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Sample records for network complexity measures

  1. Measuring distances between complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Miranda, José G. V.; Pinho, Suani T. R.; Lobão, Thierry Petit

    2008-08-01

    A previously introduced concept of higher order neighborhoods in complex networks, [R.F.S. Andrade, J.G.V. Miranda, T.P. Lobão, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 046101] is used to define a distance between networks with the same number of nodes. With such measure, expressed in terms of the matrix elements of the neighborhood matrices of each network, it is possible to compare, in a quantitative way, how far apart in the space of neighborhood matrices two networks are. The distance between these matrices depends on both the network topologies and the adopted node numberings. While the numbering of one network is fixed, a Monte Carlo algorithm is used to find the best numbering of the other network, in the sense that it minimizes the distance between the matrices. The minimal value found for the distance reflects differences in the neighborhood structures of the two networks that arise only from distinct topologies. This procedure ends up by providing a projection of the first network on the pattern of the second one. Examples are worked out allowing for a quantitative comparison for distances among distinct networks, as well as among distinct realizations of random networks.

  2. Measure of robustness for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mina Nabil

    Critical infrastructures are repeatedly attacked by external triggers causing tremendous amount of damages. Any infrastructure can be studied using the powerful theory of complex networks. A complex network is composed of extremely large number of different elements that exchange commodities providing significant services. The main functions of complex networks can be damaged by different types of attacks and failures that degrade the network performance. These attacks and failures are considered as disturbing dynamics, such as the spread of viruses in computer networks, the spread of epidemics in social networks, and the cascading failures in power grids. Depending on the network structure and the attack strength, every network differently suffers damages and performance degradation. Hence, quantifying the robustness of complex networks becomes an essential task. In this dissertation, new metrics are introduced to measure the robustness of technological and social networks with respect to the spread of epidemics, and the robustness of power grids with respect to cascading failures. First, we introduce a new metric called the Viral Conductance (VCSIS ) to assess the robustness of networks with respect to the spread of epidemics that are modeled through the susceptible/infected/susceptible (SIS) epidemic approach. In contrast to assessing the robustness of networks based on a classical metric, the epidemic threshold, the new metric integrates the fraction of infected nodes at steady state for all possible effective infection strengths. Through examples, VCSIS provides more insights about the robustness of networks than the epidemic threshold. In addition, both the paradoxical robustness of Barabasi-Albert preferential attachment networks and the effect of the topology on the steady state infection are studied, to show the importance of quantifying the robustness of networks. Second, a new metric VCSIR is introduced to assess the robustness of networks with respect

  3. Measuring multiple evolution mechanisms of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Ke; Zhu, Yu-Xiao; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Numerous concise models such as preferential attachment have been put forward to reveal the evolution mechanisms of real-world networks, which show that real-world networks are usually jointly driven by a hybrid mechanism of multiplex features instead of a single pure mechanism. To get an accurate simulation for real networks, some researchers proposed a few hybrid models by mixing multiple evolution mechanisms. Nevertheless, how a hybrid mechanism of multiplex features jointly influence the network evolution is not very clear. In this study, we introduce two methods (link prediction and likelihood analysis) to measure multiple evolution mechanisms of complex networks. Through tremendous experiments on artificial networks, which can be controlled to follow multiple mechanisms with different weights, we find the method based on likelihood analysis performs much better and gives very accurate estimations. At last, we apply this method to some real-world networks which are from different domains (including technology networks and social networks) and different countries (e.g., USA and China), to see how popularity and clustering co-evolve. We find most of them are affected by both popularity and clustering, but with quite different weights.

