCR products were bound to streptavidin-coated wells of a microtiter plate and detected by an ELISA. The specificity of the PCR was determined using 39 bacterial strains, including STEC, enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli K12, and Salmonella. All of the STEC strains were positive, and non-STEC organisms were negative. The ELISA detecting system was able to increase the sensitivity of the PCR assay by up to 100-fold, compared with a conventional gel electrophoresis. The detection limit of the PCR-ELISA was 0.1-10 CFU dependent upon STEC serotypes, and genotypes of Shiga toxins. With the aid of a simple DNA extraction system, PrepMan, the PCR-ELISA was able to detect ca. 10(5) CFU of STEC per gram of ground beef without any culture enrichment. The entire procedure took about 6 h. Because of its microtiter plate format, PCR-ELISA is particularly suitable for large-scale screening and compatible with future automation.

  9. Use of multiplex PCR and PCR restriction enzyme analysis for detection and exploration of the variability in the free-living amoeba Naegleria in the environment.

    PubMed

    Pélandakis, Michel; Pernin, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed to simultaneously detect Naegleria fowleri and other Naegleria species in the environment. Multiplex PCR was also capable of identifying N. fowleri isolates with internal transcribed spacers of different sizes. In addition, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the PCR product distinguished the main thermophilic Naegleria species from the sampling sites.

  10. REAL-TIME PCR METHOD TO DETECT ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 16S rDNA real-time PCR method was developed to detect Enterococcus faecalis in water samples. The dynamic range for cell detection spanned five logs and the detection limit was determined to be 6 cfu/reaction. The assay was capable of detecting E. faecalis cells added to biof...

  11. A PCR procedure for the detection of Giardia intestinalis cysts and Escherichia coli in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Martinez, M L; Olmos-Ortiz, L M; Barajas-Mendiola, M A; Giono Cerezo, S; Avila, E E; Cuellar-Mata, P

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a pathogen associated with foodborne outbreaks and Escherichia coli is commonly used as a marker of faecal contamination. Implementation of routine identification methods of G. intestinalis is difficult for the analysis of vegetables and the microbiological detection of E. coli requires several days. This study proposes a PCR-based assay for the detection of E. coli and G. intestinalis cysts using crude DNA isolated from artificially contaminated lettuce. The G. intestinalis and E. coli PCR assays targeted the β-giardin and uidA genes, respectively, and were 100% specific. Forty lettuces from local markets were analysed by both PCR and light microscopy and no cysts were detected, the calculated detection limit was 20 cysts per gram of lettuce; however, by PCR, E. coli was detected in eight of ten randomly selected samples of lettuce. These data highlight the need to validate procedures for routine quality assurance. These PCR-based assays can be employed as alternative methods for the detection of G. intestinalis and E. coli and have the potential to allow for the automation and simultaneous detection of protozoa and bacterial pathogens in multiple samples. Significance and impact of the study: There are few studies for Giardia intestinalis detection in food because methods for its identification are difficult for routine implementation. Here, we developed a PCR-based method as an alternative to the direct observation of cysts in lettuce by light microscopy. Additionally, Escherichia coli was detected by PCR and the sanitary quality of lettuce was evaluated using molecular and standard microbiological methods. Using PCR, the detection probability of Giardia cysts inoculated onto samples of lettuce was improved compared to light microscopy, with the advantage of easy automation. These methods may be employed to perform timely and affordable detection of foodborne pathogens. PMID:25689035

  12. A PCR procedure for the detection of Giardia intestinalis cysts and Escherichia coli in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Martinez, M L; Olmos-Ortiz, L M; Barajas-Mendiola, M A; Giono Cerezo, S; Avila, E E; Cuellar-Mata, P

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a pathogen associated with foodborne outbreaks and Escherichia coli is commonly used as a marker of faecal contamination. Implementation of routine identification methods of G. intestinalis is difficult for the analysis of vegetables and the microbiological detection of E. coli requires several days. This study proposes a PCR-based assay for the detection of E. coli and G. intestinalis cysts using crude DNA isolated from artificially contaminated lettuce. The G. intestinalis and E. coli PCR assays targeted the β-giardin and uidA genes, respectively, and were 100% specific. Forty lettuces from local markets were analysed by both PCR and light microscopy and no cysts were detected, the calculated detection limit was 20 cysts per gram of lettuce; however, by PCR, E. coli was detected in eight of ten randomly selected samples of lettuce. These data highlight the need to validate procedures for routine quality assurance. These PCR-based assays can be employed as alternative methods for the detection of G. intestinalis and E. coli and have the potential to allow for the automation and simultaneous detection of protozoa and bacterial pathogens in multiple samples. Significance and impact of the study: There are few studies for Giardia intestinalis detection in food because methods for its identification are difficult for routine implementation. Here, we developed a PCR-based method as an alternative to the direct observation of cysts in lettuce by light microscopy. Additionally, Escherichia coli was detected by PCR and the sanitary quality of lettuce was evaluated using molecular and standard microbiological methods. Using PCR, the detection probability of Giardia cysts inoculated onto samples of lettuce was improved compared to light microscopy, with the advantage of easy automation. These methods may be employed to perform timely and affordable detection of foodborne pathogens.

  13. Development of a novel PCR-RFLP assay for improved detection and typing of bovine papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Kyoko; Takahashi, Chiaki; Ishihara, Ryoko; Hatama, Shinichi

    2015-06-15

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was developed to detect and type bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) from tumors in cattle. Two degenerate primer sets targeting the BPV L1 gene, subAup/subAdw and subBup/subBdw, and one restriction enzyme RsaI were used in this assay. In silico analyses of the restriction enzyme sites in the PCR fragments of 13 BPV sequences (BPV-1 to -13) revealed that all known BPVs are differentiated by the PCR-RFLP assay. Analyses of 63 previously typed clinical samples, that included teat papillomas and both esophageal and urinary bladder cancer biopsies, show that the assay clearly differentiates between eight clinically important BPV types (BPV-1 to -6, -9, -10), and discriminates between single and multiple infections. To further assess the reliability of the PCR-RFLP method amplified fragments were sequenced. A high correlation (95%) was observed when the results of the PCR-RFLP method were compared with PCR-sequencing. Differences in typing occurred for 3 of 63 specimens; PCR-RFLP identified additional BPV types in these specimens, while the PCR-sequencing identified only one. These results indicate that the PCR-RFLP method reported here is simpler and more reliable in the detection and typing of BPVs from bovine tumor samples than PCR-sequencing.

  14. Development of real-time PCR assay for differential detection of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella parapertussis.

    PubMed

    Tizolova, Anette; Brun, Delphine; Guiso, Nicole; Guillot, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Bordetella parapertussis is a causative agent of whooping cough in humans, and B. bronchiseptica is causing wide variety of respiratory infections in mammals, including humans. Specific diagnostic tests are not currently available. Our first objective was to develop a real-time PCR test for the specific detection of B. bronchiseptica based on the previously described end-point PCR, targeting an intergenomic sequence of the fla gene locus, but it has not been reached. However, there is cross-reactivity between B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica. Therefore, the targeted region of several clinical isolates of both species was sequenced, and alignment of the sequences allowed the development of a 2-step real-time PCR assay. The first PCR assay detected the DNA of all clinical isolates of both B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis tested. The second PCR assay detected only the DNA of B. parapertussis clinical isolates, thereby allowing discrimination between B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica.

  15. Detection of sulfonamide resistance genes via in situ PCR-FISH.

    PubMed

    Gnida, Anna; Kunda, Katarzyna; Ziembińska, Aleksandra; Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Felis, Ewa; Surmacz-Górska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rising use of antibiotics and as a consequence of their concentration in the environment an increasing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria is observed. The phenomenon has a hazardous impact on human and animal life. Sulfamethoxazole is one of the sulfonamides commonly detected in surface waters and soil. The aim of the study was to detect sulfamethoxazole resistance genes in activated sludge biocenosis by use of in situ PCR and/or hybridization. So far no FISH probes for the detection of SMX resistance genes have been described in the literature. We have tested common PCR primers used for SMX resistance genes detection as FISH probes as well as a combination of in situ PCR and FISH. Despite the presence of SMX resistance genes in activated sludge confirmed via traditional PCR, the detection of the genes via microscopic visualization failed. PMID:25115110

  16. Evaluation of PCR Approaches for Detection of Bartonella bacilliformis in Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martinez-Puchol, Sandra; Pons, Maria J.; Bazán, Jorge; Tinco, Carmen; del Valle, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Background The lack of an effective diagnostic tool for Carrion’s disease leads to misdiagnosis, wrong treatments and perpetuation of asymptomatic carriers living in endemic areas. Conventional PCR approaches have been reported as a diagnostic technique. However, the detection limit of these techniques is not clear as well as if its usefulness in low bacteriemia cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection limit of 3 PCR approaches. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the detection limit of 3 different PCR approaches: Bartonella-specific 16S rRNA, fla and its genes. We also evaluated the viability of dry blood spots to be used as a sample transport system. Our results show that 16S rRNA PCR is the approach with a lowest detection limit, 5 CFU/μL, and thus, the best diagnostic PCR tool studied. Dry blood spots diminish the sensitivity of the assay. Conclusions/Significance From the tested PCRs, the 16S rRNA PCR-approach is the best to be used in the direct blood detection of acute cases of Carrion’s disease. However its use in samples from dry blood spots results in easier management of transport samples in rural areas, a slight decrease in the sensitivity was observed. The usefulness to detect by PCR the presence of low-bacteriemic or asymptomatic carriers is doubtful, showing the need to search for new more sensible techniques. PMID:26959642

  17. Detection of adenoviruses and enteroviruses in tap water and river water by reverse transcription multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Cho, H B; Lee, S H; Cho, J C; Kim, S J

    2000-05-01

    A reverse transcription (RT) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to simultaneously detect adenoviruses and enteroviruses, both of which have attracted much attention as molecular indices of viral pollution in environmental samples. The method involves a reverse transcription step, followed by a multiplex nested PCR in which the combination of primers amplifies cDNA from enteroviruses and adenoviruses. The sensitivity of this assay was found to be similar to that of each monoplex PCR or RT-PCR assay, and to be consistent regardless of relative concentrations of adenoviruses and enteroviruses. To assess suitability and environmental application of the RT multiplex PCR assay, a total of 12 river water samples and 4 tap water samples were analyzed by RT multiplex PCR, each monoplex PCR or RT-PCR, and cell culture assay on the Buffalo Green Monkey kidney cell line. The sensitivity of the RT multiplex PCR was also found to be similar to that of each monoplex PCR in environmental samples. This suggests the RT multiplex PCR assay could be applied to the routine monitoring of viral pollution in environmental waters.

  18. Low-cost, real-time, continuous flow PCR system for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carballo, B Leticia; McGuiness, Ian; McBeth, Christine; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Borrós, Salvador; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a portable and low cost point-of-care (POC) PCR system for quantitative detection of pathogens. Our system is based on continuous flow PCR which maintains fixed temperatures zones and pushes the PCR solution between two heated areas allowing for faster heat transfer and as a result, a faster PCR. The PCR system is built around a 46.0 mm × 30.9 mm × 0.4 mm disposable thermoplastic chip. In order to make the single-use chip economically viable, it was manufactured by hot embossing and was designed to be compatible with roll-to-roll embossing for large scale production. The prototype instrumentation surrounding the chip includes two heaters, thermal sensors, and an optical system. The optical system allows for pathogen detection via real time fluorescence measurements. FAM probes were used as fluorescent reporters of the amplicons generated during the PCR. To demonstrate the function of the chip, two infectious bacteria targets were selected: Chlamydia trachomatis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. For both bacteria, the limit of detection of the system was determined, PCR efficiencies were calculated, and different flow velocities were tested. We have demonstrated successful detection for these two bacterial pathogens highlighting the versatility and broad utility of our portable, low-cost, and rapid PCR diagnostic device.

  19. Ten hour real-time PCR technique for detection of Salmonella in meats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of real-time PCR assays to detect low levels of Salmonella in meats following 8 h of pre-enrichment. The sensitivity and accuracy of molecular beacon and TaqMan probe PCR assays were compared with the conventional USDA microbiological procedure using artificially contaminat...

  20. Quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Morgan; de Coppet, Pierre; Bourion, Fabrice; Rachman, Cinta; Prévost, Hervé; Dousset, Xavier

    2005-04-01

    A quantitative method based on a real-time PCR assay to enumerate Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms was developed. The specificity for L. monocytogenes of primers targeting the listeriolysin gene was demonstrated using a SYBR Green I real-time PCR assay. The number of L. monocytogenes detected growing in biofilms was 6 x 10(2) CFU/cm2.

  1. Molecular Detection of Ureaplasma urealyticum from Prostate Tissues using PCR-RFLP, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Irajian, Gholamreza; Sharifi, Mehri; Mirkalantari, Shiva; Mirnejad, Reza; Jalali Nadoushan, Mohammad reza; Ghorbanpour, Nafiseh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In most cases, prostatitis can be caused by a bacterial agent such as Ureaplasma urealyticum. Considering to the cumbersome of the culture method for the detection of Ureaplasma species in clinical samples such as prostate; PCR method that is faster and more appropriate than the cultivation methods, can be utilized for the detection of U. urealyticum and U. parvum. PCR-RFLP method can differentiate both biovars and assist in studies of the clinical diagnosis, epidemiology and pathology of this species in human. The aim of this study was to molecular detection of U. urealyticumin in prostate tissue samples based on PCR- RFLP. Methods: Two hundred prostate tissue samples were collected from patient suffering from prostatitis. The PCR assay was used to amplify a 559 bp fragment of 16S-23SRNA interspace region of Ureaplasma. After sequencing, PCR products from positive samples were digested with TaqI restriction enzyme. Results: Seven cases (3.5%) out of 200 prostate tissue samples were positive for U. urealyticum. Results of PCR products sequencing demonstrated that all isolates were U. parvum biovar. PCR-RFLP results shown that there was not any differentiation in pattern of enzymatic digestion, in addition, all isolates were U. parvum, serovar 3. Discussion: U. urealyticum can be one of the causing agents of prostatitis. Using PCR-RFLP with specific primer and restriction enzyme is a rapid and cost-effect method for detection and differentiation of Ureaplasma from clinical samples. PMID:27499775

  2. Low-cost, real-time, continuous flow PCR system for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carballo, B Leticia; McGuiness, Ian; McBeth, Christine; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Borrós, Salvador; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a portable and low cost point-of-care (POC) PCR system for quantitative detection of pathogens. Our system is based on continuous flow PCR which maintains fixed temperatures zones and pushes the PCR solution between two heated areas allowing for faster heat transfer and as a result, a faster PCR. The PCR system is built around a 46.0 mm × 30.9 mm × 0.4 mm disposable thermoplastic chip. In order to make the single-use chip economically viable, it was manufactured by hot embossing and was designed to be compatible with roll-to-roll embossing for large scale production. The prototype instrumentation surrounding the chip includes two heaters, thermal sensors, and an optical system. The optical system allows for pathogen detection via real time fluorescence measurements. FAM probes were used as fluorescent reporters of the amplicons generated during the PCR. To demonstrate the function of the chip, two infectious bacteria targets were selected: Chlamydia trachomatis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. For both bacteria, the limit of detection of the system was determined, PCR efficiencies were calculated, and different flow velocities were tested. We have demonstrated successful detection for these two bacterial pathogens highlighting the versatility and broad utility of our portable, low-cost, and rapid PCR diagnostic device. PMID:26995085

  3. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for the Detection of Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays available to detect and enumerate fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and probes that target different rRNA genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in concentration es...

  4. Integrated sorting, concentration and real time PCR based detection system for sensitive detection of microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Monalisha; Singh, Deepak; Singh, Himanshu; Kant, Rishi; Gupta, Ankur; Pandey, Shashank Shekhar; Mandal, Swarnasri; Ramanathan, Gurunath; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    The extremely low limit of detection (LOD) posed by global food and water safety standards necessitates the need to perform a rapid process of integrated detection with high specificity, sensitivity and repeatability. The work reported in this article shows a microchip platform which carries out an ensemble of protocols which are otherwise carried in a molecular biology laboratory to achieve the global safety standards. The various steps in the microchip include pre-concentration of specific microorganisms from samples and a highly specific real time molecular identification utilizing a q-PCR process. The microchip process utilizes a high sensitivity antibody based recognition and an electric field mediated capture enabling an overall low LOD. The whole process of counting, sorting and molecular identification is performed in less than 4 hours for highly dilute samples. PMID:24253282

  5. Multicenter evaluation of Seegene Anyplex TB PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinsook; Kim, Jimyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Ihm, Chunhwa; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jayoung; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2014-07-01

    Culture is the gold standard for diagnosis of tuberculosis, but it takes 6 to 8 weeks to confirm the result. This issue is complemented by the detection method using polymerase chain reaction, which is now widely used in a routine microbiology laboratory. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR to assess its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, and compared its results with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR, one of the most widely used assays in the world. Five university hospitals located in the Chungcheong area in South Korea participated in the study. A total of 1,167 respiratory specimens ordered for acid-fast bacilli staining and culture were collected for four months, analyzed via the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR, and its results were compared with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR. For detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the Anyplex TB PCR were 87.5% and 98.2% respectively, whereas those of the Cobas TaqMan were 92.0% and 98.0% respectively (p value > 0.05). For smear-positive specimens, the sensitivity of the Anyplex TB PCR was 95.2%, which was exactly the same as that of the Cobas TaqMan. For smear-negative specimens, the sensitivity of the Anyplex TB PCR was 69.2%, whereas that of the Cobas TaqMan TB PCR was 84.6%. For detection of MTB, the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR showed excellent diagnostic performance, and high sensitivity and specificity, which were comparable to the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR. In conclusion, the Anyplex TB PCR can be a useful diagnostic tool for the early detection of tuberculosis in clinical laboratories.

  6. Evaluation of Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Youn; Lee, Nam Yong

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based amplification tests allow the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recently, a real-time PCR assay for M. tuberculosis complex, the Cobas TaqMan MTB test (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland), was introduced. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the Cobas TaqMan MTB test system. A total of 406 specimens collected from 247 patients were simultaneously tested by conventional culture, Cobas Amplicor MTB PCR, and TaqMan MTB PCR. The cross-reactivity with other Mycobacterium species and the detection limit were also evaluated. Among 406 specimens, a total of 24 specimens (5.9%) were culture positive: 14 specimens were positive by both TaqMan and Amplicor MTB PCRs, while 5 specimens were positive by only TaqMan PCR. The remaining five specimens were negative by both PCR methods. Seven specimens with negative culture results were positive by TaqMan PCR, but five of these were negative by Amplicor MTB PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were 79.1%, 98.2%, 73.1%, and 98.7% for TaqMan and 58.3%, 99.5%, 87.5%, and 97.4% for the Amplicor MTB PCR test, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with M. tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial species. The detection limit for the Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR test was 4.0 copies/μl. The Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR test showed higher sensitivity for detection of the M. tuberculosis complex without disturbing the specificity and NPV than the Amplicor MTB PCR test.

  7. Nucleic acid extraction from polluted estuarine water for detection of viruses and bacteria by PCR and RT-PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Petit, F; Craquelin, S; Guespin-Michel, J; Buffet-Janvresse, C

    1999-03-01

    We describe an extraction protocol for genomic DNA and RNA of both viruses and bacteria from polluted estuary water. This procedure was adapted to the molecular study of microflora of estuarine water where bacteria and viruses are found free, forming low-density biofilms, or intimately associated with organo-mineral particles. The sensitivity of the method was determined with seeded samples for RT-PCR and PCR analysis of viruses (10 virions/mL), and bacteria (1 colony-forming unit mL). We report an example of molecular detection of both poliovirus and Salmonella in the Seine estuary (France) and an approach to studying their association with organo-mineral particles.

  8. Biofunctionalization of Polyoxometalates with DNA Primers, Their Use in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Electrochemical Detection of PCR Products.

    PubMed

    Debela, Ahmed M; Ortiz, Mayreli; Beni, Valerio; Thorimbert, Serge; Lesage, Denis; Cole, Richard B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Hasenknopf, Bernold

    2015-12-01

    The bioconjugation of polyoxometalates (POMs), which are inorganic metal oxido clusters, to DNA strands to obtain functional labeled DNA primers and their potential use in electrochemical detection have been investigated. Activated monooxoacylated polyoxotungstates [SiW11 O39 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](8-) and [P2 W17 O61 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](6-) have been used to link to a 5'-NH2 terminated 21-mer DNA forward primer through amide coupling. The functionalized primer was characterized by using a battery of techniques, including electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy. The functionality of the POM-labeled primers was demonstrated through hybridization with a surface-immobilized probe. Finally, the labeled primers were successfully used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were characterized by using electrophoresis.

  9. Real-Time PCR: Revolutionizing Detection and Expression Analysis of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, SA; Kottapalli, KR; Rakwal, R; Oros, G; Rangappa, KS; Iwahashi, H; Masuo, Y; Agrawal, GK

    2007-01-01

    Invention of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology by Kary Mullis in 1984 gave birth to real-time PCR. Real-time PCRdetection and expression analysis of gene(s) in real-time — has revolutionized the 21st century biological science due to its tremendous application in quantitative genotyping, genetic variation of inter and intra organisms, early diagnosis of disease, forensic, to name a few. We comprehensively review various aspects of real-time PCR, including technological refinement and application in all scientific fields ranging from medical to environmental issues, and to plant. PMID:18645596

  10. Insulated Isothermal Reverse Transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, O; Pasick, J; Fisher, M; Buchanan, C; Erickson, A; Ambagala, A

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an OIE-listed disease that can have a severe impact on the swine industry. User-friendly, sensitive, rapid diagnostic tests that utilize low-cost field-deployable instruments for CSF diagnosis can be useful for disease surveillance and outbreak monitoring. In this study, we describe validation of a new probe-based insulated isothermal reverse transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay for rapid detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) on a compact, user-friendly device (POCKIT(™) Nucleic Acid Analyzer) that does not need data interpretation by the user. The assay accurately detected CSFV RNA from a diverse panel of 33 CSFV strains representing all three genotypes plus an additional in vitro-transcribed RNA from cloned sequences representing a vaccine strain. No cross-reactivity was observed with a panel of 18 viruses associated with livestock including eight other pestivirus strains (bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, border disease virus, HoBi atypical pestivirus), African swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease virus, swine influenza virus, porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, porcine circovirus 1, porcine circovirus 2, porcine respiratory coronavirus, vesicular exanthema of swine virus, bovine herpes virus type 1 and vesicular stomatitis virus. The iiRT-PCR assay accurately detected CSFV as early as 2 days post-inoculation in RNA extracted from serum samples of experimentally infected pigs, before appearance of clinical signs. The limit of detection (LOD95% ) calculated by probit regression analysis was 23 copies per reaction. The assay has a sample to answer turnaround time of less than an hour using extracted RNA or diluted or low volume of neat serum. The user-friendly, compact device that automatically analyses and displays results could potentially be a useful tool for surveillance and monitoring of CSF in a disease outbreak. PMID:25644051

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms in a Mixture by Multiplex PCR-Chip Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Supriya; Dasari, Srikanth; Bhagavatula, Krishna; Mueller, Steffen; Deepak, Saligrama Adavigowda; Ghosh, Sudip; Basak, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    An efficient PCR-based method to trace genetically modified food and feed products is in demand due to regulatory requirements and contaminant issues in India. However, post-PCR detection with conventional methods has limited sensitivity in amplicon separation that is crucial in multiplexing. The study aimed to develop a sensitive post-PCR detection method by using PCR-chip capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CCE) to detect and identify specific genetically modified organisms in their genomic DNA mixture by targeting event-specific nucleotide sequences. Using the PCR-CCE approach, novel multiplex methods were developed to detect MON531 cotton, EH 92-527-1 potato, Bt176 maize, GT73 canola, or GA21 maize simultaneously when their genomic DNAs in mixtures were amplified using their primer mixture. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) of the peak migration time was 0.06 and 3.88% for the MON531 and Bt176, respectively. The RSD (RSDR) of the Cry1Ac peak ranged from 0.12 to 0.40% in multiplex methods. The method was sensitive in resolving amplicon of size difference up to 4 bp. The PCR-CCE method is suitable to detect multiple genetically modified events in a composite DNA sample by tagging their event specific sequences. PMID:26525256

  12. Simultaneous Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms in a Mixture by Multiplex PCR-Chip Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Supriya; Dasari, Srikanth; Bhagavatula, Krishna; Mueller, Steffen; Deepak, Saligrama Adavigowda; Ghosh, Sudip; Basak, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    An efficient PCR-based method to trace genetically modified food and feed products is in demand due to regulatory requirements and contaminant issues in India. However, post-PCR detection with conventional methods has limited sensitivity in amplicon separation that is crucial in multiplexing. The study aimed to develop a sensitive post-PCR detection method by using PCR-chip capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CCE) to detect and identify specific genetically modified organisms in their genomic DNA mixture by targeting event-specific nucleotide sequences. Using the PCR-CCE approach, novel multiplex methods were developed to detect MON531 cotton, EH 92-527-1 potato, Bt176 maize, GT73 canola, or GA21 maize simultaneously when their genomic DNAs in mixtures were amplified using their primer mixture. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) of the peak migration time was 0.06 and 3.88% for the MON531 and Bt176, respectively. The RSD (RSDR) of the Cry1Ac peak ranged from 0.12 to 0.40% in multiplex methods. The method was sensitive in resolving amplicon of size difference up to 4 bp. The PCR-CCE method is suitable to detect multiple genetically modified events in a composite DNA sample by tagging their event specific sequences.

  13. Development of Nested PCR, Multiplex PCR, and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assays for Rapid Detection of Cylindrocladium scoparium on Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Tian-Min; Zhang, Jing; Li, Shu-Jiang; Han, Shan; Zhu, Tian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus dieback disease, caused by Cylindrocladium scoparium, has occurred in last few years in large Eucalyptus planting areas in China and other countries. Rapid, simple, and reliable diagnostic techniques are desired for the early detection of Eucalyptus dieback of C. scoparium prior to formulation of efficient control plan. For this purpose, three PCR-based methods of nested PCR, multiplex PCR, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) were developed for detection of C. scoparium based on factor 1-alpha (tef1) and beta-tubulin gene in this study. All of the three methods showed highly specific to C. scoparium. The sensitivities of the nested PCR and LAMP were much higher than the multiplex PCR. The sensitivity of multiplex PCR was also higher than regular PCR. C. scoparium could be detected within 60 min from infected Eucalyptus plants by LAMP, while at least 2 h was needed by the rest two methods. Using different Eucalyptus tissues as samples for C. scoparium detection, all of the three PCR-based methods showed much better detection results than regular PCR. Base on the results from this study, we concluded that any of the three PCR-based methods could be used as diagnostic technology for the development of efficient strategies of Eucalyptus dieback disease control. Particularly, LAMP was the most practical method in field application because of its one-step and rapid reaction, simple operation, single-tube utilization, and simple visualization of amplification products. PMID:27721691

  14. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PATHOGENIC CANDIDA SPECIES IN WATER USING FLOW CYTOMETRY COUPLED WITH TAQMAN PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the incidence of human fungal infection increases, the ability to detect and identify pathogenic fungi in potential environmental reservoirs becomes increasingly important for disease control. PCR based assays are widely used for diagnostic purposes, but may be inadequate for...

  15. Single-Reaction Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR for Detection of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Jesse J; Gresh, Lionel; Mohamed-Hadley, Alisha; Ballesteros, Gabriela; Davila, Maria Jose Vargas; Tellez, Yolanda; Sahoo, Malaya K; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2016-07-01

    Clinical manifestations of Zika virus, chikungunya virus, and dengue virus infections can be similar. To improve virus detection, streamline molecular workflow, and decrease test costs, we developed and evaluated a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR for these viruses.

  16. Direct Detection of Erythromycin-Resistant Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens by PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengguo; Han, Ruijun; Liu, Ying; Du, Quanli; Liu, Jifeng; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Hengxin; He, Qiushui; Yan, Yongping

    2015-11-01

    Resistance of Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin has been increasingly reported. We developed an allele-specific PCR method for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis directly from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. Based on the proven association of erythromycin resistance with the A2047G mutation in the 23S rRNA of B. pertussis, four primers, two of which were designed to be specific for either the wild-type or the mutant allele, were used in two different versions of the allele-specific PCR assay. The methods were verified with results obtained by PCR-based sequencing of 16 recent B. pertussis isolates and 100 NP swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. The detection limits of the two PCR assays ranged from 10 to 100 fg per reaction for both erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant B. pertussis. Two amplified fragments of each PCR, of 286 and 112 bp, respectively, were obtained from a mutant allele of the isolates and/or NP swab samples containing B. pertussis DNAs. For the wild-type allele, only a 286-bp fragment was visible when the allele-specific PCR assay 1 was performed. No amplification was found when a number of non-Bordetella bacterial pathogens and NP swab samples that did not contain the DNAs of B. pertussis were examined. This assay can serve as an alternative for PCR-based sequencing, especially for local laboratories in resource-poor countries.

  17. Direct Detection of Erythromycin-Resistant Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengguo; Han, Ruijun; Liu, Ying; Du, Quanli; Liu, Jifeng; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Hengxin

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin has been increasingly reported. We developed an allele-specific PCR method for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis directly from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. Based on the proven association of erythromycin resistance with the A2047G mutation in the 23S rRNA of B. pertussis, four primers, two of which were designed to be specific for either the wild-type or the mutant allele, were used in two different versions of the allele-specific PCR assay. The methods were verified with results obtained by PCR-based sequencing of 16 recent B. pertussis isolates and 100 NP swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. The detection limits of the two PCR assays ranged from 10 to 100 fg per reaction for both erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant B. pertussis. Two amplified fragments of each PCR, of 286 and 112 bp, respectively, were obtained from a mutant allele of the isolates and/or NP swab samples containing B. pertussis DNAs. For the wild-type allele, only a 286-bp fragment was visible when the allele-specific PCR assay 1 was performed. No amplification was found when a number of non-Bordetella bacterial pathogens and NP swab samples that did not contain the DNAs of B. pertussis were examined. This assay can serve as an alternative for PCR-based sequencing, especially for local laboratories in resource-poor countries. PMID:26224847

  18. Detection of hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) in wild shrimp from India by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Manjanaik, B; Umesha, K R; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya

    2005-02-28

    The prevalence of hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) in wild penaeid shrimp samples from India was studied by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers designed in our laboratory. The virus could be detected in 9 out of 119 samples by non-nested PCR. However, by nested PCR 69 out of 119 samples were positive. The PCR results were confirmed by hybridization with digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe. Shrimp species positive by non-nested PCR included Penaeus monodon, Penaeus indicus and Penaeus semisulcatus and by nested PCR Parapenaeopsis stylifera, Penaeus japonicus, Metapenaeus monoceros, M. affinis, M. elegans, M. dobsoni, M. ensis and Solenocera choprai. This is the first report on the prevalence of HPV in captured wild shrimp from India. PMID:15819441

  19. Thermal factors influencing detection of Vibrio vulnificus using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shishan; Levin, Robert E

    2007-05-01

    Five thermal factors, including initial denaturation temperature, cycling denaturation temperature, annealing temperature, extension temperature and the temperature at which the intensity of the fluorescent signal is read, were evaluated for their effects on the detection of Vibrio vulnificus via real-time PCR. Fluorescent signal detection after extension was set between the Tm value of the primer-dimers (79 degrees C) and that of the PCR target amplicons (84 degrees C). This effectively eliminated the overestimation of the yield of PCR amplicons due to the presence of primer-dimers which otherwise led to erroneously lower Ct values (1.91+/-0.22 cycles lower). The annealing and extension steps were combined to convert a three-step PCR to a two-step PCR. This consisted of initial denaturation at 95 degrees C for 3 min, cycling denaturation at 94 degrees C for 15 s and a combined annealing and extension step at 60 degrees C for 5 s in each PCR cycle. One genomic target per real-time PCR reaction was detected with the simplified two-step PCR.

  20. Enhancing allele-specific PCR for specifically detecting short deletion and insertion DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiran; Rollin, Joseph A; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2010-02-01

    Allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) has been widely used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. But there are some challenges in using AS-PCR for specifically detecting DNA variations with short deletions or insertions. The challenges are associated with designing selective allele-specific primers as well as the specificity of AS-PCR in distinguishing some types of single base-pair mismatches. In order to address such problems and enhance the applicability of AS-PCR, a general primer design method was developed to create a multiple base-pair mismatch between the primer 3'-terminus and the template DNA. This approach can destabilize the primer-template complex more efficiently than does a single base-pair mismatch, and can dramatically increase the specificity of AS-PCR. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, the method of primer design was applied in colony PCR for identifying plasmid DNA deletion or insertion mutants after site-directed mutagenesis. As anticipated, multiple base-pair mismatches achieved much more specific PCR amplification than single base-pair mismatches. Therefore, with the proposed primer design method, the detection of short nucleotide deletion and insertion mutations becomes simple, accurate and more reliable.

  1. One-PCR-tube approach for in situ DNA isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Hou, Lihua; Xu, Xiaohe; Chen, Hongjun; Ji, Haifeng; Zhu, Shuifang

    2011-10-21

    Traditional real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) requires a purified DNA sample for PCR amplification and detection. This requires PCR tests be conducted in clean laboratories, and limits its applications for field tests. This work developed a method that can carry out DNA purification, amplification and detection in a single PCR tube. The polypropylene PCR tube was first treated with chromic acid and peptide nucleic acids (PNA) as DNA-capturer were immobilized on the internal surface of the tube. Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV-35S) promoter in the crude extract was hybridized with the PNA on the tube surface, and the inhibitors, interfering agents and irrelevant DNA in the crude extract were effectively removed by rinsing with buffer solutions. The tube that has captured the target DNA can be used for the following real-time PCR (RT-PCR). By using this approach, the detection of less than 2500 copies of 35S plasmids in a complex sample could be completed within 3 hours. Chocolate samples were tested for real sample analysis, and 35S plasmids in genetically modified chocolate samples have been successfully identified with this method in situ. The novel One-PCR-tube method is competitive for commercial kits with the same time and simpler operation procedure. This method may be widely used for identifying food that contains modified DNA and specific pathogens in the field. PMID:21879029

  2. Comparison of PCR and Plaque Assay for Detection and Enumeration of Coliphage in Polluted Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J. B.; Zhou, X.; Griffin, D. W.; Paul, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A total of 68 marine samples from various sites impacted by sewage and storm waters were analyzed by both the plaque assay and a reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR technique for F(sup+)-specific coliphage. The coliphage levels detected by the plaque assay averaged 1.90 x 10(sup4) PFU/100.0 ml. Using a most probable number (MPN) PCR approach, the levels averaged 2.40 x 10(sup6) MPN-PCR units/100.0 ml. Two samples were positive by RT-PCR but negative by plaque assay, and 12 samples were positive by plaque assay but negative by RT-PCR (levels lower than 11.00 PFU/100.0 ml). The host system used for the plaque assay may detect somatic coliphage in addition to the F(sup+)-specific coliphage. When it is used as an indicator of pollution, contamination may be missed with more restrictive systems. The difference in results may be due to the sensitivity, specificity, or inhibition of RT-PCR in marine samples. This study provides information on quantifying PCR results by an MPN method and insights into interpretation of PCR data for detection of viruses in marine environments. PMID:16535737

  3. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing.

  4. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing. PMID:26210470

  5. Detection of Candida albicans mRNA in Archival Histopathology Samples by Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Kyle T.; Holmes, Ann R.; Cannon, Richard D.; Rich, Alison M.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting Candida albicans mRNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival human histopathology specimens by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was investigated. RT with gene-specific primers was used to detect five single-copy C. albicans gene transcripts, including those of two housekeeping genes, in oral candidiasis samples up to 8 years of age. PMID:15131211

  6. Evaluation of a Commercial Multiplex PCR for Rapid Detection of Multi Drug Resistant Gram Negative Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chavada, Ruchir; Maley, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Community and healthcare associated infections caused by multi-drug resistant gram negative organisms (MDR GN) represent a worldwide threat. Nucleic Acid Detection tests are becoming more common for their detection; however they can be expensive requiring specialised equipment and local expertise. This study was done to evaluate the utility of a commercial multiplex tandem (MT) PCR for detection of MDR GN. Methods: The study was done on stored laboratory MDR GN isolates from sterile and non-sterile specimens (n=126, out of stored 567 organisms). Laboratory validation of the MT PCR was done to evaluate sensitivity, specificity and agreement with the current phenotypic methods used in the laboratory. Amplicon sequencing was also done on selected isolates for assessing performance characteristics. Workflow and cost implications of the MT PCR were evaluated. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of the MT PCR were calculated to be 95% and 96.7% respectively. Agreement with the phenotypic methods was 80%. Major lack of agreement was seen in detection of AmpC beta lactamase in enterobacteriaceae and carbapenemase in non-fermenters. Agreement of the MT PCR with another multiplex PCR was found to be 87%. Amplicon sequencing confirmed the genotype detected by MT PCR in 94.2 % of cases tested. Time to result was faster for the MT PCR but cost per test was higher. Conclusion: This study shows that with carefully chosen targets for detection of resistance genes in MDR GN, rapid and efficient identification is possible. MT PCR was sensitive and specific and likely more accurate than phenotypic methods. PMID:26464612

  7. A multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Tenacibaculum maritimum and Edwardsiella tarda in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nuria; Toranzo, Alicia E; Magariños, Beatriz

    2014-06-01

    A specific and sensitive multiplex PCR (mPCR) method was developed as a useful tool for the simultaneous detection of two important flatfish pathogens in marine aquaculture, Tenacibaculum maritimum and Edwardsiella tarda. In fish tissues, the average detection limit for these mPCR-amplified organisms was 2 × 10 ⁵ ± 0.2 CFU/g and 4 × 10 ⁵ ± 0.3 CFU/g, respectively. These values are similar or even lower than those previously obtained using the corresponding single PCR. Moreover, mPCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 36 taxonomically related and unrelated strains belonging to 33 different bacterial species. Large amounts of DNA from one of the target bacterial species in the presence of low amounts from the other did not have a significant effect on the amplification sensitivity of the latter.

  8. Salmonella detection from chicken rinsate with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and RT-PCR validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical detection of bacteria has been approached in recent years as a bacteria detection method that can counter time restraints of traditional plating or the high reoccurring cost of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The goal of optical detection is to identify bacteria with spectral s...

  9. [Selective detection of viable pathogenic bacteria in water using reverse transcription quantitative PCR].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Li, Dan; Wu, Shu-Xu; He, Miao; Yang, Tian

    2012-11-01

    A reverse transcription q quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay method was established, which can quantify the copy numbers of RNA in pathogenic bacteria of E. coli and Enterococcus faecium. The results showed that cDNA was generated with the RT-PCR reagents, target gene was quantified with the qPCR, the copy numbers of RNA were stable at about 1 copies x CFU(-1) for E. coli and 7.98 x 10(2) copies x CFU(-1) for Enterococcus faecium respectively during the stationary grow phase for the both indicator bacteria [E. coli (6-18 h) and Enterococcus faecium (10-38 h)]. The established RT-qPCR method can quantify the numbers of viable bacteria through detecting bacterial RNA targets. Through detecting the heat-treated E. coli and Enterococcus faecium by three methods (culture method, qPCR, RT-qPCR), we found that the qPCR and RT-qPCR can distinguish 1.43 lg copy non-viable E. coli and 2.5 lg copy non-viable Enterococcus faecium. These results indicated that the established methods could effectively distinguish viable bacteria from non-viable bacteria. Finally we used this method to evaluate the real effluents of the secondary sedimentation of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), the results showed that the correlation coefficients (R2) between RT-qPCR and culture method were 0.930 (E. coli) and 0.948 (Enterococcus faecium), and this established RT-PCR method can rapidly detect viable pathogenic bacteria in genuine waters.

  10. Detection of Thielaviopsis basicola in soil with real-time quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junli; Kang, Zhenhui

    2010-07-20

    Thielaviopsis basicola is a soil-borne fungus with a wide host range and a cosmopolitan distribution. It causes disease on many agricultural crops and in China it is the causal agent of black root rot on tobacco plant. Early diagnosis and detection of the pathogen in soil are critical to control this disease in field. The objective of this study was to develop sensitive and effective methods suitable for large-scale detection and quantification of T. basicola. Based on the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of Thielaviopsis spp, primers and TaqMan probe were designed specifically to amplify DNA from T. basicola and real-time, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed for rapid, specific and sensitive detection and quantification of T. basicola. It was sensitive with the detection limit of 100 fg microl(-1) genomic DNA of T. basicola in qPCR assays. By combining the qPCR assays with the efficient protocol to extract DNA from soil, it was possible to achieve real-time detection of T. basicola in soil in 4-5 h and the detection limit of 3 conidia per reaction in qPCR was recorded. The assays were applied to survey soils from tobacco fields in China for the presence of T. basicola and the analyses of naturally infested soil showed the reliability of the qPCR assays.

  11. Interlaboratory study of DNA extraction from multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for individual kernel detection system of genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kozue; Makiyma, Daiki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Teshima, Reiko; Nakashima, Akie; Ogawa, Asako; Yamagishi, Toru; Futo, Satoshi; Oguchi, Taichi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    In many countries, the labeling of grains, feed, and foodstuff is mandatory if the genetically modified (GM) organism content exceeds a certain level of approved GM varieties. We previously developed an individual kernel detection system consisting of grinding individual kernels, DNA extraction from the individually ground kernels, GM detection using multiplex real-time PCR, and GM event detection using multiplex qualitative PCR to analyze the precise commingling level and varieties of GM maize in real sample grains. We performed the interlaboratory study of the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR detection, and multiplex qualitative PCR detection to evaluate its applicability, practicality, and ruggedness for the individual kernel detection system of GM maize. DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR were evaluated by five laboratories in Japan, and all results from these laboratories were consistent with the expected results in terms of the commingling level and event analysis. Thus, the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for the individual kernel detection system is applicable and practicable in a laboratory to regulate the commingling level of GM maize grain for GM samples, including stacked GM maize.

  12. Interlaboratory study of DNA extraction from multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for individual kernel detection system of genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kozue; Makiyma, Daiki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Teshima, Reiko; Nakashima, Akie; Ogawa, Asako; Yamagishi, Toru; Futo, Satoshi; Oguchi, Taichi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    In many countries, the labeling of grains, feed, and foodstuff is mandatory if the genetically modified (GM) organism content exceeds a certain level of approved GM varieties. We previously developed an individual kernel detection system consisting of grinding individual kernels, DNA extraction from the individually ground kernels, GM detection using multiplex real-time PCR, and GM event detection using multiplex qualitative PCR to analyze the precise commingling level and varieties of GM maize in real sample grains. We performed the interlaboratory study of the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR detection, and multiplex qualitative PCR detection to evaluate its applicability, practicality, and ruggedness for the individual kernel detection system of GM maize. DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR were evaluated by five laboratories in Japan, and all results from these laboratories were consistent with the expected results in terms of the commingling level and event analysis. Thus, the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for the individual kernel detection system is applicable and practicable in a laboratory to regulate the commingling level of GM maize grain for GM samples, including stacked GM maize. PMID:22165018

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Xing, Na; Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  14. DNA Sequence Signatures for Rapid Detection of Six Target Bacterial Pathogens Using PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Kenjiro; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Using Streptococcus pyogenes as a model, we previously established a stepwise computational workflow to effectively identify species-specific DNA signatures that could be used as PCR primer sets to detect target bacteria with high specificity and sensitivity. In this study, we extended the workflow for the rapid development of PCR assays targeting Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Staphylococcus aureus, which are of safety concern for human tissue intended for transplantation. Twenty-one primer sets that had sensitivity of detecting 5–50 fg DNA from target bacteria with high specificity were selected. These selected primer sets can be used in a PCR array for detecting target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity. The workflow could be widely applicable for the rapid development of PCR-based assays for a wide range of target bacteria, including those of biothreat agents. PMID:26279626

  15. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of three viruses in pear plants by a multiplex RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bingyu; Wang, Guoping; Ma, Xiaofang; Liu, Wenbin; Tang, Huihui; Zhu, Hui; Hong, Ni

    2014-02-01

    A multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR) assay was developed for detection and differentiation of the Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), which are viruses frequently occurring in pear trees. Different combinations of mixed primer pairs were tested for their specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of the three viruses. Three primer pairs were used to amplify their fragments of 247bp, 358bp and 500bp, respectively. The primer pair for ASPV was designed in this work, while the primer pairs for ACLSV and ASGV were from previous reports. The sensitivity and specificity of the mRT-PCR assay for the three viruses were comparable to that of each uniplex RT-PCR. The mRT-PCR was applied successfully for the detection of three viruses in leaves of pear and apple plants, but was unreliable in the detection of ASGV in dormant barks. In conclusion, this mRT-PCR provides a useful tool for the routine and rapid detection and the differentiation of three pear viruses.

  16. Detection by PCR of Neospora caninum in Fetal Tissues from Spontaneous Bovine Abortions

    PubMed Central

    Baszler, Timothy V.; Gay, Lawrence J. C.; Long, Maureen T.; Mathison, Bruce A.

    1999-01-01

    The routine diagnosis of Neospora caninum abortion is based upon histopathologic changes in fetal tissues and identification of tissue parasites by immunohistochemistry. Confirmation of N. caninum infection by immunohistochemistry has low sensitivity. In the present study, we examined the utility of PCR in detecting N. caninum infection in fetal tissues from spontaneous bovine abortion. DNA was obtained from fresh and formalin-fixed tissues from 61 bovine fetuses submitted for abortion diagnosis. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry determined the true status of N. caninum infection in each fetus. In formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, PCR detected N. caninum DNA in 13 of 13 true-positive fetuses (100%) and in 1 of 16 true-negative fetuses (6%). In fresh or frozen tissues, PCR detected N. caninum DNA in 10 of 13 true-positive fetuses (77%) and 0 of 11 true-negative fetuses (0%). PCR also detected N. caninum DNA in 6 of 8 fetuses that had typical lesions of N. caninum but were immunohistochemistry negative, indicating a higher sensitivity of PCR in comparison to that of immunohistochemistry. N. caninum DNA was amplified most consistently from brain tissue. PCR detection of N. caninum DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues was superior to that in fresh tissues, presumably because of the increased accuracy of sample selection inherent in histologic specimens. PMID:10565932

  17. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  18. PCR and Blood Culture for Detection of Escherichia coli Bacteremia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Heininger, Alexandra; Binder, Marlies; Schmidt, Sibylle; Unertl, Klaus; Botzenhart, Konrad; Döring, Gerd

    1999-01-01

    Critically ill patients often develop symptoms of sepsis and therefore require microbiological tests for bacteremia that use conventional blood culture (BC) techniques. However, since these patients frequently receive early empirical antibiotic therapy before diagnostic procedures are completed, examination by BC can return false-negative results. We therefore hypothesized that PCR could improve the rate of detection of microbial pathogens over that of BC. To test this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were challenged intravenously with 106 CFU of Escherichia coli. Blood was then taken at several time points for detection of E. coli by BC and by PCR with E. coli-specific primers derived from the uidA gene, encoding β-glucuronidase. In further experiments, cefotaxime (100 or 50 mg/kg of body weight) was administered intravenously to rats 10 min after E. coli challenge. Without this chemotherapy, the E. coli detection rate decreased at 15 min and at 210 min after challenge from 100% to 62% of the animals with PCR and from 100% to 54% of the animals with BC (P, >0.05). Chemotherapy decreased the E. coli detection rate at 25 min and at 55 min after challenge from 100% to 50% with PCR and from 100% to 0% with BC (P, <0.05). Thus, at clinically relevant serum antibiotic levels, PCR affords a significantly higher detection rate than BC in this rat model. The results suggest that PCR could be a useful adjunct tool supplementing conventional BC techniques in diagnosing bacteremia. PMID:10405388

  19. Hepatitis C virus detection by single-round PCR specific for the terminal 3' noncoding region.

    PubMed

    Umlauft, F; Wong, D T; Oefner, P J; Underhill, P A; Cheung, R C; Wright, T L; Kolykhalov, A A; Gruenewald, K; Greenberg, H B

    1996-10-01

    A single-round PCR method with primers specific for the 3' noncoding region (NCR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed. Using a double RNAzol-B extraction, a high-temperature reverse-transcription step with SuperScript II reverse transcriptase, and a 40-cycle two-temperature PCR with a TaqStart antibody hot-start procedure, we were able to detect a 92-nucleotide fragment of the recently discovered 98-nucleotide highly conserved sequence at the 3' terminus of the HCV genome. Direct sequencing of the PCR products confirmed the specificity of the PCR and demonstrated conservation in this region. Only one nucleotide change in 14 specimens was found. End point dilution titration of sera with known viral RNA titers showed the sensitivity of the single-round 3' NCR PCR to be comparable to those of the established nested 5' NCR assays (fewer than 25 HCV genome equivalents). To evaluate specificity and sensitivity, a panel of 116 serum samples characterized by nested 5'-end PCR, genotyping, and quantitative assays was tested. A high degree of concordance (96%) between the 3' NCR and 5' NCR PCR results was found. The sequence conservation at the 3' end of the HCV genome among common genotypes and the savings in time, labor, and reagents from a single-round PCR make this assay a useful addition to the detection systems available to identify and monitor HCV infection.

