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Sample records for netec cold crucible

  1. NETEC COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEMONSTRATION FOR SRNL WITH SIMULATED SLUDGE BATCH 4 DWPF WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M; Allan Barnes, A; Alexander Choi, A; James Marra, J

    2008-07-28

    Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Technology is being considered as a possible next generation melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Initial and baseline demonstrations that vitrified a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant at a waste loading of 50 weight percent (versus about 38 weight percent in the current DWPF Melter) were performed by the Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute (NETEC) in South Korea via a subcontract from the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). This higher waste loading was achieved by using a CCIM which can run at higher glass processing temperatures (1250 C and higher) than the current DWPF Melter (1150 C). Higher waste loadings would result in less canisters being filled and faster waste throughput at the DWPF. The main demonstration objectives were to determine the maximum melt rate/waste throughput for the NETEC CCIM with a Sludge Batch 4 simulant as well as determine the viability of this technology for use in the DWPF.

  2. Letter report: Cold crucible melter assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, M.L.

    1996-03-01

    One of the activities of the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project is to assist the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Program in determining which melter systems should be performance tested for potential implementation in the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification plant. The Richland Operations Office (RL) has recommended that the Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) be evaluated as a candidate ``next generation`` melter. As a result, the CCM System Evaluation cost account was established under the PVTD Project so that the CCM could be initially assessed on a high-priority basis. This letter report summarizes a brief initial review and assessment of the CCM. Using the recommendations made in this document, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and RL will make a decision regarding the urgency of performance testing the CCM. If the decision is favorable, a subcontract will be negotiated for performance testing of a CCM using Hanford HLW simulants in a pilot-scale facility. Because of the aggressive nature of the schedule, the CCM evaluation was not rigorous. The evaluation consisted of a literature review and interviews with proponents of the technology during a recent trip to France. This letter report summarizes the evaluation and makes recommendations regarding further work in this area.

  3. Cold-Crucible Induction Melter Design and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, Dirk; Richardson, John R.

    2003-03-15

    The international process for immobilization of high-activity waste from aqueous fuel reprocessing is vitrification. In the United States joule-heated melter technology has been implemented at West Valley and the Savannah River Site, but improved melter concepts are sought to bring down the costs of processing. The cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) design is being evaluated for many applications, including radioactive wastes because it eliminates many materials and operating constraints inherent in the baseline technology. The cold-crucible design is also smaller, less expensive, and generates much less waste for ultimate disposal. In addition, it should allow a much more flexible operating envelope, which will be crucial if the heterogeneous wastes at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing sites are to be vitrified.A joule-heated melter operates by passing current between water-cooled electrodes through a molten pool in a refractory-lined chamber. This design is inherently limited by susceptibility of materials to corrosion and melting. In addition, redox conditions and free metal content have exacerbated materials problems or lead to electrical short-circuiting causing failures in developmental DOE melters. In contrast, the CCIM design is based on inductive coupling of a water-cooled high-frequency electrical coil with the glass, causing eddy currents that produce heat and mixing.While significant marketing claims have been made by technology suppliers and developers, little data is available for engineering and economic evaluation of the technology, and no facilities are available in the United States to support testing. In addition to verifying the capabilities of the technology, further development can exploit opportunities for optimization through better understanding of the electromagnetic thermal phenomena intrinsic to the cold-crucible melter. Induction frequency, applied power, and coil and crucible configuration are all related but

  4. Cold-Crucible Design Parameters for Next Generation HLW Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.; Richardson, J.; Aloy, A.; Day, D.

    2002-02-26

    The cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) design eliminates many materials and operating constraints inherent in joule-heated melter (JHM) technology, which is the standard for vitrification of high-activity wastes worldwide. The cold-crucible design is smaller, less expensive, and generates much less waste for ultimate disposal. It should also allow a much more flexible operating envelope, which will be crucial if the heterogeneous wastes at the DOE reprocessing sites are to be vitrified. A joule-heated melter operates by passing current between water-cooled electrodes through a molten pool in a refractory-lined chamber. This design is inherently limited by susceptibility of materials to corrosion and melting. In addition, redox conditions and free metal content have exacerbated materials problems or lead to electrical short-circuiting causing failures in DOE melters. In contrast, the CCIM design is based on inductive coupling of a water-cooled high-frequency electrical coil with the glass, causing eddycurrents that produce heat and mixing. A critical difference is that inductance coupling transfers energy through a nonconductive solid layer of slag coating the metal container inside the coil, whereas the jouleheated design relies on passing current through conductive molten glass in direct contact with the metal electrodes and ceramic refractories. The frozen slag in the CCIM design protects the containment and eliminates the need for refractory, while the corrosive molten glass can be the limiting factor in the JH melter design. The CCIM design also eliminates the need for electrodes that typically limit operating temperature to below 1200 degrees C. While significant marketing claims have been made by French and Russian technology suppliers and developers, little data is available for engineering and economic evaluation of the technology, and no facilities are available in the US to support testing. A currently funded project at the Idaho National Engineering

  5. Glass Formulation for Next Generation Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.; Smith, Gary L.

    2011-12-21

    Transformational melter technologies are being considered to support mission acceleration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. New glass formulations are required to take full advantage of the next generation melters, for example, the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The key advantage of CCIM technology over current reference technologies is its capability to provide higher processing temperatures, which can lead to an increased waste throughput rate by achieving higher waste loadings and by increasing the feed processing rate. Various waste compositions within the DOE complex were evaluated to determine their potential for successfully demonstrating the unique advantages of the CCIM technology. Glass formulations that satisfy a set of constraints for product quality and assumed CCIM processing conditions were developed for two Hanford waste streams, AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) and AN-105 low-activity waste (LAW). Three glasses selected for AZ-101 HLW have waste loadings of 40, 42.5, and 45 wt%. The 45-wt% waste loading corresponds to a 22% increase from 37 wt%, which is the maximum expected waste loading based on the current reference formulation. One glass selected for AN-105 LAW has a waste loading of 31.3 wt% at 24 wt% Na2O in glass, which is a 14% increase from the current reference formulation maximum of 21 wt% Na2O. These four glasses are planned for scaled melter tests for initial demonstration of the CCIM technologies for Hanford wastes.

  6. Cold Crucible Induction Melter Technology: Results of Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, Dirk; Richardson, John Grant

    2001-09-01

    This report provides a review of cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology and presents summaries of alternatives and design issues associated with major system components. The objective in this report is to provide background systems level information relating to development and application of cold crucible induction-heated melter technology for radiological waste processing. Included is a detailed description of the bench-top melter system at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute currently being used for characterization testing

  7. Modeling an RF Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter with Subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2004-07-01

    A method to reduce radioactive waste volume that includes melting glass in a cold crucible radio frequency induction heated melter has been investigated numerically. The purpose of the study is to correlate the numerical investigation with an experimental apparatus that in the above mentioned melter. Unique to this model is the subsidence of the glass as it changes from a powder to molten glass and drastically changes density. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melter process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities and magnetic vector potential. Coupled to all of this is a generator that will be used for this lab sized experiment. The coupling with the 60 kW generator occurs with the impedance of the melt as it progresses and changes with time. A power controller has been implemented that controls the primary coil current depending on the power that is induced into the molten glass region.

  8. Integrated Pilot Plant for a Large Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Do Quang, R.; Jensen, A.; Prod'homme, A.; Fatoux, R.; Lacombe, J.

    2002-02-26

    COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level liquid waste produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing on an industrial scale for over 20 years, with two main objectives: containment of the long lived fission products and reduction of the final volume of waste. Research performed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in the 1950s led to the selection of borosilicate glass as the most suitable containment matrix for waste from spent nuclear fuel and to the development of the induction melter technology. This was followed by the commissioning of the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM) in 1978. The process was implemented at a larger scale in the late 1980s in the R7 and T7 facilities of the La Hague reprocessing plant. COGEMA facilities have produced more than 11,000 high level glass canisters, representing more than 4,500 metric tons of glass and 4.5 billion curies. To further improve the performance of the vitrification lines in the R7 and T7 facilities, the CEA and COGEMA have been developing the Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) technology since the 1980s. This technology benefits from the 20 years of COGEMA HLW vitrification experience and ensures a virtually unlimited equipment service life and extensive flexibility in dealing with different types of waste. The high specific power directly transferred by induction to the melt allows high operating temperatures without any impact on the process equipment. In addition, the mechanical stirring of the melter significantly reduces operating constraints. COGEMA is already providing the CCM technology to international customers for nuclear and non-nuclear applications and plans to implement it in the La Hague vitrification plant for the vitrification of highly concentrated and corrosive solutions produced by uranium/molybdenum fuel reprocessing. The paper presents the CCM project that led to the building and start-up of this evolutionary and flexible pilot plant. It also describes the plant's technical characteristics and

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF VITRIFIED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB4 WASTE SURROGATE PRODUCED IN COLD CRUCIBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2008-08-05

    Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge batch 4 (SB4) waste surrogate with high aluminum and iron content was vitrified with commercially available Frit 503-R4 (8 wt.% Li{sub 2}O, 16 wt.% B2O3, 76 wt.% SiO{sub 2}) by cold crucible inductive melting using lab- (56 mm inner diameter), bench- (236 mm) and large-scale (418 mm) cold crucible. The waste loading ranged between 40 and 60 wt.%. The vitrified products obtained in the lab-scale cold crucible were nearly amorphous with traces of unreacted quartz in the product with 40 wt.% waste loading and traces of spinel phase in the product with 50 wt.% waste loading. The glassy products obtained in the bench-scale cold crucible are composed of major vitreous and minor iron-rich spinel phase whose content at {approx}60 wt.% waste loading may achieve {approx}10 vol.%. The vitrified waste obtained in the large-scale cold crucible was also composed of major vitreous and minor spinel structure phases. No nepheline phase has been found. Average degree of crystallinity was estimated to be {approx}12 vol.%. Anionic motif of the glass network is built from rather short metasilicate chains and boron-oxygen constituent based on boron-oxygen triangular units.

  10. Vitrification of HLW Produced by Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel Reprocessing in COGEMA's Cold Crucible Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Do Quang, R.; Petitjean, V.; Hollebecque, F.; Pinet, O.; Flament, T.; Prod'homme, A.

    2003-02-25

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel COGEMA (industrial Operator), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and SGN (respectively COGEMA's R&D provider and Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities : the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also being qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed

  11. Compilation of information on modeling of inductively heated cold crucible melters

    SciTech Connect

    Lessor, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this communication, Phase B of a two-part report, is to present information on modeling capabilities for inductively heated cold crucible melters, a concept applicable to waste immobilization. Inductively heated melters are those in which heat is generated using coils around, rather than electrodes within, the material to be heated. Cold crucible or skull melters are those in which the melted material is confined within unmelted material of the same composition. This phase of the report complements and supplements Phase A by Loren Eyler, specifically by giving additional information on modeling capabilities for the inductively heated melter concept. Eyler discussed electrically heated melter modeling capabilities, emphasizing heating by electrodes within the melt or on crucible walls. Eyler also discussed requirements and resources for the computational fluid dynamics, heat flow, radiation effects, and boundary conditions in melter modeling; the reader is referred to Eyler`s discussion of these. This report is intended for use in the High Level Waste (HLW) melter program at Hanford. We sought any modeling capabilities useful to the HLW program, whether through contracted research, code license for operation by Department of Energy laboratories, or existing codes and modeling expertise within DOE.

  12. Summary Of Cold Crucible Vitrification Tests Results With Savannah River Site High Level Waste Surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Marra, James; Lebedev, Vladimir

    2014-01-13

    The cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) technology successfully applied for vitrification of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW) at SIA Radon, Russia, was tested to be implemented for vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) stored at Savannah River Site, USA. Mixtures of Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and 4 (SB4) waste surrogates and borosilicate frits as slurries were vitrified in bench- (236 mm inner diameter) and full-scale (418 mm inner diameter) cold crucibles. Various process conditions were tested and major process variables were determined. Melts were poured into 10L canisters and cooled to room temperature in air or in heat-insulated boxes by a regime similar to Canister Centerline Cooling (CCC) used at DWPF. The products with waste loading from ~40 to ~65 wt.% were investigated in details. The products contained 40 to 55 wt.% waste oxides were predominantly amorphous; at higher waste loadings (WL) spinel structure phases and nepheline were present. Normalized release values for Li, B, Na, and Si determined by PCT procedure remain lower than those from EA glass at waste loadings of up to 60 wt.%.

  13. Corrosion study of a highly durable electrolyzer based on cold crucible technique for pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Arai, Y.; Kase, T.; Nakajima, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The application of the cold crucible technique to a pyrochemical electrolyzer used in the oxide-electrowinning method, which is a method for the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear oxide fuel, is proposed as a means for improving corrosion resistance. The electrolyzer suffers from a severe corrosion environment consisting of molten salt and corrosive gas. In this study, corrosion tests for several metals in molten 2CsCl-NaCl at 923 K with purging chlorine gas were conducted under controlled material temperature conditions. The results revealed that the corrosion rates of several materials were significantly decreased by the material cooling effect. In particular, Hastelloy C-22 showed excellent corrosion resistance with a corrosion rate of just under 0.01 mm/y in both molten salt and vapor phases by controlling the material surface at 473 K. Finally, an engineering-scale crucible composed of Hastelloy C-22 was manufactured to demonstrate the basic function of the cold crucible. The cold crucible induction melting system with the new concept Hastelloy crucible showed good compatibility with respect to its heating and cooling performances.

  14. Electromagnetic and Thermal-flow Modeling of a Cold-Wall Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Garnich, Mark R.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.

    2005-02-01

    An approach for modeling cold-wall crucible induction melters is described. Materials in the melt and melter are non-ferromagnetic. In contrast to other modeling works reported in the literature, the numerical models utilize commercial codes. The ANSYS finite element code is employed for electromagnetic field simulations and the STAR-CD finite volume code for thermal-flow calculations. Results from the electromagnetic calculations in the form of local Joule heat and Lorentz force distributions are included as loads in the thermal-flow analysis. This loosely-coupled approach is made possible by the small variation in temperature and, consequently, small variation in electrical properties across the melt as well as the quasi-steady state nature of the thermal flow calculations. A three dimensional finite element grid for electromagnetic calculations is adapted to a similar axisymmetric finite volume grid for data transfer to the thermal-flow model. Results from the electromagnetic model compare well with operational data from a 175 mm diameter melter. Results from the thermal-flow simulation provide insight toward molten metal circulation patterns, temperature variations, and velocity magnitudes. Initial results are included for a model that simulates the formation of a solid (skull) layer on the crucible base and wall. Overall, the modeling approach is shown to produce useful results relating operational parameters to the physics of steady state melter operation.

  15. Cold crucible induction melter studies for making glass ceramic waste forms: A feasibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Jarrod; Maio, Vince; McCloy, John; Scott, Clark; Riley, Brian; Benefiel, Brad; Vienna, John; Archibald, Kip; Rodriguez, Carmen; Rutledge, Veronica; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joe; Olszta, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being developed to immobilize fission products, separated from used nuclear fuel by aqueous reprocessing, into a stable waste form suitable for disposal in a geological repository. This work documents the glass ceramic formulation at bench scale and for a scaled melter test performed in a pilot-scale (∼1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). Melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling were measured on a small set of compositions to select a formulation for melter testing. Property measurements also identified a temperature range for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form. Bench scale and melter run results successfully demonstrate the processability of the glass ceramic using the CCIM melter technology.

  16. FULL-SCALE COLD CRUCIBLE TEST ON VITRIFICATION OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB4 HLW SURROGATE

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2008-08-05

    The full-scale cold crucible test on vitrification of sludge batch 4 (SB4) Savannah River Site HLW surrogate using a 418 mm inner diameter stainless steel crucible was carried-out for 66 hrs. Commercially available Frit 503-R4 (8 wt.% Li{sub 2}O, 16 wt.% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 76 wt.% SiO{sub 2}) was used as a glass forming additive at a calcine to frit ratio of 1:1 (50 wt.% calcine, 50 wt.% frit). Two portions of slurry prepared from frit and mixture of chemicals simulating waste in amount of {approx}750 kg and from frit and waste surrogate prepared by the SRT-MST-2007-00070 procedure in amount of {approx}1,300 kg with water content of {approx}27 and {approx}50 wt.%, respectively, was processed and {approx}875 kg of the vitrified product in total ({approx}415 + 460 kg) was obtained. Average parameters were as follows: vibration power - 121.6 to 134.1 kW, feed rate (capacity) - 25.1 to 39.8 kg/hr, glass pour rate (productivity) - 14.0 kg/hr specific energy expenses for feed processing - 4.8 to 3.4 kW x hr/kg, specific energy expenses for glass production (melting ratio) - 8.7 to 9.6 kW x hr/kg, specific glass productivity - 2453 kg/(m{sup 2} x d). The product was composed of major vitreous and minor spinel structure phases. No nepheline phase was found. Average degree of crystallinity was estimated to be {approx}12 vol.%. Cesium was found to be the most volatile component (up to {approx}60 wt.% of total). Lithium, sodium and boron are less volatile. Other major feed constituents (Al, Si, Mg, Fe, Mn) were not volatile but their carry-over with gas-vapor flow occurred.

  17. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  18. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases.

  19. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  20. Advanced Modeling of Cold Crucible Induction Melting for Process Control and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Roach; D. B. Lopukh; A. P. Martynov; B. S. Polevodov; S. I. Chepluk

    2008-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University “LETI” (ETU) have collaborated on development and validation of an advanced numerical model of the cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) process. This work was conducted in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management Technology and Engineering (EM-20) International Program. The model predicts quasi-steady state temperature distributions, convection cell configurations, and flow field velocities for a fully established melt of low conductivity non-magnetic materials at high frequency operations. The INL/ETU ANSYS© finite element model is unique in that it has been developed specifically for processing borosilicate glass (BSG) and other glass melts. Specifically, it accounts for the temperature dependency of key material properties, some of which change by orders of magnitude within the temperature ranges experienced (temperature differences of 500oC are common) in CCIM processing of glass, including density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and electrical resistivity. These values, and their responses to temperature changes, are keys to understanding the melt characteristics. Because the model has been validated, it provides the capability to conduct parametric studies to understand operational sensitivities and geometry effects. Additionally, the model can be used to indirectly determine difficult to measure material properties at higher temperatures such as resistivity, thermal conductivity and emissivity. The model can also be used to optimize system design and to predict operational behavior for specific materials and system configurations, allowing automated feedback control. This becomes particularly important when designing melter systems for full-scale industrial applications.

  1. THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.

    2009-06-30

    The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

  2. Cold Crucible Induction Melter Testing at The Idaho National Laboratory for the Advanced Remediation Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Roach; Nick Soelberg; Mike Ancho; Eric Tchemitcheff; John Richardson

    2009-03-01

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. This paper provides preliminary results of tests using the engineering-scale CCIM test system located at the INL. The CCIM test system was operated continuously over a time period of about 58 hours. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated semi-continuously because the glass drain rate was higher than the glass feedrate. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was

  3. Extended Development Work to Validate a HLW Calcine Waste Form via INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    James A. King; Vince Maio

    2011-09-01

    To accomplish calcine treatment objectives, the Idaho Clean-up Project contractor, CWI, has chosen to immobilize the calcine in a glass-ceramic via the use of a Hot-Isostatic-Press (HIP); a treatment selection formally documented in a 2010 Record of Decision (ROD). Even though the HIP process may prove suitable for the calcine as specified in the ROD and validated in a number of past value engineering sessions, DOE is evaluating back-up treatment methods for the calcine as a result of the technical, schedule, and cost risk associated with the HIPing process. Consequently DOE HQ has requested DOE ID to make INL's bench-scale cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) available for investigating its viability as a process alternate to calcine treatment. The waste form is the key component of immobilization of radioactive waste. Providing a solid, stable, and durable material that can be easily be stored is the rationale for immobilization of radioactive waste material in glass, ceramic, or glass-ceramics. Ceramic waste forms offer an alternative to traditional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics can usually accommodate higher waste loadings than borosilicate glass, leading to smaller intermediate and long-term storage facilities. Many ceramic phases are known to possess superior chemical durability as compared to borosilicate glass. However, ceramics are generally multiphase systems containing many minor phase that make characterization and prediction of performance within a repository challenging. Additionally, the technologies employed in ceramic manufacture are typically more complex and expensive. Thus, many have proposed using glass-ceramics as compromise between in the more inexpensive, easier to characterize glass waste forms and the more durable ceramic waste forms. Glass-ceramics have several advantages over traditional borosilicate glasses as a waste form. Borosilicate glasses can inadvertently devitrify, leading to a less durable product that could crack

  4. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marra, James C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Crawford, Charles L.; Vienna, John D.

    2014-05-22

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphate and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.

  5. GLASS-CERAMICS IN A COLD-CRUCIBLE MELTER : THE OPTIMUM COMBINATION FOR GREATER WASTE PROCESSING EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    DAY, R.A.; FERENCZY, J.; DRABAREK, E.; ADVOCAT, T.; FILLET, C.; LACOMBE, J.; LADIRAT, C.; VEYER, C.; QUANG, R. DO; THOMASSON, J.

    2003-02-27

    Improving the efficiency of nuclear waste immobilization is constantly desired by all nuclear waste management programs world-wide. For high-level and other waste to be vitrified in traditional ceramic Joule-heated melters operated at temperatures up to 1150 C, process flexibilities including waste loadings are often restricted by this temperature limit as well as the need to consider wasteform corrosion of refractory linings and electrodes. New melter technologies, such as the cold-crucible melter (CCM), enable processing up to significantly higher temperatures free of many of the limitations of conventional melters. Higher processing temperatures open up the way for wider composition and processing envelopes to be considered for the vitrification process, including the possibility for higher waste loadings. In many instances the presence of crystals in the final cooled wasteform is not considered desirable within presently existing glass specifications. For some feed compositions in creased waste loadings can lead to the formation of large amounts of crystals, and thus to a significant departure from the ''glass'' state. Nevertheless it is recognized that, in general, increasing the acceptable volume fractions of crystals in the glass offers the best opportunity to increase waste loading, all other factors being equal. In addition, the deliberate promotion of specific crystalline phases by design may enhance the quality of the wasteform, for example by partitioning a long-lived radionuclide into a very stable crystalline phase, or by depleting the glass in detrimental elements. In order to explore the potential improvements by harnessing the higher achievable processing temperatures and immunity to refractory corrosion available with the cold-crucible melter, and after promising indications for synroc-based matrices, it was decided to investigate the feasibility of designing and producing via melting new high temperature ''glass-ceramic'' wasteforms for high

  6. Synroc-D Type Ceramics Produced by Hot Isostatic Pressing and Cold Crucible Melting for Immobilisation of (Al, U) Rich Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Eric R.; La Robina, Michael; Li, Huijun; Davis, Joel

    2007-07-01

    A synroc-D ceramic consisting mostly of spinel, hollandite, pyrochlore-structured CaUTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}, UO{sub 2}, and Ti-rich regions shows promise for immobilisation of a HLW containing mainly Al and U, together with fission products. Ceramics with virtually zero porosities and waste loadings of 50-60 wt% on an oxide basis were prepared by cold crucible melting (CCM) at {approx}1500 deg. C, and also by subsolidus hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1100 deg. C to prevent volatile losses. PCT leaching test values for Cs were < 13 g/L, with all other normalised elemental extractions being well below 1 g/L. (authors)

  7. FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 8118

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

    2007-11-15

    Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined Joule heated melters. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured

  8. FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 8118

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

    2008-02-06

    Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and

  9. Feasibility Evaluation and Retrofit Plan for Cold Crucible Induction Melter Deployment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A.B.; Iverson, D.C.; Adkins, B.J.; Tchemitcheff, E.

    2008-07-01

    Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 kHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 deg. C to 200 deg. C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 deg. C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature

  10. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing

  11. Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Demonstration Using a Representative Savannah River Site Sludge Simulant On the Large-Size Pilot Platform at the CEA-Marcoule

    SciTech Connect

    Girold, C.; Delaunay, M.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Lacombe, J.; Iverson, D.; Do Quang, R.; Tchemitcheff, E.; Veyer, C.

    2008-07-01

    The cold-crucible induction melter technology (CCIM) is considered worldwide for industrial implementation to overcome the current limits of high level waste vitrification technologies and to answer future challenges such as: new or difficult sludge compositions, need for improving waste loading, need for high temperatures, and corrosive effluents. More particularly, this technology is being considered for implementation at the US DOE Savannah River site to increase the rate of waste processing while reducing the number of HLW canisters to be produced through increased waste loading and improved waste throughput. A collaborative program involving AREVA, CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) and WSRC (Washington Savannah River Company) has thus been initiated in 2007 to demonstrate vitrification with waste loadings on the order of 50% (versus the current DWPF waste loading of about 35%) with a PUREX-type waste composition (high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition), and to perform two pilot-scale runs on the large size platform equipped with a 650 mm diameter CCIM at the CEA Marcoule. The objectives of the demonstrations were 1) to show the feasibility of processing a representative SRS sludge surrogate using continuous slurry feeding, 2) to produce a glass that would meet the acceptance specifications with an increased waste loading when compared to what is presently achieved at the DWPF, and 3) achieve improved waste throughputs. This presentation describes the platform and the very encouraging results obtained from the demonstration performed at temperatures, specific throughputs and waste loadings that overcome current DWPF limits. Results from the initial exploratory run and second demonstration run include 1) production of a glass product that achieved the targeted glass composition that was more durable than the standard Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, 2) successful slurry feeding of the CCIM, and 3) promising waste

  12. Crucibles of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennis, Warren G.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Often, a traumatic event that forces a profound redefinition of the self forges leadership. The stories of a diverse group of business leaders and the "crucible experiences" that shaped them reveal four essential skills: ability to engage others in shared meanings, compelling voice, integrity, and adaptive capacity (applied creativity). (SK)

  13. An Unbalanced Crucible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deneen, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Long regarded by the vanguard of America's universities as antiquated and even dangerous, civic education is suddenly fashionable again. With the publication of "A Crucible Moment," a long battle in the culture wars appears to be winding down. It appears that everyone supports civic education today. For the past three decades, the ideal of civic…

  14. Two-Crucible Czochralski Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiegl, G.; Torbet, W.

    1985-01-01

    Scheme for continuous melt replenishment increases capacity of Czochralski crystal-growing furnace. Replenishing and drawing crucibles of improved Czochralski apparatus connected by heated quartz siphon. When doped silicon added to replenishing crucible, liquid silicon flows into drawing crucible, equalizing two melt levels. Addition of new material automatically controlled in response to optically sensed melt level. Results of this semicontinuous operation higher production speed, lower cost, and good control of crystal quality.

  15. Crucibles of leadership.

    PubMed

    Bennis, Warren G; Thomas, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    What makes a great leader? Why do some people appear to know instinctively how to inspire employees--bringing out their confidence, loyalty, and dedication--while others flounder again and again? No simple formula can explain how great leaders come to be, but Bennis and Thomas believe it has something to do with the ways people handle adversity. The authors' recent research suggests that one of the most reliable indicators and predictors of true leadership is the ability to learn from even the most negative experiences. An extraordinary leader is a kind of phoenix rising from the ashes of adversity stronger and more committed than ever. In interviewing more than 40 leaders in business and the public sector over the past three years, the authors discovered that all of them--young and old alike--had endured intense, often traumatic, experiences that transformed them and became the source of their distinctive leadership abilities. Bennis and Thomas call these shaping experiences "crucibles," after the vessels medieval alchemists used in their attempts to turn base metals into gold. For the interviewees, their crucibles were the points at which they were forced to question who they were and what was important to them. These experiences made them stronger and more confident and changed their sense of purpose in some fundamental way. Through a variety of examples, the authors explore the idea of the crucible in detail. They also reveal that great leaders possess four essential skills, the most critical of which is "adaptive capacity"--an almost magical ability to transcend adversity and emerge stronger than before. PMID:12227145

  16. Scandium separation from tungsten crucibles :

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Hess, Ryan Falcone; Neville, Michael Luke; Howard, Panit Clifton

    2013-02-01

    The first step in an attempt to isolate Sco from a Wo crucible was explored by soaking the samples in a series of organic (HOAc) and inorganic (HCl, H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3) acids. All samples, except the HOAc, yielded a powder. The weight loss suggests that HNO3 is the most efficient solvent; however, the powders were tentatively identified by PXRD and found to contain both W and Sc by-products. The higher weight loss may also indicate dissolution of the Wo crucible, which was further evidenced upon visual inspection of the crucible. The H3PO4 acid soak yielded the cleanest removal of Sc from the crucible. More work to understand the separation of the Sco from the Wo crucible is necessary but the acid routes appear to hold promise under not as of yet established criteria.