  4. Measuring multiple evolution mechanisms of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Ke; Zhu, Yu-Xiao; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Numerous concise models such as preferential attachment have been put forward to reveal the evolution mechanisms of real-world networks, which show that real-world networks are usually jointly driven by a hybrid mechanism of multiplex features instead of a single pure mechanism. To get an accurate simulation for real networks, some researchers proposed a few hybrid models by mixing multiple evolution mechanisms. Nevertheless, how a hybrid mechanism of multiplex features jointly influence the network evolution is not very clear. In this study, we introduce two methods (link prediction and likelihood analysis) to measure multiple evolution mechanisms of complex networks. Through tremendous experiments on artificial networks, which can be controlled to follow multiple mechanisms with different weights, we find the method based on likelihood analysis performs much better and gives very accurate estimations. At last, we apply this method to some real-world networks which are from different domains (including technology networks and social networks) and different countries (e.g., USA and China), to see how popularity and clustering co-evolve. We find most of them are affected by both popularity and clustering, but with quite different weights. PMID:26065382

  5. Riemannian-geometric entropy for measuring network complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Felice, Domenico; Mancini, Stefano; Pettini, Marco

    2016-06-01

    A central issue in the science of complex systems is the quantitative characterization of complexity. In the present work we address this issue by resorting to information geometry. Actually we propose a constructive way to associate with a—in principle, any—network a differentiable object (a Riemannian manifold) whose volume is used to define the entropy. The effectiveness of the latter in measuring network complexity is successfully proved through its capability of detecting a classical phase transition occurring in both random graphs and scale-free networks, as well as of characterizing small exponential random graphs, configuration models, and real networks.

  6. Riemannian-geometric entropy for measuring network complexity.

    PubMed

    Franzosi, Roberto; Felice, Domenico; Mancini, Stefano; Pettini, Marco

    2016-06-01

    A central issue in the science of complex systems is the quantitative characterization of complexity. In the present work we address this issue by resorting to information geometry. Actually we propose a constructive way to associate with a-in principle, any-network a differentiable object (a Riemannian manifold) whose volume is used to define the entropy. The effectiveness of the latter in measuring network complexity is successfully proved through its capability of detecting a classical phase transition occurring in both random graphs and scale-free networks, as well as of characterizing small exponential random graphs, configuration models, and real networks. PMID:27415290

  7. Riemannian-geometric entropy for measuring network complexity.

    PubMed

    Franzosi, Roberto; Felice, Domenico; Mancini, Stefano; Pettini, Marco

    2016-06-01

    A central issue in the science of complex systems is the quantitative characterization of complexity. In the present work we address this issue by resorting to information geometry. Actually we propose a constructive way to associate with a-in principle, any-network a differentiable object (a Riemannian manifold) whose volume is used to define the entropy. The effectiveness of the latter in measuring network complexity is successfully proved through its capability of detecting a classical phase transition occurring in both random graphs and scale-free networks, as well as of characterizing small exponential random graphs, configuration models, and real networks.

  8. Analyzing complex networks through correlations in centrality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan Ronqui, José Ricardo; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Many real world systems can be expressed as complex networks of interconnected nodes. It is frequently important to be able to quantify the relative importance of the various nodes in the network, a task accomplished by defining some centrality measures, with different centrality definitions stressing different aspects of the network. It is interesting to know to what extent these different centrality definitions are related for different networks. In this work, we study the correlation between pairs of a set of centrality measures for different real world networks and two network models. We show that the centralities are in general correlated, but with stronger correlations for network models than for real networks. We also show that the strength of the correlation of each pair of centralities varies from network to network. Taking this fact into account, we propose the use of a centrality correlation profile, consisting of the values of the correlation coefficients between all pairs of centralities of interest, as a way to characterize networks. Using the yeast protein interaction network as an example we show also that the centrality correlation profile can be used to assess the adequacy of a network model as a representation of a given real network.

  9. Range-limited centrality measures in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Lichtenwalter, Ryan N; Chawla, Nitesh V; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2012-06-01