  20. Usefulness of in-house PCR methods for hepatitis B virus DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Portilho, Moyra Machado; Baptista, Marcia Leite; da Silva, Messias; de Sousa, Paulo Sérgio Fonseca; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of three in-house PCR techniques for HBV DNA detection and compare it with commercial quantitative methods to evaluate the usefulness of in-house methods for HBV diagnosis. Three panels of HBsAg reactive sera samples were evaluated: (i) 50 samples were examined using three methods for in-house qualitative PCR and the Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor Assay; (ii) 87 samples were assayed using in-house semi-nested PCR and the Cobas TaqMan HBV test; (iii) 11 serial samples obtained from 2 HBV-infected individuals were assayed using the Cobas Amplicor HBV test and semi-nested PCR. In panel I, HBV DNA was detected in 44 samples using the Cobas Amplicor HBV test, 42 samples using semi-nested PCR (90% concordance with Cobas Amplicor), 22 samples using PCR for the core gene (63.6% concordance) and 29 samples using single-round PCR for the pre-S/S gene (75% concordance). In panel II, HBV DNA was quantified in 78 of the 87 HBsAg reactive samples using Cobas TaqMan but 52 samples using semi-nested PCR (67.8% concordance). HBV DNA was detected in serial samples until the 17th and 26th week after first donation using in-house semi-nested PCR and the Cobas Amplicor HBV test, respectively. In-house semi-nested PCR presented adequate concordance with commercial methods as an alternative method for HBV molecular diagnosis in low-resource settings.

  1. Reliability of quantitative real-time PCR for bacterial detection in cystic fibrosis airway specimens.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Wagner, Brandie D; Sagel, Scott D; Stevens, Mark J; Accurso, Frank J; Harris, J Kirk

    2010-11-30

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway microbiome is complex; polymicrobial infections are common, and the presence of fastidious bacteria including anaerobes make culture-based diagnosis challenging. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) offers a culture-independent method for bacterial quantification that may improve diagnosis of CF airway infections; however, the reliability of qPCR applied to CF airway specimens is unknown. We sought to determine the reliability of nine specific bacterial qPCR assays (total bacteria, three typical CF pathogens, and five anaerobes) applied to CF airway specimens. Airway and salivary specimens from clinically stable pediatric CF subjects were collected. Quantitative PCR assay repeatability was determined using triplicate reactions. Split-sample measurements were performed to measure variability introduced by DNA extraction. Results from qPCR were compared to standard microbial culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, common pathogens in CF. We obtained 84 sputa, 47 oropharyngeal and 27 salivary specimens from 16 pediatric subjects with CF. Quantitative PCR detected bacterial DNA in over 97% of specimens. All qPCR assays were highly reproducible at quantities≥10(2) rRNA gene copies/reaction with coefficient of variation less than 20% for over 99% of samples. There was also excellent agreement between samples processed in duplicate. Anaerobic bacteria were highly prevalent and were detected in mean quantities similar to that of typical CF pathogens. Compared to a composite gold standard, qPCR and culture had variable sensitivities for detection of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and H. influenzae from CF airway samples. By reliably quantifying fastidious airway bacteria, qPCR may improve our understanding of polymicrobial CF lung infections, progression of lung disease and ultimately improve antimicrobial treatments.

  2. Reliability of Quantitative Real-Time PCR for Bacterial Detection in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Sagel, Scott D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Accurso, Frank J.; Harris, J. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway microbiome is complex; polymicrobial infections are common, and the presence of fastidious bacteria including anaerobes make culture-based diagnosis challenging. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) offers a culture-independent method for bacterial quantification that may improve diagnosis of CF airway infections; however, the reliability of qPCR applied to CF airway specimens is unknown. We sought to determine the reliability of nine specific bacterial qPCR assays (total bacteria, three typical CF pathogens, and five anaerobes) applied to CF airway specimens. Airway and salivary specimens from clinically stable pediatric CF subjects were collected. Quantitative PCR assay repeatability was determined using triplicate reactions. Split-sample measurements were performed to measure variability introduced by DNA extraction. Results from qPCR were compared to standard microbial culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, common pathogens in CF. We obtained 84 sputa, 47 oropharyngeal and 27 salivary specimens from 16 pediatric subjects with CF. Quantitative PCR detected bacterial DNA in over 97% of specimens. All qPCR assays were highly reproducible at quantities ≥102 rRNA gene copies/reaction with coefficient of variation less than 20% for over 99% of samples. There was also excellent agreement between samples processed in duplicate. Anaerobic bacteria were highly prevalent and were detected in mean quantities similar to that of typical CF pathogens. Compared to a composite gold standard, qPCR and culture had variable sensitivities for detection of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and H. influenzae from CF airway samples. By reliably quantifying fastidious airway bacteria, qPCR may improve our understanding of polymicrobial CF lung infections, progression of lung disease and ultimately improve antimicrobial treatments. PMID:21152087

  3. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis.

  4. A One-Step, Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Rhinovirus

    PubMed Central

    Do, Duc H.; Laus, Stella; Leber, Amy; Marcon, Mario J.; Jordan, Jeanne A.; Martin, Judith M.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    One-step, real-time PCR assays for rhinovirus have been developed for a limited number of PCR amplification platforms and chemistries, and some exhibit cross-reactivity with genetically similar enteroviruses. We developed a one-step, real-time PCR assay for rhinovirus by using a sequence detection system (Applied Biosystems; Foster City, CA). The primers were designed to amplify a 120-base target in the noncoding region of picornavirus RNA, and a TaqMan (Applied Biosystems) degenerate probe was designed for the specific detection of rhinovirus amplicons. The PCR assay had no cross-reactivity with a panel of 76 nontarget nucleic acids, which included RNAs from 43 enterovirus strains. Excellent lower limits of detection relative to viral culture were observed for the PCR assay by using 38 of 40 rhinovirus reference strains representing different serotypes, which could reproducibly detect rhinovirus serotype 2 in viral transport medium containing 10 to 10,000 TCID50 (50% tissue culture infectious dose endpoint) units/ml of the virus. However, for rhinovirus serotypes 59 and 69, the PCR assay was less sensitive than culture. Testing of 48 clinical specimens from children with cold-like illnesses for rhinovirus by the PCR and culture assays yielded detection rates of 16.7% and 6.3%, respectively. For a batch of 10 specimens, the entire assay was completed in 4.5 hours. This real-time PCR assay enables detection of many rhinovirus serotypes with the Applied Biosystems reagent-instrument platform. PMID:19948820

  5. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27065589

  6. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in bovine and bubaline tissues through nested-PCR.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cristina P; Osório, Ana Luiza A R; Jorge, Klaudia S G; Ramos, Carlos A N; Souza Filho, Antonio F; Vidal, Carlos E S; Vargas, Agueda P C; Roxo, Eliana; Rocha, Adalgiza S; Suffys, Philip N; Fonseca, Antônio A; Silva, Marcio R; Barbosa Neto, José D; Cerqueira, Valíria D; Araújo, Flábio R

    2014-01-01

    Post-mortem bacterial culture and specific biochemical tests are currently performed to characterize the etiologic agent of bovine tuberculosis. Cultures take up to 90 days to develop. A diagnosis by molecular tests such as PCR can provide fast and reliable results while significantly decreasing the time of confirmation. In the present study, a nested-PCR system, targeting rv2807, with conventional PCR followed by real-time PCR, was developed to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) organisms directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. The sensitivity and specificity of the reactions were assessed with DNA samples extracted from tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, as well as other Actinomycetales species and DNA samples extracted directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. Regarding the analytical sensitivity, DNA of the M. bovis AN5 strain was detected up to 1.5 pg by nested-PCR, whereas DNA of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain was detected up to 6.1 pg. The nested-PCR system showed 100% analytical specificity for MTC when tested with DNA of reference strains of non-tuberculous mycobacteria and closely-related Actinomycetales. A clinical sensitivity level of 76.7% was detected with tissues samples positive for MTC by means of the culture and conventional PCR. A clinical specificity of 100% was detected with DNA from tissue samples of cattle with negative results in the comparative intradermal tuberculin test. These cattle exhibited no visible lesions and were negative in the culture for MTC. The use of the nested-PCR assay to detect M. tuberculosis complex in tissue homogenates provided a rapid diagnosis of bovine and bubaline tuberculosis.

  7. Duplex PCR for detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp in cockle samples.

    PubMed

    Senachai, Pachara; Chomvarin, Chariya; Wongboot, Warawan; Boonyanugomol, Wongwarut; Tangkanakul, Waraluk

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella and Shigella spp are important causative agents of foodborne diseases. A sensitive, specific and rapid method is essential for detection of these pathogens. In this study, a duplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp in cockle samples and compared with the traditional culture method. Enrichment broths for Salmonella spp recovery were also compared. Sensitivity of the duplex PCR for simultaneous detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp from pure culture was 10(3) CFU/ml (40 CFU/PCR reaction), and that of sterile cockle samples spiked with these two pathogens was 1 CFU/10 g of cockle tissue after 9 hours enrichment [3 hours in buffered peptone water (BPW), followed by 6 hours in Rappaport Vasiliadis (RV) broth or tetrathionate (TT) broth for Salmonella spp and 6 hours enrichment in Shigella broth (SB) for Shigella spp]. There was no significant difference in detection sensitivity between enrichment in RV and TT broths. Salmonella spp detected in cockles in Khon Kaen, Thailand by duplex PCR and culture method was 17% and 13%, respectively but Shigella spp was not detected. The duplex PCR technique developed for simultaneous detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp in cockle samples was highly sensitive, specific and rapid and could serve as a suitable method for food safety assessment.

  8. Duplex PCR for detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp in cockle samples.

    PubMed

    Senachai, Pachara; Chomvarin, Chariya; Wongboot, Warawan; Boonyanugomol, Wongwarut; Tangkanakul, Waraluk

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella and Shigella spp are important causative agents of foodborne diseases. A sensitive, specific and rapid method is essential for detection of these pathogens. In this study, a duplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp in cockle samples and compared with the traditional culture method. Enrichment broths for Salmonella spp recovery were also compared. Sensitivity of the duplex PCR for simultaneous detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp from pure culture was 10(3) CFU/ml (40 CFU/PCR reaction), and that of sterile cockle samples spiked with these two pathogens was 1 CFU/10 g of cockle tissue after 9 hours enrichment [3 hours in buffered peptone water (BPW), followed by 6 hours in Rappaport Vasiliadis (RV) broth or tetrathionate (TT) broth for Salmonella spp and 6 hours enrichment in Shigella broth (SB) for Shigella spp]. There was no significant difference in detection sensitivity between enrichment in RV and TT broths. Salmonella spp detected in cockles in Khon Kaen, Thailand by duplex PCR and culture method was 17% and 13%, respectively but Shigella spp was not detected. The duplex PCR technique developed for simultaneous detection of Salmonella and Shigella spp in cockle samples was highly sensitive, specific and rapid and could serve as a suitable method for food safety assessment. PMID:24437322

  9. Competitive PCR-ELISA protocols for the quantitative and the standardized detection of viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Monica; Gallinella, Giorgio; Venturoli, Simona; Zerbini, Marialuisa

    2007-01-01

    Competitive PCR-ELISA combines competitive PCR with an ELISA to allow quantitative detection of PCR products. It is based on the inclusion of an internal standard competitor molecule that is designed to differ from the target by a short sequence of nucleotides. Once such a competitor molecule has been designed and constructed, target and competitor sequences are concurrently PCR-amplified, before hybridization to two different specific probes and determination of their respective OD values by ELISA. The target can be quantified in relation to a titration curve of different dilutions of the competitor. The competitor can alternatively be used at a unique optimal concentration to allow for standardized detection of the target sequence. PCR-ELISA can be performed in 1 d in laboratories without access to a real-time PCR thermocycler. This technique is applied in diagnostics to monitor the course of infections and drug efficacy. Competitive PCR-ELISA protocols for the quantitative and for the standardized detection of parvovirus B19 are detailed here as an example of the technique.

  10. Quantitative detection of perchlorate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the perchlorate reductase gene.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors.

  11. Duplex PCR Methods for the Molecular Detection of Escherichia fergusonii Isolates from Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Karen; Rempel, Heidi; Block, Glenn; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Vaillancourt, Rolland; Malouin, François; Topp, Edward; Delaquis, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia fergusonii is an emerging pathogen that has been isolated from a wide range of infections in animals and humans. Primers targeting specific genes, including yliE (encoding a conserved hypothetical protein of the cellulose synthase and regulator of cellulose synthase island), EFER_1569 (encoding a hypothetical protein, putative transcriptional activator for multiple antibiotic resistance), and EFER_3126 (encoding a putative triphosphoribosyl-dephospho-coenzyme A [CoA]), were designed for the detection of E. fergusonii by conventional and real-time PCR methods. Primers were screened by in silico PCR against 489 bacterial genomic sequences and by both PCR methods on 55 reference and field strains. Both methods were specific and sensitive for E. fergusonii, showing amplification only for this bacterium. Conventional PCR required a minimum bacterial concentration of approximately 102 CFU/ml, while real-time PCR required a minimum of 0.3 pg of DNA for consistent detection. Standard curves showed an efficiency of 98.5%, with an R2 value of 0.99 for the real-time PCR assay. Cecal and cloacal contents from 580 chickens were sampled from broiler farms located in the Fraser Valley (British Columbia, Canada). Presumptive E. fergusonii isolates were recovered by enrichment and plating on differential and selective media. Of 301 total presumptive isolates, 140 (46.5%) were identified as E. fergusonii by biochemical profiling with the API 20E system and 268 (89.0%) using PCR methods. E. fergusonii detection directly from cecal and cloacal samples without preenrichment was achieved with both PCR methods. Hence, the PCR methods developed in this work significantly improve the detection of E. fergusonii. PMID:24441160

  12. Detection of Legionella species in environmental water by the quantitative PCR method in combination with ethidium monoazide treatment.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Takama, Tomoko; Yoshizaki, Miwa; Agata, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    We detected Legionella species in 111 bath water samples and 95 cooling tower water samples by using a combination of conventional plate culture, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and qPCR combined with ethidium monoazide treatment (EMA-qPCR) methods. In the case of bath water samples, Legionella spp. were detected in 30 samples by plate culture, in 85 samples by qPCR, and in 49 samples by EMA-qPCR. Of 81 samples determined to be Legionella-negative by plate culture, 56 and 23 samples were positive by qPCR and EMA-qPCR, respectively. Therefore, EMA treatment decreased the number of Legionella-positive bath water samples detected by qPCR. In contrast, EMA treatment had no effect on cooling tower water samples. We therefore expect that EMA-qPCR is a useful method for the rapid detection of viable Legionella spp. from bath water samples.

  13. Detection of Legionella species in environmental water by the quantitative PCR method in combination with ethidium monoazide treatment.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Takama, Tomoko; Yoshizaki, Miwa; Agata, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    We detected Legionella species in 111 bath water samples and 95 cooling tower water samples by using a combination of conventional plate culture, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and qPCR combined with ethidium monoazide treatment (EMA-qPCR) methods. In the case of bath water samples, Legionella spp. were detected in 30 samples by plate culture, in 85 samples by qPCR, and in 49 samples by EMA-qPCR. Of 81 samples determined to be Legionella-negative by plate culture, 56 and 23 samples were positive by qPCR and EMA-qPCR, respectively. Therefore, EMA treatment decreased the number of Legionella-positive bath water samples detected by qPCR. In contrast, EMA treatment had no effect on cooling tower water samples. We therefore expect that EMA-qPCR is a useful method for the rapid detection of viable Legionella spp. from bath water samples. PMID:25817816

  14. Development of a thermostabilized, one-step, nested, tetraplex PCR assay for simultaneous identification and differentiation of Entamoeba species, Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Foo, Phiaw Chong; Chan, Yean Yean; See Too, Wei Cun; Tan, Zi Ning; Wong, Weng Kin; Lalitha, Pattabhiraman; Lim, Boon Huat

    2012-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the only Entamoeba species that causes amoebiasis in humans. Approximately 50 million people are infected, with 100, 000 deaths annually in endemic countries. Molecular diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica is important to differentiate it from the morphologically identical Entamoeba dispar to avoid unnecessary medication. Conventional molecular diagnostic tests require trained personnel, cold-chain transportation and/or are storage-dependent, which make them user-unfriendly. The aim of this study was to develop a thermostabilized, one-step, nested, tetraplex PCR assay for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba species in cold-chain-free and ready-to-use form. The PCR test was designed based on the Entamoeba small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, which detects the presence of any Entamoeba species, and simultaneously can be used to differentiate Entamoeba histolytica from Entamoeba dispar. In addition, a pair of primers was designed to serve as an internal amplification control to help identify inhibitors in the samples. All PCR reagents together with the designed primers were thermostabilized by lyophilization and were stable at 24 °C for at least 6 months. The limit of detection of the tetraplex PCR was found to be 39 pg DNA or 1000 cells for Entamoeba histolytica and 78 pg DNA or 1000 cells for Entamoeba dispar, and the specificity was 100 %. In conclusion, this cold-chain-free, thermostabilized, one-step, nested, multiplex PCR assay was found to be efficacious in differentiating Entamoeba histolytica from other non-pathogenic Entamoeba species.

  15. Detection of viable Salmonella in lettuce by propidium monoazide real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ningjian; Dong, Jin; Luo, Laixin; Li, Yong

    2011-05-01

    Contamination of lettuce by Salmonella has caused serious public health problems. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in food, but it is inaccurate as it might amplify DNA from dead target cells as well. This study aimed to investigate the stability of DNA of dead Salmonella cells in lettuce and to develop an approach to detecting viable Salmonella in lettuce. Salmonella-free lettuce was inoculated with heat-killed Salmonella Typhimurium cells and stored at 4 °C. Bacterial DNA extracted from the sample was amplified by real-time PCR targeting the invA gene. Our results indicate that DNA from the dead cells remained stable in lettuce for at least 8 d. To overcome this limitation, propidium monoazide (PMA), a dye that can selectively penetrate dead bacterial cells and cross-link their DNA upon light exposure, was combined with real-time PCR. Lettuce samples inoculated with different levels of dead or viable S. Typhimurium cells were treated or untreated with PMA before DNA extraction. Real-time PCR suggests that PMA treatment effectively prevented PCR amplification from as high as 10(8) CFU/g dead S. Typhimurium cells in lettuce. The PMA real-time PCR assay could detect viable Salmonella at as low as 10(2) CFU/mL in pure culture and 10(3) CFU/g in lettuce. With 12-h enrichment, S. Typhimurium of 10(1) CFU/g in lettuce was detectable. In conclusion, the PMA real-time PCR assay provides an alternative to real-time PCR assay for accurate detection of Salmonella in food.

  16. Development of a novel detection system for microbes from bovine diarrhea by real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    TSUCHIAKA, Shinobu; MASUDA, Tsuneyuki; SUGIMURA, Satoshi; KOBAYASHI, Suguru; KOMATSU, Natsumi; NAGAI, Makoto; OMATSU, Tsutomu; FURUYA, Tetsuya; OBA, Mami; KATAYAMA, Yukie; KANDA, Shuhei; YOKOYAMA, Tadashi; MIZUTANI, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea in cattle is one of the most economically costly disorders, decreasing milk production and weight gain. In the present study, we established a novel simultaneous detection system using TaqMan real-time PCR designed as a system for detection of microbes from bovine diarrhea using real-time PCR (referred to as Dembo-PCR). Dembo-PCR simultaneously detects a total of 19 diarrhea-causing pathogens, including viruses, bacteria and protozoa. Specific primer–probe sets were newly designed for 7 pathogens and were synthesized on the basis of previous reports for 12 pathogens. Assays were optimized to react under the same reaction conditions. The PCR efficiency and correlation coefficient (R2) of standard curves for each assay were more than 80% and 0.9766, respectively. Furthermore, the sensitivity of Dembo-PCR in fecal sample analysis was measured with feces spiked with target pathogens or synthesized DNA that included specific nucleotide target regions. The resulting limits of detection (LOD) for virus-spiked samples, bacteria and DNA fragments were 0.16–1.6 TCID50 (PFU/reaction), 1.3–13 CFU/reaction and 10–100 copies/reaction, respectively. All reactions showed high sensitivity in pathogen detection. A total of 8 fecal samples, collected from 6 diarrheic cattle, 1 diarrheic calf and 1 healthy cow, were tested using Dembo-PCR to validate the assay’s clinical performance. The results revealed that bovine coronavirus had infected all diarrheic adult cattle and that bovine torovirus had infected the diarrheic calf. These results suggest that Dembo-PCR may be a powerful tool for diagnosing infectious agents in cattle diarrhea. PMID:26616156

  17. Detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by Air Sampling with a Nested PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stärk, Katharina D. C.; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the first successful detection of airborne Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae under experimental and field conditions with a new nested PCR assay. Air was sampled with polyethersulfone membranes (pore size, 0.2 μm) mounted in filter holders. Filters were processed by dissolution and direct extraction of DNA for PCR analysis. For the PCR, two nested pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed by using an M. hyopneumoniae-specific DNA sequence of a repeated gene segment. A nested PCR assay was developed and used to analyze samples collected in eight pig houses where respiratory problems had been common. Air was also sampled from a mycoplasma-free herd. The nested PCR was highly specific and 104 times as sensitive as a one-step PCR. Under field conditions, the sampling system was able to detect airborne M. hyopneumoniae on 80% of farms where acute respiratory disease was present. No airborne M. hyopneumoniae was detected on infected farms without acute cases. The chance of successful detection was increased if air was sampled at several locations within a room and at a lower air humidity. PMID:9464391

  18. Dielectrophoresis chips improve PCR detection of the food-spoiling yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in apple juice.

    PubMed

    del Carmen Jaramillo, Maria; Huttener, Mario; Alvarez, Juan Manuel; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; Samitier, Josep; Torrents, Eduard; Juárez, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoretic (DEP) manipulation of cells present in real samples is challenging. We show in this work that an interdigitated DEP chip can be used to trap and wash a population of the food-spoiling yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii that contaminates a sample of apple juice. By previously calibrating the chip, the yeast population loaded is efficiently trapped, washed, and recovered in a small-volume fraction that, in turn, can be used for efficient PCR detection of this yeast. DEP washing of yeast cells gets rid of PCR inhibitors present in apple juice and facilitates PCR analysis. This and previous works on the use of DEP chips to improve PCR analysis show that a potential use of DEP is to be used as a treatment of real samples prior to PCR. PMID:25808673

  19. Dielectrophoresis chips improve PCR detection of the food-spoiling yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in apple juice.

    PubMed

    del Carmen Jaramillo, Maria; Huttener, Mario; Alvarez, Juan Manuel; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; Samitier, Josep; Torrents, Eduard; Juárez, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoretic (DEP) manipulation of cells present in real samples is challenging. We show in this work that an interdigitated DEP chip can be used to trap and wash a population of the food-spoiling yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii that contaminates a sample of apple juice. By previously calibrating the chip, the yeast population loaded is efficiently trapped, washed, and recovered in a small-volume fraction that, in turn, can be used for efficient PCR detection of this yeast. DEP washing of yeast cells gets rid of PCR inhibitors present in apple juice and facilitates PCR analysis. This and previous works on the use of DEP chips to improve PCR analysis show that a potential use of DEP is to be used as a treatment of real samples prior to PCR.

  20. Optimization of Quantitative PCR Methods for Enteropathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Gratz, Jean; Amour, Caroline; Nshama, Rosemary; Walongo, Thomas; Maro, Athanasia; Mduma, Esto; Platts-Mills, James; Boisen, Nadia; Nataro, James; Haverstick, Doris M; Kabir, Furqan; Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Silapong, Sasikorn; Jeamwattanalert, Pimmada; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Mason, Carl; Begum, Sharmin; Haque, Rashidul; Praharaj, Ira; Kang, Gagandeep; Houpt, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of enteropathogens in stool specimens is useful for diagnosing the cause of diarrhea but is technically challenging. Here we evaluate several important determinants of quantification: specimen collection, nucleic acid extraction, and extraction and amplification efficiency. First, we evaluate the molecular detection and quantification of pathogens in rectal swabs versus stool, using paired flocked rectal swabs and whole stool collected from 129 children hospitalized with diarrhea in Tanzania. Swabs generally yielded a higher quantification cycle (Cq) (average 29.7, standard deviation 3.5 vs. 25.3 ± 2.9 from stool, P<0.001) but were still able to detect 80% of pathogens with a Cq < 30 in stool. Second, a simplified total nucleic acid (TNA) extraction procedure was compared to separate DNA and RNA extractions and showed 92% (318/344) sensitivity and 98% (951/968) specificity, with no difference in Cq value for the positive results (ΔCq(DNA+RNA-TNA) = -0.01 ± 1.17, P = 0.972, N = 318). Third, we devised a quantification scheme that adjusts pathogen quantity to the specimen's extraction and amplification efficiency, and show that this better estimates the quantity of spiked specimens than the raw target Cq. In sum, these methods for enteropathogen quantification, stool sample collection, and nucleic acid extraction will be useful for laboratories studying enteric disease. PMID:27336160

  1. Optimization of Quantitative PCR Methods for Enteropathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Gratz, Jean; Amour, Caroline; Nshama, Rosemary; Walongo, Thomas; Maro, Athanasia; Mduma, Esto; Platts-Mills, James; Boisen, Nadia; Nataro, James; Haverstick, Doris M.; Kabir, Furqan; Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Silapong, Sasikorn; Jeamwattanalert, Pimmada; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Mason, Carl; Begum, Sharmin; Haque, Rashidul; Praharaj, Ira; Kang, Gagandeep; Houpt, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of enteropathogens in stool specimens is useful for diagnosing the cause of diarrhea but is technically challenging. Here we evaluate several important determinants of quantification: specimen collection, nucleic acid extraction, and extraction and amplification efficiency. First, we evaluate the molecular detection and quantification of pathogens in rectal swabs versus stool, using paired flocked rectal swabs and whole stool collected from 129 children hospitalized with diarrhea in Tanzania. Swabs generally yielded a higher quantification cycle (Cq) (average 29.7, standard deviation 3.5 vs. 25.3 ± 2.9 from stool, P<0.001) but were still able to detect 80% of pathogens with a Cq < 30 in stool. Second, a simplified total nucleic acid (TNA) extraction procedure was compared to separate DNA and RNA extractions and showed 92% (318/344) sensitivity and 98% (951/968) specificity, with no difference in Cq value for the positive results (ΔCq(DNA+RNA-TNA) = -0.01 ± 1.17, P = 0.972, N = 318). Third, we devised a quantification scheme that adjusts pathogen quantity to the specimen’s extraction and amplification efficiency, and show that this better estimates the quantity of spiked specimens than the raw target Cq. In sum, these methods for enteropathogen quantification, stool sample collection, and nucleic acid extraction will be useful for laboratories studying enteric disease. PMID:27336160

  2. PCR and non-isotopic labeling techniques for plant virus detection.

    PubMed

    Fenby, N S; Scott, N W; Slater, A; Elliott, M C

    1995-07-01

    PCR technology permits the detection of viruses at levels several orders of magnitude lower than is possible by other methods. This high sensitivity facilitates detection of virus sequences during the early stages of infection of plants and in soil and vector samples. Early detection of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta vulgaris is an important part of the strategy for prevention of the spread of rhizomania, a commercially significant disease of sugar beet. A diagnostic test for BNYVV has been developed. This test involves amplification of the viral genome by PCR coupled with non-isotopic labeling and detection of specific sequences. The PCR amplification of BNYVV sequences has been optimized with respect to primer design, sample preparation and reaction conditions. Several non-isotopic labeling strategies for signal amplification have been compared. Hybridization with digoxigenin-labelled cDNA permits the most sensitive detection of PCR products and is the most appropriate method for routine diagnosis. These observations are discussed in the context of the application of PCR for detecting a wide range of viruses. PMID:7580844

  3. Multiplex SYBR® green-real time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and differentiation of Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae in cats.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Pilger, Diogo André; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente

    2014-01-01

    A novel SYBR® green-real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was developed to detect two Bartonella species, B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae, directly from blood samples. The test was used in blood samples obtained from cats living in animal shelters in Southern Brazil. Results were compared with those obtained by conventional PCR targeting Bartonella spp. Among the 47 samples analyzed, eight were positive using the conventional PCR and 12 were positive using qPCR. Importantly, the new qPCR detected the presence of both B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae in two samples. The results show that the qPCR described here may be a reliable tool for the screening and differentiation of two important Bartonella species.

  4. Sensitive quantitative detection of commensal bacteria by rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Asahara, Takashi; Kado, Yukiko; Nomoto, Koji

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) method was developed for exact and sensitive enumeration of subdominant bacterial populations. Using group- or species-specific primers for 16S or 23S rRNA, analytical curves were constructed for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the threshold cycle value was found to be linear up to an RNA amount of 10(-3) cell per RT-PCR. The number of bacteria in culture was determined by RT-qPCR, and the results correlated well with the CFU count over the range from 10(0) to 10(5) CFU. The bacterial counts obtained by RT-qPCR were the same as the CFU counts irrespective of the growth phase in vitro, except for C. perfringens during starvation periods; the viable cell counts obtained by using a combination of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and SYTO9-propidium iodide double staining were in good agreement with the RT-qPCR counts rather than with the CFU counts. The RT-qPCR method could detect endogenous Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa in feces of hospitalized patients (n = 38) at a level of 10(3) cells per g of feces, and for enumeration of S. aureus or P. aeruginosa spiked into human peripheral blood, the lower detection limit for RT-qPCR quantification of the bacteria was 2 cells per ml of blood, suggesting that this method was equivalent to the conventional culture method. As only 5 h was needed for RT-qPCR quantification, we suggest that rRNA-targeted RT-qPCR assays provide a sensitive and convenient system for quantification of commensal bacteria and for examining their possible invasion of a host.

  5. Detection of pork adulteration by highly-specific PCR assay of mitochondrial D-loop.

    PubMed

    Karabasanavar, Nagappa S; Singh, S P; Kumar, Deepak; Shebannavar, Sunil N

    2014-02-15

    We describe a highly specific PCR assay for the authentic identification of pork. Accurate detection of tissues derived from pig (Sus scrofa) was accomplished by using newly designed primers targeting porcine mitochondrial displacement (D-loop) region that yielded an unique amplicon of 712 base pairs (bp). Possibility of cross-amplification was precluded by testing as many as 24 animal species (mammals, birds, rodent and fish). Suitability of PCR assay was confirmed in raw (n = 20), cooked (60, 80 and 100 °C), autoclaved (121 °C) and micro-oven processed pork. Sensitivity of detection of pork in other species meat using unique pig-specific PCR was established to be at 0.1%; limit of detection (LOD) of pig DNA was 10 pg (pico grams). The technique can be used for the authentication of raw, processed and adulterated pork and products under the circumstances of food adulteration related disputes or forensic detection of origin of pig species.

  6. Specific oligonucleotide primers for detection of lecithinase-positive Bacillus spp. by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Schraft, H; Griffiths, M W

    1995-01-01

    An assay based on the PCR has been developed to facilitate detection and identification of Bacillus cereus in foods. Three primers for the PCR have been designed within the sequence for cereolysin AB, a cytolytic determinant that encodes lecithin-hydrolyzing and hemolytic activities of B. cereus. With the PCR and hybridization, the specificity of the primers was tested with 39 isolates of the B. cereus group, with 17 other Bacillus spp., and with 21 non-Bacillus strains. Results demonstrate a high specificity of the three oligonucleotides for isolates of the B. cereus group. With a combined PCR-hybridization assay, the detection limit for B. cereus in artificially contaminated milk was 1 CFU/ml of milk. PMID:7887632

  7. Detection and discrimination of four Aspergillus section Nigri species by PCR.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, J D; O'Keeffe, T L

    2015-02-01

    Species of Aspergillus section Nigri are not easily distinguished by traditional morphological techniques, and typically are identified by DNA sequencing methods. We developed four PCR primers to distinguish between Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus welwitschiae, Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus tubingensis, based on species-conserved differences in the calmodulin gene sequence. PCR amplification from total DNA using these primers was species specific; no amplification occurred from nontarget species DNA for each primer pair. Species-specific PCR could distinguish between species in mixed DNA templates, indicating a utility in determining culture uniformity of isolated Aspergillus strains. In addition, with these primer sets, each species could be detected in soil following mixed-species inoculation with Aspergillus spores. This indicates that PCR with these species-specific primers may be useful in determining the distribution of Aspergillus species in environmental samples without the need for species identification from isolated strains, as well as detecting species that may be infrequently isolated by culture-based methods.

  8. Development and validation of two SYBR green PCR assays and a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Lirón, Juan P; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are recognized as food-borne pathogens. We developed and validated two SYBR green PCR (SYBR-PCR) and a real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) to detect stx1 and stx2 genes in meat samples, and compared these techniques in ground beef samples from retail stores. One set of primers and one hydrolysis probe were designed for each stx gene. For RT-PCR, an internal amplification control (IAC) was used. All PCR intra-laboratory validations were performed using pure strains and artificially contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 50 STEC and 30 non-STEC strains were used. Naturally contaminated ground beef samples (n=103) were obtained from retail stores and screened with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR, and stx-positive samples were processed for STEC isolation. In the intra-laboratory validation, each PCR obtained a 1×10(2) CFU mL(-1) limit of detection and 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. The same results were obtained when different laboratory analysts in alternate days performed the assay. The level of agreement obtained with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR was kappa=0.758 and 0.801 (P<0.001) for stx1 and stx2 gene detection, respectively. Two PCR strategies were developed and validated, and excellent performance with artificially contaminated ground beef samples was obtained. However, the efforts made to isolate STEC from retail store samples were not enough. Only 11 STEC strains were isolated from 35 stx-positive ground beef samples identically detected by all PCRs. The combination of molecular approaches based on the identification of a virulence genotypic profile of STEC must be considered to improve isolation.

  9. Development and validation of two SYBR green PCR assays and a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Lirón, Juan P; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are recognized as food-borne pathogens. We developed and validated two SYBR green PCR (SYBR-PCR) and a real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) to detect stx1 and stx2 genes in meat samples, and compared these techniques in ground beef samples from retail stores. One set of primers and one hydrolysis probe were designed for each stx gene. For RT-PCR, an internal amplification control (IAC) was used. All PCR intra-laboratory validations were performed using pure strains and artificially contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 50 STEC and 30 non-STEC strains were used. Naturally contaminated ground beef samples (n=103) were obtained from retail stores and screened with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR, and stx-positive samples were processed for STEC isolation. In the intra-laboratory validation, each PCR obtained a 1×10(2) CFU mL(-1) limit of detection and 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. The same results were obtained when different laboratory analysts in alternate days performed the assay. The level of agreement obtained with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR was kappa=0.758 and 0.801 (P<0.001) for stx1 and stx2 gene detection, respectively. Two PCR strategies were developed and validated, and excellent performance with artificially contaminated ground beef samples was obtained. However, the efforts made to isolate STEC from retail store samples were not enough. Only 11 STEC strains were isolated from 35 stx-positive ground beef samples identically detected by all PCRs. The combination of molecular approaches based on the identification of a virulence genotypic profile of STEC must be considered to improve isolation. PMID:26410309

  10. Nested PCR method for rapid and sensitive detection of Vibrio vulnificus in fish, sediments, and water.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C R; Garay, E; Aznar, R

    1995-01-01

    A nested PCR for the detection of Vibrio vulnificus in fish farms was developed as an alternative to cultural methods by using universal primers flanking the V. vulnificus-specific sequences directed against 23S rRNA genes. This specific assay detected 10 fg of DNA or 12 to 120 cells in artificially inoculated samples without enrichment and within 24 h. PMID:7574657

  11. Use of real-time quantitative PCR to detect Chlamydophila felis infection.

    PubMed

    Helps, C; Reeves, N; Tasker, S; Harbour, D

    2001-07-01

    A real-time PCR assay was developed to detect and quantify Chlamydophila felis infection of cats. The assay uses a molecular beacon to specifically identify the major outer membrane protein gene, is highly reproducible, and is able to detect fewer than 10 genomic copies.

  12. Quantitative PCR detection for abalone shriveling syndrome-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing-Zhe; Zhu, Zhen-Ni; Zhang, Han; Liang, Ya-Yu; Guo, Zhi-Xun; Liu, Guang-Feng; Su, You-Lu; Wang, Jiang-Yong

    2012-09-01

    Haliotis diversicolor (small abalone) is an important seafood found along the southern coast of China. Since 1999, the yields of cultured abalone in China have been severely affected by an epidemic of continuous outbreaks of a fatal disease. A novel double-stranded DNA virus, abalone shriveling syndrome-associated virus (AbSV), was proven to be one of the main causative agent. Although the pathogenicity and genome of AbSV has been ascertained, the epidemiology of AbSV remains to be investigated. In this study, four pairs of AbSV-specific primers were designed on the basis of the AbSV genome, and were tested for their specificities and sensitivities in quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCRs) after optimization of the annealing temperature. The 3F3/3B3 primer pair was finally chosen with a good specificity and high efficiency of amplification, with a detection limit of about 10 copies of recombinant plasmid containing AbSV genes in a 20-μL reaction mixture. In the detection of AbSV in abalone samples along the southern coast of China, most of the diseased samples had more than 80 virus copies in 1ng host genome DNA. AbSV was also demonstrated in mature hybrid (LY) and juvenile (JH) abalones from assays of healthy animals collected in recent years.

  13. Ambient Stable Quantitative PCR Reagents for the Detection of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Guo, Zhaobiao; Zhou, Dongsheng; Zhai, Junhui; Yang, Ruifu

    2010-01-01

    Background Although assays for detecting Yersinia pestis using TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR have been developed for years, little is reported on room-temperature-stable PCR reagents, which will be invaluable for field epidemic surveillance, immediate response to public health emergencies, counter-bioterrorism investigation, etc. In this work, a set of real-time PCR reagents for rapid detection of Y. pestis was developed with extraordinary stability at 37°C. Methods/Principal Findings TaqMan-based real-time PCR assays were developed using the primers and probes targeting the 3a sequence in the chromosome and the F1 antigen gene caf1 in the plasmid pMT1of Y. pestis, respectively. Then, carbohydrate mixtures were added to the PCR reagents, which were later vacuum-dried for stability evaluation. The vacuum-dried reagents were stable at 37°C for at least 49 days for a lower concentration of template DNA (10 copies/µl), and up to 79 days for higher concentrations (≥102 copies/µl). The reagents were used subsequently to detect soil samples spiked with Y. pestis vaccine strain EV76, and 5×104 CFU per gram of soil could be detected by both 3a- and caf1-based PCR reagents. In addition, a simple and efficient method for soil sample processing is presented here. Conclusions/Significance The vacuum-dried reagents for real-time PCR maintain accuracy and reproducibility for at least 49 days at 37°C, indicating that they can be easily transported at room temperature for field application if the machine for performing real-time PCR is available. This dry reagent is of great significance for routine plague surveillance. PMID:20231881

  14. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K

    2015-09-08

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 10⁴ CFU/mL.

  15. Development of a PCR protocol for sensitive detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D W; Pieniazek, N J; Griffin, D W; Misener, L; Rose, J B

    1995-01-01

    The development of a reliable method of using PCR for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples with oligonucleotide primers which amplify a portion of the sequence encoding the small (18S) subunit of rRNA producing a 435-bp product was demonstrated. The PCR assay was found to provide highly genus-specific detection of Cryptosporidium spp. after release of nucleic acids from oocysts by a simple freeze-thaw procedure. The assay routinely detected 1 to 10 oocysts in purified oocyst preparations, as shown by direct microscopic counts and by an immunofluorescence assay. The sensitivity of the PCR assay in some seeded environmental water samples was up to 1,000-fold lower. However, this interference was eliminated by either flow cytometry or magnetic-antibody capture. Sensitivity was also improved 10- to 1,000-fold by probing of the PCR product on dot blots with an oligonucleotide probe detected by chemiluminescence. Confirmation of the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples from the outbreak in Milwaukee, Wis., was obtained with this technique, and PCR was found to be as sensitive as immunofluorescence for detection of oocysts in wastewater concentrates. PMID:8526496

  16. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K.; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 104 CFU/mL. PMID:26371000

  17. Quantitative detection of hazelnut (Corylus avellana) in cookies: ELISA versus real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Platteau, Céline; De Loose, Marc; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Taverniers, Isabel

    2011-11-01

    Hazelnuts (Corylus avellana) are used widely in the food industry, especially in confectionery, where they are used raw, roasted, or in a processed formulation (e.g., praline paste and hazelnut oil). Hazelnuts contain multiple allergenic proteins, which can induce an allergic reaction associated with symptoms ranging from mild irritation to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. To date, immunochemical (e.g., ELISA or dipstick) and PCR-based analyses are the only methods available that can be applied as routine tests. The aim of this study is to make a comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of ELISA and real-time PCR in detecting and correctly quantifying hazelnut in food model systems. To this end, the performances of two commercial ELISAs were compared to those of two commercial and one in-house-developed real-time PCR assays. The results showed that although ELISA seemed to be more sensitive compared to real-time PCR, both detection techniques suffered from matrix effects and lacked robustness with regard to food processing. As these impacts were highly variable among the different evaluated assays (both ELISA and real-time PCR), no firm conclusion can be made as to which technique is suited best to detect hazelnut in (processed) food products. In this regard, the current lack of appropriate DNA calibrators to quantify an allergenic ingredient by means of real-time PCR is highlighted.

  18. Detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in equine nasopharyngeal swabs by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Laus, Fulvio; Tejeda, Aurora Romero; Valente, Carlo; Cuteri, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis is responsible for severe diseases in humans, including primary bacteraemia, pneumonia, endocarditis, and toxic shock syndrome. Infection in some animal species can also occur, although a few studies have looked into cross-species infectivity. In horses, S. equisimilis is generally considered infrequent or opportunistic, but has recently been isolated from cases of strangles-like disease. Rapid and sensitive diagnostic techniques could enable epidemiological studies and effective investigation of outbreaks involving these bacteria. In this study, PCR protocols previously described in cattle and in humans to detect the species S. dysgalactiae and the subspecies equisimilis were evaluated to detect specific sequences in equine samples. For this purpose, 99 monolateral nasal swabs were collected from horses from stud farms with a history of S. equisimilis infection and were tested blindly by bacteriological isolation and by single and duplex PCR. DNA for PCR was extracted both from the colonies grown on agar media and from enrichment broth aliquots after incubation with nasal swab samples. S. equisimilis was identified by bacteriological isolation in 23 out of 99 swab samples, and PCR assays on these colonies were fully concordant with bacteriological identification (kappa statistic = 1.00). In addition, PCR of the enrichment broth aliquots confirmed the bacteriological results and detected S. equisimilis in 6 samples more than the bacteriological examination (kappa statistic = 0.84). The PCR protocols appeared to be reliable for the rapid identification of S. equisimilis in equine nasal swab samples, and could be useful for microbiological diagnosis. PMID:20195067

  19. Simple, Rapid and Inexpensive Quantitative Fluorescent PCR Method for Detection of Microdeletion and Microduplication Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Cunha, Pricila Silva; Pena, Heloísa B.; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2013-01-01

    Because of economic limitations, the cost-effective diagnosis of patients affected with rare microdeletion or microduplication syndromes is a challenge in developing countries. Here we report a sensitive, rapid, and affordable detection method that we have called Microdeletion/Microduplication Quantitative Fluorescent PCR (MQF-PCR). Our procedure is based on the finding of genomic regions with high homology to segments of the critical microdeletion/microduplication region. PCR amplification of both using the same primer pair, establishes competitive kinetics and relative quantification of amplicons, as happens in microsatellite-based Quantitative Fluorescence PCR. We used patients with two common microdeletion syndromes, the Williams-Beuren syndrome (7q11.23 microdeletion) and the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndromes and discovered that MQF-PCR could detect both with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Additionally, we demonstrated that the same principle could be reliably used for detection of microduplication syndromes, by using patients with the Lubs (MECP2 duplication) syndrome and the 17q11.2 microduplication involving the NF1 gene. We propose that MQF-PCR is a useful procedure for laboratory confirmation of the clinical diagnosis of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes, ideally suited for use in developing countries, but having general applicability as well. PMID:23620743

  20. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-12-22

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients' samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAF(V600E) and BRAF(V600K) mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method.

  1. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  2. A new trilocus sequence-based multiplex-PCR to detect major Acinetobacter baumannii clones.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natacha; Picão, Renata Cristina; Cerqueira-Alves, Morgana; Uehara, Aline; Barbosa, Lívia Carvalho; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-08-01

    A collection of 163 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates detected in a large Brazilian hospital, was potentially related with the dissemination of four clonal complexes (CC): 113/79, 103/15, 109/1 and 110/25, defined by University of Oxford/Institut Pasteur multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. The urge of a simple multiplex-PCR scheme to specify these clones has motivated the present study. The established trilocus sequence-based typing (3LST, for ompA, csuE and blaOXA-51-like genes) multiplex-PCR rapidly identifies international clones I (CC109/1), II (CC118/2) and III (CC187/3). Thus, the system detects only one (CC109/1) out of four main CC in Brazil. We aimed to develop an alternative multiplex-PCR scheme to detect these clones, known to be present additionally in Africa, Asia, Europe, USA and South America. MLST, performed in the present study to complement typing our whole collection of isolates, confirmed that all isolates belonged to the same four CC detected previously. When typed by 3LST-based multiplex-PCR, only 12% of the 163 isolates were classified into groups. By comparative sequence analysis of ompA, csuE and blaOXA-51-like genes, a set of eight primers was designed for an alternative multiplex-PCR to distinguish the five CC 113/79, 103/15, 109/1, 110/25 and 118/2. Study isolates and one CC118/2 isolate were blind-tested with the new alternative PCR scheme; all were correctly clustered in groups of the corresponding CC. The new multiplex-PCR, with the advantage of fitting in a single reaction, detects five leading A. baumannii clones and could help preventing the spread in healthcare settings.

  3. Detection of Salmonella from chicken rinses and chicken hot dogs with the automated BAX PCR system.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Cosby, D E

    2003-11-01

    The BAX system with automated PCR detection was compared with standard cultural procedures for the detection of naturally occurring and spiked Salmonella in 183 chicken carcass rinses and 90 chicken hot dogs. The automated assay procedure consists of overnight growth (16 to 18 h) of the sample in buffered peptone broth at 35 degrees C, transfer of the sample to lysis tubes, incubation and lysis of the cells, transfer of the sample to PCR tubes, and placement of tubes into the cycler-detector, which runs automatically. The automated PCR detection assay takes about 4 h after 16 to 24 h of overnight preenrichment. The culture procedure consists of preerichment, enrichment, plating, and serological confirmation and takes about 72 h. Three trials involving 10 to 31 samples were carried out for each product. Some samples were spiked with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Montevideo, and Salmonella Enteritidis at 1 to 250 cells per ml of rinse or 1 to 250 cells per g of meat. For unspiked chicken rinses, Salmonella was detected in 2 of 61 samples with the automated system and in 1 of 61 samples with the culture method. Salmonella was recovered from 111 of 122 spiked samples with the automated PCR system and from 113 of 122 spiked samples with the culture method. For chicken hot dogs, Salmonella was detected in all 60 of the spiked samples with both the automated PCR and the culture procedures. For the 30 unspiked samples, Salmonella was recovered from 19 samples with the automated PCR system and from 10 samples with the culture method. The automated PCR system provided reliable Salmonella screening of chicken product samples within 24 h.

  4. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis detection in cow's milk in Argentina by immunomagnetic separation-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Fernández, Bárbara; Morsella, Claudia; Mendez, Laura; Jar, Ana María; Paolicchi, Fernando Alberto; Mundo, Silvia Leonor

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize a diagnosis procedure to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) DNA in raw cow milk samples under field conditions. A procedure that combines both immunomagnetic separation and IS900-PCR detection (IMS-IS1 PCR) was employed on milk samples from 265 lactating Holstein cows from Map infected and uninfected herds in Argentina. IMS-IS1 PCR results were analyzed and compared with those obtained from milk and fecal culture and serum ELISA. The extent of agreement between both tests was determined by the Kappa test. IMS-IS1 PCR showed a detection limit of 10(1) CFU of Map/mL of milk, when 50:50 mix of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were used to coat magnetic beads. All of the 118 samples from the Map uninfected herds were negative for the set of the tests. In Map infected herds, 80 out of 147 cows tested positive by milk IMS-IS1 PCR (55%), of which 2 (1.4%) were also positive by milk culture, 15 (10%) by fecal culture, and 20 (14%) by serum ELISA. Kappa statistics (95% CI) showed a slight agreement between the different tests (<0.20), and the proportions of agreement were ≤0.55. The IMS-IS1 PCR method detected Map in milk of the cows that were not positive in other techniques. This is the first report dealing with the application of IMS-IS1 PCR in the detection of Map in raw milk samples under field conditions in Argentina.

  5. PCR based detection of mycobacteria in paraffin wax embedded material routinely processed for morphological examination.

