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Sample records for netec cold crucible

  1. NETEC COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEMONSTRATION FOR SRNL WITH SIMULATED SLUDGE BATCH 4 DWPF WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M; Allan Barnes, A; Alexander Choi, A; James Marra, J

    2008-07-28

    Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Technology is being considered as a possible next generation melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Initial and baseline demonstrations that vitrified a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant at a waste loading of 50 weight percent (versus about 38 weight percent in the current DWPF Melter) were performed by the Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute (NETEC) in South Korea via a subcontract from the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). This higher waste loading was achieved by using a CCIM which can run at higher glass processing temperatures (1250 C and higher) than the current DWPF Melter (1150 C). Higher waste loadings would result in less canisters being filled and faster waste throughput at the DWPF. The main demonstration objectives were to determine the maximum melt rate/waste throughput for the NETEC CCIM with a Sludge Batch 4 simulant as well as determine the viability of this technology for use in the DWPF.

  2. Modeling a Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2003-06-01

    FIDAP has been used to simulate melting of radioactive waste glass in a cold crucible induction heated melter. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melting process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities, and magnetic vector potential. A power controller is implemented that controls the primary coil current and power.

  3. Letter report: Cold crucible melter assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, M.L.

    1996-03-01

    One of the activities of the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project is to assist the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Program in determining which melter systems should be performance tested for potential implementation in the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification plant. The Richland Operations Office (RL) has recommended that the Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) be evaluated as a candidate ``next generation`` melter. As a result, the CCM System Evaluation cost account was established under the PVTD Project so that the CCM could be initially assessed on a high-priority basis. This letter report summarizes a brief initial review and assessment of the CCM. Using the recommendations made in this document, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and RL will make a decision regarding the urgency of performance testing the CCM. If the decision is favorable, a subcontract will be negotiated for performance testing of a CCM using Hanford HLW simulants in a pilot-scale facility. Because of the aggressive nature of the schedule, the CCM evaluation was not rigorous. The evaluation consisted of a literature review and interviews with proponents of the technology during a recent trip to France. This letter report summarizes the evaluation and makes recommendations regarding further work in this area.

  4. Cold-Crucible Design Parameters for Next Generation HLW Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.; Richardson, J.; Aloy, A.; Day, D.

    2002-02-26

    The cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) design eliminates many materials and operating constraints inherent in joule-heated melter (JHM) technology, which is the standard for vitrification of high-activity wastes worldwide. The cold-crucible design is smaller, less expensive, and generates much less waste for ultimate disposal. It should also allow a much more flexible operating envelope, which will be crucial if the heterogeneous wastes at the DOE reprocessing sites are to be vitrified. A joule-heated melter operates by passing current between water-cooled electrodes through a molten pool in a refractory-lined chamber. This design is inherently limited by susceptibility of materials to corrosion and melting. In addition, redox conditions and free metal content have exacerbated materials problems or lead to electrical short-circuiting causing failures in DOE melters. In contrast, the CCIM design is based on inductive coupling of a water-cooled high-frequency electrical coil with the glass, causing eddycurrents that produce heat and mixing. A critical difference is that inductance coupling transfers energy through a nonconductive solid layer of slag coating the metal container inside the coil, whereas the jouleheated design relies on passing current through conductive molten glass in direct contact with the metal electrodes and ceramic refractories. The frozen slag in the CCIM design protects the containment and eliminates the need for refractory, while the corrosive molten glass can be the limiting factor in the JH melter design. The CCIM design also eliminates the need for electrodes that typically limit operating temperature to below 1200 degrees C. While significant marketing claims have been made by French and Russian technology suppliers and developers, little data is available for engineering and economic evaluation of the technology, and no facilities are available in the US to support testing. A currently funded project at the Idaho National Engineering

  5. Cold Crucible Induction Melter Technology: Results of Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, Dirk; Richardson, John Grant

    2001-09-01

    This report provides a review of cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology and presents summaries of alternatives and design issues associated with major system components. The objective in this report is to provide background systems level information relating to development and application of cold crucible induction-heated melter technology for radiological waste processing. Included is a detailed description of the bench-top melter system at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute currently being used for characterization testing

  6. Growth of High Purity Oxygen-Free Silicon by Cold Crucible Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    REMOVED FROM THE COLD CRUCIBLE 38 8 POLYCRYSTALLINE SILICON INGOT PULLED FROM THE COLD CRUCIBLE 39 9 RESISTANCE HEATED SEED HOLDER 40 10 CRYSTAL...PULLING EXPERIMENT UTILIZING THE RESISTANCE HEATED 41 SEED HOLDER 11 GRAPHITE REFLECTOR USED FOR THE GROWTH OF SILICON CRYSTALS 42 FROM A MELT CONFINED IN...silicon crystals. Generation of oxygen donors by heat treatment of 4500 C for example, confuses the measurement of dopant concentration via resistivity

  7. Integrated Pilot Plant for a Large Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Do Quang, R.; Jensen, A.; Prod'homme, A.; Fatoux, R.; Lacombe, J.

    2002-02-26

    COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level liquid waste produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing on an industrial scale for over 20 years, with two main objectives: containment of the long lived fission products and reduction of the final volume of waste. Research performed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in the 1950s led to the selection of borosilicate glass as the most suitable containment matrix for waste from spent nuclear fuel and to the development of the induction melter technology. This was followed by the commissioning of the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM) in 1978. The process was implemented at a larger scale in the late 1980s in the R7 and T7 facilities of the La Hague reprocessing plant. COGEMA facilities have produced more than 11,000 high level glass canisters, representing more than 4,500 metric tons of glass and 4.5 billion curies. To further improve the performance of the vitrification lines in the R7 and T7 facilities, the CEA and COGEMA have been developing the Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) technology since the 1980s. This technology benefits from the 20 years of COGEMA HLW vitrification experience and ensures a virtually unlimited equipment service life and extensive flexibility in dealing with different types of waste. The high specific power directly transferred by induction to the melt allows high operating temperatures without any impact on the process equipment. In addition, the mechanical stirring of the melter significantly reduces operating constraints. COGEMA is already providing the CCM technology to international customers for nuclear and non-nuclear applications and plans to implement it in the La Hague vitrification plant for the vitrification of highly concentrated and corrosive solutions produced by uranium/molybdenum fuel reprocessing. The paper presents the CCM project that led to the building and start-up of this evolutionary and flexible pilot plant. It also describes the plant's technical characteristics and

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF VITRIFIED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB4 WASTE SURROGATE PRODUCED IN COLD CRUCIBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2008-08-05

    Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge batch 4 (SB4) waste surrogate with high aluminum and iron content was vitrified with commercially available Frit 503-R4 (8 wt.% Li{sub 2}O, 16 wt.% B2O3, 76 wt.% SiO{sub 2}) by cold crucible inductive melting using lab- (56 mm inner diameter), bench- (236 mm) and large-scale (418 mm) cold crucible. The waste loading ranged between 40 and 60 wt.%. The vitrified products obtained in the lab-scale cold crucible were nearly amorphous with traces of unreacted quartz in the product with 40 wt.% waste loading and traces of spinel phase in the product with 50 wt.% waste loading. The glassy products obtained in the bench-scale cold crucible are composed of major vitreous and minor iron-rich spinel phase whose content at {approx}60 wt.% waste loading may achieve {approx}10 vol.%. The vitrified waste obtained in the large-scale cold crucible was also composed of major vitreous and minor spinel structure phases. No nepheline phase has been found. Average degree of crystallinity was estimated to be {approx}12 vol.%. Anionic motif of the glass network is built from rather short metasilicate chains and boron-oxygen constituent based on boron-oxygen triangular units.

  9. Vitrification of HLW Produced by Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel Reprocessing in COGEMA's Cold Crucible Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Do Quang, R.; Petitjean, V.; Hollebecque, F.; Pinet, O.; Flament, T.; Prod'homme, A.

    2003-02-25

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel COGEMA (industrial Operator), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and SGN (respectively COGEMA's R&D provider and Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities : the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also being qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed

  10. Summary Of Cold Crucible Vitrification Tests Results With Savannah River Site High Level Waste Surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Marra, James; Lebedev, Vladimir

    2014-01-13

    The cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) technology successfully applied for vitrification of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW) at SIA Radon, Russia, was tested to be implemented for vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) stored at Savannah River Site, USA. Mixtures of Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and 4 (SB4) waste surrogates and borosilicate frits as slurries were vitrified in bench- (236 mm inner diameter) and full-scale (418 mm inner diameter) cold crucibles. Various process conditions were tested and major process variables were determined. Melts were poured into 10L canisters and cooled to room temperature in air or in heat-insulated boxes by a regime similar to Canister Centerline Cooling (CCC) used at DWPF. The products with waste loading from ~40 to ~65 wt.% were investigated in details. The products contained 40 to 55 wt.% waste oxides were predominantly amorphous; at higher waste loadings (WL) spinel structure phases and nepheline were present. Normalized release values for Li, B, Na, and Si determined by PCT procedure remain lower than those from EA glass at waste loadings of up to 60 wt.%.

  11. Application of the Cold Crucible for Melting of UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.W.; Min, B.T.; Shin, Y.S.; Park, I.K.; Kim, J.H.; Song, J.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2002-07-01

    The melting and discharge technique of UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} mixtures using the cold crucible melting method that does not need a separate crucible such as tungsten one with high melting point is developed and applied to the KAERI FCI test called TROI. To discharge the melt from a cold crucible into a fuel-coolant interaction chamber after melting, a plug is specially designed using the concept for electro-magnetic field characteristics so as to as thin as possible the crust that is formed between the melt and plug. Its function keeps the melt in the crucible during melting period and provides the melt discharge path. About 8.5 kg melt is discharged from the cold crucible to the melt-water interaction chamber through the punched hole with 8 cm in diameter. The melt temperature is also measured and analyzed from observation of the melt surface. The power balance using the operating parameters such as current, voltage and coupling factor of R.F generator is analyzed. (authors)

  12. Electromagnetic and Thermal-flow Modeling of a Cold-Wall Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Garnich, Mark R.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.

    2005-02-01

    An approach for modeling cold-wall crucible induction melters is described. Materials in the melt and melter are non-ferromagnetic. In contrast to other modeling works reported in the literature, the numerical models utilize commercial codes. The ANSYS finite element code is employed for electromagnetic field simulations and the STAR-CD finite volume code for thermal-flow calculations. Results from the electromagnetic calculations in the form of local Joule heat and Lorentz force distributions are included as loads in the thermal-flow analysis. This loosely-coupled approach is made possible by the small variation in temperature and, consequently, small variation in electrical properties across the melt as well as the quasi-steady state nature of the thermal flow calculations. A three dimensional finite element grid for electromagnetic calculations is adapted to a similar axisymmetric finite volume grid for data transfer to the thermal-flow model. Results from the electromagnetic model compare well with operational data from a 175 mm diameter melter. Results from the thermal-flow simulation provide insight toward molten metal circulation patterns, temperature variations, and velocity magnitudes. Initial results are included for a model that simulates the formation of a solid (skull) layer on the crucible base and wall. Overall, the modeling approach is shown to produce useful results relating operational parameters to the physics of steady state melter operation.

  13. Cold crucible induction melter test for crystalline ceramic waste form fabrication: A feasibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Jake W.; Marra, James; Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Brinkman, Kyle; Xu, Yun; Tang, Ming; Maio, Vince; Webb, Samuel M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2017-04-01

    The first scaled proof-of-principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test to process a multiphase ceramic waste form from a simulated combined (Cs/Sr, lanthanide and transition metal fission products) commercial used nuclear fuel waste stream was recently conducted in the United States. X-ray diffraction, 2-D X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the fabricated CCIM material. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with a desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Primary hollandite, pyrochlore/zirconolite, and perovskite phases were identified in addition to minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs. The material produced in the CCIM was chemically homogeneous and displayed a uniform phase assemblage with acceptable aqueous chemical durability.

  14. FULL-SCALE COLD CRUCIBLE TEST ON VITRIFICATION OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB4 HLW SURROGATE

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2008-08-05

    The full-scale cold crucible test on vitrification of sludge batch 4 (SB4) Savannah River Site HLW surrogate using a 418 mm inner diameter stainless steel crucible was carried-out for 66 hrs. Commercially available Frit 503-R4 (8 wt.% Li{sub 2}O, 16 wt.% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 76 wt.% SiO{sub 2}) was used as a glass forming additive at a calcine to frit ratio of 1:1 (50 wt.% calcine, 50 wt.% frit). Two portions of slurry prepared from frit and mixture of chemicals simulating waste in amount of {approx}750 kg and from frit and waste surrogate prepared by the SRT-MST-2007-00070 procedure in amount of {approx}1,300 kg with water content of {approx}27 and {approx}50 wt.%, respectively, was processed and {approx}875 kg of the vitrified product in total ({approx}415 + 460 kg) was obtained. Average parameters were as follows: vibration power - 121.6 to 134.1 kW, feed rate (capacity) - 25.1 to 39.8 kg/hr, glass pour rate (productivity) - 14.0 kg/hr specific energy expenses for feed processing - 4.8 to 3.4 kW x hr/kg, specific energy expenses for glass production (melting ratio) - 8.7 to 9.6 kW x hr/kg, specific glass productivity - 2453 kg/(m{sup 2} x d). The product was composed of major vitreous and minor spinel structure phases. No nepheline phase was found. Average degree of crystallinity was estimated to be {approx}12 vol.%. Cesium was found to be the most volatile component (up to {approx}60 wt.% of total). Lithium, sodium and boron are less volatile. Other major feed constituents (Al, Si, Mg, Fe, Mn) were not volatile but their carry-over with gas-vapor flow occurred.

  15. Inductive cold crucible melting and characterization of uranium and thorium bearing murataite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazev, O.A.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Ptashkin, A.G.; Zen'kovskaya, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    Murataite-based ceramics containing 10 wt.% either UO{sub 2} or ThO{sub 2} were produced by inductive cold crucible melting (ICCM) at operating frequencies of 1.76 MHz and 5.28 MHz and examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. High specific productivity was achieved. Average melting ratio was 8.3 kWh/kg. We identified three distinct murataite polytypes in the U-bearing ceramics: a five- (5C), eight- (8C), and three-fold (3C) fluorite unit cell composing respectively the core, intermediate and rim zones of the grains. In contrast, in the Th-bearing ceramic one of the polytypes with eight-fold (8C) fluorite unit cell was found to be prevailing over two others (5C and 3C). Computer simulation of the major reflection due to the murataite phase in the Th-bearing sample also exhibits superposition of peaks due to three distinct polytypes but one of them (8C) is predominant. The core zone of the murataite in the U-bearing specimens is characterized by UO{sub 2} concentrations as high as 12.1 wt%, which successively diminishes in concentration through the intermediate zone to the rim, the latter of which contains 5.2 wt% UO{sub 2}. Thorium distribution within the murataite crystals is more uniform. The other phases found in the ceramics are crichtonite, rutile and traces of perovskite, Fe/Mn titanate ilmenite/pyrophanite, zirconolite, and vitreous phase. The difference in phase composition and actinide partitioning in the ceramics is influenced by synthesis conditions. Thus, application of large-scale cold crucibles is a prospective route for the development of industrial-scale process and technology for ceramization of actinide-bearing HLW. The advantage of this method is production of zoned crystals with the highest concentrations of actinides and rare earth elements in the core, effectively isolating these elements from potential leach solutions. (authors)

  16. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  17. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  18. THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.

    2009-06-30

    The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

  19. Advanced Modeling of Cold Crucible Induction Melting for Process Control and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Roach; D. B. Lopukh; A. P. Martynov; B. S. Polevodov; S. I. Chepluk

    2008-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University “LETI” (ETU) have collaborated on development and validation of an advanced numerical model of the cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) process. This work was conducted in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management Technology and Engineering (EM-20) International Program. The model predicts quasi-steady state temperature distributions, convection cell configurations, and flow field velocities for a fully established melt of low conductivity non-magnetic materials at high frequency operations. The INL/ETU ANSYS© finite element model is unique in that it has been developed specifically for processing borosilicate glass (BSG) and other glass melts. Specifically, it accounts for the temperature dependency of key material properties, some of which change by orders of magnitude within the temperature ranges experienced (temperature differences of 500oC are common) in CCIM processing of glass, including density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and electrical resistivity. These values, and their responses to temperature changes, are keys to understanding the melt characteristics. Because the model has been validated, it provides the capability to conduct parametric studies to understand operational sensitivities and geometry effects. Additionally, the model can be used to indirectly determine difficult to measure material properties at higher temperatures such as resistivity, thermal conductivity and emissivity. The model can also be used to optimize system design and to predict operational behavior for specific materials and system configurations, allowing automated feedback control. This becomes particularly important when designing melter systems for full-scale industrial applications.

  20. Cold Crucible Induction Melter Testing at The Idaho National Laboratory for the Advanced Remediation Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Roach; Nick Soelberg; Mike Ancho; Eric Tchemitcheff; John Richardson

    2009-03-01

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. This paper provides preliminary results of tests using the engineering-scale CCIM test system located at the INL. The CCIM test system was operated continuously over a time period of about 58 hours. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated semi-continuously because the glass drain rate was higher than the glass feedrate. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was

  1. Extended Development Work to Validate a HLW Calcine Waste Form via INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    James A. King; Vince Maio

    2011-09-01

    To accomplish calcine treatment objectives, the Idaho Clean-up Project contractor, CWI, has chosen to immobilize the calcine in a glass-ceramic via the use of a Hot-Isostatic-Press (HIP); a treatment selection formally documented in a 2010 Record of Decision (ROD). Even though the HIP process may prove suitable for the calcine as specified in the ROD and validated in a number of past value engineering sessions, DOE is evaluating back-up treatment methods for the calcine as a result of the technical, schedule, and cost risk associated with the HIPing process. Consequently DOE HQ has requested DOE ID to make INL's bench-scale cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) available for investigating its viability as a process alternate to calcine treatment. The waste form is the key component of immobilization of radioactive waste. Providing a solid, stable, and durable material that can be easily be stored is the rationale for immobilization of radioactive waste material in glass, ceramic, or glass-ceramics. Ceramic waste forms offer an alternative to traditional borosilicate glass waste forms. Ceramics can usually accommodate higher waste loadings than borosilicate glass, leading to smaller intermediate and long-term storage facilities. Many ceramic phases are known to possess superior chemical durability as compared to borosilicate glass. However, ceramics are generally multiphase systems containing many minor phase that make characterization and prediction of performance within a repository challenging. Additionally, the technologies employed in ceramic manufacture are typically more complex and expensive. Thus, many have proposed using glass-ceramics as compromise between in the more inexpensive, easier to characterize glass waste forms and the more durable ceramic waste forms. Glass-ceramics have several advantages over traditional borosilicate glasses as a waste form. Borosilicate glasses can inadvertently devitrify, leading to a less durable product that could crack

  2. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marra, James C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Crawford, Charles L.; Vienna, John D.

    2014-05-22

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphate and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.

  3. GLASS FORMULATION DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER (CCIM) ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - 9208

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J; Amanda Billings, A; David Peeler, D; Michael Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-08-27

    Over the past few years, Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) demonstrations have been completed using SRS sludge batches 2, 3 and 4 (SB2, SB3 and SB4) simulant compositions. These campaigns demonstrated the ability of the CCIM to effectively produce quality glasses at high waste loadings. The current Advanced Remediation Technology (ART) Phase II-A Project is aimed at demonstrating the CCIM technology under representative DWPF flowsheet conditions and to demonstrate extended operations of the melter. A glass composition development effort was completed to identify and recommend a frit composition and sludge batch 4 (SB4) simulant waste loading target for subsequent ART-Phase II-A CCIM demonstration testing. Based on the results of the glass formulation testing, it was recommended that the Frit 503-R6 composition (B{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 14 wt %; Li{sub 2}O = 9 wt %; Na{sub 2}O = 3 wt %; and SiO{sub 2} = 74 wt %) be utilized for the demonstration. Furthermore, a waste loading of 46 wt % was recommended. The recommended frit and waste loading would produce a glass with acceptable durability with a liquidus temperature adequately below the 1250 C nominal CCIM operating temperature. This frit composition and waste loading was found to result in a glass that met CCIM processing requirements for viscosity, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The recommended frit and waste loading level should also provide a buffer for sludge product compositional variation to support the Phase II-A CCIM demonstration.

  4. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; ...

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion willmore » help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.« less

  5. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.

  6. GLASS-CERAMICS IN A COLD-CRUCIBLE MELTER : THE OPTIMUM COMBINATION FOR GREATER WASTE PROCESSING EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    DAY, R.A.; FERENCZY, J.; DRABAREK, E.; ADVOCAT, T.; FILLET, C.; LACOMBE, J.; LADIRAT, C.; VEYER, C.; QUANG, R. DO; THOMASSON, J.

    2003-02-27

    Improving the efficiency of nuclear waste immobilization is constantly desired by all nuclear waste management programs world-wide. For high-level and other waste to be vitrified in traditional ceramic Joule-heated melters operated at temperatures up to 1150 C, process flexibilities including waste loadings are often restricted by this temperature limit as well as the need to consider wasteform corrosion of refractory linings and electrodes. New melter technologies, such as the cold-crucible melter (CCM), enable processing up to significantly higher temperatures free of many of the limitations of conventional melters. Higher processing temperatures open up the way for wider composition and processing envelopes to be considered for the vitrification process, including the possibility for higher waste loadings. In many instances the presence of crystals in the final cooled wasteform is not considered desirable within presently existing glass specifications. For some feed compositions in creased waste loadings can lead to the formation of large amounts of crystals, and thus to a significant departure from the ''glass'' state. Nevertheless it is recognized that, in general, increasing the acceptable volume fractions of crystals in the glass offers the best opportunity to increase waste loading, all other factors being equal. In addition, the deliberate promotion of specific crystalline phases by design may enhance the quality of the wasteform, for example by partitioning a long-lived radionuclide into a very stable crystalline phase, or by depleting the glass in detrimental elements. In order to explore the potential improvements by harnessing the higher achievable processing temperatures and immunity to refractory corrosion available with the cold-crucible melter, and after promising indications for synroc-based matrices, it was decided to investigate the feasibility of designing and producing via melting new high temperature ''glass-ceramic'' wasteforms for high

  7. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, R. K.; Ray, C. S.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Reis, Signo T.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Johnson, Fabienne; Hansen, E. K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2012-01-05

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (~17 wt%) and high alkali (~80 wt%) low activity Hanford waste, known as AZ102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (SO3) content of 21 and 4.2 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7M Na) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090°C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 7 days in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their CCC-treated counterparts met the DOE LAW requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO3 (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium, surrogate for Tc-99, all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition (slurry feed) was melted continuously in the JHM and CCIM, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste.

  8. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters - 12240

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.; Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Vienna, John D.; Sevigny, Gary; Peeler, David; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Hansen, Eric K.; Soelberg, Nick; Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao

    2012-07-01

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (∼17 wt%) and high alkali (∼80 wt%) Hanford low activity waste (LAW), known as AZ-102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ-102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (represented as SO{sub 3}) content of 21 and 4.4 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7 M Na{sup +}) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090 deg. C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 70 hours in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their canister centerline cooled (CCC) counterparts met the requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT) responses in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract. These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO{sub 3} (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium (used as a surrogate for Tc) all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition was melted continuously in a slurry fed JHM and in the US, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste. The following conclusions are drawn from the results of the present work. (1) An iron phosphate composition, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, containing 26 wt% of the simulated high sulfate (17 wt%), high alkali (80 wt%) Hanford AZ-102 LAW meets all the criteria for processing in a JHM and CCIM. This

  9. Feasibility Evaluation and Retrofit Plan for Cold Crucible Induction Melter Deployment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A.B.; Iverson, D.C.; Adkins, B.J.; Tchemitcheff, E.

    2008-07-01

    Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 kHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 deg. C to 200 deg. C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 deg. C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature

  10. FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 8118

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

    2008-02-06

    Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and

  11. FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 8118

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

    2007-11-15

    Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined Joule heated melters. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured

  12. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing

  13. DATA PACKET FOR THE FRIT 202-A11 SB3 GLASS SYSTEM A CANDIDATE FOR THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D; Kevin Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2007-06-13

    A demonstration of the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology is currently planned for the fall of 2007 to assess the potential for attaining higher waste throughputs as compared to joule heated melter technology. The CCIM demonstrations will be based on a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste slurry feed surrogate with a nominal operating temperature of approximately 1250 C (higher temperatures may be used). The waste slurry feed (nominally 45-50 weight percent solids) surrogate will be representative of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) in order to allow a direct comparison to the DWPF joule heated melter performance during processing of this sludge waste. This pilot scale demonstration is being conducted to evaluate performance and to identify potential processing issues with the existing CCIM technology, and it will include characterization of the resultant glass product to ensure current product performance (durability) specifications are met. The information presented in this data packet provides a technical basis from which decisions regarding the melter demonstration can be made. More specifically, the results presented in this report provide technical data on the impact of waste loading (WL) on critical properties of interest--in particular, durability, liquidus temperature, and viscosity. All of the glasses of this study, regardless of heat treatment, were acceptable when their durabilities were compared to those of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. In general, as WL increases, the durabilities for the quenched versions of the glasses tend to decrease due to the changing composition of the glass. For the glasses subjected to the canister centerline cooling (ccc) regime, the durability response appears to be more non-linear as WL increases. At WLs less than 50%, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates the potential for the presence of aegirine and/or nepheline crystalline phases, and when these phases are present, there is a decrease in the

  14. An Unbalanced Crucible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deneen, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Long regarded by the vanguard of America's universities as antiquated and even dangerous, civic education is suddenly fashionable again. With the publication of "A Crucible Moment," a long battle in the culture wars appears to be winding down. It appears that everyone supports civic education today. For the past three decades, the ideal of civic…

  15. "The Crucible" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Margarida C.; Marquis, Leah

    2000-01-01

    Describes a cross-curricular website and curriculum that incorporates traditional teaching methods with advanced technologies and that uses Arthur Miller's play "The Crucible" as its focal point. Discusses advantages of this online curriculum that integrates language arts, literature, social studies, mathematics, technology and the…

  16. Crucibles of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennis, Warren G.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Often, a traumatic event that forces a profound redefinition of the self forges leadership. The stories of a diverse group of business leaders and the "crucible experiences" that shaped them reveal four essential skills: ability to engage others in shared meanings, compelling voice, integrity, and adaptive capacity (applied creativity). (SK)

  17. Mold and Crucible Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-28

    preparation during the IRAD included dry rags for a new crucible, rotary brushed or rotary brushed and wiped with an alchohol dipped rag for used crubibles...yttria systems. Thermodynamic calculations for the boron nitride wash revealed poor stability with uranium. Overall, zirconia washes outperformed the...is thermodynamically unstable in contact with molten uranium, and hence unsuitable as a wash material. 6. There is no advantage to the combined use of

  18. Scandium separation from tungsten crucibles :

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Hess, Ryan Falcone; Neville, Michael Luke; Howard, Panit Clifton

    2013-02-01

    The first step in an attempt to isolate Sco from a Wo crucible was explored by soaking the samples in a series of organic (HOAc) and inorganic (HCl, H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3) acids. All samples, except the HOAc, yielded a powder. The weight loss suggests that HNO3 is the most efficient solvent; however, the powders were tentatively identified by PXRD and found to contain both W and Sc by-products. The higher weight loss may also indicate dissolution of the Wo crucible, which was further evidenced upon visual inspection of the crucible. The H3PO4 acid soak yielded the cleanest removal of Sc from the crucible. More work to understand the separation of the Sco from the Wo crucible is necessary but the acid routes appear to hold promise under not as of yet established criteria.

  19. Directly Susceptible, Noncarbon Composite Crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, Cressie E.,Jr.; Kiggans, James O., Jr.; Morrow, Marvin S.; Rexford, Donald

    1998-11-25

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  20. Quench Crucibles Reinforced with Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Carrasquillo, Edgar; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKehnie, N.

    2008-01-01

    Improved crucibles consisting mainly of metal-reinforced ceramic ampules have been developed for use in experiments in which material specimens are heated in the crucibles to various high temperatures, then quenched by, for example, plunging the crucibles into water at room temperature. In a traditional quench crucible, the gap between the ampule and the metal cartridge impedes the transfer of heat to such a degree that the quench rate (the rate of cooling of the specimen) can be too low to produce the desired effect in the specimen. One can increase the quench rate by eliminating the metal cartridge to enable direct quenching of the ampule, but then the thermal shock of direct quenching causes cracking of the ampule. In a quench crucible of the present improved type, there is no gap and no metal cartridge in the traditional sense. Instead, there is an overlay of metal in direct contact with the ampule, as shown on the right side of the figure. Because there is no gap between the metal overlay and the ampule, the heat-transfer rate can be much greater than it is in a traditional quench crucible. The metal overlay also reinforces the ampule against cracking.

  1. Cermet crucible for metallurgical processing

    DOEpatents

    Boring, Christopher P.

    1995-01-01

    A cermet crucible for metallurgically processing metals having high melting points comprising a body consisting essentially of a mixture of calcium oxide and erbium metal, the mixture comprising calcium oxide in a range between about 50 and 90% by weight and erbium metal in a range between about 10 and 50% by weight.

  2. Cermet crucible for metallurgical processing

    DOEpatents

    Boring, C.P.

    1995-02-14

    A cermet crucible is disclosed for metallurgically processing metals having high melting points comprising a body consisting essentially of a mixture of calcium oxide and erbium metal, the mixture comprising calcium oxide in a range between about 50 and 90% by weight and erbium metal in a range between about 10 and 50% by weight.

  3. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Morrow, S. Marvin; Rexford, Donald

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  4. Rotatable crucible for rapid solidification process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for producing filament, fiber, ribbon or film from a molten material, comprising a preferably heat extracting crucible which contains a pool of molten material at a selected horizontal level in the pool. The crucible has an opening extending from above the free surface level to a bottom edge of the opening, the bottom edge being sufficiently below the free surface level so that the molten material cannot form and hold a meniscus by surface tension between the edge and the level of the free surface and further comprises a heat extracting substrate laterally disposed with respect to the crucible and which rotates about an axis of rotation. The substrate is positioned adjacent the edge of the opening which confines the molten material and prevents it from overflowing downwardly out of the crucible. The invention features rotating means which includes a first drive means for tiltably rotating the crucible about an axis of rotation which is coaxial with the axis of rotation of the substrate, so the crucible edge can be maintained a predetermined constant distance from the substrate. The distance chosen is suitable for depositing molten material on the substrate and the apparatus also has a second drive means which is drivingly connected to the substrate for continuously moving the surface of the substrate upwardly past the edge and a melt front formed at the interface of the molten material and the substrate surface.