  17. Directly Susceptible, Noncarbon Composite Crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, Cressie E.,Jr.; Kiggans, James O., Jr.; Morrow, Marvin S.; Rexford, Donald

    1998-11-25

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  18. Quench Crucibles Reinforced with Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Carrasquillo, Edgar; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKehnie, N.

    2008-01-01

    Improved crucibles consisting mainly of metal-reinforced ceramic ampules have been developed for use in experiments in which material specimens are heated in the crucibles to various high temperatures, then quenched by, for example, plunging the crucibles into water at room temperature. In a traditional quench crucible, the gap between the ampule and the metal cartridge impedes the transfer of heat to such a degree that the quench rate (the rate of cooling of the specimen) can be too low to produce the desired effect in the specimen. One can increase the quench rate by eliminating the metal cartridge to enable direct quenching of the ampule, but then the thermal shock of direct quenching causes cracking of the ampule. In a quench crucible of the present improved type, there is no gap and no metal cartridge in the traditional sense. Instead, there is an overlay of metal in direct contact with the ampule, as shown on the right side of the figure. Because there is no gap between the metal overlay and the ampule, the heat-transfer rate can be much greater than it is in a traditional quench crucible. The metal overlay also reinforces the ampule against cracking.

  19. Cermet crucible for metallurgical processing

    DOEpatents

    Boring, C.P.

    1995-02-14

    A cermet crucible is disclosed for metallurgically processing metals having high melting points comprising a body consisting essentially of a mixture of calcium oxide and erbium metal, the mixture comprising calcium oxide in a range between about 50 and 90% by weight and erbium metal in a range between about 10 and 50% by weight.

  20. Cermet crucible for metallurgical processing

    DOEpatents

    Boring, Christopher P.

    1995-01-01

    A cermet crucible for metallurgically processing metals having high melting points comprising a body consisting essentially of a mixture of calcium oxide and erbium metal, the mixture comprising calcium oxide in a range between about 50 and 90% by weight and erbium metal in a range between about 10 and 50% by weight.

  1. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Morrow, S. Marvin; Rexford, Donald

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  2. Covering a Crucible with Metal Containing Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    In a procedure that partly resembles the lost-wax casting process, a crucible made of a brittle material (ceramic, quartz, or glass) is covered with a layer of metal containing channels. The metal cover and the channels can serve any or all of several purposes, depending upon the application: Typically, the metal would serve at least partly to reinforce the crucible. The channels could be used as passages for narrow objects that could include thermocouples and heat-transfer strips. Alternatively or in addition, channels could be used as flow paths for liquid or gaseous coolants and could be positioned and oriented for position- or direction-selective cooling. In some cases, the channels could be filled with known gases and sealed so that failure of the crucibles could be indicated by instruments that detect the gases. The process consists of three main steps. In the first step, a pattern defining the channels is formed by wrapping or depositing a material in the desired channel pattern on the outer surface of the crucible. The pattern material can be a plastic, wax, low-ash fibrous material, a soluble material, or other suitable material that can subsequently be removed easily. In a proof-of-concept demonstration (see figure), the crucible was an alumina cylinder and the mold material was plastic tie-down tape. In the second step, the patterned crucible is coated with metal. In one variation of the second step, a very thin layer containing or consisting of an electrically conductive material (e.g., gold, silver, or carbon) is painted or otherwise deposited on the mold-covered crucible, then the covering metal required for the specific application is electrodeposited on the very thin conducting layer. In another variation of the second step, the metal coat is formed by chemical vapor deposition. In the proof-of-concept demonstration, a layer of nickel 0.003 in. ( 0.08 mm) thick was electrodeposited. In the third step, the patterned material is removed. This is

  3. North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  4. Crystal-Growing Crucible To Suppress Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1986-01-01

    Platform under growth region stabilizes melt for more uniform crystal growth. In new crucible, platform just below growth interface so melt is too shallow to support convection. Critical depth for onset of pertinent instability calculated from heat flux through surface of melt, volume coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and kinematic viscosity.

  5. Method of melting metals to reduce contamination from crucibles

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.; Wigginton, Hubert L.

    1977-01-01

    Contamination of metals from crucible materials during melting operations is reduced by coating the interior surface of the crucible with a ceramic non-reactive with the metallic charge and disposing a metal liner formed from a portion of the metallic charge within the coated crucible. The liner protects the ceramic coating during loading of the remainder of the charge and expands against the ceramic coating during heat-up to aid in sintering the coating.

  6. Making rhyolite in a basalt crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has long attracted the attention of those concerned with the origin of rhyolitic magmas and indeed of granitic continental crust, because it presents no alternative for such magmas other than deriving them from a basaltic source. Hydrothermally altered basalt has been identified as the progenitor. The fact that rhyolite erupts as pure liquid requires a process of melt-crustal separation that is highly efficient despite the high viscosity of rhyolite melt. Volcanoes in Iceland are foci of basaltic magma injection along the divergent plate boundary. Repeated injection produces remelting, digestion, and sometimes expulsion or lateral withdrawal of material resulting in a caldera, a "crucible" holding down-dropped and interlayered lava flows, tephras, and injected sills. Once melting of this charge begins, a great deal of heat is absorbed in the phase change. Just 1% change in crystallinity per degree gives a melt-present body an effective heat capacity >5 times the subsolidus case. Temperature is thus buffered at the solidus and melt composition at rhyolite. Basalt inputs are episodic ("fires") so likely the resulting generation of rhyolite by melting is too. If frequent enough to offset cooling between events, rhyolite melt extractions will accumulate as a rhyolite magma reservoir rather than as discrete crystallized sills. Evidently, such magma bodies can survive multiple firings without themselves erupting, as the 1875 eruption of Askja Caldera of 0.3 km3 of rhyolite equilibrated at 2-km depth without previous leakage over a ten-millennium period and the surprise discovery of rhyolite magma at 2-km depth in Krafla suggest. Water is required for melting; otherwise melting cannot begin at a temperature lower than that of the heat source. Because the solubility of water in melt is pressure-dependent and almost zero at surface pressure, there must be a minimum depth at which basalt-induced melting can occur and a rhyolite reservoir sustained. In practice, the

  7. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1996-01-09

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation. 9 figs.

  8. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation.

  9. Honing Emotional Intelligence with Game-Based Crucible Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybourn, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the present paper is the design of multi-player role-playing game instances as crucible experiences for the exploration of one's emotional intelligence. Subsequent sections describe the design of game-based, intercultural crucible experiences and how this design was employed for training with members of the United States Marine Corps…

  10. Effect of crucible?sample adhesion on grain germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffar, T.; Dusserre, P.; Giacometti, N.; Boiton, P.; Nabot, J. P.; Eustathopoulos, N.

    1999-03-01

    Solid-liquid interface demarcations have been performed during the growth of GaSb and Ge samples by the vertical Bridgman method. The crucibles were made of boron nitride, silica or carbon based materials. Subsequent metallographies in a plane containing the sample axis show that the interface is distorted on a distance of about 100 μm close to the crucible wall. The angle of the interface line with the crucible, measured on the solid side, ranges between 25° for GaSb/BN to 120° for Ge/SiO 2. These measures are compared to the experimental observation that parasitic grain nucleation has a high probability of occurrence when BN crucibles are used and a rather low one in the case of silica crucibles. These results are in qualitative agreement with the theory of nucleation on homogeneous or heterogeneous substrates.

  11. The Alexandrian Library: crucible of a renaissance.

    PubMed

    Chapman, P H

    2001-07-01

    At the end of the 4th century BC, the Macedonian-Greek armies of Alexander the Great swept across Asia from Egypt to the Indus River, redefining political boundaries within that vast territory at a time when important cultural changes were also taking place in the Greek world. New literary forms were beginning to emerge from the classical literature, which was then the subject of scholarly investigation. There was growing curiosity about the physical world and mathematics. Aristotle and his contemporaries were redefining scholarship at a time when Alexander was redefining the political sphere. These remarkable transformations converged in Alexandria, which became the center of a new intellectual universe. The first Ptolemaic rulers founded two unique institutions--the Alexandrian Library and the Mouseion--and the Library became the crucible within which the Hellenistic renaissance was forged.

  12. The Alexandrian Library: crucible of a renaissance.

    PubMed

    Chapman, P H

    2001-07-01

    At the end of the 4th century BC, the Macedonian-Greek armies of Alexander the Great swept across Asia from Egypt to the Indus River, redefining political boundaries within that vast territory at a time when important cultural changes were also taking place in the Greek world. New literary forms were beginning to emerge from the classical literature, which was then the subject of scholarly investigation. There was growing curiosity about the physical world and mathematics. Aristotle and his contemporaries were redefining scholarship at a time when Alexander was redefining the political sphere. These remarkable transformations converged in Alexandria, which became the center of a new intellectual universe. The first Ptolemaic rulers founded two unique institutions--the Alexandrian Library and the Mouseion--and the Library became the crucible within which the Hellenistic renaissance was forged. PMID:11440429

  13. 11. GASFIRED CRUCIBLE FURNACES WERE USED TO MELT SMALL, BATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GAS-FIRED CRUCIBLE FURNACES WERE USED TO MELT SMALL, BATCH QUANTITIES OF BRONZE IN STOCKHAM'S BRASS FOUNDRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF BRONZE VALVES, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. METHOD OF PROTECTING TANTALUM CRUCIBLES AGAINST REACTION WITH MOLTEN URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

    1960-08-16

    Tantalum crucibles against reaction with molten uranium by contacting the surfaces to be protected with metallic boron (as powder, vapor, or suspension in a liquid-volatilenonreacting medium, such as acetone and petroleum oil) at about 1800 deg C in vacuum, discontinuing contact with the boron, and heating the crucibles to a temperature of between 1800 aad 2000 deg C, whereby the tantalum boride formed in the first heating step is converted to tantalum monoboride.

  15. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.-Q.

    2015-04-01

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. The reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. For the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  16. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growthmore » in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.« less

  17. Crucible materials for growth of aluminum nitride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesser, R.; Dalmau, R.; Zhuang, D.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2005-07-01

    The growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk crystals by sublimation of an AlN source requires elevated temperatures, typically in a range of 1800-2300 °C. These temperature requirements, combined with the chemically aggressive nature of the Al vapor, severely limit the choice of reactor hot-zone materials, and most notably, the selection of reaction crucibles. Aside from refractory elements, potentially promising compound materials include refractory nitrides, carbides, and borides. In this work, TaC crucibles were fabricated using a binderless sintering process and were tested in AlN bulk growth experiments. Elemental analysis of crystals grown in these crucibles revealed extremely low Ta contamination, below the analytical detection limit of 1 ppm by weight and C contamination levels as low as 50 ppm by weight; C contamination likely originated from sources unrelated to the crucible material. Crucibles were re-used in several consecutive growth runs; average crucible lifetimes exceeded 200 h at growth temperatures exceeding 2200 °C.

  18. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material.

  19. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  20. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  1. Reduction of beta activity from depleted derbies, ingots and crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, G.G.; Schonegg, E.; Kato, T.R.

    1984-09-01

    The reduction of beta radiation on uranium ingot and crucible surfaces was demonstrated in the production casting operation by adding a mixture of slag liner material (MgF/sub 2/) and calcium fluoride to the remelt charge. The beta emitters (/sup 234/Th and /sup 234/Pa) are largely discharged with the fluorides into drums during a remote crucible burnout operation; thereby, reducing operator exposure to beta radiation. A production test showed that very low beta radiation from uranium flat castings can be achieved by using derbies recently prepared by reduction. Plant tests with fluoride addition indicate that pickling of derbies may not be necessary for casting uranium flats from a plasma sprayed (ZrO/sub 2/) crucible. Also, ingots produced with fluoride additions had less pipe as compared to standard production technique. 2 references, 5 tables.

  2. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  3. North façade of crucible steel building; looking southwest Bethlehem ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North façade of crucible steel building; looking southwest - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  4. Better VPS Fabrication of Crucibles and Furnace Cartridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Zimmerman, Frank R.; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation has shown that by (1) vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) of suitable refractory metal alloys on graphite mandrels, and then (2) heat-treating the VPS alloy deposits under suitable conditions, it is possible to fabricate improved crucibles and furnace cartridges that could be used at maximum temperatures between 1,400 and 1,600 C and that could withstand chemical attack by the materials to be heated in the crucibles and cartridges. Taken by itself, the basic concept of fabricating furnace cartridges by VPS of refractory materials onto graphite mandrels is not new; taken by itself, the basic concept of heat treatment of VPS deposits for use as other than furnace cartridges is also not new; however, prior to this investigation, experimental crucibles and furnace cartridges fabricated by VPS had not been heat treated and had been found to be relatively weak and brittle. Accordingly, the investigation was directed toward determining whether certain combinations of (1) refractory alloy compositions, (2) VPS parameters, and (3) heat-treatment parameters could result in VPS-fabricated components with increased ductility.

  5. Chemical bulk properties of multicrystalline silicon ingots for solar cells cast in silicon nitride crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, C.; Di Sabatino, M.; Syvertsen, M.; Arnberg, L.

    2012-09-01

    Silicon nitride is an alternative material to the widely used silica crucibles for directional solidification of mc-Si ingots, its main advantages being the reusability in successive castings and elimination for a source for oxygen contamination of the ingot. In this work, several ingots were cast in these crucibles and compared to reference ingots cast in silica crucibles. The thermal properties of the Si3N4 crucible differ from those of the SiO2 crucible and lead to a different thermal history during melting and casting. The oxygen contamination of the ingot was observed to depend mainly on the melting and holding temperature, rather than on the crucible material. The lowest oxygen concentration was observed in the ingots with the lowest melting temperature. However, the thermal properties of the Si3N4 crucible influence the oxygen profile along ingot height, with a faster decrease in the concentration with increasing ingot height. This is believed to be due to a different mechanism for oxygen transport compared to that of the silica crucibles. The concentration of dopants in the ingots showed that contamination from the Si3N4 crucible occurred, probably due to diffusion of B- and P-oxides into the Si melt.

  6. The use of ``self heating`` ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-12-31

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  7. The use of self heating'' ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  8. Induction furnace testing of the durability of prototype crucibles in a molten metal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.

    2005-09-01

    Engineered ceramic crucibles are commonly used to contain molten metal. Besides high temperature stability, other desired crucible characteristics include thermal shock resistance, minimal reaction with the molten metal and resistance to attack from the base metal oxide formed during melting. When used in an induction furnace, they can be employed as a “semi-permanent” crucible incorporating a dry ram backup and a ceramic cap. This report covers several 250-lb single melt crucible tests in an air melt induction furnace. These tests consisted of melting a charge of 17-4PH stainless steel, holding the charge molten for two hours before pouring off the heat and then subsequently sectioning the crucible to review the extent of erosion, penetration and other physical characteristics. Selected temperature readings were made throughout each melt. Chemistry samples were also taken from each heat periodically throughout the hold. The manganese level was observed to affect the rate of chromium loss in a non-linear fashion.

  9. Marangoni convection in open boat and crucible*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, D.; Scharmann, A.

    1981-04-01

    Thermocapillary or Marangoni Convection (MC) has been experimentally studied in open boat and Czochralski growth model experiments with an oxide melt. The streamlines and the flow velocities of MC have been visualized and measured. MC has been identified to be a significant flow phenomenon for heat and mass transport in melt growth of oxide crystals from medium size noble metal crucibles. In this case MC will dominate the fluid flow in a layer of 10 mm thickness near the free melt surface. The experiments are discussed with application to melt growth. It is pointed out that the surface phenomenon MC is sensitive to numerous kinds of surface perturbations thus resulting in unsteady MC. Another reason for time dependent MC might be the high flow velocity in meniscus regions which are thermal boundary regions as well. Time dependent MC will generate time dependence of the buoyant flow in the whole melt-volume due to intimate coupling of both phenomena.

  10. Measurement of Moisture Content in Sand, Slag, and Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1999-09-20

    The deinventory process at Rocky Flats (RFETS) has included moisture content measurements of sand, slag, and crucible (SSC) materials by performing weight loss measurements at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius on representative samples prior to packaging for shipment. Shipping requirements include knowledge of the moisture content. Work at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) showed that the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius did not account for all of the moisture. The objective of the work in this report was to determine if the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius at RFETS could be used to set upper bounds on moisture content and therefore, eliminate the need for RFETS to unpack, reanalyze and repack the material.

  11. Results of the metallographic examination of the Ta crucible used in the M. S. E. runs

    SciTech Connect

    Furr, J.S.

    1990-10-22

    A cross section from a Ta crucible used in numerous Molten Salt Extraction (MSE) runs was submitted to metallography to determine the soundness of the crucible wall, type of Pu attack, depth of wall penetration by the Pu and general microstructure. The crucible contained molten Pu and Am, with CaCl{sub 2}, KCl and PuCl{sub 3} salts ran at temperatures of 750{degree}C to 900{degree}C for approximately 10 to 12 hours. This report documents the findings of this study.

  12. A FIDAP and an empirical estimate of conjugate heat transfer of a graphite crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, K.J.; Clarksean, R.L.

    1995-05-01

    A set of thermal analyses has been conducted to conservatively predict the heat transfer of a graphite crucible. The study used conjugate heat transfer to determine the cooling characteristics of a graphite crucible. Natural convection and conduction through the casting charge and the graphite crucible are examined. All of the analyses were conducted in non-dimensional form up to a Rayleigh number of 1 x 10{sup 8}. The parametric study examined the effect of increasing the internal heat generation of the casting charge. Data derived from an empirical estimate are compared to the FIDAP simulations. The two models are found to have good correlation.

  13. Tolerance requirements to prevent fluid leakage in the crucible/plunger MEA experiment MPS 770030

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathz, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Molten Al-In leaked unexpectedly out of the crucible of a proposed MEA materials processing in space experiment. The molten metals use a spring loaded plunger to eliminate most free surfaces. The critical criteria necessary to initiate flow and the rate of fluid flow into the crucible/plunger annulus is calculated. Experimental in situ X-radiographs are interpreted according to the calculations. A note on possible effects of capillary flow if wetting occurs between crucible/plunger and liquids is included.

  14. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  15. The Durability of Various Crucible Materials for Aluminum Nitride Crystal growth by Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,B.; Edgar, J.; Gu, Z.; Zhuang, D.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Sarua, A.; Kuball, M.; Meyer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Producing high purity aluminum nitride crystals by the sublimation-recondensation technique is difficult due to the inherently reactive crystal growth environment, normally at temperature in excess of 2100 C. The durability of the furnace fixture materials (crucibles, retorts, etc.) at such a high temperature remains a critical problem. In the present study, the suitability of several refractory materials for AlN crystal growth is investigated, including tantalum carbide, niobium carbide, tungsten, graphite, and hot-pressed boron nitride. The thermal and chemical properties and performance of these materials in inert gas, as well as under AlN crystal growth conditions are discussed. TaC and NbC are the most stable crucible materials with very low elemental vapor pressures in the crystal growth system. Compared with refractory material coated graphite crucibles, HPBN crucible is better for AlN self-seeded growth, as crystals tend to nucleate in thin colorless platelets with low dislocation density.

  16. Using an induction melter with a cold crucible for the immobilization of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnikov, V.V.; Matiunin, Yu.I.; Smelova, T.V.

    1996-05-01

    This report evaluates the possibilities for immobilizing weapons-grade plutonium in glass-type materials that satisfy requirements for eventual burial in deep geologic repositories and correspond to the standards set for spent fuel.

  17. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

    2008-09-19

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble

  18. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C

    2008-07-31

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble

  19. Effect of Feeding Rate on the Cold Cap Configuration in a Laboratory-Scale Melter - 13362

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel

    2013-07-01

    High-level-waste melter feed is converted into glass in a joule-heated melter, where it forms a floating layer of reacting feed, called the cold cap. After the glass-forming phase becomes connected, evolving gases produce bubbles that form a foam layer under the feed. The bubbles coalesce into cavities, from which most of the gases are released around the edges of the cold cap while gases also escape through small shafts in the reacting feed. The foam layer insulates the cold cap from the heat transferred from the molten glass below. The cold cap behavior was investigated in a laboratory-scale assembly with a fused silica crucible. A high-alumina waste simulant was fed into the crucible and the feed charging rate was varied from 3 to 7 mL min{sup -1}. After a fixed amount of time (35 min), feed charging was stopped and the crucible was removed from the furnace and quenched on a copper block to preserve the structure of the cold cap during cooling. During the rapid quenching, thermal cracking of the glass and cold cap allowed it to be broken up into sections for analysis. The effect of the charging rate on the height, area and volume of the cold cap was determined. The size of the bubbles collected in the foam layer under the feed increased as the cold cap expanded and the relationship between these bubbles and temperature will be determined for input into a mathematical model. (authors)

  20. Growth of InP single crystals by liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) using glassy-carbon crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, C.E.M. de; Miskys, C.R.; Carvalho, M.M.G. de

    1996-12-31

    Using a high pressure puller and Glassy-Carbon crucibles, undoped InP single crystals weighing 100g and with 25 mm diameter were grown in the <100> direction. The residual carrier concentration of samples, measure by the Van der Pauw method at 300K, was about 5 {times} 10{sup 15}cm{sup {minus}3}, result as good as those obtained with Quartz crucibles with the advantage that Glassy-Carbon crucibles are fully reusable.

  1. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  2. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  3. Si3N4/fused quartz composite crucible with enhanced thermal conductivity for multicrystalline silicon ingot growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lili; Lv, Tiezheng; Zhu, Qingsong

    2015-04-01

    Two popular materials for multicrystalline Si ingot growth of the PV industry, Si3N4 and fused quartz, are working as composited material, tested and used to make industrial scale crucible. The main purpose of this composite material is to working as crucible for overcoming the low thermal conductivity of single fused quartz crucible during Si ingot process. Certain ceramic properties tests of the composite material, like porosity, density, are done with various percent of Si3N4/fused quartz, and thermal shock test did as well. These results prove that our composite material is feasible to make square crucible for Si ingot process. Thus we simulate multicrystalline Si ingot growth and experiments are done by industrial scale G5 crucible made by the composite material with optimal ratio of Si3N4/fused quartz. These results show that since composite crucible has higher thermal conductivity, the more heat flux could penetrate the bottom of crucible for Si directional solidification, correspondingly the temperature distribution, interface of solid-liquid Si, growth speed and grain structure, these kinds of key features of Si ingot process can be improved. The thermal profile analysis and photoluminescence picture show the improvement of Si ingot process using this composite crucible. Finally the considerations of industrial mass production using this kind of composite crucible are discussed.

  4. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Henry C., III; Probst, Hubert B.

    1988-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloys with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liqud phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  5. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, H. C., III; Probst, H. B.

    1989-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloy with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liquid phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  6. InP synthesis by the synthesis, solute diffusion (SSD) method using glassy-carbon crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Miskys, C.R.; Oliveira, C.E.M. de; Carvalho, M.M.G. de

    1996-12-31

    An Indium Phosphide (InP) Synthesis system by the Synthesis, Solute Diffusion (SSD) method has been built. It provides high purity InP charges with low carrier densities (3 {times} 10{sup 14} to 2 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3}) to be used as starting material for InP single-crystal Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) growth. Glassy-carbon is a refractory material with low vapor pressure that can be moulded in various forms and sizes. Indeed the glassy-carbon crucible is reusable after the synthesis because InP does not stick to its walls. Preliminary electrical characteristics measurements showed residual carrier concentration below 3 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3}. These results are comparable with those achieved utilizing quartz crucibles. The features denoted makes glassy-carbon an interesting alternative in comparison with quartz and PBN crucibles.

  7. Boron and Zirconium from Crucible Refractories in a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1958-01-01

    In a laboratory study of the factors involved in the influence of induction vacuum melting on 55ni-20cr-15co-4mo-3ti-3al heat resistant alloy, it was found that the major factor was the type of ceramic used as the crucible. The study concluded that trace amounts of boron or zirconium derived from reaction of the melt with the crucible refactories improved creep-rupture properties at 1,600 degrees F. Boron was most effective and, in addition, markedly improved hot-workability.

  8. Comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite crucibles for boron doped silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2012-11-15

    This article reports on the comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite as crucible liners in a high-temperature effusion cell used for boron doping in silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis indicates decomposition of the beryllium oxide liner, leading to significant incorporation of beryllium and oxygen in the grown films. The resulting films are of poor crystal quality with rough surfaces and broad x-ray diffraction peaks. Alternatively, the use of pyrolytic graphite crucible liners results in higher quality films.

  9. Controlling the leakage of liquid bismuth cathode elements in ceramic crucibles used for the electrowinning process in pyroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Il-Soon; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-09-01

    Pyroprocessing has shown promise as an alternative to wet processing for the recycling of transuranics with a high proliferation resistance. However, a critical issue for pyroprocessing is the ceramic crucibles used in the electrowinning process. These ceramic crucibles are frequently damaged by thermal stress, which results in significant volumes of crucible waste that must be properly disposed. Transuranic waste (TRU) elements intrude throughout the pores of a damaged crucible. The volume of generated radioactive waste is a concern when dealing with nuclear power plants and decontamination issues. In this study, laser treatment and sintering were performed on the crucibles to minimize the TRU elements trapped within. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to measure the intrusion depth of Li in the surface-treated ceramics.

  10. Development of a metal ceramic composite crucible. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0079

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, M.S.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Rexford, D.; Rausch, J.J.

    1995-09-30

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) has been a three-year collaboration among the Y-12 Plant Development Division, Blasch Precision Ceramics, Inc., and Surface Alloys, Inc. The purpose of the CRADA was to evaluate the production of a totally new crucible that would be noncarbon and that could perform like graphite. The effort required materials fabricated into a workable crucible. The goal was to produce a crucible that could be induction heated and allow melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon contamination. The US Department of Energy programs involving casting uranium and its alloys have long been concerned with reducing deleterious carbon pickup that results from the use of graphite crucibles. Therefore, the results of this CRADA provide an alternative that can eliminate carbon pickup from the graphite crucible.

  11. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  12. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  13. Effect of Feeding Rate on the Cold Cap Configuration in a Laboratory-Scale Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-02-25

    High level waste melter feed is converted into glass in a joule heated melter, where it forms a floating layer of reacting feed, called the cold cap. After the glass-forming phase becomes connected, evolving gases produce bubbles that form a foam layer under the cold cap. The bubbles coalesce into cavities that escape around the edges of the cold cap. The foam layer insulates the cold cap from the heat transferred from the molten glass below. More information is needed about the formation and behavior of the foam layer to control, limit and possibly avoid foaming, thus allowing for a higher rate of melting. The cold cap behavior was investigated in a laboratory scale assembly with a sealed silica-glass crucible. A high alumina waste simulant was fed into the crucible and the feed charging rate was varied from 3 to 7 mL min-1. After a fixed amount of time (35 min), feed charging was stopped and the crucible was removed from the furnace and quenched on a copper block to preserve the structure of the cold cap and foam during cooling. During the rapid quenching, thermal cracking of the glass and cold cap allowed it to be broken up into sections for analysis. The effect of the charging rate on the height, area and volume of the cold cap was determined. The size of the bubbles collected in the foam layer under the cold cap increased as the cold cap expanded. Under the cold cap, the bubbles coalesced into oblong cavities. These cavities allowed the evolved gases to escape around the edges of the cold cap through the molten glass into the melter plenum.

  14. Beware the Loss of Conscience: "The Crucible" as Warning for Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerjak, Judith A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the political relevance of Miller's play about Salem witch trials to (1) the McCarthy era hearings, and (2) current cases between religious fundamentalists and school curriculum boards. Summarizes the history of these events and relates them to an interpretation of "The Crucible." (JG)

  15. The Crucible of Classroom Practice: Alchemy and Early Professional Learning in Secondary English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the metaphor of the classroom as a "crucible" for early professional learning where beginning teachers forge professional identities in complex, unpredictable, paradoxical, affectively and physically potent contexts of practice. It works into the dissonances and contradictions of the micro-narratives embedded in the…

  16. Crucible cast from beryllium oxide and refractory cement is impervious to flux and molten metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrzebski, Z. D.

    1966-01-01

    Crucible from a mixture of a beryllium oxide aggregate and hydraulic refractory cement, and coated with an impervious refractory oxide will not deteriorate in the presence of fused salt- molten metal mixtures such as uranium- magnesium-zinc-halide salt systems. Vessels cast by this process are used in the flux reduction of oxides of thorium and uranium.