    PubMed Central

    Frevel, T; Schäfer, K L; Tötsch, M; Böcker, W; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of mycobacterial infections has increased during the past five years. A prompt diagnosis is indispensable for initiating appropriate treatment. Because culturing of mycobacteria takes three to six weeks and sensitivity of microscopic detection of acid fast bacilli is low, amplification methods provide promising possibilities. Recently, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be useful for confirming a mycobacterial infection, especially in cases with unexpected histological findings or lack of suitable material for culturing. AIMS: To evaluate the impact of PCR based techniques in the detection of mycobacterial infections in uncultured routine histological specimens as an alternative to surgical pathology. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty nine formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded samples from 141 patients with clinical or histological suspicion of a mycobacterial infection were investigated using three different PCR assays and Southern blotting. PCR results were compared with histology and culture and the patients' clinical findings. RESULTS: When using culture as the reference method, the sensitivity for the detection of mycobacteria of the tuberculosis complex was 90%, specificity was 92%, the positive predictive value was 81%, and the negative predictive value was 96%. The sensitivity for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacteria was 100% and specificity was 78%, the positive predictive value was 26%, and the negative predictive value was 100%. The patients' clinical findings supported the PCR positive results, indicating a mycobacterial infection in 11 of 18 initially culture negative cases and in 21 of 35 PCR positive cases without culture results. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that PCR based techniques are sensitive, specific, and rapid methods for the detection of mycobacteria in routinely processed paraffin wax embedded and formalin fixed histological samples. PMID:10748878

  6. Development of PCR and TaqMan PCR Assays to Detect Pseudomonas coronafaciens, a Causal Agent of Halo Blight of Oats

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Hye; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas coronafaciens causes halo blight on oats and is a plant quarantine bacterium in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. Using of the certificated seed is important for control of the disease. Since effective detection method of P. coronafaciens is not available yet, PCR and TaqMan PCR assays for specific detection of P. coronafaciens were developed in this study. PCR primers were designed from the draft genome sequence of P. coronafaciens LMG 5060 which was obtained by the next-generation sequencing in this study. The PCR primer set Pc-12-F/Pc-12-R specifically amplified 498 bp from the 13 strains of P. coronafaciens isolated in the seven different countries (Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Germany, and New Zealand) and the nested primer set Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R specifically amplified 298 bp from those strains. The target-size PCR product was not amplified from the non-target bacteria with the PCR and nested primer sets. TaqMan PCR with Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R and a TaqMan probe, Pc-taqman, which were designed inside of the nested PCR amplicon, generated Ct values which in a dose-dependent manner to the amount of the target DNA and the Ct values of all the P. coronafaciens strains were above the threshold Ct value for positive detection. The TaqMan PCR generated positive Ct values from the seed extracts of the artificially inoculated oat seeds above 10 cfu/ml inoculation level. PCR and TaqMan PCR assays developed in this study will be useful tools to detect and identify the plant quarantine pathogen, P. coronafaciens. PMID:25774107

  7. Comparison of the conventional multiplex RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Manohar L; Anand, Siddharth P; Tikhe, Shamal A; Walimbe, Atul M; Potdar, Varsha A; Chadha, Mandeep S; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive, specific and cost effective, having huge potential for patient management. In this study, the performance of an in-house developed conventional multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR), real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) and Luminex xTAG(®) RVP fast assay (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) for the detection of respiratory viruses was compared. A total 310 respiratory clinical specimens predominantly from pediatric patients, referred for diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 from August 2009 to March 2011 were tested to determine performance characteristic of the three methods. A total 193 (62.2%) samples were detected positive for one or more viruses by mRT-PCR, 175 (56.4%) samples by real time monoplex RT-PCR, and 138 (44.5%) samples by xTAG(®) RVP fast assay. The overall sensitivity of mRT-PCR was 96.9% (95% CI: 93.5, 98.8), rtRT-PCR 87.9% (95% CI: 82.5, 92.1) and xTAG(®) RVP fast was 68.3% (95% CI: 61.4, 74.6). Rhinovirus was detected most commonly followed by respiratory syncytial virus group B and influenza A/H1N1pdm09. The monoplex real time RT-PCR and in-house developed mRT-PCR are more sensitive, specific and cost effective than the xTAG(®) RVP fast assay.

  8. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans DNA in Tissue Samples by Nested and Real-Time PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Ralf; Weiss, Michael; Bekure-Nemariam, Kubrom; Najvar, Laura K.; Alberdi, Maria B.; Graybill, John R.; Reischl, Udo

    2002-01-01

    Two PCR protocols targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptococcus neoformans were established, compared, and evaluated in murine cryptococcal meningitis. One protocol was designed as a nested PCR to be performed in conventional block thermal cyclers. The other protocol was designed as a quantitative single-round PCR adapted to LightCycler technology. One hundred brain homogenates and dilutions originating from 20 ICR mice treated with different azoles were examined. A fungal burden of 3 × 101 to 2.9 × 104 CFU per mg of brain tissue was determined by quantitative culture. Specific PCR products were amplified by the conventional and the LightCycler methods in 86 and 87 samples, respectively, with products identified by DNA sequencing and real-time fluorescence detection. An analytical sensitivity of 1 CFU of C. neoformans per mg of brain tissue and less than 10 CFU per volume used for extraction was observed for both PCR protocols, while homogenates of 70 organs from mice infected with other fungi were PCR negative. Specificity testing was performed with genomic DNA from 31 hymenomycetous fungal species and from the ustilaginomycetous yeast Malassezia furfur, which are phylogenetically related to C. neoformans. Twenty-four strains, including species of human skin flora like M. furfur and Trichosporon spp., were PCR negative. Amplification was observed with Cryptococcus amylolentus, Filobasidiella depauperata, Cryptococcus laurentii, and five species unrelated to clinical specimens. LightCycler PCR products from F. depauperata and Trichosporon faecale could be clearly discriminated by melting curve analysis. The sensitive and specific nested PCR assay as well as the rapid and quantitative LightCycler PCR assay might be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of human cryptococcal infections. PMID:11874894

  9. Detection of Theileria orientalis in Iran by semi-nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Peyman; Hoghooghi-Rad, Nasser; Shayan, Parviz; Eckert, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    In order to identify and differentiate Theileria orientalis in cattle which may be infected with Theileria annulata simultaneously, a semi-nested PCR was performed. Thus, 160 blood samples were collected from apparently healthy native cattle in Golestan province of northern Iran, during 2009 to 2011. The Tbs-S/Tbs-A primer set derived from the 18S rRNA encoding gene was used for first PCR amplification, and the amplified sequence weight by this primer set for Theileria sp. was 426-430 bp. Then, DNA solution from purified PCR product was used for the semi-nested PCR analysis. The first PCR product amplified using T. orientalis primer set (To-S/Tbs-A) derived from the 18SrRNA encoding gene, and this specific primer weight was 235 bp. Also, the first PCR product amplified using T. annulata primer set (Ta-S/Tbs-A) derived from the 18SrRNA encoding gene and this specific primer weight was 193 bp. Having extracted DNA of each sample, using Tbs-S/Tbs-A primer set for PCR and analyzing the PCR products on the 2% agarose gel electrophoresis, 13 out of 160 blood samples (8.12%) were positive for Theileria sp. Meanwhile, performing semi-nested PCR with T. orientalis-specific primers, 9 out of 13 blood samples (5.62%) were positive and performing semi-nested PCR with T. annulata-specific primers, 12 out of 13 blood samples (7.5%) were also positive. This molecular assay approves the presence of T. orientalis in the native cattle of northern parts of Iran for the first time. In addition, this procedure will detect the concurrent infection of T. orientalis and T. annulata in the cattle too.

  10. Specific PCR detection of tiger, leopard, and lion ingredients from test samples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jijuan; Xu, Junyi; Liu, Ran; Yu, Ke; Wang, Changwen

    2011-01-01

    A PCR method was developed for specific detection of tiger, leopard, and lion DNA from test specimens for inspection and quarantine or for law-enforced animal protection. Three pairs of specific primers were designed based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of tiger, leopard, and lion and used in the PCR testing. To mimic the effect of food processing on the sensitivity of the test, the tiger muscle and bovine bonemeal powder samples were treated at 133 degrees C for 30 min. At this processing condition, the method was sensitive enough to detect as low as 0.05% of tiger-derived ingredients from the mixed bonemeal powders. The data demonstrate that our PCR method is convenient and economic, with high sensitivity and repeatability, and can be used to detect and identify tiger, leopard, and lion ingredients from various test samples.

  11. Application of the PCR technique to detect Phytophthora infestans in potato tubers and leaves.

    PubMed

    Niepold, F; Schöber-Butin, B

    1995-11-01

    A characterized repetitive sequence from Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans) was used to perform a PCR with the DNA from the four races 1, 3, 4, and 1-11. To obtain amplifiable DNA, all extractions had to be purified by DNA adsorbing spin columns. Only two out of four tested primers were well suited and gave an DNA amplificate of the same size for all four races. After optimization the detection limit of the PCR corresponded to 100 ng of freeze-dried mycelia per ml, specificity was established when testing a collection of the most important potato pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Using P. infestans zoospores to infect tuber slices, the detection threshold was determined to be two days post infection when 3 to 6 zoospores were applied. After infiltrating the tenfold concentration into potato leaves a visible PCR signal was obtained one day post infection. Further improvements of the sensitivity threshold in detecting P. infestans for breeding and prognosis purposes are discussed.

  12. Detection of acute toxoplasmosis in pigs using loop-mediated isothermal amplification and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Zhang, Delin; Yin, Hong; Wang, Meng

    2013-10-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay allows rapid diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection. In the present study, the LAMP assay was evaluated using blood from both naturally and experimentally infected pigs. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was compared with that of Q-PCR. Both assays detected T. gondii in the blood of experimentally infected pigs, with 100% agreement. In infected blood samples, the parasite was detected as early as 2 days post-infection and reached a peak in 3-5 days. In 216 field serum samples, the detection rates of LAMP and Q-PCR assays were 6.9% and 7.8%, respectively. This result indicates that the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was slightly lower than that of the Q-PCR assay. However, the LAMP may be an attractive diagnostic method in conditions where sophisticated and expensive equipment is unavailable. This assay could be a powerful supplement to current diagnostic methods.

  13. Specific detection of avian pneumovirus (APV) US isolates by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Rajashekara, G; Jirjis, F F; Shaw, D P; Goyal, S M; Halvorson, D A; Nagaraja, K V

    2000-01-01

    This report details the development of an RT-PCR assay for the specific detection of US isolates of avian pneumovirus (APV). Of the several primer pairs tested, two sets of primers derived from the matrix gene of APV were able to specifically detect the viral RNA of APV. The nucleotide sequence comparison of the PCR products of APV isolates from Minnesota suggested that these viruses were closely related to the Colorado strain of APV, but were distinct from subtypes A and B European isolates of turkey APV (turkey rhinotracheitis: TRT). This M gene-based PCR was found to be very specific and sensitive. APV as low as 8 x 10(-5) TCID50 (0.0323 microg/ml) could be detected using this assay. In addition, the two primers were able to differentiate isolates from turkeys in Minnesota.

  14. NINA-LAMP compared to microscopy, RDT, and nested PCR for the detection of imported malaria.

    PubMed

    Mohon, Abu Naser; Lee, Lydia Da-Yeong; Bayih, Abebe Genetu; Folefoc, Asongna; Guelig, Dylan; Burton, Robert A; LaBarre, Paul; Chan, Wilson; Meatherall, Bonnie; Pillai, Dylan R

    2016-06-01

    Microscopy and field adaptable rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are not sensitive and specific in certain conditions such as poor training of microscopists, lack of electricity, or lower sensitivity in the detection of non-falciparum malaria. More sensitive point-of-care testing (POCT) would reduce delays in diagnosis and initiation of therapy. In the current study, we have evaluated the efficacy of noninstrumented nucleic acid amplification (NINA) coupled with loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection of traveler's malaria (n=140) in comparison with microscopy, nested PCR, and the only Food and Drug Administration-approved rapid diagnostic test. NINA-LAMP was 100% sensitive and 98.6% specific when compared to nested PCR. For non-falciparum detection, NINA-LAMP sensitivity was 100% sensitive compared to nested PCR, whereas RDT sensitivity was 71%. LAMP is highly sensitive and specific for symptomatic malaria diagnosis regardless of species. PMID:27017271

  15. Using molecular beacons to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Mhlanga, M M; Malmberg, L

    2001-12-01

    Detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in high-throughput studies promises to be an expanding field of molecular medicine in the near future. Highly specific, simple, and accessible methods are needed to meet the rigorous requirements of single-nucleotide detection needed in pharmacogenomic studies, linkage analysis, and the detection of pathogens. Molecular beacons present such a solution for the high-throughput screening of SNPs in homogeneous assays using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular beacons are probes that fluoresce on hybridization to their perfectly complementary targets. In recent years they have emerged as a leading genetic analysis tool in a wide range of contexts from quantification of RNA transcripts, to probes on microarrays, to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. The majority of these methods use PCR to obtain sufficient amounts of sample to analyze. The use of molecular beacons with other amplification schemes has been reliably demonstrated, though PCR remains the method of choice. Here we discuss and present how to design and use molecular beacons to achieve reliable SNP genotyping and allele discrimination in real-time PCR. In addition, we provide a new means of analyzing data outputs from such real-time PCR assays that compensates for differences between sample condition, assay conditions, variations in fluorescent signal, and amplification efficiency. The mechanisms by which molecular beacons are able to have extraordinary specificity are also presented. PMID:11846616

  16. Detection of intestinal protozoa in paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Maas, L; Dorigo-Zetsma, J W; de Groot, C J; Bouter, S; Plötz, F B; van Ewijk, B E

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Blastocystis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium species and Entamoeba species in faecal samples was evaluated in an observational prospective study. Paediatric patients (0-18 years) presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and suspected of having enteroparasitic disease were included. A questionnaire on gastrointestinal symptoms and the chosen treatment was completed at the start of the study and after 6 weeks. Of 163 paediatric patients (mean age, 7.8 years), 114 (70%) had a PCR-positive faecal sample. D. fragilis was detected most frequently, in 101 patients, followed by Blastocystis in 49. In faecal samples of 47 patients, more than one protozoan was detected, mainly the combination of D. fragilis and Blastocystis. Reported gastrointestinal symptoms were abdominal pain (78%), nausea (30%), and altered bowel habits (28%). Eighty-nine of the PCR-positive patients were treated with antibiotics. A significant reduction in abdominal pain was observed both in treated and in untreated patients. This study demonstrated that multiplex real-time PCR detects a high percentage of intestinal protozoa in paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. However, interpretation and determination of the clinical relevance of a positive PCR result in this population are still difficult.

  17. Validation of a quantitative PCR assay for detection and quantification of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Carolyn S; Wight, Nate; Crosson, Lisa M; White, Samuel J; Strenge, Robyn M

    2014-04-01

    Withering syndrome (WS), a serious disease affecting abalone Haliotis spp., is caused by infection from an intracellular Rickettsia-like organism (WS-RLO). Diagnosis of the disease currently relies on a combination of histological examination and molecular methods (in situ hybridization, standard PCR, and sequence analysis). However, these techniques only provide a semi-quantitative assessment of bacterial load. We created a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to specifically identify and enumerate bacterial loads of WS-RLO in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples based on 16S rDNA gene copy numbers. The qPCR assay designed to detect DNA of the WS-RLO was validated according to standards set by the World Organisation for Animal Health. Standard curves derived from purified plasmid dilutions were linear across 7 logs of concentration, and efficiencies ranged from 90.2 to 97.4%. The limit of detection was 3 gene copies per reaction. Diagnostic sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 99.8%. The qPCR assay was robust, as evidenced by its high level of repeatability and reproducibility. This study has shown for the first time that WS-RLO DNA can be detected and quantified in abalone tissue, fecal, and seawater samples. The ability to detect and quantify RLO gene copies in a variety of materials will enable us to better understand transmission dynamics in both farmed and natural environments. PMID:24695238

  18. Development of a PCR protocol to detect aflatoxigenic molds in food products.

    PubMed

    Luque, M Isabel; Rodríguez, Alicia; Andrade, María J; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced mainly by Aspergillus species growing in foodstuffs. Because aflatoxins have important health effects, the detection of early contamination of foods by aflatoxigenic molds should be useful. In the present work, a reliable conventional PCR method for detecting aflatoxigenic molds of various species was developed. Fifty-six aflatoxigenic and nonaflatoxigenic strains commonly reported in foodstuffs were tested. Aflatoxin production was first confirmed by micellar electrokinetic capillary electrophoresis or/and high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Based on the conserved regions of the O-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, six primer pairs were designed. With only the designed primer pair AFF1-AFR3, the expected PCR product (381 bp) was obtained in all of the tested aflatoxigenic strains of various species and genera. Amplification products were not obtained with this primer pair for any of the nonaflatoxigenic reference molds. However, an amplicon of 453 bp was obtained for all aflatoxigenic and nonaflatoxigenic mold reference strains with a PCR protocol based on the constitutive fungal β-tubulin gene, which was used as a positive fungal control. The PCR protocol based on omt-1 detected as little as 15 pg of DNA from aflatoxigenic molds and 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/g in contaminated food samples. This PCR protocol should be used as a routine technique to detect aflatoxigenic molds in foods. PMID:22221359

  19. Development of a PCR protocol to detect aflatoxigenic molds in food products.

    PubMed

    Luque, M Isabel; Rodríguez, Alicia; Andrade, María J; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced mainly by Aspergillus species growing in foodstuffs. Because aflatoxins have important health effects, the detection of early contamination of foods by aflatoxigenic molds should be useful. In the present work, a reliable conventional PCR method for detecting aflatoxigenic molds of various species was developed. Fifty-six aflatoxigenic and nonaflatoxigenic strains commonly reported in foodstuffs were tested. Aflatoxin production was first confirmed by micellar electrokinetic capillary electrophoresis or/and high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Based on the conserved regions of the O-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, six primer pairs were designed. With only the designed primer pair AFF1-AFR3, the expected PCR product (381 bp) was obtained in all of the tested aflatoxigenic strains of various species and genera. Amplification products were not obtained with this primer pair for any of the nonaflatoxigenic reference molds. However, an amplicon of 453 bp was obtained for all aflatoxigenic and nonaflatoxigenic mold reference strains with a PCR protocol based on the constitutive fungal β-tubulin gene, which was used as a positive fungal control. The PCR protocol based on omt-1 detected as little as 15 pg of DNA from aflatoxigenic molds and 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/g in contaminated food samples. This PCR protocol should be used as a routine technique to detect aflatoxigenic molds in foods.

  20. Low-level detection and quantitation of cellular HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Timothy J; Gallien, Sebastien; Li, Jonathan Z; Pereyra, Florencia; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2012-12-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is an emerging nucleic acid detection method that provides absolute quantitations of target sequences without relying on the use of standard curves. The ability of ddPCR to detect and quantitate total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles from a panel of patients on and off antiviral therapy was evaluated compared to established real-time (RT)-PCR methods. To calculate the dynamic range of ddPCR for HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles, serial dilutions of DNA amplicons or episomes were determined by ddPCR as well as with RT-PCR. HIV-1 DNA from 3 viremic patients and 4 patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, and 2-LTR circles from 3 patients with low-level viremia were also quantitated. Copy numbers determined by ddPCR of serial dilutions of HIV-1 or human CCR5 DNA amplicon standards were comparable to nominal input copy number. The sensitivity of ddPCR to detect HIV-1 or CCR5 DNA was similar to that of RT-PCR. Low levels of 2-LTR circles were detected in samples from all 3 patients by both ddPCR and RT-PCR. ddPCR is a promising novel technology for the study of HIV-1 reservoirs and persistence, but further optimization of this novel technology would enhance the detection of very low-level viral genetic targets. PMID:22974526

  1. Rapid Detection of Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in Stained Wood by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Uzunovic, Adnan; Breuil, Colette

    1999-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple method was developed to detect the sapstain fungi Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in stained wood. By using microwave heating for DNA extraction and PCR with internal transcribed spacer-derived-specific primers, detection was feasible within 4 h, even with DNA obtained from a single synnema. This method can easily be extended for the detection of other wood-inhabiting fungi. PMID:9872792

  2. Detection of Histoplasma capsulatum from clinical specimens by cycling probe-based real-time PCR and nested real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Muraosa, Yasunori; Toyotome, Takahito; Yahiro, Maki; Watanabe, Akira; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    We developed new cycling probe-based real-time PCR and nested real-time PCR assays for the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum that were designed to detect the gene encoding N-acetylated α-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), which we previously identified as an H. capsulatum antigen reacting with sera from patients with histoplasmosis. Both assays specifically detected the DNAs of all H. capsulatum strains but not those of other fungi or human DNA. The limited of detection (LOD) of the real-time PCR assay was 10 DNA copies when using 10-fold serial dilutions of the standard plasmid DNA and 50 DNA copies when using human serum spiked with standard plasmid DNA. The nested real-time PCR improved the LOD to 5 DNA copies when using human serum spiked with standard plasmid DNA, which represents a 10-fold higher than that observed with the real-time PCR assay. To assess the ability of the two assays to diagnose histoplasmosis, we analyzed a small number of clinical specimens collected from five patients with histoplasmosis, such as sera (n = 4), formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue (n = 4), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (n = 1). Although clinical sensitivity of the real-time PCR assay was insufficiently sensitive (33%), the nested real-time PCR assay increased the clinical sensitivity (77%), suggesting it has a potential to be a useful method for detecting H. capsulatum DNA in clinical specimens.

  3. Quantitative real-time PCR detection of Zika virus and evaluation with field-caught Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito borne flavivirus is a pathogen affecting humans in Asia and Africa. ZIKV infection diagnosis relies on serology–which is challenging due to cross-reactions with other flaviviruses and/or absence or low titer of IgM and IgG antibodies at early phase of infection- virus isolation, which is labor intensive, time consuming and requires appropriate containment. Therefore, real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) is an appealing option as a rapid, sensitive and specific method for detection of ZIKV in the early stage of infection. So far, only one rRT-PCR assay has been described in the context of the outbreak in Micronesia in 2007. In this study, we described a one step rRT-PCR for ZIKV which can detect a wider genetic diversity of ZIKV isolates from Asia and Africa. Results The NS5 protein coding regions of African ZIKV isolates were sequenced and aligned with representative flaviviruses sequences from GenBank to design primers and probe from conserved regions. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was evaluated to be 32 genome-equivalents and 0.05 plaque forming unit (pfu). The assay was shown to detect 37 ZIKV isolates covering a wide geographic in Africa and Asia over 36 years but none of the 31 other flaviviruses tested showing high analytical specificity. The rRT-PCR could be performed in less than 3 hours. This method was used successfully to detect ZIKV strains from field-caught mosquitoes. Conclusion We have developed a rapid, sensitive and specific rRT – PCR for detection of ZIKV. This assay is a useful tool for detection of ZIKV infection in regions where a number of other clinically indistinguishable arboviruses like dengue or chikungunya co-circulate. Further studies are needed to validate this assay in clinical positive samples collected during acute ZIKV infection. PMID:24148652

  4. Effectiveness of PCR and Immunofluorescence Techniques for Detecting Human Cytomegalovirus in Blood and Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid.

    PubMed

    Roży, A; Duk, K; Szumna, B; Skrońska, P; Gawryluk, D; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic methods allow a rapid and reliable detection of active human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection by identifying the presence of pp65 CMV antigen or CMV DNA in peripheral blood and affected organs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CMV detection in blood and organ-specific biological material, such as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), by comparing two standard diagnostic methods, immunofluorescence (IF) and the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We evaluated 25 patients with concomitant respiratory disease who were referred to our hospital for diagnosis due to suspected acute CMV infection. The presence of hCMV was concomitantly evaluated by IF and PCR in 16 peripheral blood samples. In two patients, we observed positive results for both IF and PCR, and in two other patients the results were discordant. Of 11 patients, CMV DNA was detected in six BALF samples, and in one blood plasma sample. Real-time PCR detected CMV DNA in 54.6 % of BALF samples and 12.0 % of blood samples, while indirect IF testing confirmed antigenemia in 12.5 % of blood samples. The results from our study suggest that the IF method is as effective as PCR for detecting an ongoing CMV infection in blood samples. However, real-time PCR was much more effective at detecting CMV DNA in BALF compared to blood samples. Our results suggest that the biological material being tested during CMV diagnosis should be derived directly from the virally infected organ(s).

  5. A multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of five tobacco viruses in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Cheng, Julong; Huang, Ting; Zheng, Xuan; Wu, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Potato virus Y (PVY) and Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV) are major viruses infecting tobacco and can cause serious crop losses. A multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to detect simultaneously and differentiate all five viruses. The system used specific primer sets for each virus producing five distinct fragments 237, 273, 347, 456 and 547 bp, representing TMV, CMV subgroup I, TEV, PVY(O) and TVBMV, respectively. These primers were used for detection of the different viruses by single PCR and multiplex PCR and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing analysis. The protocol was used to detect viruses from different parts of China. The simultaneous and sensitive detection of different viruses using the multiplex PCR is more efficient and economical than other conventional methods for tobacco virus detection. This multiplex PCR provides a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of major tobacco viruses, and will be useful for epidemiological studies.

  6. Sensitive detection of cancer cells using light-mediated apta-PCR.

    PubMed

    Civit, Laia; Pinto, Alessandro; Rodrigues-Correia, Alexandre; Heckel, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Mayer, Günter

    2016-03-15

    Apta-PCR is an ultrasensitive assay in which aptamers are exploited not only as biomolecular recognition elements, but also as reporter labels for amplification via real-time PCR. This methodology has been successfully applied to the detection of proteins, achieving limits of detection in the picomolar range. The introduction of caged aptamers that bear photo-labile groups, so called cages, at strategic positions so that their tertiary structure and thus their binding properties can be controlled by light, facilitates a more robust and attractive assay in terms of sample conservation and reusability. In this work, we report for the first time the use of caged aptamers for cell detection in an apta-PCR assay. Specifically, a sandwich format is used combining the capture of B-cells by an antibody with the specific detection of Burkitt's lymphoma cancer cells by a caged aptamer, acting as a reporter probe. Elution of the aptamer bound to the cancer cells is performed by light and the number of cells is then correlated with the amount of eluted caged aptamer using real-time PCR analysis. The reported technique shows an excellent sensitivity, achieving detection of as few as 77 cells, and due to the inherent robustness of the assay, this detection platform can be reused for further analyses, demonstrating potential applicability in proteomics and clinical diagnostics.

  7. Sensitive detection of cancer cells using light-mediated apta-PCR.

    PubMed

    Civit, Laia; Pinto, Alessandro; Rodrigues-Correia, Alexandre; Heckel, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Mayer, Günter

    2016-03-15

    Apta-PCR is an ultrasensitive assay in which aptamers are exploited not only as biomolecular recognition elements, but also as reporter labels for amplification via real-time PCR. This methodology has been successfully applied to the detection of proteins, achieving limits of detection in the picomolar range. The introduction of caged aptamers that bear photo-labile groups, so called cages, at strategic positions so that their tertiary structure and thus their binding properties can be controlled by light, facilitates a more robust and attractive assay in terms of sample conservation and reusability. In this work, we report for the first time the use of caged aptamers for cell detection in an apta-PCR assay. Specifically, a sandwich format is used combining the capture of B-cells by an antibody with the specific detection of Burkitt's lymphoma cancer cells by a caged aptamer, acting as a reporter probe. Elution of the aptamer bound to the cancer cells is performed by light and the number of cells is then correlated with the amount of eluted caged aptamer using real-time PCR analysis. The reported technique shows an excellent sensitivity, achieving detection of as few as 77 cells, and due to the inherent robustness of the assay, this detection platform can be reused for further analyses, demonstrating potential applicability in proteomics and clinical diagnostics. PMID:26615953

  8. Multiplex SYBR Green Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sultani, Mozhdeh; Mokhtari Azad, Talat; Eshragian, Mohammadreza; Shadab, Azadeh; Naseri, Maryam; Eilami, Owrang; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is often difficult for a physician to distinguish between viral and bacterial causes of respiratory infections and this may result in overuse of antibiotics. In many cases of community-acquired respiratory infections, clinicians treat patients empirically. The development of molecular methods for direct detection of viruses has been progressed recently. Objectives: The objective of this study was recognizing the panel of respiratory RNA viruses by multiplex SYBR Green real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: Randomized 172 influenza-negative respiratory specimens of all age groups of hospitalized patients were collected. After RNA extraction, cDNA was synthesized. Three SYBR Green multiplex real-time PCR assays were developed for simultaneous detection of 12 respiratory RNA viruses. Each set of multiplex methods detected four viruses, the first set: respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus; the second set: parainfluenza viruses 1 - 4 (PIV1-4); the third set: coronaviruses NL63, 229E, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and OC43. Results: Application of the multiplex SYBR Green real-time PCR in clinical samples from 172 patients in a one-year study resulted in detection of 19 (11.04%) PIV3, 9 (5.23%) PIV4, and 1 (0.58%) coronavirus NL63. All the positive samples were detected during December to March (2011 - 2012). Conclusions: Multiplex SYBR Green real-time PCR is a rapid and relatively inexpensive method for detection of respiratory viruses. PMID:26468358

  9. Comparative analysis of two broad-range PCR assays for pathogen detection in positive-blood-culture bottles: PCR-high-resolution melting analysis versus PCR-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Blyn, Lawrence B; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Matthews, Heather; Toleno, Donna; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Carroll, Karen C; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billy; Kecojevic, Alexander; Sampath, Rangarajan; Peterson, Stephen; Rothman, Richard E

    2012-10-01

    Detection of pathogens in bloodstream infections is important for directing antimicrobial treatment, but current culture-based approaches can be problematic. Broad-range PCR assays which target conserved genomic motifs for postamplification amplicon analysis permit detection of sepsis-causing pathogens. Comparison of different broad-range assays is important for informing future implementation strategies. In this study, we compared positive-blood-culture bottles processed by PCR coupled to high-resolution melting curve analysis (PCR/HRMA) and PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to microbiology culture results. Genus-level concordance was 90% (confidence interval [CI], 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 94% (CI, 85 to 98%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Species-level concordance was 90% (CI, 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 86% (CI, 75 to 93%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Unlike PCR/HRMA, PCR/ESI-MS was able to resolve polymicrobial samples. Our results demonstrated that the two assays have similar overall concordance rates but may have different roles as potential adjunctive tests with standard blood culture, since each method has different capabilities, advantages, and disadvantages.

  10. Detection and serogroup determination of Neisseria meningitidis in CSF by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Porritt, R J; Mercer, J L; Munro, R

    2000-02-01

    A PCR protocol for the detection and serogroup determination of Neisseria meningitidis in CSF from 85 cases of suspected meningitis was evaluated. Screening assays for both IS1106 and the ctrA gene were used to detect meningococcal DNA, and a further two assays using the siaD gene were performed to determine the serogroup. PCR results were compared with results of bacteriological culture and discrepant results resolved by analysis of clinical data and further laboratory test results. The resolved sensitivity and specificity of the PCR screening assay were 89 and 100%, and those of bacteriological culture were 37 and 100%, respectively. The siaD B/C PCR assay was able to determine a serogroup in 85% of cases positive by the PCR screening assay compared with 50% of cases where a serogroup was determined by traditional methods. PCR is a useful tool for diagnosis of meningococcal meningitis when Gram stain and culture tests are negative, a situation that may arise when antibiotic treatment has commenced prior to lumbar puncture.

  11. An appraisal of PCR-based technology in the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Sathish; Ramamurthy, Mageshbabu; Nandagopal, Balaji; Sridharan, Gopalan

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an under-recognized yet catastrophic health problem, particularly in developing countries. The HIV pandemic has served to increase the number of susceptible individuals, and multidrug-resistance and poor socioeconomic conditions also augment the prevalence and the consequences of the disease. To control the disease and its spread, it is vital that tuberculosis diagnostics are accurate and rapid. Whereas microscopy and culture have several limitations (low sensitivity is a problem for the former, while the latter has a delayed turnaround time), PCR-based techniques targeting regions of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome such as IS6110 have proved to be useful. The purpose of this review is to assess the use of PCR-RFLP, nested PCR and real-time PCR protocols and the choice of target regions for the detection of M. tuberculosis. Real-time PCR for the detection of M. tuberculosis target genes in clinical specimens has contributed to improving diagnosis and epidemiologic surveillance in the past decade. However, targeting one genome sequence such as IS6110 may not by itself be sufficiently sensitive to reach 100% diagnosis, especially in the case of pulmonary tuberculosis. Additional testing for target genome sequences such as hsp65 seems encouraging. An interesting approach would be a multiplex real-time PCR targeting both IS6110 and hsp65 to achieve comprehensive and specific molecular diagnosis. This technology needs development and adequate field testing before it becomes the acceptable gold standard for diagnosis.

  12. A robust PCR primer design platform applied to the detection of Acidobacteria Group 1 in soil.

    PubMed

    Gans, Jason D; Dunbar, John; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Wolinsky, Murray; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2012-07-01

    Environmental biosurveillance and microbial ecology studies use PCR-based assays to detect and quantify microbial taxa and gene sequences within a complex background of microorganisms. However, the fragmentary nature and growing quantity of DNA-sequence data make group-specific assay design challenging. We solved this problem by developing a software platform that enables PCR-assay design at an unprecedented scale. As a demonstration, we developed quantitative PCR assays for a globally widespread, ecologically important bacterial group in soil, Acidobacteria Group 1. A total of 33,684 Acidobacteria 16S rRNA gene sequences were used for assay design. Following 1 week of computation on a 376-core cluster, 83 assays were obtained. We validated the specificity of the top three assays, collectively predicted to detect 42% of the Acidobacteria Group 1 sequences, by PCR amplification and sequencing of DNA from soil. Based on previous analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Acidobacteria Group 1 species were expected to decrease in response to elevated atmospheric CO(2). Quantitative PCR results, using the Acidobacteria Group 1-specific PCR assays, confirmed the expected decrease and provided higher statistical confidence than the 16S rRNA gene-sequencing data. These results demonstrate a powerful capacity to address previously intractable assay design challenges.

  13. Evaluation of the use of PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR for detection of pathogenic bacteria in biosolids from anaerobic digestors and aerobic composters.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Carola; Wuertz, Stefan

    2003-08-01

    A PCR-based method and a reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)-based method were developed for the detection of pathogenic bacteria in organic waste, using Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Staphylococcus aureus as model organisms. In seeded organic waste samples, detection limits of less than 10 cells per g of organic waste were achieved after one-step enrichment of bacteria, isolation, and purification of DNA or RNA before PCR or RT-PCR amplification. To test the reproducibility and reliability of the newly developed methods, 46 unseeded samples were collected from diverse aerobic (composting) facilities and anaerobic digestors and analyzed by both culture-based classical and newly developed PCR-based procedures. No false-positive but some false-negative results were generated by the PCR- or RT-PCR-based methods after one-step enrichment when compared to the classical detection methods. The results indicated that the level of activity of the tested bacteria in unseeded samples was very low compared to that of freshly inoculated cells, preventing samples from reaching the cell density required for PCR-based detection after one-step enrichment. However, for Salmonella spp., a distinct PCR product could be obtained for all 22 nonamended samples that tested positive for Salmonella spp. by the classical detection procedure when a selective two-step enrichment (20 h in peptone water at 37 degrees C and 24 h in Rappaport Vassiliadis medium at 43 degrees C) was performed prior to nucleic acid extraction and PCR. Hence, the classical procedure was shortened, since cell plating and further differentiation of isolated colonies can be omitted, substituted for by highly sensitive and reliable detection based on nucleic acid extraction and PCR. Similarly, 2 of the 22 samples in which Salmonella spp. were detected also tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes according to a two-step enrichment procedure followed by PCR, compared to 3 samples

  14. Molecular detection of Puccinia horiana in Chrysanthemum x morifolium through conventional and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Hossein; Baeyen, Steve; Maes, Martine; Höfte, Monica; Heungens, Kurt

    2009-02-01

    Puccinia horiana Henn. is a quarantine organism and one of the most important fungal pathogens of Chrysanthemum x morifolium cultivars grown for cut flower or potted plant production (florist's chrysanthemum) in several regions of the world. Highly specific primer pairs were identified for conventional, nested, and real-time PCR detection of P. horiana based on the specific and sensitive PCR amplification of selected regions in the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Using these different PCR versions, 10 pg, 10 fg, and 5 fg genomic DNA could be detected, respectively. When using cloned target DNA as template, the detection limits were 5000, 50, and 5 target copies, respectively. These detection limits were not affected by a background of chrysanthemum plant DNA. The DNA extraction method was optimized to maximize the recoverability of the pathogen from infected plant tissue. A CTAB extraction protocol or a selection of commercial DNA extraction methods allowed the use of 10 ng total (plant+pathogen) DNA without interference of PCR inhibitors. Due to the specificity of the primers, SYBR Green I technology enabled reliable real time PCR signal detection. However, an efficient TaqMan probe is available. The lowest proportion of infected plant material that could still be detected when mixed with healthy plant material was 0.001%. The real-time PCR assay could detect as few as eight pure P. horiana basidiospores, demonstrating the potential of the technique for aerial detection of the pathogen. The amount of P. horiana DNA in plant tissue was determined at various time points after basidiospore inoculation. Using the real-time PCR protocol, it was possible to detect the pathogen immediately after the inoculation period, even though the accumulation of pathogen DNA was most pronounced near the end of the latent period. The detection system proved to be accurate and sensitive and could help not only in pathogen diagnosis but

  15. G-quadruplex-generating PCR for visual colorimetric detection of amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Codrea, Vlad; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a self-reporting PCR system for visual colorimetric gene detection and distinction of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Amplification is performed using target-specific primers modified with a 5’-end tail that is complementary to a G-quadruplex deoxyribozyme-forming sequence. At end-point G-quadruplexes are forced to fold from PCR-generated duplex DNA and then used to colorimetrically report the successful occurrence of PCR by assaying their peroxidase activity using a chromogenic substrate. Furthermore, primer design considerations for the G-quadruplex-generating PCR system have allowed us to visually distinguish SNPs associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance alleles. PMID:24135653

  16. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Getchell, Rodman G.; McClure, Carol A.; Weber, S.E.; Garver, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  17. Direct colony PCR-SSCP for detection of multiple pythiaceous oomycetes in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Richardson, Patricia A; Hong, Chuanxue

    2005-04-01

    Colony PCR was developed for detection of pythiaceous species recovered on selective agar plates without DNA extraction. A minute amount of mycelia from a single colony was picked up with a pipette tip and added directly to the PCR mix as template for DNA amplification. Successful amplification was achieved in over 95% of the colonies recovered from plant tissues, irrigation water and soil with species-specific primers or oomycete ITS-1 primers. PCR was inhibited in the case of colonies emerging from unwashed pine bark potting mix plates. Direct colony PCR with ITS-1 primers combined with single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) was used to determine population levels of single and multiple species in plant and environmental samples. Application of this technique for disease diagnosis and monitoring pathogen sources was explored, and the potential for studying diversity and population dynamics of other cultivated microbial communities in the environment is discussed. PMID:15676193

  18. Optimization of PMA-PCR Protocol for Viability Detection of Pathogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelson, Brian J.; Lee, Christine M.; Ponce, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This presented study demonstrates the need that PMA-PCR can be used to capture the loss of viability of a sample that is much more specific and time-efficient than alternative methods. This protocol is particularly useful in scenarios in which sterilization treatments may inactivate organisms but not degrade their DNA. The use of a PCR-based method of pathogen detection without first inactivating the DNA of nonviable cells will potentially lead to false positives. The loss of culturability, by heat-killing, did not prevent amplified PCR products, which supports the use of PMA to prevent amplification and differentiate between viable and dead cells. PMA was shown to inhibit the amplification of DNA by PCR in vegetative cells that had been heat-killed.

  19. Goose Hemorrhagic polyomavirus detection in geese using real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Leon, Olivier; Corrand, Léni; Bich, Tran Ngoc; Le Minor, Odile; Lemaire, Mylène; Guérin, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-01

    Goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) is the viral agent of hemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of geese (HNEG), a lethal disease of goslings. Although death is the most common outcome, geese that recover from HNEG are persistently infected. Here, we present the development of real-time SYBR Green real-time PCR targeted to GHPV and its use to assess the prevalence of GHPV infection in French geese flocks. When compared with classical end-point PCR, real-time PCR revealed a much better sensitivity and equivalent specificity. Real-time PCR could, therefore, be considered a gold standard for the detection of GHPV. Results of field investigations evidenced a very high prevalence of GHPV infections in French geese, largely associated with healthy carriage.

  20. A rapid RT-PCR based method for the detection of BCR-ABL translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Sidorova JYu; Saltykova, L B; Lyschov, A A; Zaritskey AYu; Abdulkadyrov, K M; Blinov, M N

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To optimise a one step reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol for BCR-ABL chimaera detection. METHODS: Compared with published RT-PCR procedures, this novel approach has at least two advantages. First, the same enzyme is used for both reverse transcription and PCR. Second, amplification of the target (BCR-ABL chimaera) and control gene (ABL) is performed simultaneously in the same tube. RESULTS: On testing 40 chronic myelogenous leukaemia patients and 10 healthy donors there was a specificity for the newly developed technique. In addition, dilution experiments demonstrated that the protocol was highly sensitive. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested one step PCR strategy is a simple and reliable way to reveal BCR-ABL chimaeras. Images PMID:9497918

  1. An electrochemiluminescence non-PCR method for the detection of genetically modified organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xing, Da; Zhu, Debin

    2006-09-01

    An electrochemiluminescence non-PCR method has been developed for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in crops. Genomic DNA of GMOs was digested with two restriction endonucleases (FOK I and BsrD I), and hybridized with three Ru(bpy) 3 2+ (TBR)-labeled and one biotinylated probes. The hybridization products were captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal of the TBR label. Whether the tobaccos contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the ECL signal of CaMV35S promoter. The experiment results show that the detection limit for CaMV35S promoter is 100 fmol, and the GM components can be clearly identified in GM tobaccos. The ECL non-PCR method will provide a new means in GMOs detection due to its safety, simplicity and high efficiency.

  2. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in extrapulmonary biopsy samples using PCR targeting IS6110, rpoB, and nested-rpoB PCR Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Meghdadi, Hossein; Khosravi, Azar D.; Ghadiri, Ata A.; Sina, Amir H.; Alami, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    Present study was aimed to examine the diagnostic utility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR techniques for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA in samples from patients with extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). In total 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples comprising 70 samples with definite diagnosis of EPTB and 10 samples from known non- EPTB on the basis of histopathology examination, were included in the study. PCR amplification targeting IS6110, rpoB gene and nested PCR targeting the rpoB gene were performed on the extracted DNAs from 80 FFPE samples. The strong positive samples were directly sequenced. For negative samples and those with weak band in nested-rpoB PCR, TA cloning was performed by cloning the products into the plasmid vector with subsequent sequencing. The 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method. Fourteen (20%), 34 (48.6%), and 60 (85.7%) of the 70 positive samples confirmed by histopathology, were positive by rpoB-PCR, IS6110-PCR, and nested-rpoB PCR, respectively. By performing TA cloning on samples that yielded weak (n = 8) or negative results (n = 10) in the PCR methods, we were able to improve their quality for later sequencing. All samples with weak band and 7 out of 10 negative samples, showed strong positive results after cloning. So nested-rpoB PCR cloning revealed positivity in 67 out of 70 confirmed samples (95.7%). The sensitivity of these combination methods was calculated as 95.7% in comparison with histopathology examination. The CI for sensitivity of the PCR methods were calculated as 11.39–31.27% for rpoB-PCR, 36.44–60.83% for IS6110- PCR, 75.29–92.93% for nested-rpoB PCR, and 87.98–99.11% for nested-rpoB PCR cloning. The 10 true EPTB negative samples by histopathology, were negative by all tested methods including cloning and were used to calculate the specificity of the applied methods. The CI for 100

  3. Rapid-Viability PCR Method for Detection of Live, Virulent Bacillus anthracis in Environmental Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Létant, Sonia E.; Murphy, Gloria A.; Alfaro, Teneile M.; Avila, Julie R.; Kane, Staci R.; Raber, Ellen; Bunt, Thomas M.; Shah, Sanjiv R.

    2011-01-01

    In the event of a biothreat agent release, hundreds of samples would need to be rapidly processed to characterize the extent of contamination and determine the efficacy of remediation activities. Current biological agent identification and viability determination methods are both labor- and time-intensive such that turnaround time for confirmed results is typically several days. In order to alleviate this issue, automated, high-throughput sample processing methods were developed in which real-time PCR analysis is conducted on samples before and after incubation. The method, referred to as rapid-viability (RV)-PCR, uses the change in cycle threshold after incubation to detect the presence of live organisms. In this article, we report a novel RV-PCR method for detection of live, virulent Bacillus anthracis, in which the incubation time was reduced from 14 h to 9 h, bringing the total turnaround time for results below 15 h. The method incorporates a magnetic bead-based DNA extraction and purification step prior to PCR analysis, as well as specific real-time PCR assays for the B. anthracis chromosome and pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. A single laboratory verification of the optimized method applied to the detection of virulent B. anthracis in environmental samples was conducted and showed a detection level of 10 to 99 CFU/sample with both manual and automated RV-PCR methods in the presence of various challenges. Experiments exploring the relationship between the incubation time and the limit of detection suggest that the method could be further shortened by an additional 2 to 3 h for relatively clean samples. PMID:21764960

  4. Development of droplet digital PCR for the detection of Babesia microti and Babesia duncani

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Melisa; Glaser, Kathleen C.; Adams-Fish, Debra; Boley, Matthew; Mayda, Maria; Molestina, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Babesia spp. are obligate protozoan parasites of red blood cells. Transmission to humans occurs through bites from infected ticks or blood transfusion. Infections with B. microti account for the majority of the reported cases of human babesiosis in the USA. A lower incidence is caused by the more recently described species B. duncani. The current gold standard for detection of Babesia is microscopic examination of blood smears. Recent PCR-based assays, including real-time PCR, have been developed for B. microti. On the other hand, molecular assays that detect and distinguish between B. microti and B. duncani infections are lacking. Closely related species of Babesia can be differentiated due to sequence variation within the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal RNAs. In the present study, we targeted the ITS regions of B. microti and B. duncani to develop sensitive and species-specific droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays. The assays were shown to discriminate B. microti from B. duncani and resulted in limits of detection of ~10 gene copies. Moreover, ddPCR for these species were useful in DNA extracted from blood of experimentally infected hamsters, detecting infections of low parasitemia that were negative by microscopic examination. In summary, we have developed sensitive and specific quantitative ddPCR assays for the detection of B. microti and B. duncani in blood. Our methods could be used as sensitive approaches to monitor the progression of parasitemia in rodent models of infection as well as serve as suitable molecular tests in blood screening. PMID:25500215

  5. Symmetric vs asymmetric PCR and molecular beacon probe in the detection of a target gene of adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    2000-02-01

    A DNA fragment (307 bp) from the conserved region of an adenovirus gene (hexon) was amplified by symmetric and by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two amplifications, one in the absence other in the presence of a molecular beacon probe were conducted by both symmetric and asymmetric PCR. The probe sequence was complementary to an internal segment of the amplified fragment. The product amplified in the absence and presence of the probe was detected by agarose gel and fluorescence analysis, respectively. A symmetric PCR results in exponentially grown double stranded DNA. An asymmetric PCR generates one of the strands by linear ampIlification and a fraction of its total product as double-stranded DNA limited by the concentration ratio of the primers used. Thus asymmetric PCR provided lower intensity signal hence less sensitivity than symmetric PCR by agarose gel analysis as expected. However, signal from a beacon probe based PCR assay is generated only from the probe fraction that hybridizes successfully competing against the strand complementary to the target strand of the product generated by PCR. The symmetric PCR has so far been used for the molecular beacon based fluorescent signal detection. The present study compared the level of fluorescent signal detectable from a symmetric PCR with that from an asymmetric PCR. The fluorescent data analysis demonstrated that a significant higher level of fluorescent signal hence higher sensitivity of detection is obtainable using asymmetric PCR than symmetric PCR performed in presence of the molecular beacon probe.

  6. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Rao, Brianna M.; McLain, Jean E.; Watts, George S.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  7. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    PubMed

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  8. Development and Application of Real-Time PCR for Detection of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liting; Gao, Yulong; Ni, Wei; Sun, Meiyu; Wang, Yongqiang; Yin, Chunhong; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei

    2013-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an avian retrovirus that causes severe economic losses in the poultry industry. The early identification and removal of virus-shedding birds are important to reduce the spread of congenital and contact infections. In this study, a TaqMan-based real-time PCR method for the rapid detection and quantification of ALV-J with proviral DNA was developed. This method exhibited a high specificity for ALV-J. Moreover, the detection limit was as low as 10 viral DNA copies. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of both interassay and intra-assay reproducibility were less than 1%. The growth curves of ALV-J in DF-1 cells were measured by real-time PCR, yielding a trend line similar to those determined by 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and p27 antigen detection. Tissue samples suspected of ALV infection were evaluated using real-time PCR, virus isolation, and routine PCR, and the positivity rates were 60.1%, 41.6% and 44.5%, respectively. Our data indicated that the real-time PCR method provides a sensitive, specific, and reproducible diagnostic tool for the identification and quantification of ALV-J for clinical diagnosis and in laboratory research. PMID:23100340

  9. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained.