  5. Thermal Shock-Resistant Composite Crucible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geringer, H. J.; Jeck, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Heating rates of 350 degrees F per minute have not caused cracking. Surrounding inner crucible is annulus of loosely packed alumina powder, which serves as compressible insulating material. Second annulus consisting of section of fused-quartz tubing surrounds and retains alumina powder. Quartz tube held in place by refractory cement helps to contain alumina powder. Small holes in upper ring of cement allow alumina powder to outgas during operation in vacuum. Originally intended for use in Chill Block Melt Spinning (CBMS) apparatus, crucible adaptable to other operations involving rapid self-induction heating of metallic charges.

  6. North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  7. Crystal-Growing Crucible To Suppress Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1986-01-01

    Platform under growth region stabilizes melt for more uniform crystal growth. In new crucible, platform just below growth interface so melt is too shallow to support convection. Critical depth for onset of pertinent instability calculated from heat flux through surface of melt, volume coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and kinematic viscosity.

  8. Gas-Bearing Crucible for Shot Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1983-01-01

    Device protects molten drops from contamination and distortion. Gas flowing through levitator tube levitates small balls while they melt. Gas heated by filament extending through center of tube. Gas bearing crucible on tube has concave configuration to hold single relatively large ball or many recesses to hold many small balls. By time spheres reach foam, they are cooled sufficiently by radiation to retain their shape.

  9. Method of melting metals to reduce contamination from crucibles

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.; Wigginton, Hubert L.

    1977-01-01

    Contamination of metals from crucible materials during melting operations is reduced by coating the interior surface of the crucible with a ceramic non-reactive with the metallic charge and disposing a metal liner formed from a portion of the metallic charge within the coated crucible. The liner protects the ceramic coating during loading of the remainder of the charge and expands against the ceramic coating during heat-up to aid in sintering the coating.

  10. Study, Design and Fabricate a Cold Crucible System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-31

    oscillator plate current as the feedback signal. The response time of the control system was appre- cimately 2 seconds; however, Ehe theruial time constant...relted has a conductivity vs. temperature profile as shown in Figurt- I for A1203( 3 1 the dramatic change in conductivity (over 2 orders of magnr’ude...Products, Ltd., 99.997 purity) added to prevent the destructive phase change (cubic to tetragonal rev monot.linic) which occurs during the high

  11. Making rhyolite in a basalt crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has long attracted the attention of those concerned with the origin of rhyolitic magmas and indeed of granitic continental crust, because it presents no alternative for such magmas other than deriving them from a basaltic source. Hydrothermally altered basalt has been identified as the progenitor. The fact that rhyolite erupts as pure liquid requires a process of melt-crustal separation that is highly efficient despite the high viscosity of rhyolite melt. Volcanoes in Iceland are foci of basaltic magma injection along the divergent plate boundary. Repeated injection produces remelting, digestion, and sometimes expulsion or lateral withdrawal of material resulting in a caldera, a "crucible" holding down-dropped and interlayered lava flows, tephras, and injected sills. Once melting of this charge begins, a great deal of heat is absorbed in the phase change. Just 1% change in crystallinity per degree gives a melt-present body an effective heat capacity >5 times the subsolidus case. Temperature is thus buffered at the solidus and melt composition at rhyolite. Basalt inputs are episodic ("fires") so likely the resulting generation of rhyolite by melting is too. If frequent enough to offset cooling between events, rhyolite melt extractions will accumulate as a rhyolite magma reservoir rather than as discrete crystallized sills. Evidently, such magma bodies can survive multiple firings without themselves erupting, as the 1875 eruption of Askja Caldera of 0.3 km3 of rhyolite equilibrated at 2-km depth without previous leakage over a ten-millennium period and the surprise discovery of rhyolite magma at 2-km depth in Krafla suggest. Water is required for melting; otherwise melting cannot begin at a temperature lower than that of the heat source. Because the solubility of water in melt is pressure-dependent and almost zero at surface pressure, there must be a minimum depth at which basalt-induced melting can occur and a rhyolite reservoir sustained. In practice, the

  12. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1996-01-09

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation. 9 figs.

  13. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation.

  14. Honing Emotional Intelligence with Game-Based Crucible Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybourn, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the present paper is the design of multi-player role-playing game instances as crucible experiences for the exploration of one's emotional intelligence. Subsequent sections describe the design of game-based, intercultural crucible experiences and how this design was employed for training with members of the United States Marine Corps…

  15. The Alexandrian Library: crucible of a renaissance.

    PubMed

    Chapman, P H

    2001-07-01

    At the end of the 4th century BC, the Macedonian-Greek armies of Alexander the Great swept across Asia from Egypt to the Indus River, redefining political boundaries within that vast territory at a time when important cultural changes were also taking place in the Greek world. New literary forms were beginning to emerge from the classical literature, which was then the subject of scholarly investigation. There was growing curiosity about the physical world and mathematics. Aristotle and his contemporaries were redefining scholarship at a time when Alexander was redefining the political sphere. These remarkable transformations converged in Alexandria, which became the center of a new intellectual universe. The first Ptolemaic rulers founded two unique institutions--the Alexandrian Library and the Mouseion--and the Library became the crucible within which the Hellenistic renaissance was forged.

  16. Mutiple Czochralski growth of silicon crystals from a single crucible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, R. L.; Kachare, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for the Czochralski growth of silicon crystals is presented which is capable of producing multiple ingots from a single crucible. The growth chamber features a refillable crucible with a water-cooled, vacuum-tight isolation valve located between the pull chamber and the growth furnace tank which allows the melt crucible to always be at vacuum or low argon pressure when retrieving crystal or introducing recharge polysilicon feed stock. The grower can thus be recharged to obtain 100 kg of silicon crystal ingots from one crucible, and may accommodate crucibles up to 35 cm in diameter. Evaluation of the impurity contents and I-V characteristics of solar cells fabricated from seven ingots grown from two crucibles reveals a small but consistent decrease in cell efficiency from 10.4% to 9.6% from the first to the fourth ingot made in a single run, which is explained by impurity build-up in the residual melt. The crystal grower thus may offer economic benefits through the extension of crucible lifetime and the reduction of furnace downtime.

  17. Fabrication method produces high-grade alumina crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmour, H.

    1965-01-01

    Alumina-binder mixture, which has been dry pressed in a die using a mating punch, forms crucibles of various configurations and after firing results in a ceramic structure for use in diffusion experiments.

  18. 11. GASFIRED CRUCIBLE FURNACES WERE USED TO MELT SMALL, BATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GAS-FIRED CRUCIBLE FURNACES WERE USED TO MELT SMALL, BATCH QUANTITIES OF BRONZE IN STOCKHAM'S BRASS FOUNDRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF BRONZE VALVES, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. METHOD OF PROTECTING TANTALUM CRUCIBLES AGAINST REACTION WITH MOLTEN URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

    1960-08-16

    Tantalum crucibles against reaction with molten uranium by contacting the surfaces to be protected with metallic boron (as powder, vapor, or suspension in a liquid-volatilenonreacting medium, such as acetone and petroleum oil) at about 1800 deg C in vacuum, discontinuing contact with the boron, and heating the crucibles to a temperature of between 1800 aad 2000 deg C, whereby the tantalum boride formed in the first heating step is converted to tantalum monoboride.

  20. State-of-the-art in Manufacturing Pyrochemical Processing Crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, David Allen

    2016-05-03

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been purifying plutonium through pyrochemical processing for many years. The harsh environments involved with the pyrochemical processes include high temperatures (700-900 °C), molten salts and reactive metals (MgCl2, PuCl3, NaCl-KCl, CaCl2, Pu, Ca), and chlorine gas. Because of these corrosive conditions, designing and developing the pyrochemical processing equipment has always been an intriguing technical challenge. In this article I focus on the design and development of the pyrochemical processing crucible for the electrorefining (ER) process, applying design for manufacturability principles throughout the process. I review the current crucible design and electrorefining process and explore possibilities of making the crucible as one part, building the anode and cathode into the crucible, and various material of construction improvements. Materials of construction that should be reviewed further include alumina, silicon nitride, and a tantalum carbon alloy. I briefly review the application of three-dimensional (3D) printing to the process of producing the ER crucible, including thermoplastic 3D printing and mechanical property concerns. I finish by summarizing current plans and possibilities of improving the ER crucible.

  1. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growthmore » in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.« less

  2. Crucible-free pulling of germanium crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünscher, Michael; Lüdge, Anke; Riemann, Helge

    2011-03-01

    Commonly, germanium crystals are grown after the Czochralski (CZ) method. The crucible-free pedestal and floating zone (FZ) methods, which are widely used for silicon growth, are hardly known to be investigated for germanium. The germanium melt is more than twice as dense as liquid silicon, which could destabilize a floating zone. Additionally, the lower melting point and the related lower radiative heat loss is shown to reduce the stability especially of the FZ process with the consequence of a screw-like crystal growth. We found that the lower heat radiation of Ge can be compensated by the increased convective cooling of a helium atmosphere instead of the argon ambient. Under these conditions, the screw-like growth could be avoided. Unfortunately, the helium cooling deteriorates the melting behavior of the feed rod. Spikes appear along the open melt front, which touch on the induction coil. In order to improve the melting behavior, we used a lamp as a second energy source as well as a mixture of Ar and He. With this, we found a final solution for growing stable crystals from germanium by using both gases in different parts of the furnace. The experimental work is accompanied by the simulation of the stationary temperature field. The commercially available software FEMAG-FZ is used for axisymmetric calculations. Another tool for process development is the lateral photo-voltage scanning (LPS), which can determine the shape of the solid-liquid phase boundary by analyzing the growth striations in a lateral cut of a grown crystal. In addition to improvements of the process, these measurements can be compared with the calculated results and, hence, conduce to validate the calculation.

  3. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  4. Inconel crucibles - an alternative to quartz glass crucibles when analysing problematic samples by EA-IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen; Neal, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Anecdotal evidence as well as observations made in our own stable isotope laboratory suggest for samples with either a high halogen content (such as marine samples) or a high carbon and oxygen content (such as carbohydrates) to result in flash combustion temperatures exceeding temperature or burn time or both of flash combustion under typical conditions. Whatever the exact circumstances during combustion of such samples, they weaken the wall of the quartz glass reactors in the combustion zone and ultimately lead to pin-prick holes being formed through which carrier gas escapes thus resulting in a dramatic loss of carrier gas flow. Occasionally these pin-prick holes get plugged or "sealed" by molten tin thus restoring carrier gas flow but at the other end of the spectrum these pin-prick holes can become so wide for molten tin being able to pass through and to run down the outside of the reactor tube. In the latter event, a catastrophic failure of the reactor tube is inevitable with carrier gas flow downstream of the holes dropping to almost zero. While pin-prick holes (going unnoticed during an autosampler run of a large batch of samples) typically result in the loss of 3 or 4 samples until the hole/s "self-sealed" with molten tin, in a worst case scenario a catastrophic failure of the reactor tube can result in the loss of 40 or more samples (depending on number of samples in a batch run and when the failure occurred). Here we present examples of combustion reactor failure as well as observations made with crucibles made of quartz glass, stainless steel or inconel alloy during experiments to see if crucible design can mitigate against the effects of problematic samples.

  5. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  6. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  7. North façade of crucible steel building; looking southwest Bethlehem ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North façade of crucible steel building; looking southwest - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  8. Better VPS Fabrication of Crucibles and Furnace Cartridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Zimmerman, Frank R.; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation has shown that by (1) vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) of suitable refractory metal alloys on graphite mandrels, and then (2) heat-treating the VPS alloy deposits under suitable conditions, it is possible to fabricate improved crucibles and furnace cartridges that could be used at maximum temperatures between 1,400 and 1,600 C and that could withstand chemical attack by the materials to be heated in the crucibles and cartridges. Taken by itself, the basic concept of fabricating furnace cartridges by VPS of refractory materials onto graphite mandrels is not new; taken by itself, the basic concept of heat treatment of VPS deposits for use as other than furnace cartridges is also not new; however, prior to this investigation, experimental crucibles and furnace cartridges fabricated by VPS had not been heat treated and had been found to be relatively weak and brittle. Accordingly, the investigation was directed toward determining whether certain combinations of (1) refractory alloy compositions, (2) VPS parameters, and (3) heat-treatment parameters could result in VPS-fabricated components with increased ductility.

  9. Development of a Ceramic-Lined Crucible for the Separation of Salt from Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Brian R.; Marsden, K. C.; Price, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at the Idaho National Laboratory, alternate crucible materials are being developed for the processing of uranium and salt. The separation of salt (LiCl/KCl based) from uranium is performed in an inductively heated furnace capable of distillation under vacuum conditions. Historically, salt and uranium have been processed in graphite crucibles coated with a zirconia mold wash. Although the coated crucibles have performed adequately considering the reactive nature of salt and uranium at high temperature, the operations required for multiple use of the crucibles are quite labor intensive. Thus, an alternate ceramic-lined crucible has been developed to simplify remote operations. Two ceramic-lined crucibles have been tested using irradiated materials to verify their compatibility and determine an ultimate life cycle. Although minor process losses and crucible deterioration have occurred with the ceramic-lined crucibles, the overall performance of the crucibles has been adequate for the separation of salt during uranium processing.

  10. Chemical bulk properties of multicrystalline silicon ingots for solar cells cast in silicon nitride crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, C.; Di Sabatino, M.; Syvertsen, M.; Arnberg, L.

    2012-09-01

    Silicon nitride is an alternative material to the widely used silica crucibles for directional solidification of mc-Si ingots, its main advantages being the reusability in successive castings and elimination for a source for oxygen contamination of the ingot. In this work, several ingots were cast in these crucibles and compared to reference ingots cast in silica crucibles. The thermal properties of the Si3N4 crucible differ from those of the SiO2 crucible and lead to a different thermal history during melting and casting. The oxygen contamination of the ingot was observed to depend mainly on the melting and holding temperature, rather than on the crucible material. The lowest oxygen concentration was observed in the ingots with the lowest melting temperature. However, the thermal properties of the Si3N4 crucible influence the oxygen profile along ingot height, with a faster decrease in the concentration with increasing ingot height. This is believed to be due to a different mechanism for oxygen transport compared to that of the silica crucibles. The concentration of dopants in the ingots showed that contamination from the Si3N4 crucible occurred, probably due to diffusion of B- and P-oxides into the Si melt.

  11. The use of self heating'' ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  12. The use of ``self heating`` ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-12-31

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  13. Induction furnace testing of the durability of prototype crucibles in a molten metal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.

    2005-09-01

    Engineered ceramic crucibles are commonly used to contain molten metal. Besides high temperature stability, other desired crucible characteristics include thermal shock resistance, minimal reaction with the molten metal and resistance to attack from the base metal oxide formed during melting. When used in an induction furnace, they can be employed as a “semi-permanent” crucible incorporating a dry ram backup and a ceramic cap. This report covers several 250-lb single melt crucible tests in an air melt induction furnace. These tests consisted of melting a charge of 17-4PH stainless steel, holding the charge molten for two hours before pouring off the heat and then subsequently sectioning the crucible to review the extent of erosion, penetration and other physical characteristics. Selected temperature readings were made throughout each melt. Chemistry samples were also taken from each heat periodically throughout the hold. The manganese level was observed to affect the rate of chromium loss in a non-linear fashion.

  14. Measurement of Moisture Content in Sand, Slag, and Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1999-09-20

    The deinventory process at Rocky Flats (RFETS) has included moisture content measurements of sand, slag, and crucible (SSC) materials by performing weight loss measurements at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius on representative samples prior to packaging for shipment. Shipping requirements include knowledge of the moisture content. Work at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) showed that the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius did not account for all of the moisture. The objective of the work in this report was to determine if the measurement at 210 degrees - 220 degrees Celsius at RFETS could be used to set upper bounds on moisture content and therefore, eliminate the need for RFETS to unpack, reanalyze and repack the material.

  15. Characterization of gallium telluride crystals grown from graphite crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Hayes, Timothy; Muzykov, Peter G.; Krishna, Ramesh; Das, Sandip; Sudarshan, Tangali S.; Ma, Shuguo

    2010-08-01

    In this work we investigated a new method of growing detector grade large GaTe layered chalcogenide single crystals. GaTe ingots (2" in diameter and about 10 cm in length) were grown by a novel method using graphite crucible by slow crystallization from melt of high purity (7N) Ga and Te precursors in argon atmosphere. GaTe samples from the monocrystalline area of the ingot have been cleaved mechanically and characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis by x-rays (EDAX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), xray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission line matrix method (TLM), resistivity measurements using van der Pauw technique, Hall Effect and Capacitance-Voltage measurements. Our investigations reveal high potential for developing superior quality GaTe crystals using this growth technique for growing large volume inexpensive GaTe single crystals for nuclear radiation detectors.

  16. Tolerance requirements to prevent fluid leakage in the crucible/plunger MEA experiment MPS 770030

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathz, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Molten Al-In leaked unexpectedly out of the crucible of a proposed MEA materials processing in space experiment. The molten metals use a spring loaded plunger to eliminate most free surfaces. The critical criteria necessary to initiate flow and the rate of fluid flow into the crucible/plunger annulus is calculated. Experimental in situ X-radiographs are interpreted according to the calculations. A note on possible effects of capillary flow if wetting occurs between crucible/plunger and liquids is included.

  17. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  18. Method of Fabricating Protective Coating for a Crucible with the Coating Having Channels Formed Therein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is provided for the fabrication of a protective coating for a crucible with channels being formed in the coating. A material is adhered to the outer wall of the crucible to form a pattern thereon. The outer wall of the crucible along with the pattern of material adhered thereto is next coated with another material. The material used to form the pattern should extend through the outer material coating to define at least one port therein. Next, the crucible with its pattern of material and outer coating material is heated to a temperature of transformation at which the pattern of material is transformed to a fluidic state while the crucible and outer coating material maintain their solid integrity. Such transformation could also be accomplished by using a solvent that causes the pattern of material to dissolve. Finally, the material in its fluidic state is removed via the at least one port formed in the outer material coating thereby leaving channels defined in the coating adjacent the outer wall of the crucible.

  19. Growth of multicrystalline silicon in a cone-shaped crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, E.; Poklad, A.; Heinze, V.; Meier, D.; Pätzold, O.; Stelter, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a novel, vertical Bridgman-type technique for growing multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) ingots in an induction furnace is described. In contrast to conventional growth, a modified setup with a cone-shaped crucible and susceptor is used for the first time. The temperature field and melt flow in the modified setup are calculated numerically and compared with the situation in a cylindrical standard setup. A cone-shaped mc-Si ingot is presented and analyzed with focus on the microstructure (inclusions, dislocations, grains) and the minority carrier lifetime, which are compared with the properties of a cylindrical ingot grown under similar conditions. Results of numerical simulations and growth experiments are discussed with respect to the influence of the cone-shaped setup on the temperature and flow fields in the melt, as well as on the microstructure and the minority carrier lifetime in the crystal. They indicate the potential of the novel technology to produce mc-Si ingots with a globular grain structure, low dislocation density, and high carrier lifetime.

  20. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C

    2008-07-31

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble

  1. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

    2008-09-19

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble

  2. Using an induction melter with a cold crucible for the immobilization of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnikov, V.V.; Matiunin, Yu.I.; Smelova, T.V.

    1996-05-01

    This report evaluates the possibilities for immobilizing weapons-grade plutonium in glass-type materials that satisfy requirements for eventual burial in deep geologic repositories and correspond to the standards set for spent fuel.

  3. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  4. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Henry C., III; Probst, Hubert B.

    1988-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloys with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liqud phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  5. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, H. C., III; Probst, H. B.

    1989-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloy with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liquid phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  6. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  7. Comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite crucibles for boron doped silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2012-11-15

    This article reports on the comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite as crucible liners in a high-temperature effusion cell used for boron doping in silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis indicates decomposition of the beryllium oxide liner, leading to significant incorporation of beryllium and oxygen in the grown films. The resulting films are of poor crystal quality with rough surfaces and broad x-ray diffraction peaks. Alternatively, the use of pyrolytic graphite crucible liners results in higher quality films.

  8. Boron and Zirconium from Crucible Refractories in a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1958-01-01

    In a laboratory study of the factors involved in the influence of induction vacuum melting on 55ni-20cr-15co-4mo-3ti-3al heat resistant alloy, it was found that the major factor was the type of ceramic used as the crucible. The study concluded that trace amounts of boron or zirconium derived from reaction of the melt with the crucible refactories improved creep-rupture properties at 1,600 degrees F. Boron was most effective and, in addition, markedly improved hot-workability.

  9. Formation process of Si3N4 particles on surface of Si ingots grown using silica crucibles with Si3N4 coating by noncontact crucible method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Morishita, Kohei; Murai, Ryota; Usami, Noritaka

    2014-03-01

    A noncontact crucible method was used to investigate the process by which a Si3N4 coating material forms Si3N4 particles or precipitates on the surface of Si melts and ingots. Si ingots were grown using crucibles with and without a mixture of α- and β-Si3N4 particles. The oxygen and nitrogen concentrations in the ingots were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry analysis. The nitrogen concentration in the ingots grown using crucibles with a Si3N4 coating was significantly higher than that in ingots grown using crucibles without a Si3N4 coating because the nitrogen from the Si3N4 coating material dissolved into the Si melt. From orientation image maps analyzed using electron backscattering diffraction patterns of SixNy particles on the surface of the ingots, it was clarified that most of the SixNy particles were β-Si3N4. This was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The Si3N4 particles on the surface of the ingots had several morphologies such as needle-like, columnar, leaf-like, and hexagonal structures. There were two cases in which floating Si3N4 particles were formed on the surface of the Si melts, i.e., the removal and dissolution of the Si3N4 coating material. The removed or dissolved Si3N4 coating materials, which consisted of a mixture of α- and β-Si3N4 particles, are considered to have finally changed into β-Si3N4 in the form of transformers or precipitates on the surface of the Si melt, and these β-Si3N4 particles became attached to the surface of the ingots.

  10. Controlling the leakage of liquid bismuth cathode elements in ceramic crucibles used for the electrowinning process in pyroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Il-Soon; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2016-09-01

    Pyroprocessing has shown promise as an alternative to wet processing for the recycling of transuranics with a high proliferation resistance. However, a critical issue for pyroprocessing is the ceramic crucibles used in the electrowinning process. These ceramic crucibles are frequently damaged by thermal stress, which results in significant volumes of crucible waste that must be properly disposed. Transuranic waste (TRU) elements intrude throughout the pores of a damaged crucible. The volume of generated radioactive waste is a concern when dealing with nuclear power plants and decontamination issues. In this study, laser treatment and sintering were performed on the crucibles to minimize the TRU elements trapped within. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to measure the intrusion depth of Li in the surface-treated ceramics.

  11. Development of a metal ceramic composite crucible. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0079

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, M.S.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Rexford, D.; Rausch, J.J.

    1995-09-30

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) has been a three-year collaboration among the Y-12 Plant Development Division, Blasch Precision Ceramics, Inc., and Surface Alloys, Inc. The purpose of the CRADA was to evaluate the production of a totally new crucible that would be noncarbon and that could perform like graphite. The effort required materials fabricated into a workable crucible. The goal was to produce a crucible that could be induction heated and allow melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon contamination. The US Department of Energy programs involving casting uranium and its alloys have long been concerned with reducing deleterious carbon pickup that results from the use of graphite crucibles. Therefore, the results of this CRADA provide an alternative that can eliminate carbon pickup from the graphite crucible.

  12. Wootz: Erroneous Transliteration of Sanskrit " Utsa" used for Indian Crucible Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    The terminology Wootz for the legendary Indian crucible steel was first introduced by Helenus Scott in his letter to Joseph Banks, the then President of the Royal Society, London, in 1794. He stated several salient features of this steel in his letter. During the period 1794-1796, Banks received approximately 200 lbs. of this steel from Scott. Banks assigned several professionals to carry out experimental work on Indian crucible steel. One such important person was the famous surgical instrument maker, cutler and metallurgist of his time, James Stodart. Stodart experimented extensively with the Indian crucible steel, and was its great admirer. It has been shown, along with corroborative documentary evidence, that the original word for this steel was Sanskrit word " utsa". This was erroneously transliterated in Roman script as Wootz by Scott in his letter to Banks. It was James Stodart, who preserved the Sanskrit word " utsa" written in Devanāgarī script on his trade card for future generation. The reason for using this word for the Indian crucible steel has also been discussed.

  13. The Crucible of Classroom Practice: Alchemy and Early Professional Learning in Secondary English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the metaphor of the classroom as a "crucible" for early professional learning where beginning teachers forge professional identities in complex, unpredictable, paradoxical, affectively and physically potent contexts of practice. It works into the dissonances and contradictions of the micro-narratives embedded in the…

  14. Crucible cast from beryllium oxide and refractory cement is impervious to flux and molten metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrzebski, Z. D.

    1966-01-01

    Crucible from a mixture of a beryllium oxide aggregate and hydraulic refractory cement, and coated with an impervious refractory oxide will not deteriorate in the presence of fused salt- molten metal mixtures such as uranium- magnesium-zinc-halide salt systems. Vessels cast by this process are used in the flux reduction of oxides of thorium and uranium.

  15. Contributions of Interdisciplinary Studies to Civic Learning: An Addendum to "A Crucible Moment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Though overlooked or at best implicit in "A Crucible Moment," interdisciplinary studies has much to contribute to civic learning for democratic engagement. The article organizes those contributions into the report's categories of knowledge, values, and skills. It concludes with an example of how techniques used in interdisciplinary…

  16. UV-transmitting step-index fluorophosphate glass fiber fabricated by the crucible technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleani, Gustavo; Ledemi, Yannick; de Lima Filho, Elton Soares; Morency, Steeve; Delaizir, Gaëlle; Chenu, Sébastien; Duclere, Jean René; Messaddeq, Younes

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we report on the fabrication process of highly pure step-index fluorophosphate glass optical fibers by a modified crucible technique. High-purity fluorophosphate glasses based on 10 mol% of barium metaphosphate and 90 mol% of metal fluorides (AlF3sbnd CaF2sbnd MgF2sbnd SrF2) have been studied in order to produce step-index optical fibers transmitting in the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) region. The characteristic temperatures, viscosity around softening temperature and optical transmission in the UV-visible region of the prepared bulk glasses were characterized in a first step. The selected glass compositions were then used to prepare core-cladding optical preforms by using a modified built-in casting technique. While uncontrolled crystallization of the fiber was observed during the preform stretching by using the conventional method, we successfully obtained crystal-free fiber by using a modified crucible technique. In this alternative approach, the produced core-cladding preforms were inserted into a home-designed fused silica crucible assembly and heated at 643 °C to allow glass flowing throughout the crucible, preventing the formation of crystals. Single index fluorophosphate glass fibers were fabricated following the same process as well. The optical attenuation at 244 nm and in the interval 350-1750 nm was measured on both single index and step-index optical fibers. Their potential for using in DUV applications is discussed.

  17. Beware the Loss of Conscience: "The Crucible" as Warning for Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerjak, Judith A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the political relevance of Miller's play about Salem witch trials to (1) the McCarthy era hearings, and (2) current cases between religious fundamentalists and school curriculum boards. Summarizes the history of these events and relates them to an interpretation of "The Crucible." (JG)

  18. Effect of Feeding Rate on the Cold Cap Configuration in a Laboratory-Scale Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-02-25

    High level waste melter feed is converted into glass in a joule heated melter, where it forms a floating layer of reacting feed, called the cold cap. After the glass-forming phase becomes connected, evolving gases produce bubbles that form a foam layer under the cold cap. The bubbles coalesce into cavities that escape around the edges of the cold cap. The foam layer insulates the cold cap from the heat transferred from the molten glass below. More information is needed about the formation and behavior of the foam layer to control, limit and possibly avoid foaming, thus allowing for a higher rate of melting. The cold cap behavior was investigated in a laboratory scale assembly with a sealed silica-glass crucible. A high alumina waste simulant was fed into the crucible and the feed charging rate was varied from 3 to 7 mL min-1. After a fixed amount of time (35 min), feed charging was stopped and the crucible was removed from the furnace and quenched on a copper block to preserve the structure of the cold cap and foam during cooling. During the rapid quenching, thermal cracking of the glass and cold cap allowed it to be broken up into sections for analysis. The effect of the charging rate on the height, area and volume of the cold cap was determined. The size of the bubbles collected in the foam layer under the cold cap increased as the cold cap expanded. Under the cold cap, the bubbles coalesced into oblong cavities. These cavities allowed the evolved gases to escape around the edges of the cold cap through the molten glass into the melter plenum.

  19. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  20. An historical mullite fiber-reinforced ceramic composite: Characterization of the wootz' crucible refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, T.L. ); Merk, N.; Thomas, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Since at least the sixteenth century, the wootz'' ultra-high carbon white cast-iron ingot was produced in India by melting or carburising iron in a crucible. This ingot was forced into sword blades of so-called Damascus steel. The charged crucible was fired in a long (24-hour) single cycle at high temperature (1150-1250{degree}C) in a strongly reducing atmosphere. Raw materials for the refractory vessel are clay and coked'' rice husks. At high temperatures, two phases reinforce the glassy matrix: cristobalite relics of rice husks and a network of mullite crystals. This paper characterizes the microstructure and chemistry of the mullite network in the glassy matrix by means of a combination of techniques: optical microscopy, XRD, SEM, TEM and EDS, and HREM. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Development of a plasma coating system for induction melting zirconium in a graphite crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1993-05-26

    A plasma coating system has been developed for induction melting zirconium at 1900 C using a graphite crucible. This laminated coating system consists of plasma spraying the following materials onto the graphite: (1) molybdenum or tungsten, (2) a 50% blend by weight of the metal powder and calcia-stabilized zirconium oxide, and (3) calcia-stabilized zirconia followed by painting a final coating of nonstabilized zirconia on top of the plasma-sprayed coating system. Zirconium was melted in argon using both laminating systems without any degradation of the graphite crucible and with only a minimal amount of carbon absorption. This novel approach that is being proposed as an alternative method of melting zirconium alloys offers substantial cost savings over the standard practice of electric arc melting using a consumable electrode.