    Here we present a range-limited approach to centrality measures in both nonweighted and weighted directed complex networks. We introduce an efficient method that generates for every node and every edge its betweenness centrality based on shortest paths of lengths not longer than ℓ=1,...,L in the case of nonweighted networks, and for weighted networks the corresponding quantities based on minimum weight paths with path weights not larger than w(ℓ)=ℓΔ, ℓ=1,2...,L=R/Δ. These measures provide a systematic description on the positioning importance of a node (edge) with respect to its network neighborhoods one step out, two steps out, etc., up to and including the whole network. They are more informative than traditional centrality measures, as network transport typically happens on all length scales, from transport to nearest neighbors to the farthest reaches of the network. We show that range-limited centralities obey universal scaling laws for large nonweighted networks. As the computation of traditional centrality measures is costly, this scaling behavior can be exploited to efficiently estimate centralities of nodes and edges for all ranges, including the traditional ones. The scaling behavior can also be exploited to show that the ranking top list of nodes (edges) based on their range-limited centralities quickly freezes as a function of the range, and hence the diameter-range top list can be efficiently predicted. We also show how to estimate the typical largest node-to-node distance for a network of N nodes, exploiting the afore-mentioned scaling behavior. These observations were made on model networks and on a large social network inferred from cell-phone trace logs (∼5.5×10(6) nodes and ∼2.7×10(7) edges). Finally, we apply these concepts to efficiently detect the vulnerability backbone of a network (defined as the smallest percolating cluster of the highest betweenness nodes and edges) and illustrate the importance of weight-based centrality

  10. Range-limited centrality measures in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Lichtenwalter, Ryan N.; Chawla, Nitesh V.; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2012-06-01

    Here we present a range-limited approach to centrality measures in both nonweighted and weighted directed complex networks. We introduce an efficient method that generates for every node and every edge its betweenness centrality based on shortest paths of lengths not longer than ℓ=1,...,L in the case of nonweighted networks, and for weighted networks the corresponding quantities based on minimum weight paths with path weights not larger than wℓ=ℓΔ, ℓ=1,2...,L=R/Δ. These measures provide a systematic description on the positioning importance of a node (edge) with respect to its network neighborhoods one step out, two steps out, etc., up to and including the whole network. They are more informative than traditional centrality measures, as network transport typically happens on all length scales, from transport to nearest neighbors to the farthest reaches of the network. We show that range-limited centralities obey universal scaling laws for large nonweighted networks. As the computation of traditional centrality measures is costly, this scaling behavior can be exploited to efficiently estimate centralities of nodes and edges for all ranges, including the traditional ones. The scaling behavior can also be exploited to show that the ranking top list of nodes (edges) based on their range-limited centralities quickly freezes as a function of the range, and hence the diameter-range top list can be efficiently predicted. We also show how to estimate the typical largest node-to-node distance for a network of N nodes, exploiting the afore-mentioned scaling behavior. These observations were made on model networks and on a large social network inferred from cell-phone trace logs (˜5.5×106 nodes and ˜2.7×107 edges). Finally, we apply these concepts to efficiently detect the vulnerability backbone of a network (defined as the smallest percolating cluster of the highest betweenness nodes and edges) and illustrate the importance of weight-based centrality measures in

  11. Unraveling chaotic attractors by complex networks and measurements of stock market complexity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongduo; Li, Ying

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel method for measuring the complexity of a time series by unraveling a chaotic attractor modeled on complex networks. The complexity index R, which can potentially be exploited for prediction, has a similar meaning to the Kolmogorov complexity (calculated from the Lempel-Ziv complexity), and is an appropriate measure of a series' complexity. The proposed method is used to research the complexity of the world's major capital markets. None of these markets are completely random, and they have different degrees of complexity, both over the entire length of their time series and at a level of detail. However, developing markets differ significantly from mature markets. Specifically, the complexity of mature stock markets is stronger and more stable over time, whereas developing markets exhibit relatively low and unstable complexity over certain time periods, implying a stronger long-term price memory process.

  12. Offdiagonal complexity: A computationally quick complexity measure for graphs and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Jens Christian

    2007-02-01

    A vast variety of biological, social, and economical networks shows topologies drastically differing from random graphs; yet the quantitative characterization remains unsatisfactory from a conceptual point of view. Motivated from the discussion of small scale-free networks, a biased link distribution entropy is defined, which takes an extremum for a power-law distribution. This approach is extended to the node-node link cross-distribution, whose nondiagonal elements characterize the graph structure beyond link distribution, cluster coefficient and average path length. From here a simple (and computationally cheap) complexity measure can be defined. This offdiagonal complexity (OdC) is proposed as a novel measure to characterize the complexity of an undirected graph, or network. While both for regular lattices and fully connected networks OdC is zero, it takes a moderately low value for a random graph and shows high values for apparently complex structures as scale-free networks and hierarchical trees. The OdC approach is applied to the Helicobacter pylori protein interaction network and randomly rewired surrogates.