  10. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained. PMID:24128588

  11. PCR detection of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria involved in canned food spoilage.

    PubMed

    Prevost, S; Andre, S; Remize, F

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic bacteria that form highly heat-resistant spores constitute an important group of spoilage bacteria of low-acid canned food. A PCR assay was developed in order to rapidly trace these bacteria. Three PCR primer pairs were designed from rRNA gene sequences. These primers were evaluated for the specificity and the sensitivity of detection. Two primer pairs allowed detection at the species level of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Moorella thermoacetica/thermoautrophica. The other pair allowed group-specific detection of anaerobic thermophilic bacteria of the genera Thermoanaerobacterium, Thermoanaerobacter, Caldanerobium and Caldanaerobacter. After a single enrichment step, these PCR assays allowed the detection of 28 thermophiles from 34 cans of spoiled low-acid food. In addition, 13 ingredients were screened for the presence of these bacteria. This PCR assay serves as a detection method for strains able to spoil low-acid canned food treated at 55°C. It will lead to better reactivity in the canning industry. Raw materials and ingredients might be qualified not only for quantitative spore contamination, but also for qualitative contamination by highly heat-resistant spores. PMID:20397018

  12. Detection of Vibrio vulnificus biotypes 1 and 2 in eels and oysters by PCR amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, S S; Melanson, D M; Biosca, E G; Oliver, J D

    1996-01-01

    DNA extraction procedures and PCR conditions to detect Vibrio vulnificus cells naturally occurring in oysters were developed. In addition, PCR amplification of V. vulnificus from oysters seeded with biotype 1 cells was demonstrated. By the methods described, V. vulnificus cells on a medium (colistin-polymyxin B-cellobiose agar) selective for this pathogen were detectable in oysters harvested in January and March, containing no culturable cells (< 67 CFU/g), as well as in oysters harvested in May and June, containing culturable cells. It was possible to complete DNA extraction, PCR, and gel electrophoresis within 10 h by using the protocol described for oysters. V. vulnificus biotype 2 cells were also detected in eel tissues that had been infected with this strain and subsequently preserved in formalin. The protocol used for detection of V. vulnificus cells in eels required less than 5 h to complete. Optimum MgCl2 concentrations for the PCR of V. vulnificus from oysters and eels were different, although the same primer pair was used for both. This is the first report on the detection of cells of V. vulnificus naturally present in shellfish and represents a potentially powerful method for monitoring this important human and eel pathogen. PMID:8919800

  13. Detecting and genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays.

    PubMed

    Call, D R; Brockman, F J; Chandler, D P

    2001-07-20

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFU ml(-1) (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass-based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products; the system is amenable to automation.

  14. Real-time quantitative PCR detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies in meat products.

    PubMed

    Klanicova, B; Slana, I; Vondruskova, H; Kaevska, M; Pavlik, I

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this work was to examine various purchased meat products and to find out if any traces of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis could be detected in these samples. Analysis of the meat products (raw, cooked, and fermented) was performed using a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for the detection of specific insertion sequences: duplex qPCR for the detection of IS900 specific for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and triplex qPCR for the detection of IS901 specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and IS 1245 specific for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Of the 77 analyzed meat samples, 17 (22%) were found to contain M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA, 4 (5%) samples contained Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium DNA, and in 12 (16%) samples M. avium subsp. hominissuis DNA was detected. The concentration of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. hominissuis DNA in some meat products exceeded 10(4) genomes per g. Culture examination of these mycobacterial subspecies was negative. By analyzing a range of meat products, we have provided evidence to support the hypothesis that M. avium is present in everyday commodities sold to the general public.

  15. Reverse Transcription-PCR-Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Rapid Detection and Differentiation of Alphavirus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Paessler, Slobodan; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Carrara, Anne-Sophie; Ni, Haolin; Greene, Ivorlyne P.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the lack of a rapid, simple, and inexpensive assay for detecting alphavirus infections, we combined a reverse transcription-PCR with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (RT-PCR-ELISA) to identify human pathogenic alphaviruses that are endemic in the New World. By combining the sensitivity of PCR, the detection simplicity of ELISA, and the specificities of DNA probes, this method rapidly detected and differentiated closely related species and subtypes of several medically important alphaviruses. After an amplification using RT-PCR with primers targeting conserved sequences in the nonstructural protein 1 gene, sequence-specific, biotin-labeled probes targeted against Venezuelan, eastern, and western equine encephalitis or Mayaro virus genes were used for the detection of amplicons using ELISA. The assay is simple, fast, and easy to perform in an ordinary diagnostic laboratory or clinical setting. Nucleic acid derived from cell cultures infected with several alphaviruses, clinical specimens, and mosquito pools as well as frozen and paraffin-embedded animal tissues were detected and identified within 6 to 7 h in a sensitive and specific manner. PMID:16957044

  16. PCR detection of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria involved in canned food spoilage.

    PubMed

    Prevost, S; Andre, S; Remize, F

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic bacteria that form highly heat-resistant spores constitute an important group of spoilage bacteria of low-acid canned food. A PCR assay was developed in order to rapidly trace these bacteria. Three PCR primer pairs were designed from rRNA gene sequences. These primers were evaluated for the specificity and the sensitivity of detection. Two primer pairs allowed detection at the species level of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Moorella thermoacetica/thermoautrophica. The other pair allowed group-specific detection of anaerobic thermophilic bacteria of the genera Thermoanaerobacterium, Thermoanaerobacter, Caldanerobium and Caldanaerobacter. After a single enrichment step, these PCR assays allowed the detection of 28 thermophiles from 34 cans of spoiled low-acid food. In addition, 13 ingredients were screened for the presence of these bacteria. This PCR assay serves as a detection method for strains able to spoil low-acid canned food treated at 55°C. It will lead to better reactivity in the canning industry. Raw materials and ingredients might be qualified not only for quantitative spore contamination, but also for qualitative contamination by highly heat-resistant spores.

  17. Detecting and Genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J. ); Chandler, Darrell P.

    2000-12-01

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFU ml-1 (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products and the system is amenable to automation.

  18. Detecting and genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-07-05

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFUs ml-1 (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products and the system is amenable to automation.

  19. Detection of pathogenic Vibrio spp. in shellfish by using multiplex PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R; Krug, Melissa J; Bej, Asim K

    2004-12-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., could be detected and discriminated. For DNA microarrays, oligonucleotide probes for these targeted genes were deposited onto epoxysilane-derivatized, 12-well, Teflon-masked slides by using a MicroGrid II arrayer. Amplified PCR products were hybridized to arrays at 50 degrees C and detected by using tyramide signal amplification with Alexa Fluor 546 fluorescent dye. Slides were imaged by using an arrayWoRx scanner. The detection sensitivity for pure cultures without enrichment was 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and the specificity was 100%. However, 5 h of sample enrichment followed by DNA extraction with Instagene matrix and multiplex PCR with microarray hybridization resulted in the detection of 1 CFU in 1 g of oyster tissue homogenate. Thus, enrichment of the bacterial pathogens permitted higher sensitivity in compliance with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference guideline. Application of the DNA microarray methodology to natural oysters revealed the presence of V. vulnificus (100%) and V. parahaemolyticus (83%). However, V. cholerae was not detected in natural oysters. An assay involving a combination of multiplex PCR and DNA microarray hybridization would help to ensure rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic vibrios in shellfish, thereby improving the microbiological safety of shellfish for consumers. PMID:15574946

  20. Detection of Pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Shellfish by Using Multiplex PCR and DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R.; Krug, Melissa J.; Bej, Asim K.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., could be detected and discriminated. For DNA microarrays, oligonucleotide probes for these targeted genes were deposited onto epoxysilane-derivatized, 12-well, Teflon-masked slides by using a MicroGrid II arrayer. Amplified PCR products were hybridized to arrays at 50°C and detected by using tyramide signal amplification with Alexa Fluor 546 fluorescent dye. Slides were imaged by using an arrayWoRx scanner. The detection sensitivity for pure cultures without enrichment was 102 to 103 CFU/ml, and the specificity was 100%. However, 5 h of sample enrichment followed by DNA extraction with Instagene matrix and multiplex PCR with microarray hybridization resulted in the detection of 1 CFU in 1 g of oyster tissue homogenate. Thus, enrichment of the bacterial pathogens permitted higher sensitivity in compliance with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference guideline. Application of the DNA microarray methodology to natural oysters revealed the presence of V. vulnificus (100%) and V. parahaemolyticus (83%). However, V. cholerae was not detected in natural oysters. An assay involving a combination of multiplex PCR and DNA microarray hybridization would help to ensure rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic vibrios in shellfish, thereby improving the microbiological safety of shellfish for consumers. PMID:15574946

  1. Serial Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection, Species Discrimination, and Quantification of Leishmania spp. in Human Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Weirather, Jason L.; Jeronimo, Selma M. B.; Gautam, Shalini; Sundar, Shyam; Kang, Mitchell; Kurtz, Melissa A.; Haque, Rashidul; Schriefer, Albert; Talhari, Sinésio; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The Leishmania species cause a variety of human disease syndromes. Methods for diagnosis and species differentiation are insensitive and many require invasive sampling. Although quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods are reported for leishmania detection, no systematic method to quantify parasites and determine the species in clinical specimens is established. We developed a serial qPCR strategy to identify and rapidly differentiate Leishmania species and quantify parasites in clinical or environmental specimens. SYBR green qPCR is mainly employed, with corresponding TaqMan assays for validation. The screening primers recognize kinetoplast minicircle DNA of all Leishmania species. Species identification employs further qPCR set(s) individualized for geographic regions, combining species-discriminating probes with melt curve analysis. The assay was sufficient to detect Leishmania parasites, make species determinations, and quantify Leishmania spp. in sera, cutaneous biopsy specimens, or cultured isolates from subjects from Bangladesh or Brazil with different forms of leishmaniasis. The multicopy kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) probes were the most sensitive and useful for quantification based on promastigote standard curves. To test their validity for quantification, kDNA copy numbers were compared between Leishmania species, isolates, and life stages using qPCR. Maxicircle and minicircle copy numbers differed up to 6-fold between Leishmania species, but the differences were smaller between strains of the same species. Amastigote and promastigote leishmania life stages retained similar numbers of kDNA maxi- or minicircles. Thus, serial qPCR is useful for leishmania detection and species determination and for absolute quantification when compared to a standard curve from the same Leishmania species. PMID:22042830

  2. Simplified detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum using smear microscopy and PCR with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sagarika; Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Bhalla, Manpreet; De Majumdar, Shyamasree; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami

    2007-10-01

    The prompt diagnosis of smear-negative cases is a prerequisite to controlling tuberculosis (TB). Several new laboratory approaches, including nucleic acid amplification (NAA), are being evaluated in various disease settings to meet this challenge. However, NAA needs simplification before it is widely accepted. Furthermore, a supporting smear result improves confidence in and reliability of PCR. In this context, an asymmetric devR PCR assay using two molecular beacon probes for visual or fluorimetric end-point detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was developed. The assays reproducibly detected 25 fg M. tuberculosis DNA versus 100 fg by conventional gel electrophoresis (henceforth referred to as gel assay). The devR and IS6110 PCR assays were blindly evaluated on sputum specimens obtained from a directly observed-treatment short-course centre. Universal sample processing (USP) smear microscopy and culture were used as a supportive test and the 'gold' standard, respectively. Among the 148 specimens analysed, 120 were M. tuberculosis culture-positive. Amongst the 122 direct smear-negative samples, 96 were culture-positive, of which 61 were detected by USP smear microscopy. All 35 USP smear-negative samples were positive by three or more PCR methods. devR PCR had a sensitivity of 92.5 % in the fluorimetric assay versus 86.7 % by visual inspection and 90.8 % by the gel method. IS6110 PCR performed at almost equivalent levels. devR visual and fluorimetric assays considered together yielded an increased sensitivity of 95 % without compromising on a specificity of 92.9 %. The results suggest that the USP smear test is useful for diagnosing direct smear-negative TB and judiciously restricting PCR testing to only smear-negative samples. When used together, these tests can provide rapid diagnosis of smear-negative TB in a cost-effective manner.

  3. Comparison of PCR methods for detection of classical swine fever virus and other pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Podgórska, K; Kamieniecka, K; Stadejek, T; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious disease of swine controlled mainly with costly administrative methods. Swine may be infected not only with classical swine fever virus (CSFV), but also with other, non porcine, genetically and antigenically related pestiviruses. Differentiation of infections with CSFV and other pestiviruses is a crucial element of diagnostics. In the present study two real-time PCR methods and conventional one-tube nested PCR for specific detection of CSFV were compared. Additionally, two methods designed for detection of all pestivirus species real-time SYBR Green I and one-tube nested PCR were included into the study. Analyzed methods varied considerably regarding their sensitivity and specificity, what suggests that careful selection of diagnostic methods and their evaluation on a regular basis is necessary.

  4. Survey for Toxoplasma gondii by PCR detection in meat for human consumption in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Franco-Hernandez, Erika N; Acosta, Alejandro; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2016-02-01

    The overall risk for toxoplasmosis in meat produced in Colombia is unknown. We analyzed by PCR assay meat samples for human consumption in two types of plants in Colombia: 120 samples from class I plants (60 samples from chicken, 30 from swine and 30 from beef) and 60 from class II plants (30 samples from beef and 30 from swine). Presence of Toxoplasma DNA was established by targeted B1 nested PCR assay. We detected 79 (43%) samples that were positive by B1 nested PCR (33 from chicken, 22 from beef, and 24 from pork). No differences were found by region or species. Eleven positive samples were confirmed by sequencing of the B1 repeated region. Some polymorphisms were detected without relation with clonal groups nor meat species. Food animals are highly exposed to Toxoplasma in Colombia. Detailed studies are needed to establish the reasons for differences in Toxoplasma prevalence between farms, regarding practices of animal food production.

  5. Detecting Polychlorinated Biphenyls by Ah Receptor and Fluorescence Quantitative PCR with Exonuclease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Zhuang, Huisheng

    2010-11-01

    Tetrachlorobiphenyls as ligands were cultivated with goldfish, Ah receptors were extracted from the liver of goldfish and purified by hydroxyapatite. The complex of TCB ligands-receptors were analyzed by Surface Plasmon Resonance. DNA probes were amplified by PCR using Primers F1 and F2 with the DNA recognition site of responsive enhancer. DNA probes bound to the complex were not digested by exonuclease. The DNA that bound to the complex was quantified by real time PCR. A standard curve with TCB concentration to Ct values was obtained in the range of 10-12mol/L to 10-8 mol/L, according to TCB concentration in samples. The detection limit of the assay was below 10-12mol/L of TCB. Compared with HPLC, this assay is much more sensitive. These results suggest that fluorescence quantitative PCR with exonuclease by Ah receptors fits for detection of trace PCB.

  6. Survey for Toxoplasma gondii by PCR detection in meat for human consumption in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Franco-Hernandez, Erika N; Acosta, Alejandro; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2016-02-01

    The overall risk for toxoplasmosis in meat produced in Colombia is unknown. We analyzed by PCR assay meat samples for human consumption in two types of plants in Colombia: 120 samples from class I plants (60 samples from chicken, 30 from swine and 30 from beef) and 60 from class II plants (30 samples from beef and 30 from swine). Presence of Toxoplasma DNA was established by targeted B1 nested PCR assay. We detected 79 (43%) samples that were positive by B1 nested PCR (33 from chicken, 22 from beef, and 24 from pork). No differences were found by region or species. Eleven positive samples were confirmed by sequencing of the B1 repeated region. Some polymorphisms were detected without relation with clonal groups nor meat species. Food animals are highly exposed to Toxoplasma in Colombia. Detailed studies are needed to establish the reasons for differences in Toxoplasma prevalence between farms, regarding practices of animal food production. PMID:26481490

  7. From synthetic DNA to PCR product: detection of fungal infections using SERS.

    PubMed

    Mabbott, Samuel; Thompson, David; Sirimuthu, Narayana; McNay, Graeme; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2016-06-23

    We report the use of silver hydroxylamine nanoparticles functionalised with single stranded monothiolated DNA for the detection of fungal infections. The four different species of fungi that were targeted were Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Aspergillus fumigatus. Rational design of synthetic targets and probes was carried out by carefully analysing the 2-D folding of the DNA and then by global alignment of the sequences to ensure specificity. The effects of varying the concentrations of the DNA and dye surrounding the nanoparticles on the resultant surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal were also investigated to ensure compatibility of the probes in a multiplexed environment. Using principal components analysis (PCA) it was possible to detect the individual presence of each target and group them accordingly. The move to detect the C. krusei single stranded PCR product (ssPCR) was significant to demonstrate that the methodology could be employed for the detection and diagnosis of invasive fungal infections (IFDs) within a clinical setting. Initially the PCR product was subjected to an alkali shock method in order to separate the strands ready for detection using the nanoparticle probes system. This time 18 base probes were employed to enhance hybridisation efficiency and dextran sulfate was found to have a vital role in ensuring that detection of the C. krusei target was achieved. This demonstrated the use of DNA functionalised silver nanoparticle for the detection of clinically relevant DNA relating to a specific fungal infection and offers significant promise for future diagnostic applications.

  8. From synthetic DNA to PCR product: detection of fungal infections using SERS.

    PubMed

    Mabbott, Samuel; Thompson, David; Sirimuthu, Narayana; McNay, Graeme; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2016-06-23

    We report the use of silver hydroxylamine nanoparticles functionalised with single stranded monothiolated DNA for the detection of fungal infections. The four different species of fungi that were targeted were Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Aspergillus fumigatus. Rational design of synthetic targets and probes was carried out by carefully analysing the 2-D folding of the DNA and then by global alignment of the sequences to ensure specificity. The effects of varying the concentrations of the DNA and dye surrounding the nanoparticles on the resultant surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal were also investigated to ensure compatibility of the probes in a multiplexed environment. Using principal components analysis (PCA) it was possible to detect the individual presence of each target and group them accordingly. The move to detect the C. krusei single stranded PCR product (ssPCR) was significant to demonstrate that the methodology could be employed for the detection and diagnosis of invasive fungal infections (IFDs) within a clinical setting. Initially the PCR product was subjected to an alkali shock method in order to separate the strands ready for detection using the nanoparticle probes system. This time 18 base probes were employed to enhance hybridisation efficiency and dextran sulfate was found to have a vital role in ensuring that detection of the C. krusei target was achieved. This demonstrated the use of DNA functionalised silver nanoparticle for the detection of clinically relevant DNA relating to a specific fungal infection and offers significant promise for future diagnostic applications. PMID:27034997

  9. Simultaneous detection of listeria monocytogenes in chicken meat enrichments by PCR and reverse-transcription PCR without DNA/RNA isolation.

    PubMed

    Navas, Jaime; Ortiz, Sagrario; Martínez-Suárez, Joaquin V

    2005-02-01

    Environmental and food samples can be analyzed using PCR and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR techniques to discriminate between viable and nonviable cells of bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe the use of a commercial lysis buffer, initially designed for mammalian cells, that permits the rapid extraction of bacterial DNA and RNA. The buffer is an RT-PCR-compatible lysis solution in which RNA is stable and can be frozen for later use. RT-PCR is carried out directly after DNase I treatment of crude bacterial lysates using rTth polymerase for RT-PCR in a single tube. Untreated lysate is used for standard PCR. The procedure permits the amplification of either mRNA or DNA of Listeria monocytogenes at a level similar to that obtained with purified nucleic acids. Using lysates obtained with this buffer, nested PCR and RT-PCR assays detected low numbers of L. monocytogenes cells from artificially contaminated chicken meat samples. The simplicity of this system may foster the development of similar buffers specifically designed for bacteria to improve RNA detection methods that can be performed in parallel with DNA analysis. The use of a single buffer decreases the time needed for analysis, is amenable to automation and real-time assays, and might be adaptable to all bacteria and amplification methods.

  10. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed. PMID:26296900

  11. Evaluation and Field Validation of PCR Tests for Detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Subclinically Infected Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Broes, André; Harel, Josée; Kobisch, Marylène; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2003-01-01

    Eight PCR tests were evaluated for their abilities to detect Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in swine tonsils. At first they were compared regarding their specificities by using A. pleuropneumoniae and related bacterial species and their analytical sensitivities by using tonsils experimentally infected in vitro. PCRs were carried out both directly with tonsil homogenates (direct PCR) and after culture of the sample (after-culture PCR). Most tests demonstrated good specificities; however, some tests gave false-positive results with some non-A. pleuropneumoniae species. High degrees of variation in the analytical sensitivities among the tests were observed for the direct PCRs (109 to 102 CFU/g of tonsil), whereas those of most of the after-culture PCRs were similar (102 CFU/g of tonsil). In a second phase, the effects of sample storage time and storage conditions were evaluated by using tonsils from experimentally infected animals. Storage at −20°C allowed the detection of the organism for at least 4 months. Finally, the omlA PCR test described by Savoye et al. (C. Savoye et al., Vet. Microbiol. 73:337-347, 2000) and the commercially available Adiavet App PCR test were further validated with field samples. Their effectiveness was compared to those of standard and immunomagnetic separation-based methods of bacterial isolation. In addition, a comparison of tonsil biopsy specimens (from living animals) and whole tonsils (collected at the slaughterhouse) was also conducted. A. pleuropneumoniae was neither isolated nor detected by PCR from a herd serologically negative for A. pleuropneumoniae. PCR was more sensitive than the standard isolation method with whole tonsils from three infected herds. After-culture PCR offered the highest degree of sensitivity (93 and 83% for the omlA and Adiavet App PCRs, respectively). The PCR detection rate was higher with whole tonsils than with tonsil biopsy specimens. Good agreement (κ = 0.65) was found between the presence of A

  12. Effective detection of human adenovirus in hawaiian waters using enhanced pcr methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current criteria for recreational water quality evaluation are primarily based on measurements of fecal indicator bacteria growth. However, these criteria often fail to predict the presence of waterborne human pathogenic viruses. To explore the possibility of direct use of human enteric viruses as improved human fecal contamination indicators, human adenovirus (HAdV) was tested as a model in this study. Findings In order to establish a highly sensitive protocol for effective detection of HAdV in aquatic environments, sixteen published PCR primer sets were re-optimized and comparatively evaluated. Primer sets nehex3deg/nehex4deg, ADV-F/ADV-R, and nested PCR primer sets hex1deg/hex2deg and nehex3deg/nehex4deg were identified to be the most sensitive ones, with up to 1,000 fold higher detection sensitivity compared to other published assays. These three PCR protocols were successfully employed to detect HAdV in both treated and untreated urban wastewaters, and also in 6 of 16 recreational water samples collected around the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Conclusions Findings from this study support the possible use of enteric viruses for aquatic environmental monitoring, specifically for the essential routine monitoring of Hawaiian beach waters using the optimized PCR protocol to detect HAdV at certain water sites to ensure a safe use of recreational waters. PMID:21303549

  13. An in-house multiplex pcr method to detect of putative virulence factors in aeromonas species

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera-Arreola, Ma. Guadalupe; Martínez, Alma Aidee Carmona; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    A pentaplex PCR was developed and optimised to detect the genes that encode the five most important putative virulence factors in Aeromonas isolates. It seems to be more efficient than previously reported techniques and promises to be a powerful tool for more accurate risk assessments and for monitoring pathogenic strains. PMID:24031758

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  15. Detecting the Presence of Nora Virus in "Drosophila" Utilizing Single Fly RT-PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Bethany; Ericson, Brad; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    A single fly RT-PCR protocol has recently been developed to detect the presence of the persistent, horizontally transmitted Nora virus in "Drosophila." Wild-caught flies from Ohio were tested for the presence of the virus, with nearly one-fifth testing positive. The investigation presented can serve as an ideal project for biology…

  16. Rapid detection method for fusaric acid-producing species of Fusarium by PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusaric acid is a mycotoxin produced by species of the fungus Fusarium and can act synergistically with other Fusarium toxins. In order to develop a specific detection method for fusaric acid-producing fungus, PCR prim¬ers were designed to amplify FUB10, a transcription factor gene in fusaric acid ...

  17. DETECTION OF PHAKOPSORA PACHYRHIZI SPORES IN RAIN USING REAL-TIME PCR ASSAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2005, rain samples were collected weekly at selected National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites in the eastern and central US and screened for Phakopsora pachyrhizi (Asian soybean rust) spores. A nested real-time PCR assay was used to detect P. pachyrhizi DNA in the filter residue. A su...

  18. Single-Reaction Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR for Detection of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.; Gresh, Lionel; Mohamed-Hadley, Alisha; Ballesteros, Gabriela; Davila, Maria Jose Vargas; Tellez, Yolanda; Sahoo, Malaya K.; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of Zika virus, chikungunya virus, and dengue virus infections can be similar. To improve virus detection, streamline molecular workflow, and decrease test costs, we developed and evaluated a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR for these viruses. PMID:27184629

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  20. Minimally Invasive Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis in Cultivated Salmonids via the PCR

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Sergio; Heath, Sekou; Henríquez, Vitalia; Orrego, Cristián

    1998-01-01

    The attributes of the PCR allowed implementation of an assay for specific detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis from a few microliters of fish serum. This opens the way to less invasive modes of sampling for this microbial pathogen in salmonids. PMID:9687475

  1. Quantitative PCR for Detection and Enumeration of Genetic Markers of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of health risks associated with bovine (cattle) fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for the detection of two recently described cow feces-spec...

  2. Real-time PCR assay for rapid qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Erika; Perkátai, Katalin; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Farkas, Agnes; Kucsera, István

    2012-12-01

    Simple real-time PCR assay with one set of primer and probe for rapid, sensitive qualitative and quantitative detection of Entamoeba histolytica has been used. Consensus sequences were used to amplify a species-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer hybridization probes were used for detection in a LightCycler platform (Roche). The anchor probe sequence was designed to be a perfect match for the 16S rRNA gene of Entamoeba species, while the acceptor probe sequence was designed for Entamoeba histolytica, which allowed differentiation. The performed characteristics of the real-time PCR assay were compared with ELISA antigen and microscopical detection from 77 samples of individuals with suspected clinical diagnosis of imported E. histolytica infection. Stool and liver abscess pus samples were examined with analytical sensitivity of 5 parasites per PCR reaction. The melting curve means Tms (standard deviation) in clinical isolates were 54°C. The real-time assay was 100% sensitive and specific for differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, compared with conventional ELISA or microscopy. This real-time PCR assay with melting curve analysis is rapid, and specific for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica. The suitability for routine use of this assay in clinical diagnostic laboratories is discussed.

  3. Detection of shrimp-derived components in food by real-time fluorescent PCR.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jijuan; Yu, Bing; Ma, Lidan; Zheng, Qiuyue; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Junyi

    2011-10-01

    Crustaceans such as shrimp and crabs and their products are important allergens in food, and allergic reactions due to the consumption of shrimp and crabs are frequently reported. However, the chemical properties of shrimp-derived allergens, except for Pen a I, are still unclear. Therefore, it is important to establish a more sensitive and specific method for detecting the composition of foods containing shrimp. In the present study, we developed a real-time fluorescent PCR to identify the specific shrimp-derived components in food. The primers and TaqMan probes for real-time fluorescent PCR were designed based on 16S rRNA genes through comparing a large number of nucleic acid sequences from different species of shrimp that have been published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. In total, 56 kinds of samples, including different kinds of shrimp, crab, fish, shellfish, and octopus, were subjected to detection by real-time PCR. The results indicated that real-time fluorescent PCR could successfully identify the shrimp-derived components. In order to explore the effect of food processing on detection sensitivity, fish powder containing shrimp powder was treated by heating at 133°C for 30 min. The limit of detection of shrimp-derived components in fish powder was 0.05% (wt/wt). PMID:22004830

  4. Single Laboratory Comparison of Host-Specific PCR Assays for the Detection of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous PCR-based methods available to detect bovine fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each method targets a different gene and microorganism leading to differences in method performance, making it difficult to determine which approach is most suitable for field appl...

  5. Detection of shrimp-derived components in food by real-time fluorescent PCR.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jijuan; Yu, Bing; Ma, Lidan; Zheng, Qiuyue; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Junyi

    2011-10-01

    Crustaceans such as shrimp and crabs and their products are important allergens in food, and allergic reactions due to the consumption of shrimp and crabs are frequently reported. However, the chemical properties of shrimp-derived allergens, except for Pen a I, are still unclear. Therefore, it is important to establish a more sensitive and specific method for detecting the composition of foods containing shrimp. In the present study, we developed a real-time fluorescent PCR to identify the specific shrimp-derived components in food. The primers and TaqMan probes for real-time fluorescent PCR were designed based on 16S rRNA genes through comparing a large number of nucleic acid sequences from different species of shrimp that have been published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. In total, 56 kinds of samples, including different kinds of shrimp, crab, fish, shellfish, and octopus, were subjected to detection by real-time PCR. The results indicated that real-time fluorescent PCR could successfully identify the shrimp-derived components. In order to explore the effect of food processing on detection sensitivity, fish powder containing shrimp powder was treated by heating at 133°C for 30 min. The limit of detection of shrimp-derived components in fish powder was 0.05% (wt/wt).

  6. RT-PCR for detection of all seven genotypes of Lyssavirus genus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Morón, S; Avellón, A; Echevarría, J E

    2006-08-01

    The Lyssavirus genus includes seven species or genotypes named 1-7. Rabies genotypes correlate with geographical distribution and specific hosts. Co-circulation of different lyssaviruses, imported cases, and the presence of unknown viruses, such as Aravan, Khujand, Irkut and West Caucasian Bat Virus, make it necessary to use generic methods able to detect all lyssaviruses. Primer sequences were chosen from conserved regions in all genotypes in order to optimise a generic RT-PCR. Serial dilutions of 12 RNA extracts from all seven Lyssavirus genotypes were examined to compare the sensitivity of the RT-PCR standardised in this study with a published RT-PCR optimised for EBLV1 detection and capable of amplifying RNA from all seven lyssaviruses. All seven genotypes were detected by both RT-PCRs, however, the sensitivity was higher with the new version of the test. Twenty samples submitted for rabies diagnosis were tested by the new RT-PCR. Eight out of 20 samples from six dogs, one horse and one bat were found positive, in agreement with immunofluorescence results. Seven samples from terrestrial mammals were genotype 1 and one from a bat was genotype 5. In conclusion, this method can be used to complement immunofluorescence for the diagnosis of rabies, enabling the detection of unexpected lyssaviruses during rabies surveillance.

  7. Detection of allergen walnut component in food by an improved real-time PCR method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Yuan, Fei; Wu, Yajun; Yang, Hairong; Xu, Baoliang; Liu, Zhongxue; Chen, Ying

    2009-11-01

    A real-time PCR method aimed at the gene sequence of the walnut vicilin-like seed storage protein was established for the detection of the allergen walnut in food. The primers and probe were designed based on published methods. The method provided positive results for walnut and negative results for other tested agricultural plant materials including pecan. The intrinsic detection limit of the method was 0.00125 ng of walnut DNA, and the practical detection limit was 0.001% (wt/wt) walnut content in wheat; both of these values are lower than that of previously published methods. Therefore, this real-time PCR method is sufficiently specific and sensitive for the detection of walnut component in food.

  8. Detection of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen by Real-time PCR method with internal amplification control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ju; Cai, Qin; Guan, Xiao; Chen, Qin

    2015-05-01

    Specific primer sets were designed based on the DNA sequence of Ara h 1, one of the major peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergens, and a competitive internal amplification control (IAC) was designed by compound primer technology. By choosing 314 copies/PCR as the IAC dosage, a Real-time PCR method with IAC was established for detecting peanut allergen Ara h 1 DNA. The method showed high specificity with a detection limit of 0.005% peanut. A series of commercial food products with/without peanut components were tested. Among these products, the peanut allergen Ara h 1 DNA could be detected in 12 products labelled containing peanut ingredients, in two without a declaration of peanut and one labelled that was produced in a facility that produced peanut-containing foods. This indicates that the method is highly sensitive for the detection of peanut ingredients in foods.

  9. PCR-specific detection of recently described Lotmaria passim (Trypanosomatidae) in Chilean apiaries.

    PubMed

    Arismendi, Nolberto; Bruna, Alex; Zapata, Nelson; Vargas, Marisol

    2016-02-01

    The recently described trypanosome Lotmaria passim is currently considered the most predominant trypanosomatid in honey bees worldwide and could be a factor in honey bee declines. For a specific and quick detection of this pathogen, we developed primers based on the SSU rRNA and gGAPDH genes for the detection of L. passim in Chilean honey beehives. PCR products amplified and sequenced for these primers shared 99-100% identity with other sequences of L. passim. The designed primers were specific and we were able to detect a high prevalence (40-90%) of L. passim in bee hives distributed throughout Chile. Our described PCR-based method offers a feasible and specific detection of L. passim in any honey bee samples. PMID:26721451

  10. ASSESSMENT OF DETECTION EFFICACY OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES BY REAL TIME PCR BASED METHOD.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, S K; Dixit, S M; Shrestha, S; Dangol, S D; Pokhrel, D; Banjara, S; Shrestha, K S; Hengoju, S; Dahal, B K

    2013-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in Nepal and ranks as one of the most prevalent communicable diseases throughout the country. In Nepal, 45% of total population is infected with TB and 40,000 people get TB every year. Twenty thousand new sputum positive cases are seen every year and 5000-7000 people die each year from TB. Thirty sputum samples were collected from Sukraraj Tropical and Infectious Disease Hospital, Teku, Kathmandu, Nepal and the comparative study of Acid-fast Bacilli (AFB) test and Real time PCR were conducted separately with the culture test which is regarded as gold standard by WHO. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through use of Real time PCR was found to be higher as compared to AFB and culture. Real-time PCR test showed higher sensitivity (100%) and specificity (94.11%) as compared to AFB test with sensitivity of 84.61% and specificity of 88.24%. Positive predictive value was found to be 84.61% and 92.86% for AFB and Q-PCR respectively. Negative predictive value was found to be 88.24%, and for Q-PCR, it was found to be 100%. Our statistics clearly show that TB diagnosis by Q-PCR is highly efficient and reliableover conventional methods of diagnosis and here we recommend its use in the hospitals and clinics of Nepal.

  11. Comparison of culture and qPCR methods in detection of mycobacteria from drinking waters.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Noora H J; Rintala, Helena; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Torvinen, Eila

    2013-04-01

    Environmental mycobacteria are common bacteria in man-made water systems and may cause infections and hypersensitivity pneumonitis via exposure to water. We compared a generally used cultivation method and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to detect mycobacteria in 3 types of drinking waters: surface water, ozone-treated surface water, and groundwater. There was a correlation between the numbers of mycobacteria obtained by cultivation and qPCR methods, but the ratio of the counts obtained by the 2 methods varied among the types of water. The qPCR counts in the drinking waters produced from surface or groundwater were 5 to 34 times higher than culturable counts. In ozone-treated surface waters, both methods gave similar counts. The ozone-treated drinking waters had the highest concentration of assimilable organic carbon, which may explain the good culturability. In warm tap waters, qPCR gave 43 times higher counts than cultivation, but both qPCR counts and culturable counts were lower than those in the drinking waters collected from the same sites. The TaqMan qPCR method is a rapid and sensitive tool for total quantitation of mycobacteria in different types of clean waters. The raw water source and treatments affect both culturability and total numbers of mycobacteria in drinking waters.

  12. A Real-Time PCR for Detection and Quantification of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Falong; DAO, Xiaofang; RODRIGUEZ-PALACIOS, Alex; FENG, Xufei; TANG, Cheng; YANG, Xiaonong; YUE, Hua

    2014-01-01

    A real-time PCR for detection and quantification of M. ovipneumoniae was developed using 9 recently sequenced M. ovipneumoniae genomes and primers targeting a putative adhesin gene p113. The assay proved to be specific and sensitive (with a detection limit of 22 genomic DNA) and could quantify M. ovipneumoniae DNA over a wide linear range, from 2.2 × 102 to 2.2 × 107 genomes. PMID:25649947

  13. A real-time PCR for detection and quantification of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Falong; Dao, Xiaofang; Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Feng, Xufei; Tang, Cheng; Yang, Xiaonong; Yue, Hua

    2014-12-01

    A real-time PCR for detection and quantification of M. ovipneumoniae was developed using 9 recently sequenced M. ovipneumoniae genomes and primers targeting a putative adhesin gene p113. The assay proved to be specific and sensitive (with a detection limit of 22 genomic DNA) and could quantify M. ovipneumoniae DNA over a wide linear range, from 2.2 × 10(2) to 2.2 × 10(7) genomes.

  14. Development of PCR assays for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Bandea, Claudiu I; Joseph, Kahaliah; Secor, Evan W; Jones, Laurie A; Igietseme, Joseph U; Sautter, Robert L; Hammerschlag, Margaret R; Fajman, Nancy N; Girardet, Rebecca G; Black, Carolyn M

    2013-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infections are usually asymptomatic or can result in nonspecific clinical symptoms, which makes laboratory-based detection of this protozoan parasite essential for diagnosis and treatment. We report the development of a battery of highly sensitive and specific PCR assays for detection of T. vaginalis in urine, a noninvasive specimen, and development of a protocol for differentiating among Trichomonas species that commonly infect humans.

  15. Two-step, PCR-free telomerase detection by using exonuclease III-aided target recycling.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaolei; Xia, Fan; Patterson, Adriana; Soh, H Tom; Xiao, Yi; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2011-12-16

    We report the sensitive detection of telomerase activity by using exonuclease III-aided target recycling to amplify the signal produced by a chimeric LNA-DNA molecular beacon. We demonstrate the specific detection of as few as 30 telomerase-positive breast cancer cells in a single-measurement fluorescence assay that avoids the problematic PCR and gel analysis of the current "gold-standard" assay.

  16. Continuous flow real-time PCR device using multi-channel fluorescence excitation and detection.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Ray, Tathagata; Lintecum, Kelly; Youngbull, Cody

    2014-02-01

    High throughput automation is greatly enhanced using techniques that employ conveyor belt strategies with un-interrupted streams of flow. We have developed a 'conveyor belt' analog for high throughput real-time quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) using droplet emulsion technology. We developed a low power, portable device that employs LED and fiber optic fluorescence excitation in conjunction with a continuous flow thermal cycler to achieve multi-channel fluorescence detection for real-time fluorescence measurements. Continuously streaming fluid plugs or droplets pass through tubing wrapped around a two-temperature zone thermal block with each wrap of tubing fluorescently coupled to a 64-channel multi-anode PMT. This work demonstrates real-time qPCR of 0.1-10 μL droplets or fluid plugs over a range of 7 orders of magnitude concentration from 1 × 10(1) to 1 × 10(7). The real-time qPCR analysis allows dynamic range quantification as high as 1 × 10(7) copies per 10 μL reaction, with PCR efficiencies within the range of 90-110% based on serial dilution assays and a limit of detection of 10 copies per rxn. The combined functionality of continuous flow, low power thermal cycling, high throughput sample processing, and real-time qPCR improves the rates at which biological or environmental samples can be continuously sampled and analyzed. PMID:24297040

  17. Molecular identification of Salmonella Infantis isolated from backyard chickens and detection of their resistance genesby PCR.

    PubMed

    Ghoddusi, A; Nayeri Fasaei, B; Karimi, V; Ashrafi Tamai, I; Moulana, Z; Zahraei Salehi, T

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at molecular identification of Salmonella Infantis isolated from backyard chickens and the detection of their antibiotic resistance genes. A total of 46 Salmonella-suspected samples isolated from backyard chickens of northern Iran were collected. Serotyping was done by the traditional method and then confirmed by PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates against 13 antimicrobial agents was determined by the standard disk diffusion method. There were 44 samples identified as Salmonella. Serotyping results showed that all 44 isolates belonged to serogroup C1 and serovar Infantis. The most resistance observed was to tetracycline and doxycycline (100%), chloramphenicol (79%) and florfenicol (72%). The floR, catI, tetA and tetG genes were used for the detection of florfenicol chloramphenicol and tetracycline resistance. In order to identify the phenotypic resistance in strains which showed resistance genes by PCR, colony PCR and culture on plates each containing antibiotic was performed simultaneously. All the Salmonella Infantis resistant to florfenicol and chloramphenicol harbored floR and catI. None of the Salmonella resistant to tetracycline carried tetA or tetG. The result of colony PCR and culture in antibiotic medium confirmed the results of PCR and indicated phenotypic resistance in these samples. PMID:27175192

  18. Diagnostic Real-Time PCR for Detection of Salmonella in Food

    PubMed Central

    Malorny, Burkhard; Paccassoni, Elisa; Fach, Patrick; Bunge, Cornelia; Martin, Annett; Helmuth, Reiner

    2004-01-01

    A robust 5′ nuclease (TaqMan) real-time PCR was developed and validated in-house for the specific detection of Salmonella in food. The assay used specifically designed primers and a probe target within the ttrRSBCA locus, which is located near the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 at centisome 30.5. It is required for tetrathionate respiration in Salmonella. The assay correctly identified all 110 Salmonella strains and 87 non-Salmonella strains tested. An internal amplification control, which is coamplified with the same primers as the Salmonella DNA, was also included in the assay. The detection probabilities were 70% when a Salmonella cell suspension containing 103 CFU/ml was used as a template in the PCR (5 CFU per reaction) and 100% when a suspension of 104 CFU/ml was used. A pre-PCR sample preparation protocol including a preenrichment step in buffered peptone water followed by DNA extraction-purification was applied when 110 various food samples (chicken rinses, minced meat, fish, and raw milk) were investigated for Salmonella. The diagnostic accuracy was shown to be 100% compared to the traditional culture method. The overall analysis time of the PCR method was approximately 24 h, in contrast to 4 to 5 days of analysis time for the traditional culture method. This methodology can contribute to meeting the increasing demand of quality assurance laboratories for standard diagnostic methods. Studies are planned to assess the interlaboratory performance of this diagnostic PCR method. PMID:15574899

  19. Real-time PCR for rapidly detecting aniline-degrading bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Takakazu; Suzuki, Hisako; Maeda, Toshinari; Ogawa, Hiroaki I

    2013-05-01

    We developed a detection method that uses quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and the TaqMan system to easily and rapidly assess the population of aniline-degrading bacteria in activated sludge prior to conducting a biodegradability test on a chemical compound. A primer and probe set for qPCR was designed by a multiple alignment of conserved amino acid sequences encoding the large (α) subunit of aniline dioxygenase. PCR amplification tests showed that the designed primer and probe set targeted aniline-degrading strains such as Acidovorax sp., Gordonia sp., Rhodococcus sp., and Pseudomonas putida, thereby suggesting that the developed method can detect a wide variety of aniline-degrading bacteria. There was a strong correlation between the relative copy number of the α-aniline dioxygenase gene in activated sludge obtained with the developed qPCR method and the number of aniline-degrading bacteria measured by the Most Probable Number method, which is the conventional method, and a good correlation with the lag time of the BOD curve for aniline degradation produced by the biodegradability test in activated sludge samples collected from eight different wastewater treatment plants in Japan. The developed method will be valuable for the rapid and accurate evaluation of the activity of inocula prior to conducting a ready biodegradability test.

  20. Detection and identification of Malassezia species in domestic animals and aquatic birds by PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Zia, M.; Mirhendi, H.; Toghyani, M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at detection and species-level identification of the Malassezia yeasts in domestic animals and aquatic birds by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Samples were collected using tape strips and swabs from 471 animals including 97 horses, 102 cattle, 105 sheep, 20 camels, 60 dogs, 30 cats, 1 hamster, 1 squirrel, 50 aquatic birds and 5 turkeys. Tape-strip samples were examined by direct microscopy. All samples were inoculated on modified Leeming and Notman agar medium. DNA extracted from the yeast colonies was amplified by PCR using primers specific for 26S rDNA. RFLP of the PCR products was performed using Hin6I enzyme, and PCR and RFLP products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Malassezia yeasts were detected at the following frequencies: 15.46% in horses, 12.74% in cattle, 12.38% in sheep, 28.33% in dogs, 26.66% in cats and 26% in aquatic birds. Eighty colonies of 6 species were isolated: Malassezia globosa 41.25%, Malassezia furfur 22.5%, Malassezia restricta 15%, Malassezia sympodialis 15%, Malassezia pachydermatis 5% and Malassezia slooffiae 1.25%. Therefore different lipophilic Malassezia species are found in a wide diversity of animals and aquatic birds. PCR-RFLP is a suitable technique for identification of different Malassezia species. PMID:27175148

  1. A multiplex PCR method of detecting recombinant DNAs from five lines of genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, T; Kuribara, H; Akiyama, H; Miura, H; Goda, Y; Kusakabe, Y; Isshiki, K; Toyoda, M; Hino, A

    2001-02-01

    Seven lines of genetically modified (GM) maize have been authorized in Japan as foods and feeds imported from the USA. We improved a multiplex PCR method described in the previous report in order to distinguish the five lines of GM maize. Genomic DNA was extracted from GM maize with a silica spin column kit, which could reduce experimental time and improve safety in the laboratory and potentially in the environment. We sequenced recombinant DNA (r-DNA) introduced into GM maize, and re-designed new primer pairs to increase the specificity of PCR to distinguish five lines of GM maize by multiplex PCR. A primer pair for the maize intrinsic zein gene (Ze1) was also designed to confirm the presence of amplifiable maize DNA. The lengths of PCR products using these six primer pairs were different. The Ze1 and the r-DNAs from the five lines of GM maize were qualitatively detected in one tube. The specific PCR bands were distinguishable from each other on the basis of the expected length. The r-DNA could be detected from maize samples containing 0.5% of each of the five lines of GM maize. The sensitivity would be acceptable to secure the verification of non-GMO materials and to monitor the reliability of the labeling system.

  2. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Mar; Luque, M Isabel; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-08-01

    Aflatoxins are among the most toxic mycotoxins. Early detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing species is crucial to improve food safety. In the present work, two protocols of real-time PCR (qPCR) based on SYBR Green and TaqMan were developed, and their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Primers and probes were designed from the o-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Fifty-three mold strains representing aflatoxin producers and non-producers of different species, usually reported in food products, were used as references. All strains were tested for aflatoxins production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the proposed qPCR method was demonstrated by the strong linear relationship of the standard curves constructed with the omt-1 gene copy number and Ct values for the different aflatoxin producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocols to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 4 to 1 log cfu/g per reaction for all qPCR assays in the different food matrices (peanuts, spices and dry-fermented sausages). The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g for SYBR Green and TaqMan assays. No significant effect was observed due to the different equipment, operator, and qPCR methodology used in the tests of repeatability and reproducibility for different foods. The proposed methods quantified with high efficiency the fungal load in foods. These qPCR protocols are proposed for use to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds in food products. PMID:22475946

  3. Viability-qPCR for detecting Legionella: Comparison of two assays based on different amplicon lengths.

    PubMed

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2015-08-01

    Two different real-time quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) assays were applied for quantification of Legionella spp. by targeting a long amplicon (approx 400 bp) of 16S rRNA gene and a short amplicon (approx. 100 bp) of 5S rRNA gene. Purified DNA extracts from pure cultures of Legionella spp. and from environmental water samples were quantified. Application of the two assays to quantify Legionella in artificially contaminated water achieved that both assays were able to detect Legionella over a linear range of 10 to 10(5) cells ml(-1). A statistical analysis of the standard curves showed that both assays were linear with a good correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.99) between the Ct and the copy number. Amplification with the reference assay was the most effective for detecting low copy numbers (1 bacterium per PCR mixture). Using selective quantification of viable Legionella by the PMA-qPCR method we obtained a greater inhibition of the amplification of the 400-bp 16S gene fragment (Δlog(10) = 3.74 ± 0.39 log(10) GU ml(-1)). A complete inhibition of the PCR signal was obtained when heat-killed cells in a concentration below 1 × 10(5) cells ml(-1) were pretreated with PMA. Analysing short amplicon sizes led to only 2.08 log reductions in the Legionella dead-cell signal. When we tested environmental water samples, the two qPCR assays were in good agreement according to the kappa index (0.741). Applying qPCR combined with PMA treatment, we also obtained a good agreement (kappa index 0.615). The comparison of quantitative results shows that both assays yielded the same quantification sensitivity (mean log = 4.59 vs mean log = 4.31).

  4. Detection of MET Gene Copy Number in Cancer Samples Using the Droplet Digital PCR Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanni; Tang, En-Tzu; Du, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analysis of MET gene copy number (CN) has been considered to be a potential biomarker to predict the response to MET-targeted therapies in various cancers. However, the current standard methods to determine MET CN are SNP 6.0 in the genomic DNA of cancer cell lines and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in tumor models, respectively, which are costly and require advanced technical skills and result in relatively subjective judgments. Therefore, we employed a novel method, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), to determine the MET gene copy number with high accuracy and precision. Methods The genomic DNA of cancer cell lines or tumor models were tested and compared with the MET gene CN and MET/CEN-7 ratio determined by SNP 6.0 and FISH, respectively. Results In cell lines, the linear association of the MET CN detected by ddPCR and SNP 6.0 is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.867). In tumor models, the MET CN detected by ddPCR was significantly different between the MET gene amplification and non-amplification groups according to FISH (mean: 15.4 vs 2.1; P = 0.044). Given that MET gene amplification is defined as MET CN >5.5 by ddPCR, the concordance rate between ddPCR and FISH was 98.0%, and Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.760 (95% CI, 0.498–1.000; P <0.001). Conclusions The results demonstrated that the ddPCR method has the potential to quantify the MET gene copy number with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from SNP 6.0 and FISH in cancer cell lines and tumor samples, respectively. PMID:26765781

  5. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Mar; Luque, M Isabel; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-08-01

    Aflatoxins are among the most toxic mycotoxins. Early detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing species is crucial to improve food safety. In the present work, two protocols of real-time PCR (qPCR) based on SYBR Green and TaqMan were developed, and their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Primers and probes were designed from the o-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Fifty-three mold strains representing aflatoxin producers and non-producers of different species, usually reported in food products, were used as references. All strains were tested for aflatoxins production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the proposed qPCR method was demonstrated by the strong linear relationship of the standard curves constructed with the omt-1 gene copy number and Ct values for the different aflatoxin producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocols to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 4 to 1 log cfu/g per reaction for all qPCR assays in the different food matrices (peanuts, spices and dry-fermented sausages). The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g for SYBR Green and TaqMan assays. No significant effect was observed due to the different equipment, operator, and qPCR methodology used in the tests of repeatability and reproducibility for different foods. The proposed methods quantified with high efficiency the fungal load in foods. These qPCR protocols are proposed for use to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds in food products.