  2. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  3. Investigation of crucible materials in gradient freeze gallium arsenide crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    Undoped synthesized GaAs and crystals grown by the gradient freeze method were analyzed by room temperature Hall effect for net carrier density, secondary ion mass spectroscopy for Si and residual impurity concentrations, localized vibrational mode spectroscopy for C concentration, and optical absorption for neutral EL2 concentration. Impurity compensation was examined to determine limits for Si content in semi-insulating GaAs. Boules synthesized in various materials are used to determine the residual impurity densities contributing to compensation. Shallow donor densities below the residual acceptor concentration resulted in semi-insulating electronic properties for two synthesis boules. The Si incorporation rate in gradient freeze crystals is quantified through the deviation of net donor concentration from the normal freeze distribution. Crystals grown As-rich, Ga-rich and near-stoichiometric composition in SiO/sub 2/ crucibles show order-of-magnitude differences of Si incorporation rate. Crystals grown in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and graphite crucibles have <10/sup -2/ and >3 times the incorporation rates of gradient freeze GaAs grown in SiO/sub 2/ crucibles. Crystals grown in a vertical gradient freeze configuration have <1/7 the incorporation rate of those grown horizontally. A vapor mechanism for incorporation of Si is indicated that contributes enough Si to preclude semi-insulating properties. At high values of net donor density, an acceptor density is seen that may be of native defect origin and is positively correlated with net donor density. 63 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Simple and quick enhancement of SiC bulk crystal growth using a newly developed crucible material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    Newly developed highly reliable low-cost TaC-coated graphite materials prepared by a wet ceramic process were applied to SiC sublimation growth. We demonstrated an increased long-duration growth rate and a resultant increase in crystal size by a factor of ∼1.2 (experimental value) after 24 h of growth [and ∼1.5 (extrapolated value) after the optimum duration of 53.1 h] by simply and quickly replacing graphite crucibles with TaC-coated graphite crucibles. Growth with the TaC-coated graphite crucibles reduced source gas leakage and increased the material yield for single crystals because the TaC layers were gas-tight and had a low emissivity.

  5. Apparatus and method for the horizontal, crucible-free growth of silicon sheet crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for crucible-free growth of a sheet crystal of silicon, the apparatus comprising; means for providing a substantially enclosed space having an inert atmosphere; heating means for sequentially forming molten silicon from a source of substantially pure silicon within the space; means for vertically feeding a silicon source toward the heating means to form a molten layer of silicon at a top of the source; means for drawing a continuous silicon sheet crystal from the molten silicon layer within the space; wherein a meniscus of molten silicon is created by the drawing means. The apparatus includes means to control the shape of the meniscus, and the controlling means includes a repulsive RF generator for repulsive support of the meniscus as a molten silicon sheet crystal is drawn from the molten silicon. A crucible-free, non-dendritic growth method is described for continuously forming a silicon crystal sheet from a rod of substantially pure silicon, the method comprising: employing an RF heating means having first and second portions to provide a molten layer at an end of the silicon rod in an inert atmosphere by actively heating a first region at the end of the silicon rod while preventing an active heating of a second region of the end of the silicon rod.

  6. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  7. Nondestructive method for chemically machining crucibles or molds from their enclosed ingots and castings

    DOEpatents

    Stout, Norman D.; Newkirk, Herbert W.

    1991-01-01

    An inventive method is described for chemically machining rhenium, rhenium and tungsten alloy, and group 5b and 6b crucibles or molds from included ingots and castings comprised of oxide crystals including YAG and YAG based crystals, garnets, corundum crystals, and ceramic oxides. A mixture of potassium hydroxide and 15 to 90 weight percent of potassium nitrate is prepared and maintained at a temperature above melting and below the lower of 500 degrees centigrade or the temperature of decomposition of the mixture. The enveloping metal container together with its included oxide crystal object is rotated within the heated KOH-KNO.sub.3 mixture, until the container is safely chemically machined away from the included oxide crystal object.

  8. Apparatus and method for the horizontal, crucible-free growth of silicon sheet crystals

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-09-12

    Apparatus is provided for continuously forming a silicon crystal sheet from a silicon rod in a non-crucible environment. The rod is rotated and fed toward an RF coil in an inert atmosphere so that the upper end of the rod becomes molten and the silicon sheet crystal is pulled therefrom substantially horizontally in a continuous strip. A shorting ring may be provided around the rod to limit the heating to the upper end only. Argon gas can be used to create the inert atmosphere within a suitable closed chamber. By use of this apparatus and method, a substantially defect-free silicon crystal sheet is formed which can be used for micro-circuitry chips or solar cells.

  9. Frit screening for Rocky Flats ash and sand, slag, and crucible vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Li, Hong; Darab, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing vitrified waste forms for plutonium-bearing ash and plutonium-bearing sand, slag, and crucible (SS&C) materials from Rocky Flats. Waste forms are to meet product criteria (e.g., safeguard termination limits, storage criteria, and target plutonium loading) and processing constraints (e.g., upper temperature limits, processing time, and equipment compatibility). The target waste form for ash is an agglomerated product, while that for SS&C is a fully encapsulated product. Laboratory scoping studies were conducted on glass formulations from six different glass families: (1) antimony vanadium phosphate, (2) iron vanadium phosphate, (3) tin zinc phosphate, (4) soda-lime silicate, (5) alkali borosilicate, and (6) alkali borate. Glass families were selected due to viscosity behavior in the temperature range of interest (< 800C). Scoping study tests included gradient furnace tests to determine processing range and sintering temperature, thermogravimetric analysis to determine weight loss as a function of temperature, and crucible tests to determine frit compositions tolerance to variations in processing temperature, waste loading, and waste type. The primary screening criterion for the selection of frits for future studies was processing temperature below 400C to minimize the potential for foaming in ash caused by the release of gases (main source of gas is combustion of carbon species) and to minimize processing cycle times. Based on this criterion, glass formulations from the tin zinc phosphate and alkali borosilicate families were selected for future variability testing. Variability testing will include final product evaluation, glass system tolerance to waste loading and composition variation, and identification of parameters impacting time/temperature profiles. Variability testing results will give a final frit formulation for ash and SS&C, and identify key processing parameters. 12 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Numerical investigation of the effect of a crucible cover on crystal growth in the industrial directional solidification process for silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zaoyang; Zhang, Yunfeng; Hu, Zhiyan; Zhou, Genshu; Liu, Lijun

    2014-09-01

    We carried out transient global simulations of heating, melting, growing, annealing and cooling stages for the industrial directional solidification (DS) process. Two separate DS processes were performed with a covered crucible and an uncovered crucible to investigate the effect of a crucible cover on global heat transfer and silicon crystal growth. It is found that the cover blocks heat transfer from the heaters to the silicon domain significantly, and therefore influences the crystal growth through the entire DS process. For the melting of silicon feedstock, covering the crucible can lead to a significant increase in melting time, whereas it has little effect on the melting sequence. During the growing stage, the solidification time for the process with a crucible cover is much shorter than the process without a cover. The cover can also influence the melt convection near the free surface center, but it hardly changes the melt flow pattern deep in the crucible. For the annealing and cooling processes, heat transfer is not significantly affected by covering the crucible and the isotherm shapes in the silicon ingots are similar with and without a cover.

  11. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  12. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  13. Cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A

    2001-11-01

    Cold urticaria is one form of urticaria that may be associated with other forms of physical urticarias. Frequency is generally estimated at two or three per 100. The triggering effect of cold is found at history taking in most of the cases. The urticaria is usually superficial, and more rarely associated with deep and/or mucosal urticaria. The diagnosis is based on history taking and the ice cube test. An exhaustive search for an etiologic factor is often unfruitful, and the presence of a cryopathy should lead to a complete work-up. Therapy of cold urticaria may prove to be difficult. In patients with secondary cold urticaria, underlying disease must be treated in order to resolve the skin symptoms. H1-antihistamines can be used but the clinical responses are highly variable. Short-time treatment with low concentration corticosteroids suppresses the symptoms only partially and temporarily. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be proposed but the procedure is difficult to carry out in daily life over an extended period. Key word: cryoglobulins.

  14. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  15. Influence of Mechanical Stirring on the Crucible Dissolution Rate and Impurities Distribution in Directional Solidification of Multicrystalline Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Alexandra; Vizman, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    In this study, time dependent three-dimensional numerical simulations were carried out using the STHAMAS3D software in order to understand the effects of forced convection induced by mechanical stirring of the melt, on the crucible dissolution rate and on the impurities distribution in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) melt for different values of the diffusion coefficient. Numerical simulations were performed on a pilot scale furnace with crucible dimensions of 38x38x40cm3. The computational domain used for the local 3D-simulations consists of melt and crystal. The dissolution rate was estimated from the total mass of impurities that was found in the silicon melt after a certain period of time. The obtained results show that enhanced convection produced by a mechanical stirrer leads to a significant increase of the dissolution rate and also to a uniform distribution of impurities in the melt.

  16. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  17. The effect of graphite components and crucible coating on the behaviour of carbon and oxygen in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Lutz; Pätzold, Olf; Kupka, Iven; Ehrig, Jan; Würzner, Sindy; Stelter, Michael

    2011-03-01

    In the present paper the effect of the furnace interior materials on the carbon and oxygen concentrations in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is studied. Mc-Si ingots were produced in a high-vacuum induction furnace by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. Growth experiments with or without graphite components in the furnace as well as with crucible coatings of different oxygen concentrations were performed. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the growth chamber is found to depend significantly on the setup used. A standard, graphite-containing setup results in pronounced CO formation, which can be completely suppressed by applying graphite-free elements. Oxygen in the crucible coating is shown to influence the concentration of carbon monoxide via the formation of SiO. Growth under a CO enriched atmosphere is associated with the formation of a SiC/SiO2 melt surface layer, which pins the carbon concentration in the melt or crystal near its solubility limit, whereas in graphite- or CO-free growth the dissolved carbon segregates approximately according to Scheil's law. On the other hand, the effect of carbon monoxide on oxygen concentration in the grown crystals appears to be negligible. Instead, the oxygen concentration is directly related to the oxygen content of the crucible coating.

  18. Improvement in crystalline quality of Cd 1- xZn xTe( x=4%) crystals grown in graphite crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Arun Kumar; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Narula, R. C.; Bagai, R. K.; Kumar, Vikram

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we report improvement in the crystalline quality of CdZnTe (Zn=4%) crystals, with respect to etch pit density and full-width half-maximum (FWHM) of the X-ray rocking curve, grown in graphite crucible as compared to crystals grown in carbon-coated quartz ampoule. Uniform dislocation density distribution of the order of 2-3×10 4 cm -2 with no cellular structure and improvement in FWHM value (18-30 arcsec) with reduced splitting of peaks in X-ray rocking curves have been observed in the complete cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) wafers (30 mm×50 mm). We have used a larger X-ray beam (10 mm×1 mm) to study the crystalline quality of the complete CZT ingot. The effect of variation of beam size on X-ray rocking curve and its FWHM value indicates that the use of large beam size gives the true assessment of the spatial crystalline perfection of the grown CZT crystals. Although improvement in terms of crystalline perfection has been achieved in CZT material, the fall in optical transmission in the longer wave length spectral region and measured electrical properties in the annealed CZT samples point towards the incorporation of impurities in CZT during growth from the graphite crucible. Our results clearly indicate that overall improvement in the quality of CZT crystal is achievable with the use of ultra-high-purity graphite as the crucible.

  19. Use of frit-disc crucibles for routine and exploratory solution growth of single crystalline samples

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, Paul C.; Kong, Tai; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Jo, Na Hyun

    2016-01-05

    Solution growth of single crystals from high temperature solutions often involves the separation of residual solution from the grown crystals. For many growths of intermetallic compounds, this separation has historically been achieved with the use of plugs of silica wool. Whereas this is generally efficient in a mechanical sense, it leads to a significant contamination of the decanted liquid with silica fibres. In this paper, we present a simple design for frit-disc alumina crucible sets that has made their use in the growth single crystals from high temperature solutions both simple and affordable. An alumina frit-disc allows for the clean separation of the residual liquid from the solid phase. This allows for the reuse of the decanted liquid, either for further growth of the same phase, or for subsequent growth of other, related phases. In this article, we provide examples of the growth of isotopically substituted TbCd6 and icosahedral i-RCd quasicrystals, as well as the separation of (i) the closely related Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 phases and (ii) and PrZn11 and PrZn17.

  20. Use of frit-disc crucibles for routine and exploratory solution growth of single crystalline samples

    DOE PAGES

    Canfield, Paul C.; Kong, Tai; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Solution growth of single crystals from high temperature solutions often involves the separation of residual solution from the grown crystals. For many growths of intermetallic compounds, this separation has historically been achieved with the use of plugs of silica wool. Whereas this is generally efficient in a mechanical sense, it leads to a significant contamination of the decanted liquid with silica fibres. In this paper, we present a simple design for frit-disc alumina crucible sets that has made their use in the growth single crystals from high temperature solutions both simple and affordable. An alumina frit-disc allows for the cleanmore » separation of the residual liquid from the solid phase. This allows for the reuse of the decanted liquid, either for further growth of the same phase, or for subsequent growth of other, related phases. In this article, we provide examples of the growth of isotopically substituted TbCd6 and icosahedral i-RCd quasicrystals, as well as the separation of (i) the closely related Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 phases and (ii) and PrZn11 and PrZn17.« less

  1. Interaction Studies of Ceramic Vacuum Plasma Spraying for the Melting Crucible Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jong Hwan Kim; Hyung Tae Kim; Yoon Myung Woo; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee; R. S. Fielding

    2013-10-01

    Candidate coating materials for re-usable metallic nuclear fuel crucibles, TaC, TiC, ZrC, ZrO2, and Y2O3, were plasmasprayed onto a niobium substrate. The microstructure of the plasma-sprayed coatings and thermal cycling behavior were characterized, and U-Zr melt interaction studies were carried out. The TaC and Y2O3 coating layers had a uniform thickness, and high density with only a few small closed pores showing good consolidation, while the ZrC, TiC, and ZrO2 coatings were not well consolidated with a considerable amount of porosity. Thermal cycling tests showed that the adhesion of the TiC, ZrC, and ZrO2 coating layers with niobium was relatively weak compared to the TaC and Y2O3 coatings. The TaC and Y2O3 coatings had better cycling characteristics with no interconnected cracks. In the interaction studies, ZrC and ZrO2 coated rods showed significant degradations after exposure to U-10 wt.% Zr melt at 1600 degrees C for 15 min., but TaC, TiC, and Y2O3 coatings showed good compatibility with U-Zr melt.

  2. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  3. A multistage crucible of revision and approval shapes IPCC policymaker summaries

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Katharine J.; Freeman, Patrick T.; Mastrandrea, Michael D.; Field, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) member governments approve each report’s summary for policymakers (SPM) by consensus, discussing and agreeing on each sentence in a plenary session with scientist authors. A defining feature of IPCC assessment, the governmental approval process builds joint ownership of current knowledge by scientists and governments. The resulting SPM revisions have been extensively discussed in anecdotes, interviews, and perspectives, but they have not been comprehensively analyzed. We provide an in-depth evaluation of IPCC SPM revisions, establishing an evidential basis for understanding their nature. Revisions associated with governmental review and approval generally expand SPMs, with SPM text growing by 17 to 53% across recent assessment reports. Cases of high political sensitivity and failure to reach consensus are notable exceptions, resulting in SPM contractions. In contrast to recent claims, we find that IPCC SPMs are as readable, for multiple metrics of reading ease, as other professionally edited assessment summaries. Across reading-ease metrics, some SPMs become more readable through governmental review and approval, whereas others do not. In an SPM examined through the entire revision process, most revisions associated with governmental review and approval occurred before the start of the government-approval plenary session. These author revisions emphasize clarity, scientific rigor, and explanation. In contrast, the subsequent plenary revisions place greater emphasis especially on policy relevance, comprehensiveness of examples, and nuances of expert judgment. Overall, the value added by the IPCC process emerges in a multistage crucible of revision and approval, as individuals together navigate complex science-policy terrain. PMID:27532046

  4. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  5. Cold Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Stephen I.; Soter, Nicholas A.; Center, David M.; Austen, K. Frank

    1977-01-01

    Sera were obtained from the venous effluents of cold-challenged arms of patients with idiopathic cold urticaria without plasma or serum cryoproteins; these sera exhibited increased neutrophil chemotactic activity without alterations of the complement system. A two- to fourfold augmentation of the base-line neutrophil chemotactic activity of serum from the immersed extremity began within 1 min, peaked at 2 min, and returned to base-line levels within 15 min, whereas there was no change in the serum chemotactic activity in the control arm. The augmented chemotactic activity in the serum specimens from the challenged arm of each patient appeared in a high molecular-weight region, as assessed by the difference in activity recovered after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration of the paired lesional and control specimens. Sequential purification of this high molecular-weight activity by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of activity at both steps. The partially purified material continued to exhibit a high molecular weight, being excluded on Sepharose 4B, and had a neutral isoelectric point. The partially purified material showed a preferential chemotactic activity for neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, required a gradient for expression of this function, and exhibited a capacity to deactivate this cell type. This active principle, termed high molecular-weight neutrophil chemotactic factor, exhibited a time-course of release that could be superimposed upon that of histamine and the low molecular-weight eosinophil chemotactic factor and may represent another mast cell-derived mediator. PMID:874083

  6. Effect of Crucible Diameter Reduction on the Convection, Macrosegregation, and Dendritic Morphology during Directional Solidification of Pb-2.2 Wt Pct Sb Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jun; Tewari, S. N.; Magadi, G.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    The Pb-2.2 wt pct Sb alloy has been directionally solidified in 1-, 2-, 3-, and 7-mm-diameter crucibles with planar and dendritic liquid-solid interface orphology. For plane front solidification, the experimentally observed macrosegregation along the solidified length follows the relationship proposed by Favier. Application of a 0.4 T transverse magnetic field has no effect on the extent of convection. Reducing the ampoule diameter appears to decrease the extent of convection. However, extensive convection is still present even in the 1-mm-diameter crucible. An extrapolation of the observed behavior indicated that nearly diffusive transport conditions require ampoules that are about 40 microns in diameter. Reduction of the crucible diameter does not appear to have any significant effect on the primary dendrite spacing. However, it results in considerable distortion of the dendrite morphology and ordering. This is especially true for the 1-mm diameter samples.

  7. Crystal growth of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) and reaction of gold crucible with Ba-Cu-rich flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y. K.; Chen, H. C.; Martini, L.; Bechtold, J.; Huang, Z. J.; Hor, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    YBa2Cu3O(7-x) crystals are grown in a gold crucible by a self-flux method. The flux moves along the gold surface due to surface wetting and leaves Y123 crystals behind. The obtained crystals are clean and have a size up to two millimeters and a Tc is greater than 90 K. In an effort to recycle the used crucibles, it is found that the used gold is contaminated by copper. A CuO thin film is easily formed on the surface of the crucible that is made of the used gold. This film provides good surface wetting and a buffer layer, which reduces the reaction between gold and the Y-Ba-Cu-oxide melt.

  8. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... Someone Quit? Avoiding DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  9. Cold confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  10. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  11. Cold remedies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat, cough, stuffy nose, sneezing, runny nose, fever, chills, and muscle aches are all symptoms associated with the common cold. Over-the-counter medicines for a cold only alleviate cold symptoms but do not shorten the duration of a cold. As always, ...

  12. Microstructure formation and interface characteristics of directionally solidified TiAl-Si alloys in alumina crucibles with a new Y2O3 skull-aided technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianglei; Liu, Jianxiu; Wu, Shen; Tian, Shuxia; Gao, Hongxia; Wang, Shengyong; Guo, Jingjie; Wang, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    The microstructure evolution and interface characteristics of a directionally solidified Ti-43Al-3Si (at.%) alloy in an alumina (Al2O3) crucible with new Y2O3 skull-aided technology were investigated. The Y2O3-skull that is in contact with the TiAl-melt is relatively stable, which results in a more controlled reaction between the skull and the melt than in the case of an Al2O3 crucible is used. A thin reaction layer was formed between the mould and the melt through mutual diffusion. The layer thickness increased with increasing reaction time. The thickness of this layer was less than 80 μm for reaction times up to 5800 s. Y2O3 particles were not found in the specimen because the mould coating was prepared with fine Y2O3 powder without a binder, which prevented the Y2O3 particles splitting from the coating as a consequence of thermal physical erosion. The oxygen content of the TiAl-alloy increased with increasing reaction time. The total oxygen content of the solidified specimen was less than that of the specimen solidified in the Al2O3 crucibles. This new Y2O3 skull-aided technology is expected to improve the surface quality of TiAl-alloys and reduce the reaction between the crucible/mould and molten TiAl alloys during directional solidification processing with longer contact times.

  13. Influence of accelerated crucible rotation on defect distribution and detector characteristics of melt grown CdZnTe (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Santosh; McCoy, Jedidiah; Lynn, Kelvin

    2016-09-01

    Non-stoichiometry related extended defects in CdTe/CZT, such as tellurium inclusions and precipitates are known to be detrimental bulk defects in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride. In our attempt to minimize the size of tellurium inclusions we have employed accelerated crucible rotation technique in modified vertical Bridgman growth configuration. Acceleration and deceleration rate as high as 900 rpm2 was successfully applied during superheated melt mixing and growth. By comparing growths with and without ACRT under otherwise identical growth conditions, it was observed that the average inclusion size reduced by more than 50 percent due to ACRT. Additionally, we will discuss the effect of forced melt convection on the axial zinc and dopant segregation profile. Electrical characterization, spectrometric performance and purity analysis of the grown crystals will be presented.

  14. A Study of Undercooling Behavior Of Immiscible Metal Alloys in the Absence of Crucible-Induced Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael B.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Li, Delin; Workman, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the question: Would eliminating the crucible eliminate the wall-induced nucleation of one of the liquid phases in an immiscible alloy and result in undercooling of the liquid into the metastable region thereby producing significant differences in the separation process and the microstructure upon solidification. Another primary objective of this research is to study systems with a metastable miscibility gap and to directly determine the metastable liquid miscibility gap by undercooling experiments. Nucleation and growth of droplets in these undercooled metallic liquid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Results of this investigation indicate that containerless processing of immiscibles may not promote the undercooling of the single-phase liquid into the metastable region. Although no recalescence event was observed for this liquid-liquid transition, undercooling did occur across the miscibility gap for the solidification of the Ti phase that eventually separated.

  15. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  16. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  17. Cold medicines and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspx . Accessed July 26, 2016. Cherry JD. The common cold. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach ... 2014:chap 7. Miller EK, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  18. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  19. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  20. Solute redistribution and constitutional supercooling effects in vertical Bridgman grown indium gallium antimonide by accelerated crucible rotation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, K. Juliet

    The ternary alloy, InxGa1- xSb, is a compound semiconducting material of compositionally tunable bandgap (0.18 - 0.72 eV), making it desirable for use in photovoltaic, photodetector, and other opto-electronic devices in the infra-red regime. In the past, this material has proven to be difficult to synthesize in bulk due to the large phase separation between the constituent binaries. In this work, InxGa1-xSb has been grown in a state-of-the-art, computer-controlled system based on vertical Bridgman technique designed to allow crucible rotation during solidification of the material to reincorporate excess solute and improve material quality. Independent thermocouples allow for in situ monitoring and maintenance of the temperature to 0.2°C precision during crystal growth, reducing compositional inhomogeneities caused by temperature fluctuations. A series of experiments has been performed to evaluate the effect of accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) on the structural quality and compositional homogeneity of bulk-grown InxGa 1-xSb for a starting melt composition of x = 0.25. A lowering rate of 3 mm/hr has been employed, for an overall cooling rate of 5.1°C/hr, which deliberately exceeds the threshold for constitutional supercooling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been performed on samples of In0.18Ga0.82Sb revealing a 92% percent reduction in micro-cracking with the application of ACRT when compared to synthesis performed without rotation. Furthermore; electron probe microscopy (EPMA) indicates an order of magnitude improvement in compositional homogeneity in the direction of growth with the use of ACRT. Micro-cracking and compositional homogeneity throughout cross-sections of InxGa1-xSb material also indicate areas of improved mixing during solidification, which can be compared to existing models of fluid flow exhibited in ACRT. The boule synthesized with ACRT shows a decrease in compositional deviation of 62% in the first-to-freeze areas of the

  1. Continuous Czochralski growth. Development of advanced Czochralski growth process to produce low cost 150 kg silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The improvement of growth rates using radiation shielding and investigation of the crucible melt interaction for improved yields were emphasized. Growth runs were performed from both 15 and 16 inch diameter crucibles, producing 30 and 37 kg ingots respectively. Efforts to increase the growth rate of 150 mm diameter ingots were limited by temperature instabilities believed to be caused by undesirable thermal convections in the larger melts. The radiation shield improved the growth rate somewhat, but the thermal instability was still evident, leading to nonround ingots and loss of dislocation-free structure. A 38 kg crystal was grown to demonstrate the feasibility of producing 150 kg with four growth cycles. After the grower construction phase, the Hamco microprocessor control system was interfaced to the growth facility, including the sensor for automatic control of seeding temperature, and the sensor for automatic shouldering. Efforts focused upon optimization of the seeding, necking, and shoulder growth automation programs.

  2. Microstructure formation and interface characteristics of directionally solidified TiAl-Si alloys in alumina crucibles with a new Y2O3 skull-aided technology

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianglei; Liu, Jianxiu; Wu, Shen; Tian, Shuxia; Gao, Hongxia; Wang, Shengyong; Guo, Jingjie; Wang, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure evolution and interface characteristics of a directionally solidified Ti-43Al-3Si (at.%) alloy in an alumina (Al2O3) crucible with new Y2O3 skull-aided technology were investigated. The Y2O3-skull that is in contact with the TiAl-melt is relatively stable, which results in a more controlled reaction between the skull and the melt than in the case of an Al2O3 crucible is used. A thin reaction layer was formed between the mould and the melt through mutual diffusion. The layer thickness increased with increasing reaction time. The thickness of this layer was less than 80 μm for reaction times up to 5800 s. Y2O3 particles were not found in the specimen because the mould coating was prepared with fine Y2O3 powder without a binder, which prevented the Y2O3 particles splitting from the coating as a consequence of thermal physical erosion. The oxygen content of the TiAl-alloy increased with increasing reaction time. The total oxygen content of the solidified specimen was less than that of the specimen solidified in the Al2O3 crucibles. This new Y2O3 skull-aided technology is expected to improve the surface quality of TiAl-alloys and reduce the reaction between the crucible/mould and molten TiAl alloys during directional solidification processing with longer contact times. PMID:28332635

  3. Crucible melts and bench-scale ISV (in situ vitrification) tests on simulated wastes in INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) soils

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of eight crucible melt tests and three bench-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test that were performed on simulated metals/soils mixtures containing actual site soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The crucible melt and bench-scale ISV tests are a part of efforts by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist the INEL in conducting a treatability study on ISV for application to the mixed waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area (SDA). The crucible melt tests were performed to evaluate the effect of various chemical additives and metal oxidation techniques on soil melting temperatures, melt viscosities, metals versus electrode oxidation potentials, and metals incorporation in the glass. The bench-scale ISV tests were performed to supplement the existing ISV data base with information on certain hazardous materials that have not been adequately evaluated in previous ISV tests. These materials included five EP toxicity metals, various volatile organic materials fixed in a cementitious matrix (including carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)), and asbestos. In addition, the bench-scale test were used to evaluated the effect of the proposed chemical additive on ISV processing performance and product quality. 8 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Minority-carrier lifetime and defect content of n-type silicon grown by the noncontact crucible method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivambe, Maulid; Powell, Douglas M.; Castellanos, Sergio; Ann Jensen, Mallory; Morishige, Ashley E.; Nakajima, Kazuo; Morishita, Kohei; Murai, Ryota; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2014-12-01

    We evaluate minority-carrier lifetime and defect content of n-type photovoltaic silicon grown by the noncontact crucible method (NOC-Si). Although bulk impurity concentrations are measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy to be less than one part per million, homogeneously throughout the as-grown material we observe lifetimes in the 150 μs range, well below the theoretical entitlement of single-crystalline silicon. These observations suggest the presence of homogeneously distributed recombination-active point defects. We compare an industry-standard gettering profile to an extended gettering profile tailored for chromium extraction, to elucidate potential gains and limitations of impurity gettering. Near the ingot top, gettering improves lifetimes to 750 and >1800 μs for standard and extended profiles, respectively. Relatively lower gettered lifetimes are observed in wafers extracted from the ingot middle and bottom. In these regions, concentric-swirl patterns of low lifetime are revealed after gettering. We hypothesize that gettering removes a large fraction of fast-diffusing recombination-active impurities, while swirl microdefect regions reminiscent of Czochralski silicon can locally limit gettering efficiency and lifetime. Apart from these swirl microdefects, a low dislocation density of <103 cm-2 is observed. The millisecond lifetimes and low dislocation density suggest that, by applying appropriate bulk microdefect and impurity control during growth and/or gettering, n-type NOC-Si can readily support solar cells with efficiencies >23%.

  5. Measuring Inductive-Heating Coupling Coefficients and Thermal Loss Characteristics as a Function of Crucible Geometry and Material Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Jay

    A power measurement system has been designed for an ultra-high temperature inductively heated molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) reactor. The work presented in this research contributes to three different aspects of the induction heated MOE reactor facility: mathematical modeling of coil-to-workpiece power transfer, numerical modeling of heat transfer within the reactor, and experiments to measure the total hemispherical emittance of potential crucible materials. Facility-specific coupling coefficients for various samples have been experimentally determined for the MOE reactor facility. An analytical model coupling the predicted power input with heat transfer software was developed using COMSOL Multiphysics, and validated with experimental measurements of the steady state temperature gradient inside the reactor. These models were used to support the design of an experiment to measure the total hemispherical emissivity (epsilon) of conductive samples using a transient calorimetric technique. Results of epsilon are presented over a wide range of temperatures for copper, nickel, graphite and molybdenum. Furthermore, an investigation into optimizing the reactor system for heating will be discussed.