  17. Wootz: Erroneous Transliteration of Sanskrit " Utsa" used for Indian Crucible Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    The terminology Wootz for the legendary Indian crucible steel was first introduced by Helenus Scott in his letter to Joseph Banks, the then President of the Royal Society, London, in 1794. He stated several salient features of this steel in his letter. During the period 1794-1796, Banks received approximately 200 lbs. of this steel from Scott. Banks assigned several professionals to carry out experimental work on Indian crucible steel. One such important person was the famous surgical instrument maker, cutler and metallurgist of his time, James Stodart. Stodart experimented extensively with the Indian crucible steel, and was its great admirer. It has been shown, along with corroborative documentary evidence, that the original word for this steel was Sanskrit word " utsa". This was erroneously transliterated in Roman script as Wootz by Scott in his letter to Banks. It was James Stodart, who preserved the Sanskrit word " utsa" written in Devanāgarī script on his trade card for future generation. The reason for using this word for the Indian crucible steel has also been discussed.

  18. Archaeology of Lisbon Old City: ceramic crucibles from pre-XVIIIth century metallurgical foundries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, M. O.; Silva, T. P.; Veiga, J. P.; Dias Diogo, A. M.; Trindade, L.

    During an emergency archaeological intervention conducted in downtown Lisbon (the Old City), ceramic foundry crucibles were collected in a layer of embankment debris used after the earthquake that destroyed the city in 1755. A chemical and phase-constitution study was undertaken to complement the dating and to ascertain the kind of foundries (metallurgical or glass-working) concerning two intact cup-shaped crucibles and a fragment displaying glassy outflows. Non-destructive methodologies were used - namely, laboratory techniques (X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction) combined with synchrotron-radiation-induced micro-fluorescence (SRXRF). Analytical results are presented and discussed. SRXRF analysis of the glassy outflow on the larger crucible revealed the presence of mercury and traces of gold, along with copper, suggesting that it might have been used to manipulate gold amalgams. A possible Islamic origin was disclosed for the smaller crucible as only tin was detected in the external outflow and further confirmed by minute cassiterite (SnO2) grains.

  19. Contributions of Interdisciplinary Studies to Civic Learning: An Addendum to "A Crucible Moment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Though overlooked or at best implicit in "A Crucible Moment," interdisciplinary studies has much to contribute to civic learning for democratic engagement. The article organizes those contributions into the report's categories of knowledge, values, and skills. It concludes with an example of how techniques used in interdisciplinary…

  20. Fabrication of aluminum nitride crucibles for molten salt and plutonium compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.

    1991-07-24

    The overall objective of this research was to fabricate a calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride crucible and determine the compatibility of this crucible with molten chloride salts and plutonium metal in the DOR process. Calcium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride was preferred over yttrium oxide sinter-aided aluminum nitride because of (1) the presence of calcium chloride, calcium oxide, and calcium metal in the molten salts utilized in the DOR process, and (2) the higher volatility of the secondary phases formed compared with phases resulting from the addition of yttrium oxide during the aluminum nitride sintering process. The calcium oxide system may yield a higher purity crystal structure with fewer secondary phases present than in the yttrium oxide system. The secondary phases that are present in the grain boundaries may be unreactive with the calcium chloride salt due to the presence of calcium in the secondary phases.

  1. An historical mullite fiber-reinforced ceramic composite: Characterization of the wootz' crucible refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, T.L. ); Merk, N.; Thomas, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Since at least the sixteenth century, the wootz'' ultra-high carbon white cast-iron ingot was produced in India by melting or carburising iron in a crucible. This ingot was forced into sword blades of so-called Damascus steel. The charged crucible was fired in a long (24-hour) single cycle at high temperature (1150-1250{degree}C) in a strongly reducing atmosphere. Raw materials for the refractory vessel are clay and coked'' rice husks. At high temperatures, two phases reinforce the glassy matrix: cristobalite relics of rice husks and a network of mullite crystals. This paper characterizes the microstructure and chemistry of the mullite network in the glassy matrix by means of a combination of techniques: optical microscopy, XRD, SEM, TEM and EDS, and HREM. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  2. (Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degrees}C and 2100{degrees}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  3. Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Ellis, T.W.; Laabs, F.C.

    1992-04-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/pY{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degree}C and 2100{degree}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  4. [Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degrees}C and 2100{degrees}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  5. Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Ellis, T.W.; Laabs, F.C.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/pY{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degree}C and 2100{degree}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  6. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... been tried for colds, such as vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea. Talk to your health care ... nih.gov/pubmed/22962927 . Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database of Systematic ...

  7. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  8. Experimental study of the hydrodynamics in a model crystal growth crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, X.; Massons, J.; Aguilo, M.; Diaz, F. . Dept. of Tecnico Quimica)

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, image processing techniques are applied to the meridional visualizations of the bulk flow generated under different boundary conditions in a model crystal growth crucible. The steady forced convective patterns obtained by means of tracer particles are digitized and processed in order to characterize its hydrodynamic behaviour. This characterization is carried out based on the analysis of the resulting meridional velocity, streamfunction and vorticity distributions. Some comparisons between the present results and other available data are also made.

  9. Sublimation growth of AlN bulk crystals in Ta crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, E. N.; Avdeev, O. V.; Barash, I. S.; Chemekova, T. Yu.; Roenkov, A. D.; Segal, A. S.; Wolfson, A. A.; Makarov, Yu. N.; Ramm, M. G.; Helava, H.

    2005-07-01

    AlN single crystals of 0.5 in diameter and up to 10-12 mm long have been grown by sublimation/recondensation in pre-treated tantalum crucibles. Growth of 45 mm diameter and 4 mm long polycrystalline AlN boules has also been demonstrated. After high-temperature pre-treatment in a carbon-containing atmosphere, the tantalum crucibles can be used for 300-400 h of AlN sublimation growth at 2200-2300 °C, without Ta impurities or additional C impurities in concentrations higher than 100 ppm appearing in the crystals. Both self-seeded growth of polycrystalline AlN on the crucible lid and seeded growth of single-crystal AlN on (0 0 0 1) SiC plates and AlN/SiC templates are demonstrated. X-ray diffractometry and topography of the grown crystals show a block structure with the characteristic block size >200 nm and the scatter of FWHMs of ω-scans in the range of 60-750 arcsec. Test slicing and polishing of the crystals and test MBE growth of AlGaN/AlN structures on the obtained AlN substrates have been successfully performed.

  10. Influence of the crucible geometry on the shape of the melt crystal interface during growth of sapphire crystal using a heat exchanger method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei

    2004-05-01

    Computer simulations using the commercial code FIDAP, which is based on finite element techniques, were performed to investigate the effect of the shape of the crucible on the temperature distribution, velocity distribution and shape of the melt-crystal interface, during the application of the heat exchanger method (HEM) of growing sapphire crystals. Heat transfer from the furnace to the crucible and heat extraction from the heat exchanger can be modeled by the convection boundary conditions. Cylindrical crucibles with differently curved corners at their base are considered. The curved base of the crucible decreases the convexity of the melt-crystal interface and suppresses the appearance of "hot spots". A hemispherically shaped crucible base yields the lowest maximum convexity. The variation in convexity of the melt-crystal interface is less abrupt for a cylindrical crucible with curved corners at the base than one without curved corners. The effects of the thickness and the conductivity of the crucible are also addressed. The convexity of the melt-crystal interface decreases as the thickness of the crucible wall increases. The convexity also declines as the conductivity of the crucible increases.

  11. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  12. Life's crucible.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, P

    1998-02-01

    Research by German chemists Gunter Wachtershauser and Claudia Huber about the origins of life is reviewed. Other theories about the beginning of life on Earth are examined with comments by noted researchers.

  13. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  14. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  15. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  16. Chemical compatibility of a TiAl-Nb melt with oxygen-free crucible ceramics made of aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, A. V.; Cherdyntsev, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    The problem of uncontrolled oxygen contamination of intermetallic TiAl ingots is considered for the application of crucibles and molds based on traditional oxide ceramics. A synthesized Ti-45.9Al-8Nb (at %) alloy is solidified in alternative oxygen-free crucibles made of high-purity aluminum nitride (99.99% AlN) upon holding at 1670°C for 5, 12, and 25 min and subsequent quenching in a high-purity argon atmosphere. The initial material and the solidified ingots are studied by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron-probe microanalysis, and gas-content chemical analysis. The key features of the interaction of the TiAl-Nb melt with AlN ceramics are revealed. Partial thermal dissociation of the crucible material according to the reaction AlN → Al + N and the reaction of atomic nitrogen with the melt lead to the formation of a solid 6.4-μm-thick TiN coating on the ingot surface and provide perfect wettability of the crucible by the melt and easy removal of solidified casting items from the mold. The TiN coating serves as a diffusion barrier that hinders the diffusion of nitrogen and residual oxygen from the pores in the crucible toward the melt. As a result, no oxide particles are detected in the ingots. However, few single microprecipitates of two nitride phases ((Ti,Al) x N y , NbN) are detected in the near-bottom region, 300 μm thick, in the alloy after holding at 1670°C for 25 min. The total oxygen contamination in a two-phase α2 + γ ingot does not exceed 1100 wt ppm, which is 1.5-2 times lower than that obtained in the experiments performed with modern advanced oxide crucibles made of yttrium ceramics Y2O3. AlN is shown to be a promising crucible material that can be considered as an alternative to oxide ceramics in the metallurgy of TiAl intermetallics.

  17. Nondestructive method for chemically machining crucibles or molds from their enclosed ingots and castings

    DOEpatents

    Stout, Norman D.; Newkirk, Herbert W.

    1991-01-01

    An inventive method is described for chemically machining rhenium, rhenium and tungsten alloy, and group 5b and 6b crucibles or molds from included ingots and castings comprised of oxide crystals including YAG and YAG based crystals, garnets, corundum crystals, and ceramic oxides. A mixture of potassium hydroxide and 15 to 90 weight percent of potassium nitrate is prepared and maintained at a temperature above melting and below the lower of 500 degrees centigrade or the temperature of decomposition of the mixture. The enveloping metal container together with its included oxide crystal object is rotated within the heated KOH-KNO.sub.3 mixture, until the container is safely chemically machined away from the included oxide crystal object.

  18. Comparison of three Co-C fixed points constructed using different crucible lining materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, A. D. W.; Woods, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    The melting plateaus of three Co-C fixed points for radiation thermometry with different constructions were measured and compared. Two of the fixed points were of the hybrid type and contained either carbon composite cloth or pyrolytic graphite sheet between the graphite sleeve and the crucible wall. The third fixed point contained only the graphite sleeve. Little difference was found in the shapes of the melting curves between the fixed points. Given a comparison uncertainty of 37 mK (k = 1), there were, however, significant differences in the melting temperatures determined for each of the fixed points. Over three days of measurement, the melting temperature of the fixed point filled using the pyrolytic sheet drifted up by nearly 140 mK.

  19. Apparatus and method for the horizontal, crucible-free growth of silicon sheet crystals

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-09-12

    Apparatus is provided for continuously forming a silicon crystal sheet from a silicon rod in a non-crucible environment. The rod is rotated and fed toward an RF coil in an inert atmosphere so that the upper end of the rod becomes molten and the silicon sheet crystal is pulled therefrom substantially horizontally in a continuous strip. A shorting ring may be provided around the rod to limit the heating to the upper end only. Argon gas can be used to create the inert atmosphere within a suitable closed chamber. By use of this apparatus and method, a substantially defect-free silicon crystal sheet is formed which can be used for micro-circuitry chips or solar cells.

  20. Frit screening for Rocky Flats ash and sand, slag, and crucible vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Li, Hong; Darab, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing vitrified waste forms for plutonium-bearing ash and plutonium-bearing sand, slag, and crucible (SS&C) materials from Rocky Flats. Waste forms are to meet product criteria (e.g., safeguard termination limits, storage criteria, and target plutonium loading) and processing constraints (e.g., upper temperature limits, processing time, and equipment compatibility). The target waste form for ash is an agglomerated product, while that for SS&C is a fully encapsulated product. Laboratory scoping studies were conducted on glass formulations from six different glass families: (1) antimony vanadium phosphate, (2) iron vanadium phosphate, (3) tin zinc phosphate, (4) soda-lime silicate, (5) alkali borosilicate, and (6) alkali borate. Glass families were selected due to viscosity behavior in the temperature range of interest (< 800C). Scoping study tests included gradient furnace tests to determine processing range and sintering temperature, thermogravimetric analysis to determine weight loss as a function of temperature, and crucible tests to determine frit compositions tolerance to variations in processing temperature, waste loading, and waste type. The primary screening criterion for the selection of frits for future studies was processing temperature below 400C to minimize the potential for foaming in ash caused by the release of gases (main source of gas is combustion of carbon species) and to minimize processing cycle times. Based on this criterion, glass formulations from the tin zinc phosphate and alkali borosilicate families were selected for future variability testing. Variability testing will include final product evaluation, glass system tolerance to waste loading and composition variation, and identification of parameters impacting time/temperature profiles. Variability testing results will give a final frit formulation for ash and SS&C, and identify key processing parameters. 12 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  2. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  3. PbO reduction and crucible reactions of 70 wt pct PbO-30 wt pct B2O3 glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, Christopher H.; Lee, Mark C.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has conducted an investigation of PbO-B2O3 glass with a view to PbO reduction and subsequent crucible reactions as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, in order to establish the optimum processing conditions for subcentimetric glass hollow spheres applicable to inertial confinement fusion targets. The results obtained support the selection of appropriate crucible materials and oxygen partial pressure-temperature combinations that avoid phase separation from PbO reduction and/or crucible reactions.

  4. Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159805.html Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold Healthy body temperature boosts ability of immune system ... proving Mom right: Your odds of avoiding a cold get better if you bundle up and stay ...

  5. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  6. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  7. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  8. Influence of melt convection on microstructure evolution of Nd-Fe-B alloys using a forced crucible rotation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K.; Hermann, R.; Filip, O.; Acker, J.; Gerbeth, G.; Priede, J.

    2006-09-01

    The forced crucible rotation technique has been applied to the solidification of Nd-Fe-B alloys. Specially sealed samples were subjected to well-defined forced rotation during induction heating and solidification. The resulting microstructure of the Nd-Fe-B alloys in consideration of melt convection has been investigated using scanning electron probe microscopy. The determination of the -Fe volume fraction by measuring the magnetic moment in a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) resulted in a distinct reduction of the -Fe volume fraction in samples with high crucible rotation frequencies. Furthermore, a new category of experiment has been started where a tailored magnetic field was applied in order to study the microstructure evolution due to an enhancement or suppression of the melt convection by additional alternating magnetic fields.

  9. Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling of Cold Cap Behavior in High-Level-Waste Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-03-03

    The cold cap is a layer of reacting melter feed floating on the surface of molten glass in a glass-melting furnace. The cold cap consists of two distinct portions, of which the upper allows the reaction gases to escape through open pores, whereas the lower portion traps the gases within the continuous glass-forming melt, creating foam. The temperature span over the cold cap is ~1000 K. Data needed to simulate the cold cap mathematically include the kinetics of multiple reactions, reaction enthalpies, heat capacity, density, porosity, and heat conductivity as functions of both the temperature and the rate of heating. These data were produced via crucible experiments. The mathematical model has been completed. It relates the cold cap thickness, the rate of melting, the temperature field, and cold cap structure (foaming, dissolution of quartz particles, and formation and subsequent dissolution of crystalline phases, such as spinel) to the cold cap bottom temperature, the fraction of heat flow to the upper cold cap surface, the melt foaminess, and the chemical and physical nature of melter feed materials. To verify the model, cold caps were produced in a laboratory-scale melter and their structure is currently investigated.

  10. Use of frit-disc crucibles for routine and exploratory solution growth of single crystalline samples

    DOE PAGES

    Canfield, Paul C.; Kong, Tai; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Jo, Na Hyun

    2016-01-05

    Solution growth of single crystals from high temperature solutions often involves the separation of residual solution from the grown crystals. For many growths of intermetallic compounds, this separation has historically been achieved with the use of plugs of silica wool. Whereas this is generally efficient in a mechanical sense, it leads to a significant contamination of the decanted liquid with silica fibres. In this paper, we present a simple design for frit-disc alumina crucible sets that has made their use in the growth single crystals from high temperature solutions both simple and affordable. An alumina frit-disc allows for the cleanmore » separation of the residual liquid from the solid phase. This allows for the reuse of the decanted liquid, either for further growth of the same phase, or for subsequent growth of other, related phases. In this article, we provide examples of the growth of isotopically substituted TbCd6 and icosahedral i-RCd quasicrystals, as well as the separation of (i) the closely related Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 phases and (ii) and PrZn11 and PrZn17.« less

  11. Interaction Studies of Ceramic Vacuum Plasma Spraying for the Melting Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jong Hwan Kim; Hyung Tae Kim; Yoon Myung Woo; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee; R. S. Fielding

    2013-10-01

    Candidate coating materials for re-usable metallic nuclear fuel crucibles, TaC, TiC, ZrC, ZrO2, and Y2O3, were plasmasprayed onto a niobium substrate. The microstructure of the plasma-sprayed coatings and thermal cycling behavior were characterized, and U-Zr melt interaction studies were carried out. The TaC and Y2O3 coating layers had a uniform thickness, and high density with only a few small closed pores showing good consolidation, while the ZrC, TiC, and ZrO2 coatings were not well consolidated with a considerable amount of porosity. Thermal cycling tests showed that the adhesion of the TiC, ZrC, and ZrO2 coating layers with niobium was relatively weak compared to the TaC and Y2O3 coatings. The TaC and Y2O3 coatings had better cycling characteristics with no interconnected cracks. In the interaction studies, ZrC and ZrO2 coated rods showed significant degradations after exposure to U-10 wt.% Zr melt at 1600 degrees C for 15 min., but TaC, TiC, and Y2O3 coatings showed good compatibility with U-Zr melt.

  12. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  13. Ionic Conductivity and Air Stability of Al-Doped Li₇La₃Zr₂O₁₂ Sintered in Alumina and Pt Crucibles.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenhao; Xu, Biyi; Duan, Huanan; Guo, Yiping; Kang, Hongmei; Li, Hua; Liu, Hezhou

    2016-03-01

    Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) is a promising electrolyte material for all-solid-state battery due to its high ionic conductivity and good stability with metallic lithium. In this article, we studied the effect of crucibles on the ionic conductivity and air stability by synthesizing 0.25Al doped LLZO pellets in Pt crucibles and alumina crucibles, respectively. The results show that the composition and microstructure of the pellets play important roles influencing the ionic conductivity, relative density, and air stability. Specifically, the 0.25Al-LLZO pellets sintered in Pt crucibles exhibit a high relative density (∼96%) and high ionic conductivity (4.48 × 10(-4) S cm(-1)). The ionic conductivity maintains 3.6 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) after 3-month air exposure. In contrast, the ionic conductivity of the pellets from alumina crucibles is about 1.81 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) and drops to 2.39 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) 3 months later. The large grains and the reduced grain boundaries in the pellets sintered in Pt crucibles are favorable to obtain high ionic conductivity and good air stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy results suggest that the formation of Li2CO3 on the pellet surface is probably another main reason, which is also closely related to the relative density and the amount of grain boundary within the pellets. This work stresses the importance of synthesis parameters, crucibles included, to obtain the LLZO electrolyte with high ionic conductivity and good air stability.

  14. A multistage crucible of revision and approval shapes IPCC policymaker summaries

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Katharine J.; Freeman, Patrick T.; Mastrandrea, Michael D.; Field, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) member governments approve each report’s summary for policymakers (SPM) by consensus, discussing and agreeing on each sentence in a plenary session with scientist authors. A defining feature of IPCC assessment, the governmental approval process builds joint ownership of current knowledge by scientists and governments. The resulting SPM revisions have been extensively discussed in anecdotes, interviews, and perspectives, but they have not been comprehensively analyzed. We provide an in-depth evaluation of IPCC SPM revisions, establishing an evidential basis for understanding their nature. Revisions associated with governmental review and approval generally expand SPMs, with SPM text growing by 17 to 53% across recent assessment reports. Cases of high political sensitivity and failure to reach consensus are notable exceptions, resulting in SPM contractions. In contrast to recent claims, we find that IPCC SPMs are as readable, for multiple metrics of reading ease, as other professionally edited assessment summaries. Across reading-ease metrics, some SPMs become more readable through governmental review and approval, whereas others do not. In an SPM examined through the entire revision process, most revisions associated with governmental review and approval occurred before the start of the government-approval plenary session. These author revisions emphasize clarity, scientific rigor, and explanation. In contrast, the subsequent plenary revisions place greater emphasis especially on policy relevance, comprehensiveness of examples, and nuances of expert judgment. Overall, the value added by the IPCC process emerges in a multistage crucible of revision and approval, as individuals together navigate complex science-policy terrain. PMID:27532046

  15. A multistage crucible of revision and approval shapes IPCC policymaker summaries.

    PubMed

    Mach, Katharine J; Freeman, Patrick T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Field, Christopher B

    2016-08-01

    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) member governments approve each report's summary for policymakers (SPM) by consensus, discussing and agreeing on each sentence in a plenary session with scientist authors. A defining feature of IPCC assessment, the governmental approval process builds joint ownership of current knowledge by scientists and governments. The resulting SPM revisions have been extensively discussed in anecdotes, interviews, and perspectives, but they have not been comprehensively analyzed. We provide an in-depth evaluation of IPCC SPM revisions, establishing an evidential basis for understanding their nature. Revisions associated with governmental review and approval generally expand SPMs, with SPM text growing by 17 to 53% across recent assessment reports. Cases of high political sensitivity and failure to reach consensus are notable exceptions, resulting in SPM contractions. In contrast to recent claims, we find that IPCC SPMs are as readable, for multiple metrics of reading ease, as other professionally edited assessment summaries. Across reading-ease metrics, some SPMs become more readable through governmental review and approval, whereas others do not. In an SPM examined through the entire revision process, most revisions associated with governmental review and approval occurred before the start of the government-approval plenary session. These author revisions emphasize clarity, scientific rigor, and explanation. In contrast, the subsequent plenary revisions place greater emphasis especially on policy relevance, comprehensiveness of examples, and nuances of expert judgment. Overall, the value added by the IPCC process emerges in a multistage crucible of revision and approval, as individuals together navigate complex science-policy terrain. PMID:27532046

  16. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  17. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  18. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts. They do not protect against getting a ...

  19. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  20. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  1. Effect of Crucible Diameter Reduction on the Convection, Macrosegregation, and Dendritic Morphology during Directional Solidification of Pb-2.2 Wt Pct Sb Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jun; Tewari, S. N.; Magadi, G.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    The Pb-2.2 wt pct Sb alloy has been directionally solidified in 1-, 2-, 3-, and 7-mm-diameter crucibles with planar and dendritic liquid-solid interface orphology. For plane front solidification, the experimentally observed macrosegregation along the solidified length follows the relationship proposed by Favier. Application of a 0.4 T transverse magnetic field has no effect on the extent of convection. Reducing the ampoule diameter appears to decrease the extent of convection. However, extensive convection is still present even in the 1-mm-diameter crucible. An extrapolation of the observed behavior indicated that nearly diffusive transport conditions require ampoules that are about 40 microns in diameter. Reduction of the crucible diameter does not appear to have any significant effect on the primary dendrite spacing. However, it results in considerable distortion of the dendrite morphology and ordering. This is especially true for the 1-mm diameter samples.

  2. Crystal growth of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) and reaction of gold crucible with Ba-Cu-rich flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y. K.; Chen, H. C.; Martini, L.; Bechtold, J.; Huang, Z. J.; Hor, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    YBa2Cu3O(7-x) crystals are grown in a gold crucible by a self-flux method. The flux moves along the gold surface due to surface wetting and leaves Y123 crystals behind. The obtained crystals are clean and have a size up to two millimeters and a Tc is greater than 90 K. In an effort to recycle the used crucibles, it is found that the used gold is contaminated by copper. A CuO thin film is easily formed on the surface of the crucible that is made of the used gold. This film provides good surface wetting and a buffer layer, which reduces the reaction between gold and the Y-Ba-Cu-oxide melt.

  3. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  4. A Study of Undercooling Behavior Of Immiscible Metal Alloys in the Absence of Crucible-Induced Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael B.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Li, Delin; Workman, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the question: Would eliminating the crucible eliminate the wall-induced nucleation of one of the liquid phases in an immiscible alloy and result in undercooling of the liquid into the metastable region thereby producing significant differences in the separation process and the microstructure upon solidification. Another primary objective of this research is to study systems with a metastable miscibility gap and to directly determine the metastable liquid miscibility gap by undercooling experiments. Nucleation and growth of droplets in these undercooled metallic liquid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Results of this investigation indicate that containerless processing of immiscibles may not promote the undercooling of the single-phase liquid into the metastable region. Although no recalescence event was observed for this liquid-liquid transition, undercooling did occur across the miscibility gap for the solidification of the Ti phase that eventually separated.

  5. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  6. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  7. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  8. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  9. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  10. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  11. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  12. Continuous Czochralski growth. Development of advanced Czochralski growth process to produce low cost 150 kg silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The improvement of growth rates using radiation shielding and investigation of the crucible melt interaction for improved yields were emphasized. Growth runs were performed from both 15 and 16 inch diameter crucibles, producing 30 and 37 kg ingots respectively. Efforts to increase the growth rate of 150 mm diameter ingots were limited by temperature instabilities believed to be caused by undesirable thermal convections in the larger melts. The radiation shield improved the growth rate somewhat, but the thermal instability was still evident, leading to nonround ingots and loss of dislocation-free structure. A 38 kg crystal was grown to demonstrate the feasibility of producing 150 kg with four growth cycles. After the grower construction phase, the Hamco microprocessor control system was interfaced to the growth facility, including the sensor for automatic control of seeding temperature, and the sensor for automatic shouldering. Efforts focused upon optimization of the seeding, necking, and shoulder growth automation programs.

  13. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  14. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  15. Assessment of Different Turbulence Models for the Motion of Non-metallic Inclusion in Induction Crucible Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, H.; Wu, M.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-07-01

    Turbulent fluid flow due to the electromagnetic forces in induction crucible furnace (ICF) is modeled using k-ɛ, k-ω SST and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence models. Fluid flow patterns calculated by different turbulence models and their effects on the motion of non-metallic inclusions (NMI) in the bulk melt have been investigated. Results show that the conventional k-ɛ model cannot solve the transient flow in ICF properly. With k-ω model transient flow and oscillation behavior of the flow pattern can be solved, and the motion of NMI can be tracked fairly well. LES model delivers the best modeling result on both details of the transient flow pattern and motion trajectories of NMI without the limitation of NMI size. The drawback of LES model is the long calculation time. Therefore, for general purpose to estimate the dynamic behavior of NMI in ICF both k-ω SST and LES are recommended. For the precise calculation of the motion of NMI smaller than 10 μm only LES model is appropriate.

  16. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  17. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  18. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  19. Metallographic examination of the structure of the metal of cold arms of the nineteenth-early twentieth centuries made at the Zlatoust arms factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Rodionov, D. P.; Gerasimov, V. Yu.; Khlebnikova, Yu. V.

    2010-11-01

    Data are given concerning the structure and the chemical composition of carbon steel used for making cold arms, which was produced at the Zlatoust arms factory in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The results of the analysis of the structure of metal demonstrates the general trend of the development of metallurgy both at the Ural plants and in the world: from the creation of the crucible methods of production of cast steel to the mass production of cast steel by the Bessemer and Martin methods.

  20. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  1. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Thioglycolate poisoning ... Below are symptoms of cold wave lotion poisoning in different parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Mouth irritation Burning and redness of the eyes Possibly serious damage to ...

  2. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  3. Cold Hardening in Citrus Stems

    PubMed Central

    Yelenosky, George

    1975-01-01

    Stem cold hardening developed to different levels in citrus types tested in controlled environments. Exotherms indicated ice spread was more uniform and rapid in unhardened than in cold-hardened stems. All attempts to inhibit the functioning of citrus leaves resulted in less cold hardening in the stems. Citrus leaves contribute a major portion of cold hardening in the wood. PMID:16659340

  4. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  5. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  6. Growth of Si Bulk Crystals with Large Diameter Ratio Using Small Crucibles by Creating a Large Low-Temperature Region Inside a Si Melt Contained in an NOC Furnace Developed Using Two Zone Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Ono, Satoshi; Murai, Ryota; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Three zone heaters were generally used for a noncontact crucible (NOC) furnace. For practical reasons a simpler NOC furnace was developed with two zone heaters, which had a carbon heat holder to cover the three roles of each heater. Large low-temperature regions were obtained, and silicon ingots were grown in small crucibles with a large diameter and diameter ratio. Here, the diameter ratio is the ratio of the ingot diameter to the crucible diameter and can be as large as 0.90. The diameter ratio was controlled mainly by the temperature reduction of the first heater. Power changes of the second heater did not have a significant impact on the ingot diameter. Using this NOC furnace, maximum ingot diameters of 28.0, 33.5, and 45.0 cm were obtained using crucibles of 33, 40, and 50 cm in diameter, respectively. The oxygen concentration of the ingots did not strongly depend on the diameter ratio and were always low because convection in the Si melt was markedly suppressed by the carbon heat holder. Moreover, the oxygen concentration of the ingots has a tendency to become lower as the crucible diameter becomes larger.