  6. Comparison of six real-time PCR assays for qualitative detection of cytomegalovirus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, M J; Espy, M E

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we compared the performance of six real-time PCR assays for the qualitative detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in clinical samples other than plasma. Two hundred specimens (respiratory [n = 72], urine [n = 67], cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] [n = 25], tissue [n = 18], amniotic fluid [n = 10], and bone marrow [n = 8]) submitted for routine testing by CMV real-time PCR analyte-specific reagents (ASR) (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) were also tested by a laboratory-developed test (LDT) and 4 commercially available PCR assays: EraGen Multicode (Luminex, Austin, TX), Focus Simplexa (Focus Diagnostics, Cypress, CA), Elitech MGB Alert CMV (Fisher Scientific, Hanover Park, IL), and Abbott CMV (Abbott Park, IL). Nucleic acid was extracted using the MagNA Pure system (Roche Diagnostics) and subsequently tested by each PCR method. Results were analyzed by comparing each assay to a "consensus result," which was defined as the result obtained from at least 4 of the 6 assays. In addition to the prospective samples, 13 lower respiratory samples with known positive results by CMV shell vial were tested by each PCR method. Following testing of the 200 prospective specimens, the Abbott, Elitech, EraGen, and Focus PCR assays demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% (46/46), while the Roche analyte-specific reagents (ASR) and LDT showed sensitivities of 89% (41/46) and 98% (45/46), respectively. Percent specificities ranged from 97% (149/154) by Elitech to 100% (154/154) by the LDT. Among the 13 shell vial-positive lower respiratory samples, the percent sensitivities ranged from 69% (9/13) by Elitech to 92% (12/13) by the LDT. The Abbott, EraGen, Elitech, Focus, and LDT PCR assays performed similarly (κ ≥ 0.89) for the detection of CMV in clinical specimens and demonstrated increased sensitivity compared to the Roche ASR.

  7. Field evaluation of a PCR test for Schistosoma japonicum egg detection in low-prevalence regions of China.

    PubMed

    Fung, Mai S; Xiao, Ning; Wang, Shuo; Carlton, Elizabeth J

    2012-12-01

    Sensitive Schistosoma japonicum detection methods are needed to progress from schistosomiasis control to elimination. The sensitivity of the Kato-Katz thick smear and miracidium hatching tests decrease with infection intensity and serological tests cannot always identify current infections. We evaluated a fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect S. japonicum infection in 106 humans and 8 bovines in China. PCR was highly sensitive, detecting S. japonicum DNA at 0.5 eggs/g of stool. Comparing PCR examination of a single stool sample to the miracidium hatching test using three consecutive stool samples, more humans were hatching test positive (20%) than PCR positive (15%). However, two individuals were PCR positive in a village where no infections were detected by coprological methods. The sensitivity of PCR makes it a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnostics and screening, although egg shedding variability and stool sample size present challenges for any detection method in low-transmission areas. PMID:23109374

  8. Field Evaluation of a PCR Test for Schistosoma japonicum Egg Detection in Low-Prevalence Regions of China

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Mai S.; Xiao, Ning; Wang, Shuo; Carlton, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive Schistosoma japonicum detection methods are needed to progress from schistosomiasis control to elimination. The sensitivity of the Kato-Katz thick smear and miracidium hatching tests decrease with infection intensity and serological tests cannot always identify current infections. We evaluated a fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect S. japonicum infection in 106 humans and 8 bovines in China. PCR was highly sensitive, detecting S. japonicum DNA at 0.5 eggs/g of stool. Comparing PCR examination of a single stool sample to the miracidium hatching test using three consecutive stool samples, more humans were hatching test positive (20%) than PCR positive (15%). However, two individuals were PCR positive in a village where no infections were detected by coprological methods. The sensitivity of PCR makes it a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnostics and screening, although egg shedding variability and stool sample size present challenges for any detection method in low-transmission areas. PMID:23109374

  9. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-01-01

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%. PMID:22843069

  10. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-08-16

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%.

  11. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. Results A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. Conclusions The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification. PMID:23409683

  12. Development of a real-time SYBR Green PCR assay for the rapid detection of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    PubMed

    García, Alfredo; Martínez, Remigio; Benitez-Medina, José Manuel; Risco, David; Garcia, Waldo Luis; Rey, Joaquín; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Methods such as real time (RT)-PCR have not been developed for the rapid detection and diagnosis of Dermatophilus (D.) congolensis infection. In the present study, a D. congolensis-specific SYBR Green RT-PCR assay was evaluated. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was 1 pg of DNA per PCR reaction. No cross-reaction with nucleic acids extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus, or Austwickia chelonae was observed. Finally, the RT-PCR assay was used to evaluate clinical samples collected from naturally infected animals with D. congolensis. The results showed that this assay is a fast and reliable method for diagnosing dermatophilosis.

  13. [Detection and Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae Carried in Healthy Adults with a Modified PCR Method].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yuka; Okamoto, Akira; Ohta, Michio

    2015-05-01

    Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae colonized in the pharynx of healthy carriers currently relies on conventional culture methods of direct plating with pharyngeal swab specimens. The accurate measurement of the carriage of pneumococci, however, has not been necessarily achieved with these methods due to low density colonization and contamination of numerous oral streptococci that express α-hemolysis. A PCR-based detection method of pneumococci-specific for lytA as well as PCR serotyping of S. pneumoniae was recently developed and their effectiveness was confirmed. We modified the reaction conditions of these methods to improve the detection rate and applied them to the measurement of S. pneumoniae carried in healthy adults. Pharyngeal swab specimens obtained from 110 healthy volunteers over 40 and living in Nagoya were enriched for 5 hours with broth medium supplemented with rabbit serum and the template DNA for PCR was extracted from the mixed enriched culture. Of 110 specimens 36 (32.7%) were lytA-positive, the rate of which was much higher than the results of previous culture-based studies. The DNA template preparations were then used for PCR-based serotyping with primers specific for each of the types included in pneumococcal 23 valent vaccine (PPV23). We found that 28 out of 36 lytA-positive carriers were identified as being positive for the serotypes belonging to PPV23, although serotypes 6A and 6B were indistinguishable with the PCR method. The most frequent serotype was serotype 14, and serotypes 4, 18C, and 6A/B were also frequently identified. Five lytA-positive carriers were previously vaccinated with PPV23, and among them, 4 were positive for serotypes contained in PPV23. We recommend PCR-based identification and serotyping of S. pneumoniae in broth enrichment culture of pharyngeal swab specimens as a reliable method for the surveillance of healthy carriers with low density colonization. PMID:26552129

  14. Semiquantitative Multiplexed Tandem PCR for Detection and Differentiation of Four Theileria orientalis Genotypes in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Piyumali K.; Gasser, Robin B.; Firestone, Simon M.; Smith, Lee; Roeber, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Oriental theileriosis is an emerging, tick-borne disease of bovines in the Asia-Pacific region and is caused by one or more genotypes of the Theileria orientalis complex. This study aimed to establish and validate a multiplexed tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay using three distinct markers (major piroplasm surface protein, 23-kDa piroplasm membrane protein, and the first internal transcribed spacer of nuclear DNA), for the simultaneous detection and semiquantification of four genotypes (Buffeli, Chitose, Ikeda, and type 5) of the T. orientalis complex. Analytical specificity, analytical sensitivity, and repeatability of the established MT-PCR assay were assessed in a series of experiments. Subsequently, the assay was evaluated using 200 genomic DNA samples collected from cattle from farms on which oriental theileriosis outbreaks had occurred, and 110 samples from a region where no outbreaks had been reported. The results showed the MT-PCR assay specifically and reproducibly detected the expected genotypes (i.e., genotypes Buffeli, Chitose, Ikeda, and type 5) of the T. orientalis complex, reliably differentiated them, and was able to detect as little as 1 fg of genomic DNA from each genotype. The diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of the MT-PCR were estimated at 94.0% and 98.8%, respectively. The MT-PCR assay established here is a practical and effective diagnostic tool for the four main genotypes of T. orientalis complex in Australia and should assist studies of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of oriental theileriosis in the Asia-Pacific region. PMID:25339402

  15. Ultra-rapid real-time PCR for the detection of Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB).

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Do-Bu; Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Eul-Hwan; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2008-09-01

    A novel micro-PCR-based detection method, termed ultra-rapid real-time PCR, was applied to the development of a rapid detection for Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) which is the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB). This method was designed to detect the 16S rRNA gene of P. larvae with a micro-scale chip-based real-time PCR system, GenSpector TMC-1000, which has uncommonly fast heating and cooling rates (10 degrees C per second) and small reaction volume (6microl). In the application of ultra-rapid real-time PCR detection to an AFB-infected larva, the minimum detection time was 7 min and 54s total reaction time (30 cycles), including the melting temperature analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this novel detection method is one of the most rapid real-time PCR-based detection tools. PMID:18571197

  16. A rapid method for detecting specific amplified PCR fragments in microtiter plates.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, A; Ritter, E

    1996-01-01

    A simple method is presented to circumvent laborious and time consuming electrophoretic separations of specific PCR amplification products. Specific target DNA is amplified using nucleotides labelled with DIG-dUTP or biotin-dCTP. The labelled PCR products are separated from unincorporated nucleotides or oligonucleotides by using a positively charged DEAE cellulose matrix. Amplification products are visualized directly in the matrix using immunoenzymatic methods or streptavidin-conjugated enzymes. The detection process can be carried out within 2 h, allows the processing of large sample sizes and can potentially be automated. PMID:8774915

  17. Ultra sensitive detection of Listeria monocytogenes in milk by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Starbuck, M A; Hill, P J; Stewart, G S

    1992-12-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used to detect Listeria monocytogenes in whole milk at a level of 0.1 cfu per 30 ml. This high degree of sensitivity has been achieved following enzymatic digestion, polysulphonone membrane filtration and amplification of a nucleotide sequence within the promoter region of hlyA. Key elements of the procedure are the absence of enrichment culture and a complete solubilization of the membrane filter, ensuring total nucleic acid recovery. The simplicity of the protocol coupled with high sample volumes and exquisite sensitivity extends the relevance of PCR within food and environmental microbiology. PMID:1368996

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Real-Time PCR for Pan-Dermatophyte Detection in Nail Specimens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jie; Ran, Menglong; Wang, Xiaowen; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu

    2016-02-01

    An accurate diagnosis of tinea unguium is necessary for the selection of antimycotics and successful treatment. To rapidly and accurately identify the aetiological agents causing tinea unguium, we improved upon the conventional boiling method for DNA extraction and developed a novel real-time PCR detection system that includes two assays. The two assays, based on the amplification of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions and 28S rDNA, were designed to detect pan-dermatophyte and Trichophyton rubrum, respectively. The analytical sensitivities of both assays permitted the detection of ten copies of plasmid DNA template. The analytical specificity of the detection system was confirmed using 11 dermatophyte strains and 25 non-dermatophyte strains. In total, 165 nail specimens were examined by microscopy, culture, conventional PCR, and the novel real-time PCR method. Real-time PCR gave positive results in 47.3 % of the specimens (78), a rate exceeding those obtained using microscopy (72, 43.6 %), conventional PCR (69, 41.8 %), and culture (49, 29.7 %). All conventional PCR-positive specimens were detected by real-time PCR, and real-time PCR detected nine specimens that were missed by conventional PCR. The results from latent class analysis, and further calculations, showed that real-time PCR was the most sensitive method, but the diagnostic specificity of the four approaches was equivalent. In particular, molecular approaches may be more effective than microscopy and culture when the clinical symptoms of tinea unguium are not evident.

  19. [Study of real-time PCR assays for rapid detection of food-borne pathogens].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Tsunomori, Yoshie

    2005-09-01

    A duplex real-time SYBR Green LightCycler PCR (LC-PCR) assay with DNA extraction using QIAamp DNA Stool Minikit was evaluated for detection of 8 of 19 species of food-borne pathogens, including Plesiomonas shigelloides, Providencia alcalifaciens, in five stool specimens. The time frame was within 2h or less. The protocol used the same LC-PCR with 22 pairs of specific primers. The rapid amplification and reliable detection of specific genes were determined by this LC-PCR assay from 10 cases of food-borne outbreaks in Shimane Prefecture from 2002 to 2005. These cases included Campylobacter jejuni (4), Clostridium perfringens (2), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and astA positive E. coli (1), and astA positive E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli 026, and Bacillus cereus (1 each). Rapid amplification and reliable detection of specific genes of food-or water-borne pathogenic bacteria in fecal samples should facilitate the diagnosis and management of food-borne outbreaks.

  20. Detection by real time PCR of walnut allergen coding sequences in processed foods.

    PubMed

    Linacero, Rosario; Ballesteros, Isabel; Sanchiz, Africa; Prieto, Nuria; Iniesto, Elisa; Martinez, Yolanda; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Rovira, Mercè; Burbano, Carmen; Cuadrado, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) method, employing novel primer sets designed on Jug r 1, Jug r 3, and Jug r 4 allergen-coding sequences, was set up and validated. Its specificity, sensitivity, and applicability were evaluated. The DNA extraction method based on CTAB-phenol-chloroform was best for walnut. RT-PCR allowed a specific and accurate amplification of allergen sequence, and the limit of detection was 2.5pg of walnut DNA. The method sensitivity and robustness were confirmed with spiked samples, and Jug r 3 primers detected up to 100mg/kg of raw walnut (LOD 0.01%, LOQ 0.05%). Thermal treatment combined with pressure (autoclaving) reduced yield and amplification (integrity and quality) of walnut DNA. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) did not produce any effect on the walnut DNA amplification. This RT-PCR method showed greater sensitivity and reliability in the detection of walnut traces in commercial foodstuffs compared with ELISA assays.

  1. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV. PMID:27444120

  2. Rapid duplex PCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains.

    PubMed

    Aarts, H J; Joosten, R G; Henkens, M H; Stegeman, H; van Hoek, A H

    2001-11-01

    For the detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains, a duplex PCR has been developed based on differences observed between the fingerprint profiles of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. The profiles were obtained by using a primer derived from the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) sequences. From the sequence of one pathogen-specific amplified fragment, a discriminative primer has been designed bridging the sequence of the highly conserved core region and 3' end of the ERIC element. In combination with three other primers, all located within the detected open reading frame that resembled the sequence of the bipA gene, this primer was applied in a duplex PCR assay to simultaneously detect Y. enterocolitica and to discriminate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. The same primer combinations were used in an on line rapid cycling real-time PCR assay. The used SYBR Green I format allowed for the easy translation of the PCR conditions and confirmation of the resulting amplicons. The time of analysis was reduced to approximately 60 min. PMID:11576685

  3. Development of a quantitative PCR for the detection of Rangelia vitalii.

    PubMed

    Paim, Francine Chimelo; dos Santos, Andrea Pires; do Nascimento, Naíla Cannes; Lasta, Camila Serina; Oliveira, Simone Tostes; Messick, Joanne Belle; Lopes, Sonia Terezinha dos Anjos

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a SYBR Green qPCR assay to detect and quantify a fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of Rangelia vitalii in canine blood. Repeatability of the qPCR was determined by the intra- and inter-assay variations. The qPCR showed efficiency of E=101.30 (r(2)=0.996), detecting as few as one copy of plasmid containing the target DNA. Specificity of the assay was performed using DNA samples of Babesia canis, B. gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis, E. ewingii and Leishmania sp. No cross-reactivity was observed. Field samples consisting of blood from 265 dogs from Porto Alegre, Brazil were also tested. A total of 24 (9.05%) samples were positive for R. vitalii. Amplicons of 50% of positive samples were confirmed to be R. vitalii by Sanger sequencing. The positive samples had an average of 3.5×10(5) organisms/mL of blood (range: 1.27×10(3)-1.88×10(6)) based on the plasmid-generated standard curve. In conclusion, the SYBR Green qPCR assay developed herein is sensitive and specific and can be used as a diagnostic tool for detection and quantification of R. vitalii in canine blood samples. PMID:26827871

  4. Real-time PCR with internal amplification control for detecting tuberculosis: method design and validation.

    PubMed

    Flores, E; Rodríguez, J C; Garcia-Pachón, E; Soto, J L; Ruiz, M; Escribano, I; Royo, G

    2009-08-01

    Real-time PCR has been a major development in the diagnosis of tuberculosis. However, most tests do not include an internal amplification control (IAC), which therefore limits it clinical application. In this study a new, easy to perform real-time PCR test with IAC was designed and validated in clinical samples. The primers amplified a 163-bp fragment of IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the IAC was designed with a fragment of a different microorganism (Chlamydia trachomatis). The interassay and intraassay variation of this test were very low (0.45-1.65% and 0.18-1.80%, respectively). The detection accuracy was validated in 50 samples (25 urine, 25 sputum) with different concentrations of M. tuberculosis, 18 clinical isolates of non-tuberculous mycobacteria and 148 samples with clinical suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis. The specificity was 100%. The detection limit of this PCR test without IAC was approximately 15 bacteria and with IAC approximately 32 bacteria. This real-time PCR with IAC assay can improve the detection of M. tuberculosis and contribute to standardization of this diagnostic technique.

  5. European validation of Real-Time PCR method for detection of Salmonella spp. in pork meat.

    PubMed

    Delibato, Elisabetta; Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Gianfranceschi, Monica; De Cesare, Alessandra; Comin, Damiano; Gattuso, Antonietta; Hernandez, Marta; Sonnessa, Michele; Pasquali, Frédérique; Sreter-Lancz, Zuzsanna; Saiz-Abajo, María-José; Pérez-De-Juan, Javier; Butrón, Javier; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella; Horvatek Tomic, Danijela; Johannessen, Gro S; Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Olsen, John E; Chemaly, Marianne; Le Gall, Francoise; González-García, Patricia; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Lukac, Maja; Quesne, Segolénè; Zampieron, Claudia; De Santis, Paola; Lovari, Sarah; Bertasi, Barbara; Pavoni, Enrico; Proroga, Yolande T R; Capuano, Federico; Manfreda, Gerardo; De Medici, Dario

    2014-08-01

    The classical microbiological method for detection of Salmonella spp. requires more than five days for final confirmation, and consequently there is a need for an alternative methodology for detection of this pathogen particularly in those food categories with a short shelf-life. This study presents an international (at European level) ISO 16140-based validation study of a non-proprietary Real-Time PCR-based method that can generate final results the day following sample analysis. It is based on an ISO compatible enrichment coupled to an easy and inexpensive DNA extraction and a consolidated Real-Time PCR assay. Thirteen laboratories from seven European Countries participated to this trial, and pork meat was selected as food model. The limit of detection observed was down to 10 CFU per 25 g of sample, showing excellent concordance and accordance values between samples and laboratories (100%). In addition, excellent values were obtained for relative accuracy, specificity and sensitivity (100%) when the results obtained for the Real-Time PCR-based methods were compared to those of the ISO 6579:2002 standard method. The results of this international trial demonstrate that the evaluated Real-Time PCR-based method represents an excellent alternative to the ISO standard. In fact, it shows an equal and solid performance as well as it reduces dramatically the extent of the analytical process, and can be easily implemented routinely by the Competent Authorities and Food Industry laboratories. PMID:24513055

  6. Detection of Zika virus by SYBR green one-step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yue; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has rapidly spread to new areas of Americas, which were the first transmissions outside its traditional endemic areas in Africa and Asia. Due to the link with newborn defects and neurological disorder, numerous infected cases throughout the world and various mosquito vectors, the virus has been considered to be an international public health emergency. In the present study, we developed a SYBR Green based one-step real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid detection of ZIKV. Our results revealed that the real-time assay is highly specific and sensitive in detection of ZIKV in cell samples. Importantly, the replication of ZIKV at different time points in infected cells could be rapidly monitored by the real-time RT-PCR assay. Specifically, the real-time RT-PCR showed acceptable performance in measurement of infectious ZIKV RNA. This assay could detect ZIKV at a titer as low as 1PFU/mL. The real-time RT-PCR assay could be a useful tool for further virology surveillance and diagnosis of ZIKV.

  7. Detection by real time PCR of walnut allergen coding sequences in processed foods.

    PubMed

    Linacero, Rosario; Ballesteros, Isabel; Sanchiz, Africa; Prieto, Nuria; Iniesto, Elisa; Martinez, Yolanda; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Rovira, Mercè; Burbano, Carmen; Cuadrado, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) method, employing novel primer sets designed on Jug r 1, Jug r 3, and Jug r 4 allergen-coding sequences, was set up and validated. Its specificity, sensitivity, and applicability were evaluated. The DNA extraction method based on CTAB-phenol-chloroform was best for walnut. RT-PCR allowed a specific and accurate amplification of allergen sequence, and the limit of detection was 2.5pg of walnut DNA. The method sensitivity and robustness were confirmed with spiked samples, and Jug r 3 primers detected up to 100mg/kg of raw walnut (LOD 0.01%, LOQ 0.05%). Thermal treatment combined with pressure (autoclaving) reduced yield and amplification (integrity and quality) of walnut DNA. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) did not produce any effect on the walnut DNA amplification. This RT-PCR method showed greater sensitivity and reliability in the detection of walnut traces in commercial foodstuffs compared with ELISA assays. PMID:26920302

  8. Development and validation of real-time PCR for the detection of Yersinia ruckeri.

    PubMed

    Keeling, S E; Johnston, C; Wallis, R; Brosnahan, C L; Gudkovs, N; McDonald, W L

    2012-02-01

    Yersiniosis (enteric red mouth disease) is a contagious bacterial disease caused by Yersinia ruckeri, which primarily affects salmonids. A real-time PCR assay using a molecular beacon has been developed and validated to improve the detection of the causative biotypes of Y. ruckeri. The assay, which targets the glnA (glutamine synthetase) gene, proved to have 100% analytical specificity and analytical sensitivities of 5 fg and 3 × 10(3) CFU g(-1) for DNA and seeded kidney tissue, respectively. The assay was highly repeatable with low % CV for intra- and inter-run experiments, and the optimized parameters transferred easily between different real-time PCR platforms. Following analytical validation, diagnostic specificity was determined using New Zealand farmed Chinook salmon (n = 750) from 10 farms during 2007/08. The real-time PCR was run in parallel with the bacterial culture detection method, and all fish tested were found to be negative by both methods for Y. ruckeri, resulting in 100% diagnostic specificity (95% confidence interval). The molecular beacon real-time PCR system is specific, sensitive, reproducible and a rapid method for the detection of Y. ruckeri and has the potential to be used for routine diagnostic testing, health certification and active surveillance programmes.

  9. European validation of Real-Time PCR method for detection of Salmonella spp. in pork meat.

    PubMed

    Delibato, Elisabetta; Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Gianfranceschi, Monica; De Cesare, Alessandra; Comin, Damiano; Gattuso, Antonietta; Hernandez, Marta; Sonnessa, Michele; Pasquali, Frédérique; Sreter-Lancz, Zuzsanna; Saiz-Abajo, María-José; Pérez-De-Juan, Javier; Butrón, Javier; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella; Horvatek Tomic, Danijela; Johannessen, Gro S; Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Olsen, John E; Chemaly, Marianne; Le Gall, Francoise; González-García, Patricia; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Lukac, Maja; Quesne, Segolénè; Zampieron, Claudia; De Santis, Paola; Lovari, Sarah; Bertasi, Barbara; Pavoni, Enrico; Proroga, Yolande T R; Capuano, Federico; Manfreda, Gerardo; De Medici, Dario

    2014-08-01

    The classical microbiological method for detection of Salmonella spp. requires more than five days for final confirmation, and consequently there is a need for an alternative methodology for detection of this pathogen particularly in those food categories with a short shelf-life. This study presents an international (at European level) ISO 16140-based validation study of a non-proprietary Real-Time PCR-based method that can generate final results the day following sample analysis. It is based on an ISO compatible enrichment coupled to an easy and inexpensive DNA extraction and a consolidated Real-Time PCR assay. Thirteen laboratories from seven European Countries participated to this trial, and pork meat was selected as food model. The limit of detection observed was down to 10 CFU per 25 g of sample, showing excellent concordance and accordance values between samples and laboratories (100%). In addition, excellent values were obtained for relative accuracy, specificity and sensitivity (100%) when the results obtained for the Real-Time PCR-based methods were compared to those of the ISO 6579:2002 standard method. The results of this international trial demonstrate that the evaluated Real-Time PCR-based method represents an excellent alternative to the ISO standard. In fact, it shows an equal and solid performance as well as it reduces dramatically the extent of the analytical process, and can be easily implemented routinely by the Competent Authorities and Food Industry laboratories.

  10. PCR detection and microbiological isolation of Salmonella spp. from fresh beef and cantaloupes.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Robles, M A; Morales-Loredo, A; Alvarez-Ojeda, G; Osuna-García, J A; Martínez, I O; Morales-Ramos, L H; Fratamico, P

    2009-01-01

    Species belonging to the genus Salmonella are an important cause of enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and septicemia, and the pathogens are commonly transmitted through contaminated food. In this study, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 287-bp region of the invA gene was compared to a microbiological technique to determine the presence of Salmonella in retail beef and in cantaloupe rinse samples. Both methods showed the same level of sensitivity, detecting 1 CFU/25 g of meat after enrichment for 24 h at 42 degrees C. The presence of Salmonella was determined in 50 commercial top sirloin beef samples that were not artificially inoculated. Three samples were positive by the microbiological method, and these samples and an additional sample were positive by the PCR. Both methods were also used to test surface rinses of cantaloupes collected from 4 farms in Nayarit, Mexico. Salmonella was detected by the microbiological method in 9 of 20 samples (45%), whereas the pathogen was detected by the PCR in 11 samples (55%). This study demonstrates the utility of the PCR targeting the invA gene to determine the presence of Salmonella spp. in beef and cantaloupe samples.

  11. Detection of Legionella pneumophila by PCR-ELISA method in industrial cooling tower water.

    PubMed

    Soheili, Majid; Nejadmoghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Babashamsi, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Jeddi Tehrani, Mahmood

    2007-11-15

    Water supply and Cooling Tower Water (CTW) are among the most common sources of Legionella pneumophila (LP) contamination. A nonradio active method is described to detect LP in industrial CTW samples. DNA was purified and amplified by nested -PCR with amplimers specific for the 16s rRNA gene of LP. The 5' end biotinylated oligomer probe was immobilized on sterptavidin B coated microtiter plates. The nested-PCR product was labeled with digoxigenin and then hybridized with 5'-biotinylated probes. The amplification products were detected by using proxidase-labled anti dioxygenin antibody in a colorimetric reaction. The assay detected LP present in 1 L of 5 CTW samples examined. All of the samples were Legionella positive in both culture and PCR-ELISA methods. The PCR-ELISA assay appears to exhibit high specificity and is a more rapid technique in comparison with bacterial culture method. Thus could prove suitable for use in the routine examination of industrial CTW contamination. PMID:19090273

  12. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays.

  13. Detection of sesame seed DNA in foods using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2007-04-01

    The detection of potentially allergenic foods, such as sesame seeds, in food products is a major concern for the food-processing industry. A real-time PCR method was designed to determine if sesame seed DNA is present in food products. The PCR reaction amplifies a 66-bp fragment of the sesame seed 2S albumin gene, which is detected with a sesame-specific, dual-labeled TaqMan probe. This reaction will not amplify DNA derived from other seeds present in baked goods, such as pumpkin, poppy, and sunflower seeds. Additionally, this assay will not cross-react with DNA from several tree nut species, such as almond, Brazil nut, cashew, hazelnut, and walnut, as well as four varieties of peanut. This assay is sensitive enough to detect 5 pg of purified sesame seed DNA, as well as sesame seed DNA in a spiked wheat cracker sample.

  14. A PCR method of detecting American Foulbrood (Paenibacillus larvae) in winter beehive wax debris.

    PubMed

    Ryba, Stepan; Titera, Dalibor; Haklova, Marcela; Stopka, Pavel

    2009-10-20

    The objective of this work was to create a fast and sensitive method of detecting Paenibacillus larvae from beehive debris based on PCR that does not require long-lasting cultivation steps. Various methods of extracting spores from beehive debris were compared: the original method of extraction of spores into toluene, and alternative spore extraction methods into Tween 80, into water, into isopropanol and into 95% ethanol. Isolation of DNA from various spore extractions was evaluated too. Best results were provided by isolation of DNA using the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, without heat treatment. DNA of spores was detected by PCR from 0.25 g of beeswax debris, with the detected titer of 10(5) in 1g according to the cultivation tests.

  15. Detection of almond allergen coding sequences in processed foods by real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Nuria; Iniesto, Elisa; Burbano, Carmen; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Rovira, Mercè; Rodríguez, Julia; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Crespo, Jesus F; Cuadrado, Carmen; Linacero, Rosario

    2014-06-18

    The aim of this work was to develop and analytically validate a quantitative RT-PCR method, using novel primer sets designed on Pru du 1, Pru du 3, Pru du 4, and Pru du 6 allergen-coding sequences, and contrast the sensitivity and specificity of these probes. The temperature and/or pressure processing influence on the ability to detect these almond allergen targets was also analyzed. All primers allowed a specific and accurate amplification of these sequences. The specificity was assessed by amplifying DNA from almond, different Prunus species and other common plant food ingredients. The detection limit was 1 ppm in unprocessed almond kernels. The method's robustness and sensitivity were confirmed using spiked samples. Thermal treatment under pressure (autoclave) reduced yield and amplificability of almond DNA; however, high-hydrostatic pressure treatments did not produced such effects. Compared with ELISA assay outcomes, this RT-PCR showed higher sensitivity to detect almond traces in commercial foodstuffs. PMID:24857239

  16. Direct detection of salmonella cells in the air of livestock stables by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Fallschissel, Kerstin; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2009-11-01

    A SYBR Green real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for specific detection and quantification of airborne Salmonella cells in livestock housings is presented. A set of specific primers was tested and validated for specific detection and quantification of Salmonella-specific invA genes of DNA extracted from bioaerosol samples. Application of the method to poultry house bioaerosol samples showed concentrations ranging from 2.2 x 10(1) to 3 x 10(6) Salmonella targets m(-3) of air. Salmonella were also detected by a cultivation-based approach in some samples, but concentrations were two to three magnitudes lower than the concentrations detected by molecular biological results. Specificity of results was demonstrated by cloning analyses of PCR products, which were exclusively assigned to the genus Salmonella. However, by molecular methods, microorganisms are detected independently of their viability status, leading to an overestimation of concentration. Hence, the survival rate of Salmonella cells was measured on filter surfaces during filtration samplings where 82% of the cells died within 20 min of filtration. The results clearly show the specificity and practicability of the established qPCR assay for analysis and quantification of salmonellae in bioaerosols. The results demonstrate airborne Salmonella workplace concentrations in poultry production of up to 3.3% of 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole-counted total cell numbers.

  17. Quantitative PCR detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis DNA from sediments and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirshtein, J.D.; Anderson, C.W.; Wood, J.S.; Longcore, J.E.; Voytek, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) causes chytridiomycosis, a disease implicated in amphibian declines on 5 continents. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets exist with which amphibians can be tested for this disease, and advances in sampling techniques allow non-invasive testing of animals. We developed filtering and PCR based quantitative methods by modifying existing PCR assays to detect Bd DNA in water and sediments, without the need for testing amphibians; we tested the methods at 4 field sites. The SYBR based assay using Boyle primers (SYBR/Boyle assay) and the Taqman based assay using Wood primers performed similarly with samples generated in the laboratory (Bd spiked filters), but the SYBR/Boyle assay detected Bd DNA in more field samples. We detected Bd DNA in water from 3 of 4 sites tested, including one pond historically negative for chytridiomycosis. Zoospore equivalents in sampled water ranged from 19 to 454 l-1 (nominal detection limit is 10 DNA copies, or about 0.06 zoospore). We did not detect DNA of Bd from sediments collected at any sites. Our filtering and amplification methods provide a new tool to investigate critical aspects of Bd in the environment. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  18. An ECL-PCR method for quantitative detection of point mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Debin; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Chen, Qun; Liu, Jinfeng

    2005-04-01

    A new method for identification of point mutations was proposed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a sequence from genomic DNA was followed by digestion with a kind of restriction enzyme, which only cut the wild-type amplicon containing its recognition site. Reaction products were detected by electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay after adsorption of the resulting DNA duplexes to the solid phase. One strand of PCR products carries biotin to be bound on a streptavidin-coated microbead for sample selection. Another strand carries Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR) to react with tripropylamine (TPA) to emit light for ECL detection. The method was applied to detect a specific point mutation in H-ras oncogene in T24 cell line. The results show that the detection limit for H-ras amplicon is 100 fmol and the linear range is more than 3 orders of magnitude, thus, make quantitative analysis possible. The genotype can be clearly discriminated. Results of the study suggest that ECL-PCR is a feasible quantitative method for safe, sensitive and rapid detection of point mutation in human genes.

  19. The use of singleplex and nested PCR to detect Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in free-living frogs

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Selene Dall'Acqua; Burke, Julieta Catarina; de Paula, Catia Dejuste; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Many microorganisms are able to cause diseases in amphibians, and in the past few years one of the most reported has been Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. This fungus was first reported in Brazil in 2005; following this, other reports were made in specimens deposited in museum collections, captive and free-living frogs. The aim of this study was to compare singleplex and nested-PCR techniques to detect B. dendrobatidis in free-living and apparently healthy adult frogs from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. The sample collection area was a protected government park, with no general entrance permitted and no management of the animals there. Swabs were taken from the skin of 107 animals without macroscopic lesions and they were maintained in ethanol p.a. Fungal DNA was extracted and identification of B. dendrobatidis was performed using singleplex and nested-PCR techniques, employing specific primers sequences. B. dendrobatidis was detected in 61/107 (57%) and 18/107 (17%) animals, respectively by nested and singleplex-PCR. Nested-PCR was statistically more sensible than the conventional for the detection of B. dendrobatidis (Chi-square = 37.1; α = 1%) and the agreement between both techniques was considered just fair (Kappa = 0.27). The high prevalence obtained confirms that these fungi occur in free-living frogs from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest with no macroscopic lesions, characterizing the state of asymptomatic carrier. We concluded that the nested-PCR technique, due to its ease of execution and reproducibility, can be recommended as one of the alternatives in epidemiological surveys to detect B. dendrobatidis in healthy free-living frog populations. PMID:26273273

  20. Comparison of Stool Antigen Detection Kits to PCR for Diagnosis of Amebiasis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; van Hal, S.; Fotedar, R.; Butcher, A.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare two stool antigen detection kits with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infections by using fecal specimens submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, Australia. A total of 279 stool samples containing the E complex (E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii) were included in this study. The stool specimens were tested by using two commercially produced enzyme immunoassays (the Entamoeba CELISA PATH and TechLab E. histolytica II kits) to detect antigens of E. histolytica. DNA was extracted from all of the samples with a Qiagen DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), and a PCR targeting the small-subunit ribosomal DNA was performed on all of the samples. When PCR was used as a reference standard, the CELISA PATH kit showed 28% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The TechLab ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) kit did not prove to be useful in detecting E. histolytica, as it failed to identify any of the E. histolytica samples which were positive by PCR. With the TechLab kit, cross-reactivity was observed for three specimens, one of which was positive for both E. dispar and E. moshkovskii while the other two samples contained E. moshkovskii. Quantitative assessment of the PCR and ELISA results obtained showed that the ELISA kits were 1,000 to 10,000 times less sensitive, and our results show that the CELISA PATH kit and the TechLab ELISA are not useful for the detection of E. histolytica in stool samples from patients in geographical regions where this parasite is not endemic. PMID:18367563

  1. Identification and environmental detection of Rhodococcus species by 16S rDNA-targeted PCR.

    PubMed

    Bell, K S; Kuyukina, M S; Heidbrink, S; Philp, J C; Aw, D W; Ivshina, I B; Christofi, N

    1999-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus can degrade a wide range of organic pollutants and catalyse many useful biotransformations. There is a need for improved tests to identify Rhodococcus species. PCR-based methods for species identification offer advantages in terms of speed and accuracy over traditional methods and can allow direct detection of microbes in environmental samples., PCR tests, using primers targeted at species-specific sequences in the 16S rRNA gene, were successfully developed for R. globerulus, R. erythropolis, R. opacus and R. ruber. These tests gave positive results with all or most strains of target species but did not generally cross-react with other species. Cases of apparent cross-reaction were shown to be due to prior misclassification of strains of R. opacus as R. erythropolis and of strains of R. ruber as R. rhodochrous. A simple and rapid method for the extraction and purification of DNA from soil was developed and successfully applied to the PCR detection of indigenous R. erythropolis in an environmental sample. Cell lysis in the samples was achieved by lysozyme and sarkosyl treatment, aided by freeze-thaw cycles. Removal of humic compounds inhibitory to PCR was accomplished by CTAB treatment with solvent extraction and, if necessary, passage of extracts through Sepharose CL-6B in a spun-column format. Extracts prepared using a tris-EDTA buffer were much clearer than those prepared using a sodium phosphate buffer, indicating lower levels of humic compounds. A detection limit of 104 cfu g-1 of soil was achieved and the use of a secondary PCR allowed detection of 1 cfu g-1.

  2. Pentaplex PCR assay for detection of hemorrhagic bacteria from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Talib, Hassanain; Latif, Baha; Mohd-Zain, Zaini

    2014-09-01

    Diarrheal diseases cause illness and death among children younger than 10 years in developing countries. Conventional testing for the detection of hemorrhagic bacteria takes 2 to 5 days to yield complete information on the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Hence, in the present study, we developed a molecular-based diagnostic assay that identifies common hemorrhagic bacteria in stool samples. A set of specific primers were designed for the detection of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), and Campylobacter spp., suitable for use in a one-tube PCR assay. The assay in the present study simultaneously detected five genes, namely, ompC for the Salmonella genus, virA for the Shigella genus, eaeA for EHEC, 16S rRNA for the Campylobacter genus, and hemA for an internal control. Specific primer pairs were successfully designed and simultaneously amplified the targeted genes. Validation with 20 Gram-negative and 17 Gram-positive strains yielded 100% specificity. The limit of detection of the multiplex PCR assay was 1 × 10(3) CFU at the bacterial cell level and 100 pg at the genomic DNA level. Further evaluation of the multiplex PCR with 223 bacterium-spiked stool specimens revealed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that the developed multiplex PCR assay was rapid, giving results within 4 h, which is essential for the identification of hemorrhagic bacteria, and it might be useful as an additional diagnostic tool whenever time is important in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic bacteria that cause diarrhea. In addition, the presence of an internal control in the multiplex PCR assay is important for excluding false-negative cases.

  3. Development of PCR-based methods for detection of Sphaerothecum destruens in fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Holly L; Arkush, Kristen D

    2004-11-01

    Single-round and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were developed for amplification of a 434 bp fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene from Sphaerothecum destruens, previously known as the rosette agent, an intracellular parasite of salmonid fishes. Both tests have successfully amplified S. destruens-specific DNA from different isolates of S. destruens but not from related organisms. The limits of detection using the nested PCR test were 1 pg for purified S. destruens genomic DNA and 0.1 fg for plasmid DNA. We conducted 2 experimental transmission studies, consisting of injection or waterborne exposure of juvenile winter-run Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to spore stages of the parasite. In the injection study, parasite DNA was detected in 100% of kidney samples from exposed fish (n = 83) at 1 and 3 mo post-exposure using nested PCR, versus 98% using microscopic analysis of Gram-stained impression smears made from the kidney. Following waterborne exposure, fish were sampled over the course of a year. From each fish, samples of gill, liver, posterior intestine and kidney were analyzed. S. destruens-specific DNA was detected most often in gill and kidney over the course of the experiment, and 71% (64/90) of the exposed fish were identified as positive for S. destruens using the nested PCR test, versus 16% (14/90) using microscopic analysis of Gram-stained kidney smears. Natural infections in captive broodstock of adult winter-run Chinook salmon, originally diagnosed by examination of Gram-stained kidney smears, were confirmed using the nested PCR test in all fish examined (15/15). Further, the nested test amplified parasite-specific DNA from other tissues in these fish with varying frequencies. This report introduces the first DNA-based detection method for S. destruens, to be used alone as a diagnostic tool or in conjunction with histologic tests for confirmatory identification of the parasite. PMID:15609874

  4. Interlaboratory Validation for a Real-Time PCR Salmonella Detection Method Using the ABI 7500 FAST Real-Time PCR System.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Doran, Tara; Lin, Wen; Chen, Kai-Shun; Williams-Hill, Donna; Pamboukian, Ruiqing

    2015-06-01

    Sixteen FERN (Food Emergency Response Network) member laboratories collaborated in this study to verify extension of the real-time PCR Salmonella detection method originally designed for the single-tube Cepheid SmartCycler II and validated against the Salmonella method of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual to the Applied Biosystems (ABI) 7500 FAST Real-Time PCR system multiwell plate platform. Four foods were selected for this study: chili powder, soft cheese, fish, and tomatoes; these foods represent products that are commonly analyzed for the presence of Salmonella for regulatory purposes. Each food consisted of six uninoculated control samples, six samples inoculated with low Salmonella levels (target 1 to 5 CFU/25 g), and six samples inoculated with high levels (target 10 to 50 CFU/25 g). All samples were tested for Salmonella using the 24-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for detecting Salmonella, which utilizes modified buffered peptone water as the sole enrichment medium and an internal control for the qPCR. Each of these 18 samples was individually analyzed for Salmonella by the collaborating laboratories using both the ABI 7500 FAST system (alternative method) and the SmartCycler II system (reference method). Statistical analysis of the data revealed no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between these two qPCR platforms except for the chili powder samples. The differences noted with chili powder (P = 0.0455) were attributed to the enhanced sensitivity of the ABI 7500 FAST system compared with the SmartCycler II system. The detection limit of both qPCR methods was 0.02 to 0.15 CFU/g. These results provide a solid basis for extending the 24-h qPCR Salmonella method to the ABI 7500 FAST system for high-throughput detection of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26038901

  5. A real-time PCR diagnostic method for detection of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Madarová, Lucia; Trnková, Katarína; Feiková, Sona; Klement, Cyril; Obernauerová, Margita

    2010-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba that can cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). While, traditional methods for diagnosing PAM still rely on culture, more current laboratory diagnoses exist based on conventional PCR methods; however, only a few real-time PCR processes have been described as yet. Here, we describe a real-time PCR-based diagnostic method using hybridization fluorescent labelled probes, with a LightCycler instrument and accompanying software (Roche), targeting the Naegleria fowleriMp2Cl5 gene sequence. Using this method, no cross reactivity with other tested epidemiologically relevant prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was found. The reaction detection limit was 1 copy of the Mp2Cl5 DNA sequence. This assay could become useful in the rapid laboratory diagnostic assessment of the presence or absence of Naegleria fowleri.

  6. Detection of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi using a triplex qPCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Katy; Barker, Colin; Harrison, Tihana; Heather, Zoe; Steward, Karen F.; Robinson, Carl; Newton, J. Richard; Waller, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing data for Streptococcus equi subspecies equi and zooepidemicus were used to develop a novel diagnostic triplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting two genes specific to S. equi (eqbE and SEQ2190) and a unique 100 base pair control DNA sequence (SZIC) inserted into the SZO07770 pseudogene of S. zooepidemicus strain H70. This triplex strangles qPCR assay can provide results within 2 h of sample receipt, has an overall sensitivity of 93.9% and specificity of 96.6% relative to the eqbE singlex assay and detects S. equi at levels below the threshold of the culture assay, even in the presence of contaminating bacteria. PMID:22884566

  7. [Real-time PCR Detection Method for the Reston Subtype of the Ebola Virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Bao, Linlin; Gu, Songzhi; Qin, Chuan

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to develop a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for the Reston subtype of the Ebola virus. The NP gene of the Reston subtype of the Ebola virus was selected as the detection object. Sequences of different subtypes of Ebola viruses were aligned using Clustal W software. The most unique and conserved regions of the Reston subtype of the Ebola virus were recruited as candidate sequences for specific primers. Primer Express and Primer Premier 5. 0 software were used to filter the optimal pair of primers for detection. Real-time PCR was carried out using optimized parameters and positive DNA prepared by serial (tenfold) dilution of a recombinant plasmid and by plotting a standard curve. In addition, the reproducibility, accuracy, and specificity of the assay were tested. Results showed that the sensitivity of detection of the Reston subtype of the Ebola virus by real-time PCR could reached 10(2) copies/microL. The linear relationship (R2) reached 0.997, the slope of the standard curve was -0.3101, and amplification efficiency was 110.145%. A sharp and narrow melting peak appeared at 79.94 degrees C for all standards in different dilutions. In conclusion, a fast and sensitive real-time PCR detection system for the Reston subtype of the Ebola virus was developed. This system could be used as a supplementary diagnostic and monitoring approach for basic and clinical studies on the Reston subtype of the Ebola virus. The detection system does not require expensive technology or specialist operators. PMID:26470534

  8. Development of molecular approach based on PCR assay for detection of histamine producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wongsariya, Karn; Bunyapraphatsara, Nuntavan; Yasawong, Montri; Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej

    2016-01-01

    Histamine fish poisoning becomes highly concern not only in public health but also economic aspect. Histamine is produced from histidine in fish muscles by bacterial decarboxylase enzyme. Several techniques have been developed to determine the level of histamine in fish and their products but the effective method for detecting histamine producing bacteria is still required. This study was attempted to detect histamine producing bacteria by newly developed PCR condition. Histamine producing bacteria were isolated from scombroid fish and determined the ability to produce histamine of isolated bacteria by biochemical and TLC assays. PCR method was developed to target the histidine decarboxylase gene (hdc). The result showed that fifteen histamine producing bacterial isolates and three standard strains produced an amplicon at the expected size of 571 bp after amplified by PCR using Hdc_2F/2R primers. Fifteen isolates of histamine producing bacteria were classified as M. morganii, E. aerogenes, and A. baumannii. The lowest detection levels of M. morganii and E. aerogenes were 10(2) and 10(5) Cfu/mL in culture media and 10(3) and 10(6) Cfu/mL in fish homogenates, respectively. The limit of detection by this method was clearly shown to be sensitive because the primers could detect the presence of M. morganii and E. aerogenes before the histamine level reached the regulation level at 50 ppm. Therefore, this PCR method exhibited the potential efficiency for detecting the hdc gene from histamine producing bacteria and could be used to prevent the proliferation of histamine producing bacteria in fish and fish products.

  9. Molecular detection of Mikrocytos mackini in Pacific oysters using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Polinski, Mark; Lowe, Geoff; Meyer, Gary; Corbeil, Serge; Colling, Axel; Caraguel, Charles; Abbott, Cathryn L

    2015-01-01

    Mikrocytos mackini is an internationally regulated pathogen and causative agent of Denman Island disease in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. Recent phylogenetic breakthroughs have placed this parasite within a highly divergent and globally distributed eukaryotic lineage that has been designated a new taxonomic order, Mikrocytida. The discovery of this new radiation of parasites is accompanied by a heightened awareness of the many knowledge gaps that exist with respect to the general biology, epizootiology, and potential impact of mikrocytid parasites on hosts, ecosystems, and commercial fisheries. It has also highlighted current shortcomings regarding our ability to detect these organisms. In this study, we developed a species-specific, sensitive, and quantitative method for detecting M. mackini DNA from host tissues using probe-based real-time qPCR technology. A limit of sensitivity between 2 and 5 genome copy equivalents was achieved in a reaction matrix containing ≥ 40 ng/μL host gDNA without inhibition. This detection proved superior to existing methods based on conventional PCR, histology or gross pathology and is the first species-specific diagnostic test for M. mackini. Quantitative assessment of parasite DNA using this assay remained accurate to between 10 and 50 copies identifying that during infection, M. mackini DNA was significantly more prevalent in hemolymph, labial palp, and mid-body cross-sections compared to mantle or adductor muscle. DNA extracted from a mid-body cross-section also provided the highest likelihood for detection during diagnostic screening of infected oysters. Taken together, these findings provide strong analytical evidence for the adoption of qPCR as the new reference standard for detecting M. mackini and give preliminary insight into the distribution of the parasite within host tissues. Standardised operating methodologies for sample collection and qPCR testing are provided to aid in the international regulatory diagnosis of

  10. Detection and identification of transgenic elements by fluorescent-PCR-based capillary gel electrophoresis in genetically modified cotton and soybean.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sanjay; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z; Sesikeran, Boindala; Ghosh, Sudip

    2014-01-01

    A detection method for genetically modified foods is an essential regulatory requirement for many countries. The present study is aimed at developing a qualitative method for detection of genetically modified organisms by combining PCR methodology with capillary gel electrophoresis (PCR-CGE) in a sequencing platform to detect Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-cotton (MON 531) and Roundup Ready (RR) soybean (GTS 40-3-2). A sensitive duplex PCR-CGE method was developed in which target DNA sequences (35S and Nos) were separated both by size and color to detect 0.01% Cry1Ac DNA (w/w) in Bt-cotton. A multiplex PCR-CGE method was developed to simultaneously detect four targets such as Sad1, Cry1Ac, 35S, and Nos in Bt-cotton. Four novel PCR primers were designed to customize amplicon size for multiplexing for better visualization of multiple peaks. The LOD for CrylAc DNA specific PCR was 0.01% for Bt-cotton. The LOD for multiplex PCR assay was 0.05% for Bt-cotton. A singleplex PCR-CGE method was developed to detect Lec, 35S and Nos in a trace sample of RR soybean grain powder (0.1%, w/w). This study demonstrates a PCR-CGE-based method for the qualitative detection of 35S, Nos and Cry1Ac targets associated with genetically modified products.