  6. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  7. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  8. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  9. Solar Cell Efficiency and High Temperature Processing of n-type Silicon Grown by the Noncontact Crucible Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Mallory A.; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Morishige, Ashley E.; Nakajima, Kazuo; Veschetti, Yannick; Jay, Frederic; Jouini, Anis; Youssef, Amanda; Stradins, Paul; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-08-01

    The capital expense (capex) of conventional crystal growth methods is a barrier to sustainable growth of the photovoltaic industry. It is challenging for innovative techniques to displace conventional growth methods due the low dislocation density and high lifetime required for high efficiency devices. One promising innovation in crystal growth is the noncontact crucible method (NOC-Si), which combines aspects of Czochralski (Cz) and conventional casting. This material has the potential to satisfy the dual requirements, with capex likely between that of Cz (high capex) and multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si, low capex). In this contribution, we observe a strong dependence of solar cell efficiency on ingot height, correlated with the evolution of swirl-like defects, for single crystalline n-type silicon grown by the NOC-Si method. We posit that these defects are similar to those observed in Cz, and we explore the response of NOC-Si to high temperature treatments including phosphorous diffusion gettering (PDG) and Tabula Rasa (TR). The highest lifetimes (2033 us for the top of the ingot and 342 us for the bottom of the ingot) are achieved for TR followed by a PDG process comprising a standard plateau and a low temperature anneal. Further improvements can be gained by tailoring the time-temperature profiles of each process. Lifetime analysis after the PDG process indicates the presence of a getterable impurity in the as-grown material, while analysis after TR points to the presence of oxide precipitates especially at the bottom of the ingot. Uniform lifetime degradation is observed after TR which we assign to a presently unknown defect. Future work includes additional TR processing to uncover the nature of this defect, microstructural characterization of suspected oxide precipitates, and optimization of the TR process to achieve the dual goals of high lifetime and spatial homogenization.

  10. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  11. Exercise in the Cold

    PubMed Central

    Fudge, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypothermia and frostbite injuries occur in cold weather activities and sporting events. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was used to identify original research and review articles related to cold, frostbite, and hypothermia. Inclusion was based on their relevance to prevention and treatment of cold-related injuries in sports and outdoor activities. Dates of review articles were limited to those published after 2010. No date limit was set for the most recent consensus statements or original research. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Frostbite and hypothermia are well-documented entities with good prevention strategies and prehospital treatment recommendations that have changed very little with time. A layered approach to clothing is the best way to prevent injury and respond to weather changes. Each athlete, defined as a participant in a cold weather sport or activity, will respond to cold differently depending on anthropometric measurements and underlying medical risk factors. An understanding of wind-chill temperatures, wetness, and the weather forecast allows athletes and event coordinators to properly respond to changing weather conditions. At the first sign of a freezing cold injury, ensure warm, dry clothes and move to a protected environment. Conclusion: Cold injuries can be prevented, and cold weather activities are safe with proper education, preparation, and response to changing weather conditions or injury. PMID:26857732

  12. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  13. Cold-Weather Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports Print A A A What's in this ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  14. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  15. Chilling Out With Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your head hurts. You don't have the energy to even get out of bed. And you can't breathe out of your nose. What's wrong? You may have a cold! Having a cold is the #1 reason kids visit the doctor and stay home from school. Kids can get six to ten ...

  16. Formation of a nuclear reactor's molten core bath in a crucible-type corium catcher for a nuclear power station equipped with VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshta, S. V.; Vitol', S. A.; Granovskii, V. S.; Kalyago, E. K.; Kovtunova, S. V.; Krushinov, E. V.; Sulatskaya, M. B.; Sulatskii, A. A.; Khabenskii, V. B.; Al'Myashev, V. I.; Gusarov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    Results from a calculation study on analyzing the formation of a melt bath in a crucible-type catcher for the conditions of a severe accident at a nuclear power station equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are presented. It is shown that the heat loads exerted on the water-cooled walls of the corium catcher shell are limited to a permissible level at which the necessary margins to nucleate boiling crisis and to destruction are ensured under the conditions of thermal and mechanical loading of the shell. An important role of sacrificial material in the efficient operation of the corium catcher is pointed out.

  17. Cold subcutaneous abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.; Stephens, L.; Kelly, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    Cold abscesses are defined as having no associated erythema, heat, or tenderness. They may be present in immunodeficiency disorders, deep mycoses, and other infectious diseases. As there is a dearth information on this subject in the dermatology, surgery, and infectious disease literature, we present a case of cold abscesses secondary to coccidioidomycosis and discuss the possible role of humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, prostaglandins, T cells, and other mediators in cold abscess pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic guidelines for abscesses are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2280425

  18. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  19. CRUCIBLE LINING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Bone, W.H.; Schmidt, W.W.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for forming refractory liners in cylindrical reaction vessels used for the reductlon of uranium tetrafluoride to metallic uranium. A preliminary form, having positioning lugs attached thereto, is inserted into the reaction vessel and the refractory powder, usually CaO, is put in the annular space between the form and the inner wall of the reaction vessel. A jolting table is used to compact this charge of liner material ln place, and after thls has been done, the preliminary form is removed and the flnal form or plug is lnserted without disturbing the partially completed lining. The remainder of the lining charge is then introduced and compacted by jolting, after which the form is removed.

  20. Cold hardiness in molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansart, Armelle; Vernon, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Molluscs inhabit all types of environments: seawater, intertidal zone, freshwater and land, and of course may have to deal with subzero temperatures. Ectotherm animals survive cold conditions by avoiding it by extensive supercooling (freezing avoidant species) or by bearing the freezing of their extracellular body fluids (freezing tolerant species). Although some studies on cold hardiness are available for intertidal molluscs, they are scarce for freshwater and terrestrial ones. Molluscs often exhibit intermediary levels of cold hardiness, with a moderate or low ability to supercool and a limited survival to the freezing of their tissues. Several factors could be involved: their dependence on water, their ability to enter dormancy, the probability of inoculative freezing in their environment, etc. Size is an important parameter in the development of cold hardiness abilities: it influences supercooling ability in land snails, which are rather freezing avoidant and survival to ice formation in intertidal organisms, which generally tolerate freezing.

  1. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  2. Coping with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... re hungry. And you might have heard that chicken soup can cure a cold. There's no real ... you have strep throat and need treatment with antibiotics. If your doctor does prescribe antibiotics, be sure ...

  3. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  4. Development of advanced Czochralski Growth Process to produce low cost 150 KG silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The goals in this program for advanced czochralski growth process to produce low cost 150 kg silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness are outlined. To provide a modified CG2000 crystal power capable of pulling a minimum of five crystals, each of approximately 30 kg in weight, 150 mm diameter from a single crucible with periodic melt replenishment. Crystals to have: resistivity of 1 to 3 ohm cm, p-type; dislocation density below 1- to the 6th power per cm; orientation (100); after growth yield of greater than 90%. Growth throughput of greater than 2.5 kg per hour of machine operation using a radiation shield. Prototype equipment suitable for use as a production facility. The overall cost goal is $.70 per peak watt by 1986. To accomplish these goals, the modified CG2000 grower and development program includes: (1) increased automation with a microprocessor based control system; (2) sensors development which will increase the capability of the automatic controls system, and provide technology transfer of the developed systems.

  5. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  6. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  7. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colds Prevention Treatment Children Complications Special Features References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose ... cm (3/8 inch) per minute. What a Common Cold Is A common cold is an illness caused ...

  8. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  9. A three-dimensional phase field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces with accelerated crucible rotation and traveling magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie

    2014-11-01

    In this study, which builds on other related work, we present a new three-dimensional numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model accounts for buoyancy, accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT), and traveling magnetic field (TMF) induced convective flow and their effect on crystal growth and the chemical component's transport process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase field method. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. A one-way coupled concentration transport model is used to simulate the component fraction variation in both the liquid and solid phases, which can be used to check the quality of the crystal growth.

  10. Out in the cold.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-05-04

    Every now and then, you say something to a patient and wonder whether you should have kept quiet. On this occasion, a female patient and I were indulging in a moment of shared empathy over an annoying symptom we both experience - permanently cold feet.

  11. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one…

  12. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  13. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  14. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  15. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  16. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview.

  17. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  18. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  19. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  20. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  1. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  2. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  3. Electronic Equipment Cold Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    equations for such a flow regiae. For laainar flow and Moderate teaperature differwwe« between the well «nd coolant, a aodifled Sieder -Tate...con- figuration. The heat-transfer coefficients, therefore, were determined by using both the Sieder -Tate and McAdams equations and the coaputed...values used In the analytical predictions. As with th* previous cold Plates, the Sieder -Tate equation gave too low of values for the heat- transfer

  4. Cold Climate Heat Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    central heating , cooling, and air conditioning (HVAC) system . Both buildings had two zones for heating and cooling, which allowed for a direct...section calls for improved efficiency of mechanical systems as well as an increase of renewable resource usage. Current heating technologies in cold... heated refrigerant is injected into a mixing chamber between the two compressors. The injection leads to a gain in performance of the system through

  5. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  6. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aide researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials. Details of these current technologies will be provided along with operational experience gained to date. With shuttle retirement looming, NASA has protected the capability to provide a temperature controlled environment during transportation to and from the ISS with the use of Glacier and Coldbags, which are compatible with future commercial vehicles including SpaceX's Dragon Capsule, and Orbital s Cygnus vehicle. This paper will discuss the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  7. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  8. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases.

  9. Cold Fusion Verification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater ...way of N-rays and polywater . To date, no one, including Pons and Fleischmann, has been able to construct a so-called CNF electrochemical cell that...Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The conclusion is that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater

  10. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed.

  11. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed. PMID:20036896

  12. Idiopathic cold urticaria and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Işk, Sakine; Arkan-Ayyldz, Zeynep; Sozmen, Sule Caglayan; Karaman, Özkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    Cold urticaria (CU) is a subtype of physical urticaria characterized by the development of urticaria and angioedema after cold exposure. Symptoms typically occur minutes after skin exposure to cold air, liquids, and objects. Most common method to confirm the diagnosis of CU is through ice cube challenge test, but 20% of patients with CU have negative ice cube challenge test results. The greatest risk with this kind of urticaria is the development of systemic reaction resulting in a hemodynamic collapse during generalized cold exposure. We report a case of a patient who developed CU and anaphylaxis during swimming and diving in the sea.

  13. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  14. Cold isopressing method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Stawisuck, Valerie M.; Prasad, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    A cold isopressing method in which two or more layers of material are formed within an isopressing mold. One of the layers consists of a tape-cast film. The layers are isopressed within the isopressing mold, thereby to laminate the layers and to compact the tape-cast film. The isopressing mold can be of cylindrical configuration with the layers being coaxial cylindrical layers. The materials used in forming the layers can contain green ceramic materials and the resultant structure can be fired and sintered as necessary and in accordance with known methods to produce a finished composite, ceramic structure. Further, such green ceramic materials can be of the type that are capable of conducting hydrogen or oxygen ions at high temperature with the object of utilizing the finished composite ceramic structure as a ceramic membrane element.

  15. Nonfreezing Cold-Induced Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    circumstances. This chapter explores the history, epidemiology , pathophysiology, and current prevention and treatments of NFCI, as well as pernio...environment should mean that NFCI is preventable in most circumstances. This chapter explores the history, epidemiology , pathophysi- ology, and current...prevention and treatments of NFCI, as well as pernio (chilblains), cryoglobulinemia, and cold urticaria. Epidemiology Individuals suffering cold

  16. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  17. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Parents > Cough ... cough and cold medicine. Why Do Kids Abuse Cough and Cold Remedies? Before the U.S. Food and ...

  18. Cold urticaria and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa Delgado, M; Martín Muñoz, F; Polanco Allué, I; Martín Esteban, M

    2008-01-01

    Cold urticaria can be associated with blood and thyroid disorders, drugs, or infections. Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by permanent gluten intolerance. It is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as chronic idiopathic urticaria. Nevertheless, association with cold urticaria has not yet been described. A boy aged 3 years 8 months presented local urticaria-angioedema when exposed to cold temperatures. An ice cube test was positive and iron deficiency anemia was demonstrated. He later developed legume intolerance, rhinoconjunctivitis related to pollen sensitization, and asthma. Due to persistence of cold urticaria symptoms and refractory anemia, a test for immunoglobulin A autoantibodies to tissue transglutaminase and an intestinal biopsy were performed. Results of both tests were compatible with celiac disease.A study of human leukocyte antigen indicated a high risk phenotype (HLA, DR6/DR7; DQA 0501, 0201; DQB 0301, 0201). After 7 months of a gluten-free diet, the boy's anemia resolved and he is free of symptoms when exposed to cold. This is a first description of the possibility of an association between celiac disease and cold urticaria. A poor course of cold urticaria in the absence of evidence of another underlying condition should lead to suspicion of celiac disease.

  19. Cold Fusion, A Journalistic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2005-03-01

    Author of the recent book, The Rebirth of Cold Fusion, and founder of New Energy Times, Steven B. Krivit presents a summary of cold fusion's, past, present and possible future. This talk will briefly review five highlights of the recent New Energy Times investigation into cold fusion research:1. Analysis of early studies that supposedly disproved cold fusion.2. Key early corroborations that supported the claims of Fleischmann and Pons.3. The evolving understanding of cold fusion reaction paths and by-products.4. A look at volumetric power density.5. Brief comparison of the progress in hot fusion research as compared to cold fusion research.New Energy Times, founded in 2000, is an independent communications company which currently specializes in reporting on cold fusion researchootnotetextReferences and copies of the presentation are available at www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htmhttp://www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htm. It has no affiliations with any organization, entity or party which invests in these technologies, nor any individual researcher or research facility.

  20. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  1. Cold fusion verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, M. H.; Mastny, G. F.; Wesley, E. J.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this work to verify and reproduce experimental observations of Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The method was to start with the original report and add such additional information as became available to build a set of operational electrolytic CNF cells. Verification was to be achieved by first observing cells for neutron production, and for those cells that demonstrated a nuclear effect, careful calorimetric measurements were planned. The authors concluded, after laboratory experience, reading published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater. The neutron detector used for these tests was a completely packaged unit built into a metal suitcase that afforded electrostatic shielding for the detectors and self-contained electronics. It was battery-powered, although it was on charge for most of the long tests. The sensor element consists of He detectors arranged in three independent layers in a solid moderating block. The count from each of the three layers as well as the sum of all the detectors were brought out and recorded separately. The neutron measurements were made with both the neutron detector and the sample tested in a cave made of thick moderating material that surrounded the two units on the sides and bottom.

  2. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  3. Plants in a cold climate.

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Maggie; Bowles, Dianna J

    2002-01-01

    Plants are able to survive prolonged exposure to sub-zero temperatures; this ability is enhanced by pre-exposure to low, but above-zero temperatures. This process, known as cold acclimation, is briefly reviewed from the perception of cold, through transduction of the low-temperature signal to functional analysis of cold-induced gene products. The stresses that freezing of apoplastic water imposes on plant cells is considered and what is understood about the mechanisms that plants use to combat those stresses discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix. PMID:12171647

  4. ANS cold source neutronics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the calculational procedures employed in the ongoing neutronics analysis of the ANS cold source and presents in chronological order some of the more important results from the one- and two-dimensional discrete calculations performed to date in support of the ANS cold source design. In particular, cold neutron currents from cryostat shapes which can be adequately modeled with two-dimensional geometries are compared with and without reentrant cavities. Also, results are presented from one-dimensional comparative liquid hydrogen vs liquid deuterium calculations in which the density, placement, and para-ortho mixture of liquid hydrogen is investigated. In addition, the evolution of the ANS conceptual design cold source from an initial short cylindrical cryostat with hemispherical upper and lower heads employing a natural convection liquid deuterium circulation system to the final spherical design employing a pumped system is described. Finally, performance data and heating rates are presented for some possible alternate ANS cryostat and vacuum jacket materials.

  5. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are, after marijuana (and alcohol), the most commonly abused substances by ...

  6. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  7. Cold regions hydrology and hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.L. ); Crissman, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This monograph addresses a narrow aspect of cold regions engineering, namely the effects of cold weather on the traditional civil engineering disciplines of hydrology and hydraulics. Hydrologic and hydraulic considerations in the design, construction, and operation of civil works are very important. Many of the problems encountered in the design and construction of buildings, transportation systems, water supply facilities, waste treatment facilities, and hazardous waste disposal facilities, for example are closely tied to the characteristics of the site hydrology.

  8. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.

  9. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-11-11

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  10. Recycling of cold-stable microtubules: evidence that cold stability is due to substoichiometric polymer blocks.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Fischer, E H; Margolis, R L

    1982-02-02

    A substantial subpopulation of mammalian brain crude extract microtubules is resistant to cold-temperature disassembly. We propose here that microtubules are rendered cold stable by rare substoichiometric blocks. Mild shearing of rat brain cold-stable microtubules makes them largely cold labile. In addition, cold-stable microtubules can be destabilized by exposure to low concentrations of calmodulin (5 microM) in the presence of calcium at 0 degree C. Cold-disassembled microtubule protein, obtained from sheared or calmodulin-treated cold-stable preparations, re-forms a cold-stable subpopulation upon reassembly. These observations allow strategies for the recycling purification of cold-stable microtubules. Comparison of purified cold-labile and cold-stable material by gel electrophoresis shows enrichment for a few unique polypeptides, of 135, 70-82, and 56 kilodaltons, in the cold-stable preparation. The 64-kilodalton "switch protein", previously identified as uniquely dephosphorylated in cold-stable microtubules, is equally represented in recycled cold-stable and cold-labile microtubule preparations. Furthermore, when disassembled, cold-stable microtubule proteins are passed through a calmodulin affinity column on which the polypeptides characteristic of cold-stable microtubules are specifically retained, the breakthrough (unbound) material repolymerizes into cold-labile microtubules only. Based on the above data, a model is presented in which microtubules are rendered cold stable by the presence of substoichiometric, calmodulin-sensitive blocks that randomly reshuffle upon reassembly of cold-stable microtubules.

  11. Primary (idiopathic) cold urticaria and cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gene

    2004-11-30

    A 76-year-old man with a longstanding history of cold sensitivity developed wheals after the application of an ice cube. Cold urticaria is a type of physical urticaria that is characterized urticaria and angioedema after exposure to cold. It may be idiopathic or secondary to hematologic or infectious diseases. Treatment of primary cold urticaria includes antihistamines; however, ketotifen, doxantrazole, zafirlukast, cyclosporine, and cold-tolerance induction may be tried in refractory cases.

  12. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  13. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  14. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  15. Method of operating a cold cathode-cold reservoir thyratron

    SciTech Connect

    Tauber, A.; Finnegan, R.D.; Rothwarf, F.

    1984-05-22

    A method is disclosed of operating a cold-cathode-cold-reservoir thyratron for laser/radar and other systems employing high voltage and current pulses using ZrVFe as the hydrogen thyratron material. According to the method, a hydride of ZrVFe is first formed and the hydrided material then placed in the cathode structure of the thyratron. The tube is then pumped down to its operating pressure of approximately 10/sup -3/ atmospheres, the hydrided material then acting as a ballast to maintain that partial pressure of hydrogen at room temperature.

  16. Creative Writing Class as Crucible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Monica

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her experiences as creative writing teacher and her views as a teacher in the aftermath of Virginia Tech shooting. As a teacher who had taught writing and literature for twenty years, the author had received a great deal of submissions from her students about serial killers, rapists, slashers, and murderers and…

  17. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  18. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    PubMed

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  19. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  20. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  1. Underwater cold tap machine tested

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Tests are complete on a strategic cold tap machine for underwater lines. The system was designed around Total's Norway-UK Frigg gas line. It provides a permanent, easily mobilized, mechanical insurance against damage to the Frigg line but also provides a proven, workable principle for the repair or modification of other lines. The design of the system is discussed.

  2. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  3. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  4. Advances in cold plasma technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens continue to be an issue on a variety of commodities, prompting research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The prim...

  5. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  6. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  7. Cold Stress and Urinary Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    There have been few studies regarding the onset of urinary sensations and frequent urination induced by sudden whole-body cooling. In this article, we review the relationship between cold stress and urinary frequency based mainly on our previous studies. A recent study showed that cold stress induces bladder overactivity in conscious rats, and these effects were mediated, at least in part, by α1A -adrenergic receptor (AR) and α1D -AR. Another study suggested that the resiniferatoxin-sensitive nerves present in the urinary bladder may also be involved in the regulation of detrusor activity associated with cold stress. The mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family consists of 28 channels subdivided into five different classes: TRPV (vanilloid), TRPC (canonical), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin). TRP channels function as multifunctional sensors at the cellular level. They can be activated by physical (voltage, heat, cold, mechanical stress) or chemical stimuli and binding of specific ligands. In 2002, it was reported that a nonselective cation channel, TRPM8, could be activated by both menthol and thermal stimuli (8-28 °C). We demonstrated the presence of TRPM8 in the skin from the legs and back of rats by immunofluorescence staining and that stimulation of this receptor by menthol causes urinary frequency. There have been other reports demonstrating roles of TRPM8 not related to its thermosensory function. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism of cold stress-induced urinary frequency, and the roles of TRPM8 in the micturition control system.

  8. Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies? Page Content Article Body ​Medicines Over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines can cause serious side effects ...

  9. [The skin, cold and winter sports].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Henry, F; Letawe, C; Piérard, G E

    2001-04-01

    Winter sports are responsible for various dermatoses which could be often avoided by simple preventive procedures. Both the severity and duration of cold exposure combined with wind speed, altitude and environmental hygrometric value govern the potential types of cold injuries.

  10. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  11. Cold Medicines for Kids: What's the Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or difficult breathing. There's no cure for the common cold, but you can help your child feel better ... Pediatrics; 2009:1934. Pappas DE, et al. The common cold in children: Management and prevention. http://www.uptodate. ...

  12. Zinc for Colds: The Final Word?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eby GA, et al. Reduction in duration of common colds by zinc gluconate lozenges in a double-blind ... 2014;28:4. Sexton DJ, et al. The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate. ...

  13. Vitamin C and the Common Cold Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, H. Richard

    1984-01-01

    Various studies indicate that Vitamin C does not prevent or cure a cold, but it may ameliorate symptoms in some individuals. The development of a balanced life-style is more effective towards cold prevention. (DF)

  14. Common cold - how to treat at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm Common cold - how to treat at home To use the ... Antibiotics are almost never needed to treat a common cold. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower ...

  15. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W; Rudin, Sven P; Corckett, Scott D; Wills, John M

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  16. Cold Tolerance of Plants Used for Cold-Regions Revegetation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    also interact among themselves. Evaporation, insolation (sunlight), soil-forming processes, soil microbiota , plant Leaf chlorosis cadfrost banding...that can etation applications. cold harden will do so with 10-14 days of exposure to Soluble carbohydrates depress freezing points and temperatures...water, melting point depression , and tissue Belding, R.D. and E. Young (1987) Shoot and root water content. Botanical Gazette, 137: 313-317. temperature

  17. Different types of cold adaptation in humans.

    PubMed

    Makinen, Tiina Maria

    2010-06-01

    Human adaptation to cold may occur through acclimatization or acclimation and includes genetic, physiologic, morphological or behavioural responses. It has been studied in indigenous populations, during polar or ski expeditions, sporting activities, military training, in urban people, or under controlled conditions involving exposures to cold air or water. Although divergent results exist between the studies, the main cold adaptation responses are either insulative (circulatory adjustments, increase of fat layer) or metabolic (shivering or nonshivering thermogenesis) and may be positive (enhanced) or negative (blunted). The pattern of cold adaptation is dependent on the type (air, water) and intensity (continuous, intermittent) of the cold exposure. In addition, several individual factors like age, sex, body composition, exercise, diet, fitness and health modify the responses to cold. Habituation of thermal sensations to cold develops first, followed by cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrinological responses. If the repeated cold stimulus is discontinued, adaptation will gradually disappear. The functional significance of physiological cold adaptation is unclear, and some of the responses can even be harmful and predispose to cold injuries. The article summarises recent research information concerning with the thermoregulatory responses related to repeated exposures to cold (air or water), and also discusses the determinants of cold adaptation, as well as its functional significance.

  18. Common Cold in Babies: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Common cold in babies Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms The first indication of the common cold in a baby is often: A congested or ... or green Other signs and symptoms of a common cold in a baby may include: Fever Sneezing Coughing ...

  19. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. Appendix, that the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study will conduct a teleconference meeting on August 3, 2012. Members of...

  20. Cold dark matter heats up.

    PubMed

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  1. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  2. Acclimatization to cold in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Greenleaf, John E.

    1989-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses and mechanisms of both natural and artificial acclimatization to a cold environment in mammals, with specific reference to human beings. The purpose is to provide basic information for designers of thermal protection systems for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activities. Hibernation, heat production, heat loss, vascular responses, body insulation, shivering thermogenesis, water immersion, exercise responses, and clinical symptoms and hypothermia in the elderly are discussed.

  3. Medical problems from cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dembert, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Problems resulting from cold exposure can be successfully treated when a coordinated emergency medical transport system and appropriate equipment are available, as well as medical personnel knowledgeable in the management of frostbite and hypothermia. Clinical suspicion of these disorders is essential. Profoundly hypothermic individuals with no recordable vital signs have been resuscitated after controlled, rapid rewarming measures and the use of emergency life-support systems.

  4. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  5. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    were conducted using microstructural analysis, hardness, bond strength, and corrosion testing. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cold spray, magnesium, aluminum ... corrosion pitting are the primary causes for removing the components from service. In addition, any repair must be confined to nonstructural areas of...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The U.S. Army has experienced significant corrosion problems with magnesium alloys that are used to

  6. Small Cold Temperature Instrument Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Feng, S.; Brigham, D.; Beaman, B.

    We are developing a small cold temperature instrument package concept that integrates a cold temperature power system with ultra low temperature ultra low power electronics components and power supplies now under development into a 'cold temperature surface operational' version of a planetary surface instrument package. We are already in the process of developing a lower power lower temperature version for an instrument of mutual interest to SMD and ESMD to support the search for volatiles (the mass spectrometer VAPoR, Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) both as a stand alone instrument and as part of an environmental monitoring package. We build on our previous work to develop strategies for incorporating Ultra Low Temperature/Ultra Low Power (ULT/ULP) electronics, lower voltage power supplies, as well as innovative thermal design concepts for instrument packages. Cryotesting has indicated that our small Si RHBD CMOS chips can deliver >80% of room temperature performance at 40K (nominal minimum lunar surface temperature). We leverage collaborations, past and current, with the JPL battery development program to increase power system efficiency in extreme environments. We harness advances in MOSFET technology that provide lower voltage thresholds for power switching circuits incorporated into our low voltage power supply concept. Conventional power conversion has a lower efficiency. Our low power circuit concept based on 'synchronous rectification' could produce stable voltages as low as 0.6 V with 85% efficiency. Our distributed micro-battery-based power supply concept incorporates cold temperature power supplies operating with a 4 V or 8 V battery. This work will allow us to provide guidelines for applying the low temperature, low power system approaches generically to the widest range of surface instruments.

  7. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  8. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  9. Cold Ion Escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Wei, Y.; Morgan, D.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2013-09-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express in combination with the MARSIS radar experiment. We first compare calculations of the mean ion flux observed by ASPERA-3 alone with previously published results. We then combine observations of the cold ion velocity by ASPERA-3 with observations of the cold plasma density by MARSIS since ASPERA-3 misses the cold core of the ion distribution. We show that the mean density of the nightside plasma observed by MARSIS is about two orders higher than observed by ASPERA-3 (Fig.1). Combining both datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars (Fig. 2). At a distance of about 0.5 R_M the flux settles at a constant value (Fig. 3) which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  10. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  11. Pilot-scale Tests to Vitrify Korean Low-Level Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Kim, C.-W.; Park, J. K.; Shin, S. W.; Song, M.-J.; Brunelot, P.; Flament, T.

    2002-02-26

    Korea is under preparation of its first commercial vitrification plant to handle LLW from her Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The waste streams include three categories: combustible Dry Active Wastes (DAW), borate concentrates, and spent resin. The combustible DAW in this research contains vinyl bag, paper, and protective cloth and rubber shoe. The loaded resin was used to simulate spent resin from NPPs. As a part of this project, Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC) has tested an operation mode utilizing its pilot-scale plant and the mixed waste surrogates of resin and DAW. It has also proved, with continuous operation for more than 100 hours, the consistency and operability of the plant including cold crucible melter and its off-gas treatment equipment. Resin and combustible DAW were simultaneously fed into the glass bath with periodic addition of various glass frits as additives, so that it achieved a volume reduction factor larger than 70. By adding various glass frits, this paper discusses about maintaining the viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass bath within their operable ranges, but not about obtaining a durable glass product. The operating mode starts with a batch of glass where a titanium ring is buried. When the induced power ignites the ring, the joule heat melts the surrounding glass frit along with the oxidation heat of titanium. As soon as the molten bath is prepared, in the first stage of the mode, the wastes consisting of loaded resin and combustible DAW are fed with no or minimum addition of glass frits. Then, in the second stage, the bath composition is kept as constant as possible. This operation was successful in terms of maintaining the glass bath under operable condition and produced homogeneous glass. This operation mode could be adapted in commercial stage.

  12. Physiological characteristics of cold acclimatization in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-09-01

    Studies were conducted on 15 healthy young soldiers to evaluate the effect of a cold acclimatization schedule on the thermoregulatory and metabolic activity on exposure to acute cold stress. These men were exposed to cold (10‡C) for 4 h daily wearing only shorts for 21 days, in a cold chamber. They were subjected to a standard cold test at 10 ± 1‡C the day 1, 6, 11 and 21. The subjects were made to relax in a thermoneutral room (26 28‡C) for 1 h and their heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature, peripheral temperatures, and shivering activity were recorded. Then they were exposed to 10‡C and measurements were repeated at 30 min intervals, for 2 h. The cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD), cold pressor response and thermoregulatory efficiency tests were measured initially and at the end of acclimatization schedule. The data show that the procedure resulted in elevated resting metabolism, less fall in body temperature during acute cold stress, reduction in shivering, improvement in CIVD and thermoregulatory efficiency and less rise in BP and HR during cold pressor response. The data suggest the possibility of cold acclimatization in man by repeated exposure to moderately severe cold stress.