  7. Progress toward cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Estrada, J.; Peil, S.; Roach, T.; Tan, J. N.; Yesley, P.

    1999-12-10

    The production and study of cold antihydrogen will require the manipulation of dense and cold, single component plasmas of antiprotons and positrons. The undertaking will build upon the experience of the nonneutral plasma physics community. Annihilations of the antimatter particles in the plasmas can be imaged, offering unique diagnostic opportunities not available to this community when electrons and protons are used. The techniques developed by our TRAP collaboration to capture and cool antiprotons will certainly be used by our expanded ATRAP collaboration, and by the competing ATHENA Collaboration, both working at the nearly completed AD facility of CERN. We recently demonstrated a new techniques for accumulating cold positrons directly into a cryogenic vacuum system. The closest we have come to low energy antihydrogen so far is to confine cold positrons and cold antiprotons within the same trap structure and vacuum container. Finally, we mention that stored electrons have been cooled to 70 mK, the first time that elementary particles have been cooled below 4 K. In such an apparatus it should be possible to study highly magnetized plasmas of electrons or positrons at this new low temperature.

  8. Cold sea survival.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veghte, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two prototype three-man life rafts were evaluated during the winter months in Arctic waters off Kodiak Island, Alaska, to assess potential survival problems and determine tolerance limits. Each raft incorporated thermal characteristics specifically designed for cold water. Water and air temperatures varied from 0 to +2 C and -5 to +4 C respectively. All subjects were removed upon reaching subjective tolerance. The results showed that none of the clothing assemblies was adequate to maintain a person in comfort even with dry boarding. No significant biochemical shifts in the blood or urine were found. The TUL raft was found to be superior in its thermal characteristics and afforded better subject protection. General tolerance for cold water immersion, wet and dry, and cold water raft exposures are depicted graphically, based on previously reported data.

  9. Assessment of cold stress.

    PubMed

    Holmér, I

    1991-01-01

    Cold stress may be present in terms of a risk for skin surface cooling (wind chill), extremity cooling and whole body cooling. Measures of cold stress differ for the various situations. The most common approach, however, has been to apply more or less complex formulas for heat balance calculations. The combined effect of several climatic factors (air temperature, mean radiant temperature, humidity and air velocity) and the activity level determines the cooling power of the environment. The cooling power can be easily converted into a required insulation value, that applies both to parts of the body and to the body as a whole. The value provides information about cold stress in two ways; (a) by specifying necessary behavioural adjustments in terms of required activity level and clothing insulation level, and (b) by quantifying the thermal imbalance and tolerance time, when protection worn does not provide sufficient insulation.

  10. Cold asymmetrical fermion superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Caldas, Heron

    2003-12-19

    The recent experimental advances in cold atomic traps have induced a great amount of interest in fields from condensed matter to particle physics, including approaches and prospects from the theoretical point of view. In this work we investigate the general properties and the ground state of an asymmetrical dilute gas of cold fermionic atoms, formed by two particle species having different densities. We have show in a recent paper, that a mixed phase composed of normal and superfluid components is the energetically favored ground state of such a cold fermionic system. Here we extend the analysis and verify that in fact, the mixed phase is the preferred ground state of an asymmetrical superfluid in various situations. We predict that the mixed phase can serve as a way of detecting superfluidity and estimating the magnitude of the gap parameter in asymmetrical fermionic systems.

  11. CRUCIBLE LINING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Bone, W.H.; Schmidt, W.W.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for forming refractory liners in cylindrical reaction vessels used for the reductlon of uranium tetrafluoride to metallic uranium. A preliminary form, having positioning lugs attached thereto, is inserted into the reaction vessel and the refractory powder, usually CaO, is put in the annular space between the form and the inner wall of the reaction vessel. A jolting table is used to compact this charge of liner material ln place, and after thls has been done, the preliminary form is removed and the flnal form or plug is lnserted without disturbing the partially completed lining. The remainder of the lining charge is then introduced and compacted by jolting, after which the form is removed.

  12. Development of advanced Czochralski Growth Process to produce low cost 150 KG silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The goals in this program for advanced czochralski growth process to produce low cost 150 kg silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness are outlined. To provide a modified CG2000 crystal power capable of pulling a minimum of five crystals, each of approximately 30 kg in weight, 150 mm diameter from a single crucible with periodic melt replenishment. Crystals to have: resistivity of 1 to 3 ohm cm, p-type; dislocation density below 1- to the 6th power per cm; orientation (100); after growth yield of greater than 90%. Growth throughput of greater than 2.5 kg per hour of machine operation using a radiation shield. Prototype equipment suitable for use as a production facility. The overall cost goal is $.70 per peak watt by 1986. To accomplish these goals, the modified CG2000 grower and development program includes: (1) increased automation with a microprocessor based control system; (2) sensors development which will increase the capability of the automatic controls system, and provide technology transfer of the developed systems.

  13. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  14. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one man for another, and the place…

  15. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  16. Cold War Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discusses the development of Cold War propaganda in the United States, Canada, and the USSR after 1947. Presents two movie reviews and a Canadian magazine advertisement of the period which illustrate the harshness of propaganda used by both sides in the immediate postwar years. (GEA)

  17. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  18. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  19. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What is Prescription Drug Abuse: ... treatment of addiction. Read more Safe Disposal of Medicines Disposal of Unused Medicines: What You Should Know ( ...

  20. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview. PMID:24944030

  1. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview.

  2. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  3. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  4. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  5. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  6. When blood runs cold: cold agglutinins and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Rhonda R; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinins are particular cold-reactive antibodies that react with red blood cells when the blood temperature drops below normal body temperature causing increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping. Most individuals with cold agglutinins are not aware of their presence, as these antibodies have little effect on daily living, often necessitating no treatment. However, when those with cold agglutinins are exposed to hypothermic situations or undergo procedures such as cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia during cardiac surgery, lethal complications of hemolysis, microvascular occlusion and organ failure can occur. By identifying those suspected of possessing cold agglutinins through a comprehensive nursing assessment and patient history, cold agglutinin screening can be performed prior to surgery to determine a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease. With a confirmed diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease, the plan of care can be focused on measures to maintain the patient's blood temperature above the thermal amplitude throughout their hospitalization including the use of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with warm myocardial preservation techniques to prevent these fatal complications. Using a case report approach, the authors review the mechanism, clinical manifestations, detection and nursing management of a patient with cold agglutinins undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery. Cold agglutinin disease is rare. However, the risk to patients warrants an increased awareness of cold agglutinins and screening for those who are suspected of carrying these antibodies. PMID:21630629

  7. WISPy cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Cadamuro, Davide; Goodsell, Mark; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches — exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques — can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future.

  8. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  9. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  10. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  11. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  12. Cold denaturation of encapsulated ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Pometun, Maxim S; Peterson, Ronald W; Babu, Charles R; Wand, A Joshua

    2006-08-23

    Theoretical considerations suggest that protein cold denaturation can potentially provide a means to explore the cooperative substructure of proteins. Protein cold denaturation is generally predicted to occur well below the freezing point of water. Here NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity alkanes is used to follow cold-induced unfolding to temperatures below -25 degrees C. Comparison of cold-induced structural transitions in a variety of reverse micelle-buffer systems indicate that protein-surfactant interactions are negligible and allow the direct observation of the multistate cold-induced unfolding of the protein.

  13. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aide researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials. Details of these current technologies will be provided along with operational experience gained to date. With shuttle retirement looming, NASA has protected the capability to provide a temperature controlled environment during transportation to and from the ISS with the use of Glacier and Coldbags, which are compatible with future commercial vehicles including SpaceX's Dragon Capsule, and Orbital s Cygnus vehicle. This paper will discuss the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  14. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  15. A three-dimensional phase field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces with accelerated crucible rotation and traveling magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie

    2014-11-01

    In this study, which builds on other related work, we present a new three-dimensional numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model accounts for buoyancy, accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT), and traveling magnetic field (TMF) induced convective flow and their effect on crystal growth and the chemical component's transport process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase field method. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. A one-way coupled concentration transport model is used to simulate the component fraction variation in both the liquid and solid phases, which can be used to check the quality of the crystal growth.

  16. Experimental hypothermia and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R G; Pozos, R S

    1989-10-01

    Twelve subjects clothed in flotation suits were immersed in 10 degrees C cold water and their surface temperatures at the back and groin, as well as core temperatures, were continuously monitored. Subjects were unable to reliably assess how cold they were, with the highest correlation observed between perceived temperature and actual temperature reaching only 0.51. This was felt to be partially due to the uneven distribution of surface temperatures seen in this experiment and in most cold water immersions. Rapid cooling in cold water also produced the perceptual phenomenon of "overshooting" previously observed in cold air studies, characterized by sudden temperature drops being perceived as cold sensations of greater magnitude. The results suggest that subjects who are rapidly cooled in water may have considerable difficulty separating feelings of cold from feelings of pain and discomfort, which can have serious implications in survival situations and highlights the subjective and highly variable nature of cold perception. Perceived cold sensation may be a very poor, and possibly dangerous, predictor in cold water immersion situations.

  17. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  18. Cold isopressing method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Stawisuck, Valerie M.; Prasad, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    A cold isopressing method in which two or more layers of material are formed within an isopressing mold. One of the layers consists of a tape-cast film. The layers are isopressed within the isopressing mold, thereby to laminate the layers and to compact the tape-cast film. The isopressing mold can be of cylindrical configuration with the layers being coaxial cylindrical layers. The materials used in forming the layers can contain green ceramic materials and the resultant structure can be fired and sintered as necessary and in accordance with known methods to produce a finished composite, ceramic structure. Further, such green ceramic materials can be of the type that are capable of conducting hydrogen or oxygen ions at high temperature with the object of utilizing the finished composite ceramic structure as a ceramic membrane element.

  19. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  20. The status of cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  1. A Cold and Wet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, A. G.; Davila, A. F.; Duport, L. G.; Uceda, E. R.; Lim, D. S.; Amils, R.; McKay, C. P.

    2008-03-01

    Here we consider the hypothesis that cold and hypersaline liquid solutions have been stable on the surface of Mars under subzero mean temperatures and for relatively extended periods of time, completing a hydrogeological cycle in a water-enriched but cold planet.

  2. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  3. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  4. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  5. Zitterbewegung in Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Poliana; Egues, J. Carlos

    2013-03-01

    In condensed matter systems, the coupling between spatial and spin degrees of freedom through the spin-orbit (SO) interaction offers the possibility of manipulating the electron spin via its orbital motion. The proposal by Datta and Das of a `spin transistor' for example, highlights the use of the SO interaction to control the electron spin via electrical means. Recently, arrangements of crossed lasers and magnetic fields have been used to trap and cool atoms in optical lattices and also to create light-induced gauge potentials, which mimic the SO interactions in real solids. In this work, we investigate the Zitterbewegung in cold atoms by starting from the effective SO Hamiltonian derived in Ref.. Cross-dressed atoms as effective spins can provide a proper setting in which to observe this effect, as the relevant parameter range of SO strengths may be more easily attainable in this context. We find a variety of peculiar Zitterbewegung orbits in real and pseudo-spin spaces, e.g., cycloids and ellipses - all of which obtained with realistic parameters. This work is supported by FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  6. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  7. Plants in a cold climate.

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Maggie; Bowles, Dianna J

    2002-01-01

    Plants are able to survive prolonged exposure to sub-zero temperatures; this ability is enhanced by pre-exposure to low, but above-zero temperatures. This process, known as cold acclimation, is briefly reviewed from the perception of cold, through transduction of the low-temperature signal to functional analysis of cold-induced gene products. The stresses that freezing of apoplastic water imposes on plant cells is considered and what is understood about the mechanisms that plants use to combat those stresses discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix. PMID:12171647

  8. Measuring the Cold Mask Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roye, E.; Krist, J.; Schultz, A. B.; Wiklind, T.

    2003-04-01

    An unexpected increase in measured thermal background during the Cycle 11 early calibration program caused speculation that the cold mask position could have shifted since Cycle 7. To address this concern, a single orbit NICMOS program was executed (Program ID: 9704) to obtain deep PSF images of the star LHS1846 in all three cameras. Analysis of this data using the Phase Retrieval software package revealed a minimal amount of cold mask shift since Cycle 7 and provided new, more accurate cold mask values for the Tiny Tim PSF modeling software. It was concluded that the cold mask position was not the cause of increased thermal background observed during the Cycle 11 early calibration program. Increased thermal background has since been determined to be the result of increased thermal load on the HST aft shroud due to the addition of ACS and NCS during SM3b.

  9. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  10. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  11. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-11-11

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  12. Cold and lonely: does social exclusion literally feel cold?

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chen-Bo; Leonardelli, Geoffrey J

    2008-09-01

    Metaphors such as icy stare depict social exclusion using cold-related concepts; they are not to be taken literally and certainly do not imply reduced temperature. Two experiments, however, revealed that social exclusion literally feels cold. Experiment 1 found that participants who recalled a social exclusion experience gave lower estimates of room temperature than did participants who recalled an inclusion experience. In Experiment 2, social exclusion was directly induced through an on-line virtual interaction, and participants who were excluded reported greater desire for warm food and drink than did participants who were included. These findings are consistent with the embodied view of cognition and support the notion that social perception involves physical and perceptual content. The psychological experience of coldness not only aids understanding of social interaction, but also is an integral part of the experience of social exclusion. PMID:18947346

  13. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  14. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  15. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  16. Cold welded laser mirror assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffee, E.G.

    1989-02-07

    A gas laser apparatus is described comprising: (a) a gas laser tube having a bore extending between cathode and anode ends; (b) the laser tube terminating at each end with a bellows assembly operative to extend the length of the tube bore; (c) each bellows assembly comprising: (i) an adjustably positionable metal bellows secured to a selected end of the tube; (ii) a tubular pedestal secured at one end to the bellows to form an extension thereof and at the opposite end providing a mirror mount surface; (iii) a mirror secured to the surface; (iv) a cold weld material located between the mirror and mirror mount surface; and (v) retaining means secured to the pedestal encasing the outer portion of the mirror and operative to apply pressure to the cold weld material to establish a cold weld seal between the mirror and mirror mount surface to retain the mirror on and prevent shifting of the mirror with respect to the mirror mount surface.

  17. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  18. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  19. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  20. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  1. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  2. Cold War Geopolitics: Embassy Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogeler, Ingolf

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that the geopolitics of the Cold War can be illustrated by the diplomatic ties among countries, particularly the superpowers and their respective allies. Describes a classroom project in which global patterns of embassy locations are examined and compared. Includes five maps and a chart indicating types of embassy locations. (CFR)

  3. Images of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The conventional U.S. picture traces the Cold War to Soviet violation of wartime agreements, while the U.S.S.R. defends its actions as responses to American violations and foreign adventurism. An understanding of how ideology is shaped by national self-interest will help students see beyond propaganda and myth in interpreting past and current…

  4. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  5. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  6. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  7. Combustion heated cold sealed TEC

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, V.I.; Klepikov, V.V.; Meleta, Y.A.; Mikheyev, A.S.; Yarygin, D.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a thermionic domestic boiler system using natural gas, which as performed under an ECS-project in 1992 to 1994 by a Russian-Dutch team of researchers, will be continued again. Thanks to financial support on the part of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the major effort in 1997 to 1999 will be focused on the development, manufacture and testing of an improved, easier to fabricate, more repairable and less expensive combustion heated TEC with a longer life-time. The achievement of the aim of this project will make it possible to expand the field of the terrestrial thermionics application and to embark on the commercialization stage. This report discusses the concept of the combustion heated Cold Seal TEC. A Cold Seal TEC will be developed and tested, in which the rubber O-ring seal will electrically insulate the hot shell from the collector heat pipe. The Cold Seal TEC will use a noble gas + cesium as the working medium (the idea of such a TEC was first proposed in 1973 by Professor Musa from Romania). In its cold state, the cesium will short circuit the emitter and the collector. During operation, the interelectrode space will be filled with cesium vapor. The upper part of a Cold Seal TEC will be filled with a noble gas. This noble gas will prevent the O-ring seal from being attacked by the cesium. The TEC output characteristics will be considerably improved by using electrode materials that were developed earlier in the course of an ECS-project for the development of low temperature TEC electrodes.

  8. Vitamin C and the Common Cold Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, H. Richard

    1984-01-01

    Various studies indicate that Vitamin C does not prevent or cure a cold, but it may ameliorate symptoms in some individuals. The development of a balanced life-style is more effective towards cold prevention. (DF)

  9. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  10. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 508 Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes) WHAT IS HERPES? HSV ... virus 1 (HSV1) is the common cause of cold sores (oral herpes) around the mouth. HSV2 normally ...

  11. Tips to Protect Workers in Cold Environments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anti-Retaliation Tips To Protect Workers In Cold Environments Prolonged exposure to freezing or cold temperatures may ... 321-OSHA. Freedom of Information Act | Privacy & Security Statement | Disclaimers | Important Web Site Notices | International | Contact Us ...

  12. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W; Rudin, Sven P; Corckett, Scott D; Wills, John M

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  13. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Creative Writing Class as Crucible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Monica

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her experiences as creative writing teacher and her views as a teacher in the aftermath of Virginia Tech shooting. As a teacher who had taught writing and literature for twenty years, the author had received a great deal of submissions from her students about serial killers, rapists, slashers, and murderers and…

  15. Crucible of Unity and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocca, Frances X.

    2006-01-01

    The College of Europe, in Bruges, Belgium, is a small, elite graduate institution, the world's oldest and best known in the field of European studies, that trains the future leaders of the European Union (EU). The college is known as the premier training ground for officials of the European Commission, which is the executive body of the EU, and of…

  16. Vernalizing cold is registered digitally at FLC.

    PubMed

    Angel, Andrew; Song, Jie; Yang, Hongchun; Questa, Julia I; Dean, Caroline; Howard, Martin

    2015-03-31

    A fundamental property of many organisms is an ability to sense, evaluate, and respond to environmental signals. In some situations, generation of an appropriate response requires long-term information storage. A classic example is vernalization, where plants quantitatively sense long-term cold and epigenetically store this cold-exposure information to regulate flowering time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stable epigenetic memory of cold is digital: following long-term cold exposure, cells respond autonomously in an all-or-nothing fashion, with the fraction of cells that stably silence the floral repressor flowering locus C (FLC) increasing with the cold exposure duration. However, during cold exposure itself it is unknown whether vernalizing cold is registered at FLC in individual cells in an all-or-nothing (digital) manner or is continuously varying (analog). Using mathematical modeling, we found that analog registration of cold temperature is problematic due to impaired analog-to-digital conversion into stable memory. This disadvantage is particularly acute when responding to short cold periods, but is absent when cold temperatures are registered digitally at FLC. We tested this prediction experimentally, exposing plants to short periods of cold interrupted with even shorter warm breaks. For FLC expression, we found that the system responds similarly to both interrupted and uninterrupted cold, arguing for a digital mechanism integrating long-term temperature exposure.

  17. Is It a Cold or an Allergy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... C AT I O N S IS IT A Cold OR AN Allergy  ? COLD Common Slight Sometimes Rare or never Usual Common Common Common Rare 3 to 14 days Cold ■■ Antihistamines ■■ Decongestants ■■ Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines ■■ Wash your ...

  18. Catching a Cold When It's Warm

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Catching a Cold When It’s Warm What’s the Deal with Summertime Sniffles? Most ... be more unfair than catching a cold when it’s warm? How can cold symptoms arise when it’s ...

  19. Excess lithium salt functions more than compensating for lithium loss when synthesizing Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12 in alumina crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Chang-An

    2014-08-01

    Garnet type electrolyte "Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12" (LLZTO) was prepared by conventional solid-state reaction in alumina crucibles and excess lithium salt (from 0% to 50 mol%) was added into the starting materials to investigate the effects of excess lithium salt on the property of LLZTO. SEM, XRD and AC impedance were used to determine the microstructure, phase formation and Li-ion conductivity. Cubic garnet with a minor second phase LiAlO2 in the grain boundary was obtained for the pellets with excess lithium salt. As the amount of excess lithium salt increased, more Al element diffused from alumina crucibles to LLZTO pellets and reacted with excess lithium salt to form liquid Li2O-Al2O3 phase in the grain boundary, which accelerated the pellets' densification and reduced lithium loss at a high temperature. Ionic conductivity of LLZTO pellets increased with the amount of excess lithium salt added and leveled off at ∼4 × 10-4 S cm-1 when lithium salt exceeded 30 mol%. The performance of Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolytes, using homemade LLZTO thin pellets as solid electrolytes, was investigated. The LLZTO thin pellet with more excess lithium salt in starting material had a higher density and resulted in better cell performance.

  20. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of...

  1. Cold injury in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I J

    1977-04-01

    Sixteen cases of neonatal cold injury, five of them fatal, were seen in the winter of 1974-75. The affected infants, who weighed from 2.5 to 3 kg. had developed symptoms when the ambient termperature was below 10 C. Few of them were referred as cases of hypothermia. Refusal to eat was the most common complaint and less often edema and/or apathy. No correlation was found between death and ethnic origin, sex, duration of illness or minimum temperature. Admission weight, however, tended to be lower in the infants who died. The consistent finding of thrombocytopenia and the suspected bleeding phenomena suggested that disseminated intravascular coagulation may have been a factor in the unfavorable outcome of some of the cases. Evidence supporting such a hypothesis and proposals for the prevention. Diagnosis and treatment of neonatal cold injury are presented. PMID:326724

  2. Cold dark matter heats up.

    PubMed

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  3. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  4. Medical problems from cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dembert, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Problems resulting from cold exposure can be successfully treated when a coordinated emergency medical transport system and appropriate equipment are available, as well as medical personnel knowledgeable in the management of frostbite and hypothermia. Clinical suspicion of these disorders is essential. Profoundly hypothermic individuals with no recordable vital signs have been resuscitated after controlled, rapid rewarming measures and the use of emergency life-support systems.

  5. Acclimatization to cold in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses and mechanisms of both natural and artificial acclimatization to a cold environment in mammals, with specific reference to human beings. The purpose is to provide basic information for designers of thermal protection systems for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activities. Hibernation, heat production, heat loss, vascular responses, body insulation, shivering thermogenesis, water immersion, exercise responses, and clinical symptoms and hypothermia in the elderly are discussed.

  6. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  7. A cold and wet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, Alberto G.

    2010-07-01

    Water on Mars has been explained by invoking controversial and mutually exclusive solutions based on warming the atmosphere with greenhouse gases (the "warm and wet" Mars) or on local thermal energy sources acting in a global freezing climate (the "cold and dry" Mars). Both have critical limitations and none has been definitively accepted as a compelling explanation for the presence of liquid water on Mars. Here is considered the hypothesis that cold, saline and acidic liquid solutions have been stable on the sub-zero surface of Mars for relatively extended periods of time, completing a hydrogeological cycle in a water-enriched but cold planet. Computer simulations have been developed to analyze the evaporation processes of a hypothetical martian fluid with a composition resulting from the acid weathering of basalt. This model is based on orbiter- and lander-observed surface mineralogy of Mars, and is consistent with the sequence and time of deposition of the different mineralogical units. The hydrological cycle would have been active only in periods of dense atmosphere, as having a minimum atmospheric pressure is essential for water to flow, and relatively high temperatures (over ˜245 K) are required to trigger evaporation and snowfall; minor episodes of limited liquid water on the surface could have occurred at lower temperatures (over ˜225 K). During times with a thin atmosphere and even lesser temperatures (under ˜225 K), only transient liquid water can potentially exist on most of the martian surface. Assuming that surface temperatures have always been maintained below 273 K, Mars can be considered a "cold and wet" planet for a substantial part of its geological history.

  8. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  9. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  10. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  11. The COLD-SAT program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite is an experimental spacecraft launched from an expendable launch vehicle which is designed to investigate the systems and technologies required for efficient and reliable management of cryogenic fluid in the reduced-gravity space environment. Future applications such as Space Station, Space Transportation Vehicle (STV), external tank (ET), aft cargo carrier (ACC) propellant scavenging, storage depots, and lunar and interplanetary missions, among others, have provided the impetus to pursue this technology in a timely manner to support the design efforts. A refined conceptual approach has been developed and an overview of the COLD-SAT program is described which includes the following: (1) a definition of the technology needs and the accompanying experimental six-month baseline mission; (2) a description of the experiment subsystem, major features, and rationale for satisfaction of primary and secondary experiment requirements using LH2 as the test fluid; and (3) a presentation of the conceptual design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft subsystems which support the on-orbit experiment with emphasis on those areas which posed the greatest technical challenge.

  12. Axion cold dark matter revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, L.; Gondolo, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae [1], and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass ma = (85 ± 3) μeV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for ma < 15 meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle θi is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass ma. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle θi.

  13. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  14. Physiological characteristics of cold acclimatization in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-09-01

    Studies were conducted on 15 healthy young soldiers to evaluate the effect of a cold acclimatization schedule on the thermoregulatory and metabolic activity on exposure to acute cold stress. These men were exposed to cold (10‡C) for 4 h daily wearing only shorts for 21 days, in a cold chamber. They were subjected to a standard cold test at 10 ± 1‡C the day 1, 6, 11 and 21. The subjects were made to relax in a thermoneutral room (26 28‡C) for 1 h and their heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature, peripheral temperatures, and shivering activity were recorded. Then they were exposed to 10‡C and measurements were repeated at 30 min intervals, for 2 h. The cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD), cold pressor response and thermoregulatory efficiency tests were measured initially and at the end of acclimatization schedule. The data show that the procedure resulted in elevated resting metabolism, less fall in body temperature during acute cold stress, reduction in shivering, improvement in CIVD and thermoregulatory efficiency and less rise in BP and HR during cold pressor response. The data suggest the possibility of cold acclimatization in man by repeated exposure to moderately severe cold stress.

  15. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  16. Cold Fusion Has Now Come Out of the Cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2003-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion or LENR (Low-Energy-Nuclear-Reaction) has now achieved a level of reproducibility and understanding that warrants re-examination of the claims. A summary of what is known and want is being done worldwide to obtain more knowledge will be given. Rather than disappearing as better data are obtained, the effects are becoming more reproducible and of greater magnitude. Justification for this claim can be obtained at www.LENR-CANR.org. The phenomenon is too important to ignore any longer even though it conflicts with conventional theory.

  17. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  18. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories.

  19. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, R.; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, P.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; de Jager, C. W.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Voutier, E.; Watson, J. W.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Zheng, X.-C.; Zhu, L.

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  20. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  1. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  2. Pilot-scale Tests to Vitrify Korean Low-Level Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Kim, C.-W.; Park, J. K.; Shin, S. W.; Song, M.-J.; Brunelot, P.; Flament, T.

    2002-02-26

    Korea is under preparation of its first commercial vitrification plant to handle LLW from her Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The waste streams include three categories: combustible Dry Active Wastes (DAW), borate concentrates, and spent resin. The combustible DAW in this research contains vinyl bag, paper, and protective cloth and rubber shoe. The loaded resin was used to simulate spent resin from NPPs. As a part of this project, Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC) has tested an operation mode utilizing its pilot-scale plant and the mixed waste surrogates of resin and DAW. It has also proved, with continuous operation for more than 100 hours, the consistency and operability of the plant including cold crucible melter and its off-gas treatment equipment. Resin and combustible DAW were simultaneously fed into the glass bath with periodic addition of various glass frits as additives, so that it achieved a volume reduction factor larger than 70. By adding various glass frits, this paper discusses about maintaining the viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass bath within their operable ranges, but not about obtaining a durable glass product. The operating mode starts with a batch of glass where a titanium ring is buried. When the induced power ignites the ring, the joule heat melts the surrounding glass frit along with the oxidation heat of titanium. As soon as the molten bath is prepared, in the first stage of the mode, the wastes consisting of loaded resin and combustible DAW are fed with no or minimum addition of glass frits. Then, in the second stage, the bath composition is kept as constant as possible. This operation was successful in terms of maintaining the glass bath under operable condition and produced homogeneous glass. This operation mode could be adapted in commercial stage.