  13. Measuring the significance of community structure in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Nie, Yuchao; Yang, Hua; Cheng, Jie; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2010-12-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks, and separating a network into communities could simplify functional analysis considerably. Many approaches have recently been proposed to detect communities, but a method to determine whether the detected communities are significant is still lacking. In this paper, an index to evaluate the significance of communities in networks is proposed based on perturbation of the network. In contrast to previous approaches, the network is disturbed gradually, and the index is defined by integrating all of the similarities between the community structures before and after perturbation. Moreover, by taking the null model into account, the index eliminates scale effects. Thus, it can evaluate and compare the significance of communities in different networks. The method has been tested in many artificial and real-world networks. The results show that the index is in fact independent of the size of the network and the number of communities. With this approach, clear communities are found to always exist in social networks, but significant communities cannot be found in protein interactions and metabolic networks.

  14. Multi-attribute integrated measurement of node importance in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shibo; Zhao, Jinlou

    2015-11-01

    The measure of node importance in complex networks is very important to the research of networks stability and robustness; it also can ensure the security of the whole network. Most researchers have used a single indicator to measure the networks node importance, so that the obtained measurement results only reflect certain aspects of the networks with a loss of information. Meanwhile, because of the difference of networks topology, the nodes' importance should be described by combining the character of the networks topology. Most of the existing evaluation algorithms cannot completely reflect the circumstances of complex networks, so this paper takes into account the degree of centrality, the relative closeness centrality, clustering coefficient, and topology potential and raises an integrated measuring method to measure the nodes' importance. This method can reflect nodes' internal and outside attributes and eliminate the influence of network structure on the node importance. The experiments of karate network and dolphin network show that networks topology structure integrated measure has smaller range of metrical result than a single indicator and more universal. Experiments show that attacking the North American power grid and the Internet network with the method has a faster convergence speed than other methods.

  15. Multi-attribute integrated measurement of node importance in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibo; Zhao, Jinlou

    2015-11-01

    The measure of node importance in complex networks is very important to the research of networks stability and robustness; it also can ensure the security of the whole network. Most researchers have used a single indicator to measure the networks node importance, so that the obtained measurement results only reflect certain aspects of the networks with a loss of information. Meanwhile, because of the difference of networks topology, the nodes' importance should be described by combining the character of the networks topology. Most of the existing evaluation algorithms cannot completely reflect the circumstances of complex networks, so this paper takes into account the degree of centrality, the relative closeness centrality, clustering coefficient, and topology potential and raises an integrated measuring method to measure the nodes' importance. This method can reflect nodes' internal and outside attributes and eliminate the influence of network structure on the node importance. The experiments of karate network and dolphin network show that networks topology structure integrated measure has smaller range of metrical result than a single indicator and more universal. Experiments show that attacking the North American power grid and the Internet network with the method has a faster convergence speed than other methods. PMID:26627565

  16. An Activation Force-based Affinity Measure for Analyzing Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Guo, Hanliang; Wang, Zhanyi

    2011-01-01

    Affinity measure is a key factor that determines the quality of the analysis of a complex network. Here, we introduce a type of statistics, activation forces, to weight the links of a complex network and thereby develop a desired affinity measure. We show that the approach is superior in facilitating the analysis through experiments on a large-scale word network and a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network consisting of ∼5,000 human proteins. The experiment on the word network verifies that the measured word affinities are highly consistent with human knowledge. Further, the experiment on the PPI network verifies the measure and presents a general method for the identification of functionally similar proteins based on PPIs. Most strikingly, we find an affinity network that compactly connects the cancer-associated proteins to each other, which may reveal novel information for cancer study; this includes likely protein interactions and key proteins in cancer-related signal transduction pathways. PMID:22355630