  13. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  14. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

    2009-02-07

    Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

  15. Plant adaptation to cold climates

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In this short review, I will first summarize criteria by which environments can be considered “cold”, with plant stature (size, height above ground) playing a central role for the climate actually experienced. Plants adapted to such environments have to cope with both extremes and with gradual influences of low temperature. The first requires freezing resistance, which is tightly coupled to developmental state (phenology) and prehistory (acclimation). Gradual low temperature constraints affect the growth process (meristems) long before they affect photosynthetic carbon gain. Hence, plants growing in cold climates are commonly not carbon limited. PMID:27990251

  16. Cold urticaria with persistent weals.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L

    1981-06-01

    A patient with cold urticaria is described in whom weals appeared immediately after an ice cube test for 3 min and persisted for a week as a red, tender swelling. The duration of the oedema was dependent on the intensity of the immediate reaction. If the immediate wealing was blocked by treatment with an oral antihistamine 3 h before the ice cube test, no delayed reaction was seen. Antihistamines given after the immediate wealing had occurred did not influence the delayed reaction. Reactions to intradermally injected histamine, prostaglandin E, kallikrein, serotonin and serum appeared normal.

  17. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  18. Window performance in extreme cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, S. N.; Buska, J. S.; Barrett, S. A.

    1982-12-01

    Extreme cold causes heavy buildup of frost, ice and condensation on many windows. It also increases the incentive for improving the airtightness of windows against heat loss. Our study shows that tightening specifications for Alaskan windows to permit only 30% of the air leakage allowed by current American airtightness standards is economically attractive. We also recommend triple glazing in much of Alaska to avoid window icing in homes and barracks. We base our conclusions on a two year field study of Alaskan military bases that included recording humidity and temperature data, observing moisture accumulation on windows and measuring airtightness with a fan pressurized device.

  19. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  20. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  1. Cold thermoregulatory responses following exertional fatigue.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Sawka, Michael N; DeGroot, David W; Young, Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    Participants in prolonged, physically demanding cold-weather activities are at risk for a condition called "thermoregulatory fatigue". During cold exposure, the increased gradient favoring body heat loss to the environment is opposed by physiological responses and clothing and behavioral strategies that conserve body heat stores to defend body temperature. The primary human physiological responses elicited by cold exposure are shivering and peripheral vasoconstriction. Shivering increases thermogenesis and replaces body heat losses, while peripheral vasoconstriction improves thermal insulation of the body and retards the rate of heat loss. A body of scientific literature supports the concept that prolonged and/or repeated cold exposure, fatigue induced by sustained physical exertion, or both together, can impair the shivering and vasoconstrictor responses to cold ("thermoregulatory fatigue"). The mechanisms accounting for this thermoregulatory impairment are not clear, but there is evidence to suggest that changes in central thermoregulatory control or peripheral sympathetic responsiveness to cold lead to thermoregulatory fatigue and increased susceptibility to hypothermia.

  2. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster. This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  3. Diagnosis and management of cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Reid; Halverstam, Caroline P

    2016-01-01

    Cold urticaria is a physical urticaria characterized by a localized or systemic eruption of papules upon exposure of the skin to cold air, liquids, and/or objects. In some cases, angioedema and anaphylaxis also may occur. The symptoms of cold urticaria can have a negative impact on patients' quality of life. Second-generation H1 antihistamines are the first line of treatment in cold urticaria; however, patients who are unresponsive to initial treatment with H1 antihistamines may require further management options. Avoidance of cold exposure is the most effective prophylactic measure. In mild to moderate cases, the primary goal of therapy is to improve the patient's quality of life. In more severe cases, treatment measures to protect the patient's airway, breathing, and circulation may be necessary. We report the case of a 23-year-old man with cold urticaria who was refractory to initial therapy with H1 antihistamines. A review of the literature also is provided.

  4. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  5. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  6. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  7. Isocurvature cold dark matter fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Bond, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    According to Preskill et al. (1983), the axion field represents a particularly attractive candidate for the dark matter in the universe. In many respects it behaves like other forms of cold dark matter, such as massive gravitinos, photinos, and monopoles. It is, however, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of very low mass, and it is only because of rapid coherent oscillations of the field that it can dominate the mass density of the universe. In the present paper it is assumed that the isocurvature mode is dominant. The linear evolution calculations conducted do not depend upon specific details of particle physics. For this reason, the conducted discussion is applicable to any cold dark matter model with isocurvature perturbations. The results of the study lead to the conclusion that scale-invariant isocurvature perturbations do not seem an attractive possibility for the origin of large-scale structure. The findings strengthen the review that primordial adiabatic perturbations were the dominant fluctuations in the early stages of the Big Bang.

  8. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  9. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  10. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, P.

    1991-10-15

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

  11. Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream.

  12. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  13. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  14. Blood histamine levels following graded cold challenge in atypical acquired cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Miller, S D; Pritchard, D; Crowley, J P

    1992-01-01

    Acquired cold urticaria with a negative cold stimulation test has been described in seven patients in whom the standard ice cube test did not induce localized urticaria. Subsequent total body cold exposure induced a generalized urticaria. A patient with this syndrome is presented where blood histamine levels rose from 9 to 60 micrograms/dL after a negative local cold stimulation test and from 60 to 90 micrograms/dL after total body cold exposure. Urticaria occurred only after generalized cold exposure. Blood histamine levels following the ice cube test may represent a sensitive method to diagnose this form of atypical acquired cold urticaria, without subjecting the patient to the risk of anaphylaxis reported following total body cold exposure.

  15. Age and Ethnic Differences in Cold Weather and Contagion Theories of Colds and Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with…

  16. Status of cold fusion (2010).

    PubMed

    Storms, Edmund

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

  17. The cold-fog test

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.A.; Ringler, K.G.; Erven, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical performance of outdoor insulation degrades severely during combinations of factors that include surface contamination (C), ice (I), fog (F) and an ambient temperature that rises through 0 C (T{sub 0{degree}}). Failures at operating voltage on 115-kV, 230-kV and 500-kV systems occur with increasing probability under these conditions. A new CFT{sub 0{degree}} or cold-fog test method has been developed to reproduce the flashovers at all three voltage levels. Three options are identified for improving CFT{sub 0{degree}} performance: use of semi-conductive glazes, substitution of silicone for porcelain and use of silicone coatings on existing porcelain insulators.

  18. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-01-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants. PMID:12117658

  19. Cold warriors target arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.

    1995-09-01

    While disagreements over the conflict in Bosnia have strained US relations with Western Europe and Russia, these divisions will pale in comparison to the tensions that will arise if recent congressional arms control decisions become law. If the Republicans who dominate Congress are successful, a series of arms control agreements painstakingly negotiated by Republican and Democratic presidents could be consigned to the ash heap. This list includes the Start I and Start II nuclear reduction agreements, the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and the ongoing negotiations to achieve a comprehensive test ban (CTB) by 1996. US leadership in the post-Cold War era will undermined as the international community, already skeptical about this country`s direction, will question the ability of the executive branch to surmount isolantionist impulses.

  20. Cold plasma processing to improve food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is an antimicrobial process being developed for application as a food processing technology. This novel intervention is the subject of an expanding research effort by groups around the world. A variety of devices can be used to generate cold plasma and apply it to the food commodity bein...

  1. Lessons on the Cold War. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Susan J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of the Cold War requires teachers to change their teaching methods and content. Presents six lessons, most with three individual student activities, that trace the Cold War from the pre-World War I era through the end of the Vietnam War. (CFR)

  2. Physiological Acceptance Criteria for Cold Weather Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    subjective feelings of thermal comfort and temperature sensation were examined. Under many conditions that Navy cold weather clothing items are worn, it...is not practical to expect that the optimal level of thermal comfort can be obtained. Allowing for a moderate level of cold sensation and thermal

  3. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.; Jentsch, Ch.; Schleich, W. P.

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  4. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  9. Cold urticaria. Clinical findings in 220 patients.

    PubMed

    Neittaanmäki, H

    1985-10-01

    Patients with cold urticaria, a total of 220, were studied in Finland. Sixty-three percent of the patients were female. The diagnosis was based on a positive ice cube test in 90% of cases, and the other cold tests were needed to certify the diagnosis for the remainder of patients. The mean age at the onset of the disease was 25.1 years (range, 1-74), and the mean duration of symptoms was 6.3 years (range, 3 weeks to 37 years). Cold urticaria symptoms had disappeared in fifty-three patients (24%), but there was a recurrence of the disease in twelve. Idiopathic (primary acquired) cold urticaria was present in 96% of the patients. Only two patients had a secondary acquired cold urticaria. Two patients had cold-induced, "cholinergic" urticaria, and four patients had a delayed type of cold urticaria. Twenty-one percent of the patients had dermatographism, 8% had cholinergic urticaria, and two patients (1%) had heat urticaria concurrently with cold urticaria.

  10. Cold plasma as a food processing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on a variety of foods, such as meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The primary modes of action are reactive chemical species and ultraviolet light. Various cold plasma systems are under development, operating at am...

  11. Cold plasma processing technology makes advances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma (AKA nonthermal plasma, cool plasma, gas plasma, etc.) is a rapidly maturing antimicrobial process being developed for applications in the food industry. A wide array of devices can be used to create cold plasma, but the defining characteristic is that they operate at or near room temper...

  12. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family Print A A A What's in this article? ... outside and keep fit — for you and your family. But what if everyone in your house believes ...

  13. Computer model for analyzing sodium cold traps

    SciTech Connect

    McPheeters, C C; Raue, D J

    1983-05-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions. The calculated pressure drop as a function of impurity mass content determines the capacity of the cold trap. The accuracy of the model was checked by comparing calculated mass distributions with experimentally determined mass distributions from literature publications and with results from our own cold trap experiments. The comparisons were excellent in all cases. A parametric study was performed to determine which design variables are most important in maximizing cold trap capacity.

  14. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  15. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan L.; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning. PMID:23564985

  16. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  17. Social science in the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life.

  18. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-12-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors.

  19. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  20. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-01-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors. PMID:27922084

  1. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance (P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation (P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life (P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures (T max) (P = 0.040), smaller amplitude (P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD (P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude (P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cold-induced sweating syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions cold-induced sweating syndrome cold-induced sweating syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Cold-induced sweating syndrome is characterized by problems with regulating body ...

  3. Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lingering cold? – Michelle Seasonal allergies and the common cold can be so much alike that it's sometimes ... What Is Skin Testing for Allergies? First Aid: Common Cold Why Is Hand Washing So Important? Can Kids ...

  4. When Working in Cold, Be Prepared and Be Aware

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to ... the cold, there are many risks. Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to ...

  5. 13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW FROM COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE LOOKING DOWN CONNECTING TUNNEL TO COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND BASEMENT, SHOWING HARD WIRE CONNECTION (INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE, COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND FOR FL ENGINE FOR SATURN V. EXHAUST DUCT IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... germs, called viruses, cause colds. Symptoms of the common cold include: Runny nose Nasal congestion Sneezing Sore throat ... flu symptoms are similar to those of a common cold. Flu can symptoms can also include fever, muscle ...

  8. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... germs, called viruses, cause colds. Symptoms of the common cold include: Runny nose Nasal congestion Sneezing Sore throat ... Read More Acute respiratory distress syndrome Avian influenza Common cold Cough Fever Flu H1N1 influenza (Swine flu) Immune ...

  9. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold

    PubMed Central

    Hai-long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (感冒gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory (中醫理論 zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type (風寒型 fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type (風熱型 fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type (暑熱型 shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; 補充與替代醫學 bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions (中國民間處方 zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied. PMID:26151024

  10. Reversibility of cold-induced hypertension after removal of rats from cold.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O; Papanek, P E; Fregly, M J

    1990-07-01

    Chronic exposure of rats to cold air induces hypertension, including elevation of blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy. The present study was designed to assess reversibility of these changes after removal from cold. Five groups of six male rats each were exposed to cold (5 +/- 2 degrees C) for 39 days, while six control rats were maintained at 26 +/- 2 degrees C. Systolic blood pressures of the rats in one of the cold-treated groups, as well as the controls, were measured twice weekly throughout the experiment. Blood pressure of the cold-exposed rats (150 +/- 3 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133.3 Pa) became elevated significantly above that of controls (129 +/- 3 mmHg) within 4 weeks. On day 39 of cold exposure, one group (six rats) of the cold-treated rats was sacrificed while still in the cold. The remaining four groups of cold-treated rats were than removed from cold and kept at 26 +/- 2 degrees C. One group of cold-treated rats was sacrificed weekly thereafter. During the last week, the six control rats were also sacrificed. At death, the heart, kidneys, and adrenal glands were removed and weighed. Mean heart weight of the cold-treated group (346 +/- 7 mg/100 g body weight), sacrificed prior to removal from cold, was significantly (p less than 0.01) greater than that of controls (268 +/- 5 mg/100 g body weight). The increased heart weight of the cold-treated group appeared to result mainly from an increase in left ventricular weight.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Some Chinese folk prescriptions for wind-cold type common cold.

    PubMed

    Hai-Long, Zhai; Shimin, Chen; Yalan, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Although self-limiting, the common cold (gǎn mào) is highly prevalent. There are no effective antivirals to cure the common cold and few effective measures to prevent it, However, for thousands years, Chinese people have treated the common cold with natural herbs, According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory ( zhōng yī lǐ lùn), the common cold is considered as an exterior syndrome, which can be further divided into the wind-cold type ( fēng hán xíng), the wind-heat type ( fēng rè xíng), and the summer heat dampness type ( shǔ rè xíng). Since the most common type of common cold caught in winter and spring is the wind-cold type, the article introduced some Chinese folk prescriptions for the wind-cold type common cold with normal and weak physique, respectively. For thousands of years, Chinese folk prescriptions for the common cold, as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué), have been proven to be effective, convenient, cheap, and most importantly, safe. The Chinese folk prescriptions ( zhōng guó mín jiān chǔ fāng) for the wind-cold type common cold are quite suitable for general practitioners or patients with the wind-cold type common cold, to treat the disease. Of course, their pharmacological features and mechanisms of action need to be further studied.

  12. Properties and uses of cold neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, David D.

    1992-07-01

    Cold neutrons are conventionally defined as those with energy below 0.005 eV; the corresponding velocity and wavelength arc 980 m/s and 4 angstroms. The first extensive use of cold neutrons was in the 1960's by condensed matter physicists for investigations of spatial structure and internal dynamics of solids and liquids. Different experiments place different requirements on neutron beams, but it is usually advantageous to eliminate the faster neutrons and the gamma rays that are present in normal reactor beams. Several types of filters that pass only the low-energy portion of an incident Maxwellian spectrum have been developed and will be discussed. Examples include single crystal quartz or bismuth (room temperature or cooled), polycrystalline beryllium, and neutron guides. For any of these shifting the incident neutrons to a lower energy spectrum by use of a cold moderator leads to large increases in the intensity of cold neutrons. The properties of the beams resulting from the particular combination of a cold moderator and a neutron guide will be discussed. These include the changes in beam intensity and spectral shape as warm neutrons in a typical reactor spectrum first interact with a cold moderator and then pass through a straight or curved neutron guide. The spatial and angular distribution of the neutrons at the exit of the guide will be described. One further important effect for cold neutron beam experiments involving nuclear reactions is the increase in reaction rates because of the usual 1/v dependence of reaction cross sections and another is the considerable simplification with cold neutrons in the problems of collimating, shielding, and stopping the beam. The resulting benefits for studies of nuclear energy levels by neutron capture gamma-ray and conversion electron experiments and for the analysis of materials by PGNAA will be discussed. Neutron depth profiling is also improved with cold neutrons. (author)

  13. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  14. Microbiological Interactions with Cold Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Paula; Zuizina, Dana; Han, Lu; Cullen, P J; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2017-02-28

    There is a diverse range of microbiological challenges facing the food, healthcare and clinical sectors. The increasing and pervasive resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics and health related concerns with many biocidal agents drives research for novel and complementary antimicrobial approaches. Biofilms display increased mechanical and antimicrobial stability and are the subject of extensive research. Cold plasmas (CP) have rapidly evolved as a technology for microbial decontamination, wound healing and cancer treatment, owing to the chemical and bio-active radicals generated known collectively as reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RONS). This review outlines the basics of CP technology and discusses interactions with a range of microbiological targets. Advances in mechanistic insights are presented and applications to food and clinical issues are discussed. The possibility of tailoring CP to control specific microbiological challenges is apparent. This review focuses on microbiological issues in relation to food and health care associated human infections, the role of CP in their elimination and the current status of plasma mechanisms of action. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Cold dust in hot regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jenness, Tim; Dunlop, James S.; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Gibb, Andy; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Greaves, Jane S.; Robson, Ian

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ∼10 to 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r {sup –2.36±0.35} density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 10{sup 4} AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  16. Hot flakes in cold cases.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Harald; Sommerer, Thomas; Rand, Steve; Wiegand, Peter

    2011-07-01

    In the past, it was almost impossible for forensic scientists to separate DNA from an undefined number of different individuals in mixed stains where, for example, two or more suspects had handled the same weapon. Such samples often contain complex mixtures with the consequence of ambiguous or inconclusive mixed DNA profiles. Using the method described of comprehensive and/or targeted screening of shed cells adhering to tapings of garments or objects enables such stains to be individualized. To evaluate the method, 500 microscopically selected single skin flakes were analyzed using two different commercial STR kits to compare the success rates for each PCR typing system. The method has been validated for use in routine casework and has been shown to be rapid, sensitive, and reproducible. It can be predicted that many cases in the archives with body tapings, which have not yet been examined will benefit from this new or perhaps more appropriate, reanimated, technical development, and of particular importance are serious crimes, the so-called cold cases. The remarkable forensic value of this simple but time-consuming technique is exemplified by 2 out of approximately 100 cases already successfully solved using this approach.

  17. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  18. Cold atoms coupled with mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Jose; Montoya, Cris; Ranjit, Gambhir; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matt; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical resonators can be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, ultimately enabling new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing. We describe our experiment that manipulates the spin of trapped, cold Rb atoms using magnetic material on a cantilever. Cold atoms can also be used as a coolant for mechanical resonators: we estimate that ground state cooling of an optically trapped nano-sphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle.

  19. Animal Adaptation and Acclimatization to Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, R. E.; Watson, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    This article examines the mechanisms of adaptation and acclimatization of animals to cold temperatures. The differences between the two processes are explained and terms are defined. Graphs and drawings illustrate the article. (MA)

  20. Cold-War Echoes in American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Ira Jay

    1984-01-01

    The author believes a cold war ideology permeates our culture and poisons the minds of youth. The challenge to education is to awaken people to a historical and global perspective and raise public consciousness of the necessity for peace. (MD)

  1. Soap Bubbles on a Cold Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiveris, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of blowing bubbles in extremely cold weather. Describes the freezing conditions of the bubbles and some physical properties. Suggests using the activity with all ages of students. (MVL)

  2. Caring for Your Child's Cold or Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Caring for Your Child’s Cold or Flu Page Content ​Unfortunately, there's no cure for the ... Liquid Medicine Safely for more information. Prevent & Treatment: Flu vaccine Children 6 months or older should get ...

  3. Cold-induced changes in amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angelier, N.; Moreau, N.A.; N'Da, E.A.; Lautredou, N.F. )

    1989-08-01

    Female Pleurodeles waltl newts (Amphibia, urodele), usually raised at 20 degrees C, were submitted to low temperatures; oocytes responded to this cold stress by drastic changes both in lampbrush chromosome structure and in protein pattern. Preexisting lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes were reduced in size and number, while cold-induced loops which were tremendously developed, occurred on defined bivalents of the oocyte at constant, reproducible sites. A comparison of protein patterns in control and stressed oocytes showed two main differences: in stressed oocytes, overall protein synthesis was reduced, except for a set of polypeptides, the cold-stress proteins; second, there was a striking inversion of the relative amount of beta- and gamma-actin found in the oocyte nucleus before and after cold stress. Whereas beta-actin was the predominant form in control oocytes, gamma-actin became the major form in stressed oocytes.

  4. A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... cold," said study co-author Angie LeRoy, a psychology graduate student at Rice University in Houston. "Millions ... The findings were published March 30 in Health Psychology . SOURCE: Rice University and the American Psychological Association, ...

  5. Compatible Transfusion Therapy for Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausen, Aaron R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Presented are case histories of two children, ages 2 and 4 years, with paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH, a syndrome characterized by acute intravascular hemoglobin dissolution and hemoglobin in the urine). (Author/CL)

  6. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  7. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  8. A search for cold water rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    SAR imagery obtained by Seasat in the Sargasso Sea during 1978 is examined for cold ring signatures. One orbit on August 26 is thought to have imaged the edge of a cold ring, although the ring's position was not well known at the time. During another orbit on September 23, drifting buoy and expendable bathythermography data furnished conclusive evidence that the ring was centered directly in the SAR swath. Although some suggestive patterns are visible in the images, it is not clear that cold rings can be identified by SAR, even though dynamically similar features, such as the Gulf Stream and warm rings, can be accurately detected. The suggestion is made that cold rings may be imaged inadequately because of their lack of surface temperature gradient.

  9. Difference between Sinusitis and a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children. Viral sinusitis usually accompanies a cold. Allergic sinusitis may ...

  10. Improvements in Cold-Plate Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A.; Taddey, Edmund P.; Laurin, Michael B.; Chabebe, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Five improvements are reported in cold-plate fabrication. This cold plate is part of a thermal control system designed to serve on space missions. The first improvement is the merging of the end sheets of the cold plate with the face sheets of the structural honeycomb panel. The cold plate, which can be a brazed assembly, uses the honeycomb face sheet as its end sheet. Thus, when the honeycomb panel is fabricated, the face sheet that is used is already part of the cold plate. In addition to reducing weight, costs, and steps, the main benefit of this invention is that it creates a more structurally sound assembly. The second improvement involves incorporation of the header into the closure bar to pass the fluid to a lower layer. Conventional designs have used a separate header, which increases the geometry of the system. The improvement reduces the geometry, thus allowing the cold plate to fit into smaller area. The third improvement eliminates the need of hose, tube, or manifold to supply the cooling fluid externally. The external arrangement can be easily damaged and is vulnerable to leakage. The new arrangement incorporates an internal fluid transfer tube. This allows the fluid to pass from one cold plate to the other without any exposed external features. The fourth improvement eliminates separate fabrication of cold plate(s) and structural members followed by a process of attaching them to each other. Here, the structural member is made of material that can be brazed just as that of the cold plate. Now the structural member and the cold plate can be brazed at the same time, creating a monolithic unit, and thus a more structurally sound assembly. Finally, the fifth improvement is the elimination of an additional welding step that can damage the braze joints. A tube section, which is usually welded on after the braze process, is replaced with a more structurally sound configuration that can be brazed at the same time as the rest of the cold plate.

  11. A Theoretical Study of Cold Air Damming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin

    1990-12-01

    The dynamics of cold air damming are examined analytically with a two-layer steady state model. The upper layer is a warm and saturated cross-mountain (easterly or southeasterly onshore) flow. The lower layer is a cold mountain-parallel (northerly) jet trapped on the windward (eastern) side of the mountain. The interface between the two layers represents a coastal front-a sloping inversion layer coupling the trapped cold dome with the warm onshore flow above through pressure continuity.An analytical expression is obtained for the inviscid upper-layer flow with hydrostatic and moist adiabatic approximations. Blackadar's PBL parameterization of eddy viscosity is used in the lower-layer equations. Solutions for the mountain-parallel jet and its associated secondary transverse circulation are obtained by expanding asymptotically upon a small parameter proportional to the square root of the inertial aspect ratio-the ratio between the mountain height and the radius of inertial oscillation. The geometric shape of the sloping interface is solved numerically from a differential-integral equation derived from the pressure continuity condition imposed at the interface.The observed flow structures and force balances of cold air damming events are produced qualitatively by the model. In the cold dome the mountain-parallel jet is controlled by the competition between the mountain-parallel pressure gradient and friction: the jet is stronger with smoother surfaces, higher mountains, and faster mountain-normal geostrophic winds. In the mountain-normal direction the vertically averaged force balance in the cold dome is nearly geostrophic and controls the geometric shape of the cold dome. The basic mountain-normal pressure gradient generated in the cold dome by the negative buoyancy distribution tends to flatten the sloping interface and expand the cold dome upstream against the mountain-normal pressure gradient (produced by the upper-layer onshore wind) and Coriolis force (induced

  12. Photosynthetic microorganisms in cold environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Elster, Josef; Bartak, Milos; Vaczi, Peter; Nedbalova, Linda

    and their physiological processes are inactive. If hydrated, they are physiologically active even at subzero temperatures (Kappen et al., 1996). Although living in cold environments, the growth optimum temperature of typical phycobiont Trebouxia (Chlorophyta) sp. is above 15 ° C, so these algae are considered to be rather psychrotolerant. Acknowledgement The work was supported from projects GA AS CR Nos. KJB 601630808 and KJ KJB600050708, CAREX and long-term institutional research plan of the Institute of Botany AS CR AV0Z600050516 and the Masaryk University. Prof. Martin Backor (Safarik University in Kosice) is kindly ac-knowledged for providing the strains Trebouxia erici and T. glomerata (Backor). References Elster, J. , Benson, E.E. Life in the polar terrestrial environment with a focus on algae and cyanobacteria, in Fuller, B.J., Lane, N. , Benson, E.E. (Eds), Life in the Frozen State. CRC Press, pp. 111-150, 2004. Kappen, L., Schroeter, B., Scheidegger, C., Sommerkorn, M. , Hestmark, G. Cold resistance and metabolic activity of lichens below 0 ° C. Adv. Space Res. 18, 119-128, 1996. Kviderova, J. Characterization of the community of snow algae and their photochemical performance in situ in the Giant Mountains, Czech Republic. Arct. Antarct. Alp. Res. accepted, 2010. Nedbalova, L., Kocianova, M. , Lukavsky, J. Ecology of snow algae in the Giant Mountains and their relation to cryoseston in Europe. Opera Corcontica 45, 59-68, 2008.

  13. Cold Memories: An Examination of U.S. Army Doctrine for Combat in Cold Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-14

    enormous loss of combat. power due to cold injuries caused a massive study by the Surgeon General’s office before the invasion of Italy, and the immediate...dense cold air. and the trapping of the cold air by temperature inversions. These cause local concentrations of extremely low ambient. air...temperatures. Thus. short days can cause the subarctic regions of Siberia, Alaska, and Canada to produce the coldest temperatures on Earth’. CoM Rl•iimx Pbemwena

  14. Quantum simulation with cold molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    Recent experimental developments on cooling, trapping, manipulating and loading ultra-cold ground state molecules in an optical lattice have opened the door for the exploration of quantum magnetism and the observation of complex quantum dynamics. In this talk I will discuss recent developments towards the implementation of controllable spin lattice models in polar molecules with the spin degrees of freedom encoded in rotational states. The spin-spin couplings are generated by direct dipolar interactions and can be fully controlled by dc electromagnetic fields and microwaves. The spin models realized in this way are long range, anisotropic and can even feature direction-dependent spin interactions. They can emulate Hamiltonians ranging from the Heisenberg spin model, to Hamiltonians with symmetry protected topological phases to Hamiltonians without solid state counterpart. At JILA we have been able to realize for the first time a lattice spin model with fermionic KRb molecules pinned in a 3D lattice. We observe clear manifestation of dipolar exchange interactions in Ramsey spectroscopy even at substantially less than unit lattice filling. I will describe the new theoretical methods that we developed to model the spin dynamics and show that those reproduce the experimental observations. Even though so far the spin dynamics has been restricted to pinned molecules, in part to prevent chemical reactions, I will finish by presenting theoretical calculations supported by experimental measurement at JILA that demonstrate that the continuous quantum Zeno mechanism can actually suppress loss in this highly reactive system. This finding opens the exciting possibility of observing itinerant quantum magnetism in near term experiments. This work is supported by ARO, ARO-DARPA-OLE, NSF-PFC and NSF-PIF

  15. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  16. Properties of the Central American cold surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.; Reding, Philip J.; Zhang, Yuxia

    1993-01-01

    The Central American cold surge (CACS) is a frontal incursion from the United States into Central America and resembles the East Asian cold surge. They occur more frequently than analyzed by NMC or by published results, based on our observations between 1979 and 1990. Climatology and structure are quantified, based on surface and upper air stations throughout Central America and satellite products from GOES visible and infrared sensors and SSM/I precipitable water and rain rate sensors.

  17. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  18. Cold acclimation allows Drosophila flies to maintain mitochondrial functioning under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Colinet, Hervé; Renault, David; Roussel, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stress generally disturbs cellular homeostasis. Researchers have hypothesized that chilling injury is linked to a shortage of ATP. However, previous studies conducted on insects exposed to nonfreezing low temperatures presented conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the mitochondrial bioenergetics of Drosophila melanogaster flies exposed to chronic cold stress (4 °C). We assessed mitochondrial oxygen consumption while monitoring the rate of ATP synthesis at various times (0, 1, 2, and 3 days) during prolonged cold stress and at two assay temperatures (25 and 4 °C). We compared organelle responses between cold-susceptible and cold-acclimated phenotypes. Continuous exposure to low temperature provoked temporal declines in the rates of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis. Respiratory control ratios (RCRs) suggested that mitochondria were not critically uncoupled. Nevertheless, after 3 days of continuous cold stress, a sharp decline in the mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate was observed in control flies when they were assayed at low temperature. This change was associated with reduced survival capacity in control flies. In contrast, cold-acclimated flies exhibited high survival and maintained higher rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and coupling (i.e., higher RCRs). Adaptive changes due to cold acclimation observed in the whole organism were thus manifested in isolated mitochondria. Our observations suggest that cold tolerance is linked to the ability to maintain bioenergetics capacity under cold stress.

  19. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  20. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  1. TRPA1 contributes to cold hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    del Camino, Donato; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B; Earley, Taryn J; Cook, Colby A; Petrus, Matt J; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J; Chong, Jayhong A; Fanger, Christopher M; Woolf, Clifford J; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M

    2010-11-10

    TRPA1 is a nonselective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. Although it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions in which reactive oxygen species and proinflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1(-/-) mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide] reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

  2. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  6. Systemic cold-induced urticaria--clinical and laboratory characterization.