  3. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  4. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  5. Piezoelectric Actuators On A Cold Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Garba, John A.; Glaser, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental system for active suppression of vibrations of cold finger includes three piezoelectric actuators bonded to outer surface. Actuators used to suppress longitudinal and lateral vibrations of upper end of cold finger by applying opposing vibrations. Cold finger in question is part of a cryogenic system associated with an infrared imaging detector. When fully developed, system would be feedback sensor/control/actuator system automatically adapting to changing vibrational environment and suppresses pressure-induced vibrations by imposing compensatory vibrations via actuators.

  6. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  7. Scanning/friction force microscopy study of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystals grown in BaZrO{sub 3} crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, H.P.; Jess, P.; Hubler, U.

    1996-12-01

    Very pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) single crystals grown in BaZrO{sub 3} crucibles are studied in the as-grown and the oxidized state by scanning force (SFM), friction force (FFM) and scanning tunneling microscopies (STM). The images show clean terraces with step-heights of one unit cell along YBCO(001), i.e. 1.2 nm. Only close to step edges is material contrast observed by FFM indicating traces of flux. Some crystal surfaces exhibit over-layer features, such as star-like, ribbon-like and checkerboard-like structures, which exhibit friction contrast implying the presence of different materials on the surface. Tunneling spectroscopy at 4-7 K in high vacuum reveals a superconducting energy gap of 2{Delta} {approx} 26 meV.

  8. Global transcriptional profiling of a cold-tolerant rice variety under moderate cold stress reveals different cold stress response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junliang; Zhang, Shaohong; Yang, Tifeng; Zeng, Zichong; Huang, Zhanghui; Liu, Qing; Wang, Xiaofei; Leach, Jan; Leung, Hei; Liu, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Gene expression profiling under severe cold stress (4°C) has been conducted in plants including rice. However, rice seedlings are frequently exposed to milder cold stresses under natural environments. To understand the responses of rice to milder cold stress, a moderately low temperature (8°C) was used for cold treatment prior to genome-wide profiling of gene expression in a cold-tolerant japonica variety, Lijiangxintuanheigu (LTH). A total of 5557 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found at four time points during moderate cold stress. Both the DEGs and differentially expressed transcription factor genes were clustered into two groups based on their expression, suggesting a two-phase response to cold stress and a determinative role of transcription factors in the regulation of stress response. The induction of OsDREB2A under cold stress is reported for the first time in this study. Among the anti-oxidant enzyme genes, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were upregulated, suggesting that the glutathione system may serve as the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger in LTH. Changes in expression of genes in signal transduction pathways for auxin, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) imply their involvement in cold stress responses. The induction of ABA response genes and detection of enriched cis-elements in DEGs suggest that ABA signaling pathway plays a dominant role in the cold stress response. Our results suggest that rice responses to cold stress vary with the specific temperature imposed and the rice genotype.

  9. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  10. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  11. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  12. Medical Evaluation for Exposure Extremes: Cold.

    PubMed

    Fudge, Jessie R; Bennett, Brad L; Simanis, Juris P; Roberts, William O

    2015-09-01

    Risk of injury in cold environments is related to a combination of athlete preparedness, preexisting medical conditions, and the body's physiologic response to environmental factors, including ambient temperature, windchill, and wetness. The goal of this section is to decrease the risk of hypothermia, frostbite, and nonfreezing cold injuries as well as to prevent worsening of preexisting conditions in cold environments using a preparticipation screening history, examination, and counseling. Cold weather exercise can be done safely with education, proper preparation, and appropriate response to changing weather conditions.

  13. Medical Evaluation for Exposure Extremes: Cold.

    PubMed

    Fudge, Jessie R; Bennett, Brad L; Simanis, Juris P; Roberts, William O

    2015-12-01

    Risk of injury in cold environments is related to a combination of athlete preparedness, preexisting medical conditions, and the body's physiologic response to environmental factors, including ambient temperature, windchill, and wetness. The goal of this section is to decrease the risk of hypothermia, frostbite, and nonfreezing cold injuries as well as to prevent worsening of preexisting conditions in cold environments using a preparticipation screening history, examination, and counseling. Cold weather exercise can be done safely with education, proper preparation, and appropriate response to changing weather conditions.

  14. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  15. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  16. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  17. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  18. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

    2009-02-07

    Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

  19. Age and Ethnic Differences in Cold Weather and Contagion Theories of Colds and Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with…

  20. Status of cold fusion (2010).

    PubMed

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  1. Status of cold fusion (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  2. Cold-Rydberg-gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Walz-Flannigan, A.; Guest, J.R.; Choi, J.-H.; Raithel, G.

    2004-06-01

    Using state-selective field ionization, the state distributions of Rydberg atoms in cold Rydberg gases are measured for various initially excited Rydberg levels, populations, and evolution times. We provide direct experimental evidence for l-changing collisions that we previously observed indirectly [S. K. Dutta, D. Feldbaum, A. Walz-Flannigan, J. R. Guest, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3993 (2001)]. We also observe n-mixing and find that its effects are largely in agreement with recent theoretical work on n-changing collisions between electrons and Rydberg atoms, thus enabling an estimation of the electron temperature. Unexpectedly large populations of atoms are found in states with principal quantum numbers much lower than that of the initially excited atoms. We explain this observation by collisions between high-l Rydberg atoms, which are highly polar and can collide due to static electric-dipole forces between them.

  3. The cold-fog test

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.A.; Ringler, K.G.; Erven, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical performance of outdoor insulation degrades severely during combinations of factors that include surface contamination (C), ice (I), fog (F) and an ambient temperature that rises through 0 C (T{sub 0{degree}}). Failures at operating voltage on 115-kV, 230-kV and 500-kV systems occur with increasing probability under these conditions. A new CFT{sub 0{degree}} or cold-fog test method has been developed to reproduce the flashovers at all three voltage levels. Three options are identified for improving CFT{sub 0{degree}} performance: use of semi-conductive glazes, substitution of silicone for porcelain and use of silicone coatings on existing porcelain insulators.

  4. Cold warriors target arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.

    1995-09-01

    While disagreements over the conflict in Bosnia have strained US relations with Western Europe and Russia, these divisions will pale in comparison to the tensions that will arise if recent congressional arms control decisions become law. If the Republicans who dominate Congress are successful, a series of arms control agreements painstakingly negotiated by Republican and Democratic presidents could be consigned to the ash heap. This list includes the Start I and Start II nuclear reduction agreements, the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and the ongoing negotiations to achieve a comprehensive test ban (CTB) by 1996. US leadership in the post-Cold War era will undermined as the international community, already skeptical about this country`s direction, will question the ability of the executive branch to surmount isolantionist impulses.

  5. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-07-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants.

  6. Neandertal cold adaptation: physiological and energetic factors.

    PubMed

    Steegmann, A Theodore; Cerny, Frank J; Holliday, Trenton W

    2002-01-01

    European Neandertals employed a complex set of physiological cold defenses, homologous to those seen in contemporary humans and nonhuman primates. While Neandertal morphological patterns, such as foreshortened extremities and low relative surface-area, may have explained some of the variance in cold resistance, it is suggested the adaptive package was strongly dependent on a rich array of physiological defenses. A summary of the environmental cold conditions in which the Neandertals lived is presented, and a comparative ethnographic model from Tierra del Fuego is used. Muscle and subcutaneous fat are excellent "passive" insulators. Neandertals were quite muscular, but it is unlikely that they could maintain enough superficial body fat to offer much cold protection. A major, high-energy metabolic adaptation facilitated by modest amounts of highly thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT) is proposed. In addition, Neandertals would have been protected by general mammalian cold defenses based on systemic vasoconstriction and intensified by acclimatization, aerobic fitness, and localized cold--induced vasodilation. However, these defenses are energetically expensive. Based on contemporary data from circumpolar peoples, it is estimated that Neandertals required 3,360 to 4,480 kcal per day to support strenuous winter foraging and cold resistance costs. Several specific genetic cold adaptations are also proposed--heat shock protein (actually, stress shock protein), an ACP*1 locus somatic growth factor, and a specialized calcium metabolism not as yet understood. PMID:12203812

  7. Electrodeposition process reduces cost of cold plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient nickel heat-exchanger cold plates can be fabricated less expensively than stainless steel plates. If adapted to mass production, it is estimated that nickel cold plates might be made for about 30 percent less than stainless-steel plates.

  8. Cold plasma processing technology makes advances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma (AKA nonthermal plasma, cool plasma, gas plasma, etc.) is a rapidly maturing antimicrobial process being developed for applications in the food industry. A wide array of devices can be used to create cold plasma, but the defining characteristic is that they operate at or near room temper...

  9. Cold head maintenance with minimal service interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovinsky, A. L.; Michael, P. C.; Zhukovsky, A.; Forton, E.; Paradis, Y.; Nuttens, V.; Minervini, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Turn-key superconducting magnet systems are increasingly conduction-cooled by cryogenerators. Gifford-McMahon systems are reliable and cost effective, but require annual maintenance. A usual method of servicing is replacing the cold head of the cryocooler. It requires a complicated design with a vacuum chamber separate from the main vacuum of the cryostat, as well as detachable thermal contacts, which add to the thermal resistance of the cooling heat path and reduce the reliability of the system. We present a rapid warm-up scheme to bring the cold head body, which remains rigidly affixed to the cold mass, to room temperature, while the cold mass remains at cryogenic temperature. Electric heaters thermally attached to the cold head stations are used to warm them up, which permits conventional cold head maintenance with no danger of contaminating the inside of the cold head body. This scheme increases the efficiency of the cooling system, facilitates annual maintenance of the cold head and returning the magnet to operation in a short time.

  10. The Origins of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Thomas G.

    1986-01-01

    Briefly reviews conventional reasoning about the start of the Cold War. Describes contemporary revisionist views of the Cold War and the reasons they arose. Maintains that American leaders exaggerated the Soviet ideological and military threat, spurring an American arms build-up which ultimately led to the present-day arms race. (JDH)

  11. Is It a Cold or the Flu?

    MedlinePlus

    IS IT A Cold OR THE Flu ? SYMPTOMS FEVER HEADACHE GENERAL ACHES, PAINS FATIGUE, WEAKNESS EXTREME EXHAUSTION STUFFY NOSE SNEEZING SORE THROAT CHEST ... P L I C AT I O N S COLD Rare Rare Slight Sometimes Never Common Usual Common ...

  12. Peripheral cold acclimatization in Antarctic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S A

    1991-08-01

    Peripheral acclimatization to cold in scuba divers stationed at the British Antarctic Survey's Signy Station was investigated during a year in Antarctica. Five divers and five non-diver controls underwent monthly laboratory tests of index finger immersion in cold water for 30 min. Index finger pulp temperature and time of onset of cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) were measured. Pain was recorded with verbal and numerical psychophysical subjective pain ratings. Average finger temperatures and median finger pain from 6-30 min of immersion, maximum finger temperatures during the first CIVD cycle, and finger temperatures at the onset of CIVD were calculated. Comparison of the variables recorded from divers and non-divers were performed with analysis of variance. No significant differences were found among the variables recorded from divers and non-divers. From a review of the literature, divers have responses typical of non-cold-adapted Caucasians. There is, therefore, no evidence that Signy divers peripherally acclimatized to cold. We suggest that these findings occur because either the whole body cooling which divers undergo inhibits peripheral acclimatization or because of insufficiently frequent or severe cold exposure while diving. Further basic studies on the duration, frequency and severity of cold exposure necessary to induce peripheral cold acclimatization are required before this question can be satisfactorily answered.

  13. Lessons on the Cold War. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Susan J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of the Cold War requires teachers to change their teaching methods and content. Presents six lessons, most with three individual student activities, that trace the Cold War from the pre-World War I era through the end of the Vietnam War. (CFR)

  14. Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety Print A A A Text Size What's ... a few. Plus, someone has to shovel the snow, right? Once outdoors, however, take precautions to keep ...

  15. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  18. Cold plasma as a food processing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on a variety of foods, such as meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The primary modes of action are reactive chemical species and ultraviolet light. Various cold plasma systems are under development, operating at am...

  19. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  20. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  1. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning. PMID:23564985

  2. Social science in the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life.

  3. Social science in the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life. PMID:20718280

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of cold response in tomato fruits identifies dehydrin as a marker of cold stress.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J; Egea-Cortines, M

    2009-01-01

    Tomato is sensitive to cold during vegetative growth, fruit set, development, and ripening. We have characterized the effect of cold stress (6xC for up to 48 h) on the transcriptome of Micro-Tom tomato fruits during ripening by subtractive PCR. The cold stress caused modifications in gene expression of housekeeping genes. From a total of 38 genes up-regulated by cold, only one clone - a dehydrin homologue - was related to previously identified cold-stress genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed its clustering with other cold-induced dehydrins, and increased distances from dehydrins activated by abscisic acid. Quantitative expression analysis of tomato dehydrin showed it was activated by cold treatment in leaves and fruits. As dehydrin is a member of the Sl-CBF1 regulon from tomato, we analyzed the cold-responsive transcription factor Sl-CBF1 in mature leaves and ripening fruits stored at 6xC. Leaves of Micro-Tom showed high basal levels of the transcription factor Sl-CBF1, compared to fruits. Cold treatment caused increased levels of Sl-CBF1 expression in leaves but not in fruits of Micro-Tom and Demisem (a commercial cultivar). Tomato dehydrin can be used as a transcriptional marker of cold stress in leaves and ripening fruits. However, our results indicate that the cold response activation of dehydrin gene in tomato fruits is the consequence of an alternative pathway, different from the Sl-CBF1 regulon. PMID:19875881

  5. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  6. Working smarter on cold cases: identifying factors associated with successful cold case investigations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert C; Jensen, Carl J; Burgette, Lane; Burnett, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Cold case squads have garnered much attention; however, they have yet to undergo significant empirical scrutiny. In the present study, the authors interviewed investigators and reviewed 189 solved and unsolved cold cases in Washington, D.C., to determine whether there are factors that can predict cold case solvability. In the interviews, new information from witnesses or information from new witnesses was cited as the most prevalent reason for case clearance. The case reviews determined that there were factors in each of the following domains that predicted whether cases would be solved during cold case investigations: Crime Context, Initial Investigation Results, Basis for Opening Cold Case, and Cold Case Investigator Actions. The results suggest that it is possible to prioritize cold case work based on the likelihood of investigations leading to clearances. PMID:24502665

  7. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    PubMed

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  8. 13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL TO COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND BASEMENT, SHOWING HARD WIRE CONNECTION (INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000250.htm Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - ... enable JavaScript. Many different germs, called viruses, cause colds. Symptoms of the common cold include: Runny nose ...

  10. Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Know the Difference for Best Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services Latest Issue This Issue Features Sweet Stuff Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Health Capsules Genetic Clues ... infection, middle ear infection, asthma search Features Sweet Stuff Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Wise Choices Links Cold, ...

  11. When Working in Cold, Be Prepared and Be Aware

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to ... the cold, there are many risks. Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to ...

  12. 1. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT TO RIGHT COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT TO RIGHT COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE, COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND FOR FL ENGINE FOR SATURN V. EXHAUST DUCT IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. 5. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION OBSERVATION BUNKER BACKGROUND, COLD CALIBRATION TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  15. Ultrasensitive cold-electron bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulo, Ian Jasper Ayagan

    2007-08-01

    The Cold-Electron Bolometer (CEB) is an ultrasensitive device designed for the detection of cosmic microwave background radiation. The key to its sensitivity is the electron cooling of the absorber by the superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) tunnel junction. At a voltage near and below the superconducting gap, the electrons in the absorber are cooled well below the phonon temperature of the normal metal. This translates to the enhanced sensitivity of the CEB. This thesis describes the work we have done on the optimization of electron cooling of the normal metal absorber, and our measurement of the sensitivity of the CEB. We have optimized the electron cooling of the absorber by SIN tunnel junctions. The best electron cooling was achieved when normal metal traps were added in proximity to the superconducting electrodes in addition to the advanced geometry of the superconducting electrodes. With these modifications, we have decreased the electron temperature by 198 mK. With just the advanced geometry, the electron temperature drop was 129 mK. With just a simple geometry, the drop in temperature was 56 mK. The noise equivalent power (NEP) of the CEB was also measured at 100 mK to be at the level of 10 -18 W/Hz 1/2 at 1 kHz. The NEP was obtained by measuring the noise of the CEB, and then dividing that by its power responsivity, dV/dP. The main limitation in our measurements was the noise component from the amplifier. Finally, we have made measurements on the temperature sensitivity of the SIN tunnel junctions. We have compared the sensitivity between single and ten SIN junctions in series and found that it increases proportionally to the number of junctions. The best temperature responsivity obtained for 10 junctions was approximately 15 mV/mK. Using such thermometer, we have been able to measure the temperature stability of the Oxford Instruments cryogenfree refrigerator to be ±250 mK for a period of 8 hours. The resolution of the thermometer was measured to

  16. Protection of feet in cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuklane, Kalev

    2009-07-01

    The paper summarizes the research on cold protection of feet. There exist several conflicting requirements for the choice of the best suited footwear for cold exposure. These conflicts are related to various environmental factors, protection needs and user comfort issues. In order to reduce such conflicts and simplify the choice of proper footwear the paper suggests dividing the cold into specific ranges that are related to properties and state of water and its possibility to penetrate into, evaporate from or condensate in footwear. The thermo-physiological background and reactions in foot are briefly explained, and main problems and risks related to cold injuries, mechanical injuries and slipping discussed. Footwear thermal insulation is the most important factor for protection against cold. The issues related to measuring the insulation and the practical use of measured values are described, but also the effect of socks, and footwear size. Other means for reducing heat losses, such as PCM and electrical heating are touched. The most important variable that affects footwear thermal insulation and foot comfort is moisture in footwear. In combination with motion they may reduce insulation and thus protection against cold by 45%. The paper includes recommendations for better foot comfort in cold.

  17. Cold storage of rat hepatocyte spheroids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongling; Yu, Yue; Glorioso, Jaime; Mao, Shennen; Rodysil, Brian; Amiot, Bruce P; Rinaldo, Piero; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapies for liver disease rely on a high-quality supply of hepatocytes and a means for storage during transportation from site of isolation to site of usage. Unfortunately, frozen cryopreservation is associated with unacceptable loss of hepatocyte viability after thawing. The purpose of this study was to optimize conditions for cold storage of rat hepatocyte spheroids without freezing. Rat hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step perfusion method; hepatocyte spheroids were formed during 48 h of rocked culture in serum-free medium (SFM). Spheroids were then maintained in rocked culture at 37 °C (control condition) or cold stored at 4 °C for 24 or 48 h in six different cold storage solutions: SFM alone; SFM + 1 mM deferoxamine (Def); SFM + 1 μM cyclosporin A (CsA); SFM + 1 mM Def + 1 μM CsA, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution alone, UW + 1 mM Def. Performance metrics after cold storage included viability, gene expression, albumin production, and functional activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes and urea cycle proteins. We observed that cold-induced injury was reduced significantly by the addition of the iron chelator (Def) to both SFM and UW solution. Performance metrics (ammonia detoxification, albumin production) of rat hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM + Def for 24 h were significantly increased from SFM alone and approached those in control conditions, while performance metrics after cold storage in SFM alone or cold storage for 48 h were both significantly reduced. A serum-free medium supplemented with Def allowed hepatocyte spheroids to tolerate 24 h of cold storage with less than 10% loss in viability and functionality. Further research is warranted to optimize a solution for extended cold storage of hepatocyte spheroids.

  18. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  19. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  20. Detection of Cold Antihydrogen Annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Goldenbaum, F.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.

    2005-10-26

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition between the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.The experimental studies are performed at two separate installations, ATRAP-I, a system with severe space limitation, where routinely antihydrogen was produced and ATRAP-II, which will start full operation within the next AD running period. ATRAP-II includes a much larger solenoid allowing the installation of an extended detection system as well as an optimized Ioffe trap. The antihydrogen annihilation detector system consists of several layers of scintillating fibers, counts the antihydrogen atoms and determines the annihilation vertex of the atoms. This diagnostic element will allow to optimize the production of cold antihydrogen sufficiently to permit the optical observations and measurements.Measurements are in progress to check the performance and specifications of the antihydrogen annihilation detector. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations concerning the track reconstruction have been started and will be continued using the program GEANT4.

  1. Spin squeezing a cold molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we present a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the cold ground-state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. In contrast to existing work, we consider a single, noninteracting molecule with angular momentum greater than 1 /2 . Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify an adiabatic regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.47.5138], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T. Ng, and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.055601], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevA.39.2969]. We then consider the situation in which nonadiabatic effects are quite large and show that the effective Hamiltonian supports spin squeezing even in this case. We provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounting for the effects of field misalignment. Our results have consequences for applications such as precision spectroscopy, techniques such as magnetometry, and stereochemical effects such as the orientation-to-alignment transition.

  2. Cold dust in hot regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jenness, Tim; Dunlop, James S.; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Gibb, Andy; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Greaves, Jane S.; Robson, Ian

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ∼10 to 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r {sup –2.36±0.35} density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 10{sup 4} AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  3. Cold Dust in Hot Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Dunlop, James S.; Gibb, Andy; Greaves, Jane S.; Halpern, Mark; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Jenness, Tim; Robson, Ian; Scott, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 1023 cm-2, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ~10 to 103 M ⊙. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r -2.36 ± 0.35 density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 104 AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  4. Cold vacuum drying facility site evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Diebel, J.A.

    1996-03-11

    In order to transport Multi-Canister Overpacks to the Canister Storage Building they must first undergo the Cold Vacuum Drying process. This puts the design, construction and start-up of the Cold Vacuum Drying facility on the critical path of the K Basin fuel removal schedule. This schedule is driven by a Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestone requiring all of the spent nuclear fuel to be removed from the K Basins by December, 1999. This site evaluation is an integral part of the Cold Vacuum Drying design process and must be completed expeditiously in order to stay on track for meeting the milestone.

  5. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy.

  6. Photosynthetic microorganisms in cold environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Elster, Josef; Bartak, Milos; Vaczi, Peter; Nedbalova, Linda

    and their physiological processes are inactive. If hydrated, they are physiologically active even at subzero temperatures (Kappen et al., 1996). Although living in cold environments, the growth optimum temperature of typical phycobiont Trebouxia (Chlorophyta) sp. is above 15 ° C, so these algae are considered to be rather psychrotolerant. Acknowledgement The work was supported from projects GA AS CR Nos. KJB 601630808 and KJ KJB600050708, CAREX and long-term institutional research plan of the Institute of Botany AS CR AV0Z600050516 and the Masaryk University. Prof. Martin Backor (Safarik University in Kosice) is kindly ac-knowledged for providing the strains Trebouxia erici and T. glomerata (Backor). References Elster, J. , Benson, E.E. Life in the polar terrestrial environment with a focus on algae and cyanobacteria, in Fuller, B.J., Lane, N. , Benson, E.E. (Eds), Life in the Frozen State. CRC Press, pp. 111-150, 2004. Kappen, L., Schroeter, B., Scheidegger, C., Sommerkorn, M. , Hestmark, G. Cold resistance and metabolic activity of lichens below 0 ° C. Adv. Space Res. 18, 119-128, 1996. Kviderova, J. Characterization of the community of snow algae and their photochemical performance in situ in the Giant Mountains, Czech Republic. Arct. Antarct. Alp. Res. accepted, 2010. Nedbalova, L., Kocianova, M. , Lukavsky, J. Ecology of snow algae in the Giant Mountains and their relation to cryoseston in Europe. Opera Corcontica 45, 59-68, 2008.

  7. A search for cold water rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    SAR imagery obtained by Seasat in the Sargasso Sea during 1978 is examined for cold ring signatures. One orbit on August 26 is thought to have imaged the edge of a cold ring, although the ring's position was not well known at the time. During another orbit on September 23, drifting buoy and expendable bathythermography data furnished conclusive evidence that the ring was centered directly in the SAR swath. Although some suggestive patterns are visible in the images, it is not clear that cold rings can be identified by SAR, even though dynamically similar features, such as the Gulf Stream and warm rings, can be accurately detected. The suggestion is made that cold rings may be imaged inadequately because of their lack of surface temperature gradient.

  8. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  9. Cold-induced changes in amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angelier, N.; Moreau, N.A.; N'Da, E.A.; Lautredou, N.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Female Pleurodeles waltl newts (Amphibia, urodele), usually raised at 20 degrees C, were submitted to low temperatures; oocytes responded to this cold stress by drastic changes both in lampbrush chromosome structure and in protein pattern. Preexisting lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes were reduced in size and number, while cold-induced loops which were tremendously developed, occurred on defined bivalents of the oocyte at constant, reproducible sites. A comparison of protein patterns in control and stressed oocytes showed two main differences: in stressed oocytes, overall protein synthesis was reduced, except for a set of polypeptides, the cold-stress proteins; second, there was a striking inversion of the relative amount of beta- and gamma-actin found in the oocyte nucleus before and after cold stress. Whereas beta-actin was the predominant form in control oocytes, gamma-actin became the major form in stressed oocytes.

  10. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  11. Soap Bubbles on a Cold Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiveris, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of blowing bubbles in extremely cold weather. Describes the freezing conditions of the bubbles and some physical properties. Suggests using the activity with all ages of students. (MVL)

  12. Cold acclimation in food-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Puerta, M L; Abelenda, M

    1987-01-01

    Food intake, body weight and brown adipose tissue (BAT) mass and composition of rats exposed at 6 degrees C either with food ad libitum or food-restricted were compared with those of rats in the thermoneutral zone, with food ad libitum. Cold acclimation with food ad libitum increases food intake and prevents body weight gains. IBAT (interscapular BAT) increases its mass and changes its composition after 3 weeks of cold exposure. Cold acclimation with food restriction produces a progressive decrease in body weight. IBAT mass increases after 3 weeks but changes in composition occur sooner. It is concluded that the overfeeding that accompanies cold acclimation is not necessary for non-shivering thermogenesis in BAT.

  13. The Cold War: A Yearbook Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graebner, William

    1986-01-01

    Shows how the photographs, valedictorian addresses, nicknames, cartoons and other material contained in high school yearbook can yield information regarding the world views of Americans at the start of the Cold War. (JDH)

  14. Halting Hypothermia: Cold Can Be Dangerous

    MedlinePlus

    ... who spends much time outdoors in very cold weather can get hypothermia. But hypothermia can happen anywhere— ... just outside and not just in bitter winter weather. It can strike when temperatures are cool—for ...

  15. Compatible Transfusion Therapy for Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausen, Aaron R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Presented are case histories of two children, ages 2 and 4 years, with paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH, a syndrome characterized by acute intravascular hemoglobin dissolution and hemoglobin in the urine). (Author/CL)

  16. Caring for Your Child's Cold or Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Caring for Your Child’s Cold or Flu Page Content ​Unfortunately, there's no cure for the ... Liquid Medicine Safely for more information. Prevent & Treatment: Flu vaccine Children 6 months or older should get ...

  17. Cold-War Echoes in American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Ira Jay

    1984-01-01

    The author believes a cold war ideology permeates our culture and poisons the minds of youth. The challenge to education is to awaken people to a historical and global perspective and raise public consciousness of the necessity for peace. (MD)

  18. Improvements in Cold-Plate Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A.; Taddey, Edmund P.; Laurin, Michael B.; Chabebe, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Five improvements are reported in cold-plate fabrication. This cold plate is part of a thermal control system designed to serve on space missions. The first improvement is the merging of the end sheets of the cold plate with the face sheets of the structural honeycomb panel. The cold plate, which can be a brazed assembly, uses the honeycomb face sheet as its end sheet. Thus, when the honeycomb panel is fabricated, the face sheet that is used is already part of the cold plate. In addition to reducing weight, costs, and steps, the main benefit of this invention is that it creates a more structurally sound assembly. The second improvement involves incorporation of the header into the closure bar to pass the fluid to a lower layer. Conventional designs have used a separate header, which increases the geometry of the system. The improvement reduces the geometry, thus allowing the cold plate to fit into smaller area. The third improvement eliminates the need of hose, tube, or manifold to supply the cooling fluid externally. The external arrangement can be easily damaged and is vulnerable to leakage. The new arrangement incorporates an internal fluid transfer tube. This allows the fluid to pass from one cold plate to the other without any exposed external features. The fourth improvement eliminates separate fabrication of cold plate(s) and structural members followed by a process of attaching them to each other. Here, the structural member is made of material that can be brazed just as that of the cold plate. Now the structural member and the cold plate can be brazed at the same time, creating a monolithic unit, and thus a more structurally sound assembly. Finally, the fifth improvement is the elimination of an additional welding step that can damage the braze joints. A tube section, which is usually welded on after the braze process, is replaced with a more structurally sound configuration that can be brazed at the same time as the rest of the cold plate.