  11. Real-Time PCR Detection of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and Phaeoacremonium aleophilum

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Rebeca; Martín, Laura; López-Enríquez, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and Phaeoacremonium aleophilum are the two main fungal causal agents of Petri disease and esca. Both diseases cause significant economic losses to viticulturalists. Since no curative control measures are known, proactive defensive measures must be taken. An important aspect of current research is the development of sensitive and time-saving protocols for the detection and identification of these pathogens. Real-time PCR based on the amplification of specific sequences is now being used for the identification and quantification of many infective agents. The present work reports real-time PCR protocols for identification of P. chlamydospora and P. aleophilum. Specificity was demonstrated against purified DNA from 60 P. chlamydospora isolates or 61 P. aleophilum isolates, and no amplification was obtained with 54 nontarget DNAs. The limits of detection (i.e., DNA detectable in 95% of reactions) were around 100 fg for P. chlamydospora and 50 fg for P. aleophilum. Detection was specific and sensitive for P. chlamydospora and P. aleophilum. Spores of P. chlamydospora and P. aleophilum were detected without the need for DNA purification. The established protocols detected these fungi in wood samples after DNA purification. P. chlamydospora was detectable without DNA purification and isolation in 67% of reactions. The detection of these pathogens in wood samples has great potential for use in pathogen-free certification schemes. PMID:22447605

  12. Real-time PCR detection of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and Phaeoacremonium aleophilum.

    PubMed

    Martín, Maria Teresa; Cobos, Rebeca; Martín, Laura; López-Enríquez, Lorena

    2012-06-01

    Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and Phaeoacremonium aleophilum are the two main fungal causal agents of Petri disease and esca. Both diseases cause significant economic losses to viticulturalists. Since no curative control measures are known, proactive defensive measures must be taken. An important aspect of current research is the development of sensitive and time-saving protocols for the detection and identification of these pathogens. Real-time PCR based on the amplification of specific sequences is now being used for the identification and quantification of many infective agents. The present work reports real-time PCR protocols for identification of P. chlamydospora and P. aleophilum. Specificity was demonstrated against purified DNA from 60 P. chlamydospora isolates or 61 P. aleophilum isolates, and no amplification was obtained with 54 nontarget DNAs. The limits of detection (i.e., DNA detectable in 95% of reactions) were around 100 fg for P. chlamydospora and 50 fg for P. aleophilum. Detection was specific and sensitive for P. chlamydospora and P. aleophilum. Spores of P. chlamydospora and P. aleophilum were detected without the need for DNA purification. The established protocols detected these fungi in wood samples after DNA purification. P. chlamydospora was detectable without DNA purification and isolation in 67% of reactions. The detection of these pathogens in wood samples has great potential for use in pathogen-free certification schemes.

  13. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in water samples from Scotland and a comparison between the 529bp real-time PCR and ITS1 nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Wells, Beth; Shaw, Hannah; Innocent, Giles; Guido, Stefano; Hotchkiss, Emily; Parigi, Maria; Opsteegh, Marieke; Green, James; Gillespie, Simon; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2015-12-15

    Waterborne transmission of Toxoplasma gondii is a potential public health risk and there are currently no agreed optimised methods for the recovery, processing and detection of T. gondii oocysts in water samples. In this study modified methods of T. gondii oocyst recovery and DNA extraction were applied to 1427 samples collected from 147 public water supplies throughout Scotland. T. gondii DNA was detected, using real time PCR (qPCR) targeting the 529bp repeat element, in 8.79% of interpretable samples (124 out of 1411 samples). The samples which were positive for T. gondii DNA originated from a third of the sampled water sources. The samples which were positive by qPCR and some of the negative samples were reanalysed using ITS1 nested PCR (nPCR) and results compared. The 529bp qPCR was the more sensitive technique and a full analysis of assay performance, by Bayesian analysis using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, was completed which demonstrated the efficacy of this method for the detection of T. gondii in water samples. PMID:26408950

  14. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in water samples from Scotland and a comparison between the 529bp real-time PCR and ITS1 nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Wells, Beth; Shaw, Hannah; Innocent, Giles; Guido, Stefano; Hotchkiss, Emily; Parigi, Maria; Opsteegh, Marieke; Green, James; Gillespie, Simon; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2015-12-15

    Waterborne transmission of Toxoplasma gondii is a potential public health risk and there are currently no agreed optimised methods for the recovery, processing and detection of T. gondii oocysts in water samples. In this study modified methods of T. gondii oocyst recovery and DNA extraction were applied to 1427 samples collected from 147 public water supplies throughout Scotland. T. gondii DNA was detected, using real time PCR (qPCR) targeting the 529bp repeat element, in 8.79% of interpretable samples (124 out of 1411 samples). The samples which were positive for T. gondii DNA originated from a third of the sampled water sources. The samples which were positive by qPCR and some of the negative samples were reanalysed using ITS1 nested PCR (nPCR) and results compared. The 529bp qPCR was the more sensitive technique and a full analysis of assay performance, by Bayesian analysis using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, was completed which demonstrated the efficacy of this method for the detection of T. gondii in water samples.

  15. Development of a PCR Assay for Detection of Yersinia ruckeri in Tissues of Inoculated and Naturally Infected Trout

    PubMed Central

    Gibello, A.; Blanco, M. M.; Moreno, M. A.; Cutuli, M. T.; Domenech, A.; Domínguez, L.; Fernández-Garayzábal, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    A PCR-based method was developed for the specific detection of Yersinia ruckeri in tissues of inoculated trout and naturally infected trout. No amplification products were obtained with other yersiniae, bacterial fish pathogens, or phylogenetically related bacteria (n = 34). The sensitivity of PCR detection was 60 to 65 bacterial cells per PCR tube, which was decreased to 10 to 20 cells by hybridization with a nonradioactive probe. The PCR assay proved to be as reliable as and faster than the conventional culture method for the detection of Y. ruckeri in infected trout tissues. PMID:9872807

  16. Accuracy, precision, and method detection limits of quantitative PCR for airborne bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Hospodsky, Denina; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Peccia, Jordan

    2010-11-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for rapid and specific enumeration of microbial agents is finding increased use in aerosol science. The goal of this study was to determine qPCR accuracy, precision, and method detection limits (MDLs) within the context of indoor and ambient aerosol samples. Escherichia coli and Bacillus atrophaeus vegetative bacterial cells and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores loaded onto aerosol filters were considered. Efficiencies associated with recovery of DNA from aerosol filters were low, and excluding these efficiencies in quantitative analysis led to underestimating the true aerosol concentration by 10 to 24 times. Precision near detection limits ranged from a 28% to 79% coefficient of variation (COV) for the three test organisms, and the majority of this variation was due to instrument repeatability. Depending on the organism and sampling filter material, precision results suggest that qPCR is useful for determining dissimilarity between two samples only if the true differences are greater than 1.3 to 3.2 times (95% confidence level at n = 7 replicates). For MDLs, qPCR was able to produce a positive response with 99% confidence from the DNA of five B. atrophaeus cells and less than one A. fumigatus spore. Overall MDL values that included sample processing efficiencies ranged from 2,000 to 3,000 B. atrophaeus cells per filter and 10 to 25 A. fumigatus spores per filter. Applying the concepts of accuracy, precision, and MDL to qPCR aerosol measurements demonstrates that sample processing efficiencies must be accounted for in order to accurately estimate bioaerosol exposure, provides guidance on the necessary statistical rigor required to understand significant differences among separate aerosol samples, and prevents undetected (i.e., nonquantifiable) values for true aerosol concentrations that may be significant.

  17. Rapid and Specific Detection of Salmonella spp. in Animal Feed Samples by PCR after Culture Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Löfström, Charlotta; Knutsson, Rickard; Axelsson, Charlotta Engdahl; Rådström, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A PCR procedure has been developed for routine analysis of viable Salmonella spp. in feed samples. The objective was to develop a simple PCR-compatible enrichment procedure to enable DNA amplification without any sample pretreatment such as DNA extraction or cell lysis. PCR inhibition by 14 different feed samples and natural background flora was circumvented by the use of the DNA polymerase Tth. This DNA polymerase was found to exhibit a high level of resistance to PCR inhibitors present in these feed samples compared to DyNAzyme II, FastStart Taq, Platinum Taq, Pwo, rTth, Taq, and Tfl. The specificity of the Tth assay was confirmed by testing 101 Salmonella and 43 non-Salmonella strains isolated from feed and food samples. A sample preparation method based on culture enrichment in buffered peptone water and DNA amplification with Tth DNA polymerase was developed. The probability of detecting small numbers of salmonellae in feed, in the presence of natural background flora, was accurately determined and found to follow a logistic regression model. From this model, the probability of detecting 1 CFU per 25 g of feed in artificially contaminated soy samples was calculated and found to be 0.81. The PCR protocol was evaluated on 155 naturally contaminated feed samples and compared to an established culture-based method, NMKL-71. Eight percent of the samples were positive by PCR, compared with 3% with the conventional method. The reasons for the differences in sensitivity are discussed. Use of this method in the routine analysis of animal feed samples would improve safety in the food chain. PMID:14711627

  18. Development of a highly sensitive one-tube nested real-time PCR for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeonim; Jeon, Bo-Young; Shim, Tae Sun; Jin, Hyunwoo; Cho, Sang-Nae; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-12-01

    Rapid, accurate detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is crucial in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), but conventional diagnostic methods have limited sensitivity and specificity or are time consuming. A new highly sensitive nucleic acid amplification test, combined nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a single tube (one-tube nested real-time PCR), was developed for detecting M. tuberculosis, which takes advantage of two PCR techniques, i.e., nested PCR and real-time PCR. One-tube nested real-time PCR was designed to have two sequential reactions with two sets of primers and dual probes for the insertion sequence (IS) 6110 sequence of M. tuberculosis in a single closed tube. The minimum limits of detection of IS6110 real-time PCR and IS6110 one-tube nested real-time PCR were 100 fg/μL and 1 fg/μL of M. tuberculosis DNA, respectively. AdvanSure TB/non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) real-time PCR, IS6110 real-time PCR, and two-tube nested real-time PCR showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and NTM isolates. In comparison, the sensitivities of AdvanSure TB/NTM real-time PCR, single IS6110 real-time PCR, and one-tube nested real-time PCR were 91% (152/167), 94.6% (158/167), and 100% (167/167) for sputum specimens, respectively. In conclusion, IS6110 one-tube nested real-time PCR is useful for detecting M. tuberculosis due to its high sensitivity and simple manipulation.

  19. Single Fluorescence Channel-based Multiplex Detection of Avian Influenza Virus by Quantitative PCR with Intercalating Dye.

    PubMed

    Ahberg, Christian D; Manz, Andreas; Neuzil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Since its invention in 1985 the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a well-established method for amplification and detection of segments of double-stranded DNA. Incorporation of fluorogenic probe or DNA intercalating dyes (such as SYBR Green) into the PCR mixture allowed real-time reaction monitoring and extraction of quantitative information (qPCR). Probes with different excitation spectra enable multiplex qPCR of several DNA segments using multi-channel optical detection systems. Here we show multiplex qPCR using an economical EvaGreen-based system with single optical channel detection. Previously reported non quantitative multiplex real-time PCR techniques based on intercalating dyes were conducted once the PCR is completed by performing melting curve analysis (MCA). The technique presented in this paper is both qualitative and quantitative as it provides information about the presence of multiple DNA strands as well as the number of starting copies in the tested sample. Besides important internal control, multiplex qPCR also allows detecting concentrations of more than one DNA strand within the same sample. Detection of the avian influenza virus H7N9 by PCR is a well established method. Multiplex qPCR greatly enhances its specificity as it is capable of distinguishing both haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes as well as their ratio.

  20. Evaluation of Swabs, Transport Media, and Specimen Transport Conditions for Optimal Detection of Viruses by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Katherine; Tran, Thomas; Papadakis, Georgina; Birch, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of swabs and viral transport medium during epidemics may prompt the use of unvalidated alternatives. Swabs collected and transported dry or in saline were compared to commercially available swab/medium combinations for PCR detection of influenza, enterovirus, herpes simplex virus, and adenovirus. Each was detected at an ambient temperature (22°C) and 4°C for 7 days. Detection of influenza on dry or saline swabs is important because of its capacity to cause outbreaks involving large numbers of cases. PMID:22205810

  1. Single-step PCR for detection of Brucella spp. from blood and milk of infected animals.

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Klevezas, D S; Martínez-Vázquez, I O; López-Merino, A; Martínez-Soriano, J P

    1995-01-01

    A versatile method for the extraction of Brucella DNA and PCR are presented as reliable tools for the detection of Brucella spp. from body fluids of infected animals. Two oligonucleotides homologous to regions of the gene encoding for an outer membrane protein (omp-2) were designed to detect the pathogen from milk and/or blood of infected goats, bovines, and human patients. The sensitivity of our test and its ability to detect the pathogen in samples from the field reveal a promising advance in the diagnosis of brucellosis in animals and humans. PMID:8586678

  2. [Applicability of PCR methods for detection of shrimp and crab in processed food].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiromu; Nagatomi, Yasuaki; Kikuchi, Ryo; Hirao, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    According to Japanese food allergen labeling regulations, an ELISA screening test is used for detection of crustacean proteins in food and a shrimp/crab-PCR confirmation test is used to confirm a positive ELISA screening test and to exclude false positives. Forty-six kinds of processed foods labeled as containing shrimp/crab were subjected to ELISA screening test and PCR confirmation test and the usefulness of the shrimp/crab-PCR was evaluated. Twenty-seven of the 46 samples contained total crustacean protein levels of 10 ppm or more in the ELISA screening test. All of the samples were positive in the shrimp/crab-PCR confirmation test. The results of the confirmation test were consistent with the declaration in the list of ingredients and with the results of the ELISA screening test. The shrimp/crab-PCR confirmation test was demonstrated to be applicable to various kinds of foods, including powder, extract, seasoning paste, prepared frozen food, snack food, retort food and canned food. PMID:24598221

  3. A Real-Time PCR Method to Detect the Population Level of Halovirus SNJ1

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yunjun; He, Congcong; Deng, Wei; Ba, Dala; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Shunxi; Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses of haloarchaea are the predominant predator in hypersaline ecosystem, the culture studies about halovirus-host systems are infancy. The main reason is the tradition methodology (plaque assay) for virus-host interaction depends on culturable and susceptible host. Actually, more than 90% of haloarchaea are unculturable. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an approach for detecting the dynamics of virus in hypersaline environment without culture. In this study, we report a convenient method to determine the dynamics of halovirus SNJ1 based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). All findings showed that the qPCR method was specific (single peak in melt curves), accurate (a good linear relationship between the log of the PFU and the Ct values, R2 = 0.99), reproducible (low coefficient of variations, below 1%). Additionally, the physicochemical characteristics of the samples tested did not influence the stability of qPCR. Therefore, the qPCR method has the potential value in quantifying and surveying haloviruses in halophilic ecological system. PMID:27192212

  4. Molecular analysis of dolphin morbillivirus: A new sensitive detection method based on nested RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Centelleghe, Cinzia; Beffagna, Giorgia; Zanetti, Rossella; Zappulli, Valentina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Mazzariol, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    Cetacean Morbillivirus (CeMV) has been identified as the most pathogenic virus for cetaceans. Over the past three decades, this RNA virus has caused several outbreaks of lethal disease in odontocetes and mysticetes worldwide. Isolation and identification of CeMV RNA is very challenging in whales because of the poor preservation status frequently shown by tissues from stranded animals. Nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (nested RT-PCR) is used instead of conventional RT-PCR when it is necessary to increase the sensitivity and the specificity of the reaction. This study describes a new nested RT-PCR technique useful to amplify small amounts of the cDNA copy of Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) when it is present in scant quantity in whales' biological specimens. This technique was used to analyze different tissues (lung, brain, spleen and other lymphoid tissues) from one under human care seal and seven cetaceans stranded along the Italian coastline between October 2011 and September 2015. A well-characterized, 200 base pair (bp) fragment of the dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV) haemagglutinin (H) gene, obtained by nested RT-PCR, was sequenced and used to confirm DMV positivity in all the eight marine mammals under study. In conclusion, this nested RT-PCR protocol can represent a sensitive detection method to identify CeMV-positive, poorly preserved tissue samples. Furthermore, this is also a rather inexpensive molecular technique, relatively easy to apply. PMID:27220282

  5. [Applicability of PCR methods for detection of shrimp and crab in processed food].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiromu; Nagatomi, Yasuaki; Kikuchi, Ryo; Hirao, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    According to Japanese food allergen labeling regulations, an ELISA screening test is used for detection of crustacean proteins in food and a shrimp/crab-PCR confirmation test is used to confirm a positive ELISA screening test and to exclude false positives. Forty-six kinds of processed foods labeled as containing shrimp/crab were subjected to ELISA screening test and PCR confirmation test and the usefulness of the shrimp/crab-PCR was evaluated. Twenty-seven of the 46 samples contained total crustacean protein levels of 10 ppm or more in the ELISA screening test. All of the samples were positive in the shrimp/crab-PCR confirmation test. The results of the confirmation test were consistent with the declaration in the list of ingredients and with the results of the ELISA screening test. The shrimp/crab-PCR confirmation test was demonstrated to be applicable to various kinds of foods, including powder, extract, seasoning paste, prepared frozen food, snack food, retort food and canned food.

  6. RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR methods for the detection of potato virus Y in potato leaves and tubers.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Tyler D B; Nie, Xianzhou; Singh, Mathuresh

    2015-01-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is a major threat to potato crops around the world. It is an RNA virus of the family Potyviridae, exhibiting many different strains that cause a range of symptoms in potato. ELISA detection of viral proteins has traditionally been used to quantify virus incidence in a crop or seed lot. ELISA, however, cannot reliably detect the virus directly in dormant tubers, requiring several weeks of sprouting tubers to produce detectable levels of virus. Nor can ELISA fully discriminate between the wide range of strains of the virus. Several techniques for directly detecting the viral RNA have been developed which allow rapid detection of PVY in leaf or tuber tissue, and that can be used to easily distinguish between different strains of the virus. Described in this chapter are several protocols for the extraction of RNA from leaf and tuber tissues, and three detection methods based upon reverse-transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). First described is a traditional two-step protocol with separate reverse transcription of viral RNA into cDNA, then PCR to amplify the viral cDNA fragment. Second described is a one-step RT-PCR protocol combining the cDNA production and PCR in one tube and one step, which greatly reduces material and labor costs for PVY detection. The third protocol is a real-time RT-PCR procedure which not only saves on labor but also allows for more precise quantification of PVY titre. The three protocols are described in detail, and accompanied with a discussion of their relative advantages, costs, and possibilities for cost-saving modifications. While these techniques have primarily been developed for large-scale screening of many samples for determining viral incidence in commercial fields or seed lots, they are also amenable to use in smaller-scale research applications.

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by a Direct In Situ PCR Method

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Fernando; Aguilar, Diana; Garbaccio, Sergio; Francinelli, Gladys; Hernández-Pando, R.; Romano, María Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In situ detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is useful for diagnosis and research of paratuberculosis. The aim of this paper was to detect this agent in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples by a direct in situ PCR. The technique was performed on ileum or ileocaecal lymph node samples from 8 naturally infected cattle and 1 healthy calf, by using p89 and p92 primers for amplification of IS900 sequence. Moderate positive signal was detected in all positive samples and not in negative control, but tissues resulted were affected in many cases due to the enzymatic treatment and the high temperature exposition. Although the technique was useful for Map detection, the signal was lower than immunohistochemistry probably because of the fixation process. In one case, signal was higher, which might be due to the detection of spheroplasts. Thus, the described method should be recommended when others resulted negative or for spheroplasts detection. PMID:21772965

  8. Bordetella pertussis detection by spectrofluorometry using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a molecular beacon probe.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K; Le, C T

    2001-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis was detected by spectrofluorometry following PCR incorporating a molecular beacon probe in the reaction. A DNA fragment from the tandem repeat sequence region (IS 481) of the genome of B. pertussis was amplified in presence of the probe complementary to an internal segment of the amplified DNA fragment. Fluorescein (FAM) and DABCYL were used as the fluorophore and quencher in the probe. The probe was characterized for its signal to noise ratio by homogeneous solution hybridization with a complementary oligonucleotide. Measurement of fluorescent signal at the emission maxima of FAM, immediately after a PCR was used to detect the B. pertussis target, with no additional steps. Presence of B. pertussis in a sample was also examined by agarose gel electrophoresis of the PCR product. A serial diluted stock of B. pertussis (ATCC strain #9797) and fourteen clinical isolates of B. pertussis were examined. The sensitivity of detection by fluorescent measurement was found to be at least in the range of 0.01-0.1 CFU per 10 microl of the sample and was equal to or better than that detected by agarose gel analysis.

  9. Rapid detection of airborne viruses by personal bioaerosol sampler combined with the PCR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovski, I. E.; Safatov, A. S.; Sergeev, A. A.; Pyankov, O. V.; Petrishchenko, V. A.; Mikheev, M. V.; Sergeev, A. N.

    A new personal sampler had been previously developed and verified for monitoring of viable airborne viruses. The aims of this project were to investigate a possibility of the utilization of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to speed up the time consuming analytical procedures and to evaluate a lower detection limit of the combined (sampler-PCR) device. Tenfold serial dilutions of the initial suspension of the Vaccinia virus were aerosolized in the chamber and airborne viruses were monitored by two simultaneously operating samplers. The results of monitoring were successfully obtained by a standard plaque assay (live microbes) and by the PCR method (total DNA). The corresponding calculations to identify the minimal detectable concentration in the ambient air were then performed. It was found that the minimal detectable concentration of airborne viruses in the ambient air depends on the sampling time. As demonstrated, such concentration should be at least 125×10 3 PFU m -3 for a sampling time of as short as 1 min. The detectable concentration decreases with the increase of the sampling time and reaches 25×10 3 and 10×10 3 PFU m -3 for 5 and 12.5 min of sampling respectively.

  10. Colorimetric Sensor for Label Free Detection of Porcine PCR Product (ID: 18)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Bari, M. F.; Dhahi, Th. S.

    2011-05-01

    This report described the use of 40±5 nm in diameter citrate-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect the presence of a 17-base swine specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in the mixed PCR products of pig, deer and shad cytochrome b genes. The size of these PCR amplicons was 109 base-pair and was amplified with a pair of common primers. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish- red to purple-gray in 2 mM PBS buffer by losing its characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and gaining new features between 620 and 800 nm in the absorption spectrum indicating strong aggregation. The particles were stabilized against salt induced aggregation, retained spectral features and characteristic color upon adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products without any additional processing were hybridized with a 17-nucleotide swine probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55° C) that differentiated between the match and mismatch pairing, the probe was hybridized with the pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer's and shad's. The interaction of dehybridized probe to GNPs prevented them from salt-induced aggregation, retaining their characteristic red color. The assay did not need any surface modification chemistry or labeling steps. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The assay obviated the need of complex RFLP, sequencing or blotting to differentiate the same size PCR products. We find the application of the assay for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology study among closely related species.

  11. An advanced PCR method for the specific detection of viable total coliform bacteria in pasteurized milk.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Minami, Jun-ichi; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-07-01

    Pasteurized milk is a complex food that contains various inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and may contain a large number of dead bacteria, depending on the milking conditions and environment. Ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA)-PCR is occasionally used to distinguish between viable and dead bacteria in foods other than pasteurized milk. EMA is a DNA-intercalating dye that selectively permeates the compromised cell membranes of dead bacteria and cleaves DNA. Usually, EMA-PCR techniques reduce the detection of dead bacteria by up to 3.5 logs compared with techniques that do not use EMA. However, this difference may still be insufficient to suppress the amplification of DNA from dead Gram-negative bacteria (e.g., total coliform bacteria) if they are present in pasteurized milk in large numbers. Thus, false positives may result. We developed a new method that uses real-time PCR targeting of a long DNA template (16S-23S rRNA gene, principally 2,451 bp) following EMA treatment to completely suppress the amplification of DNA of up to 7 logs (10(7) cells) of dead total coliforms. Furthermore, we found that a low dose of proteinase K (25 U/ml) removed PCR inhibitors and simultaneously increased the signal from viable coliform bacteria. In conclusion, our simple protocol specifically detects viable total coliforms in pasteurized milk at an initial count of ≥1 colony forming unit (CFU)/2.22 ml within 7.5 h of total testing time. This detection limit for viable cells complies with the requirements for the analysis of total coliforms in pasteurized milk set by the Japanese Sanitation Act (which specifies <1 CFU/2.22 ml). PMID:22644523

  12. A Multiplex PCR-coupled Liquid Bead Array for the Simultaneous Detection of Four Biothreat Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W J; Erler, A M; Nasarabadi, S L; Skowronski, E W; McCready, P M

    2004-02-04

    We have developed a 10-plexed PCR assay coupled to a 12-plexed liquid bead array to rapidly screen environmental samples for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, and B. melitensis. Highly validated species -specific primer sets were used to simultaneously amplify multiple diagnostic regions unique to each individual pathogen. Resolution of the mix of amplified products was achieved by PCR product hybridization to corresponding probe sequences, attached to unique sets of fluorescent beads. The hybridized beads were processed through a flow cytometer, which detected presence and quantity of each PCR product. The assay was optimized to allow for maximum sensitivity in a multiplexed format. A high- throughput demonstration was performed where 384 simulated environmental samples were spiked with different amounts of B. thuringensis spores and pathogen DNA. The samples were robotically processed to extract DNA and arrayed for multiplexed PCR-liquid bead detection. The assay correctly identified the presence or absence of each pathogen and collected over 3,000 individual data points within a single 8-hour shift for approximately $1.20 per sample in a 10-plexed assay.

  13. Application of COLD-PCR for improved detection of NF2 mosaic mutations.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Irene; Mancini, Irene; Baroncelli, Marta; Arena, Guido; Gensini, Francesca; Papi, Laura; Sestini, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    Somatic mosaicism represents the coexistence of two or more cell populations with different genotypes in one person, and it is involved in >30 monogenic disorders. Somatic mosaicism characterizes approximately 25% to 33% of patients with de novo neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). The identification of mosaicism is crucial to patients and their families because the clinical course of the disease and its transmission risk is influenced by the degree and distribution of mutated cells. Moreover, in NF2, the capability of discriminating patients with mosaicism is especially important to make differential diagnosis with schwannomatosis. However, the identification of mosaic variants is considerably difficult, and the development of specific molecular techniques to detect low levels of unknown molecular alterations is required. Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR has been described as a powerful method to selectively amplify minority alleles from mixtures of wild-type and mutation-containing sequences. Here, we applied COLD-PCR to molecular analysis of patients with NF2 mosaicism. With the use of COLD-PCR, followed by direct sequencing, we were able to detect NF2 mutations in blood DNA of three patients with NF2 mosaicism. Our study has shown the capability of COLD-PCR in enriching low-represented mutated allele in blood DNA sample, making it usable for molecular diagnosis of patients with mosaicism.

  14. PCR-based detection of composite transposons and translocatable units from oral metagenomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Tansirichaiya, Supathep; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-09-01

    A composite transposon is a mobile genetic element consisting of two insertion sequences (ISs) flanking a segment of cargo DNA often containing antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Composite transposons can move as a discreet unit. There have been recently several reports on a novel mechanism of movement of an IS26-based composite transposon through the formation of a translocatable unit (TU), carrying the internal DNA segment of a composite transposon and one copy of a flanking IS. In this study, we determined the presence of composite transposons and TUs in human oral metagenomic DNA using PCR primers from common IS elements. Analysis of resulting amplicons showed four different IS1216 composite transposons and one IS257 composite transposon in our metagenomic sample. As our PCR strategy would also detect TUs, PCR was carried out to detect circular TUs predicted to originate from these composite transposons. We confirmed the presence of two novel TUs, one containing an experimentally proven antiseptic resistance gene and another containing a putative universal stress response protein (UspA) encoding gene. This is the first report of a PCR strategy to amplify the DNA segment on composite transposons and TUs in metagenomic DNA. This can be used to identify AR genes associated with a variety of mobile genetic elements from metagenomes. PMID:27521260

  15. PCR-based detection of composite transposons and translocatable units from oral metagenomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Tansirichaiya, Supathep; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-09-01

    A composite transposon is a mobile genetic element consisting of two insertion sequences (ISs) flanking a segment of cargo DNA often containing antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Composite transposons can move as a discreet unit. There have been recently several reports on a novel mechanism of movement of an IS26-based composite transposon through the formation of a translocatable unit (TU), carrying the internal DNA segment of a composite transposon and one copy of a flanking IS. In this study, we determined the presence of composite transposons and TUs in human oral metagenomic DNA using PCR primers from common IS elements. Analysis of resulting amplicons showed four different IS1216 composite transposons and one IS257 composite transposon in our metagenomic sample. As our PCR strategy would also detect TUs, PCR was carried out to detect circular TUs predicted to originate from these composite transposons. We confirmed the presence of two novel TUs, one containing an experimentally proven antiseptic resistance gene and another containing a putative universal stress response protein (UspA) encoding gene. This is the first report of a PCR strategy to amplify the DNA segment on composite transposons and TUs in metagenomic DNA. This can be used to identify AR genes associated with a variety of mobile genetic elements from metagenomes.

  16. Bone marrow micrometastasis detected by RT-PCR in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Natsugoe, Shoji; Nakashima, Saburo; Nakajo, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masataka; Okumura, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Koki; Miyazono, Futoshi; Kijima, Fumio; Aridome, Kuniaki; Ishigami, Sumiya; Takao, Sonshin; Aikou, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    The clinical implications of bone marrow micrometastases (BMM) detected by RT-PCR in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) have not been elucidated. We evaluated the relation between the presence of BMM, both before and after surgery, and clinicopathologic findings in patients with ESCC. Bone marrow samples from 48 patients with ESCC were obtained from the iliac crest before and after surgery. After total RNA was extracted from each bone marrow sample, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific RT-PCR was performed. BMM was detected by RT-PCR in 10 of the 48 patients. Four patients each had positive signals only before or only after surgery and 2 patients had positive signals both before and after surgery. There were no significant differences in clinicopathologic factors, including neoadjuvant therapy, between patients with BMM and without BMM. To date, the rates of recurrent disease in patients with BMM and without BMM are 80% (8/10) and 50% (19/38), respectively, a difference which is not significant. The 4-year survival rates of patients with BMM and without BMM are 10.0% and 47.3%, respectively. Recurrence and survival rates were poorer in patients with RT-PCR positivity, although the differences were not significant. A larger study is required to clarify the clinical impact of BMM.

  17. Development of real-time PCR assays for detection of megalocytiviruses in imported ornamental fish.

    PubMed

    Gias, E; Johnston, C; Keeling, S; Spence, R P; McDonald, W L

    2011-08-01

    Megalocytiviruses have been associated globally with severe systemic disease and economic loss in farmed food fish and ornamental fish. The viruses have been spread internationally by translocation of live fish. In New Zealand, megalocytiviruses are regarded as exotic. A potential pathway for introduction has been identified, namely imported ornamental fish. In the present study, real-time PCR assays were developed for detection of megalocytiviruses using a conserved major capsid protein gene. A SYBR green assay was developed to target all known megalocytiviruses. A second real-time PCR assay using a molecular beacon was developed to specifically target gourami, Trichogaster trichopterus, iridovirus, a species of iridovirus previously linked to ornamental fish imports in Australia. The analytical sensitivity for the SYBR green and molecular beacon assays were 10 and 100 fg, respectively. The analytical specificity of the real-time PCR assays determined using genomic DNA templates from three target viruses, 12 non-target viruses and 25 aquatic bacterial species were 100%. The intra-run and inter-run coefficients of variation of both assays were <5%. The real-time PCR assays developed in this study provide rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of megalocytiviruses and gourami iridovirus.

  18. Development and validation of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Aeromonas salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Keeling, S E; Brosnahan, C L; Johnston, C; Wallis, R; Gudkovs, N; McDonald, W L

    2013-05-01

    A real-time PCR assay using a molecular beacon was developed and validated to detect the vapA (surface array protein) gene in the fish pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida. The assay had 100% analytical specificity and analytical sensitivities of 5 ± 0 fg (DNA), 2.2 × 10(4) ± 1 × 10(4) CFU g(-1) (without enrichment) and 40 ± 10 CFU g(-1) (with enrichment) in kidney tissue. The assay was highly repeatable and proved to be robust following equivalency testing using a different real-time PCR platform. Following analytical validation, diagnostic specificity was determined using New Zealand farmed Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), (n = 750) and pink shubunkin, Carassius auratus (L.) (n = 157). The real-time PCR was run in parallel with culture and all fish tested were found to be negative by both methods for A. salmonicida, resulting in 100% diagnostic specificity (95% confidence interval). The molecular beacon real-time PCR system is specific, sensitive and a reproducible method for the detection of A. salmonicida. It can be used for diagnostic testing, health certification and active surveillance programmes.

  19. New Multiplex PCR for Rapid Detection of Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-León, Laura; Molina, Tamara; Saíz, Pilar; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Soledad Jiménez, Maria

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we describe a multiplex PCR to detect a AGC→ACC (serine to threonine) mutation in the katG gene and a −15 C-to-T substitution (inhAC−15T) at the 5′ end of a presumed ribosome binding site in the promoter of the mabA-inhA operon. These mutations have been reported in the majority of previous studies as the most frequent mutations involved in the resistance to isoniazid (INH) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical strains with high levels of resistance. The method was optimized and validated after an analysis of 30 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates with known sequences of the relevant part of the katG gene and the regulatory region of the mabA-inhA operon. We analyzed 297 INH-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates collected in Spain from 1996 to 2003 by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (using the katG gene), DNA sequencing, and the newly developed multiplex PCR. The results were concordant for all 297 isolates tested. The analysis revealed that 204 (68.7%) of the isolates carried one or both of the mutations. This finding suggests that with further development this multiplex PCR will be able to detect the majority of the INH-resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from Spain and other countries where a high frequency of similar mutations occur. PMID:15616288

  20. Digital gene expression analysis with sample multiplexing and PCR duplicate detection: A straightforward protocol.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, Andrey; Leese, Florian; Weiss, Linda C; Tollrian, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Tag-Seq is a high-throughput approach used for discovering SNPs and characterizing gene expression. In comparison to RNA-Seq, Tag-Seq eases data processing and allows detection of rare mRNA species using only one tag per transcript molecule. However, reduced library complexity raises the issue of PCR duplicates, which distort gene expression levels. Here we present a novel Tag-Seq protocol that uses the least biased methods for RNA library preparation combined with a novel approach for joint PCR template and sample labeling. In our protocol, input RNA is fragmented by hydrolysis, and poly(A)-bearing RNAs are selected and directly ligated to mixed DNA-RNA P5 adapters. The P5 adapters contain i5 barcodes composed of sample-specific (moderately) degenerate base regions (mDBRs), which later allow detection of PCR duplicates. The P7 adapter is attached via reverse transcription with individual i7 barcodes added during the amplification step. The resulting libraries can be sequenced on an Illumina sequencer. After sample demultiplexing and PCR duplicate removal with a free software tool we designed, the data are ready for downstream analysis. Our protocol was tested on RNA samples from predator-induced and control Daphnia microcrustaceans. PMID:27401671

  1. Rapid detection of MDR-Mycobacterium tuberculosis using modified PCR-SSCP from clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imani Fooladi Abbas; Babak, Farzam; Fazlollah, Mousavi Seyed; Nematollah, Jonaidi Jafari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To design a rapid test to detect the rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistant mutant based on polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique that analyzes the katG, rpoB genes. Methods Biochemical test as well as IS6110 targeting PCR revealed 103 clinical samples were tuberculosis. To determine the susceptibility of isolates to anti TB drugs, the proportional method was used. Mutations presented within the amplified products of the katG, rpoB genes were evaluated by SSCP. Results Using proportional method, 12 (11.6%) and 9 (8.7%) isolates were resistant respectively to INH and RIF and 9 (8.7%) isolates showed resistance to both drug (multi-drug resistant tuberculosis). Three (2.9%) multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and two INH resistant isolates were detected by the PCR-SSCP and sequencing. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR-SSCP for multi-drug resistant isolates were 33% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions Complete agreement between SSCP and sequencing can indicate that resistance-associated mutations have occurred in other genes except our considered genes. PMID:25183075

  2. A quality control program within a clinical trial Consortium for PCR protocols to detect Plasmodium species.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve M; Mayor, Alfredo; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Mkali, Happy; Mwangoka, Grace; Valecha, Neena; Singh, Jai Prakash Narayan; Clark, Martha A; Verweij, Jaco J; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Macete, Eusebio; Menendez, Clara; Cisteró, Pau; Njie, Fanta; Affara, Muna; Otieno, Kephas; Kariuki, Simon; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Meshnick, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Malaria parasite infections that are only detectable by molecular methods are highly prevalent and represent a potential transmission reservoir. The methods used to detect these infections are not standardized, and their operating characteristics are often unknown. We designed a proficiency panel of Plasmodium spp. in order to compare the accuracy of parasite detection of molecular protocols used by labs in a clinical trial consortium. Ten dried blood spots (DBSs) were assembled that contained P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale; DBSs contained either a single species or a species mixed with P. falciparum. DBS panels were tested in 9 participating laboratories in a masked fashion. Of 90 tests, 68 (75.6%) were correct; there were 20 false-negative results and 2 false positives. The detection rate was 77.8% (49/63) for P. falciparum, 91.7% (11/12) for P. vivax, 83.3% (10/12) for P. malariae, and 70% (7/10) for P. ovale. Most false-negative P. falciparum results were from samples with an estimated ≤ 5 parasites per μl of blood. Between labs, accuracy ranged from 100% to 50%. In one lab, the inability to detect species in mixed-species infections prompted a redesign and improvement of the assay. Most PCR-based protocols were able to detect P. falciparum and P. vivax at higher densities, but these assays may not reliably detect parasites in samples with low P. falciparum densities. Accordingly, formal quality assurance for PCR should be employed whenever this method is used for diagnosis or surveillance. Such efforts will be important if PCR is to be widely employed to assist malaria elimination efforts.

  3. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D.; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M.; Silva, Ita de Oliveira e; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R.; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts. PMID:26571269

  4. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M; Silva, Ita de Oliveira; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C

    2015-11-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts. PMID:26571269

  5. PCR-based detection of salivary bacteria as a marker of expirated blood.

    PubMed

    Power, Daniel A; Cordiner, Stephen J; Kieser, Jules A; Tompkins, Geoffrey R; Horswell, Jacqui

    2010-06-01

    Distinguishing between bloodstains caused by a spatter pattern or by expirated blood may be crucial to a forensic investigation. Expirated blood is likely to be contaminated with saliva but current techniques have limited sensitivity, especially with small bloodstains. We report that a PCR assay, designed to detect salivary bacteria, can amplify streptococcal DNA from saliva stains applied to fabrics for at least 62 days after seeding. Bacterial DNA was detected when 0.01 microl of saliva was present in the stain and the amplification was not affected by contamination with blood. These findings indicate that PCR amplification of salivary microbial DNA may have application in the identification of expirated bloodstains in forensic case-work.

  6. Nested PCR protocol for the rapid detection of Escherichia coli in potable water.

    PubMed

    Juck, D; Ingram, J; Prévost, M; Coallier, J; Greer, C

    1996-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for the detection of low levels of bacteria in potable water was developed. The fecal indicator bacterium Escherichia coli was used as the test organism in a filtration concentration - nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol, combined with ethidium bromide visualization of PCR products. Two sets of primers were designed from the E. coli specific beta-glucuronidase gene (uidA), the primary pair producing a 486-bp fragment that was used as template for the nested primer pair delineating a 186-bp fragment. This protocol can detect 1-10 bacterial cells/50 mL water sample within 6-8 h, in contrast to traditional culturing or Southern hybridization methods which require 2-3 days for results.

  7. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M; Silva, Ita de Oliveira; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C

    2015-11-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts.

  8. Autonomous Detection of Aerosolized Biological Agents by Multiplexed Immunoassay with PCR Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Hindson, B J; McBride, M T; Makarewicz, A J; Henderer, B D; Setlur, U S; Smith, S M; Gutierrez, D M; Metz, T R; Nasarabadi, S L; Venkateswaran, K S; Farrow, S W; Colston, Jr., B W; Dzenitis, J M

    2004-05-27

    The autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) is an automated, podium-sized instrument that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents (bacteria, viruses, and toxins). The system has been developed to warn of a biological attack in critical or high-traffic facilities and at special events. The APDS performs continuous aerosol collection, sample preparation, and detection using multiplexed immunoassay followed by confirmatory PCR using real-time TaqMan assays. We have integrated completely reusable flow-through devices that perform DNA extraction and PCR amplification. The fully integrated system was challenged with aerosolized Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus globigii and botulinum toxoid. By coupling highly selective antibody and DNA based assays, the probability of an APDS reporting a false positive is extremely low.

  9. Detection and quantification of cultured marine Alexandrium species by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) throughout the world has increased and poses a large threat to human health, fishery resources and tourism industries. The genus Alexandrium includes a number of toxic species associated with HABs. Therefore, it is very important to rapidly detect and monitor the harmful algae, such as Alexandrium genus. In this study, a standard curve of plasmid containing 18S rDNA-28S rDNA region from Alexandrium catenella was constructed and 5.8S rDNA sequence served as the primer of the real-time PCR. Cultured A. catenella, Alexandrium affine, Alexandrium lusitanicum and Alexandrium minutum samples were analyzed by real-time PCR using the same set of primers simultaneously. Using microscopy cells counts, 5.8S rDNA copies per cell and total DNA per cell were estimated. This assay method is promising for rapid detection of large number of Alexandrium samples. PMID:22864601

  10. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  11. PCR bias toward the wild-type k-ras and p53 sequences: implications for PCR detection of mutations and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R; Futo, V; Pecheniuk, N; Slattery, M; Walsh, T

    1998-10-01

    PCR-based cancer diagnosis requires detection of rare mutations in k-ras, p53 or other genes. The assumption has been that mutant and wild-type sequences amplify with near equal efficiency, so that they are eventually present in proportions representative of the starting material. Work on factor IX suggests that this assumption is invalid for one case of near-sequence identity. To test the generality of this phenomenon and its relevance to cancer diagnosis, primers distant from point mutations in p53 and k-ras were used to amplify wild-type and mutant sequences from these genes. A substantial bias against PCR amplification of mutants was observed for two regions of the p53 gene and one region of k-ras. For k-ras and p53, bias was observed when the wild-type and mutant sequences were amplified separately or when mixed in equal proportions before PCR. Bias was present with proofreading and non-proofreading polymerases. Mutant and wild-type segments of the factor V, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and prothrombin genes were amplified and did not exhibit PCR bias. Therefore, the assumption of equal PCR efficiency for point mutant and wild-type sequences is invalid in several systems. Quantitative or diagnostic PCR will require validation for each locus, and enrichment strategies may be needed to optimize detection of mutants. PMID:9793653

  12. Increased efficacy for in-house validation of real-time PCR GMO detection methods.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, I M J; Kok, E J; Hougs, L; Molenaar, B; Thissen, J T N M; van der Voet, H

    2010-03-01

    To improve the efficacy of the in-house validation of GMO detection methods (DNA isolation and real-time PCR, polymerase chain reaction), a study was performed to gain insight in the contribution of the different steps of the GMO detection method to the repeatability and in-house reproducibility. In the present study, 19 methods for (GM) soy, maize canola and potato were validated in-house of which 14 on the basis of an 8-day validation scheme using eight different samples and five on the basis of a more concise validation protocol. In this way, data was obtained with respect to the detection limit, accuracy and precision. Also, decision limits were calculated for declaring non-conformance (>0.9%) with 95% reliability. In order to estimate the contribution of the different steps in the GMO analysis to the total variation variance components were estimated using REML (residual maximum likelihood method). From these components, relative standard deviations for repeatability and reproducibility (RSD(r) and RSD(R)) were calculated. The results showed that not only the PCR reaction but also the factors 'DNA isolation' and 'PCR day' are important factors for the total variance and should therefore be included in the in-house validation. It is proposed to use a statistical model to estimate these factors from a large dataset of initial validations so that for similar GMO methods in the future, only the PCR step needs to be validated. The resulting data are discussed in the light of agreed European criteria for qualified GMO detection methods. PMID:20012027

  13. Detection and quantification of Enterococcus gilvus in cheese by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Carminati, Domenico; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the occurrence of Enterococcus gilvus in cheese. For this purpose, a real-time PCR protocol using phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS) as a target gene was optimized to evaluate the presence and abundance of this microorganism in Italian artisan cheeses. The real-time assay unequivocally distinguished E. gilvus from 25 non-target LAB and non-LAB species, demonstrating its absolute specificity. The assay performed well not only with purified DNA but also with DNA extracted from cheese samples artificially contaminated with E. gilvus. The dynamic range of target determination of the method in the cheese matrix (from 10(7) to 10(4) cfu/ml, covering three orders of magnitude) was lower and the detection limit higher than in vitro conditions, but still high enough to obtain an excellent quantification accuracy in cheese. Twenty commercially available cheeses were analyzed by real-time PCR and approximately 40% of the cheese samples contained E. gilvus at levels ranging from 4.17+/-0.10 to 6.75+/-0.01 log cfu/g. Such levels represented 0.1-10% of the total enterococci counted on kanamycin aesculin azide agar (KAA) from the corresponding cheeses. The successful isolation of E. gilvus from cheeses containing high loads of this species, as detected by real-time PCR, provided definitive proof on both assay specificity and presence of this organism in cheeses. Despite the relatively low sensitivity in cheese (> or =4 log cfu/g), the real-time PCR described here may, however, be useful to detect E. gilvus rapidly when present at (sub)dominant levels within the enterococcal cheese microflora. The assay may be helpful to detect and quantify E. gilvus strains from food, thus enabling a better understanding of technological role, ecological and safety aspects in cheeses and other fermented food products of this infrequent species. PMID:19625150

  14. Increased efficacy for in-house validation of real-time PCR GMO detection methods.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, I M J; Kok, E J; Hougs, L; Molenaar, B; Thissen, J T N M; van der Voet, H

    2010-03-01

    To improve the efficacy of the in-house validation of GMO detection methods (DNA isolation and real-time PCR, polymerase chain reaction), a study was performed to gain insight in the contribution of the different steps of the GMO detection method to the repeatability and in-house reproducibility. In the present study, 19 methods for (GM) soy, maize canola and potato were validated in-house of which 14 on the basis of an 8-day validation scheme using eight different samples and five on the basis of a more concise validation protocol. In this way, data was obtained with respect to the detection limit, accuracy and precision. Also, decision limits were calculated for declaring non-conformance (>0.9%) with 95% reliability. In order to estimate the contribution of the different steps in the GMO analysis to the total variation variance components were estimated using REML (residual maximum likelihood method). From these components, relative standard deviations for repeatability and reproducibility (RSD(r) and RSD(R)) were calculated. The results showed that not only the PCR reaction but also the factors 'DNA isolation' and 'PCR day' are important factors for the total variance and should therefore be included in the in-house validation. It is proposed to use a statistical model to estimate these factors from a large dataset of initial validations so that for similar GMO methods in the future, only the PCR step needs to be validated. The resulting data are discussed in the light of agreed European criteria for qualified GMO detection methods.

  15. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications. PMID:19203085

  16. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications.

  17. [Real-time PCR kits for the detection of the African Swine Fever virus].

    PubMed

    Latyshev, O E; Eliseeva, O V; Grebennikova, T V; Verkhovskiĭ, O A; Tsibezov, V V; Chernykh, O Iu; Dzhailidi, G A; Aliper, T I

    2014-01-01

    The results obtained using the diagnostic kit based on real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the DNA of the African Swine Fever in the pathological material, as well as in the culture fluid, are presented. A high sensitivity and specificity for detection of the DNA in the organs and tissues of animals was shown to be useful for detection in the European Union referentiality reagent kits for DNA detection by real time PCR of ASFV. More rapid and effective method of DNA extraction using columns mini spin Quick gDNA(TM) MiniPrep was suggested and compared to the method of DNA isolation on the inorganic sorbent. High correlation of the results of the DNA detection of ASFV by real-time PCR and antigen detection results ASFV by competitive ELISA obtained with the ELISA SEROTEST/INGEZIM COMRAC PPA was demonstrated. The kit can be used in the veterinary services for effective monitoring of ASFV to contain, eliminate and prevent further spread of the disease.

  18. Development of SCAR Primers for PCR Assay to Detect Diplodia seriata

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. T.; Cuesta, M. J.; Martín, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop primer pairs for Diplodia seriata identification, one of the most common fungal species associated with grapevine decline in Castilla y León (Spain). Genetic variability of selected isolates of D. seriata was estimated. A molecular marker was generated from a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragment. PCR products of around 1200 bp were obtained with OPE20 primer. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The sequences were compared and a fragment of 1207 bp was used to design primer pairs. Two primer pairs were selected (DS3.8 S3-DS3.8 R6 and DS3.8 S3-DS3.8 R4) that amplified a single DNA product of 634 bp and 233 bp, respectively, with D. seriata isolates. No amplification was obtained for any of the 57 isolates of other species. The designed SCAR primer pairs allowed a rapid detection of D. seriata, and were able to detect 0.1 pg of the target DNA. Detection was specific and sensitive for D. seriata. The established protocols detected these fungi in naturally infected grapevines after DNA purification. Diplodia seriata was detectable without DNA purification and isolation in 62.5% to 75% of reactions. The detection of this pathogen in wood samples has great potential for use in pathogen-free certification schemes. PMID:27437468

  19. Development of SCAR Primers for PCR Assay to Detect Diplodia seriata.

    PubMed

    Martín, M T; Cuesta, M J; Martín, L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop primer pairs for Diplodia seriata identification, one of the most common fungal species associated with grapevine decline in Castilla y León (Spain). Genetic variability of selected isolates of D. seriata was estimated. A molecular marker was generated from a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragment. PCR products of around 1200 bp were obtained with OPE20 primer. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The sequences were compared and a fragment of 1207 bp was used to design primer pairs. Two primer pairs were selected (DS3.8 S3-DS3.8 R6 and DS3.8 S3-DS3.8 R4) that amplified a single DNA product of 634 bp and 233 bp, respectively, with D. seriata isolates. No amplification was obtained for any of the 57 isolates of other species. The designed SCAR primer pairs allowed a rapid detection of D. seriata, and were able to detect 0.1 pg of the target DNA. Detection was specific and sensitive for D. seriata. The established protocols detected these fungi in naturally infected grapevines after DNA purification. Diplodia seriata was detectable without DNA purification and isolation in 62.5% to 75% of reactions. The detection of this pathogen in wood samples has great potential for use in pathogen-free certification schemes.