    PubMed

    Kivity, S; Schwartz, Y; Wolf, R; Topilsky, M

    1990-01-01

    Six patients are described with a history of cold-related urticaria in whom standard tests (water-immersion and ice-cube) did not induce symptoms. Only total-body cold exposure induced generalized urticaria. Systemic cold urticaria should, therefore, be included in the differential diagnosis of cold-dependent allergic disorders.

  7. Experiences issues with plastic parts at cold temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri

    2005-01-01

    Missions to MARS/planets/asteroids require electronic parts to operate and survive at extreme cold conditions. At extreme cold temperatures many types of cold related failures can occur. Office 514 is currently evaluating plastic parts under various cold temperature conditions and applications. Evaluations, screens, and qualifications are conducted on flight parts.

  8. Gene expression analysis to understand cold tolerance in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus cultivars show a wide range of tolerance to cold temperatures. Lemons and limes are known to be sensitive to cold while certain mandarins and trifoliate oranges can endure severe winters. To understand the mechanism of cold tolerance in citrus, we selected three known cold-sensitive and three...

  9. Molecular markers associated with cold-hardiness in Camellia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers from expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed with the goal to separate cold hardy camellias from non-cold hardy ones. A total of 28 cold hardy and non-cold h...

  10. Cold-moderator scattering kernel methods

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    An accurate representation of the scattering of neutrons by the materials used to build cold sources at neutron scattering facilities is important for the initial design and optimization of a cold source, and for the analysis of experimental results obtained using the cold source. In practice, this requires a good representation of the physics of scattering from the material, a method to convert this into observable quantities (such as scattering cross sections), and a method to use the results in a neutron transport code (such as the MCNP Monte Carlo code). At Los Alamos, the authors have been developing these capabilities over the last ten years. The final set of cold-moderator evaluations, together with evaluations for conventional moderator materials, was released in 1994. These materials have been processed into MCNP data files using the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Over the course of this work, they were able to develop a new module for NJOY called LEAPR based on the LEAP + ADDELT code from the UK as modified by D.J. Picton for cold-moderator calculations. Much of the physics for methane came from Picton`s work. The liquid hydrogen work was originally based on a code using the Young-Koppel approach that went through a number of hands in Europe (including Rolf Neef and Guy Robert). It was generalized and extended for LEAPR, and depends strongly on work by Keinert and Sax of the University of Stuttgart. Thus, their collection of cold-moderator scattering kernels is truly an international effort, and they are glad to be able to return the enhanced evaluations and processing techniques to the international community. In this paper, they give sections on the major cold moderator materials (namely, solid methane, liquid methane, and liquid hydrogen) using each section to introduce the relevant physics for that material and to show typical results.

  11. Cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miralles López, J C; López Andreu, F R; Sánchez-Gascón, F; López Rodríguez, C; Negro Alvarez, J M

    2005-01-01

    Cold urticaria is defined as a urticarial and/or angioedematous reaction of the skin to contact with cold objects, water or air. Types of urticaria associated with infectious diseases, such as mononucleosis, rubeola, varicella, syphilis, hepatitis, and HIV infection have been reported. We present the case of a patient who developed cold urticaria associated with acute serologic toxoplasmosis. The patient was a 34-year-old man who for the previous 2 months had presented cutaneous pruritus accompanied by several papular lesions in parts of the skin exposed to cold as well as those in contact with cold water. The result of an "ice-cube test" was positive. Serologic tests for Toxoplasma gondii showed an IgG level of 68 UI/ml and were positive for IgM, while a test for cryoglobulins was positive. One month later cryoglobulins were negative and a serologic test for T. gondii showed an IgG concentration of 75 UI/ml and positive IgM. Three months later cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG for T. gondii was 84 UI/ml, and IgM was positive. After 6 months cryoglobulins were still negative, IgG level was 68 UI/ml and IgM was still slightly positive. In the final evaluation, 14 months later, IgG level was 32 UI/ml and IgM was negative. The patient continues to present clinical manifestations of cold urticaria, although he has experienced some improvement and his tolerance to cold has increased after treatment with cetirizine.

  12. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  13. Cold Regions - Environmental Testing of Individual Soldier Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) provides testing guidelines for individual Soldier cold weather clothing and footwear in a cold regions...Cold weather clothing test Cold weather footwear test Environmental clothing test Environmental footwear test 16...1983; TOP 10-3-512 Cold Regions Environmental Test of Boot and Similar Footwear , dated 9 May 1980; and TOP 10-4-005 Arctic Environmental Test of

  14. Cold-hearted or cool-headed: physical coldness promotes utilitarian moral judgment.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroko; Ito, Yuichi; Honma, Yoshiko; Mori, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine the effect of physical coldness on personal moral dilemma judgment. Previous studies have indicated that utilitarian moral judgment-sacrificing a few people to achieve the greater good for others-was facilitated when: (1) participants suppressed an initial emotional response and deliberately thought about the utility of outcomes; (2) participants had a high-level construal mindset and focused on abstract goals (e.g., save many); or (3) there was a decreasing emotional response to sacrificing a few. In two experiments, we exposed participants to extreme cold or typical room temperature and then asked them to make personal moral dilemma judgments. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that coldness prompted utilitarian judgment, but the effect of coldness was independent from deliberate thought or abstract high-level construal mindset. As Experiment 2 revealed, coldness facilitated utilitarian judgment via reduced empathic feelings. Therefore, physical coldness did not affect the "cool-headed" deliberate process or the abstract high-level construal mindset. Rather, coldness biased people toward being "cold-hearted," reduced empathetic concern, and facilitated utilitarian moral judgments.

  15. Cognitive, Psychomotor, and Physical Performance in Cold Air After Cooling by Exercise in Cold Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Saybrook, CT ) were at- tached at 11 skin sites: foot, calf, anterior thigh, abdo - men, chest, triceps, anterior aspect of the forearm, sub- scapular...Effects of cold experience and training on administration of emergency medical treatment in the cold. Groton, CT : Naval Submarine Medical Research

  16. The cold driver: Cold stress while driving results in dangerous behavior.

    PubMed

    Morris, Drew M; Pilcher, June J

    2016-10-01

    Cool vehicle cabin temperatures can induce short-term non-hypothermic cold stress. The current study created a cold condition to examine the impact of cold stress on driving behavior. Forty-four participants drove a high-fidelity driving simulator during a thermal neutral or local torso cooled condition. Participants performed additional tasks to assess attention, psychomotor vigilance, and manual dexterity. Skin temperature was significantly lower in the cold condition while internal temperature was unaffected. Participants who had higher subjective ratings of cold followed lead vehicles closer and started to brake later. Participants in the cold condition followed the lead car 22% (0.82s) closer and started braking 20% (2.35s) later when approaching a stop sign during the car-following task. No change in attention, psychomotor vigilance, or dexterity was observed. The current results suggest that cold environmental conditions can contribute to dangerous driving behaviors. Measures of cold perception were also shown to predict changes in driving behavior.

  17. Cold War Paradigms and the Post-Cold War High School History Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAninch, Stuart A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how Cold War ideological models provide a way to examine the U.S. role in world affairs. Discusses and compares on the writings of Paul Gagnon and Noam Chomsky on this topic. Concludes that students should stand outside both models to develop a meaningful perspective on the U.S. role during the Cold War. (CFR)

  18. Cold-hearted or cool-headed: physical coldness promotes utilitarian moral judgment

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hiroko; Ito, Yuichi; Honma, Yoshiko; Mori, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine the effect of physical coldness on personal moral dilemma judgment. Previous studies have indicated that utilitarian moral judgment—sacrificing a few people to achieve the greater good for others—was facilitated when: (1) participants suppressed an initial emotional response and deliberately thought about the utility of outcomes; (2) participants had a high-level construal mindset and focused on abstract goals (e.g., save many); or (3) there was a decreasing emotional response to sacrificing a few. In two experiments, we exposed participants to extreme cold or typical room temperature and then asked them to make personal moral dilemma judgments. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that coldness prompted utilitarian judgment, but the effect of coldness was independent from deliberate thought or abstract high-level construal mindset. As Experiment 2 revealed, coldness facilitated utilitarian judgment via reduced empathic feelings. Therefore, physical coldness did not affect the “cool-headed” deliberate process or the abstract high-level construal mindset. Rather, coldness biased people toward being “cold-hearted,” reduced empathetic concern, and facilitated utilitarian moral judgments. PMID:25324800

  19. Age and ethnic differences in cold weather and contagion theories of colds and flu.

    PubMed

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-02-01

    Age and ethnic group differences in cold weather and contagion or germ theories of infectious disease were explored in two studies. A cold weather theory was frequently invoked to explain colds and to a lesser extent flu but became less prominent with age as children gained command of a germ theory of disease. Explanations of how contact with other people causes disease were more causally sophisticated than explanations of how cold weather causes it. Finally, Mexican American and other minority children were more likely than European American children to subscribe to cold weather theories, a difference partially but not wholly attributable to ethnic group differences in parent education. Findings support the value of an intuitive or naïve theories perspective in understanding developmental and sociocultural differences in concepts of disease and in planning health education to help both children and their parents shed misconceptions so that they can focus on effective preventive actions.

  20. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  1. Assessment of cold stress in outdoor work.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of cold stress in working life was done in 13, mainly outdoor, occupations and 143 workers using local temperatures, body cooling and thermal sensations. The subjects in the study were young, healthy men and they wore the type of winter clothing generally used in those ambient temperatures (+6...-29 degrees C), for in a work load of from 112 to 480 W. Local temperatures on finger skin indicated that manual dexterity was often reduced in outdoor work. A risk of frostbite was frequently found on the cheek and the wind chill index predicted the risk quite well. Body cooling was often temporarily too high when measured by heat debt and mean skin temperature. Thermal sensations were cool or cold occasionally in 28% of the workers interviewed. The insulation of clothing worn was often lower than the IREQmin-value recommends. The results showed that in outdoor work in winter time cold stress frequently reduced (70%) working ability at least for a short period. Mean skin temperature seems to be, in practice, a useful indicator for body cooling and the IREQmin-value was suitable, especially in light work, to indicate body cooling. A very sensitive factor for the expression of cold stress was finger temperature, at least as an indicator of finger dexterity. Due to the adverse health effects found the cold stress should also be evaluated more systematically in occupational health and safety with health examinations, with protective clothing and technical preventive means.

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga; Ann Stepp, Mary; Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony; Trink, Barry

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  3. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  4. Cold Hole Over Jupiter's Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations with two NASA telescopes show that Jupiter has an arctic polar vortex similar to a vortex over Earth's Antarctica that enables depletion of Earth's stratospheric ozone.

    These composite images of Jupiter's north polar region from the Hubble Space Telescope (right) and the Infrared Telescope Facility (left) show a quasi-hexagonal shape that extends vertically from the stratosphere down into the top of the troposphere. A sharp temperature drop, compared to surrounding air masses, creates an eastward wind that tends to keep the polar atmosphere, including the stratospheric haze, isolated from the rest of the atmosphere.

    The linear striations in the composite projections are artifacts of the image processing. The area closest to the pole has been omitted because it was too close to the edge of the planet in the original images to represent the planet reliably.

    The composite on the right combines images from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope taken at a wavelength of 890 nanometers, which shows stratospheric haze particles.

    The sharp boundary and wave-like structure of the haze layer suggest a polar vortex and a similarity to Earth's stratospheric polar clouds. Images of Jupiter's thermal radiation clinch that identification. The composite on the left, for example, is made from images taken with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mid-Infrared Large-Well Imager at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at a wavelength of 17 microns. It shows polar air mass that is 5 to 6 degrees Celsius (9 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit) colder than its surroundings, with the same border as the stratospheric haze. Similar observations at other infrared wavelengths show the cold air mass extends at least as high as the middle stratosphere down to the top of the troposphere.

    These images were taken Aug. 11 through Aug. 13, 1999, near a time when Jupiter's north pole was most visible from Earth. Other Infrared Telescope Facility images at

  5. Cold fission as heavy ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Maruhn, J. A.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Gherghescu, R.

    1987-09-01

    The last version of the analytical superasymmetric fission model is applied to study cold fission processes. Strong shell effects are present either in one or both fission fragments. A smooth behaviour is observed when the proton or the neutron numbers are changed by four units. Increasing Z and N, in the transuranium region, a sharp transition from asymmetry with a large peak-to-valley ratio to symmetry at Z=100 and/or N=164 is obtained. The transition toward asymmetry at higher Z and N is much smoother. The most probable cold fission light fragments from234U,236U,239Np and240Pu are100Zr,104Mo,106Mo and106Mo, respectively, in good agreement with experimental data. The unified treatment of alpha decay, heavy ion radioactivities and cold fission is illustrated for234U — the first nucleus in which all three groups have been already observed.

  6. Sympathetic cooling of nanospheres with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ground state cooling of mesoscopic mechanical structures could enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. Such systems could provide coupling between photons, spins and charges via phonons. It has recently been shown theoretically that optically trapped dielectric nanospheres could reach the ground state via sympathetic cooling with trapped cold atoms. This technique can be beneficial in cases where cryogenic operation of the oscillator is not practical. We describe experimental advances towards coupling an optically levitated dielectric nanosphere to a gas of cold Rubidium atoms. The sphere and the cold atoms are in separate vacuum chambers and are coupled using a one-dimensional optical lattice. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant Nos. PHY-1205994,PHY-1506431.

  7. [Technical problems associated with the cold chain].

    PubMed

    Gac, A

    2001-01-01

    After having covered the current status of the cold chain in France, the author highlights the economic impact of refrigerated storage and processing involving refrigeration. Lose reduction is such that the return on investments is estimated as being roughly 3 years. In years to come, progress will be achieved in the field of plant design. Some information on design trends is provided. Operators in general, and carriers in particular, are faced with an increasingly complex regulatory framework leading to a competition imbalance. The current cold chain developmental trend is characterized by complex computer management of logistics: the flow of goods is modulated in order to meet the production to the distribution needs as cost effectively as possible. This logistic strategy enables management of downstream to upstream interfaces involving various operators. Finally, the author indicates the main causes of non-compliance with the cold chain, generally at retail and consumer levels.

  8. Cold urticaria and infectious mononucleosis in children.

    PubMed

    Morais-Almeida, M; Marinho, S; Gaspar, A; Arêde, C; Loureiro, V; Rosado-Pinto, J

    2004-01-01

    Physical urticaria includes a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the development of urticarial lesions and/or angioedema after exposure to certain physical stimuli. The authors present the case of a child with severe acquired cold urticaria secondary to infectious mononucleosis. Avoidance of exposure to cold was recommended; prophylactic treatment with ketotifen and cetirizine was begun and a self-administered epinephrine kit was prescribed. The results of ice cube test and symptoms significantly improved. Physical urticaria, which involves complex pathogenesis, clinical course and therapy, may be potentially life threatening. Evaluation and diagnosis are especially important in children. To our knowledge this is the first description of persistent severe cold-induced urticaria associated with infectious mononucleosis in a child.

  9. Cold press sintering of simulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to predict the conditions for which the lunar regolith may be adequately sintered, experiments were conducted in which samples of simulated lunar basalt (MLS-1) were pressed at high pressures and then heated in an electric furnace. This sintering process may be referred to as cold press sintering since the material is pressed at room temperature. Although test articles were produced which possessed compressive strengths comparable to that of terrestrial concrete, the cold press sintering process requires very high press pressures and sintering temperatures in order to achieve that strength. Additionally, the prospect of poor internal heat transfer adversely affecting the quality of sintered lunar material is a major concern. Therefore, it is concluded that cold press sintering will most likely be undesirable for the production of lunar construction materials.

  10. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  11. Cold weather injuries in an arctic environment.

    PubMed

    Schissel, D J; Barney, D L; Keller, R

    1998-08-01

    The cases of eight Special Forces soldiers who sustained cold weather-related injuries while conducting winter training as part of Operation Arctic Saber in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Circle are reported. Environmentally related injuries can represent difficult diagnostic and treatment challenges in the field. Moreover, they may compromise the overall mission if they are not identified and treated early. Cold weather injuries can also result in long-term disfigurement and disability that may limit a soldier's future worldwide deployability. Mission requirements, equipment utilization, and environmental exposure place soldiers at particular risk for cold weather-related injuries in such austere settings. Nonetheless, with appropriate education and safety precautions, these potentially life-threatening risks can be greatly minimized.

  12. [Cold-induced urticaria and angioedema. Classification, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Krause, K; Degener, F; Altrichter, S; Ardelean, E; Kalogeromitros, D; Magerl, M; Metz, M; Siebenhaar, F; Weller, K; Maurer, M

    2010-09-01

    The onset of wheals and/or angioedema following the exposure to cold may be associated with a number of different diseases. Most frequently this occurs in cold contact urticaria, a type of physical urticaria, which is characterized by a positive cold stimulation test. The clinical symptoms are based on cold-dependent mast cell activation with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators. In cases of negative or atypical reaction to cold stimulation testing rare acquired atypical or familiar cold urticaria forms may be suspected. Strict avoidance of cold should be recommended as far as possible. As the underlying causes of cold contact urticaria are widely unknown, the symptomatic use of non-sedating antihistamines is the treatment of first choice. The very rare familiar cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is based on CIAS1/NLRP3 mutations and may be treated effectively by neutralization of pathogenic interleukin 1beta.

  13. On air motion trajectories in cold fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, Michael J.; Smith, Roger K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines air parcel trajectories in the two-dimensional model for a cold front by Reeder and Smith (1987). These are found to be in close agreement with trajectories deduced from analyses of summertime 'cool changes' in southeastern Australia, adding further support to the applicability of the numerical model to this kind of cold front. The favorable comparison points also to the dynamical consistency of the conceptual model for the cool change, which has evolved from the analysis of data from observational experiments.

  14. Cold-fusion television show angers APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2009-06-01

    Cold fusion has been controversial since its inception on 23 March 1989, when chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons at the University of Utah in the US announced that they had achieved a sustained nuclear-fusion reaction at room temperature. Two decades on, a US television documentary about the field has stirred up fresh debate after it linked the American Physical Society (APS) to an evaluation of some cold-fusion results by Robert Duncan, a physicist and vice chancellor of the University of Missouri.

  15. Alcohol cold starting - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    Two theoretical computer models have been developed to study cold starting problems with alcohol fuels. The first model, a droplet fall-out and sling-out model, shows that droplets must be smaller than 50 microns to enter the cylinder under cranking conditions without being slung-out in the intake manifold. The second model, which examines the fate of droplets during the compression process, shows that the heat of compression can be used to vaporize small droplets (less than 50 microns) producing flammable mixtures below freezing ambient temperatures. While droplet size has the greater effect on startability, a very high compression ratio can also aid cold starting.

  16. Therapeutic Hypothermia: What's Hot about Cold.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Reducing body temperature to 33 °C in patients who have been resuscitated from cardiac arrest but who remain comatose can ameliorate anoxic encephalopathy and improve recovery. Experimental animal studies have suggested that cooling to 33 °C also aids the resuscitative process itself, facilitating the resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The mechanism of cooling benefit is probably the reduction of metabolic demand of most organs, and reduced production of toxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species. External cooling by application of ice or pads through which cold water circulates is effective but requires up to 8 hours to achieve the target temperature of 33 °C. Our goal was to develop a faster method of cooling that could be initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In anesthetized swine, we induced ventricular fibrillation by passing alternating current down an electrode catheter in the right ventricle. We then ventilated the animals' lungs with liquid perfluorocarbons (PFCs), a technique known as total liquid ventilation (TLV). Perfluorocarbons are oxygen-carrying modules; we pre-oxygenated the PFCs by bubbling 100% O(2) through the solution for 2 minutes before use, and pre-cooled the PFCs to -15 °C. The cold oxygenated PFCs reduced pulmonary artery temperature (a surrogate for myocardial temperature) to 33 °C in about 6 minutes. Using this technique we achieved ROSC in 8 of 11 (82%) animals given TLV versus 3 of 11 (27%) control animals receiving conventional CPR without PFCs (P<0.05). We also compared the cold TLV technique with the administration of intravenous iced saline to achieve hypothermia. Both the cold TLV and cold saline techniques produced rapid hypothermia, but we could achieve ROSC in only 2 of 8 (25%) animals given cold saline versus 7 of 8 (88%) given cold TLV. This result is likely due to the rise in right atrial pressure and corresponding reduction in coronary perfusion pressure caused by volume loading with IV saline

  17. Is the moon hot or cold.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hanks, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    Basic observations are discussed which do not demand a presently cold moon and are consistent with a hot moon. It is suggested that an iron-deficient, highly resistive, hot lunar interior, capped by a cool, rigid lunar lithosphere with a thickness of several hundred kilometers, can explain the relevant observations and is a reasonable model of the moon today. The strength of the moon, lunar electrical conductivity profiles, the relative absence of present-day volcanic activity, and thermal history considerations are examined. Whether the deep interior of the moon is hot or cold has an important bearing on the overall composition of the moon and its origin.

  18. Cold Temperatures Increase Cold Hardiness in the Next Generation Ophraella communa Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%–4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates. PMID:24098666

  19. Cold temperatures increase cold hardiness in the next generation Ophraella communa beetles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Shi; Rasmann, Sergio; Li, Min; Guo, Jian-Ying; Chen, Hong-Song; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2013-01-01

    The leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, has been introduced to control the spread of the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, in China. We hypothesized that the beetle, to be able to track host-range expansion into colder climates, can phenotypically adapt to cold temperatures across generations. Therefore, we questioned whether parental experience of colder temperatures increases cold tolerance of the progeny. Specifically, we studied the demography, including development, fecundity, and survival, as well as physiological traits, including supercooling point (SCP), water content, and glycerol content of O. communa progeny whose parents were maintained at different temperature regimes. Overall, the entire immature stage decreased survival of about 0.2%-4.2% when parents experienced cold temperatures compared to control individuals obtained from parents raised at room temperature. However, intrinsic capacity for increase (r), net reproductive rate (R 0) and finite rate of increase (λ) of progeny O. communa were maximum when parents experienced cold temperatures. Glycerol contents of both female and male in progeny was significantly higher when maternal and paternal adults were cold acclimated as compared to other treatments. This resulted in the supercooling point of the progeny adults being significantly lower compared to beetles emerging from parents that experienced room temperatures. These results suggest that cold hardiness of O. communa can be promoted by cold acclimation in previous generation, and it might counter-balance reduced survival in the next generation, especially when insects are tracking their host-plants into colder climates.

  20. A field study of cold effects among cold store workers in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Li, T; Huang, H; Holmér, I

    1991-01-01

    A field study was carried out among cold store workers in China. A self administrative questionnaire and health check-up were taken among 463 male workers from two different types of cold stores, all during their whole daily work. 296 men from Lower Temperature Stores (LTS), where the air temperature was between -10 to -25 degrees C, and 167 men from Ice Stores (IS), where the air temperature was between -5 and +5 degrees C participated. Another group of 152 men working in normal stores and exposed to an air temperature between 20 and 30 degrees C served as a control group. The study did not indicate any special disease attributable to the cold environment. The number of complaints of lower back pain and knee pain in the cold exposed group were significantly higher than that of the control group (in LTS: 42.3%, 46.6%; IS: 52.7%, 50.8%; control group: 9.2%, 14.5%; low back and knee pain, respectively). After 5 years of cold exposure work, the lower back and knee symptoms were very frequent. The point press pain on the knees of the cooler group (LTS) was higher than in the moderate cold group (IS). We suppose that the cold factor contributed to lower back and knee pain. 12.2% of 463 cold exposed workers had frostbite on the body extremities viz: hand, foot and ear. Self estimation of health indicated more problems among cold exposed workers (28.0%) than control group (2.7%).

  1. Anoxic stress and rapid cold hardening enhance cold tolerance of the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Hanying; Kang, Le

    2014-10-01

    Anoxia and rapid cold hardening (RCH) can increase the cold tolerance of many animals. However, mechanisms underlying these two kinds of stresses remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship of acclimation to cold stress with acclimation to anoxic stress in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. RCH at 0°C for 3h promoted the survival of cold stress-exposed locusts. Anoxic hypercapnia (CO2 anoxic treatment) for 40 min exerted an effect similar to that of RCH. Anoxic hypercapnia within 1h can all promote the cold hardiness of locusts. We investigated the transcript levels of six heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, namely, Hsp20.5, Hsp20.6, Hsp20.7, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90. Four genes, namely, Hsp90, Hsp40, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7, showed differential responses to RCH and anoxic hypercapnia treatments. Under cold stress, locusts exposed to the two regimens showed different responses for Hsp90, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7. However, the varied responses disappeared after recovery from cold stress. Compared with the control group, the transcript levels of six Hsp genes were generally downregulated in locusts subjected to anoxic hypercapnia or/and RCH. These results indicate that anoxic stress and RCH have different mechanisms of regulating the transcription of Hsp family members even if the two treatments exerted similar effects on cold tolerance of the migratory locust. However, Hsps may not play a major role in the promotion of cold hardiness by the two treatments.

  2. ENSO’s far reaching connection to Indian cold waves

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Annamalai, H.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts. PMID:27876871

  3. ENSO’s far reaching connection to Indian cold waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Annamalai, H.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-01

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  4. ENSO's far reaching connection to Indian cold waves.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Annamalai, H; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-23

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  5. Condensation of galactic cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Visinelli, Luca

    2016-07-07

    We consider the steady-state regime describing the density profile of a dark matter halo, if dark matter is treated as a Bose-Einstein condensate. We first solve the fluid equation for “canonical” cold dark matter, obtaining a class of density profiles which includes the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, and which diverge at the halo core. We then solve numerically the equation obtained when an additional “quantum pressure” term is included in the computation of the density profile. The solution to this latter case is finite at the halo core, possibly avoiding the “cuspy halo problem” present in some cold dark matter theories. Within the model proposed, we predict the mass of the cold dark matter particle to be of the order of M{sub χ}c{sup 2}≈10{sup −24} eV, which is of the same order of magnitude as that predicted in ultra-light scalar cold dark matter models. Finally, we derive the differential equation describing perturbations in the density and the pressure of the dark matter fluid.

  6. Production and application of translationally cold molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Meijer, Gerard

    Inspired by the spectacular successes in the field of cold atoms, there is currently great interest in cold molecules. Cooling molecules is useful for various fundamental physics studies and gives access to an exotic regime in chemistry where the wave property of the molecules becomes important. Although cooling molecules has turned out to be considerably more difficult than cooling atoms, a number of methods to produce samples of cold molecules have been demonstrated over the last few years. This paper aims to review the application of cold molecules and the methods to produce them. Emphasis is put on the deceleration of polar molecules using time-varying electric fields. The operation principle of the array of electrodes that is used to decelerate polar molecules is described in analogy with, and using terminology from, charged-particle accelerators. It is shown that, by applying an appropriately timed high voltage burst, molecules can be decelerated while the phase-space density, i.e. the number of molecules per position-velocity interval, remains constant. In this way the high density and low temperature in the moving frame of a pulsed molecular beam can be transferred to the laboratory frame. Experiments on metastable CO in states that are either repelled by or attracted to high electric fields are presented. Loading of slow molecules into traps and storage rings is discussed.

  7. 75 FR 52213 - Cold Treatment Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting as a final rule, with... tamperproof temperature recording devices specifically. These actions relieve certain requirements that we... effective. Immediate action was necessary to amend the cold treatment regulations to ensure that...

  8. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-01

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges. This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips. Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  9. Is It a Cold or the Flu?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Sometimes Chest Discomfort, Cough Mild to moderate; hacking cough Common; can become severe Treatment Antihistamines Decongestant Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines Antiviral medicines— See your doctor Prevention Wash your hands often Avoid close contact with anyone with a cold Annual ...

  10. On Air Shutter for Cold Storage Room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Isamu; Tsuji, Katsuhiko

    Air curtains are frequently placed at doorway of cold storage room or freezing chamber. As an opening of jet flow in these air curtains is relatively narrow and speed of jet flow is fast, air entrained from surroundings increases in quantity. Therefore, we consider that jet flow with narrow opening can not effectively isolate inside air from the external atmosphere, but the one with relatively wide opening can decrease air entrained from surroundings. Then, when air curtain which has a wide opening (we call it air shutter) is installed at cold storage room, and isolating performances of air shutter are compared with the air curtain. First, as various conditions can be easily changed in numerical calculation, we compare a velocity and temperature field in cold storage room under these conditions when velocity of jet flow is changed by using numerical method. Second, we measure a temperature and velocity distribution in an actual cold storage room under three conditions (air shutter operates, air curtain operates and no operation). From these results, it was found that air shutter is more efficient than air curtain.

  11. Cold weather properties and performance of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oil or animal fat that can be employed in compression-ignition (diesel) engines. Biodiesel is more prone to start-up and operability problems during cold weather than conventional diesel fuels (petrodiesel). This work reviews impacts that exposu...

  12. Astronomical Constraints on Quantum Cold Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivey, Shane; Musielak, Z.; Fry, J.

    2012-01-01

    A model of quantum (`fuzzy') cold dark matter that accounts for both the halo core problem and the missing dwarf galaxies problem, which plague the usual cold dark matter paradigm, is developed. The model requires that a cold dark matter particle has a mass so small that its only allowed physical description is a quantum wave function. Each such particle in a galactic halo is bound to a gravitational potential that is created by luminous matter and by the halo itself, and the resulting wave function is described by a Schrödinger equation. To solve this equation on a galactic scale, we impose astronomical constraints that involve several density profiles used to fit data from simulations of dark matter galactic halos. The solutions to the Schrödinger equation are quantum waves which resemble the density profiles acquired from simulations, and they are used to determine the mass of the cold dark matter particle. The effects of adding certain types of baryonic matter to the halo, such as a dwarf elliptical galaxy or a supermassive black hole, are also discussed.

  13. Astrochemical Properties of Planck Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Liu, Tie; Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyễn Lu’o’ng, Quang; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Thompson, Mark A.; Fuller, Gary; Wu, Yuefang; Li, Di; Di Francesco, James; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wang, Ke; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Juvela, Mika; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Cunningham, Maria; Saito, Masao; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; He, Jinhua; Sakai, Takeshi; Kim, Jungha; JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We observed 13 Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N2H+ distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC3N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N2H+ emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN13C, N2D+, and cyclic-C3H2 toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N2D+ is 50%. Furthermore, we observed the NH3 emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most targets are cold (≲20 K). In two of the starless clumps we observed, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N2H+ core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N2D+. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the chemical evolution factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.