  19. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  20. Properties of the Central American cold surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.; Reding, Philip J.; Zhang, Yuxia

    1993-01-01

    The Central American cold surge (CACS) is a frontal incursion from the United States into Central America and resembles the East Asian cold surge. They occur more frequently than analyzed by NMC or by published results, based on our observations between 1979 and 1990. Climatology and structure are quantified, based on surface and upper air stations throughout Central America and satellite products from GOES visible and infrared sensors and SSM/I precipitable water and rain rate sensors.

  1. Probing Nuclear Structure by Cold Emission Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Delion, D. S.

    2008-01-24

    Cold emission processes (one and two-proton emission, alpha-decay, heavy cluster emission and cold binary or ternary fission) are presently among important tools to investigate the structure of rare nuclei far from the stability line. We analyze the coupling between collective excitations of the emitted fragments and the relative motion, in terms of the coupled channels technique. It turns out that partial decay widths to excited states of emitted fragments are very sensitive to the nuclear structure details.

  2. Human adaptation to repeated cold immersions.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, F S; Tipton, M J

    1988-01-01

    1. The present investigation was designed to examine human adaptation to intermittent severe cold exposure and to assess the effect of exercise on any adaptation obtained. 2. Sixteen subjects were divided into two equal groups. Each subject performed ten head-out immersions; two into thermoneutral water which was then cooled until they shivered vigorously, and eight into water at 15 degrees C for 40 min. During the majority of the 15 degrees C immersions, one group (dynamic group) exercised whilst the other (static group) rested. 3. Results showed that both groups responded to repeated cold immersions with a reduction in their initial responses to cold. The time course of these reductions varied, however, between responses. 4. Only the static group developed a reduced metabolic response to prolonged resting immersion. 5. It is concluded that repeated resting exposure to cold was the more effective way of producing an adaptation. The performance of exercise during repeated exposure to cold prevented the development of an adaptive reduction in the metabolic response to cold during a subsequent resting immersion. In addition, many of the adaptations obtained during repeated resting exposure were overridden or masked during a subsequent exercising immersion. PMID:3411500

  3. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  4. Microstructure and chemical homogeneity of plasma-arc cold-hearth melted Ti-48Al-2Mn-2Nb gamma titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Dowson, A.L.; Johnson, T.P.; Young, J.M.; Jacobs, M.H.

    1995-12-31

    The microstructure and chemical homogeneity of plasma-arc cold-hearth (PACH) melted Ti-48Al-2Mn-2Nb gamma-based titanium aluminide have been studied and potential correlation`s between compositional variations and changes in both the withdrawal rate and the crucible torch current have been explored. Periodic oscillations in composition have been identified both across the ingot cross section and down the length of the bar, and distinct regions involving both Al enrichment and depletion have been identified, primarily towards the edge and near central regions of the bar. These changes in composition were accompanied by a change in the microstructural morphology with the microstructure changing from a relatively fine, fully equiaxed gamma phase morphology at the surface, through coarse columnar, to a heavily cored dendritic-type structure on moving towards the centre of the bar. Micro-analytical studies of this dendritic region have shown the primary and secondary dendrite arms to consist of a fully transformed lamellar structure relatively rich in both Ti and Nb with Mn and Al tending to segregate preferentially to the interdendritic regions.

  5. Experiences issues with plastic parts at cold temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri

    2005-01-01

    Missions to MARS/planets/asteroids require electronic parts to operate and survive at extreme cold conditions. At extreme cold temperatures many types of cold related failures can occur. Office 514 is currently evaluating plastic parts under various cold temperature conditions and applications. Evaluations, screens, and qualifications are conducted on flight parts.

  6. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  11. New description of Io's cold plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Floyd; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Dessler, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite more than 25 years of study of the Io plasma torus, its generation, dynamics, and even its spatial structure are still poorly understood, especially in the case of the inner, cold region of the torus. To remedy this lack, we analyzed ground-based coronagraphic images of the torus in S+ 6371 Å emission. We derived cold torus properties by modeling and removing these images' inherent line-of-sight integration and atmospheric blurring, using new deconvolution techniques, obtaining high-spatial-resolution estimates of the three-dimensional (3-D) S+ distributions. From these 3-D distributions, we discovered that the cold torus is washer-shaped, with a roughly constant vertical thickness ≤0.25 Jovian radius (RJ), and a radial width that varies from 0.6 to 0.9 RJ. The cold torus is separated by a 0.1-0.2 RJ-wide low-density region, or "gap," from the "ribbon" region which lies just outside it. The small, approximately constant washer height implies an ion parallel temperature (T∥) of ˜3 eV, compared with a ribbon T∥ that varies from about 20 to 50 eV as a function of Jovian magnetic longitude (λIII). The washer has a distinct inner edge, not seen before, whose jovicentric distance varies with λIII so as to create the variable cold torus width. Thus this inner edge is concentric with neither Jupiter nor the rest of the torus. We also confirm the existence of a tilt between the midplanes of the ribbon and cold torus, with an orientation that cannot be produced by the magnetic mirror force acting on ion temperature anisotropy. The structure and composition of the gap and cold torus are best explained by a model in which a small amount of warm S+ plasma diffuses inwards while radiatively cooling. While still warm, its distribution over a large scale height keeps its density small, forming the gap. After sufficient cooling, it collapses to the centrifugal equator, where its higher density and continued inward diffusion make it more visible as the cold torus

  12. How cold pool triggers deep convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2014-05-01

    The cold pool in the boundary layer is often considered a major triggering mechanism of convection. Here, presented are basic theoretical considerations on this issue. Observations suggest that cold pool-generated convective cells is available for shallow maritime convection (Warner et al. 1979; Zuidema et al. 2012), maritime deep convection (Barnes and Garstang 1982; Addis et al. 1984; Young et al. 1995) and continental deep convection (e.g., Lima and Wilson 2008; Flamant 2009; Lothon et al. 2011; Dione et al. 2013). Moreover, numerical studies appear to suggest that cold pools promote the organization of clouds into larger structures and thereby aid the transition from shallow to deep convection (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2006, Boing et al. 2012, Schlemmer and Hohenegger, 2014). Even a cold--pool parameterization coupled with convection is already proposed (Grandpeix and Lafore 2010: but see also Yano 2012). However, the suggested link between the cold pool and deep convection so far is phenomenological at the best. A specific process that the cold pool leads to a trigger of deep convection must still to be pinned down. Naively, one may imagine that a cold pool lifts up the air at the front as it propagates. Such an uplifting leads to a trigger of convection. However, one must realize that a shift of air along with its propagation does not necessarily lead to an uplifting, and even if it may happen, it would not far exceed a depth of the cold pool itself. Thus, the uplifting can never be anything vigorous. Its thermodynamic characteristics do help much either for inducing convection. The cold-pool air is rather under rapid recovering process before it can induce convection under a simple parcel-lifting argument. The most likely reason that the cold pool may induce convection is its gust winds that may encounter an air mass from an opposite direction. This induces a strong convergence, also leading to a strong uplifting. This is an argument essentially developed

  13. Systemic Cold Stress Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Hanak, Anne-Mette; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important model organisms nowadays phylogenetically situated between higher plants and animals (Merchant et al. 2007). Stress adaptation of this unicellular model algae is in the focus because of its relevance to biomass and biofuel production. Here, we have studied cold stress adaptation of C. reinhardtii hitherto not described for this algae whereas intensively studied in higher plants. Toward this goal, high throughput mass spectrometry was employed to integrate proteome, metabolome, physiological and cell-morphological changes during a time-course from 0 to 120 h. These data were complemented with RT-qPCR for target genes involved in central metabolism, signaling, and lipid biosynthesis. Using this approach dynamics in central metabolism were linked to cold-stress dependent sugar and autophagy pathways as well as novel genes in C. reinhardtii such as CKIN1, CKIN2 and a hitherto functionally not annotated protein named CKIN3. Cold stress affected extensively the physiology and the organization of the cell. Gluconeogenesis and starch biosynthesis pathways are activated leading to a pronounced starch and sugar accumulation. Quantitative lipid profiles indicate a sharp decrease in the lipophilic fraction and an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids suggesting this as a mechanism of maintaining membrane fluidity. The proteome is completely remodeled during cold stress: specific candidates of the ribosome and the spliceosome indicate altered biosynthesis and degradation of proteins important for adaptation to low temperatures. Specific proteasome degradation may be mediated by the observed cold-specific changes in the ubiquitinylation system. Sparse partial least squares regression analysis was applied for protein correlation network analysis using proteins as predictors and Fv/Fm, FW, total lipids, and starch as responses. We applied also Granger causality analysis and revealed correlations between proteins and

  14. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  15. Cold War Paradigms and the Post-Cold War High School History Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAninch, Stuart A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how Cold War ideological models provide a way to examine the U.S. role in world affairs. Discusses and compares on the writings of Paul Gagnon and Noam Chomsky on this topic. Concludes that students should stand outside both models to develop a meaningful perspective on the U.S. role during the Cold War. (CFR)

  16. Cold-hearted or cool-headed: physical coldness promotes utilitarian moral judgment

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hiroko; Ito, Yuichi; Honma, Yoshiko; Mori, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine the effect of physical coldness on personal moral dilemma judgment. Previous studies have indicated that utilitarian moral judgment—sacrificing a few people to achieve the greater good for others—was facilitated when: (1) participants suppressed an initial emotional response and deliberately thought about the utility of outcomes; (2) participants had a high-level construal mindset and focused on abstract goals (e.g., save many); or (3) there was a decreasing emotional response to sacrificing a few. In two experiments, we exposed participants to extreme cold or typical room temperature and then asked them to make personal moral dilemma judgments. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that coldness prompted utilitarian judgment, but the effect of coldness was independent from deliberate thought or abstract high-level construal mindset. As Experiment 2 revealed, coldness facilitated utilitarian judgment via reduced empathic feelings. Therefore, physical coldness did not affect the “cool-headed” deliberate process or the abstract high-level construal mindset. Rather, coldness biased people toward being “cold-hearted,” reduced empathetic concern, and facilitated utilitarian moral judgments. PMID:25324800

  17. Cold Hole Over Jupiter's Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations with two NASA telescopes show that Jupiter has an arctic polar vortex similar to a vortex over Earth's Antarctica that enables depletion of Earth's stratospheric ozone.

    These composite images of Jupiter's north polar region from the Hubble Space Telescope (right) and the Infrared Telescope Facility (left) show a quasi-hexagonal shape that extends vertically from the stratosphere down into the top of the troposphere. A sharp temperature drop, compared to surrounding air masses, creates an eastward wind that tends to keep the polar atmosphere, including the stratospheric haze, isolated from the rest of the atmosphere.

    The linear striations in the composite projections are artifacts of the image processing. The area closest to the pole has been omitted because it was too close to the edge of the planet in the original images to represent the planet reliably.

    The composite on the right combines images from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope taken at a wavelength of 890 nanometers, which shows stratospheric haze particles.

    The sharp boundary and wave-like structure of the haze layer suggest a polar vortex and a similarity to Earth's stratospheric polar clouds. Images of Jupiter's thermal radiation clinch that identification. The composite on the left, for example, is made from images taken with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mid-Infrared Large-Well Imager at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at a wavelength of 17 microns. It shows polar air mass that is 5 to 6 degrees Celsius (9 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit) colder than its surroundings, with the same border as the stratospheric haze. Similar observations at other infrared wavelengths show the cold air mass extends at least as high as the middle stratosphere down to the top of the troposphere.

    These images were taken Aug. 11 through Aug. 13, 1999, near a time when Jupiter's north pole was most visible from Earth. Other Infrared Telescope Facility images at

  18. Age and ethnic differences in cold weather and contagion theories of colds and flu.

    PubMed

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-02-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with other people causes disease were more causally sophisticated than explanations of how cold weather causes it. Finally, Mexican American and other minority children were more likely than European American children to subscribe to cold weather theories, a difference partially but not wholly attributable to ethnic group differences in parent education. Findings support the value of an intuitive or naïve theories perspective in understanding developmental and sociocultural differences in concepts of disease and in planning health education to help both children and their parents shed misconceptions so that they can focus on effective preventive actions.

  19. Assessment of cold stress in outdoor work.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of cold stress in working life was done in 13, mainly outdoor, occupations and 143 workers using local temperatures, body cooling and thermal sensations. The subjects in the study were young, healthy men and they wore the type of winter clothing generally used in those ambient temperatures (+6...-29 degrees C), for in a work load of from 112 to 480 W. Local temperatures on finger skin indicated that manual dexterity was often reduced in outdoor work. A risk of frostbite was frequently found on the cheek and the wind chill index predicted the risk quite well. Body cooling was often temporarily too high when measured by heat debt and mean skin temperature. Thermal sensations were cool or cold occasionally in 28% of the workers interviewed. The insulation of clothing worn was often lower than the IREQmin-value recommends. The results showed that in outdoor work in winter time cold stress frequently reduced (70%) working ability at least for a short period. Mean skin temperature seems to be, in practice, a useful indicator for body cooling and the IREQmin-value was suitable, especially in light work, to indicate body cooling. A very sensitive factor for the expression of cold stress was finger temperature, at least as an indicator of finger dexterity. Due to the adverse health effects found the cold stress should also be evaluated more systematically in occupational health and safety with health examinations, with protective clothing and technical preventive means. PMID:8049001

  20. Assessment of cold stress in outdoor work.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of cold stress in working life was done in 13, mainly outdoor, occupations and 143 workers using local temperatures, body cooling and thermal sensations. The subjects in the study were young, healthy men and they wore the type of winter clothing generally used in those ambient temperatures (+6...-29 degrees C), for in a work load of from 112 to 480 W. Local temperatures on finger skin indicated that manual dexterity was often reduced in outdoor work. A risk of frostbite was frequently found on the cheek and the wind chill index predicted the risk quite well. Body cooling was often temporarily too high when measured by heat debt and mean skin temperature. Thermal sensations were cool or cold occasionally in 28% of the workers interviewed. The insulation of clothing worn was often lower than the IREQmin-value recommends. The results showed that in outdoor work in winter time cold stress frequently reduced (70%) working ability at least for a short period. Mean skin temperature seems to be, in practice, a useful indicator for body cooling and the IREQmin-value was suitable, especially in light work, to indicate body cooling. A very sensitive factor for the expression of cold stress was finger temperature, at least as an indicator of finger dexterity. Due to the adverse health effects found the cold stress should also be evaluated more systematically in occupational health and safety with health examinations, with protective clothing and technical preventive means.

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga; Ann Stepp, Mary; Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony; Trink, Barry

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  2. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  3. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  4. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  5. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  6. COLD-PCR: Applications and Advantages.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhuang; Jabbar, Kausar J

    2016-01-01

    Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-based polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a single-step amplification method that results in the enhancement of both known and unknown minority alleles during PCR, irrespective of mutation type and position. This method is based on exploitation of the critical temperature, Tc, at which mutation-containing DNA is preferentially melted over wild type. COLD-PCR can be a good strategy for mutation detection in specimens with high nonneoplastic cell content, small specimens in which neoplastic cells are difficult to micro-dissect and therefore enrich, and whenever a mutation is suspected to be present but is undetectable using conventional PCR and sequencing methods. We describe in this chapter our COLD-PCR-based pyrosequencing method for KRAS mutation detection in various clinical samples using DNA extracted from either fresh or fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  7. Improved cold-neutron prompt gamma spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Heald, A.E.; Langland, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The cold-neutron prompt-gamma activation analysis (PGAA) spectrometer at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) has been rebuilt to take advantage of the newly installed LH{sub 2} cold neutron source at the NIST reactor. The new source, a 32-cm-o.d., 2-cm-thick spherical shell of liquid hydrogen, produces a higher neutron density at longer wave-length than did the D{sub 2}O ice source that has been in use since 1987. At the PGAA spectrometer, located 41 m from the cold source on neutron guide NG7, the effective neutron fluence rate (using s, = 98.6 b for gold) was measured to be 8 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}{center_dot}s{sup -1}, a factor of 3 higher at the same reactor power (20 MW) than before.

  8. Radio frequency field assisted cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yijue; D'Incao, Jose; Greene, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The radio frequency (RF) field is a promising but less developed tool to control cold collisions. From the few-body perspective, we study cold atom collisions in an external magnetic field and a single-color RF field. We employ the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the hyperspherical toolkit to solve the two-body and three-body Schrödinger equations. Our results show that RF fields can effectively control the two-body scattering length through Feshbach resonances. Such RF induced Feshbach resonances can be applied to quenching experiments or spinor condensates. Analogous to photo association, RF fields can also associate cold atoms into molecules with a reasonable rate. Moreover, we will discuss the feasibility of using RF fields to control three-body recombination, which may improve the experimental timescale by suppressing three-body losses. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  9. Storage of Heat, Cold and Electricity.

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Anastasia; Ammann, Andreas; Abdon, Andreas; Fischer, Ludger J; Gwerder, Damian; Worlitschek, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A promising energy storage system is presented based on the combination of a heat pump, a heat engine, a hot and a cold storage. It can be operated as a pure bulk electricity storage (alternative to Pumped Heat Electrical Storage (PHES)/Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES)) or as combined storage of heat, cold and electricity. Both variations have been evaluated using a steady state, thermodynamic model and two promising concepts are proposed: A transcritical CO(2) cycle for the pure electricity storage and a subcritical NH(3) cycle for combined storage of electricity, heat and cold. Parametric studies are used to evaluate the influence of different parameters on the roundtrip efficiency of the storage system. PMID:26842329

  10. Sympathetic cooling of nanospheres with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ground state cooling of mesoscopic mechanical structures could enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. Such systems could provide coupling between photons, spins and charges via phonons. It has recently been shown theoretically that optically trapped dielectric nanospheres could reach the ground state via sympathetic cooling with trapped cold atoms. This technique can be beneficial in cases where cryogenic operation of the oscillator is not practical. We describe experimental advances towards coupling an optically levitated dielectric nanosphere to a gas of cold Rubidium atoms. The sphere and the cold atoms are in separate vacuum chambers and are coupled using a one-dimensional optical lattice. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant Nos. PHY-1205994,PHY-1506431.

  11. Resource Prospector Propulsion Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Pederson, Kevin; Dervan, Melanie; Holt, Kimberly; Jernigan, Frankie; Trinh, Huu; Flores, Sam

    2014-01-01

    For the past year, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center have been working on a government version of a lunar lander design for the Resource Prospector Mission. A propulsion cold flow test system, representing an early flight design of the propulsion system, has been fabricated. The primary objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the Resource Prospector propulsion system operation through water flow testing and obtain data for anchoring analytical models. This effort will also provide an opportunity to develop a propulsion system mockup to examine hardware integration to a flight structure. This paper will report the work progress of the propulsion cold flow test system development and test preparation. At the time this paper is written, the initial waterhammer testing is underway. The initial assessment of the test data suggests that the results are as expected and have a similar trend with the pretest prediction. The test results will be reported in a future conference.

  12. Storage of Heat, Cold and Electricity.

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Anastasia; Ammann, Andreas; Abdon, Andreas; Fischer, Ludger J; Gwerder, Damian; Worlitschek, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A promising energy storage system is presented based on the combination of a heat pump, a heat engine, a hot and a cold storage. It can be operated as a pure bulk electricity storage (alternative to Pumped Heat Electrical Storage (PHES)/Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES)) or as combined storage of heat, cold and electricity. Both variations have been evaluated using a steady state, thermodynamic model and two promising concepts are proposed: A transcritical CO(2) cycle for the pure electricity storage and a subcritical NH(3) cycle for combined storage of electricity, heat and cold. Parametric studies are used to evaluate the influence of different parameters on the roundtrip efficiency of the storage system.

  13. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined. PMID

  14. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined.

  15. Application of Heat Pipes in Cold Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Masataka

    Recently, there has been put into practical use of heat pipes as space application, electronics cooling, and waste heat recovery. Especially, the low temperature heat pipe which can be used in below atmospheric temperature are also actively developed and applied in terrestrial field. These are based on utilization of natural energy in cold region. This paper is described about application of snow melting and deicing system on a road and roof, snow damage prevention system for electric pole branch wire, artificial permafrost storage system as a reverse utilization of cold atmosphere, and cryo-anchor applied in Alaska and northern Canada.

  16. Chemical abundances in cold, dark interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Ohishi, M; Kaifu, N

    1991-05-01

    The Sun may well have formed in the type of interstellar cloud currently referred to as a cold, dark cloud. We present current tabulations of the totality of known interstellar molecules and of the subset which have been identified in cold clouds. Molecular abundances are given for two such clouds which show interesting chemical differences in spite of strong physical similarities, Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 (TMC-1) and Lynd's 134N (L134N, also referred to as L183). These regions may be at different evolutionary stages.

  17. Cold-fusion television show angers APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2009-06-01

    Cold fusion has been controversial since its inception on 23 March 1989, when chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons at the University of Utah in the US announced that they had achieved a sustained nuclear-fusion reaction at room temperature. Two decades on, a US television documentary about the field has stirred up fresh debate after it linked the American Physical Society (APS) to an evaluation of some cold-fusion results by Robert Duncan, a physicist and vice chancellor of the University of Missouri.

  18. Alcohol cold starting - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    Two theoretical computer models have been developed to study cold starting problems with alcohol fuels. The first model, a droplet fall-out and sling-out model, shows that droplets must be smaller than 50 microns to enter the cylinder under cranking conditions without being slung-out in the intake manifold. The second model, which examines the fate of droplets during the compression process, shows that the heat of compression can be used to vaporize small droplets (less than 50 microns) producing flammable mixtures below freezing ambient temperatures. While droplet size has the greater effect on startability, a very high compression ratio can also aid cold starting.

  19. Cold temperatures increase cold hardiness in the next generation Ophraella communa beetles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%-4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R 0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates.

  20. Cold Temperatures Increase Cold Hardiness in the Next Generation Ophraella communa Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%–4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates. PMID:24098666

  1. Anoxic stress and rapid cold hardening enhance cold tolerance of the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Hanying; Kang, Le

    2014-10-01

    Anoxia and rapid cold hardening (RCH) can increase the cold tolerance of many animals. However, mechanisms underlying these two kinds of stresses remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship of acclimation to cold stress with acclimation to anoxic stress in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. RCH at 0°C for 3h promoted the survival of cold stress-exposed locusts. Anoxic hypercapnia (CO2 anoxic treatment) for 40 min exerted an effect similar to that of RCH. Anoxic hypercapnia within 1h can all promote the cold hardiness of locusts. We investigated the transcript levels of six heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, namely, Hsp20.5, Hsp20.6, Hsp20.7, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90. Four genes, namely, Hsp90, Hsp40, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7, showed differential responses to RCH and anoxic hypercapnia treatments. Under cold stress, locusts exposed to the two regimens showed different responses for Hsp90, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7. However, the varied responses disappeared after recovery from cold stress. Compared with the control group, the transcript levels of six Hsp genes were generally downregulated in locusts subjected to anoxic hypercapnia or/and RCH. These results indicate that anoxic stress and RCH have different mechanisms of regulating the transcription of Hsp family members even if the two treatments exerted similar effects on cold tolerance of the migratory locust. However, Hsps may not play a major role in the promotion of cold hardiness by the two treatments.

  2. Neutron measurements in search of cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Goulding, C.A.; Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.; Gottesfeld, S.; Baker, D.A.; Springer, T.E.; Garzon, F.H.; Bolton, R.D.; Leonard, E.M.; Chancellor, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have conducted a research for neutron emission from cold fusion systems of the electrochemical type and, to a lesser extent, the high-pressure gas cell type. Using a high-efficiency well counter and an NE 213 scintillator, the experiments were conducted on the earth's surface and in a shielded cave approximately 50 ft underground. After approximately 6500 h of counting time, we have obtained no evidence for cold fusion processes leading to neutron production. However, we have observed all three types of neutron data that have been presented as evidence for cold fusion: large positive fluctuations in the neutron counting rate, weak peaks near 2.5 MeV in the neutron energy spectrum, and bursts of up to 145 neutrons in 500-{mu}s intervals. The data were obtained under circumstances that clearly show our results to be data encountered as a part of naturally occurring neutron background, which is due primarily to cosmic rays. Thus, observing these types of data does not, of itself, provide evidence for the existence of cold fusion processes. Artifacts in the data that were due to counter misbehavior were also to lead to long-term neutron bursts'' whose time duration varied from several hours to several days. We conclude that any experiments which attempt to observe neutron emission must include strong steps to ensure that the experiments deal adequately with both cosmic-ray processes and counter misbehavior. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  3. EVALUATION OF THE COLD PIPE PRECHARGER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the performance of the cold pipe precharger, taking a more rigorous approach than had been previously taken. The approach required detailed descriptions of electrical characteristics, electro-hydrodynamics, and charging theory. The co...

  4. Common colds on Tristan da Cunha

    PubMed Central

    Shibli, M.; Gooch, S.; Lewis, H. E.; Tyrrell, D. A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Eight epidemics of respiratory disease have been observed among islanders of Tristan da Cunha. They seem to be initiated by the arrival of ships and transmission seemed to occur as a result of close human contact but could not always be traced. Islanders suffered from less colds than those in less isolated communities. PMID:5282927

  5. Decontamination of foods by cold plasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology for meats, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas, such as air, oxygen, nitrogen, or helium to inactivate microbes without the use of conventional antimicrobial chemical agents. ...

  6. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  7. Cold Climates Heat Pump Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Heat pumps provide an efficient heating method; however they suffer from sever capacity and performance degradation at low ambient conditions. This has deterred market penetration in cold climates. There is a continuing effort to find an efficient air source cold climate heat pump that maintains acceptable capacity and performance at low ambient conditions. Systematic optimization techniques provide a reliable approach for the design of such systems. This paper presents a step-by-step approach for the design optimization of cold climate heat pumps. We first start by describing the optimization problem: objective function, constraints, and design space. Then we illustrate how to perform this design optimization using an open source publically available optimization toolbox. The response of the heat pump design was evaluated using a validated component based vapor compression model. This model was treated as a black box model within the optimization framework. Optimum designs for different system configurations are presented. These optimum results were further analyzed to understand the performance tradeoff and selection criteria. The paper ends with a discussion on the use of systematic optimization for the cold climate heat pump design.

  8. [A girl with a cold foot].

    PubMed

    Rouwet, E V; Ten Raa, S; Verhagen, H J M

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a progressively cold, pale foot. Pedal pulses were absent and there was sensory and motor loss. CT angiography revealed a thromboembolic occlusion of the crural arteries and a popliteal artery entrapment. Following thromboembolectomy with popliteal artery patch angioplasty and release of the gastrocnemius muscle, the girl fully recovered.

  9. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  10. COLD-SAT Dynamic Model Computer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, G.; Adams, N. S.

    1995-01-01

    COLD-SAT Dynamic Model (CSDM) computer code implements six-degree-of-freedom, rigid-body mathematical model for simulation of spacecraft in orbit around Earth. Investigates flow dynamics and thermodynamics of subcritical cryogenic fluids in microgravity. Consists of three parts: translation model, rotation model, and slosh model. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP): Scientific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorn, L.

    1982-01-01

    During late summer 1978 a rocket campaign was carried out at Esrange. The ion chemistry and composition at and around the extremely cold arctic mesopause, particularly in connection with observations of noctilucent clouds (NLC) was studied. Several plasma parameters were measured, for example, density of electrons and positive ions and composition of both positive and negative ions.

  12. The Cold War and Revisionist Historiography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogeboom, Willard L.

    1970-01-01

    An important historiographic controversy exists between those who blame the Soviets for the origins of the Cold War (orthodox) and those who blame the U. S. (revisionist--New Left). While the latter criticize the orthodox historians' methods, they are often guilty of semilar biases and simplifications. (JB)

  13. Structural Assembly for Cold Plate Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device including a structural member having a heat spreader and an electronic device mounted directly to a first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member. The device also includes a cold plate mounted directly to the first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member.