  20. Advances in multiplex PCR: balancing primer efficiencies and improving detection success

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Daniela; Raso, Lorna; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    1. Multiplex PCR is a valuable tool in many biological studies but it is a multifaceted procedure that has to be planned and optimised thoroughly to achieve robust and meaningful results. In particular, primer concentrations have to be adjusted to assure an even amplification of all targeted DNA fragments. Until now, total DNA extracts were used for balancing primer efficiencies; however, the applicability for comparisons between taxa or different multiple-copy genes was limited owing to the unknown number of template molecules present per total DNA. 2. Based on a multiplex system developed to track trophic interactions in high Alpine arthropods, we demonstrate a fast and easy way of generating standardised DNA templates. These were then used to balance the amplification success for the different targets and to subsequently determine the sensitivity of each primer pair in the multiplex PCR. 3. In the current multiplex assay, this approach led to an even amplification success for all seven targeted DNA fragments. Using this balanced multiplex PCR, methodological bias owing to variation in primer efficiency will be avoided when analysing field-derived samples. 4. The approach outlined here allows comparing multiplex PCR sensitivity, independent of the investigated species, genome size or the targeted genes. The application of standardised DNA templates not only makes it possible to optimise primer efficiency within a given multiplex PCR, but it also offers to adjust and/or to compare the sensitivity between different assays. Along with other factors that influence the success of multiplex reactions, and which we discuss here in relation to the presented detection system, the adoption of this approach will allow for direct comparison of multiplex PCR data between systems and studies, enhancing the utility of this assay type. PMID:23549328

  1. Detection of the oyster herpesvirus in commercial bivalve in northern California, USA: conventional and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Burge, Colleen A; Strenge, Robyn E; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2011-04-01

    The ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV-1) and related oyster herpesviruses (OsHV) are associated with world-wide mortalities of larval and juvenile bivalves. To quantify OsHV viral loads in mollusc tissues, we developed a SYBR Green quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on the A-region of the OsHV-1 genome. Reaction efficiency and precision were demonstrated using a plasmid standard curve. The analytical sensitivity is 1 copy per reaction. We collected Crassostrea gigas, C. sikamea, C. virginica, Ostrea edulis, O. lurida, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Venerupis phillipinarum from Tomales Bay (TB), and C. gigas from Drakes Estero (DE), California, U.S.A., and initially used conventional PCR (cPCR) to test for presence of OsHV DNA. Subsequently, viral loads were quantified in selected samples of all tested bivalves except O. lurida. Copy numbers were low in each species tested but were significantly greater in C. gigas (p < 0.0001) compared to all other species, suggesting a higher level of infection. OsHV DNA was detected with cPCR and/or qPCR and confirmed by sequencing in C. gigas, C. sikamea, C. virginica, O. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and V phillipinarum from TB and C. gigas from DE. These data indicate that multiple bivalve species may act as reservoirs for OsHV in TB. A lack of histological abnormalities in potential reservoirs requires alternative methods for their identification. Further investigation is needed to determine the host-parasite relationship for each potential reservoir, including characterization of viral loads and their relationship with infection (via in situ hybridization), assessments of mortality, and host responses. PMID:21648239

  2. Rapid and reliable detection and identification of GM events using multiplex PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodan; Li, Yingcong; Zhao, Heng; Wen, Si-yuan; Wang, Sheng-qi; Huang, Jian; Huang, Kun-lun; Luo, Yun-bo

    2005-05-18

    To devise a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of genetically modified (GM) events, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with a DNA microarray system simultaneously aiming at many targets in a single reaction. The system included probes for screening gene, species reference gene, specific gene, construct-specific gene, event-specific gene, and internal and negative control genes. 18S rRNA was combined with species reference genes as internal controls to assess the efficiency of all reactions and to eliminate false negatives. Two sets of the multiplex PCR system were used to amplify four and five targets, respectively. Eight different structure genes could be detected and identified simultaneously for Roundup Ready soybean in a single microarray. The microarray specificity was validated by its ability to discriminate two GM maizes Bt176 and Bt11. The advantages of this method are its high specificity and greatly reduced false-positives and -negatives. The multiplex PCR coupled with microarray technology presented here is a rapid and reliable tool for the simultaneous detection of GM organism ingredients.

  3. Multiplex Detection of Rare Mutations by Picoliter Droplet Based Digital PCR: Sensitivity and Specificity Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zonta, Eleonora; Garlan, Fanny; Pécuchet, Nicolas; Perez-Toralla, Karla; Caen, Ouriel; Milbury, Coren; Didelot, Audrey; Fabre, Elizabeth; Blons, Hélène; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Taly, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    In cancer research, the accuracy of the technology used for biomarkers detection is remarkably important. In this context, digital PCR represents a highly sensitive and reproducible method that could serve as an appropriate tool for tumor mutational status analysis. In particular, droplet-based digital PCR approaches have been developed for detection of tumor-specific mutated alleles within plasmatic circulating DNA. Such an approach calls for the development and validation of a very significant quantity of assays, which can be extremely costly and time consuming. Herein, we evaluated assays for the detection and quantification of various mutations occurring in three genes often misregulated in cancers: the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and the Tumoral Protein p53 (TP53) genes. In particular, commercial competitive allele-specific TaqMan® PCR (castPCR™) technology, as well as TaqMan® and ZEN™ assays, have been evaluated for EGFR p.L858R, p.T790M, p.L861Q point mutations and in-frame deletions Del19. Specificity and sensitivity have been determined on cell lines DNA, plasmatic circulating DNA of lung cancer patients or Horizon Diagnostics Reference Standards. To show the multiplexing capabilities of this technology, several multiplex panels for EGFR (several three- and four-plexes) have been developed, offering new "ready-to-use" tests for lung cancer patients. PMID:27416070

  4. A multiplex PCR for the detection of Fasciola hepatica in the intermediate snail host Galba cubensis.

    PubMed

    Alba, Annia; Vázquez, Antonio A; Hernández, Hilda; Sánchez, Jorge; Marcet, Ricardo; Figueredo, Mabel; Sarracent, Jorge; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-07-30

    Fasciolosis is a snail-borne trematode infection that has re-emerged as a human disease, and is considered a significant problem for veterinary medicine worldwide. The evaluation of the transmission risk of fasciolosis as well as the efficacy of the strategies for its control could be carried out through epidemiological surveillance of the snails that act as intermediate hosts of the parasites. The present study aimed to develop the first multiplex PCR to detect Fasciola hepatica in Galba cubensis, an important intermediate host of the parasite in the Americas and especially in the Caribbean basin. The multiplex PCR was optimized for the amplification of a 340 bp fragment of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of F. hepatica rDNA, while another set of primers was designed and used to amplify a conserved segment of the nuclear 18S rDNA of the snail (451 bp), as an internal control of the reaction. The assay was able to detect up to 100 pg of the parasite even at high concentrations of snail DNA, an analytical sensitivity that allows the detection of less than a single miracidium, which is the minimal biological infestation unit. A controlled laboratory-reared G. cubensis - F. hepatica system was used for the evaluation of the developed multiplex PCR, and 100% sensitivity and specificity was achieved. This assay constitutes a novel, useful and suitable technique for the survey of fasciolosis transmission through one of the main intermediate hosts in the Western hemisphere. PMID:26012858

  5. Detection of canine vector-borne diseases in eastern Poland by ELISA and PCR.

    PubMed

    Dzięgiel, Beata; Adaszek, Łukasz; Carbonero, Alfonso; Łyp, Paweł; Winiarczyk, Mateusz; Dębiak, Piotr; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi in dogs in eastern Poland and to determine the factors associated with exposure (seroposity) or infection (PCR). Anti-A. phagocytophilum, anti-B. burgdorferi and anti-E. canis antibodies were determined in 400 dogs, using the SNAP 4Dx ® test (IDEXX Laboratories). In addition, PCRs were performed for the detection of E. canis, A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi DNA. In reference to the risk factor analysis, a regression logistic model was determined for each aetiological agent. The overall seroprevalence was highest for B. burgdorferi (11.0 %), followed by A. phagocytophilum (8.0 %) and E. canis (1.5 %). Eleven healthy dogs were found to be infected with A. phagocytophilum, as determined by PCR, while the remainder were seronegative. For B. burgdorferi, the DNA of the spirochetes was detected in the blood of 20 dogs, while the presence of anti-B. burgdorferi IgG was detected in the sera of ten of these. For E. canis, none of the dogs tested positive by PCR. Tick control was included as a protective factor for A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi, while the origin (rural) was included as a risk factor for B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum infection. In addition, breed (pure) was a risk factor for B. burgdorferi infection, and sex (female) was a risk factor for E. canis. PMID:26581374

  6. Detection of human tumor cells by amplicon fusion site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Axel; Taube, Sylvia; Starke, Sven; Bergmann, Eckhard; Christiansen, Nina Merete; Christiansen, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic strategies for individuals with cancer demand practical methods for highly sensitive and specific detection of tumor cells. Amplification of genomic regions that include putative oncogenes is common in tumor cells of various types. Genomic array platforms offer the opportunity to identify and precisely map amplified genomic regions (ampGRs). The stable existence of these tumor cell–specific genomic aberrations during and after therapy, in theory, make ampGRs optimal targets for cancer diagnostics. In this study, we mapped ampGRs around the proto-oncogene MYCN of human neuroblastomas using a high-resolution tiling array (HR-TA). Based on the HR-TA data, we were able to precisely describe the telomeric and centromeric borders of the ampGRs and deduce virtual fusion sites of the joined ampGRs (amplicon fusion sites [AFSs]). These AFSs served as blueprints for the subsequent design of AFS bridging PCR assays (AFS-PCRs). Strikingly, these assays were absolutely tumor cell specific and capable of detecting 1 tumor cell in 1 × 106 to 8 × 106 control cells. We successfully proved the in vivo practicability of AFS-PCR by detecting and quantifying the specific AFS DNA of human MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas in the patients’ corresponding peripheral blood and bone marrow samples. Thus, we believe AFS-PCR could become a powerful and nevertheless feasible personalized diagnostic tool applicable to a large number of cancer patients, including children with MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas. PMID:21293059

  7. Detection of human tumor cells by amplicon fusion site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR).

    PubMed

    Weber, Axel; Taube, Sylvia; Starke, Sven; Bergmann, Eckhard; Christiansen, Nina Merete; Christiansen, Holger

    2011-02-01

    Reliable diagnostic strategies for individuals with cancer demand practical methods for highly sensitive and specific detection of tumor cells. Amplification of genomic regions that include putative oncogenes is common in tumor cells of various types. Genomic array platforms offer the opportunity to identify and precisely map amplified genomic regions (ampGRs). The stable existence of these tumor cell–specific genomic aberrations during and after therapy, in theory, make ampGRs optimal targets for cancer diagnostics. In this study, we mapped ampGRs around the proto-oncogene MYCN of human neuroblastomas using a high-resolution tiling array (HR-TA). Based on the HR-TA data, we were able to precisely describe the telomeric and centromeric borders of the ampGRs and deduce virtual fusion sites of the joined ampGRs (amplicon fusion sites [AFSs]). These AFSs served as blueprints for the subsequent design of AFS bridging PCR assays (AFS-PCRs). Strikingly, these assays were absolutely tumor cell specific and capable of detecting 1 tumor cell in 1 × 10(6) to 8 × 10(6) control cells. We successfully proved the in vivo practicability of AFS-PCR by detecting and quantifying the specific AFS DNA of human MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas in the patients’ corresponding peripheral blood and bone marrow samples. Thus, we believe AFS-PCR could become a powerful and nevertheless feasible personalized diagnostic tool applicable to a large number of cancer patients, including children with MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas.

  8. Integrated biochip for PCR-based DNA amplification and detection on capacitive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschou, D.; Vourdas, N.; Filippidou, M. K.; Tsouti, V.; Kokkoris, G.; Tsekenis, G.; Zergioti, I.; Chatzandroulis, S.; Tserepi, A.

    2013-05-01

    Responding to an increasing demand for LoC devices to perform bioanalytical protocols for disease diagnostics, the development of an integrated LoC device consisting of a μPCR module integrated with resistive microheaters and a biosensor array for disease diagnostics is presented. The LoC is built on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) platform, implementing both the amplification of DNA samples and DNA detection/identification on-chip. The resistive microheaters for PCR and the wirings for the sensor read-out are fabricated by means of standard PCB technology. The microfluidic network is continuous-flow, designed to perform 30 PCR cycles with heated zones at constant temperatures, and is built onto the PCB utilizing commercial photopatternable polyimide layers. Following DNA amplification, the product is driven in a chamber where a Si-based biosensor array is placed for DNA detection through hybridization. The sensor array is tested for the detection of mutations of the KRAS gene, responsible for colon cancer.

  9. A multiplex PCR for the detection of Fasciola hepatica in the intermediate snail host Galba cubensis.

    PubMed

    Alba, Annia; Vázquez, Antonio A; Hernández, Hilda; Sánchez, Jorge; Marcet, Ricardo; Figueredo, Mabel; Sarracent, Jorge; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-07-30

    Fasciolosis is a snail-borne trematode infection that has re-emerged as a human disease, and is considered a significant problem for veterinary medicine worldwide. The evaluation of the transmission risk of fasciolosis as well as the efficacy of the strategies for its control could be carried out through epidemiological surveillance of the snails that act as intermediate hosts of the parasites. The present study aimed to develop the first multiplex PCR to detect Fasciola hepatica in Galba cubensis, an important intermediate host of the parasite in the Americas and especially in the Caribbean basin. The multiplex PCR was optimized for the amplification of a 340 bp fragment of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of F. hepatica rDNA, while another set of primers was designed and used to amplify a conserved segment of the nuclear 18S rDNA of the snail (451 bp), as an internal control of the reaction. The assay was able to detect up to 100 pg of the parasite even at high concentrations of snail DNA, an analytical sensitivity that allows the detection of less than a single miracidium, which is the minimal biological infestation unit. A controlled laboratory-reared G. cubensis - F. hepatica system was used for the evaluation of the developed multiplex PCR, and 100% sensitivity and specificity was achieved. This assay constitutes a novel, useful and suitable technique for the survey of fasciolosis transmission through one of the main intermediate hosts in the Western hemisphere.

  10. A portable, shock-proof, surface-heated droplet PCR system for Escherichia coli detection.

    PubMed

    Angus, Scott V; Cho, Soohee; Harshman, Dustin K; Song, Jae-Young; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-12-15

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device was developed that uses wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM) to guide a droplet over three different heating chambers. After PCR amplification, end-point detection is achieved using a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope. The device was tested for identification of the 16S rRNA gene V3 hypervariable region from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) genome copies per sample. The device is portable with smartphone-based end-point detection and provides the assay results quickly (15 min for a 30-cycle amplification) and accurately. The system is also shock and vibration resistant, due to the multiple points of contact between the droplet and the thermocouple and the Teflon film on the heater surfaces. The thermocouple also provides real-time droplet temperature feedback to ensure it reaches the set temperature before moving to the next chamber/step in PCR. The device is equipped to use either silicone oil or coconut oil. Coconut oil provides additional portability and ease of transportation by eliminating spilling because its high melting temperature means it is solid at room temperature. PMID:26164008

  11. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  12. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    PubMed

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  13. A comparative study of culture methods and PCR assay for Salmonella detection in poultry drinking water.

    PubMed

    Soria, M C; Soria, M A; Bueno, D J

    2013-01-01

    The present work compared 2 culture methods and PCR assays for motile and nonmotile Salmonella detection using artificially contaminated poultry drinking water. The specificity was 1 for all methods studied. The accuracy and sensitivity were 1 for all motile strains, whereas these parameters were between 0 and 0.7 for nonmotile Salmonella strains. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 1 for all motile Salmonella strains in the 3 methods used. Nonmotile Salmonella strains showed a positive predictive value of 1 in the PCR method. However, the positive predictive value was indeterminate in the tetrathionate (TT) methods for both strains tested and in the modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) method for Salmonella Pullorum. On the other hand, the negative predictive value was between 0.20 and 0.43 for the 3 methods. The detection level of motile strains was 4 to 7 cfu/25 mL for all methods. Nonmotile Salmonella strains could not be detected in the TT method, whereas only Salmonella Gallinarum could be recovered from 1.1 × 10(1) cfu/25 mL in the MSRV method. In relation to the molecular methods, PCR could detect these strains from 1.1 × 10(4) cfu/25 mL. Extending incubation time of the enrichment medium to 6 d in the TT method did not improve the isolation rates. In general, all selective plating media did not show any statistical differences in the parameters of performance studied. The kappa coefficient showed that there was an excellent agreement between the 3 methods for motile strains. For nonmotile strains, the agreement was poor between the MSRV and the PCR; there was no agreement when the TT method was compared with the MSRV and the PCR methods. The difference in detection levels obtained with the methods used for motile and nonmotile Salmonella strains and the difficulty in detecting these last strains represents a potential problem when a poultry water sample is considered negative for the presence of Salmonella.

  14. Detection of respiratory syncytial virus by reverse transcription-PCR and hybridization with a DNA enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Freymuth, F; Eugene, G; Vabret, A; Petitjean, J; Gennetay, E; Brouard, J; Duhamel, J F; Guillois, B

    1995-01-01

    Nasal aspirates from 238 infants hospitalized with acute respiratory infections during the winter of 1994 and 1995 were tested for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and the viral isolation technique (VIT) and by two PCR and hybridization methods: reverse transcription PCR 1 (RT-PCR1), which amplifies the RNAs of all RSV strains, and RT-PCR-2, which allows subgroup classification of RSV. RT-PCR-1 and RT-PCR-2 detected viral sequences in 56.7% (135 of 238) and 48.3% (115 of 238) of the samples, respectively, while only 80 (33.6%) samples were found to be positive by IFA and VIT. Of the PCR-positive specimens, 57 were missed by these routine techniques in RT-PCR-1 and 45 were missed in RT-PCR-2. Although the RSV-PCR-1 and RSV-PCR-2 techniques amplified two different sequences of the RSV genome, they gave similar results for 218 (91.6%) nasal aspirates. Compared with conventional methods, the sensitivity, specificity, and agreement were 97.5, 63.9, and 75.2%, respectively, for RT-PCR-1 and 89.7, 71.9, and 77.7%, respectively, for RT-PCR-2, and for these two RT-PCR assays, the positive predictive value (PPV) and the index of agreement (kappa) were comparable and moderate, respectively: PPV was 57.8% and kappa was 0.52 in RT-PCR-1, and PPV was 60.9% and kappa was 0.54 in RT-PCR-2. However, there was a perfect correlation between the two RT-PCRs, with a PPV of 100% and an excellent index of agreement (kappa = 0.88). Therefore, most RT-PCR results were really true positive, and VIT and IFA, which missed some of them, appeared to be less sensitive. PMID:8586738

  15. Comparison of Real-Time PCR Signal-Amplified In Situ Hybridization and Conventional PCR for Detection and Quantification of Human Papillomavirus in Archival Cervical Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Karin; Dandachi, Nadia; Trattner, Maria; Vogl, Georgia; Doppelmayr, Hildegard; Moré, Elena; Staudach, Alfons; Dietze, Otto; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia

    2004-01-01

    Archival paraffin-embedded tumor specimens offer a wealth of information for both cancer research and for routine clinical applications. However, the use of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens for quantitative real-time PCR is not yet a standard diagnostic method in many laboratories, in particular for the quantification of human papillomavirus (HPV). Particularly high-risk HPV types are involved in almost 100% of the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. We compared the diagnostic applicability and sensitivity of real-time PCR to that of chromogenic tyramide-signal-amplified in situ hybridization and conventional PCR for the detection of HPV from archival tissue in 164 cases of carcinoma in situ and cervical cancer. Furthermore, we examined whether the viral load of HPV is of prognostic relevance. Our findings indicate that patients in tumor stage I with a lower viral load of HPV type 16 (HPV16; up to 1,000 copies/ng of DNA) had a significantly better survival than HPV 16-negative patients (P = 0.037). We observed a greater sensitivity of both real-time PCR and conventional PCR for the detection of HPV16 and -18 compared to signal amplified in situ hybridization. We found a considerable concordance between HPV16 (κ = 0.661) and HPV18 (κ = 0.781) status as measured by real-time PCR and conventional PCR, indicating similar sensitivities. We recognized an inhibitory effect of formalin fixation and paraffin embedding on the evaluation of real-time PCR quantification. PMID:15297527

  16. Comparative detection of rotavirus RNA by conventional RT-PCR, TaqMan RT-PCR and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo; Tan, Hua; Wu, Bi-Mei; Feng, Zi-Li; Wang, Qi; Lin, Ji-Can; Yang, Ze

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus is one of the major viral pathogens leading to diarrhea. Diagnosis has been conducted by either traditional cultural, serological methods or molecular biology techniques, which include RT-PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). However, their differences regarding accuracy and sensitivity remain unknown. In this study, an in-house conventional RT-PCR assay and more importantly, an in-house real-time NASBA (RT-NASBA) were established, and compared with a commercial TaqMan RT-PCR assay. The results showed that all of these methods were able to detect and distinguish rotavirus from other diarrhea viruses with a 100% concordance rate during the course of an evaluation on 20 clinical stool samples. However, RT-NASBA was much quicker than the other two methods. More importantly, the limit of detection of RT-NASBA could reach seven copies per reaction and was one to two logs lower than that of conventional RT-PCR and TaqMan RT-PCR. These results indicate that this in-house assay was more sensitive, and thus could be used as an efficient diagnosis tool for rotavirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct comparison among three different assays for the detection of rotavirus. These findings would provide implication for the rational selection of diagnosis tool for rotavirus.

  17. Development and application of an RT-PCR test for detecting avian nephritis virus.

    PubMed

    Todd, D; Trudgett, J; McNeilly, F; McBride, N; Donnelly, B; Smyth, V J; Jewhurst, H L; Adair, B M

    2010-06-01

    The development of a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for detecting avian nephritis virus (ANV) is described. Primers, which amplified a fragment of 182 base pairs (bp), were located in the conserved 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the genome. The limit of detection of the test was estimated to be approximately 18 viral copies using a 10-fold dilution series of in vitro transcribed RNA. Positive signals were produced with representative ANV samples, some of which were not detected by previously described RT-PCR tests for detecting ANV, but other avian astroviruses including chicken astrovirus isolates and duck hepatitis virus types 2 and 3 tested negative. When applied to gut content samples from UK, German and US broiler flocks with enteritis/growth problems, ANVs were detected by RT-PCR in 82/82 (100%) samples. ANVs were also detected in 80/96 (83%) pooled gut content samples from longitudinal surveys of four broiler flocks displaying below-average performance. Whereas all samples collected on day 0 from the surveys were negative for ANV, all samples collected at days 4/5, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 tested positive. Sequence determinations performed with amplicons produced with 14 field samples confirmed the ANV specificity of the test, while comparative and phylogenetic analyses based on 109-nucleotide 3'-UTR sequences demonstrated that the majority of ANVs investigated were more closely related to the serotype 2 ANV (accession number AB 046864) than to the serotype 1 ANV (accession number NC 003790).

  18. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. in human fecal samples using multiplex PCR and qPCR-MCA.

    PubMed

    Zebardast, Nozhat; Yeganeh, Farshid; Gharavi, Mohammad Javad; Abadi, Alireza; Seyyed Tabaei, Seyyed Javad; Haghighi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. are common causes of diarrheal and intestinal diseases all over the world. Microscopic methods are useful in the diagnosis of intestinal parasites (IPs), but their sensitivity was assessed approximately 60 percent. Recently, molecular techniques have been used increasingly for the identification and characterization of the parasites. Among those, in this study we have used multiplex PCR and Real-time PCR with melting curve analysis (qPCR-MCA) for simultaneous detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. in human fecal samples. Twenty DNA samples from 12 E. histolytica and 8 E. dispar samples and twenty stool samples confirmed positive for G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. were analyzed. After DNA extraction from the samples, multiplex PCR was done for detection and differentiation of above mentioned parasites. QPCR-MCA was also performed for the detection and differentiation of 11 isolates of above mentioned parasite in a cycle with a time and temperature. Multiplex PCR was able to simultaneous detect and differentiate of above mentioned parasite in a single reaction. QPCR-MCA was able to differentiate genus and species those five protozoa using melting temperature simultaneously at the same time and temperature programs. In total, qPCR-MCA diagnosed 7/11 isolation of E. histolytica, 6/8 isolation of E. dispar, 1/1 E. moshkovskii Laredo, 10/11 G. Lamblia and 6/11 Cryptosporidium spp. Application of multiplex PCR for detection of more than one species in a test in developing countries, at least in reference laboratories has accurate diagnosis and plays a critical role in differentiation of protozoan species. Multiplex PCR assay with a template and multi template had different results and it seems that using a set of primers with one template has higher diagnostic capability in compare with multi template. The results of this study

  19. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. in human fecal samples using multiplex PCR and qPCR-MCA.

    PubMed

    Zebardast, Nozhat; Yeganeh, Farshid; Gharavi, Mohammad Javad; Abadi, Alireza; Seyyed Tabaei, Seyyed Javad; Haghighi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. are common causes of diarrheal and intestinal diseases all over the world. Microscopic methods are useful in the diagnosis of intestinal parasites (IPs), but their sensitivity was assessed approximately 60 percent. Recently, molecular techniques have been used increasingly for the identification and characterization of the parasites. Among those, in this study we have used multiplex PCR and Real-time PCR with melting curve analysis (qPCR-MCA) for simultaneous detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. in human fecal samples. Twenty DNA samples from 12 E. histolytica and 8 E. dispar samples and twenty stool samples confirmed positive for G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. were analyzed. After DNA extraction from the samples, multiplex PCR was done for detection and differentiation of above mentioned parasites. QPCR-MCA was also performed for the detection and differentiation of 11 isolates of above mentioned parasite in a cycle with a time and temperature. Multiplex PCR was able to simultaneous detect and differentiate of above mentioned parasite in a single reaction. QPCR-MCA was able to differentiate genus and species those five protozoa using melting temperature simultaneously at the same time and temperature programs. In total, qPCR-MCA diagnosed 7/11 isolation of E. histolytica, 6/8 isolation of E. dispar, 1/1 E. moshkovskii Laredo, 10/11 G. Lamblia and 6/11 Cryptosporidium spp. Application of multiplex PCR for detection of more than one species in a test in developing countries, at least in reference laboratories has accurate diagnosis and plays a critical role in differentiation of protozoan species. Multiplex PCR assay with a template and multi template had different results and it seems that using a set of primers with one template has higher diagnostic capability in compare with multi template. The results of this study

  20. Detection of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 using real time qRT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Al Rwahnih, Maher; Osman, Fatima; Sudarshana, Mysore; Uyemoto, Jerry; Minafra, Angelantonio; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Martelli, Giovanni; Rowhani, Adib

    2012-02-01

    Nine isolates of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 (GLRaV-7) from diverse geographical regions were sequenced to design more sensitive molecular diagnostic tools. The coat protein (CP) and heat shock protein 70 homologue (HSP70h) genes of these nine isolates were sequenced. Sequences were then used to design more sensitive molecular diagnostic tools. Sequence identity among these isolates ranged between 90 to 100% at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. One RT-PCR and two qRT-PCR assays were used to survey 86 different grapevines from the University of California, Davis Grapevine Virus Collection, the Foundation Plant Services collection and the USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Davis, CA with primers designed in conserved regions of the CP and HSP70h genes. Results revealed that qRT-PCR assays designed in the HSP70h gene was more sensitive (29.07% positives) than that designed in the CP gene (22.09% positives) and both qRT-PCR assays proved to be more sensitive than RT-PCR.

  1. A multiplex real-time PCR panel assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of 12 common swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiju; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Qin; Das, Amaresh; Ma, Guiping; Xu, Lu; Sun, Qing; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Jia, Wei; Liu, Yanhua; Anderson, Gary; Bai, Jianfa; Shi, Jishu

    2016-10-01

    Mixed infection with different pathogens is common in swine production systems especially under intensive production conditions. Quick and accurate detection and differentiation of different pathogens are necessary for epidemiological surveillance, disease management and import and export controls. In this study, we developed and validated a panel of multiplex real-time PCR/RT-PCR assays composed of four subpanels, each detects three common swine pathogens. The panel detects 12 viruses or viral serotypes, namely, VSV-IN, VSV-NJ, SVDV, CSFV, ASFV, FMDV, PCV2, PPV, PRV, PRRSV-NA, PRRSV-EU and SIV. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) and PCR amplification efficiencies of all singular and triplex real-time PCR reactions are within the acceptable range. Comparison between singular and triplex real-time PCR assays of each subpanel indicates that there is no significant interference on assay sensitivities caused by multiplexing. Specificity tests on 226 target clinical samples or 4 viral strains and 91 non-target clinical samples revealed that the real-time PCR panel is 100% specific, and there is no cross amplification observed. The limit of detection of each triplex real-time PCR is less than 10 copies per reaction for DNA, and less than 16 copies per reaction for RNA viruses. The newly developed multiplex real-time PCR panel also detected different combinations of co-infections as confirmed by other means of detections.

  2. A multiplex real-time PCR panel assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of 12 common swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiju; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Qin; Das, Amaresh; Ma, Guiping; Xu, Lu; Sun, Qing; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Jia, Wei; Liu, Yanhua; Anderson, Gary; Bai, Jianfa; Shi, Jishu

    2016-10-01

    Mixed infection with different pathogens is common in swine production systems especially under intensive production conditions. Quick and accurate detection and differentiation of different pathogens are necessary for epidemiological surveillance, disease management and import and export controls. In this study, we developed and validated a panel of multiplex real-time PCR/RT-PCR assays composed of four subpanels, each detects three common swine pathogens. The panel detects 12 viruses or viral serotypes, namely, VSV-IN, VSV-NJ, SVDV, CSFV, ASFV, FMDV, PCV2, PPV, PRV, PRRSV-NA, PRRSV-EU and SIV. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) and PCR amplification efficiencies of all singular and triplex real-time PCR reactions are within the acceptable range. Comparison between singular and triplex real-time PCR assays of each subpanel indicates that there is no significant interference on assay sensitivities caused by multiplexing. Specificity tests on 226 target clinical samples or 4 viral strains and 91 non-target clinical samples revealed that the real-time PCR panel is 100% specific, and there is no cross amplification observed. The limit of detection of each triplex real-time PCR is less than 10 copies per reaction for DNA, and less than 16 copies per reaction for RNA viruses. The newly developed multiplex real-time PCR panel also detected different combinations of co-infections as confirmed by other means of detections. PMID:27506582

  3. Strategies for PCR based detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei DNA in paraffin wax embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Hagen, R M; Gauthier, Y P; Sprague, L D; Vidal, D R; Zysk, G; Finke, E-J; Neubauer, H

    2002-12-01

    Recently, several cases of melioidosis imported to Europe have been reported. The diagnosis of the acute or chronic infection remains challenging. This report describes an optimised protocol for fast and reliable DNA preparation for use in two different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, namely: (1) a seminested PCR assay targeting a genus specific sequence of the ribosomal protein subunit 21 (rpsU) gene and (2) a nested PCR assay targeting the gene encoding the filament forming flagellin (fliC). Various strains of Burkholderia spp, strains of closely related genera, and spleen tissue samples of experimentally infected mice were investigated. The combination of PCR and sequencing of the amplicons resulted in high sensitivity and specificity. These procedures may allow rapid, sensitive, and reliable detection of B pseudomallei DNA in routinely formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded samples, thus providing a safe diagnostic tool and avoiding the cultivation of a risk group 3 agent. In addition, this method could be useful for retrospective histopathological investigations.

  4. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction. PMID:26853558

  5. Molecular detection of Papaya meleira virus in the latex of Carica papaya by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marília Mendes Melo de; Tavares, Eder Torres; Silva, Felipe Rodrigues da; Marinho, Vera Lúcia de Almeida; Júnior, Manoel Teixeira Souza

    2007-12-01

    A RT-PCR assay was developed for early and accurate detection of Papaya meleira virus (PMeV) in the latex from infected papayas. The meleira disease is characterized by an excessive exudation of more fluidic latex from fruits, leaves and stems. This latex oxidises and gives the fruit a "sticky" texture. In the field, disease symptoms are seen almost exclusively on fruit. However, infected plants can be a source of virus for dissemination by insects. Primers specific for PMeV were designed based on nucleotide sequences of the viral dsRNA obtained using a RT-RAPD approach. When tested for RT-PCR amplification, one of these primers (C05-3') amplified a 669-nucleotide fragment using dsRNA obtained from purified virus particles as a template. The translated sequence of this DNA fragment showed a certain degree of similarity to the amino acid sequence of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from other dsRNA viruses. When used as the single primer in two RT-PCR kits available commercially, primer C05-3' also amplified the DNA fragment from papaya latex of infected, but not from healthy plants. The RT-PCR-based method developed in this study could simplify early plant disease diagnosis, assist in monitoring the dissemination of the pathogen within and between fields, and assist in guiding plant disease management.

  6. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction. PMID:26853558

  7. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction.

  8. Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. basilici in substrates and roots by PCR.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, M; Ferrocino, I; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-borne fungus that causes vascular wilts in a wide variety of plant species. Basil is recognized as an ecological niche for Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. basilici (FOB) and this fungus is now present in most countries where basil is cultivated. The rapid identification of the species affecting basil plants is necessary to define a successful method for crop protection. The aim of this study was to develop a PCR method for the rapid detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. basilici in substrates. The specificity of the primers used was tested using the DNA extracted directly from substrate samples. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. basilici was artificially inoculated with decreasing amounts in a commercial substrate (sphagnum peat moss) and in a mixture with 40% of municipal compost, after steam disinfestation. Basil seeds (cv. Fine verde) were sown in pots that were laid on a bench in the greenhouse. At time 0 and after 7, 14 and 21 days from the inoculation, substrate and root samples were collected and prepared for microbial analysis and for the DNA extraction. DNA extraction was carried out using NucleoSpin Soil Kit (Macherey-Nagel, Germany). PCR amplification for the specific detection was carried out using primer sets Bik 1 (5'-ATT CAA GAG CTA AAG GTC C-3') and Bik 4 (5'-TTT GAC CAA GAT AGA TGC C-3') for the first PCR, while primers Bik 1 + Bik 2 (5'-AAA GGT AGT ATA TCG GAG G-3') for the nested PCR to increase detection sensitivity. Disease incidence was also assessed 21 days after seeding. The results showed the presence of amplified fragments of the expected size when the concentration of F. oxysporum f.sp. basilici was at least 3.5 Log CFU g(-1) by using DNA extract directly from substrate, before roots were infected by the pathogen. The detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. basilici by PCR method developed in this study is certainly simple and fast and can be useful for its reliable detection in substrate samples, but not to guarantee that

  9. Development of a specific DNA probe and PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Ghadersohi, A; Coelen, R J; Hirst, R G

    1997-05-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is responsible for several production diseases in cattle, including mastitis, arthritis, pneumonia, abortion and infertility. Current methodologies for detecting and identifying M. bovis are time consuming and difficult. Tests which rely on antigen or antibody detection have poor sensitivity and specificity. In this paper associated protocols for the development of a hybridization probe and PCR are described. A genomic library (SauIIIA digested) was prepared from M. bovis DNA (Colindale Reference Strain: NC10131:02) and cloned into pUC19. Colony hybridization, using a probe preparation made from purified M. bovis DNA, was used to identify colonies of interest. M. bovis DNA fragments were retrieved from recombinant plasmids by digestion with EcoRI and HindIII. This DNA was used to prepare randomly primed probes for dot blot hybridization analysis with immobilized DNA from M. bovis (two strains), M. dispar, M. agalactiae, M. bovigenitalium (two strains), M. ovipneumoniae, a Group 7 strain, M. arginini and bacteria belonging to different genera. Four probes were found to hybridize only with M. bovis and M. ovipneumoniae DNA, whereas one probe reacted with genomic DNA from only one of the two M. bovis strains. The level of sensitivity of the dot blot hybridization assay was 200 CFU (colony forming units)/mL. To enhance the sensitivity further, an M. bovis-specific PCR assay was developed. The primers were designed using sequences obtained from the probe DNA which discriminated M. bovis from all other Mycoplasma DNA tested. The minimum amount of target DNA that could be detected by the PCR assay was that isolated from 10-20 CFU/mL. The PCR assay was therefore 10 times more sensitive than dot blot hybridization.

  10. Development of antibodies to and PCR detection of Ehrlichia spp. in dogs following natural tick exposure.

    PubMed

    Starkey, Lindsay A; Barrett, Anne W; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Stillman, Brett A; Tyrrell, Phyllis; Thatcher, Brendon; Beall, Melissa J; Gruntmeir, Jeff M; Meinkoth, James H; Little, Susan E

    2014-10-10

    Dogs exposed to ticks in the southern US may become infected with multiple species of Ehrlichia. To better define infection risk, blood samples collected from 10 dogs infested with ticks via a natural infestation model were evaluated by blood smear examination, PCR, patient-side ELISAs (SNAP® 4Dx® and SNAP® 4Dx® Plus), IFA, and peptide based ELISA for evidence of infection with Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, and/or E. ewingii. Although morulae were rarely identified in blood smears, every dog (10/10) became infected with Ehrlichia spp. as evidenced by nested PCR detection of E. chaffeensis (7/10) and E. ewingii DNA (10/10); real-time PCR detection of E. chaffeensis (0/10) and E. ewingii (9/10); seroconversion on two different patient-side ELISAs (4/10 or 10/10); seroconversion on IFA to E. canis (10/10, maximum inverse titer=128-4096, GMTMAX=548.7) and E. chaffeensis (10/10, maximum inverse titer=1024-32,768, GMTMAX=4096); and seroconversion on peptide specific ELISA to E. chaffeensis VLPT (7/10) and E. ewingii p28 (9/10). Rickettsemia with E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii, as determined by nested PCR, persisted in dogs for an average of 3.2 or 30.5 days, respectively. Ehrlichia canis was not detected in any dog by any method, and no dogs developed signs of clinical disease. Our data suggest that in areas where ticks are common, dogs are at high risk of infection with Ehrlichia spp., particularly E. ewingii and E. chaffeensis, and can serve as a sentinel for monitoring for the presence of these zoonotic pathogens.

  11. Two-stage PCR assay for detection of human brucellosis in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a common zoonosis that can cause a severe febrile illness in humans. It constitutes a persistent health problem in many developing countries around the world. It is one of the most frequently reported diseases in Saudi Arabia and incidence is particularly high in the Central region, and around the city of Riyadh. The aim of this study was to evaluate a two-stage PCR assay for detection of human brucellosis particularly in endemic areas. Methods A total of 101 serum samples were collected from patients with acute febrile illness (AFI) of unknown cause from two different locations in the Western region of Saudi Arabia. The first location (Northern) is characterized by a nomadic rural population while the second (Central) is a modern urban city. All samples were subjected to DNA extraction and Brucella genus-specific PCR amplification using B4/B5 primers of the bcsp31 gene. Positive B4/B5 samples were subjected to multiplex species-specific Brucella PCR amplification. Results In the Northern location, 81.9% of the AFI samples were confirmed Brucella positive, while all the samples collected from the Central region proved to be Brucella negative. Samples positive for Brucella were subjected to multiplex species-specific Brucella amplification. B. abortus was detected in 10% and B. melitensis in 8% of the samples, while the majority (82%) of samples showed both B. abortus and B. melitensis. As expected, B. suis was not detected in any of the samples. Conclusions This study concluded that a two-stage PCR assay could be useful as a rapid diagnostic tool to allow the consideration of brucellosis as a possible cause of AFI, particularly in non-urban locations. It also recommends the collection of epidemiological data for such patients to obtain further information that may help in rapid diagnosis. PMID:23517532

  12. Theileria, Babesia, and Anaplasma detected by PCR in ruminant herds at Bié Province, Angola

    PubMed Central

    Kubelová, M.; Mazancová, J.; Široký, P.

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Ehrlichia ruminantium, was for the first time studied in Bié Province, central Angola. We examined 76 blood samples of cattle originated from seven farms, and 13 blood samples of goats from two farms employing molecular genetic tools (PCR). Most prevalent was A. ovis-infection in goats (100%) and A. marginale-infection in cattle (38% of examined animals, and six out of seven farms). B. bigemina-infection was detected in only one specimen at Andulo, whereas B. bovis was not detected in Bié. We did not detected T. parva, the causative agent of serious diseases in cattle; nevertheless, infection by T. velifera was quite frequent (14% of examined animals, and five out of seven farms). Causative agent of heartwater disease – E. ruminantium, was not detected. Taking into account short-term perspective of PCR methods in monitoring of epidemiological status in herds, the number of infected animals and distribution of detected pathogens should not be ignored. PMID:23193527

  13. Development of PCR-based technique for detection of purity of Pashmina fiber from textile materials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Shakyawar, D B; Pareek, P K; Raja, A S M; Prince, L L L; Kumar, Satish; Naqvi, S M K

    2015-04-01

    Pashmina fiber is one of major specialty animal fiber in India. The quality of Pashmina obtained from Changthangi and Chegu goats in India is very good. Due to restricted availability and high prices, adulteration of natural prized fibers is becoming a common practice by the manufacturers. Sheep wool is a cheap substitute, which is usually used for adulteration and false declaration of Pashmina-based products. Presently, there is lack of cost-effective and readily available methodology to identify the adulteration of Pashmina products from other similar looking substitutes like sheep wool. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection method can be used to identify origin of animal fiber. Extraction of quality DNA from dyed and processed animal fiber and textile materials is a limiting factor in the development of such detection methods. In the present study, quality DNA was extracted from textile materials, and PCR-based technique using mitochondrial gene (12S rRNA) specific primers was developed for detection of the Pashmina in textile blends. This technique has been used for detection of the adulteration of the Pashmina products with sheep wool. The technique can detect adulteration level up to 10 % of sheep/goat fibers in textile blends.

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium bovis in Bovine and Bubaline Tissues Using Nested-PCR for TbD1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Cristina P.; Osório, Ana Luiza A. R.; Jorge, Kláudia S. G.; Ramos, Carlos Alberto N.; Filho, Antonio Francisco S.; Vidal, Carlos Eugênio S.; Roxo, Eliana; Nishibe, Christiane; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Júnior, Antônio A. F.; Silva, Marcio R.; Neto, José Diomedes B.; Cerqueira, Valíria D.; Zumárraga, Martín J.; Araújo, Flábio R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a nested-PCR system, targeting the TbD1 region, involving the performance of conventional PCR followed by real-time PCR, was developed to detect Mycobacterium bovis in bovine/bubaline tissue homogenates. The sensitivity and specificity of the reactions were assessed with DNA samples extracted from tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, as well as other actinomycetales species and DNA samples extracted directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. In terms of analytical sensitivity, the DNA of M. bovis AN5 was detected up to 1.56 ng with conventional PCR, 97.6 pg with real-time PCR, and 1.53 pg with nested-PCR in the reaction mixture. The nested-PCR exhibited 100% analytical specificity for M. bovis when tested with the DNA of reference strains of environmental mycobacteria and closely-related Actinomycetales. A clinical sensitivity value of 76.0% was detected with tissue samples from animals that exhibited positive results in the comparative intradermal tuberculin test (CITT), as well as from those with lesions compatible with tuberculosis (LCT) that rendered positive cultures. A clinical specificity value of 100% was detected with tissue samples from animals with CITT- results, with no visible lesions (NVL) and negative cultures. No significant differences were found between the nested-PCR and culture in terms of detecting CITT+ animals with LCT or with NVL. No significant differences were recorded in the detection of CITT- animals with NVL. However, nested-PCR detected a significantly higher number of positive animals than the culture in the group of animals exhibiting LCT with no previous records of CITT. The use of the nested-PCR assay to detect M. bovis in tissue homogenates provided a rapid diagnosis of bovine and bubaline tuberculosis. PMID:24618787

  15. Detection of Banana mild mosaic virus and Banana virus X by polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Acina, Isabelle; Lockhart, Benham E L; Candresse, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    Viruses are important constraints to the movement and propagation of plant germplasm, especially for vegetatively propagated crops such as banana and plantain. Their control relies primarily on the use of virus-free plant material, whose production and certification requires sensitive and reliable detection methods. An existing polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR) assay was adapted to the detection of Banana mild mosaic virus (BanMMV) and Banana virus X, two Flexiviridae infecting Musa spp. PDO inosine-containing primers were found to be well suited to the detection of BanMMV, despite its high molecular diversity, but not to that of the highly conserved BVX, for which species-specific primers were designed. Sampling and sample processing steps were optimized in order to avoid nucleic acid purification prior to the reverse transcription step. A polyclonal anti-BanMMV antiserum was raised and successfully used for the immunocapture (IC) of BanMMV viral particles from leaf extracts, leading to the development of a PDO-IC-RT-nested PCR assay. Although the anti-BanMMV antiserum could to some extent recognize BVX viral particles, direct binding (DB) was shown to be a more efficient method for processing BVX-infected samples and a PDO-DB-RT-nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of BVX from leaf extracts. PMID:17280722

  16. Detection of Banana mild mosaic virus and Banana virus X by polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Acina, Isabelle; Lockhart, Benham E L; Candresse, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    Viruses are important constraints to the movement and propagation of plant germplasm, especially for vegetatively propagated crops such as banana and plantain. Their control relies primarily on the use of virus-free plant material, whose production and certification requires sensitive and reliable detection methods. An existing polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotide RT-PCR (PDO-RT-PCR) assay was adapted to the detection of Banana mild mosaic virus (BanMMV) and Banana virus X, two Flexiviridae infecting Musa spp. PDO inosine-containing primers were found to be well suited to the detection of BanMMV, despite its high molecular diversity, but not to that of the highly conserved BVX, for which species-specific primers were designed. Sampling and sample processing steps were optimized in order to avoid nucleic acid purification prior to the reverse transcription step. A polyclonal anti-BanMMV antiserum was raised and successfully used for the immunocapture (IC) of BanMMV viral particles from leaf extracts, leading to the development of a PDO-IC-RT-nested PCR assay. Although the anti-BanMMV antiserum could to some extent recognize BVX viral particles, direct binding (DB) was shown to be a more efficient method for processing BVX-infected samples and a PDO-DB-RT-nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of BVX from leaf extracts.

  17. Nonrandom chromosomal imbalances in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma detected by arbitrarily primed PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, A; Taruscio, D; Scardoni, M; Iosi, F; Paradisi, S; Ennas, M G; Rigaud, G; Moore, P S; Menestrina, F

    1999-11-01

    We used arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) fingerprinting to identify chromosomal imbalances in six primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas (PMBLs). Seventy-four chromosomal imbalances were detected, consisting of 49 sequence gains and 25 losses. Amplifications on chromosome X were seen in five cases, four of which involved the same chromosomal locus. Nonrandom gains at the same locus were also identified on chromosomes 2 and 7 in four cases and on chromosomes 5, 9, and 12 in three cases. Five PMBLs were also analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), which found chromosome arm 9p amplification as the only nonrandom imbalance. Our data demonstrate that chromosomal amplifications outnumber losses in PMBL. These mainly involve chromosomes 9 and X and may reflect more complex phenomena, such as translocations or other chromosomal rearrangements, as AP-PCR found coexistent gains and losses on these chromosomes. Comparison between AP-PCR and CGH suggests that anomalies affecting the same chromosomal regions may occur at much higher frequencies than expected by CGH, suggesting that genomic amplifications are usually confined to DNA segments smaller than the megabase long segments required for detection in CGH. Modest increases in genetic material may be as effective as higher-level amplifications when affecting sites where a proto-oncogene resides.

  18. PCR-Based Detection of Babesia ovis in Rhipicephalus bursa and Small Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilnejad, Bijan; Tavassoli, Mousa; Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Mardani, Karim; Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Golabi, Mostafa; Arjmand, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of Babesia ovis infection in adult Rhipicephalus bursa and small ruminants in West Azerbaijan province, Iran. Blood samples were collected from 280 sheep and 122 goats of forty randomly selected flocks. Specific B. ovis fragment was detected in 67 animals (16.7%), of which 52 animals (18.6%) were sheep and 15 animals (12.2%) goats (P < 0.05). Of the 848 R. bursa collected from naturally infested small ruminants and farm dogs, Babesia ovis was detected by PCR in salivary glands of 94 adult ticks. The frequency of B. ovis infection was higher in flocks with tick in comparison with animals without tick (P < 0.05). Positive amplification from blood of ruminants, ticks, oviposition ticks, eggs, and larvae was subjected to restriction digestion with HphI. One RFLP profile was produced. The PCR-RFLP results indicated that one strain of B. ovis exists in this area. The results showed that the PCR was useful method to investigate the epidemiology of small ruminants' babesiosis. Furthermore, R. Bursa, which can transovarially transmit B. ovis and as well as being widely distributed in West Azerbaijan province, Iran, might play an important role in the field as a natural vector of B. ovis.