  14. Laser-Free Cold-Atom Gymnastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, Benedict; Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have performed beam transport simulations on ultra cold (2 μK) and cold (130 μK) neutral Cs atoms in the F = M = + 4 (magnetic weak-field seeking) ground state. We use inhomogeneous magnetic fields to focus and accelerate the atoms. Acceleration of neutral atoms by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was demonstrated by Stern and Gerlach in 1922. In the simulations, a two mm diameter cloud of atoms is released to fall under gravity. A magnetic coil focuses the falling atoms. After falling 41 cm, the atoms are reflected in the magnetic fringe field of a solenoid. They return to their starting height, about 0.7 s later, having passed a second time through the focusing coil. The simulations show that > 98 % of ultra cold Cs atoms and > 70 % of cold Cs atoms will survive at least 15 round trips (assuming perfect vacuum). More than 100 simulations were run to optimize coil currents and focusing coil diameter and height. Simulations also show that atoms can be launched into a fountain. An experimental apparatus to test the simulations, is being constructed. This technique may find application in atomic fountain clocks, interferometers, and gravitometers, and may be adaptable for use in microgravity. It may also work with Bose-Einstein condensates of paramagnetic atoms.

  15. Structural Assembly for Cold Plate Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device including a structural member having a heat spreader and an electronic device mounted directly to a first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member. The device also includes a cold plate mounted directly to the first surface of the heat spreader of the structural member.

  16. Decontamination of foods by cold plasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology for meats, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas, such as air, oxygen, nitrogen, or helium to inactivate microbes without the use of conventional antimicrobial chemical agents. ...

  17. Cold plasma technology close-up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column discusses cold plasma, an emerging technology that has potential applications as an antimicrobial process for fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables, low-moisture foods, and food contact surfaces. Brendan A. Niemira, the coauthor of this month’s column, is the research leader ...

  18. Confronting Common Folklore: Catching a Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    Almost every child has experienced the sniffly, stuffy, and achy congestion of the common cold. In addition, many have encountered the "old wives tales" that forge a link between personal actions and coming down with this common respiratory infection. Much of this health folklore has been passed down from generation to generation (e.g., getting a…

  19. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  20. Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP): Scientific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorn, L.

    1982-01-01

    During late summer 1978 a rocket campaign was carried out at Esrange. The ion chemistry and composition at and around the extremely cold arctic mesopause, particularly in connection with observations of noctilucent clouds (NLC) was studied. Several plasma parameters were measured, for example, density of electrons and positive ions and composition of both positive and negative ions.

  1. EVALUATION OF THE COLD PIPE PRECHARGER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the performance of the cold pipe precharger, taking a more rigorous approach than had been previously taken. The approach required detailed descriptions of electrical characteristics, electro-hydrodynamics, and charging theory. The co...

  2. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  3. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  4. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  5. Cold Atmosphere Plasma in Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas that is typically generated in high-temperature laboratory conditions. Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Areas of potential application of cold atmospheric plasmas (CAP) include dentistry, drug delivery, dermatology, cosmetics, wound healing, cellular modifications, and cancer treatment. Various diagnostic tools have been developed for characterization of CAP including intensified charge-coupled device cameras, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical measurements of the discharge propertied. Recently a new method for temporally resolved measurements of absolute values of plasma density in the plasma column of small-size atmospheric plasma jet utilizing Rayleigh microwave scattering was proposed [1,2]. In this talk we overview state of the art of CAP diagnostics and understanding of the mechanism of plasma action of biological objects. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (long, bladder, and skin) was recently demonstrated [3]. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. For instance a strong selective effect was observed; the resulting 60--70% of lung cancer cells were detached from the plate in the zone treated with plasma, whereas no detachment was observed in the treated zone for the normal lung cells under the same treatment conditions. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration

  6. Cold weather exercise and airway cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Malayer, Jerry R; Vandeventer, Lori; Royer, Christopher M; McKenzie, Erica C; Williamson, Katherine K

    2005-06-01

    Athletes who perform repeated exercise while breathing cold air have a high prevalence of asthmalike chronic airway disease, but the mechanism linking such activity to airway inflammation is unknown. We used a novel animal model (exercising horses) to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced chronic airway disease is caused by exposure of intrapulmonary airways to unconditioned air, resulting in the upregulation of cytokine expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from eight horses 5 h after submaximal exercise while they breathed room temperature or subfreezing air in a random crossover design. BALF total and differential nucleated cell counts were determined, and relative cytokine mRNA expression in BALF nucleated cells was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using primer and probe sequences specific for equine targets. There were no significant changes in total or differential cell concentrations between BALF recovered after warm and cold air exercise, although there was a strong trend toward increased concentrations of airway epithelial cells after cold air exercise (P = 0.0625). T(H)2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were preferentially upregulated after cold air exercise 12-, 9-, and 10-fold, respectively, compared with warm air exercise. Other cytokines (IL-2 and IL-6) were upregulated to a lesser extent (6- and 3-fold, respectively) or not at all (IL-1, IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha). These results suggest that cold weather exercise can lead to asthmalike airway disease through the local induction of cytokines typical of the T(H)2 phenotype.

  7. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  8. Preserving Alaska's early Cold War legacy.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffecker, J.; Whorton, M.

    1999-03-08

    The US Air Force owns and operates numerous facilities that were constructed during the Cold War era. The end of the Cold War prompted many changes in the operation of these properties: missions changed, facilities were modified, and entire bases were closed or realigned. The widespread downsizing of the US military stimulated concern over the potential loss of properties that had acquired historical value in the context of the Cold War. In response, the US Department of Defense in 1991 initiated a broad effort to inventory properties of this era. US Air Force installations in Alaska were in the forefront of these evaluations because of the role of the Cold War in the state's development and history and the high interest on the part of the Alaska State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in these properties. The 611th Air Support Group (611 ASG) owns many of Alaska's early Cold War properties, most were associated with strategic air defense. The 611 ASG determined that three systems it operates, which were all part of the integrated defense against Soviet nuclear strategic bomber threat, were eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and would require treatment as historic properties. These systems include the Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) System, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and Forward Operating Bases (FOBs). As part of a massive cleanup operation, Clean Sweep, the 611 ASG plans to demolish many of the properties associated with these systems. To mitigate the effects of demolition, the 611 ASG negotiated agreements on the system level (e.g., the DEW Line) with the Alaska SHPO to document the history and architectural/engineering features associated with these properties. This system approach allowed the US Air Force to mitigate effects on many individual properties in a more cost-effective and efficient manner.

  9. [Introduction of cold light to endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Kieser, C W

    2008-03-01

    It is the aim of the paper to describe how, 40 years ago, optic glass fibers were developed, and what has been K. Storz's contribution to the new technology. In 1951 the term "Cold Light" was used the first time for illumination of a French type film- and photoendoscope. In 1957 the gastroenterologist B. Hirschowitz at Ann Arbor, U.S.A. succeeded making glass fibers of high light-guiding properties. In 1961 the Cystoscope Makers Inc (ACMI) at New York using these fibers brought the first flexible gastroscope on the market, still equipped with a conventional electric lamp. But in 1960, the year before, the physicist's of ACMI, J. H. Hett and L. Curtiss built the first cold light endoscope using glass fibers for both light and images conduction. In the following years ACMI equipped all of his endoscopes with this new type of illumination. Not before 1963 did K. Storz and the other German manufacturers produce their first cold light cystoscopes. Not possessing the know-how of glass fiber manufacturing, they had to get their fibers from abroad. K. Storz transmitted the term "cold light", which before had been the label of his French-type endoscopes, to the new glass fiber illumination. He constructed an excellent light source for fiber illumination without having light cables of his own fabrication. That is why his name is intimately connected with cold light illumination. But, nevertheless, the invention of the new glass fiber illumination must be credited to B. Hirschowitz and the physicists of ACMI in the U.S.A.

  10. An unusual reaction to cold: a sporadic case of familial polymorphous cold eruption?

    PubMed

    Urano, Y; Shikiji, T; Sasaki, S; Fukuhara, K; Arase, S

    1998-09-01

    A 14-year-old Japanese girl had a lifelong history of skin lesions developing after generalized exposure to cold air; the lesions were often accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever and chills. The skin lesions were non-pruritic, maculopapular, erythematous eruptions and were neither urticarial nor angioedematous. An ice-cube test was negative. Laboratory examinations showed marked leucocytosis during an acute attack. On the basis of clinical features, histological findings and laboratory data, although these symptoms were sporadic, the most likely diagnosis was familial polymorphous cold eruption, which has also been referred to as familial cold urticaria. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 were significantly elevated during an acute attack after cold exposure, suggesting that both cytokines played important parts in the development of her condition.

  11. MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    ... MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) These MISR Browse images provide a ... over the region observed during the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). CLPX involved ground, airborne, and satellite measurements ...

  12. Is It a Cold or the Flu (For Parents)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... flu that's been going around? Or just a common cold ? Although the flu (or influenza ) usually causes symptoms ... someone feel worse than symptoms associated with a common cold, it's not always easy to tell the difference ...

  13. Cold-Weather Foot Care Key for Diabetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163022.html Cold-Weather Foot Care Key for Diabetics It's important to ... potentially serious foot problems, especially during the cold weather, a foot and ankle specialist warns. "When it ...

  14. Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) Street names: Candy, Drank, Robo Print What are cough and cold medicines? Also known as: Robotripping, Robo, Tussin, Triple C, ...

  15. Common Cold Can Be Dangerous After Bone Marrow Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164206.html Common Cold Can Be Dangerous After Bone Marrow Transplant Rhinovirus ... 2017 TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The common cold can be deadly for patients recovering from bone ...

  16. High Blood Pressure and Cold Remedies: Which Are Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feb. 25, 2016. Sexton DJ, et al. The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 25, 2016. Common cold: Protect yourself and others. National Institute of Allergy ...

  17. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  18. Pharmacological Blockade of TRPM8 Ion Channels Alters Cold and Cold Pain Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Daniel D.; McKemy, David D.

    2011-01-01

    TRPM8 (Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-8) is a cold- and menthol-gated ion channel necessary for the detection of cold temperatures in the mammalian peripheral nervous system. Functioning TRPM8 channels are required for behavioral responses to innocuous cool, noxious cold, injury-evoked cold hypersensitivity, cooling-mediated analgesia, and thermoregulation. Because of these various roles, the ability to pharmacologically manipulate TRPM8 function to alter the excitability of cold-sensing neurons may have broad impact clinically. Here we examined a novel compound, PBMC (1-phenylethyl-4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl(2-aminoethyl)carbamate) which robustly and selectively inhibited TRPM8 channels in vitro with sub-nanomolar affinity, as determined by calcium microfluorimetry and electrophysiology. The actions of PBMC were selective for TRPM8, with no functional effects observed for the sensory ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1. PBMC altered TRPM8 gating by shifting the voltage-dependence of menthol-evoked currents towards positive membrane potentials. When administered systemically to mice, PBMC treatment produced a dose-dependent hypothermia in wildtype animals while TRPM8-knockout mice remained unaffected. This hypothermic response was reduced at lower doses, whereas responses to evaporative cooling were still significantly attenuated. Lastly, systemic PBMC also diminished cold hypersensitivity in inflammatory and nerve-injury pain models, but was ineffective against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold hypersensitivity, despite our findings that TRPM8 is required for the cold-related symptoms of this pathology. Thus PBMC is an attractive compound that serves as a template for the formulation of highly specific and potent TRPM8 antagonists that will have utility both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21984952

  19. Cold rearing improves cold-flight performance in Drosophila via changes in wing morphology.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Melanie R; Harrison, Jon F; Kirkton, Scott D; Roberts, Stephen P

    2008-07-01

    We use a factorial experimental design to test whether rearing at colder temperatures shifts the lower thermal envelope for flight of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen to colder temperatures. D. melanogaster that developed in colder temperatures (15 degrees C) had a significant flight advantage in cold air compared to flies that developed in warmer temperatures (28 degrees C). At 14 degrees C, cold-reared flies failed to perform a take-off flight approximately 47% of the time whereas warm-reared flies failed approximately 94% of the time. At 18 degrees C, cold- and warm-reared flies performed equally well. We also compared several traits in cold- and warm-developing flies to determine if cold-developing flies had better flight performance at cold temperatures due to changes in body mass, wing length, wing loading, relative flight muscle mass or wing-beat frequency. The improved ability to fly at low temperatures was associated with a dramatic increase in wing area and an increase in wing length (after controlling for wing area). Flies that developed at 15 degrees C had approximately 25% more wing area than similarly sized flies that developed at 28 degrees C. Cold-reared flies had slower wing-beat frequencies than similarly sized flies from warmer developmental environments, whereas other traits did not vary with developmental temperature. These results demonstrate that developmental plasticity in wing dimensions contributes to the improved flight performance of D. melanogaster at cold temperatures, and ultimately, may help D. melanogaster live in a wide range of thermal environments.

  20. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant correlations between progesterone level and laser-Doppler flux response to local cooling were observed during the follicular (R=-0.552, p=0.0174) and during the luteal phases (R=0.520, p=0.0271). In contrast, the correlation between estradiol level and laser-Doppler flux response was observed only in the follicular phase (R=-0.506, p=0.0324). Our results show that individual sensitivity to cold influences cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling; that microvascular reactivity is more pronounced during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; and that reactivity correlates with hormone levels. The effect of specific sex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature.

  1. Prevention and Management of Cold-Weather Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    metabolism.) TB MED 508 11 d. Diuresis and fluid balance. (1) A widely recognized effect of exposure to cold is an increase...in urine flow rate, that is, cold-induced diuresis (CID). This response is likely caused by a redistribution of body fluids from the extremities and...CID cold-induced diuresis CIVD cold-induced vasodilation CO carbon monoxide CO2 carbon dioxide CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation

  2. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  6. The Family Crucible and Healthy Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, David A.

    This essay examines the challenges that today's children and families face due to the rapidly changing nature of modern society, and suggests some solutions to help ensure the optimal development of children and adolescents. Rapid technological change, the decline of the extended family, the increased number of women in the workplace, and…

  7. Reusable crucible for containing corrosive liquids

    DOEpatents

    de Pruneda, Jean A. H.

    1995-01-01

    A reusable, non-wetting, corrosion-resistant material suitable for containment of corrosive liquids is formed of a tantalum or tantalum alloy substrate that is permeated with carbon atoms. The substrate is carburized to form surface layers of TaC and Ta.sub.2 C, and then is heated at high temperature under vacuum until the carbon atoms in the carbide layers diffuse throughout the substrate to form a solid solution of carbon atoms randomly interspersed in the tantalum or tantalum alloy lattice.

  8. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)].

  9. Reusable crucible for containing corrosive liquids

    DOEpatents

    Pruneda, J.A.H. de.

    1995-01-24

    A reusable, non-wetting, corrosion-resistant material suitable for containment of corrosive liquids is formed of a tantalum or tantalum alloy substrate that is permeated with carbon atoms. The substrate is carburized to form surface layers of TaC and Ta[sub 2]C, and then is heated at high temperature under vacuum until the carbon atoms in the carbide layers diffuse throughout the substrate to form a solid solution of carbon atoms randomly interspersed in the tantalum or tantalum alloy lattice. 10 figures.

  10. The Crucible of Physician Performance Reports

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Individualized physician performance reports are an emerging phenomena. The narrative piece examines one physician’s experience with individualized physician performance reports. Reforming the data collection process could enhance the value of the reports to stakeholders. PMID:20838915

  11. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  12. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  13. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  14. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  15. Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? Print A A A My son has been ... common cold can be so much alike that it's sometimes hard to tell the two apart. But ...

  16. Some Like It Hot, Some like It Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to find the right combination to construct a cold pack for athletic injuries, students mix liquids and solids in a calorimeter, and use a thermometer to ascertain whether the chemical reaction is hot or cold. Many formulae for chemical reactions are given, the first of which is used for commercial cold packs.

  17. 7 CFR 305.16 - Cold treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cold treatment schedules. 305.16 Section 305.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Cold Treatments § 305.16 Cold...

  18. Cold Regions Test of Tracked and Wheeled Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-11

    of light, which can make objects appear closer or further away than the actual distances. Temperature inversions may also cause sounds to become...are cold temperatures , strong seasonality with distinct changes in insolation, frozen atmospheric moisture, frozen ground, and freeze thaw of water...characteristics of a cold region are cold temperatures , strong seasonality with distinct changes in insolation, frozen atmospheric moisture, frozen

  19. Cold Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't, What Can't Hurt

    MedlinePlus

    ... can't hurt There's no cure for the common cold. But what about cold remedies that claim to ... Cold remedies are almost as common as the common cold, but are they effective? Nothing can cure a ...

  20. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  1. Axion cold dark matter in nonstandard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with nonstandard thermal histories before big bang nucleosynthesis: the low-temperature reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these nonstandard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  2. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  3. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  4. Lunar Cold Trap Contamination by Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, Scott T.; Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Tools have been developed to model and simulate the effects of lunar landing vehicles on the lunar environment (Metzger, 2011), mostly addressing the effects of regolith erosion by rocket plumes and the fate of the ejected lunar soil particles (Metzger, 2010). These tools are being applied at KSC to predict ejecta from the upcoming Google Lunar X-Prize Landers and how they may damage the historic Apollo landing sites. The emerging interest in lunar mining poses a threat of contamination to pristine craters at the lunar poles, which act as "cold traps" for water and may harbor other valuable minerals Crider and Vondrak (2002). The KSC Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab tools have been expanded to address the probability for contamination of these pristine "cold trap" craters.

  5. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  6. COLD-SAT feasibility study safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, Steven T.; Yost, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite presents some unique safety issues. The feasibility study conducted at NASA-Lewis desired a systems safety program that would be involved from the initial design in order to eliminate and/or control the inherent hazards. Because of this, a hazards analysis method was needed that: (1) identified issues that needed to be addressed for a feasibility assessment; and (2) identified all potential hazards that would need to be controlled and/or eliminated during the detailed design phases. The developed analysis method is presented as well as the results generated for the COLD-SAT system.

  7. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

  8. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  9. Cold-start hydrocarbon emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This article describes an effective, energy-efficient strategy for dealing with this problem using HC traps and heat-exchange related catalyst beds that have been successfully tested. The worldwide regulatory climate for continued and dramatic reductions in vehicle exhaust emissions will continue unabated for some time. The best known of these mandates includes California Air Resources Board`s Low Emission Vehicle (CARB LEV) program, the Ozone Transport Commission`s recent petition to the EPA for partial adoption of CARB`s LEV program, and the European Economic Community`s proposed staged multi-tier approach to reduce auto exhaust pollution. Since up to 70% of hydrocarbon tailpipe emissions occur during the cold-start portion of the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), significant reductions in total FTP HC emissions must include a cold-start HC abatement strategy.

  10. Impact of Hight Velocity Cold Spray Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Jiang, X.; Neiser, R.A.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents experimental data and an computational model of the cold spray solid particle impact process. Copper particles impacting onto a polished stainless steel substrate are examined. The high velocity impact causes significant plastic deformation of both the particle and the sub- strate, but no melting is observed. The plastic deformation exposes clean surfaces that, under the high impact pressures, result in significant bond strengths between the particle and substrate. Experimental measurements of the splat and crater sizes compare well with the numerical calculations. It is shown that the crater depth is significant and increases with impact velocity. However, the splat diameter is much less sensitive to the impact velocity. It is also shown that the geometric lengths of the splat and crater scale linearly with the diameter of the impacting particle. It is hoped that the results presented will allow better understanding of the bonding process during cold spray.

  11. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  12. Improvement of cold resistance and performance of broilers by acute cold exposure during late embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shinder, D; Ruzal, M; Giloh, M; Druyan, S; Piestun, Y; Yahav, S

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fine-tune previous acute cold exposure treatments of broiler embryos during late embryogenesis to improve lifelong cold resistance and performance. Six hundred Cobb hatching eggs were incubated under standard conditions and then exposed to 3 treatments: control; cold treatment in which embryos were exposed to 15°C for 30 min on d 18 and 19 of incubation (30 × 2); and cold treatment similar to 30 × 2 but with 60-min exposures (60 × 2). Egg shell temperature (T(egg)) and heart rate (HR) were monitored pre- and posttreatment. Upon hatching, hatchability, body weight, and body temperature were recorded. From 14 to 35 d of age, three quarters of the chickens in each treatment were raised under ascites-inducing conditions (AIC) and the remaining birds were raised under standard brooding conditions (SBC). The T(egg) and HR decreased significantly in response to increased exposure time on d 18 of incubation. On d 19 of incubation, before the second cold exposure, the 30 × 2 group showed greater T(egg) and HR than the controls, and during the second exposure they maintained these parameters better than the 60 × 2 embryos. No treatment effect on hatchability was observed. At 35 d of age ascites incidence among 30 × 2 chickens under AIC was significantly less than that among the controls (P < 0.01), and body weight of these chickens under either SBC or AIC was significantly higher than that of the controls. Under SBC relative breast muscle weight was significantly higher in 60 × 2 chickens, whereas the relative heart weight was higher in both cold-treated groups than in the controls. It can be concluded that repeated short acute cold exposures during late embryogenesis significantly reduced ascites incidence and improved growth rate under either SBC or AIC. These results may be related to a prenatal epigenetic adaptation of the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular systems to low ambient temperature.

  13. How cold is it? TRPM8 and TRPA1 in the molecular logic of cold sensation.

    PubMed

    McKemy, David D

    2005-04-22

    Recognition of temperature is a critical element of sensory perception and allows us to evaluate both our external and internal environments. In vertebrates, the somatosensory system can discriminate discrete changes in ambient temperature, which activate nerve endings of primary afferent fibers. These thermosensitive nerves can be further segregated into those that detect either innocuous or noxious (painful) temperatures; the latter neurons being nociceptors. We now know that thermosensitive afferents express ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family that respond at distinct temperature thresholds, thus establishing the molecular basis for thermosensation. Much is known of those channels mediating the perception of noxious heat; however, those proposed to be involved in cool to noxious cold sensation, TRPM8 and TRPA1, have only recently been described. The former channel is a receptor for menthol, and links the sensations provided by this and other cooling compounds to temperature perception. While TRPM8 almost certainly performs a critical role in cold signaling, its part in nociception is still at issue. The latter channel, TRPA1, is activated by the pungent ingredients in mustard and cinnamon, but has also been postulated to mediate our perception of noxious cold temperatures. However, a number of conflicting reports have suggested that the role of this channel in cold sensation needs to be confirmed. Thus, the molecular logic for the perception of cold-evoked pain remains enigmatic. This review is intended to summarize our current understanding of these cold thermoreceptors, as well as address the current controversy regarding TRPA1 and cold signaling.

  14. Design calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation procedure, based on discrete ordinates transport methods, that is being used to carry out design calculations for the Advanced Neutron Source cold source is described. Calculated results on the gain in cold neutron flux produced by a liquid deuterium cold source are compared with experimental data and with calculated data previously obtained by P. Ageron et al., at the Institute Max von Laue-Paul Langevin in Grenoble, France. Calculated results are also presented that indicated how the flux of cold neutrons vary with cold source parameters. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  16. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  17. Cold Atoms, Statistical Physics and Quantum Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-22

    to be the development of robust theoretical techniques for the simulations of ultra-cold Bose gases and other quantum phenomena, such theoretical...finite-temperature effects in atom-chip interferometry of Bose -Einstein condensates, R. G. Scott, et al., Physical Review A, 063624 (2009). A copy of...March 2009. Mr Hodder was supported through a University of Otago Scholarship. He initially developed a simple single-site Hubbard model, which can be

  18. Temporal characteristics of cold pain perception.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Michael A; Bolding, Mark S; Cutter, Gary R; Ness, Timothy J; Zhang, Kui

    2010-08-09

    Adaptation to a sustained stimulus is an important phenomenon in psychophysical experiments. When studying the response to an experimental task, the investigator has to account for the change in perceived stimulus intensity with repeated stimulus application and, if the stimulus is sustained, for the change in intensity during the presentation. An example of a sustained stimulus is the cold pressor task (CPT). The task has been used both as an experimental pain task and to study cardiovascular physiology. In functional imaging research, the CPT has been used to evaluate cognitive processing of a noxious stimulus. Investigators typically model the stimulus in a block design as a categorical (on-off) stimulus and do not account for a temporal change in stimulus perception. If the perceived stimulus changes over time, the results may be misleading. Therefore, we characterized the time course of cold pain in human volunteers and developed a model of the temporal characteristics of perceived cold pain. Fifteen healthy participants underwent cold pain testing by immersing their right foot into a container filled with ice water (2 degrees C) for 30s alternating with a 30s immersion into a container filled with tepid water 32 degrees C (control). Participants rated the pain intensity using an electronic slide algometer. Using a mixed general linear model (effectively a polynomial regression model), we determined that pain ratings follow a crescendo-decrescendo pattern that can be described well using a quadratic model. We conclude that the time course of quantitative perception differs fundamentally from the time course of stimulus presentation. This may be important when looking for the physiological correlates of perception as opposed to the presence of a stimulus per se.

  19. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  20. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  1. Pump battery assessment: cold, old, or dead!

    PubMed

    Leong, M S; Carpentier, B W

    2001-07-01

    Intraspinal drug delivery systems are becoming increasingly utilized for the management of patients with pain or spasticity. Numerous potential complications associated with the use of this technology have previously been described in the literature. We have had experience with a new complication of the internal alarm being triggered by the instillation of cold solution into the pump resevoir. This new finding could have implications for patients with respect to unnecessary reevaluations of the pump, or possible premature scheduling of pump replacement surgery.

  2. Air Source Cold Climate Heat Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    The buildings were modified so that one zone used the cold climate heat pump and the other zone used its original modern central HVAC system . Both...been updated with insulation, a sheet metal roof, and a modern central HVAC system . Both buildings had two zones for heating and cooling, which...climate heat pump and the other zone used its original modern central HVAC system . Both zones were instrumented so that energy consumption and

  3. The Cold War: An Assessment of Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    capitalized on their vulnerabilities even at the expense of the U.S. economy, and directly contributed to the demise of the USSR. INSIGHTS GAINED FOR... capital . This was an ideological war, but the difference between ideologies was political and economic views. In the post-Cold War world order...SDI", Foreign Affairs. Spring, 1988. Larson, Deborah W. Origins of Containment: A Psycological E.x.planation Princton Univ. Press, 1985. Lippmann

  4. Cold War Conflict: American Intervention in Greece

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    King.4 0 Undoubtedly, the majority was more of a vote against the Left than it was for the King. Nonetheless, the King returned and further insulated ...much stock in any pledge by the King to prevent such a regime would probably be less responsive to American influence and desire then it more pliable ...London: Hart- Davis, MacGibbon. 1976. Woods , Randall B., and Jones, Howard. Dawning of the Cold War: The United States’ Ouest For Order. Athens

  5. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soreghan, G.S.; Soreghan, M.J.; Poulsen, C.J.; Young, R.A.; Eble, C.F.; Sweet, D.E.; Davogustto, O.C.

    2008-01-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic. Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidence for continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have long been considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded from the highlatitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacial indicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperatures in western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley and associated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation that extended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains. Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only known occurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history; the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) is most consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emerging indicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, these results suggest that tropical climate was not buffered from the high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climate shifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheet model simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solar luminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that other factors must be considered in attempting to explain this 'best-known' analogue to our present Earth. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  6. Cold atom quantum emulation of ultrafast processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Senaratne, Ruwan; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed lasers are an invaluable probe of fast electron dynamics in condensed matter systems. However, despite tremendous progress, physical limitations on lasers and a lack of exact theoretical models still limit the exploration of ultrafast processes in solids. We discuss a possible complementary approach, in which lattice-trapped cold neutral atoms driven far from equilibrium are used as a quantum emulator of ultrafast physics at sub-cycle timescales. The cold atom context is in many ways a natural choice for such experiments: equilibration timescales are more than ten orders of magnitude slower than those in solids, and strong driving forces are easily produced and manipulated. Our experimental approach uses ultracold strontium in optical traps. Multiple stable isotopes and a long-lived metastable state provide control over interaction strengths, while a narrow-linewidth transition expands the typical cold-atom toolbox of readout techniques. We discuss initial efforts in quantum emulation of tunnel ionization and development of a platform for more complicated endeavors, including the study of multiple-pulse sequences and recollision processes. We acknowledge support from the NSF GRFP, the AFOSR, the ARO and DURIP program, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the University of California Office of the President.

  7. Cold prebiotic evolution, tunneling, chirality and exobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldanskii, Vitalii I.

    1996-07-01

    The extra-terrestrial scenario of the origin of life suggested by Svante Arrhenius (1) as the `panspermia' hypothesis was revived by the discovery of a low-temperature quantum limit of a chemical reaction rate caused by the molecular tunneling (2). Entropy factors play no role near absolute zero, and slow molecular tunneling can lead to the exothermic formation of quite complex molecules. Interstellar grains or particles of cometary tails could serve as possible cold seeds of life, with acetic acid, urea and products of their polycondensation as quasi-equilibrium intermediates. Very cold solid environment hinders racemization and stabilizes optical activity under conditions typical for outer space. Neither `advantage' factors can secure the evolutionary formation of chiral purity of initial prebiotic monomeric medium-even being temporary achieved it cannot be maintained at subsequent stages of prebiotic evolution because of counteraction of `enantioselective pressure'. Only bifurcational mechanism of the formation of prebiotic homochiral-monomeric and afterwards polymeric-medium and its subsequent transformation in `homochiral chemical automata' (`biological big bang'-passage from `stochastic' to `algorithmic' chemistry) is possible and can be realized. Extra-terrestrial (cold, solid phase) scenarios of the origin of life seem to be more promising from that point of view than terrestrial (warm) scenarios. Within a scheme of five main stages of prebiological evolution some problems important for further investigation are briefly discussed.