  17. An Attractor-Based Complexity Measurement for Boolean Recurrent Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cabessa, Jérémie; Villa, Alessandro E. P.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a novel refined attractor-based complexity measurement for Boolean recurrent neural networks that represents an assessment of their computational power in terms of the significance of their attractor dynamics. This complexity measurement is achieved by first proving a computational equivalence between Boolean recurrent neural networks and some specific class of -automata, and then translating the most refined classification of -automata to the Boolean neural network context. As a result, a hierarchical classification of Boolean neural networks based on their attractive dynamics is obtained, thus providing a novel refined attractor-based complexity measurement for Boolean recurrent neural networks. These results provide new theoretical insights to the computational and dynamical capabilities of neural networks according to their attractive potentialities. An application of our findings is illustrated by the analysis of the dynamics of a simplified model of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical network simulated by a Boolean recurrent neural network. This example shows the significance of measuring network complexity, and how our results bear new founding elements for the understanding of the complexity of real brain circuits. PMID:24727866

  18. An attractor-based complexity measurement for Boolean recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cabessa, Jérémie; Villa, Alessandro E P

    2014-01-01

    We provide a novel refined attractor-based complexity measurement for Boolean recurrent neural networks that represents an assessment of their computational power in terms of the significance of their attractor dynamics. This complexity measurement is achieved by first proving a computational equivalence between Boolean recurrent neural networks and some specific class of ω-automata, and then translating the most refined classification of ω-automata to the Boolean neural network context. As a result, a hierarchical classification of Boolean neural networks based on their attractive dynamics is obtained, thus providing a novel refined attractor-based complexity measurement for Boolean recurrent neural networks. These results provide new theoretical insights to the computational and dynamical capabilities of neural networks according to their attractive potentialities. An application of our findings is illustrated by the analysis of the dynamics of a simplified model of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical network simulated by a Boolean recurrent neural network. This example shows the significance of measuring network complexity, and how our results bear new founding elements for the understanding of the complexity of real brain circuits.

  19. Network complexity as a measure of information processing across resting-state networks: evidence from the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Ian M.; Nashiro, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    An emerging field of research focused on fluctuations in brain signals has provided evidence that the complexity of those signals, as measured by entropy, conveys important information about network dynamics (e.g., local and distributed processing). While much research has focused on how neural complexity differs in populations with different age groups or clinical disorders, substantially less research has focused on the basic understanding of neural complexity in populations with young and healthy brain states. The present study used resting-state fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project (Van Essen et al., 2013) to test the extent that neural complexity in the BOLD signal, as measured by multiscale entropy (1) would differ from random noise, (2) would differ between four major resting-state networks previously associated with higher-order cognition, and (3) would be associated with the strength and extent of functional connectivity—a complementary method of estimating information processing. We found that complexity in the BOLD signal exhibited different patterns of complexity from white, pink, and red noise and that neural complexity was differentially expressed between resting-state networks, including the default mode, cingulo-opercular, left and right frontoparietal networks. Lastly, neural complexity across all networks was negatively associated with functional connectivity at fine scales, but was positively associated with functional connectivity at coarse scales. The present study is the first to characterize neural complexity in BOLD signals at a high temporal resolution and across different networks and might help clarify the inconsistencies between neural complexity and functional connectivity, thus informing the mechanisms underlying neural complexity. PMID:24959130

  20. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC.

  1. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC.

  2. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC. PMID:25833434

  3. Local difference measures between complex networks for dynamical system model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F; Volkholz, Jan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A faithful modeling of real-world dynamical systems necessitates model evaluation. A recent promising methodological approach to this problem has been based on complex networks, which in turn have proven useful for the characterization of dynamical systems. In this context, we introduce three local network difference measures and demonstrate their capabilities in the field of climate modeling, where these measures facilitate a spatially explicit model evaluation.Building on a recent study by Feldhoff et al. [8] we comparatively analyze statistical and dynamical regional climate simulations of the South American monsoon system [corrected]. types of climate networks representing different aspects of rainfall dynamics are constructed from the modeled precipitation space-time series. Specifically, we define simple graphs based on positive as well as negative rank correlations between rainfall anomaly time series at different locations, and such based on spatial synchronizations of extreme rain events. An evaluation against respective networks built from daily satellite data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V7 reveals far greater differences in model performance between network types for a fixed but arbitrary climate model than between climate models for a fixed but arbitrary network type. We identify two sources of uncertainty in this respect. Firstly, climate variability limits fidelity, particularly in the case of the extreme event network; and secondly, larger geographical link lengths render link misplacements more likely, most notably in the case of the anticorrelation network; both contributions are quantified using suitable ensembles of surrogate networks. Our model evaluation approach is applicable to any multidimensional dynamical system and especially our simple graph difference measures are highly versatile as the graphs to be compared may be constructed in whatever way required. Generalizations to directed as well as edge- and node