  19. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR. PMID:27143320

  20. A PCR-free fluorescence strategy for detecting telomerase activity via double amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiafei; Cheng, Rui; Shi, Zhilu; Jin, Yan

    2016-01-15

    As a universal tumor biomarker, research on the activity and inhibition of telomerase is of great importance for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Although the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) has served as a powerful assay for detecting telomerase activity, its application has been significantly limited by amplification related errors and time-consuming procedure. To address the limitations of PCR-based protocol, a dual amplification fluorescence assay was developed for PCR-free detecting telomerase activity. Briefly, we designed an arch-structure DNA probe to specifically control strand displacement reaction and subsequent enzyme-aided amplification. Telomerase substrate (TS) primer was extended by telomerase to form long elongation products which contain several TTAGGG repeat units. So, one elongation product can release more than one trigger DNA (t-DNA) via strand displacement reaction to realize first amplification. Subsequently, t-DNA specifically opened molecular beacon (MB) to restore the fluorescence of MB. Meanwhile, t-DNA was recycled by the aid of nicking endonuclease to continuously open more and more MBs, leading to a second amplification. Owing to the double amplification strategy, the proposed method allowed the measurement of telomerase activity in crude cell extracts equivalent to 5 HeLa cells and 10 CCRF-CEM cells without PCR amplification. Besides, the influence of telomere-binding ligands on the telomerase activity demonstrated that the proposed method holds the potential to evaluate the inhibition efficiency of telomerase inhibitors.

  1. Rapid quantitative detection of Lactobacillus sakei in meat and fermented sausages by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Martín, Belén; Jofré, Anna; Garriga, Margarita; Pla, Maria; Aymerich, Teresa

    2006-09-01

    A quick and simple method for quantitative detection of Lactobacillus sakei in fermented sausages was successfully developed. It is based on Chelex-100-based DNA purification and real-time PCR enumeration using a TaqMan fluorescence probe. Primers and probes were designed in the L. sakei 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region, and the assay was evaluated using L. sakei genomic DNA and an artificially inoculated sausage model. The detection limit of this technique was approximately 3 cells per reaction mixture using both purified DNA and the inoculated sausage model. The quantification limit was established at 30 cells per reaction mixture in both models. The assay was then applied to enumerate L. sakei in real samples, and the results were compared to the MRS agar count method followed by confirmation of the percentage of L. sakei colonies. The results obtained by real-time PCR were not statistically significantly different than those obtained by plate count on MRS agar (P > 0.05), showing a satisfactory agreement between both methods. Therefore, the real-time PCR assay developed can be considered a promising rapid alternative method for the quantification of L. sakei and evaluation of the implantation of starter strains of L. sakei in fermented sausages.

  2. Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Bocavirus in Human Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Olsen, Sonja J.; Mackay, Ian M.; Sloots, Theo P.; Fry, Alicia M.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2006-01-01

    The recently discovered human bocavirus (HBoV) is the first member of the family Parvoviridae, genus Bocavirus, to be potentially associated with human disease. Several studies have identified HBoV in respiratory specimens from children with acute respiratory disease, but the full spectrum of clinical disease and the epidemiology of HBoV infection remain unclear. The availability of rapid and reliable molecular diagnostics would therefore aid future studies of this novel virus. To address this, we developed two sensitive and specific real-time TaqMan PCR assays that target the HBoV NS1 and NP-1 genes. Both assays could reproducibly detect 10 copies of a recombinant DNA plasmid containing a partial region of the HBoV genome, with a dynamic range of 8 log units (101 to 108 copies). Eight blinded clinical specimen extracts positive for HBoV by an independent PCR assay were positive by both real-time assays. Among 1,178 NP swabs collected from hospitalized pneumonia patients in Sa Kaeo Province, Thailand, 53 (4.5%) were reproducibly positive for HBoV by one or both targets. Our data confirm the possible association of HBoV infection with pneumonia and demonstrate the utility of these real-time PCR assays for HBoV detection. PMID:16954253

  3. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR.

  4. A TaqMan-based real-time PCR for detection and quantification of porcine parvovirus 4.

    PubMed

    Gava, Danielle; Souza, Carine K; Schaefer, Rejane; Vincent, Amy L; Cantão, Maurício E; Coldebella, Arlei; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice R

    2015-07-01

    Porcine parvovirus 4 (PPV4) is a DNA virus, and a member of the Parvoviridae family within the Bocavirus genera. It was detected recently in swine, but its epidemiology and pathology remain unclear. A TaqMan-based real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting a conserved region of the ORF3 gene of PPV4 was developed. The qPCR detection limit was 9.5 × 10(1) DNA copies/μL. There was no cross-reaction with porcine parvovirus, torque teno virus 1, torque teno virus 2, porcine circovirus type 1, porcine circovirus type 2, or with pseudorabies virus. Two hundred and seventy-two samples, including serum, semen, lungs, feces, ovarian follicular fluids, ovaries and uterus, were evaluated by qPCR and PPV4 was detected in 36 samples (13.2%). When compared with a conventional PCR (cPCR), the qPCR assay was 10 times more sensitive and the detection of PPV4 DNA in field samples was increased 2.5 times. Partial sequencing of PPV4 ORF3 gene, obtained from two pooled samples of uterus and ovaries, revealed a high nucleotide identity (98-99%) with a reference PPV4 sequence. The qPCR can be used as a fast and accurate assay for the detection and quantification of PPV4 in field samples and for epidemiological studies in swine herds.

  5. Development of a quantitative immunocapture real-time PCR assay for detecting structurally intact adenoviral particles in water.

    PubMed

    Ogorzaly, Leslie; Bonot, Sébastien; Moualij, Benaissa El; Zorzi, Willy; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2013-12-01

    Development of rapid, sensitive and specific methods for detection of infectious enteric viruses in water is challenging but crucial for gaining reliable information for risk assessment. An immunocapture real-time PCR (IC-qPCR) was designed to detect jointly the two major viral particle components, i.e. the capsid protein and the viral genome. Targeting both constituents helps circumventing the technical limits of cell culture approaches and the inability of PCR based methods to predict the infectious status. Two waterborne pathogenic virus models, human adenovirus types 2 and 41, were chosen for this study. IC-qPCR showed a detection limit of 10MPNCU/reaction with a dynamic range from 10(2) to 10(6)MPNCU/reaction. Sensitivity was thus 100-fold higher compared to ELISA-based capture employing the same anti-hexon antibodies. After optimisation, application on environmental water samples was validated, and specificity towards the targeted virus types was obtained through the qPCR step. Heat-treated pure samples as well as surface water samples brought evidence that this method achieves detection of encapsidated viral genomes while excluding free viral genome amplification. As a consequence, adenovirus concentrations estimated by IC-qPCR were below those calculated by direct qPCR. The results demonstrate that the IC-qPCR method is a sensitive and rapid tool for detecting, in a single-tube assay, structurally intact and thus potentially infectious viral particles in environmental samples. PMID:23850702

  6. A novel COLD-PCR/FMCA assay enhances the detection of low-abundance IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pang, Brendan; Durso, Mary B; Hamilton, Ronald L; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2013-03-01

    Point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been identified in many gliomas. The detection of IDH1 mutations becomes challenging on suboptimal glioma biopsies when a limited number of tumor cells is available for analysis. Coamplification at lower denaturing-polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a PCR technique that deliberately lowers the denaturing cycle temperature to selectively favor amplification of mutant alleles, allowing for the sensitive detection of low-abundance mutations. We developed a novel COLD-PCR assay on the LightCycler platform (Roche, Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN), using post-PCR fluorescent melting curve analysis (FMCA) for the detection of mutant IDH1 with a detection limit of 1%. Thirty-five WHO grade I to IV gliomas and 9 non-neoplastic brain and spinal cord biopsies were analyzed with this technique and the results were compared with the conventional real-time PCR and the Sanger sequencing analysis. COLD-PCR/FMCA was able to detect the most common IDH1 R132H mutation and rare mutation types including R132H, R132C, R132L, R132S, and R132G mutations. Twenty-five glioma cases were positive for IDH1 mutations by COLD-PCR/FMCA, and 23 gliomas were positive by the conventional real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing. A pilocytic astrocytoma (PA I) and a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM IV) showed low-abundance IDH1 mutations detected by COLD-PCR/FMCA. The remaining 10 glioma and 9 non-neoplastic samples were negative by all the 3 methods. In summary, we report a novel COLD-PCR/FMCA method that provides rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1 mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and can be used in the clinical setting to assess the small brain biopsies.

  7. Real-time PCR detection of Campylobacter spp.: A comparison to classic culturing and enrichment.

    PubMed

    de Boer, P; Rahaoui, H; Leer, R J; Montijn, R C; van der Vossen, J M B M

    2015-10-01

    The major disadvantage of the current gold standard for detection of the food pathogen Campylobacter, i.e. culturing, is the lengthy procedure. In this study we assessed the use of real-time PCR for detection of Campylobacter. To this end, 926 poultry samples, taken from transport containers and broiler caeca in The Netherlands in 2007, were subjected to three different real-time PCR detection methods: one targeting the Campylobacter jejuni hipO gene, one targeting the Campylobacter coli glyA gene, and one generically targeting Campylobacter spp. 16S rDNA sequence. The PCR results from the three different PCR protocols were compared to the work of Nauta et al. (2009) who analyzed the same set of samples collected from 62 broiler flocks by means of enrichment culturing. The results indicate that the generic 16S campylobacter PCR detection is equally reliable but much faster (4 h instead of ≥2 days) than detection by means of culturing. Moreover, PCR detection targeting the hipO and the glyA gene provide the possibility of C. jejuni and C. coli species discrimination. The generic Campylobacter spp. PCR analysis also confirmed the high incidence of Campylobacter spp. in poultry samples (∼90%) and the species specific PCR showed the simultaneous presence of C. jejuni and C. coli in ∼24% of the samples. Furthermore, the results from the three PCR analyses suggested the occurrence of alternative Campylobacter species in almost 10% of the samples. The campylobacter PCR detection methods reported here can replace traditional culturing because of being quicker and more reliable.

  8. Novel polyomavirus detected in the feces of a chimpanzee by nested broad-spectrum PCR.

    PubMed

    Johne, Reimar; Enderlein, Dirk; Nieper, Hermann; Müller, Hermann

    2005-03-01

    In order to screen for new polyomaviruses in samples derived from various animal species, degenerated PCR primer pairs were constructed. By using a nested PCR protocol, the sensitive detection of nine different polyomavirus genomes was demonstrated. The screening of field samples revealed the presence of a new polyomavirus, tentatively designated chimpanzee polyomavirus (ChPyV), in the feces of a juvenile chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Analysis of the region encoding the major capsid protein VP1 revealed a unique insertion in the EF loop of the protein and showed that ChPyV is a distinct virus related to the monkey polyomavirus B-lymphotropic polyomavirus and the human polyomavirus JC polyomavirus. PMID:15731285

  9. Novel Polyomavirus Detected in the Feces of a Chimpanzee by Nested Broad-Spectrum PCR

    PubMed Central

    Johne, Reimar; Enderlein, Dirk; Nieper, Hermann; Müller, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    In order to screen for new polyomaviruses in samples derived from various animal species, degenerated PCR primer pairs were constructed. By using a nested PCR protocol, the sensitive detection of nine different polyomavirus genomes was demonstrated. The screening of field samples revealed the presence of a new polyomavirus, tentatively designated chimpanzee polyomavirus (ChPyV), in the feces of a juvenile chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Analysis of the region encoding the major capsid protein VP1 revealed a unique insertion in the EF loop of the protein and showed that ChPyV is a distinct virus related to the monkey polyomavirus B-lymphotropic polyomavirus and the human polyomavirus JC polyomavirus. PMID:15731285

  10. Detection of Talaromyces marneffei from Fresh Tissue of an Inhalational Murine Pulmonary Model Using Nested PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yinghui; Huang, Xiaowen; Yi, Xiuwen; He, Ya; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Xi, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Penicilliosis marneffei, often consecutive to the aspiration of Talaromyces marneffei (Penicillium marneffei), continues to be one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients in endemic regions such as Southeast Asia. Improving the accuracy of diagnosing this disease would aid in reducing the mortality of associated infections. In this study, we developed a stable and reproducible murine pulmonary model that mimics human penicilliosis marneffei using a nebulizer to deliver Talaromyces marneffei (SUMS0152) conidia to the lungs of BALB/c nude mice housed in exposure chamber. Using this model, we further revealed that nested PCR was sensitive and specific for detecting Talaromyces marneffei in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and fresh tissues. This inhalation model may provide a more representative analysis tool for studying the development of penicilliosis marneffei, in addition to revealing that nested PCR has a predictive value in reflecting pulmonary infection. PMID:26886887

  11. Fast real-time PCR for the detection of crustacean allergen in foods.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Beatriz; Vieites, Juan M; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2012-02-29

    Crustaceans are one of the most common allergens causing severe food reaction. These food allergens are a health problem, and they have become very important; there are various regulations that establish that labeling must be present regarding these allergens to warn consumers. In the present work a fast real-time PCR, by a LNA probe, was developed. This allows the detection of crustaceans in all kinds of products, including processed products in which very aggressive treatments of temperature and pressure during the manufacturing process are used. This methodology provides greater sensitivity and specificity and reduces the analysis time of real-time PCR to 40 min. This methodology was further validated by means of simulating products likely to contain this allergen. For this, products present on the market were spiked with crustacean cooking water. The assay is a potential tool in issues related to the labeling of products and food security to protect the allergic consumer.

  12. Detection of tumor cell contamination in peripheral blood by RT-PCR in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Noh, Y H; Im, G; Ku, J H; Lee, Y S; Ahn, M J

    1999-12-01

    We analyzed the peripheral blood of patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer at different stages to assess the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which we used as an indicator for micrometastatic malignant cells. A total of 35 gastric, 24 colorectal, 4 esophageal and 4 biliary tract cancer patients and nine normal healthy subjects were studied. No CEA mRNA was detected in the nine normal healthy volunteers. CEA mRNA was detected in 100% (10/10) of metastatic, 33.3% (3/9) of early gastric cancer (EGC), and 18.8% (3/16) resectable gastric cancer patients, respectively. In colorectal cancer, 55.6% (5/9) of metastatic cancers were positive for CEA mRNA, and 26.7% (4/15) Duke stage B/C showed positive. One patient with stage III gastric cancer who was negative CEA mRNA initially and turned positive during follow-up, developed multiple bone metastasis one month later. Another stage III patient, who was positive for CEA mRNA, preoperatively revealed early relapse in two months. These results suggest that the identification of circulating tumor cells using RT-PCR for the detection of CEA mRNA is feasible and this analysis may be a promising tool for early detection of micrometastatic circulating malignant cells in patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  13. Digital PCR methods improve detection sensitivity and measurement precision of low abundance mtDNA deletions

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Frances R.; Martin, James L.; Frescura, Kristin; Damas, Joana; Pereira, Filipe; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Kaufman, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are a common cause of primary mitochondrial disorders, and have also been implicated in a broad collection of conditions, including aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Prevalent among these pathogenic variants are mtDNA deletions, which show a strong bias for the loss of sequence in the major arc between, but not including, the heavy and light strand origins of replication. Because individual mtDNA deletions can accumulate focally, occur with multiple mixed breakpoints, and in the presence of normal mtDNA sequences, methods that detect broad-spectrum mutations with enhanced sensitivity and limited costs have both research and clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated semi-quantitative and digital PCR-based methods of mtDNA deletion detection using double-stranded reference templates or biological samples. Our aim was to describe key experimental assay parameters that will enable the analysis of low levels or small differences in mtDNA deletion load during disease progression, with limited false-positive detection. We determined that the digital PCR method significantly improved mtDNA deletion detection sensitivity through absolute quantitation, improved precision and reduced assay standard error. PMID:27122135

  14. Detection and Identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 5 by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Terry M.; Ward, Christine K.; Inzana, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is based on detection of the serotype-specific capsular antigen. However, not all isolates can be serotyped, and some may cross-react with multiple serotyping reagents. To improve sensitivity and specificity of serotyping and for early detection, a multiplex PCR assay was developed for detection of A. pleuropneumoniae and identification of serotype 5 isolates. DNA sequences specific to the conserved export and serotype-specific biosynthesis regions of the capsular polysaccharide of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 were used as primers to amplify 0.7- and 1.1-kb DNA fragments, respectively. The 0.7-kb fragment was amplified from all strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested with the exception of serotype 4. The 0.7-kb fragment was not amplified from any heterologous species that are also common pathogens or commensals of swine. In contrast, the 1.1-kb fragment was amplified from all serotype 5 strains only. The assay was capable of amplifying DNA from less than 102 CFU. The A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular DNA products were readily amplified from lung tissues obtained from infected swine, although the 1.1-kb product was not amplified from some tissues stored frozen for 6 years. The multiplex PCR assay enabled us to detect A. pleuropneumoniae rapidly and to distinguish serotype 5 strains from other serotypes. The use of primers specific to the biosynthesis regions of other A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes would expand the diagnostic and epidemiologic capabilities of this assay. PMID:9620404

  15. Effective detection of human noroviruses in Hawaiian waters using enhanced RT-PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hsin-I; Connell, Christina; Boehm, Alexandria B; Lu, Yuanan

    2011-11-15

    The current recreational water quality criteria using growth-based measurements of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentration have their limitations for swimmer protection. To evaluate the possible use of enteric viruses as an improved indicator of human sewage contamination in recreational waters for enhanced health risk assessment, human norovirus (huNoV) was tested as a model in this study. To establish a highly sensitive protocol for effective huNoV detection in waters, 16 published and newly designed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) primer pairs specific for huNoV genogroup I (GI) and genogroup II (GII) were comparatively evaluated side-by-side using single sources of huNoV RNA stock extracted from local clinical isolates. Under optimized conditions, these RT-PCR protocols shared a very different pattern of detection sensitivity for huNoV. The primer sets COG2F/COG2R and QNIF4/NV1LCR were determined to be the most sensitive ones for huNoV GII and GI, respectively, with up to 10(5)- and 10(6)-fold more sensitive as compared to other sets tested. These two sensitive protocols were validated by positive detection of huNoV in untreated and treated urban wastewater samples. In addition, these RT-PCR protocols enabled detection of the prevalence of huNoV in 5 (GI) and 10 (GII) of 16 recreational water samples collected around the island of O'ahu, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing and sequence analysis. Findings from this study support the possible use of enteric viral pathogens for environmental monitoring and argue the importance and essentiality for such monitoring activity to ensure a safe use of recreational waters. PMID:21945082

  16. Detection of aerosolized biological agents by immunoassay followed by autonomous PCR confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Hindson, B J; McBride, M T; Makarewicz, A J; Henderer, B D; Sathyam, U S; Smith, S M; Gutierrez, D M; Metz, T R; Venkateswaran, K S; Colston, B W; Farrow, S W

    2003-12-15

    An Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) unit is an automated, podium-sized system that monitors the air for all three biological threat agents (bacteria, viruses, and toxins). The system has been developed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy and Department of Homeland Security by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to protect people in critical or high-traffic facilities and at special events. The system performs continuous aerosol collection, sample preparation, and multiplexed biological tests using advanced immunoassays as the primary screen. Over ten agents are assayed at once, and results are reported hourly. R&D work this year focused on incorporating polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) techniques for detecting DNA as confirmation of immunoassay positives. The primary objective of the Dugway testing was to demonstrate the APDS with immunoassay identification and PCR confirmation of bacteria. A secondary objective was to demonstrate immunoassay identification of a protein toxoid (denatured toxin) aerosol release. A total of 12 agent trials were conducted over 14 days of testing, for a total of four work weeks at Dugway. Both testing objectives were achieved with multiple releases and clear identifications. The APDS was shown to be effective for identifying aerosolized Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus globigii, and botulinum toxoid. The two areas for improvement were operational as opposed to hardware-related. The first was slowing the PCR thermal cycling to achieve stronger signals, which was demonstrated during the later phases of testing. The second area is to improve the parameters for autonomous PCR triggering; this is one of the focuses of the upcoming year's work.

  17. Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Nabili, Mojtaba; Shokohi, Tahereh; Janbabaie, Ghasem; Hashemi-Soteh, Mohammad Bagher; Ali-Moghaddam, Kamran; Aghili, Seyed Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a serious opportunistic infection caused by various species of Aspergillus in immunocompromised individuals. Basically, rapid and early diagnosis prevents IA progression. In this study we performed a Real Time PCR/ Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for diagnosis of IA in hematologic malignancies and bone marrow transplant recipients. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients with hematologic malignancies and marrow transplant recipients were evaluated for IA in Sari and Tehran from 2009 to 2010. The primer and hybridization probe were designed to amplify the specific sequence of 18S rRNA genes using Light Cycler system and FRET. Galactomannan (GM) assay was performed on serums which obtained from selected patients using the Platelia Aspergillus kit. Results: According to the criteria defined by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) for IA, 18 (29%) patients out of 62 patients were stratified into probable and possible groups. The female-to-male ratio was 1:2; the mean age of the patients was 36 years. The most common malignancies in these patients were acute lymphoblastic leukemia (38.9%). The minimum detection limit was 10 conidia (101 CFU/ml) equivalents (100 fg) per PCR reaction. GM assay was positive in 20.9% and real-time PCR probe set assay were positive in 17.7% patients who had clinical signs and host factor according to the mentioned criteria. Conclusion: Using the Real-Time PCR/FRET assay in whole blood specimens seems to be a promising method for diagnosis of IA, especially when used in combination with the GM detection test. PMID:23853434

  18. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  19. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF[sub 1] mice irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from [gamma]-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5[prime] region of the mRb gene.

  20. Caution in evaluation of removal of virus by filtration: Misinterpretation due to detection of viral genome fragments by PCR.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Muneo; Ohkubo, Yuji; Masuda, Maki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kadue; Sasaki, Yuko; Yunoki, Mikihiro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    The testing of biological products at different stages of the manufacturing process currently involves quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR)-based assays. Q-PCR techniques are able to detect not only the viral genome in viral particles but also fragments of degraded genome in samples. The ability of 15 and 19-nm filters to remove viruses was examined by conducting infectivity assays and Q-PCR assays using parvovirus B19 (B19), one of the smallest non-enveloped viruses. Although the filtered samples showed no infectivity, viral DNA was detected by Q-PCR. Interestingly, approximately 90% of the total viral genome in 15-nm filtrates had a detectable size of less than 0.5kb by the Q-PCR and as a consequence reduction factors were underestimated using Q-PCR. The reduction factors using Q-PCR might be underestimated due to the presence of a large amount of free B19 DNA which shows no infectivity in the tested filtrates. Therefore, the results of Q-PCR should be interpreted with caution. The careful design of primers is needed to eliminate amplification from fragments of viral DNA by Q-PCR.

  1. Optimization of triplex real time PCR for detecting Staphylococcus aureus mecA, pvl and nuc genes.

    PubMed

    Vremeră, Teodora; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda; Logigan, Cătălina; Năstase, Eduard; Miftode, Egidia; Luncă, Cătălina; Dorneanu, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows simultaneous detection of two or more genes, using the same reaction conditions, and so it is possible the rapid detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA) in clinical specimens. This study aimed to implement, for the first time in our laboratory, a triplex real time PCR (RT-PCR) technique for detection of genes encoding resistance to oxacillin and synthesis of Panton Valentine leukocidin (pvl), a pathogenicity factor characteristic for community acquired strains (CA-MRSA). The application of this method will permit the epidemiological surveillance of circulating strains and early application of prevention measures.

  2. Duplex real-time PCR for rapid simultaneous detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in Amphibian samples.

    PubMed

    Blooi, M; Pasmans, F; Longcore, J E; Spitzen-van der Sluijs, A; Vercammen, F; Martel, A

    2013-12-01

    Chytridiomycosis is a lethal fungal disease contributing to declines and extinctions of amphibian species worldwide. The currently used molecular screening tests for chytridiomycosis fail to detect the recently described species Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans. In this study, we present a duplex real-time PCR that allows the simultaneous detection of B. salamandrivorans and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. With B. dendrobatidis- and B. salamandrivorans-specific primers and probes, detection of the two pathogens in amphibian samples is possible, with a detection limit of 0.1 genomic equivalent of zoospores of both pathogens per PCR. The developed real-time PCR shows high degrees of specificity and sensitivity, high linear correlations (r(2) > 0.995), and high amplification efficiencies (>94%) for B. dendrobatidis and B. salamandrivorans. In conclusion, the described duplex real-time PCR can be used to detect DNA of B. dendrobatidis and B. salamandrivorans with highly reproducible and reliable results.

  3. Duplex Real-Time PCR for Rapid Simultaneous Detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in Amphibian Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pasmans, F.; Longcore, J. E.; Spitzen-van der Sluijs, A.; Vercammen, F.; Martel, A.

    2013-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis is a lethal fungal disease contributing to declines and extinctions of amphibian species worldwide. The currently used molecular screening tests for chytridiomycosis fail to detect the recently described species Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans. In this study, we present a duplex real-time PCR that allows the simultaneous detection of B. salamandrivorans and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. With B. dendrobatidis- and B. salamandrivorans-specific primers and probes, detection of the two pathogens in amphibian samples is possible, with a detection limit of 0.1 genomic equivalent of zoospores of both pathogens per PCR. The developed real-time PCR shows high degrees of specificity and sensitivity, high linear correlations (r2 > 0.995), and high amplification efficiencies (>94%) for B. dendrobatidis and B. salamandrivorans. In conclusion, the described duplex real-time PCR can be used to detect DNA of B. dendrobatidis and B. salamandrivorans with highly reproducible and reliable results. PMID:24108616

  4. Clinical Evaluation of COBAS TaqMan PCR for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ikegame, Satoshi; Sakoda, Yoritake; Fujino, Nao; Taguchi, Kazuhito; Kawasaki, Masayuki; Kajiki, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective observational study was performed to determine the sensitivity and limitation of PCR test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex. We obtained clinical specimens collected from the respiratory tract, cultured M. tuberculosis or M. avium complex, and performed PCR analysis. A total of 299 samples (M. tuberculosis, 177; M. avium, 35; M. intracellulare, 87) were analyzed by COBAS TaqMan PCR from April 2007 to March 2011. The PCR positivity rates were 50–55%, 70–100%, 88–98%, and 100% in smear-negative, smear 1+, 2+, and 3+ groups, respectively. The PCR positivity of tuberculosis in smear 1+ was 80.6%, which was statistically significantly (P < 0.001) lower than that of smear 2+ (97.3%). From January 2005 to March 2007, we collected an additional 138 samples (M. tuberculosis, 74; M. avium, 21; M. intracellulare, 43), which were analyzed by COBAS Amplicor PCR. The PCR positivity rates obtained using COBAS TaqMan PCR and COBAS Amplicor PCR were not significantly different. The sensitivity of PCR test for mycobacteria is not sufficient in case of smear 1+. Careful consideration must be given to the interpretation of negative PCR test results in smear 1+, because smear-positive tuberculosis is the criterion for isolation. PMID:23029612

  5. Detection of 12 respiratory viruses by duplex real time PCR assays in respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Arvia, Rosaria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Ciccone, Nunziata; Della Malva, Nunzia; Azzi, Alberta

    2015-12-01

    Different viruses can be responsible for similar clinical manifestations of respiratory infections. Thus, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory viral diseases requires the detection of a large number of viruses. In this study, 6 duplex real-time PCR assays, using EvaGreen intercalating dye, were developed to detect 12 major viruses responsible for respiratory diseases: influenza A and B viruses, enteroviruses (including enterovirus spp, and rhinovirus spp), respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, coronaviruses group I (of which CoV 229E and CoV NL63 are part) and II (including CoV OC43 and CoV HKU1), parainfluenza viruses type 1, 2, 3 and 4, human adenoviruses and human bocaviruses. The 2 target viruses of each duplex reaction were distinguishable by the melting temperatures of their amplicons. The 6 duplex real time PCR assays were applied for diagnostic purpose on 202 respiratory samples from 157 patients. One hundred fifty-seven samples were throat swabs and 45 were bronchoalveolar lavages. The results of the duplex PCR assays were confirmed by comparison with a commercial, validated, assay; in addition, the positive results were confirmed by sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of the duplex PCR assays varied from 10(3) copies/ml to 10(4) copies/ml. For parainfluenza virus 2 only it was 10(5) copies/ml. Seventy clinical samples (35%) from 55 patients (30 children and 25 adults) were positive for 1 or more viruses. In adult patients, influenza A virus was the most frequently detected respiratory virus followed by rhinoviruses. In contrast, respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus in children, followed by enteroviruses, influenza A virus and coronavirus NL63. The small number of samples/patients does not allow us to draw any epidemiological conclusion. Altogether, the results of this study indicate that the 6 duplex PCR assays described in this study are sensitive, specific and cost-effective. Thus, this assay could be

  6. Development of duplex real-time PCR for the detection of WSSV and PstDV1 in cultivated shrimp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Penaeus stylirostris penstyldensovirus 1 (previously named Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus-IHHNV) are two of the most important viral pathogens of penaeid shrimp. Different methods have been applied for diagnosis of these viruses, including Real-time PCR (qPCR) assays. A duplex qPCR method allows the simultaneous detection of two viruses in the same sample, which is more cost-effective than assaying for each virus separately. Currently, an assay for the simultaneous detection of the WSSV and the PstDV1 in shrimp is unavailable. The aim of this study was to develop and standardize a duplex qPCR assay for the simultaneous detection of the WSSV and the PstDV1 in clinical samples of diseased L. vannamei. In addition, to evaluate the performance of two qPCR master mixes with regard to the clinical sensitivity of the qPCR assay, as well as, different methods for qPCR results evaluation. Results The duplex qPCR assay for detecting WSSV and PstDV1 in clinical samples was successfully standardized. No difference in the amplification of the standard curves was observed between the duplex and singleplex assays. Specificities and sensitivities similar to those of the singleplex assays were obtained using the optimized duplex qPCR. The analytical sensitivities of duplex qPCR were two copies of WSSV control plasmid and 20 copies of PstDV1 control plasmid. The standardized duplex qPCR confirmed the presence of viral DNA in 28 from 43 samples tested. There was no difference for WSSV detection using the two kits and the distinct methods for qPCR results evaluation. High clinical sensitivity for PstDV1 was obtained with TaqMan Universal Master Mix associated with relative threshold evaluation. Three cases of simultaneous infection by the WSSV and the PstDV1 were identified with duplex qPCR. Conclusion The standardized duplex qPCR was shown to be a robust, highly sensitive, and feasible diagnostic tool for the

  7. Development of a PCR procedure for the detection of a herpes-like virus infecting oysters in France.

    PubMed

    Renault, T; Le Deuff, R M; Lipart, C; Delsert, C

    2000-07-01

    A PCR-based procedure for detecting a herpes-like virus that infects the Japanese oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in France was developed. Two primers were designed to provide specific amplification products ranging in size from 917 to 1001 bp when carried out on oyster herpes-like virus DNA. No amplification was observed of oyster genomic DNA nor of the DNA from vertebrate herpesviruses. Crude samples were prepared and submitted to nested PCR, allowing amplification of DNA fragments of the expected size when carried out on infected larval and spat samples. The procedure used to prepare the sample for PCR was found to be critical because of the presence of unidentified substances in oyster tissues that inhibit the PCR reaction. A rapid and convenient sample preparation using ground tissues allowed a sensitive detection of the herpes-like virus infected oysters. The ability of the defined PCR protocol to diagnose herpes-like virus infections in oysters was compared to the transmission electron microscopy technique using 15 C. gigas larval batches with or without mortalities. PCR amplification is as sensitive a diagnostic assay for herpes-like virus as transmission electron microscopy. However, the nested PCR protocol is more convenient and less time consuming. The relationship between reported mortalities among C. gigas oyster spat and herpes-like virus DNA detection by PCR was also investigated. Statistical analysis showed that virus detection and mortalities are correlated. This observation highlights the importance of studying the causative role of herpes-like virus in oyster spat mortalities.

  8. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method ...

  9. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method p...

  10. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop a method to determine the 95% LOD (lowest co...

  11. Detection of salmonellae in chicken feces by a combination of tetrathionate broth enrichment, capillary PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Carli, K T; Unal, C B; Caner, V; Eyigor, A

    2001-05-01

    This report describes a rapid detection procedure for salmonellae from chicken feces by the combination of tetrathionate primary enrichment (preenrichment [PE])-bacterial lysis-capillary PCR and capillary gel electrophoresis. Pure Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis 64K was reisolated and detected by capillary PCR after buffered peptone water and nutrient broth, tetrathionate broth base Hajna (TTBH), and tetrathionate broth (TTB) preenrichments. When the same culture was mixed with intestinal homogenate, bacteriological reisolation and capillary PCR detection was achieved only by TTBH and TTB preenrichments. Capillary gel electrophoresis revealed that a Salmonella genus-specific 281-bp PCR product was detected when Salmonella strains but not non-Salmonella strains were tested. The detection limit of capillary PCR with whole-cell DNA extracted from pure Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis 64K, Typhimurium LT2-CIP60-62, and Gallinarum 64K was 3, 3, and 9 CFU ml(-1), respectively. The detection limit of capillary PCR from whole-cell DNA extracted from intestinal homogenate artificially contaminated with the same three strains was 3, 3, and 7 CFU ml(-1), respectively. We compared the results of the capillary PCR and bacteriological examination from the natural samples. Thirty-five of 53 naturally contaminated samples produced a specific PCR product. In 9 of the 35 PCR-positive samples, Salmonella could not be detected bacteriologically either by PE or a primary and delayed secondary enrichment (DSE) combination. In the 18 PCR-negative samples, 4 samples were found to harbor Salmonella by both PE and DSE and 14 samples were positive after DSE. Fifty-three additional intestinal homogenate samples, which were negative by their PE and DSE in bacteriological examination, were found to be also negative by their PCRs. The total time required to detect Salmonella with the capillary PCR method we used was approximately 20 h. If samples are from clinically diseased

  12. A new pentaplex-nested PCR to detect five pathogenic bacteria in free living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Calvo, L; Gregorio, I; García, A; Fernández, M T; Goñi, P; Clavel, A; Peleato, M L; Fillat, M F

    2013-02-01

    Changes in water use and anthropogenic activity have major impacts on the quality of natural aquatic ecosystems, water distribution and wastewater plants. One of the main problems is the presence of some pathogenic microorganisms that are resistant to disinfection procedures when they are hosted by free living amoeba and that in many cases are hardly detectable by culture-based procedures. In this work we report a sensitive, low-cost procedure consisting of a pentaplex-nested PCR that allows simultaneous detection of Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp., Vibrio cholerae and the microcystin-producing cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa. The method has been used to detect the presence of these pathogenic bacteria in water and inside free living amoeba. Its validation in 72 samples obtained from different water sources from Aragon (Spain) evidences that Mycobacterium and Pseudomonas spp are prevailing as amoeba-resistant bacteria.

  13. Detection of Simkania negevensis by culture, PCR, and serology in respiratory tract infection in Cornwall, UK

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, M G; Kahane, S; Dvoskin, B; Hartley, J W

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections are often treated empirically without investigation to detect the aetiological agent, which may be a virus or a bacterium, including atypical pathogens such as Chlamydophila pneumoniae or Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Recently, several types Chlamydia‐like intracellular bacteria have been detected in environmental samples and clinical specimens. Little is known of their geographical distribution and potential pathogenicity. We describe the detection, by PCR and isolation in cell culture, of Simkania negevensis in nasopharyngeal aspirates of paediatric patients with bronchiolitis in Cornwall, UK. We also present serological evidence of exposure to the organism in 62% of adult patients and 46% of a sample of pregnant women. Empirical treatment of serious respiratory tract infection should consider the possible contribution of these organisms. PMID:16505289

  14. Multiplex PCR allows simultaneous detection of pathogens in ships' ballast water.

    PubMed

    Aridgides, L J; Doblin, M A; Berke, T; Dobbs, F C; Matson, D O; Drake, L A

    2004-06-01

    There is enormous potential for global transfer of microorganisms, including pathogens, in ships' ballast water. We contend that a major advancement in the study of ballast-water microorganisms in particular, and of aquatic pathogens in general, will be expedited sample analysis, such as provided by the elegant technology of DNA microarrays. In order to use DNA microarrays, however, one must establish the appropriate conditions to bind target sequences in samples to multiple probes on the microarrays. We conducted proof-of-concept experiments to optimize simultaneous detection of multiple microorganisms using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization. We chose three target organisms, all potentially found in ballast water: a calicivirus, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, and the photosynthetic protist Aureococcus anophagefferens. Here, we show simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens is possible, a result supporting the promising future use of microarrays for simultaneous detection of pathogens in ballast water.

  15. Multiplex PCR assay for the detection of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Eaqub; Razzak, Md Abdur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Amin, Md Al; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abd; Asing

    2015-06-15

    Food falsification has direct impact on public health, religious faith, fair-trades and wildlife. For the first time, here we described a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the accurate identification of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods in a single assay platform. Five pairs of species-specific primers were designed targeting mitochondrial ND5, ATPase 6, and cytochrome b genes to amplify 172, 163, 141, 129 and 108 bp DNA fragments from cat, dog, pig, monkey and rat meats, respectively. All PCR products were identified in gel-images and electrochromatograms obtained from Experion Bioanalyzer. Species-specificity checking against 15 important meat and fish and 5 plant species detected no cross-species amplification. Screening of target species in model and commercial meatballs reflected its application to detect target species in process foods. The assay was tested to detect 0.01-0.02 ng DNA under raw states and 1% suspected meats in meatball formulation.

  16. Laboratory Tests of Multiplex Detection of PCR Amplicons Using the Luminex 100 Flow Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, K.S.; Nasarabadi, S.; Langlois, R.G.

    2000-05-05

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) demonstrated the power of flow cytometry in detecting the biological agents simulants at JFT III. LLNL pioneered in the development of advanced nucleic acid analyzer (ANM) for portable real time identification. Recent advances in flow cytometry provide a means for multiplexed nucleic acid detection and immunoassay of pathogenic microorganisms. We are presently developing multiplexed immunoassays for the simultaneous detection of different simulants. Our goal is to build an integrated instrument for both nucleic acid analysis and immuno detection. In this study we evaluated the Luminex LX 100 for concurrent identification of more than one PCR amplified product. ANAA has real-time Taqman fluorescent detection capability for rapid identification of field samples. However, its multiplexing ability is limited by the combination of available fluorescent labels. Hence integration of ANAA with flow cytometry can give the rapidity of ANAA amplification and the multiplex capability of flow cytometry. Multiplexed flow cytometric analysis is made possible using a set of fluorescent latex microsphere that are individually identified by their red and infrared fluorescence. A green fluorochrome is used as the assay signal. Methods were developed for the identification of specific nucleic acid sequences from Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) and Erwinia herbicola (Eh). Detection sensitivity using different reporter fluorochromes was tested with the LX 100, and also different assay formats were evaluated for their suitability for rapid testing. A blind laboratory trial was carried out December 22-27, 1999 to evaluate bead assays for multiplex identification of Bg and Bt PCR products. This report summarizes the assay development, fluorochrome comparisons, and the results of the blind trial conducted at LLNL for the laboratory evaluation of the LX 100 flow analyzer.

  17. Rapid Detection of Ceratocystis platani Inoculum by Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Luisa; Belbahri, Lassaâd; Quartier, Marion; Santini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis platani is the causal agent of canker stain of plane trees, a lethal disease able to kill mature trees in one or two successive growing seasons. The pathogen is a quarantine organism and has a negative impact on anthropogenic and natural populations of plane trees. Contaminated sawdust produced during pruning and sanitation fellings can contribute to disease spread. The goal of this study was to design a rapid, real-time quantitative PCR assay to detect a C. platani airborne inoculum. Airborne inoculum traps (AITs) were placed in an urban setting in the city of Florence, Italy, where the disease was present. Primers and TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes were designed to target cerato-platanin (CP) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) genes. The detection limits of the assay were 0.05 pg/μl and 2 fg/μl of fungal DNA for CP and ITS, respectively. Pathogen detection directly from AITs demonstrated specificity and high sensitivity for C. platani, detecting DNA concentrations as low as 1.2 × 10−2 to 1.4 × 10−2 pg/μl, corresponding to ∼10 conidia per ml. Airborne inoculum traps were able to detect the C. platani inoculum within 200 m of the closest symptomatic infected plane tree. The combination of airborne trapping and real-time quantitative PCR assay provides a rapid and sensitive method for the specific detection of a C. platani inoculum. This technique may be used to identify the period of highest risk of pathogen spread in a site, thus helping disease management. PMID:23811499

  18. Detection of enteroviruses and parechoviruses by a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Pabbaraju, Kanti; Wong, Sallene; Wong, Anita A; Tellier, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Detection of all enteroviruses while excluding cross-detection of rhinoviruses is challenging because of sequence similarities in the commonly used conserved targets for molecular assays. In addition, simultaneous detection and differentiation of enteroviruses and parechoviruses would be beneficial because of a similar clinical picture presented by these viruses. A sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR protocol that can address these clinical needs would be valuable to molecular diagnostic laboratories. Here we report a multiplex nucleic acid based assay using hydrolysis probes targeting the 5' non-translated region for the detection and differentiation of enteroviruses and parechoviruses without cross-detection of rhinoviruses. This assay has been shown to detect enteroviruses belonging to the different species in a variety of specimen types without detecting the different species of rhinoviruses. Laboratory validation shows the assay to be sensitive, specific, reproducible, easy to set up and uses generic cycling conditions. This assay can be implemented for diagnostic testing of patient samples in a high throughput fashion.

  19. Detection of dermcidin for sweat identification by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Koichi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Fukushima, Hisayo; Watanabe, Ken; Yoshino, Mineo

    2010-01-30

    We evaluated the performance of real-time RT-PCR and ELISA assays for detection of dermcidin (DCD) in sweat and body-fluid stains. DCD, a small antibiotic peptide secreted into human sweat, was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 7-day-old stains containing as small as 10 microL of sweat, and the assay showed high specificity when testing 7-day-old stains containing 30 microL of other body-fluid. ELISA using anti-human dermcidin mouse monoclonal antibody detected DCD sweat diluted up to approximately 10,000-fold and could specifically detect DCD in 10 microL of body-fluid stains. The performance of the two assays was tested during winter on samples that simulated forensic case samples: an undershirt and a sock worn for 20 h, a handkerchief used to wipe the brow several times within 12h, a cap and a cotton glove worn for 4h, and a white robe worn at intervals for 2 years. The result showed that the former assay detected DCD in all sites of the undershirt examined (armpit, back, and breast), and the latter gave a relatively high OD value in the armpit among the three sites. For the socks, although the latter assay gave very high OD values in both the center and toe of the foot sole, the former could not detect DCD in both of them. These results indicate that highly damp conditions, such as inside a shoe, might promote the degradation of mRNA in samples such as socks. In the other case samples, sweat was adequately detected by both assays. This study is the first demonstration of the use of real-time RT-PCR to sensitively identify sweat among body-fluid stains, and it confirmed that dermcidin was an excellent marker for sweat identification. In addition, the usefulness of ELISA was also verified. Positive sweat identification using these assays is expected to assist forensic practice.

  20. Detection and quantification of Histomonas meleagridis by real-time PCR targeting single copy genes.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Imtiaz; Jaskulska, Barbara; Hess, Michael; Bilic, Ivana

    2015-09-15

    Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite that can infect gallinaceous birds, affects mainly the liver and caeca of infected birds. As a consequence of the recent ban of chemotherapeuticals in Europe and the USA, histomonosis gained somewhat more attention due to its re-emergence and the fact that there is no effective treatment available. Therefore, special attention is now also given towards the diagnosis and the control of the disease. In the actual study we report the development of highly specific and sensitive real-time PCR methods for detection and quantification of the parasite, based on two protein coding genes, Fe-hydrogenase (FeHYD) and rpb1. Both genes seem to be in a single copy in H. meleagridis as shown by southern blotting and absolute quantification using real-time PCRs on samples containing a known amount of the parasite. The real-time PCR assays based on FeHYD and rpb1 genes were found to be an efficient method for the quantification and detection of H. meleagridis in in vitro grown cultures, tissues of infected birds and in faecal samples. Both real-time PCRs were able to detect up to a single cell in in vitro cultures of H. meleagridis and in fecal samples spiked with H. meleagridis. Finally, qPCR assays were shown to be highly specific for H. meleagridis as samples containing either of the two H. meleagridis genotypes were positive, whereas samples containing other protozoa such as Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Trichomonas gallinae, Simplicimonas sp., Tritrichomonas sp., Parahistomonas wenrichi, Dientamoebidae sp. and Blastocystis sp. were all negative. PMID:26319200

  1. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in biofilms by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Linke, S; Lenz, J; Gemein, S; Exner, M; Gebel, J

    2010-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a cause of peptic ulcer disease and a causative agent of gastric cancer. Currently, a possible waterborne route of transmission or a possible survival in drinking water biofilms is discussed. H. pylori, like many other bacterial strains, has the ability to enter the viable but nonculturable state (vbnc) in case of unfavorable conditions. Therefore it is necessary to develop new analysis tools for vbnc bacteria. We established a fast and reliable method to detect H. pylori in drinking water biofilms by quantitative real-time PCR which makes it redundant to use difficult cultivation methods for nonculturable bacteria. With this method it was possible to identify water biofilms as a niche for H. pylori. The real-time PCR analysis targets the ureA subunit of the Helicobacter pylori urea gene which showed high specificity and sensitivity. The quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect H. pylori in biofilms of different age, unspiked and spiked with predetermined levels of cells. The drinking water biofilms were generated in a silicone-tube model. The DNA-sequences for probe and primers showed no cross-homologies to other related bacteria and it was possible to detect less than 10 genomic units of H. pylori. This novel method is a useful tool for a fast screening of drinking water biofilms for H. pylori. The results suggest that drinking water biofilms may act as a reservoir for H. pylori which raises new concerns about the role of biofilms as vectors for pathogens like Helicobacter pylori.

  2. Optimal DNA isolation method for detection of bacteria in clinical specimens by broad-range PCR.

    PubMed

    Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Jalava, Jari

    2002-11-01

    Broad-range amplification of bacterial DNA from clinical specimens has proved useful for the diagnosis of various bacterial infections, especially during antimicrobial treatment of the patient. Optimal sample processing protocols for diagnostic broad-range bacterial PCR should release DNA from an array of target organisms with equal efficiencies and wash out inhibitory factors from various sample types without introducing bacterial DNA contamination to the amplification reaction. In the present study, two physical cell wall disintegration methods, bead beating and sonication, for enhanced detection of organisms with difficult-to-lyse cell walls were studied. The analytical sensitivities of several commercially available DNA purification kits, which were used with and without additional cell disintegration steps, were compared by using dilution series of model bacteria. Selected purification methods were used to process routine clinical specimens in parallel with the standard phenol-ether DNA extraction, and the results obtained by bacterial PCR and sequencing with the two template preparations were compared. The method with the DNA isolation kit with the lowest detection limits from the bacterial suspensions (Masterpure) did not prove to be superior to the standard method when the two methods were applied to 69 clinical specimens. For another set of 68 clinical specimens, DNA purified with a glass fiber filter column (High Pure) with an additional sonication step yielded results well in accord with those obtained by the standard method. Furthermore, bacterial DNA was detected in four samples that remained PCR negative by the standard method, and three of these contained DNA from gram-positive pathogens. Three samples were positive by the standard method only, indicating the limitations of applying any single method to all samples.

  3. Effective PCR-based detection of Naegleria fowleri from cultured sample and PAM-developed mouse.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, Mi Yeoun; Lee, Won-Ja; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2015-10-01

    Increasing numbers of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) cases due to Naegleria fowleri are becoming a serious issue in subtropical and tropical countries as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). To establish a rapid and effective diagnostic tool, a PCR-based detection technique was developed based on previous PCR methods. Four kinds of primer pairs, Nfa1, Nae3, Nf-ITS, and Naegl, were employed in the cultured amoebic trophozoites and a mouse with PAM experimentally developed by N. fowleri inoculation (PAM-mouse). For the extraction of genomic DNA from N. fowleri trophozoites (1×10(6)), simple boiling with 10μl of PBS (pH 7.4) at 100°C for 30min was found to be the most rapid and efficient procedure, allowing amplification of 2.5×10(2) trophozoites using the Nfa-1 primer. The primers Nfa1 and Nae3 amplified only N. fowleri DNA, whereas the ITS primer detected N. fowleri and N. gruberi DNA. Using the PAM-mouse brain tissue, the Nfa1 primer was able to amplify the N. fowleri DNA 4 days post infection with 1ng/μl of genomic DNA being detectable. Using the PAM-mouse CSF, amplification of the N. fowleri DNA with the Nae3 primer was possible 5 days post infection showing a better performance than the Nfa1 primer at day 6. PMID:26322498

  4. Frequency-encoded laser-induced fluorescence for multiplexed detection in infrared-mediated quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Schrell, Adrian M; Roper, Michael G

    2014-06-01

    A frequency-modulated fluorescence encoding method was used as a means to increase the number of fluorophores monitored during infrared-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Laser lines at 488 nm and 561 nm were modulated at 73 and 137 Hz, respectively, exciting fluorescence from the dsDNA intercalating dye, EvaGreen, and the temperature insensitive dye, ROX. Em