  8. The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Cold Sensation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Of somatosensory modalities, cold is one of the more ambiguous percepts, evoking the pleasant sensation of cooling, the stinging bite of cold pain, and welcome relief from chronic pain. Moreover, unlike the precipitous thermal thresholds for heat activation of thermosensitive afferent neurons, thresholds for cold fibers are across a range of cool to cold temperatures that spans over 30 °C. Until recently, how cold produces this myriad of biological effects has been poorly studied, yet new advances in our understanding of cold mechanisms may portend a better understanding of sensory perception as well as provide novel therapeutic approaches. Chief among these was the identification of a number of ion channels that either serve as the initial detectors of cold as a stimulus in the peripheral nervous system, or are part of rather sophisticated differential expression patterns of channels that conduct electrical signals, thereby endowing select neurons with properties that are amenable to electrical signaling in the cold. This review highlights the current understanding of the channels involved in cold transduction as well as presents a hypothetical model to account for the broad range of cold thermal thresholds and distinct functions of cold fibers in perception, pain, and analgesia. PMID:23421674

  9. Analysis of cold worked holes for structural life extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, David H.; Cutshall, Jon T.; Burnside, O. Hal; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    1994-01-01

    Cold working holes for improved fatigue life of fastener holes are widely used on aircraft. This paper presents methods used by the authors to determine the percent of cold working to be applied and to analyze fatigue crack growth of cold worked fastener holes. An elastic, perfectly-plastic analysis of a thick-walled tube is used to determine the stress field during the cold working process and the residual stress field after the process is completed. The results of the elastic/plastic analysis are used to determine the amount of cold working to apply to a hole. The residual stress field is then used to perform damage tolerance analysis of a crack growing out of a cold worked fastener hole. This analysis method is easily implemented in existing crack growth computer codes so that the cold worked holes can be used to extend the structural life of aircraft. Analytical results are compared to test data where appropriate.

  10. Thyroid function and cold acclimation in the hamster, Mesocricetus auratus

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, T.E.; Horwitz, B.A.

    1987-02-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR), thyroxine utilization rate (T4U), and triiodothyronine utilization rate (T3U) were measured in cold-acclimated (CA) and room temperature-acclimated (RA) male golden hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus. Hormone utilization rates were calculated via the plasma disappearance technique using SVI-labeled hormones and measuring serum hormone levels via radioimmunoassay. BMR showed a significant 28% increase with cold acclimation. The same cold exposure also produced a 32% increase in T4U, and a 204% increase in T3U. The much greater increase in T3U implies that previous assessments of the relationship between cold acclimation and thyroid function may have been underestimated and that cold exposure induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in thyroid function. It is concluded that in the cold-acclimated state, T3U more accurately reflects thyroid function than does T4U. A mechanism for the cold-induced change in BMR is proposed.

  11. Acute cooling of the body surface and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R

    2002-09-01

    There is a widely held belief that acute viral respiratory infections are the result of a "chill" and that the onset of a respiratory infection such as the common cold is often associated with acute cooling of the body surface, especially as the result of wet clothes and hair. However, experiments involving inoculation of common cold viruses into the nose, and periods of cold exposure, have failed to demonstrate any effect of cold exposure on susceptibility to infection with common cold viruses. Present scientific opinion dismisses any cause-and-effect relationship between acute cooling of the body surface and common cold. This review proposes a hypothesis; that acute cooling of the body surface causes reflex vasoconstriction in the nose and upper airways, and that this vasoconstrictor response may inhibit respiratory defence and cause the onset of common cold symptoms by converting an asymptomatic subclinical viral infection into a symptomatic clinical infection.

  12. Cold shock and cold acclimation proteins in the psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, F; Morellet, N; Menu, F; Potier, P

    1996-01-01

    The psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55 was grown at 4 and 25 degrees C, and the cell protein contents were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Cells subjected to cold shocks of increasing magnitude were also analyzed. Correspondence analysis of protein appearance distinguished four groups of physiological significance. Group I contained cold shock proteins (Csps) overexpressed only after a large temperature downshift. Group II contained Csps with optimal expression after mild shocks. Group III contained proteins overexpressed after all cold shocks. These last proteins were also overexpressed in cells growing at 4 degrees C and were considered to be early cold acclimation proteins (Caps). Group IV contained proteins which were present at high concentrations only in 4 degrees C steady-state cells and appeared to be late Caps. A portion of a gene very similar to the Escherichia coli cspA gene (encoding protein CS7.4) was identified. A synthetic peptide was used to produce an antibody which detected a CS7.4-like protein (A9) by immunoblotting two-dimensional electrophoresis gels of A. globiformis SI55 total proteins. Unlike mesophilic microorganisms, this CS7.4-like protein was still produced during prolonged growth at low temperature, and it might have a particular adaptive function needed for balanced growth under harsh conditions. However, A9 was induced at high temperature by chloramphenicol, suggesting that CS7.4-like proteins have a more general role than their sole implication in cold acclimation processes. PMID:8655472

  13. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  14. The cold air drainage model KLAM_21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossmann, M.

    2010-09-01

    A brief description of the physics and numerical techniques of the cold air drainage model KLAM_21 is presented. The model has been developed by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (Sievers, 2005) for simulations of nocturnal airflow in hilly and mountainous terrain under dry fair weather conditions. The model has been widely used as an environmental consultancy tool. Typical model applications include frost protection (cold air ponding) and air quality (nocturnal ventilation). The single-layer model calculates the depth and the mean wind of a surface based stable layer that evolves from a neutrally stratified atmosphere during nighttime. The prediction of the velocity and direction of the cold air drainage is based on vertically averaged momentum tendency equations. Temporal changes in the total heat deficit in the cold air layer are calculated from a prescribed local heat loss rate (describing turbulent and radiative cooling) and advection (donor-cell algorithm). The depth of the cold air layer (depth of the surface based temperature inversion) is calculated diagnostically from the total heat loss deficit. The model is initialised with neutral stratification at sunset (onset time of nocturnal cooling). Optionally, effects of an ambient (regional) wind and/or the dispersion of a passive tracer can be simulated. Integration over time is carried out on a regular Arakawa C grid using dynamically calculated time steps. Spatial gradients are discretised using centred differential quotients. The standard size of the computational domains can reach up to 1500 x 1500 grid cells. Grid resolutions usually range between 10 m and 500 m. High resolution simulation can be limited to a nested inner grid domain, while the courser outer domain is covering the entire airshed of interest. A friendly user interface allows easy setup, control, and evaluation of model simulations. Some selected examples of KLAM_21 applications are shown to illustrate the features and capabilities of the model

  15. Improving the cold chain for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J S

    1977-01-01

    The cold chain may be defined as a system for transporting and storing vaccines at very low temperataures, particularly in tropical countries. In Ghana, efforts are being made, with the assistance of the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop and test a new cold chain technology. Emphasis is on local production in order to meet the needs of the countrywide immunization program, and, if possible, of similar programs in other West African nations. Focus in this discussion is on the losses resulting from mishandling of vaccines during storage and in transit through various stages in the cold chain as well as the problems, requirements, and proposed solutions. In most countries with immunization programs, breakdowns in refrigeration during the transport and storage of vaccines in remote rural areas or at the regional and national central stores have led to great losses of vaccine. The losses are often caused by inappropriate management and technology. The most promising recent development in the area of storage is an enzyme-based time/temperature indicator contained in a paper tab which is attached to the vaccine packet. In order to reduce to a minimum the handling of vaccines at the national central store it is proposed that the ministry of health submit details of regional requirements in their requisition to the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer can make presealed packages which are dispatched by air to the national central store and from there to the regions, while they are still sealed. Insulated boxes for this purpose have been tested in Sweden and been shown to maintain deep-freezing temperatures for 5 days. Road communications to the regional centers are good in Ghana and the 5-day cold boxes give adequate safety margins. The plan for the immunization program in Ghana is to employ a combination of teams from both fixed and mobile centers. 3 contacts, 3 months apart, will be made by the fixed teams; mobile teams will make 2 contacts, 2 months apart. Mobile

  16. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cold-adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how human cells in tissue culture adapt to hypothermia may aid in developing new clinical procedures for improved ischemic and hypothermic protection. Human coronary artery endothelial cells grown to confluence at 37°C and then transferred to 25°C become resistant over time to oxidative stress and injury induced by 0°C storage and rewarming. This protection correlates with an increase in intracellular glutathione at 25°C. To help understand the molecular basis of endothelial cold-adaptation, isolated proteins from cold-adapted (25°C/72 h) and pre-adapted cells were analyzed by quantitative proteomic methods and differentially expressed proteins were categorized using the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource. Results Cells adapted to 25°C expressed changes in the abundance of 219 unique proteins representing a broad range of categories such as translation, glycolysis, biosynthetic (anabolic) processes, NAD, cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, oxidoreductase activity, response-to-stress and cell redox homeostasis. The number of proteins that decreased significantly with cold-adaptation exceeded the number that increased by 2:1. Almost half of the decreases were associated with protein metabolic processes and a third were related to anabolic processes including protein, DNA and fatty acid synthesis. Changes consistent with the suppression of cytoskeletal dynamics provided further evidence that cold-adapted cells are in an energy conserving state. Among the specific changes were increases in the abundance and activity of redox proteins glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which correlated with a decrease in oxidative stress, an increase in protein glutathionylation, and a recovery of reduced protein thiols during rewarming from 0°C. Increases in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase implicate a central role for the methionine-cysteine transulfuration pathway in increasing

  17. Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    The cosmic web is a vast, foam-like network of filaments and voids stretching throughout the universe. How did the first galaxies form within the cosmic web, at the intersections of filaments? New observations of a protodisk a galaxy in the early stages of formation may provide a clue.Models for Galaxy FormationNarrowband image of the candidate protodisk (marked with a white ellipse) and filaments (outlined in white). [Adapted from Martin et al. 2016]The standard model for galaxy formation, known as the hot accretion model, argues that galaxies form out of collapsing, virialized gas that forms a hot halo and then slowly cools, fueling star and galaxy formation at its center.But what if galaxies are actually formed from cool gas? In this contrasting picture, the cold accretion model, cool (temperature of ~104 K) unshocked gas from cosmic web filaments flows directly onto galactic disks forming at the filamentary intersections. The narrow streams of cold gas deliver fuel for star formation.A signature of the cold accretion model is that the streams of cold gas form a disk as the gas spirals inward, sinking toward the central protogalaxy. Detecting these cold-flow disks could be strong evidence in support of this model and last year, a team of authors reported just such a detection! This year theyre back again with a second object that may provide confirmation of cold accretion from the cosmic web.A Candidate ProtodiskThe team, led by Christopher Martin (California Institute of Technology), made the discovery using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager, an instrument designed to observe faint emission from the intergalactic medium. Martin and collaborators found a large (R 100 kpc, more than six times the radius of the Milky Way), rotating structure of hydrogen gas, illuminated by the nearby quasi-stellar object QSO HS1549+1919. The system is located at a redshift of z~2.8.The authors testthree potential kinematic models of the candidate protodisk and filaments. In (a) two

  18. Monitoring of Sedimentary Fluxes in Cold Environments: The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2014-05-01

    Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated geomorphic process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G. / A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program (2005 - 2017) is addressing this existing key knowledge gap. The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Research carried out at each of the ca. 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by program, logistics and available resources, but typically represent interdisciplinary collaborations of geomorphologists, hydrologists, ecologists, permafrost scientists and glaciologists. SEDIBUD has developed manuals and protocols (SEDIFLUX Manual) with a key set of primary surface process monitoring and research data requirements to incorporate results from these diverse projects and allow coordinated quantitative analysis across the program. Defined SEDIBUD key tasks for the coming years include (i) The continued generation and compilation of comparable longer-term datasets on contemporary sedimentary fluxes and sediment yields from SEDIBUD key test sites worldwide, (ii) The continued extension of the SEDIBUD metadata database with these datasets, (iii) The testing of defined SEDIBUD hypotheses (available

  19. The impacts of repeated cold exposure on insects.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katie E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2012-05-15

    Insects experience repeated cold exposure (RCE) on multiple time scales in natural environments, yet the majority of studies of the effects of cold on insects involve only a single exposure. Three broad groups of experimental designs have been employed to examine the effects of RCE on insect physiology and fitness, defined by the control treatments: 'RCE vs cold', which compares RCE with constant cold conditions; 'RCE vs warm', which compares RCE with constant warm conditions; and 'RCE vs matched cold' which compares RCE with a prolonged period of cold matched by time to the RCE condition. RCE are generally beneficial to immediate survival, and increase cold hardiness relative to insects receiving a single prolonged cold exposure. However, the effects of RCE depend on the study design, and RCE vs warm studies cannot differentiate between the effects of cold exposure in general vs RCE in particular. Recent studies of gene transcription, immune function, feeding and reproductive output show that the responses of insects to RCE are distinct from the responses to single cold exposures. We suggest that future research should attempt to elucidate the mechanistic link between physiological responses and fitness parameters. We also recommend that future RCE experiments match the time spent at the stressful low temperature in all experimental groups, include age controls where appropriate, incorporate a pilot study to determine time and intensity of exposure, and measure sub-lethal impacts on fitness.

  20. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-1 attenuates cold-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Crosswhite, Patrick; Sun, Zhongjie

    2013-03-01

    Chronic exposure to cold caused pulmonary arterial hypertension (cold-induced pulmonary hypertension [CIPH]) and increased phosphodiesterase-1C (PDE-1C) expression in pulmonary arteries (PAs) in rats. The purpose of this study is to investigate a hypothesis that inhibition of PDE-1 would decrease inflammatory infiltrates and superoxide production leading to attenuation of CIPH. Three groups of male rats were exposed to moderate cold (5±1°C) continuously, whereas 3 groups were maintained at room temperature (23.5±1°C, warm; 6 rats/group). After 8-week exposure to cold, 3 groups in each temperature condition received continuous intravenous infusion of 8-isobutyl-methylxanthine (8-IBMX) (PDE-1 inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or vehicle, respectively, for 1 week. Cold exposure significantly increased right-ventricular systolic pressure compared with warm groups (33.8±3.2 versus 18.6±0.3 mm Hg), indicating that animals developed CIPH. Notably, treatment with 8-IBMX significantly attenuated the cold-induced increase in right ventricular pressure (23.5±1.8 mm Hg). Cold exposure also caused right-ventricular hypertrophy, whereas 8-IBMX reversed cold-induced right ventricular hypertrophy. Cold exposure increased PDE-1C protein expression, macrophage infiltration, NADPH oxidase activity, and superoxide production in PAs and resulted in PA remodeling. 8-IBMX abolished cold-induced upregulation of PDE-1C in PAs. Interestingly, inhibition of PDE-1 eliminated cold-induced macrophage infiltration, NADPH oxidase activation, and superoxide production in PAs and reversed PA remodeling. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin abolished cold-induced superoxide production and attenuated CIPH and PA remodeling. In conclusion, inhibition of PDE-1 attenuated CIPH and reversed cold-induced PA remodeling by suppressing macrophage infiltration and superoxide production, suggesting that upregulation of PDE-1C expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of CIPH.

  1. Galactic cold cores. III. General cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Pagani, L.; Doi, Y.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marshall, D. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Falgarone, E.; Malinen, J.; Marton, G.; McGehee, P.; Montier, L. A.; Motte, F.; Paladini, R.; Tóth, L. V.; Ysard, N.; Zahorecz, S.; Zavagno, A.

    2012-05-01

    Context. In the project galactic cold cores we are carrying out Herschel photometric observations of cold regions of the interstellar clouds as previously identified with the Planck satellite. The aim of the project is to derive the physical properties of the population of cold clumps and to study its connection to ongoing and future star formation. Aims: We examine the cloud structure around the Planck detections in 71 fields observed with the Herschel SPIRE instrument by the summer of 2011. We wish to determine the general physical characteristics of the fields and to examine the morphology of the clouds where the cold high column density clumps are found. Methods: Using the Herschel SPIRE data, we derive colour temperature and column density maps of the fields. Together with ancillary data, we examine the infrared spectral energy distributions of the main clumps. The clouds are categorised according to their large scale morphology. With the help of recently released WISE satellite data, we look for signs of enhanced mid-infrared scattering ("coreshine"), an indication of growth of the dust grains, and have a first look at the star formation activity associated with the cold clumps. Results: The mapped clouds have distances ranging from ~100 pc to several kiloparsecs and cover a range of sizes and masses from cores of less than 10 M⊙ to clouds with masses in excess of 10 000 M⊙. Most fields contain some filamentary structures and in about half of the cases a filament or a few filaments dominate the morphology. In one case out of ten, the clouds show a cometary shape or have sharp boundaries indicative of compression by an external force. The width of the filaments is typically ~0.2-0.3 pc. However, there is significant variation from 0.1 pc to 1 pc and the estimates are sensitive to the methods used and the very definition of a filament. Enhanced mid-infrared scattering, coreshine, was detected in four clouds with six additional tentative detections. The

  2. The Cold and Icy Heart of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The locations of large deposits of frozen volatiles on planetary surfaces are largely coincident with areas receiving the minimum annual influx of solar energy. Thus we have the familiar polar caps of Earth and Mars, but cold equatorial regions for planets with obliquities between 54 and 126 degrees. Furthermore, for tilts between 45-66 degrees and 114-135 degrees the minimum incident energy occurs neither at the pole nor the equator. We find that the annual average insolation is always symmetric about Pluto's equator and is fully independent of the relative locations of the planet's pericenter and equinoxes. Remarkably, this symmetry holds for arbitrary orbital eccentricities and obliquities, and so we provide a short proof in the margin of this abstract. The current obliquity of Pluto is 119 degrees, giving it minima in average annual insolation at +/- 27 degrees latitude, with ~1.5% more flux to the equator and ~15% more to the poles. But the obliquity of Pluto also varies sinusoidally from 102-126 degrees and so, over the past million years, Pluto's annual equatorial and polar fluxes have changed by +15% and -13%, respectively. Interestingly, the energy flux received by latitudes between 25-35 degrees remains nearly constant over the presumably billions of years since Pluto acquired its current orbit and spin properties. Thus these latitudes are continuously cold and should be favored for the long-term deposition of volatile ices; the bright heart of Pluto, Sputnik Planum, extends not coincidentally across these latitudes. Reflected light and emitted thermal radiation from Charon increases annual insolation to one side of Pluto by of order 0.02%. Although small, the bulk of the energy is delivered at night to Pluto's cold equatorial regions. Furthermore, Charon's thermal IR is delivered very efficiently to icy deposits. Over billions of years, ices have preferentially formed and survived in the anti-Charon hemisphere.

  3. Cold prebiotic evolution, tunneling, chirality and exobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Goldanskii, V.I.

    1996-07-01

    The extra-terrestrial scenario of the origin of life suggested by Svante Arrhenius (1) as the {open_quote}panspermia{close_quote} hypothesis was revived by the discovery of a low-temperature quantum limit of a chemical reaction rate caused by the molecular tunneling (2). Entropy factors play no role near absolute zero, and slow molecular tunneling can lead to the exothermic formation of quite complex molecules. Interstellar grains or particles of cometary tails could serve as possible cold seeds of life, with acetic acid, urea and products of their polycondensation as quasi-equilibrium intermediates. Very cold solid environment hinders racemization and stabilizes optical activity under conditions typical for outer space. Neither {open_quote}advantage{close_quote} factors can secure the evolutionary formation of chiral purity of initial prebiotic monomeric medium{emdash}even being temporary achieved it cannot be maintained at subsequent stages of prebiotic evolution because of counteraction of {open_quote}enantioselective pressure{close_quote}. Only bifurcational mechanism of the formation of prebiotic homochiral{emdash}monomeric and afterwards polymeric{emdash}medium and its subsequent transformation in {open_quote}homochiral chemical automata{close_quote} ({open_quote}biological big bang{close_quote}{emdash}passage from {open_quote}stochastic{close_quote} to {open_quote}algorithmic{close_quote} chemistry) is possible and can be realized. Extra-terrestrial (cold, solid phase) scenarios of the origin of life seem to be more promising from that point of view than terrestrial (warm) scenarios. Within a scheme of five main stages of prebiological evolution some problems important for further investigation are briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Recrystallization of heavy metals after cold deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Goren-Muginstein, G.R.; Rosen, A.

    1996-06-01

    Rapid heating experiments, of the order of tens of seconds, were performed on a 90%W-7%Ni-3%Fe alloy, which was cold worked by rotary swaging to 50% reduction in diameter. It was found that even very short periods of heating brings to the separation of the elongated tungsten grains into small round ones, therefore refining the microstructure. The process involves melting of the matrix and its penetration into the tungsten grains. During cooling, very small, new grains are precipitated. It is suggested that grain refining is achieved by penetration of the molten matrix into the solid tungsten grains through subgrain boundaries.

  5. Mechanical Engineering Refrigeration Systems for Cold Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    heating water ur brine. (See Figure 5.) (1) Heat brine for the underfloor heating system . * (2) Heat water for heating adjacent...in Basic DM Title 3.1 1 Plumbing Systems 3.2 2,2A Industrial and Municipal Type Incinerators 3.3 3,4,5 Heating , Ventilation, and Air Conditioning... Systems 3.4 6 Refrigeration Systems for Cold Storage 3.5 7,10 Compressed and Vacuum Air Systems 3.6 8 Central Heating Plants 3.7 9 Power Plants 3.8

  6. Evaporative cooling of cold atoms at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märkle, J.; Allen, A. J.; Federsel, P.; Jetter, B.; Günther, A.; Fortágh, J.; Proukakis, N. P.; Judd, T. E.

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the evaporative cooling of cold rubidium atoms that are brought close to a solid surface. The dynamics of the atom cloud are described by coupling a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate with a quantum Boltzmann description of the thermal cloud (the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin method). We have also performed experiments to allow for a detailed comparison with this model and find that it can capture the key physics of this system provided the full collisional dynamics of the thermal cloud are included. In addition, we suggest how to optimize surface cooling to obtain the purest and largest condensates.

  7. Metal assisted carbon cold storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1988-01-05

    This patent describes a method of storing hydrogen by sorption on a composite formed of carbon and a transition metal, comprising the steps of contacting gaseous hydrogen with a storage medium formed of high surface area activated carbon combined with an active transition metal in elemental form capable of dissociating the hydrogen, physisorbing the hydrogen on the storage medium, and storing the sorbed hydrogen by maintaining the pressure at or above one bar and maintaining the temperature of the medium in a cold temperature range below 293 K.

  8. Cold Strontium Ion Source for Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2015-05-01

    We are working on a cold source of Sr Ions to be used in an ion interferometer. The beam will be generated from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Sr atoms by optically ionizing atoms leaking out a carefully prepared hole in the MOT. A single laser cooling on the resonant transition (461 nm) in Sr should be sufficient for trapping, as we've calculated that losses to the atom beam will outweigh losses to dark states. Another laser (405 nm), together with light from the trapping laser, will drive a two photon transition in the atom beam to an autoionizing state. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  9. Portable compact cold atoms clock topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechoneri, R. D.; Müller, S. T.; Bueno, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The compact frequency standard under development at USP Sao Carlos is a cold atoms system that works with a distributed hardware system principle and temporal configuration of the interrogation method of the atomic sample, in which the different operation steps happen in one place: inside the microwave cavity. This type of operation allows us to design a standard much more compact than a conventional one, where different interactions occur in the same region of the apparatus. In this sense, it is necessary to redefine all the instrumentation associated with the experiment. This work gives an overview of the topology we are adopting for the new system.

  10. Hot and cold water issues deftly described.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Speaking at a Legionella Control Association Open Day on 9 October last year in Tamworth, Mike Quest, an LCA director and Committee Member who is an independent water hygiene and safety consultant and an NHS Authorising Engineer, presented his standpoint on effective risk assessment and monitoring of complex hot and cold water systems. He also focused on some of the challenges for engineering and estates teams in maintaining water temperatures within 'safe limits' in modern buildings, with reference to the complications he had seen in a hospital project he has recently been working on.

  11. Cosmological explosions from cold dark matter perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological-explosion model is examined for a universe dominated by cold dark matter in which explosion seeds are produced from the growth of initial density perturbations of a given form. Fragmentation of the exploding shells is dominated by the dark-matter potential wells rather than the self-gravity of the shells, and particular conditions are required for the explosions to bootstrap up to very large scales. The final distribution of dark matter is strongly correlated with the baryons on small scales, but uncorrelated on large scales.

  12. Hadronization measurements in cold nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, Raphael

    2015-05-01

    Hadronization is the non-perturbative process of QCD by which partons become hadrons. It has been studied at high energies through various processes, we focus here on the experiments of lepto-production of hadrons in cold nuclear matter. By studying the dependence of observables to the atomic number of the target, these experimentscan give information on the dynamic of the hadronization at the femtometer scale. In particular, we will present preliminary results from JLab Hall B (CLAS collaboration), which give unprecedented statistical precision. Then, we will present results of a phenomenological study showing how HERMES data can be described with pure energyloss models.

  13. Lunar magnetism and an early cold moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    Models of lunar magnetism have involved dynamo action in a fluid core in an early hot moon; an early cold moon magnetized some time before 4 billion years ago, which has subsequently heated up; and local field sources which, in some models, are related to impact. The present work examines the second possibility and shows that, provided the moon contained a few percent of metallic iron and was exposed to an extra-lunar field of about 10 or 20 oersted while much of it was still below the Curie point of iron, a restricted class of thermal evolution models, which satisfy the known constraints, can be derived.

  14. On Trade-wind cumulus cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, P.; Li, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow, precipitating, cumuli within the easterly trades were investigated using ship-board measurements, scanning radar data, and visible satellite imagery from two weeks in January 2005 of the Rain in Cumulus over Ocean experiment. One focus was to identify the mechanism(s) triggering convection. Shipboard rainfall rates of up to 2 mm hr-1 were recorded almost daily, if only for 10-30 minutes typically, almost always from clouds within mesoscale arcs. The precipitating cumuli, capable of reaching above 4 km, cooled surface air by 1-2 K, in all cases lowered surface specific humidities by up to 1.5 g kg-1, reduced surface equivalent potential temperatures by up to 6 K, and were often associated with short-lived increases in wind speed of up to 4 m s-1. Cohesive downdrafts producing surface air drier than the environment differed from previous observations of moist cold pools under stratocumulus. Upper-level downdrafts were also inferred to explain double-lobed moisture and temperature sounding profiles, as well as multiple inversions in wind profiler data. In two cases investigated further, the precipitating convection propagated faster westward than the mean surface wind by ˜ 2-3 m s-1, consistent with a density current of depth ˜ 200 m. In the cold pool recovery zones of the two cases, the surface air temperatures equilibrated with time to the sea surface temperatures, but the surface air specific humidities stayed relatively constant after initial quick recoveries. This suggested entrainment of drier air from above fully compensated moistening from surface latent heat fluxes as the new surface-based mixed-layer deepened. Recovery zone surface wind speeds and latent heat fluxes were not higher than environmental values. Non-precipitating shallow clouds were observed after the surface buoyancy had sufficiently recovered (barring encroachment of other convection from outside the original cold pool). The mesoscale arcs favored atmospheres with higher water vapor

  15. Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle

    DOEpatents

    Tajbl, Daniel G.; Lee, Bernard S.; Schora, Jr., Frank C.; Lam, Henry W.

    1976-07-06

    In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

  16. Linear theory of a cold bounded plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1983-02-01

    The linear dispersive properties of the electron surface waves of a bounded plasma are considered by means of the cold fluid theory. Wave dissipation due to resonant absorption as well as leaking processes are discussed. A general method is introduced to describe the eigenmodes of a plasma with arbitrary boundary shape. A hydrodynamic fluctuation theory, which can be useful for plasma diagnostics, is also presented. By means of the eigenmode theory we then discuss total absorption of plasma radiation as well as superreflectivity processes.

  17. Magnetospheric electrostatic emissions and cold plasma densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A synoptic study of electric wave, magnetometer, and plasma data from IMP-6 was carried out for times when banded electrostatic waves are observed between harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency in the earth's outer magnetosphere. Four separate classes of such waves were previously identified. The spatial and temporal occurrences of waves in each class are summarized here, as are correlations of occurrence with geomagnetic activity. Most importantly, associations between the observations of waves of different classes and the relative portions of cold and hot electrons present at the position of the spacecraft are established. Finally, evidence for the signature of the loss cone is sought in the plasma data.

  18. When hot water freezes before cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is due to freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. The solutes are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reducing the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reducing the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the freezing front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  19. The cosmological constant and cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1990-12-01

    It is argued here that the success of the cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) model can be retained and the new observations of very large scale cosmological structures can be accommodated in a spatially flat cosmology in which as much as 80 percent of the critical density is provided by a positive cosmological constant. In such a universe, expansion was dominated by CDM until a recent epoch, but is now governed by the cosmological constant. This constant can also account for the lack of fluctuations in the microwave background and the large number of certain kinds of objects found at high redshift.

  20. Chaotic cold accretion on to black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Oh, S. Peng

    2013-07-01

    Bondi theory is often assumed to adequately describe the mode of accretion in astrophysical environments. However, the Bondi flow must be adiabatic, spherically symmetric, steady, unperturbed, with constant boundary conditions. Using 3D adaptive mesh refinement simulations, linking the 50 kpc to the sub-parsec (sub-pc) scales over the course of 40 Myr, we systematically relax the classic assumptions in a typical galaxy hosting a supermassive black hole. In the more realistic scenario, where the hot gas is cooling, while heated and stirred on large scales, the accretion rate is boosted up to two orders of magnitude compared with the Bondi prediction. The cause is the non-linear growth of thermal instabilities, leading to the condensation of cold clouds and filaments when tcool/tff ≲ 10. The clouds decouple from the hot gas, `raining' on to the centre. Subsonic turbulence of just over 100 km s-1 (M > 0.2) induces the formation of thermal instabilities, even in the absence of heating, while in the transonic regime turbulent dissipation inhibits their growth (tturb/tcool ≲ 1). When heating restores global thermodynamic balance, the formation of the multiphase medium is violent, and the mode of accretion is fully cold and chaotic. The recurrent collisions and tidal forces between clouds, filaments and the central clumpy torus promote angular momentum cancellation, hence boosting accretion. On sub-pc scales the clouds are channelled to the very centre via a funnel. In this study, we do not inject a fixed initial angular momentum, though vorticity is later seeded by turbulence. A good approximation to the accretion rate is the cooling rate, which can be used as subgrid model, physically reproducing the boost factor of 100 required by cosmological simulations, while accounting for the frequent fluctuations. Since our modelling is fairly general (turbulence/heating due to AGN feedback, galaxy motions, mergers, stellar evolution), chaotic cold accretion may be common in