  4. Local Difference Measures between Complex Networks for Dynamical System Model Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F.; Volkholz, Jan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A faithful modeling of real-world dynamical systems necessitates model evaluation. A recent promising methodological approach to this problem has been based on complex networks, which in turn have proven useful for the characterization of dynamical systems. In this context, we introduce three local network difference measures and demonstrate their capabilities in the field of climate modeling, where these measures facilitate a spatially explicit model evaluation. Building on a recent study by Feldhoff et al. [1] we comparatively analyze statistical and dynamical regional climate simulations of the South American monsoon system. Three types of climate networks representing different aspects of rainfall dynamics are constructed from the modeled precipitation space-time series. Specifically, we define simple graphs based on positive as well as negative rank correlations between rainfall anomaly time series at different locations, and such based on spatial synchronizations of extreme rain events. An evaluation against respective networks built from daily satellite data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V7 reveals far greater differences in model performance between network types for a fixed but arbitrary climate model than between climate models for a fixed but arbitrary network type. We identify two sources of uncertainty in this respect. Firstly, climate variability limits fidelity, particularly in the case of the extreme event network; and secondly, larger geographical link lengths render link misplacements more likely, most notably in the case of the anticorrelation network; both contributions are quantified using suitable ensembles of surrogate networks. Our model evaluation approach is applicable to any multidimensional dynamical system and especially our simple graph difference measures are highly versatile as the graphs to be compared may be constructed in whatever way required. Generalizations to directed as well as edge- and node

  5. PAFit: A Statistical Method for Measuring Preferential Attachment in Temporal Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Thong; Sheridan, Paul; Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Preferential attachment is a stochastic process that has been proposed to explain certain topological features characteristic of complex networks from diverse domains. The systematic investigation of preferential attachment is an important area of research in network science, not only for the theoretical matter of verifying whether this hypothesized process is operative in real-world networks, but also for the practical insights that follow from knowledge of its functional form. Here we describe a maximum likelihood based estimation method for the measurement of preferential attachment in temporal complex networks. We call the method PAFit, and implement it in an R package of the same name. PAFit constitutes an advance over previous methods primarily because we based it on a nonparametric statistical framework that enables attachment kernel estimation free of any assumptions about its functional form. We show this results in PAFit outperforming the popular methods of Jeong and Newman in Monte Carlo simulations. What is more, we found that the application of PAFit to a publically available Flickr social network dataset yielded clear evidence for a deviation of the attachment kernel from the popularly assumed log-linear form. Independent of our main work, we provide a correction to a consequential error in Newman’s original method which had evidently gone unnoticed since its publication over a decade ago. PMID:26378457

  6. Correlation dimension of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-04-19

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers.

  7. Eigencentrality based on dissimilarity measures reveals central nodes in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Socorro, A. J.; Herrera-Almarza, G. C.; González-Díaz, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important problems in complex network’s theory is the location of the entities that are essential or have a main role within the network. For this purpose, the use of dissimilarity measures (specific to theory of classification and data mining) to enrich the centrality measures in complex networks is proposed. The centrality method used is the eigencentrality which is based on the heuristic that the centrality of a node depends on how central are the nodes in the immediate neighbourhood (like rich get richer phenomenon). This can be described by an eigenvalues problem, however the information of the neighbourhood and the connections between neighbours is not taken in account, neglecting their relevance when is one evaluates the centrality/importance/influence of a node. The contribution calculated by the dissimilarity measure is parameter independent, making the proposed method is also parameter independent. Finally, we perform a comparative study of our method versus other methods reported in the literature, obtaining more accurate and less expensive computational results in most cases. PMID:26603652