  14. Calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis mimicking cold abscess.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra P; Bharati, Joyita; Sheriff, Abraar; Priyadarshini, Praytusha; Chumber, Sunil; Kabra, S K

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of dystrophic calcification presenting as soft cystic swelling in a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis. A 15-year-old boy with lumbosacral cystic swelling, which was considered a cold abscess clinically, was evaluated for nonresponse to antitubercular therapy. The cystic swelling had liquefied calcium with a well circumscribed calcified wall on imaging, which was subsequently excised. PMID:27586213

  15. Confronting Common Folklore: Catching a Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    Almost every child has experienced the sniffly, stuffy, and achy congestion of the common cold. In addition, many have encountered the "old wives tales" that forge a link between personal actions and coming down with this common respiratory infection. Much of this health folklore has been passed down from generation to generation (e.g., getting a…

  16. Variational approach to cold fermionic atom superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Meera; Mihaila, Bogdan; Blagoev, Krastan; Gaudio, Sergio; Timmermans, Eddy; Szymanska, Marzena; Littlewood, Peter

    2004-03-01

    We study a system of ultra-cold, dilute, fermionic atoms close to a Feshbach resonance. By using a variational approach, we avoid making the approximation of preformed molecular pairs. This enables us to follow the crossover from BCS to Blatt-Schafroth pairs.

  17. Cold Shock Syndrome in Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Rao, V S; Brand, J J; Myers, J

    1977-05-01

    The phenomenon of cold shock in Anacystis nidulans has been explored further in terms of loss of viability and immediate and subsequent metabolic effects. Cold shock was observed also in two closely related strains in which unsaturated fatty acid contents are also known to be low and temperature-dependent. Loss of viability was maximum for cells grown at temperatures above 40 C (<10(-4) survivors after 5 min at 0 C) but became negligibly small for cells grown below 34 C. Development of the cold-sensitive condition after transfer 25 --> 39 C was slow and comparable to rate of growth; development of the insensitive condition after transfer 39 --> 25 C was rapid, implying rapid in situ alteration. An immediate metabolic effect, observed as a decrease in rate of photosynthetic O(2) evolution measured at growth temperature, was less severe than loss of viability. Continued light incubation under growth conditions led to slow decay in rate of O(2) evolution accompanied by loss of membrane chlorophyll. The multiple effects which comprise the cold shock syndrome appear to be membrane-related phenomena and thereby provide an experimental probe of normal membrane function.

  18. Cold weather properties and performance of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oil or animal fat that can be employed in compression-ignition (diesel) engines. Biodiesel is more prone to start-up and operability problems during cold weather than conventional diesel fuels (petrodiesel). This work reviews impacts that exposu...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... containing a specially hydrated pliable silicate gel capable of forming to the contour of the body and that provides cold therapy for body surfaces. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  20. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... containing a specially hydrated pliable silicate gel capable of forming to the contour of the body and that provides cold therapy for body surfaces. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  1. Cold plasma technology close-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column discusses cold plasma, an emerging technology that has potential applications as an antimicrobial process for fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables, low-moisture foods, and food contact surfaces. Brendan A. Niemira, the coauthor of this month’s column, is the research leader ...

  2. Common cold - how to treat at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough sleep, and stay away from secondhand smoke. Wheezing can be a common symptom of a cold if you have asthma. Use your rescue inhaler as prescribed if you are wheezing. See your provider immediately if it becomes hard to breathe.

  3. Cold-night responses in grapevine inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Mélodie; Ait Barka, Essaid; Clément, Christophe; Gilard, Françoise; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Baillieul, Fabienne; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cédric

    2015-10-01

    Cold nights impact grapevine flower development and fruit set. Regulation at the female meiosis stepmay be of considerable importance for further understanding on how flower reacts to cold stress. In this study, the impact of chilling temperature (0 °C overnight) on carbon metabolism was investigated in the inflorescencesof two cultivars, Pinot noir (Pinot) and Gewurztraminer (Gewurtz.). Fluctuations in photosynthetic activity and carbohydrate metabolism were monitored by analyzing gas exchanges, simultaneous photosystem I and II activities, andcarbohydrate content. Further, the expression of PEPc, PC, FNR, ISO, OXO, AGPase, amylases and invertase genes, activities of various enzymes, as well as metabolomic analysis were attained. Results showed that the chilling night has different impacts depending on cultivars. Thus, in Gewurtz., net photosynthesis (Pn) was transiently increased whereas, in Pinot, the Pn increase was persistent and concomitant with an inhibition of respiration. However, during the days following the cold night, photosynthetic activity was decreased, and the cyclic electron flow was inhibited in Gewurtz., suggesting lower efficient energy dissipation. Likewise, metabolomic analysis revealed that several metabolites contents (namely alanine, GABA, lysine and succinate)were distinctly modulated in the two cultivars. Taking together, these results reflect a photosynthetic metabolism alteration or internal CO2 conductance in Gewurtz. explaining partly why Pinot is less susceptible to cold stress. PMID:26398796

  4. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  5. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  6. Cold Atmosphere Plasma in Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas that is typically generated in high-temperature laboratory conditions. Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Areas of potential application of cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) include dentistry, drug delivery, dermatology, cosmetics, wound healing, cellular modifications, and cancer treatment. Various diagnostic tools have been developed for characterization of CAP including intensified charge-coupled device cameras, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical measurements of the discharge propertied. Recently a new method for temporally resolved measurements of absolute values of plasma density in the plasma column of small-size atmospheric plasma jet utilizing Rayleigh microwave scattering was proposed [1,2]. In this talk we overview state of the art of CAP diagnostics and understanding of the mechanism of plasma action of biological objects. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (long, bladder, and skin) was recently demonstrated [3]. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. For instance a strong selective effect was observed; the resulting 60--70% of lung cancer cells were detached from the plate in the zone treated with plasma, whereas no detachment was observed in the treated zone for the normal lung cells under the same treatment conditions. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration

  7. Preserving Alaska's early Cold War legacy.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffecker, J.; Whorton, M.

    1999-03-08

    The US Air Force owns and operates numerous facilities that were constructed during the Cold War era. The end of the Cold War prompted many changes in the operation of these properties: missions changed, facilities were modified, and entire bases were closed or realigned. The widespread downsizing of the US military stimulated concern over the potential loss of properties that had acquired historical value in the context of the Cold War. In response, the US Department of Defense in 1991 initiated a broad effort to inventory properties of this era. US Air Force installations in Alaska were in the forefront of these evaluations because of the role of the Cold War in the state's development and history and the high interest on the part of the Alaska State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in these properties. The 611th Air Support Group (611 ASG) owns many of Alaska's early Cold War properties, most were associated with strategic air defense. The 611 ASG determined that three systems it operates, which were all part of the integrated defense against Soviet nuclear strategic bomber threat, were eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and would require treatment as historic properties. These systems include the Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) System, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and Forward Operating Bases (FOBs). As part of a massive cleanup operation, Clean Sweep, the 611 ASG plans to demolish many of the properties associated with these systems. To mitigate the effects of demolition, the 611 ASG negotiated agreements on the system level (e.g., the DEW Line) with the Alaska SHPO to document the history and architectural/engineering features associated with these properties. This system approach allowed the US Air Force to mitigate effects on many individual properties in a more cost-effective and efficient manner.

  8. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  9. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  10. Cold rearing improves cold-flight performance in Drosophila via changes in wing morphology.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Melanie R; Harrison, Jon F; Kirkton, Scott D; Roberts, Stephen P

    2008-07-01

    We use a factorial experimental design to test whether rearing at colder temperatures shifts the lower thermal envelope for flight of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen to colder temperatures. D. melanogaster that developed in colder temperatures (15 degrees C) had a significant flight advantage in cold air compared to flies that developed in warmer temperatures (28 degrees C). At 14 degrees C, cold-reared flies failed to perform a take-off flight approximately 47% of the time whereas warm-reared flies failed approximately 94% of the time. At 18 degrees C, cold- and warm-reared flies performed equally well. We also compared several traits in cold- and warm-developing flies to determine if cold-developing flies had better flight performance at cold temperatures due to changes in body mass, wing length, wing loading, relative flight muscle mass or wing-beat frequency. The improved ability to fly at low temperatures was associated with a dramatic increase in wing area and an increase in wing length (after controlling for wing area). Flies that developed at 15 degrees C had approximately 25% more wing area than similarly sized flies that developed at 28 degrees C. Cold-reared flies had slower wing-beat frequencies than similarly sized flies from warmer developmental environments, whereas other traits did not vary with developmental temperature. These results demonstrate that developmental plasticity in wing dimensions contributes to the improved flight performance of D. melanogaster at cold temperatures, and ultimately, may help D. melanogaster live in a wide range of thermal environments.

  11. Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Street names: Candy, Drank, Robo Print What Are Cough and Cold Medicines? Also known as: robotripping, robo, tussin, triple c, ...

  12. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  13. 12. COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE BASEMENT VIEW FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE BASEMENT VIEW FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, CABLE TRAYS, RACKS, CABLE CONNECTION TERMINALS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. 1. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Cold Flow Laboratory Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 2. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Cold Flow Laboratory Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  16. MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) These MISR Browse ... series of images over the region observed during the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). CLPX involved ground, airborne, and ...

  17. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant correlations between progesterone level and laser-Doppler flux response to local cooling were observed during the follicular (R=-0.552, p=0.0174) and during the luteal phases (R=0.520, p=0.0271). In contrast, the correlation between estradiol level and laser-Doppler flux response was observed only in the follicular phase (R=-0.506, p=0.0324). Our results show that individual sensitivity to cold influences cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling; that microvascular reactivity is more pronounced during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; and that reactivity correlates with hormone levels. The effect of specific sex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature. PMID:27430896

  18. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  3. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  4. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  5. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  6. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  7. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  8. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cold-pack cheese food. 133.124 Section 133.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the...

  9. Computer Output Laser Disk (COLD) Systems--COM Replacement Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolnick, Franklin I.

    1993-01-01

    Explains the COLD (Computer Output Laser Disk) system and describes current applications. Use of the COLD system to replace COM (Computer Output Microfilm) is discussed; advantages and disadvantages of the COLD system are considered; optical disks OD-WORM (Optical Disk-Write Once Read Many) versus CD-ROM are compared; and equipment and software…

  10. Ultra-cold methods for polarized atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Luppov, V. G.; Arnold, J. D.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Krisch, A. D.; Lin, A. M. T.; Raymond, R. S.; Bychkov, M. A.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Mochalov, V. V.; Semenov, P. A.

    1998-01-20

    Using the ultra-cold electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen technique, one can produce a slow monochromatic beam for use as a polarized jet target. We will first review the development of the ultra-cold technique and then discuss the recent progress on Michigan's Mark-II ultra-cold proton-spin-polarized hydrogen jet target.

  11. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cuts? Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? Print A A A Text Size Can you get genital herpes from a cold sore? – Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get ...

  12. Some Like It Hot, Some like It Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to find the right combination to construct a cold pack for athletic injuries, students mix liquids and solids in a calorimeter, and use a thermometer to ascertain whether the chemical reaction is hot or cold. Many formulae for chemical reactions are given, the first of which is used for commercial cold packs.

  13. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold-pack cheese food. 133.124 Section 133.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the...

  14. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold-pack cheese food. 133.124 Section 133.124 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Cheese and Related Products § 133.124 Cold-pack cheese food. (a)(1) Cold-pack cheese food is the...

  15. The End of the Cold War, 1961-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulzinger, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of Cold War years from President Kennedy's inauguration to end of Soviet Union on December 31, 1991. Recommends six questions to provide a structure for studying or teaching about the Cold War era. Concludes that the Cold War remains one of the premier forces in shaping the world during the second half of the 20th century.…

  16. Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zika & Pregnancy A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? Print A A A Text Size My son ... common cold can be so much alike that it's sometimes hard to tell the two apart. But ...

  17. Cold Pool and Surface Flux Interactions in Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, L. D.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Cold pools play important roles in tropical and midlatitude deep convective initiation and organization through their influence on near-surface kinematic and thermodynamic fields. Because temperature, moisture, and winds are perturbed within cold pools, cold pools can also impact surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. In turn, surface fluxes both within the cold pool and in the environment can modify the characteristics of cold pools and their evolution, with subsequent implications for convective initiation and organization. The two-way interaction between cold pools and surface energy fluxes has not been well studied and is likely to vary according to the environment and surface type. The goal of this study is therefore to investigate the mechanisms by which surface fluxes and cold pools interact in environmental conditions ranging from tropical oceanic to dry continental. This goal will be accomplished using high-resolution (grid spacings as fine as 10 m), idealized, 2D simulations of isolated cold pools; such modeling experiments have proven useful for investigating cold pools and their dynamics in many previous studies. In the proposed experiments, the surface flux formulation, surface type, and environmental conditions will be systematically varied. The impact of surface fluxes on various cold pool characteristics and their evolution, including the buoyancy, maximum vertical velocity, and moisture distribution, will be analyzed and presented. Results suggest that the mechanisms by which surface fluxes and cold pools interact vary substantially with the environment. Additionally, the indirect effects of surface fluxes on turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool are found to play an important role in cold pool evolution. These results suggest that surface fluxes can impact the timing and manner in which cold pools initiate convection, and that their effects may be important to incorporate into cold pool parameterizations for climate simulations.

  18. Lunar Cold Trap Contamination by Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, Scott T.; Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Tools have been developed to model and simulate the effects of lunar landing vehicles on the lunar environment (Metzger, 2011), mostly addressing the effects of regolith erosion by rocket plumes and the fate of the ejected lunar soil particles (Metzger, 2010). These tools are being applied at KSC to predict ejecta from the upcoming Google Lunar X-Prize Landers and how they may damage the historic Apollo landing sites. The emerging interest in lunar mining poses a threat of contamination to pristine craters at the lunar poles, which act as "cold traps" for water and may harbor other valuable minerals Crider and Vondrak (2002). The KSC Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab tools have been expanded to address the probability for contamination of these pristine "cold trap" craters.

  19. Large spin magnetism with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laburthe-Tolra, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The properties of quantum gases made of ultra-cold atoms strongly depend on the interactions between atoms. These interactions lead to condensed-matter-like collective behavior, so that quantum gases appear to be a new platform to study quantum many-body physics. In this seminar, I will focus on the case where the atoms possess an internal (spin) degrees of freedom. The spin of atoms is naturally larger than that of electrons. Therefore, the study of the magnetic properties of ultra-cold gases allows for an exploration of magnetism beyond the typical situation in solid-state physics where magnetism is associated to the s = 1/2 spin of the electron. I will describe three specific cases: spinor Bose-Einstein condensates, where spin-dependent contact interactions introduce new quantum phases and spin dynamics; large spin magnetic atoms where strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to exotic quantum magnetism; large spin Fermi gases.

  20. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  1. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruester, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-03-15

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  2. Referred thermal sensations: warmth versus cold.

    PubMed

    Green, B G

    1978-09-01

    The present study investigates further the phenomenon of thermal referral, in which thermal sensations are "referred" to the site of nearby tactile stimuli. First demonstrated with three stimulators (Green, B.G. Perception and Psychophysics, 1977, 22, 331-337), the present experiments show that referral also occurs between two contact stimuli. Measurements with two stimulators reveal that (1) on the arm and fingers, warmth refers more strongly that cold, and (2) referral of warmth is affected relatively little by increasing the distance between stimulators; (3) on the fingertips, referral is greater when the thermal sensation refers away from rather than toward the first digit; and (4) the pattern or referral across fingers differs for warmth and cold and appears unrelated to the pattern of peripheral innervation. The phenomenon of referral illustrates that information about locus gathered through the tactile sense is available to the thermal senses, which means that information about stimulus locus and quality can be carried on separate nerve fibers.

  3. Rapid cold hardening: a gut feeling.

    PubMed

    Worland, M R; Convey, P; Luke ov, A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the rate of cold hardening of a field population of Antarctic springtails and the effect of eating food with particular levels of ice nucleating activity on the animal's whole body freezing point. The SCPs of samples of c. 20, freshly collected, Cryptopygus antarcticus were measured hourly over a 32 hour collection period using differential scanning calorimetry and related to habitat temperature. The mean SCP of the springtails increased from -24 to -10 degree C during which time the habitat temperature warmed slowly from -2.5 to +2.5 degree C. In laboratory experiments, previously starved, cold tolerant springtails were fed on selected species of algae with measured SCP's but there was no clear correlation between the SCP of food and that of the animals after feeding. Microscopic examination of faecal pellets and guts from springtails showed that algal cells were completely destroyed during digestion.

  4. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  5. Cold condensation of dust in the ISM.

    PubMed

    Rouillé, Gaël; Jäger, Cornelia; Krasnokutski, Serge A; Krebsz, Melinda; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The condensation of complex silicates with pyroxene and olivine composition under conditions prevailing in molecular clouds has been experimentally studied. For this purpose, molecular species comprising refractory elements were forced to accrete on cold substrates representing the cold surfaces of surviving dust grains in the interstellar medium. The efficient formation of amorphous and homogeneous magnesium iron silicates at temperatures of about 12 K has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The gaseous precursors of such condensation processes in the interstellar medium are formed by erosion of dust grains in supernova shock waves. In the laboratory, we have evaporated glassy silicate dust analogs and embedded the released species in neon ice matrices that have been studied spectroscopically to identify the molecular precursors of the condensing solid silicates. A sound coincidence between the 10 microm band of the interstellar silicates and the 10 microm band of the low-temperature siliceous condensates can be noted.

  6. Cold in-situ recycling evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    In 1984 the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department began using Cold Insitu Recycling for the rehabilitation of asphalt concrete pavements. This paper reports the results of a comprehensive evaluation of the method from the standpoint of pavement performance and cost. The evaluation was performed by selecting and investigating by physical tests, condition inspections and review of other data, 45 projects located throughout the state of New Mexico. It is concluded that performance will generally exceed the 10 year service life assumed during design. Costs were evaluated in comparison to a mill and overlay rehabilitation method with an equal structural coefficient on the basis of construction costs and estimated maintenance costs during the design life. It is clear from this study that the use of cold insitu recycling is cost effective and provides excellent performance for a service life that is yet to be determined, certainly exceeding ten years.

  7. Axion cold dark matter in nonstandard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with nonstandard thermal histories before big bang nucleosynthesis: the low-temperature reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these nonstandard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  8. Common cold outbreaks: A network theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishkaie, Faranak Rajabi; Bakouie, Fatemeh; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2014-11-01

    In this study, at first we evaluated the network structure in social encounters by which respiratory diseases can spread. We considered common-cold and recorded a sample of human population and actual encounters between them. Our results show that the database structure presents a great value of clustering. In the second step, we evaluated dynamics of disease spread with SIR model by assigning a function to each node of the structural network. The rate of disease spread in networks was observed to be inversely correlated with characteristic path length. Therefore, the shortcuts have a significant role in increasing spread rate. We conclude that the dynamics of social encounters' network stands between the random and the lattice in network spectrum. Although in this study we considered the period of common-cold disease for network dynamics, it seems that similar approaches may be useful for other airborne diseases such as SARS.

  9. COLD-SAT feasibility study safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, Steven T.; Yost, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite presents some unique safety issues. The feasibility study conducted at NASA-Lewis desired a systems safety program that would be involved from the initial design in order to eliminate and/or control the inherent hazards. Because of this, a hazards analysis method was needed that: (1) identified issues that needed to be addressed for a feasibility assessment; and (2) identified all potential hazards that would need to be controlled and/or eliminated during the detailed design phases. The developed analysis method is presented as well as the results generated for the COLD-SAT system.

  10. Automatic Flatness Control of Cold Rolling Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbe, Yoshiharu; Sekiguchi, Kunio

    One of the subjects of cold rolling is a flatness of the rolled strip. Conventionally, measured strip flatness was approximated by polynomial (2th, 4th, 6th) equation across the entire strip width. This made it difficult to deal with desired loose edge or any desired flatness across the entire strip width. Also conventional flatness control was done for the entire strip width, so if there is a different flatness error among drive side and work side, conventional flatness control can not control properly. We propose independent strip flatness control among drive side and work side, and also automatic flatness control (AFC) system with arbitrary desired strip flatness. Also some applied results to cold mill are shown.

  11. Coupling cold atoms with mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2014-05-01

    Macroscopic systems, coupled to quantum systems with well understood coherence properties, can enable the study of the boundary between quantum microscopic phenomena and macroscopic systems. Ultra-cold atoms can be probed and manipulated with micro-mechanical resonators that provide single-spin sensitivity and sub-micron spatial resolution, facilitating studies of decoherence and quantum control. In the future, hybrid quantum systems consisting of cold atoms interfaced with mechanical devices may have applications in quantum information science. We describe our experiment to couple laser-cooled Rb atoms to a magnetic cantilever tip. This cantilever is precisely defined on the surface of a chip with lithography and the atoms are trapped at micron-scale distances from this chip. To match cantilever mechanical resonances, atomic magnetic resonances are tuned with a magnetic field.

  12. Cold condensation of dust in the ISM.

    PubMed

    Rouillé, Gaël; Jäger, Cornelia; Krasnokutski, Serge A; Krebsz, Melinda; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The condensation of complex silicates with pyroxene and olivine composition under conditions prevailing in molecular clouds has been experimentally studied. For this purpose, molecular species comprising refractory elements were forced to accrete on cold substrates representing the cold surfaces of surviving dust grains in the interstellar medium. The efficient formation of amorphous and homogeneous magnesium iron silicates at temperatures of about 12 K has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The gaseous precursors of such condensation processes in the interstellar medium are formed by erosion of dust grains in supernova shock waves. In the laboratory, we have evaporated glassy silicate dust analogs and embedded the released species in neon ice matrices that have been studied spectroscopically to identify the molecular precursors of the condensing solid silicates. A sound coincidence between the 10 microm band of the interstellar silicates and the 10 microm band of the low-temperature siliceous condensates can be noted. PMID:25302393

  13. Heavily cold worked metals: structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N.

    1999-07-01

    Large strain deformation of metals and alloys leads to a microstructural subdivision on a fine scale. Subdividing features are dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. Key microstructural parameters are the spacing between such boundaries and their angle of misorientation. These parameters have been characterized by TEM including Kikuchi pattern analysis of metals deformed to very large strains. By the way of examples, pure metals have been studied after deformation by cold rolling and after Cyclic-Extrusion-Compression (CEC) and Equal Channel Angular (ECA) deformation. It has also been examined how addition of fine particles affects the microstructure evolution. These experiments show a significant effect of materials and process parameters on microstructure and local crystallography which is reflected in the flow stress of the cold worked metal.

  14. Hyperosmolar cold storage kidney preservative solution.

    PubMed

    Masuda, J Y; Bleich, R N; Beckerman, J H

    1975-04-01

    A hyperosmolar kidney preservative solution which can maintain kidneys from experimental animals viable for up to 72 hours is described. Using the criterion of a one-month failure rate, the cold storage preservation method was found to be superior to machine preservation methods. Sachs' solution was found to be superior to all other cold storage solutions. The most important aspect of the hyperosmolar kidney preservative solution appears to be its ability to maintain normal intracellular electrolyte composition and to prevent cellular damage due to swelling. The present formula requires that the basic solution and a magnesium chloride additive solution be prepared separately and combined before use. A stable combined solution is proposed which can be sterilized by membrane filtration. PMID:1130414

  15. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

  16. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  17. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  18. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  19. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  20. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  1. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  2. Microwave devices: Carbon nanotubes as cold cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Minoux, Eric; Hudanski, Ludovic; Peauger, Franck; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Gangloff, Laurent; Legagneux, Pierre; Dieumegard, Dominique; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Milne, William I.

    2005-10-01

    To communicate, spacecraft and satellites rely on microwave devices, which at present are based on relatively inefficient thermionic electron sources that require heating and cannot be switched on instantaneously. Here we describe a microwave diode that uses a cold-cathode electron source consisting of carbon nanotubes and that operates at high frequency and at high current densities. Because it weighs little, responds instantaneously and has no need of heating, this miniaturized electron source should prove valuable for microwave devices used in telecommunications.

  3. Microwave devices: carbon nanotubes as cold cathodes.

    PubMed

    Teo, Kenneth B K; Minoux, Eric; Hudanski, Ludovic; Peauger, Franck; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Gangloff, Laurent; Legagneux, Pierre; Dieumegard, Dominique; Amaratunga, Gehan A J; Milne, William I

    2005-10-13

    To communicate, spacecraft and satellites rely on microwave devices, which at present are based on relatively inefficient thermionic electron sources that require heating and cannot be switched on instantaneously. Here we describe a microwave diode that uses a cold-cathode electron source consisting of carbon nanotubes and that operates at high frequency and at high current densities. Because it weighs little, responds instantaneously and has no need of heating, this miniaturized electron source should prove valuable for microwave devices used in telecommunications.

  4. Spatial distribution of cold antihydrogen formation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, N; Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2005-01-28

    Antihydrogen is formed when antiprotons are mixed with cold positrons in a nested Penning trap. We present experimental evidence, obtained using our antihydrogen annihilation detector, that the spatial distribution of the emerging antihydrogen atoms is independent of the positron temperature and axially enhanced. This indicates that antihydrogen is formed before the antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium with the positron plasma. This result has important implications for the trapping and spectroscopy of antihydrogen.

  5. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  6. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  7. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  8. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  9. Liquid deuterium cold source in graphite thermal column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsuro, M.; Kawai, T.; Maeda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Akiyoshi, T.; Okamoto, S.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid deuterium cold source with a non-spherical moderator chamber of about 4 litres was installed into the graphite thermal column of 5 MW Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Three cold neutron holes and one very cold neutron hole are provided in the graphite for beam extractions. The operation tests with hydrogen liquefied in the condenser showed satisfactory performances and high gain factors of cold and very cold neutrons of more than 20 and 10, respectively. Neutron measurements with the deuterium moderator are now in progress.

  10. Cold atom quantum emulation of ultrafast processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Senaratne, Ruwan; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed lasers are an invaluable probe of fast electron dynamics in condensed matter systems. However, despite tremendous progress, physical limitations on lasers and a lack of exact theoretical models still limit the exploration of ultrafast processes in solids. We discuss a possible complementary approach, in which lattice-trapped cold neutral atoms driven far from equilibrium are used as a quantum emulator of ultrafast physics at sub-cycle timescales. The cold atom context is in many ways a natural choice for such experiments: equilibration timescales are more than ten orders of magnitude slower than those in solids, and strong driving forces are easily produced and manipulated. Our experimental approach uses ultracold strontium in optical traps. Multiple stable isotopes and a long-lived metastable state provide control over interaction strengths, while a narrow-linewidth transition expands the typical cold-atom toolbox of readout techniques. We discuss initial efforts in quantum emulation of tunnel ionization and development of a platform for more complicated endeavors, including the study of multiple-pulse sequences and recollision processes. We acknowledge support from the NSF GRFP, the AFOSR, the ARO and DURIP program, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the University of California Office of the President.

  11. Structure and origin of Holocene cold events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, Heinz; Solomina, Olga; Grosjean, Martin; Ritz, Stefan P.; Jetel, Markéta

    2011-10-01

    The present interglacial, the Holocene, spans the period of the last 11,700 years. It has sustained the growth and development of modern society. The millennial-scale decreasing solar insolation in the Northern Hemisphere summer lead to Northern Hemisphere cooling, a southern shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and a weakening of the Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon systems. On the multidecadal to multicentury-scale, periods of more stable and warmer climate were interrupted by several cold relapses, at least in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropical area. Based on carefully selected 10,000-year-long time series of temperature and humidity/precipitation, as well as reconstructions of glacier advances, the spatiotemporal pattern of six cold relapses during the last 10,000 years was analysed and presented in form of a Holocene Climate Atlas (HOCLAT; see http://www.oeschger.unibe.ch/research/projects/holocene_atlas/). A clear cyclicity was not found, and the spatiotemporal variability of temperature and humidity/precipitation during the six specific cold events (8200, 6300, 4700, 2700, 1550 and 550 years BP) was very high. Different dynamical processes such as meltwater flux into the North Atlantic, low solar activity, explosive volcanic eruptions, and fluctuations of the thermohaline circulation likely played a major role. In addition, internal dynamics in the North Atlantic and Pacific area (including their complex interaction) were likely involved.

  12. COLD FLOWS AND THE FIRST QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Di Matteo, T.; Khandai, N.; DeGraf, C.; Feng, Y.; Croft, R. A. C.; Lopez, J.; Springel, V.