  8. A quantitative measure for organization of complex and co-evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-02-01

    To define evolution and self-organization in complex networks a quantitative measure for organization is necessary. Two systems should be numerically distinguishable by their degree of organization and their rate of self-organization. Here we apply as a measure for quantity of organization the inverse of the average sum of physical actions of all elements in a system per unit motion multiplied by the Planck's constant. The meaning of quantity of organization here is the number of quanta of action per one unit motion of an element. For example, a unit motion for electrons on a computer chip is the one necessary for one computation. This definition can be applied to the organization in any complex system. Systems self-organize to decrease the average action per element per unit motion in them. This is the attractor for a dynamical, nonlinear system evolving in time. Constraints increase this average action, so constraint minimization is a basic mechanism for action minimization. Increase of quantity of elements in the network, leads to faster constraint minimization through grouping, decrease of average action per element and motion and therefore faster self-organization and evolution.

  9. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  10. Search in weighted complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thadakamalla, Hari P.; Albert, R.; Kumara, S. R. T.

    2005-12-01

    We study trade-offs presented by local search algorithms in complex networks which are heterogeneous in edge weights and node degree. We show that search based on a network measure, local betweenness centrality (LBC), utilizes the heterogeneity of both node degrees and edge weights to perform the best in scale-free weighted networks. The search based on LBC is universal and performs well in a large class of complex networks.

  11. Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Living systems are associated with Social networksnetworks made up of nodes, some of which may be more important in various aspects as compared to others. While different quantitative measures labeled as “centralities” have previously been used in the network analysis community to find out influential nodes in a network, it is debatable how valid the centrality measures actually are. In other words, the research question that remains unanswered is: how exactly do these measures perform in the real world? So, as an example, if a centrality of a particular node identifies it to be important, is the node actually important? Purpose The goal of this paper is not just to perform a traditional social network analysis but rather to evaluate different centrality measures by conducting an empirical study analyzing exactly how do network centralities correlate with data from published multidisciplinary network data sets. Method We take standard published network data sets while using a random network to establish a baseline. These data sets included the Zachary's Karate Club network, dolphin social network and a neural network of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Each of the data sets was analyzed in terms of different centrality measures and compared with existing knowledge from associated published articles to review the role of each centrality measure in the determination of influential nodes. Results Our empirical analysis demonstrates that in the chosen network data sets, nodes which had a high Closeness Centrality also had a high Eccentricity Centrality. Likewise high Degree Centrality also correlated closely with a high Eigenvector Centrality. Whereas Betweenness Centrality varied according to network topology and did not demonstrate any noticeable pattern. In terms of identification of key nodes, we discovered that as compared with other centrality measures, Eigenvector and Eccentricity Centralities were better able to identify important nodes

  12. Attack vulnerability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Kim, Beom Jun; Yoon, Chang No; Han, Seung Kee

    2002-05-01

    We study the response of complex networks subject to attacks on vertices and edges. Several existing complex network models as well as real-world networks of scientific collaborations and Internet traffic are numerically investigated, and the network performance is quantitatively measured by the average inverse geodesic length and the size of the largest connected subgraph. For each case of attacks on vertices and edges, four different attacking strategies are used: removals by the descending order of the degree and the betweenness centrality, calculated for either the initial network or the current network during the removal procedure. It is found that the removals by the recalculated degrees and betweenness centralities are often more harmful than the attack strategies based on the initial network, suggesting that the network structure changes as important vertices or edges are removed. Furthermore, the correlation between the betweenness centrality and the degree in complex networks is studied.

  13. Measuring microscopic evolution processes of complex networks based on empirical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Liping

    2015-04-01

    Aiming at understanding the microscopic mechanism of complex systems in real world, we perform the measurement that characterizes the evolution properties on two empirical data sets. In the Autonomous Systems Internet data, the network size keeps growing although the system suffers a high rate of node deletion (r = 0.4) and link deletion (q = 0.81). However, the average degree keeps almost unchanged during the whole time range. At each time step the external links attached to a new node are about c = 1.1 and the internal links added between existing nodes are approximately m = 8. For the Scientific Collaboration data, it is a cumulated result of all the authors from 1893 up to the considered year. There is no deletion of nodes and links, r = q = 0. The external and internal links at each time step are c = 1.04 and m = 0, correspondingly. The exponents of degree distribution p(k) ∼ k-γ of these two empirical datasets γdata are in good agreement with that obtained theoretically γtheory. The results indicate that these evolution quantities may provide an insight into capturing the microscopic dynamical processes that govern the network topology.