    2012-02-15

    Observations of the most distant bright quasars imply that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have to be assembled within the first 800 million years. Under our standard galaxy formation scenario such fast growth implies large gas densities providing sustained accretion at critical or supercritical rates onto an initial black hole seed. It has been a long standing question whether and how such high black hole accretion rates can be achieved and sustained at the centers of early galaxies. Here we use our new MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation covering a volume (0.75 Gpc){sup 3} appropriate for studying the rare first quasars to show that steady high density cold gas flows responsible for assembling the first galaxies produce the high gas densities that lead to sustained critical accretion rates and hence rapid growth commensurate with the existence of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black holes as early as z {approx} 7. We find that under these conditions quasar feedback is not effective at stopping the cold gas from penetrating the central regions and hence cannot quench the accretion until the host galaxy reaches M{sub halo} > or approx. 10{sup 1}2{sup M}{sub Sun }. This cold-flow-driven scenario for the formation of quasars implies that they should be ubiquitous in galaxies in the early universe and that major (proto)galaxy mergers are not a requirement for efficient fuel supply and growth, particularly for the earliest SMBHs.

  13. Cold prebiotic evolution, tunneling, chirality and exobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldanskii, Vitalii I.

    1996-07-01

    The extra-terrestrial scenario of the origin of life suggested by Svante Arrhenius (1) as the `panspermia' hypothesis was revived by the discovery of a low-temperature quantum limit of a chemical reaction rate caused by the molecular tunneling (2). Entropy factors play no role near absolute zero, and slow molecular tunneling can lead to the exothermic formation of quite complex molecules. Interstellar grains or particles of cometary tails could serve as possible cold seeds of life, with acetic acid, urea and products of their polycondensation as quasi-equilibrium intermediates. Very cold solid environment hinders racemization and stabilizes optical activity under conditions typical for outer space. Neither `advantage' factors can secure the evolutionary formation of chiral purity of initial prebiotic monomeric medium-even being temporary achieved it cannot be maintained at subsequent stages of prebiotic evolution because of counteraction of `enantioselective pressure'. Only bifurcational mechanism of the formation of prebiotic homochiral-monomeric and afterwards polymeric-medium and its subsequent transformation in `homochiral chemical automata' (`biological big bang'-passage from `stochastic' to `algorithmic' chemistry) is possible and can be realized. Extra-terrestrial (cold, solid phase) scenarios of the origin of life seem to be more promising from that point of view than terrestrial (warm) scenarios. Within a scheme of five main stages of prebiological evolution some problems important for further investigation are briefly discussed.

  14. A swirl flow evaporative cold plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niggemann, R. E.; Greenlee, W. J.; Hill, D. G.; Ellis, W.; Marshall, P.

    1985-01-01

    A forced flow evaporative cold plate is under development for future application to the thermal bus concept being pursued by NASA for Space Station Thermal Control. The vaporizer is a swirl-flow device employing a spiral tube coil geometry sandwiched between conductive metal plates upon which electric components could be mounted. This concept is based on the inherent phase separation that occurs in a two phase stream in curvilinear flow. This is a zero 'g' design with one 'g' all-attitude capability and is capable of high heat transfer coefficients, good isothermality, and the ability to function at heat fluxes approaching 5w/sq cm on the cold plates (10w/sq cm on the tube wall) with Freon 114. The advantages of this design over other two phase evaporator approaches are high heat flux capability, simplified control requirements, insensitivity to micro-gravity oscillations, and inexpensive manufacturability. The program included design, fabrication, and test of such a cold plate utilizing an existing test stand developed for two-phase thermal management system (TPTMS) testing. Test results analysis and conclusions are included.

  15. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soreghan, G.S.; Soreghan, M.J.; Poulsen, C.J.; Young, R.A.; Eble, C.F.; Sweet, D.E.; Davogustto, O.C.

    2008-01-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic. Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidence for continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have long been considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded from the highlatitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacial indicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperatures in western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley and associated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation that extended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains. Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only known occurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history; the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) is most consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emerging indicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, these results suggest that tropical climate was not buffered from the high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climate shifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheet model simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solar luminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that other factors must be considered in attempting to explain this 'best-known' analogue to our present Earth. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Cold moderator test facilities working group

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Guenter S.; Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The working group meeting was chaired by Bauer and Lucas.Testing is a vital part of any cold source development project. This applies to specific physics concept verification, benchmarking in conjunction with computer modeling and engineering testing to confirm the functional viability of a proposed system. Irradiation testing of materials will always be needed to continuously extend a comprehensive and reliable information database. An ever increasing worldwide effort to enhance the performance of reactor and accelerator based neutron sources, coupled with the complexity and rising cost of building new generation facilities, gives a new dimension to cold source development and testing programs. A stronger focus is now being placed on the fine-tuning of cold source design to maximize its effectiveness in fully exploiting the facility. In this context, pulsed spallation neutron sources pose an extra challenge due to requirements regarding pulse width and shape which result from a large variety of different instrument concepts. The working group reviewed these requirements in terms of their consequences on the needs for testing equipment and compiled a list of existing and proposed facilities suitable to carry out the necessary development work.

  17. Performance and energy expenditure in cold environments.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the associations between physical performance and energy expenditure in cold environments. The basic question in cold is how to maintain adequate thermal insulation without marked cold or heat strain and with minimal impairment on physical performance. 24-hour energy expenditure is increased by 105-156 kJ when ambient temperature decreases by 1 degrees C either due to increased clothing, lowered body temperatures or environmental conditions like snow, ice or darkness. Clothing and other protective garments decrease performance due to the weight, bulkiness and friction, and by covering body areas which are important for sensory functions. Each additional kg in clothing weight increases energy costs approximately by 3% and each additional layer by 4%. Increased energy costs are associated with a decrease in physical performance: the decrease is task specific, and roughly comparable to the changes in the energy costs. The decrement in performance can be minimized by decreasing clothing weight and bulkiness as well as the friction between the clothing layers as well as the number of clothing layers. Minimal friction is important in sites where large range of movements is expected like in trouser legs and sleeves of jackets. PMID:17929641

  18. Investigation of cold colored smoke production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, T.

    1985-08-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop a nonfading colored cold smoke composition for use in a signal cartridge for practice bombs. The primary constraint is that the substance must not require any form of heat to produce the smoke; hence the term cold smoke. The principal use of the colored cold smoke charge is to mark the point of impact of practice bombs used by the Canadian Forces (CF). In summertime, white smoke produced by titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) is satisfactory; however, colored smoke is required during winter because of the white snow background. Different methods for producing large colored smoke clouds for use as spotting charges are evaluated. The problem of the disappearance, or bleaching, of the orange color from vanadium oxytrichloride (VOCl3) clouds during times of high relative humidity is considered. It is postulated that this is caused by the absorption of large quantities of atmospheric moisture by the smoke. A model has been developed to study the process. This model makes the key predictions concerning the absorption of very large amounts of atmospheric moisture by VOCl3 type smokes above a relative humidity of 80% and the very small importance of temperature as a parameter. These predictions are, in general, corroborated very well by experiment. Possible solutions to this color bleaching problem are discussed, including one that calls for the synthesis of hydrolyzable vanadium compounds with nonhygroscopic leaving groups.

  19. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Soreghan, Michael J.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Young, Roger A.; Eble, Cortland F.; Sweet, Dustin E.; Davogustto, Oswaldo C.

    2008-08-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic.Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidencefor continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have longbeen considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded fromthe high-latitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacialindicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperaturesin western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley andassociated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation thatextended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains.Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only knownoccurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history;the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) ismost consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emergingindicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, theseresults suggest that tropical climate was not buffered fromthe high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climateshifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheetmodel simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solarluminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that otherfactors must be considered in attempting to explain this "best-known"analogue to our present Earth.

  20. Cold Spray Forming of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, W.; Irissou, E.; Vo, P.; Sone, M.; Bernier, F.; Legoux, J.-G.; Fukanuma, H.; Yue, S.

    2013-03-01

    Inconel 718 was cold spray formed to a 6-mm thickness on an 8-cm diameter aluminum alloy tube using Sulzer Amdry 1718 powder and the Plasma Giken PCS-1000 cold spray system. The effects of spray particle velocity and post-spray heat treatment were studied. Post-spray annealing was performed from 950 to 1250 °C for 1-2 h. The resulting microstructures as well as the corresponding mechanical properties were characterized. As-sprayed coatings exhibited very low ductility. The tensile strength and ductility of the heat-treated coatings were improved to varying levels depending on the heat-treatment and spray conditions. For coatings sprayed at higher particle velocity and heat treated at 1250 °C for 1 h, an elongation of 24% was obtained. SEM micrographs showed a higher fraction of interparticle metallurgical bonds due to some sintering effect. Corresponding fracture surfaces also revealed a higher fraction of dimple features, typically associated with ductile fracture, in the annealed coatings. The results demonstrate that cold spray forming of Inconel 718 is feasible, and with appropriate heat treatment, metallurgical bonding can be increased. The ductility of the spray-formed samples was comparable to that of the bulk material.

  1. The University of Texas Cold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Kenan; Ríos-Martínez, Carlos; Wehring, Bernard W.

    1994-12-01

    A cold neutron source has been designed, constructed, and tested by the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at The University of Texas at Austin. The Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) is located in one of the beam ports of the NETL 1-MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The main components of the TCNS are a cooled moderator, a heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and a neutron guide. 80 ml of mesitylene moderator are maintained at about 30 K in a chamber within the reactor graphite reflector by the heat pipe and cryogenic refrigerator. The heat pipe is a 3-m long aluminum tube that contains neon as the working fluid. The cold neutrons obtained from the moderator are transported by a curved 6-m long neutron guide. This neutron guide has a radius of curvature of 300 m, a 50 × 15 mm cross-section, 58Ni coating, and is separated into three channels. The TCNS will provide a low-background subthermal neutron beam for neutron capture and scattering research. After the installation of the external portion of the neutron guide, a neutron focusing system and a Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis facility will be set up at the TCNS.

  2. Acute cooling of the body surface and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R

    2002-09-01

    There is a widely held belief that acute viral respiratory infections are the result of a "chill" and that the onset of a respiratory infection such as the common cold is often associated with acute cooling of the body surface, especially as the result of wet clothes and hair. However, experiments involving inoculation of common cold viruses into the nose, and periods of cold exposure, have failed to demonstrate any effect of cold exposure on susceptibility to infection with common cold viruses. Present scientific opinion dismisses any cause-and-effect relationship between acute cooling of the body surface and common cold. This review proposes a hypothesis; that acute cooling of the body surface causes reflex vasoconstriction in the nose and upper airways, and that this vasoconstrictor response may inhibit respiratory defence and cause the onset of common cold symptoms by converting an asymptomatic subclinical viral infection into a symptomatic clinical infection.

  3. Thyroid function and cold acclimation in the hamster, Mesocricetus auratus

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, T.E.; Horwitz, B.A.

    1987-02-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR), thyroxine utilization rate (T4U), and triiodothyronine utilization rate (T3U) were measured in cold-acclimated (CA) and room temperature-acclimated (RA) male golden hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus. Hormone utilization rates were calculated via the plasma disappearance technique using SVI-labeled hormones and measuring serum hormone levels via radioimmunoassay. BMR showed a significant 28% increase with cold acclimation. The same cold exposure also produced a 32% increase in T4U, and a 204% increase in T3U. The much greater increase in T3U implies that previous assessments of the relationship between cold acclimation and thyroid function may have been underestimated and that cold exposure induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in thyroid function. It is concluded that in the cold-acclimated state, T3U more accurately reflects thyroid function than does T4U. A mechanism for the cold-induced change in BMR is proposed.

  4. Effects of repeated short-term cold exposures on cold induced thermogenesis of women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silami-Garcia, E.; Haymes, E. M.

    1989-12-01

    The effects of repeated exposures to resting cold air (10°C) on the shivering and thermogenic responses of women to standard cold stress were investigated. Ten women, aged 18 to 34 years, were divided into two groups of five women each. One group, the acclimated (A) was exposed ten times within 2 weeks, the first and the last exposures being the pre-and post-tests respectively. The second group, the control (C) was exposed twice within 18 days. Measurements of rectal and skin temperatures, oxygen uptake, time to onset of shivering (TOS), and perceived cold were performed during all exposures. Shivering responses were evaluated by electromyography and visually. A significant ( P<0.05), increase was seen in TOS (from 26.2 min to 55.6 min), and a significant decrease was seen in thermoregulatory heat production (from 14.78 kcal/h to -2.64 kcal/h) in group A; these changes were evident after about five exposures. It is concluded that the women became cold acclimated as a result of the repeated short-term resting cold air exposures.

  5. Role of cold shock proteins in growth of Listeria monocytogenes under cold and osmotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Barbara; Klumpp, Jochen; Raimann, Eveline; Loessner, Martin J; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2009-03-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of both public health and food safety significance. It possesses three small, highly homologous protein members of the cold shock protein (Csp) family. We used gene expression analysis and a set of mutants with single, double, and triple deletions of the csp genes to evaluate the roles of CspA, CspB, and CspD in the cold and osmotic (NaCl) stress adaptation responses of L. monocytogenes. All three Csps are dispensable for growth at optimal temperature (37 degrees C). These proteins are, however, required for efficient cold and osmotic stress tolerance of this bacterium. The hierarchies of their functional importance differ, depending on the environmental stress conditions: CspA>CspD>CspB in response to cold stress versus CspD>CspA/CspB in response to NaCl salt osmotic stress. The fact that Csps are promoting L. monocytogenes adaptation against both cold and NaCl stress has significant implications in view of practical food microbial control measures. The combined or sequential exposure of L. monocytogenes cells to these two stresses in food environments might inadvertently induce cross-protection responses.

  6. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  7. The cold air drainage model KLAM_21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossmann, M.

    2010-09-01

    A brief description of the physics and numerical techniques of the cold air drainage model KLAM_21 is presented. The model has been developed by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (Sievers, 2005) for simulations of nocturnal airflow in hilly and mountainous terrain under dry fair weather conditions. The model has been widely used as an environmental consultancy tool. Typical model applications include frost protection (cold air ponding) and air quality (nocturnal ventilation). The single-layer model calculates the depth and the mean wind of a surface based stable layer that evolves from a neutrally stratified atmosphere during nighttime. The prediction of the velocity and direction of the cold air drainage is based on vertically averaged momentum tendency equations. Temporal changes in the total heat deficit in the cold air layer are calculated from a prescribed local heat loss rate (describing turbulent and radiative cooling) and advection (donor-cell algorithm). The depth of the cold air layer (depth of the surface based temperature inversion) is calculated diagnostically from the total heat loss deficit. The model is initialised with neutral stratification at sunset (onset time of nocturnal cooling). Optionally, effects of an ambient (regional) wind and/or the dispersion of a passive tracer can be simulated. Integration over time is carried out on a regular Arakawa C grid using dynamically calculated time steps. Spatial gradients are discretised using centred differential quotients. The standard size of the computational domains can reach up to 1500 x 1500 grid cells. Grid resolutions usually range between 10 m and 500 m. High resolution simulation can be limited to a nested inner grid domain, while the courser outer domain is covering the entire airshed of interest. A friendly user interface allows easy setup, control, and evaluation of model simulations. Some selected examples of KLAM_21 applications are shown to illustrate the features and capabilities of the model

  8. Improving the cold chain for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J S

    1977-01-01

    The cold chain may be defined as a system for transporting and storing vaccines at very low temperataures, particularly in tropical countries. In Ghana, efforts are being made, with the assistance of the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop and test a new cold chain technology. Emphasis is on local production in order to meet the needs of the countrywide immunization program, and, if possible, of similar programs in other West African nations. Focus in this discussion is on the losses resulting from mishandling of vaccines during storage and in transit through various stages in the cold chain as well as the problems, requirements, and proposed solutions. In most countries with immunization programs, breakdowns in refrigeration during the transport and storage of vaccines in remote rural areas or at the regional and national central stores have led to great losses of vaccine. The losses are often caused by inappropriate management and technology. The most promising recent development in the area of storage is an enzyme-based time/temperature indicator contained in a paper tab which is attached to the vaccine packet. In order to reduce to a minimum the handling of vaccines at the national central store it is proposed that the ministry of health submit details of regional requirements in their requisition to the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer can make presealed packages which are dispatched by air to the national central store and from there to the regions, while they are still sealed. Insulated boxes for this purpose have been tested in Sweden and been shown to maintain deep-freezing temperatures for 5 days. Road communications to the regional centers are good in Ghana and the 5-day cold boxes give adequate safety margins. The plan for the immunization program in Ghana is to employ a combination of teams from both fixed and mobile centers. 3 contacts, 3 months apart, will be made by the fixed teams; mobile teams will make 2 contacts, 2 months apart. Mobile

  9. Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    The cosmic web is a vast, foam-like network of filaments and voids stretching throughout the universe. How did the first galaxies form within the cosmic web, at the intersections of filaments? New observations of a protodisk a galaxy in the early stages of formation may provide a clue.Models for Galaxy FormationNarrowband image of the candidate protodisk (marked with a white ellipse) and filaments (outlined in white). [Adapted from Martin et al. 2016]The standard model for galaxy formation, known as the hot accretion model, argues that galaxies form out of collapsing, virialized gas that forms a hot halo and then slowly cools, fueling star and galaxy formation at its center.But what if galaxies are actually formed from cool gas? In this contrasting picture, the cold accretion model, cool (temperature of ~104 K) unshocked gas from cosmic web filaments flows directly onto galactic disks forming at the filamentary intersections. The narrow streams of cold gas deliver fuel for star formation.A signature of the cold accretion model is that the streams of cold gas form a disk as the gas spirals inward, sinking toward the central protogalaxy. Detecting these cold-flow disks could be strong evidence in support of this model and last year, a team of authors reported just such a detection! This year theyre back again with a second object that may provide confirmation of cold accretion from the cosmic web.A Candidate ProtodiskThe team, led by Christopher Martin (California Institute of Technology), made the discovery using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager, an instrument designed to observe faint emission from the intergalactic medium. Martin and collaborators found a large (R 100 kpc, more than six times the radius of the Milky Way), rotating structure of hydrogen gas, illuminated by the nearby quasi-stellar object QSO HS1549+1919. The system is located at a redshift of z~2.8.The authors testthree potential kinematic models of the candidate protodisk and filaments. In (a) two

  10. Reusable crucible for containing corrosive liquids

    DOEpatents

    Pruneda, J.A.H. de.

    1995-01-24

    A reusable, non-wetting, corrosion-resistant material suitable for containment of corrosive liquids is formed of a tantalum or tantalum alloy substrate that is permeated with carbon atoms. The substrate is carburized to form surface layers of TaC and Ta[sub 2]C, and then is heated at high temperature under vacuum until the carbon atoms in the carbide layers diffuse throughout the substrate to form a solid solution of carbon atoms randomly interspersed in the tantalum or tantalum alloy lattice. 10 figures.

  11. Contactless Ultrasound Generation in a Crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarevics, Valdis; Djambazov, Georgi S.; Pericleous, Koulis A.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound treatment is used in light alloys during solidification to refine microstructure, remove gas, or disperse immersed particles. A mechanical sonotrode immersed in the melt is most effective when probe tip vibrations lead to cavitation. Liquid contact with the probe can be problematic for high temperature or reactive melts leading to contamination. An alternative contactless method of generating ultrasonic waves is proposed, using electromagnetic (EM) induction. As a bonus, the EM force induces vigorous stirring distributing the effect to treat larger volumes of material. In a typical application, the induction coil surrounding the crucible—also used to melt the alloy—may be adopted for this purpose with suitable tuning. Alternatively, a top coil, immersed in the melt (but still contactless due to EM force repulsion) may be used. Numerical simulations of sound, flow, and EM fields suggest that large pressure amplitudes leading to cavitation may be achievable with this method.

  12. Reusable crucible for containing corrosive liquids

    DOEpatents

    de Pruneda, Jean A. H.

    1995-01-01

    A reusable, non-wetting, corrosion-resistant material suitable for containment of corrosive liquids is formed of a tantalum or tantalum alloy substrate that is permeated with carbon atoms. The substrate is carburized to form surface layers of TaC and Ta.sub.2 C, and then is heated at high temperature under vacuum until the carbon atoms in the carbide layers diffuse throughout the substrate to form a solid solution of carbon atoms randomly interspersed in the tantalum or tantalum alloy lattice.

  13. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)].

  14. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)]. PMID:27611673

  15. Monitoring of Sedimentary Fluxes in Cold Environments: The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2014-05-01

    Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated geomorphic process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G. / A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program (2005 - 2017) is addressing this existing key knowledge gap. The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Research carried out at each of the ca. 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by program, logistics and available resources, but typically represent interdisciplinary collaborations of geomorphologists, hydrologists, ecologists, permafrost scientists and glaciologists. SEDIBUD has developed manuals and protocols (SEDIFLUX Manual) with a key set of primary surface process monitoring and research data requirements to incorporate results from these diverse projects and allow coordinated quantitative analysis across the program. Defined SEDIBUD key tasks for the coming years include (i) The continued generation and compilation of comparable longer-term datasets on contemporary sedimentary fluxes and sediment yields from SEDIBUD key test sites worldwide, (ii) The continued extension of the SEDIBUD metadata database with these datasets, (iii) The testing of defined SEDIBUD hypotheses (available

  16. Cold exposure reveals two populations of microtubules in pulmonary endothelia

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Stevens, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules are composed of α-tubulin and β-tubulin dimers. Microtubules yield tubulin dimers when exposed to cold, which reassemble spontaneously to form microtubule fibers at 37°C. However, mammalian neurons, glial cells, and fibroblasts have cold-stable microtubules. While studying the microtubule toxicity mechanisms of the exotoxin Y from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, we observed that some endothelial microtubules were very difficult to disassemble in the cold. As a consequence, we designed studies to test the hypothesis that microvascular endothelium has a population of cold-stable microtubules. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells (control) were grown under regular cell culture conditions, followed by exposure to an ice-cold water bath and a microtubule extraction protocol. Polymerized microtubules were detected by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analyses. After cold exposure, immunofluorescence revealed that the majority of HeLa cell microtubules disassembled, whereas a smaller population of endothelial cell microtubules disassembled. Immunoblot analyses showed that microvascular endothelial cells express the microtubule cold-stabilizing protein N-STOP (neuronal stable tubule-only polypeptides), and that N-STOP binds to endothelial microtubules after cold exposure, but not if microtubules are disassembled with nocodazole before cold exposure. Hence, pulmonary endothelia have a population of cold-stable microtubules. PMID:20971804

  17. The dynamics of Persistent Cold-Air Pool breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, Neil P.

    The wind-induced disruption and breakup of multiday cold-air pools are investigated using observational analyses and idealized numerical simulations. The observations are from the Persistent Cold-Air Pool (CAP) Study, which provides modern measurement of the meteorological processes affecting the duration of cold-air pools in the Salt Lake Valley of Utah. In general, the observations indicate that synoptic-scale processes control cold-air pool duration while local processes affect near-surface stratification and mixing. The most common form of CAP breakup is due to cold-air advection aloft. However, analyses reveal that some cold-air pools are destroyed or disrupted by strong winds penetrating into the valley. The resulting wind-CAP interactions are complex, involving sequential CAP displacements, internal oscillations, dynamic instabilities, and terrain-flow interactions. Large Eddy Simulations of multiday cold-air pools in idealized valley topography further demonstrate that cold-air pool removal is affected by the interplay of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and warm air advection. This dynamic instability generates breaking waves in the stratified shear flow that mix cold-air into the warmer flow aloft. Variations in the initial cold pool stratification and valley terrain affect the timescale for cold-air pool removal. Despite these variations, a basic relationship between the magnitude of the flow aloft and the strength of the underlying cold-air pool can be expressed in terms of the "CAP Froude number." This dimensionless quantity is useful for diagnosing the onset and amplification of turbulent mixing, as well as the complete removal of cold-air pools.

  18. Galactic cold cores. III. General cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Pagani, L.; Doi, Y.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marshall, D. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Falgarone, E.; Malinen, J.; Marton, G.; McGehee, P.; Montier, L. A.; Motte, F.; Paladini, R.; Tóth, L. V.; Ysard, N.; Zahorecz, S.; Zavagno, A.

    2012-05-01

    Context. In the project galactic cold cores we are carrying out Herschel photometric observations of cold regions of the interstellar clouds as previously identified with the Planck satellite. The aim of the project is to derive the physical properties of the population of cold clumps and to study its connection to ongoing and future star formation. Aims: We examine the cloud structure around the Planck detections in 71 fields observed with the Herschel SPIRE instrument by the summer of 2011. We wish to determine the general physical characteristics of the fields and to examine the morphology of the clouds where the cold high column density clumps are found. Methods: Using the Herschel SPIRE data, we derive colour temperature and column density maps of the fields. Together with ancillary data, we examine the infrared spectral energy distributions of the main clumps. The clouds are categorised according to their large scale morphology. With the help of recently released WISE satellite data, we look for signs of enhanced mid-infrared scattering ("coreshine"), an indication of growth of the dust grains, and have a first look at the star formation activity associated with the cold clumps. Results: The mapped clouds have distances ranging from ~100 pc to several kiloparsecs and cover a range of sizes and masses from cores of less than 10 M⊙ to clouds with masses in excess of 10 000 M⊙. Most fields contain some filamentary structures and in about half of the cases a filament or a few filaments dominate the morphology. In one case out of ten, the clouds show a cometary shape or have sharp boundaries indicative of compression by an external force. The width of the filaments is typically ~0.2-0.3 pc. However, there is significant variation from 0.1 pc to 1 pc and the estimates are sensitive to the methods used and the very definition of a filament. Enhanced mid-infrared scattering, coreshine, was detected in four clouds with six additional tentative detections. The

  19. The Cold and Icy Heart of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The locations of large deposits of frozen volatiles on planetary surfaces are largely coincident with areas receiving the minimum annual influx of solar energy. Thus we have the familiar polar caps of Earth and Mars, but cold equatorial regions for planets with obliquities between 54 and 126 degrees. Furthermore, for tilts between 45-66 degrees and 114-135 degrees the minimum incident energy occurs neither at the pole nor the equator. We find that the annual average insolation is always symmetric about Pluto's equator and is fully independent of the relative locations of the planet's pericenter and equinoxes. Remarkably, this symmetry holds for arbitrary orbital eccentricities and obliquities, and so we provide a short proof in the margin of this abstract. The current obliquity of Pluto is 119 degrees, giving it minima in average annual insolation at +/- 27 degrees latitude, with ~1.5% more flux to the equator and ~15% more to the poles. But the obliquity of Pluto also varies sinusoidally from 102-126 degrees and so, over the past million years, Pluto's annual equatorial and polar fluxes have changed by +15% and -13%, respectively. Interestingly, the energy flux received by latitudes between 25-35 degrees remains nearly constant over the presumably billions of years since Pluto acquired its current orbit and spin properties. Thus these latitudes are continuously cold and should be favored for the long-term deposition of volatile ices; the bright heart of Pluto, Sputnik Planum, extends not coincidentally across these latitudes. Reflected light and emitted thermal radiation from Charon increases annual insolation to one side of Pluto by of order 0.02%. Although small, the bulk of the energy is delivered at night to Pluto's cold equatorial regions. Furthermore, Charon's thermal IR is delivered very efficiently to icy deposits. Over billions of years, ices have preferentially formed and survived in the anti-Charon hemisphere.

  20. Treatment of the common cold with troxerutin.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ronald B; Fowler, Sandra L; Berg, Kurt

    2004-09-01

    The rutosides are naturally occurring flavonoids that have documented effects on capillary permeability and edema. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of troxerutin, one of the rutosides, on the symptoms of the common cold. Ninety-four volunteers with common cold symptoms were recruited for participation in the study. Volunteers were randomized to either active treatment (n=49) with troxerutin (50 mg) and Zn gluconate (25 mg) or control treatment (n=45) with 10 mg Zn gluconate. Symptoms were assessed by subjective symptom score prior to treatment and then daily for the next 4 days. The total symptom score over the 4 days of study treatment was 27.7+/-2.0 (mean+/-SEM) and 33.0+/-2.6 in the active and control groups, respectively (p=0.10, unpaired t-test). The total daily symptom score on day 1 was reduced by 11% compared to baseline in the active group and by 1% in the control group (p=0.03). Evaluation of the effect of treatment on individual symptoms revealed a significant effect on rhinorrhea. The total rhinorrhea score over the course of the study was 3.7+/-0.4 in the active group compared to 5.1+/-0.5 in the control group (p=0.025, unpaired t-test). Daily rhinorrhea scores were significantly lower in the active group on study days 1 and 3. Based on this preliminary study, the possibility that the rutosides might provide a safe and effective treatment for rhinorrhea in the common cold deserves systematic evaluation.