  14. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  15. Matrix measure method for global exponential stability of complex-valued recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weiqiang; Liang, Jinling; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, based on the matrix measure method and the Halanay inequality, global exponential stability problem is investigated for the complex-valued recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. Without constructing any Lyapunov functions, several sufficient criteria are obtained to ascertain the global exponential stability of the addressed complex-valued neural networks under different activation functions. Here, the activation functions are no longer assumed to be derivative which is always demanded in relating references. In addition, the obtained results are easy to be verified and implemented in practice. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  16. Determining electron temperature for small spherical probes from network analyzer measurements of complex impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Fernsler, R. F.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2008-12-15

    In earlier work, using a network analyzer, it was shown that collisionless resistance (CR) exists in the sheath of a spherical probe when driven by a small rf signal. The CR is inversely proportional to the plasma density gradient at the location where the applied angular frequency equals the plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}. Recently, efforts have concentrated on a study of the low-to-intermediate frequency response of the probe to the rf signal. At sufficiently low frequencies, the CR is beyond cutoff, i.e., below the plasma frequency at the surface of the probe. Since the electron density at the probe surface decreases as a function of applied (negative) bias, the CR will extend to lower frequencies as the magnitude of negative bias increases. Therefore to eliminate both CR and ion current contributions, the frequencies presently being considered are much greater than the ion plasma frequency, {omega}{sub pi}, but less than the plasma frequency, {omega}{sub pe}(r{sub 0}), where r{sub 0} is the probe radius. It is shown that, in this frequency regime, the complex impedance measurements made with a network analyzer can be used to determine electron temperature. An overview of the theory is presented along with comparisons to data sets made using three stainless steel spherical probes of different sizes in different experimental environments and different plasma parameter regimes. The temperature measurements made by this method are compared to those made by conventional Langmuir probe sweeps; the method shown here requires no curve fitting as is the usual procedure with Langmuir probes when a Maxwell-Boltzmann electron distribution is assumed. The new method requires, however, a solution of the Poisson equation to determine the approximate sheath dimensions and integrals to determine approximate plasma and sheath inductances. The solution relies on the calculation of impedance for a spherical probe immersed in a collisionless plasma and is based on a simple

  17. Complexity measures of the central respiratory networks during wakefulness and sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Andrei; Akay, Yasemin; Curran, Aidan K.; Akay, Metin

    2008-06-01

    Since sleep is known to influence respiratory activity we studied whether the sleep state would affect the complexity value of the respiratory network output. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the complexity values of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) activity would be lower during REM compared to NREM. Furthermore, since REM is primarily generated by a homogeneous population of neurons in the medulla, the possibility that REM-related respiratory output would be less complex than that of the awake state was also considered. Additionally, in order to examine the influence of neuron vulnerabilities within the rostral ventral medulla (RVM) on the complexity of the respiratory network output, we inhibited respiratory neurons in the RVM by microdialysis of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. Diaphragm EMG, nuchal EMG, EEG, EOG as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume) were recorded from five unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets (3-10 days old). Complexity of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) signal during wakefulness, NREM and REM was evaluated using the approximate entropy method (ApEn). ApEn values of the EMGdia during NREM and REM sleep were found significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower than those of awake EMGdia after muscimol inhibition. In the absence of muscimol, only the differences between REM and wakefulness ApEn values were found to be significantly different.

  18. Synchronization Dynamics in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changsong; Zemanová, Lucia; Kurths, Jürgen

    Previous chapters have discussed tools from graph theory and their contribution to our understanding of the structural organization of mammalian brains and its functional implications. The brain functions are mediated by complicated dynamical processes which arise from the underlying complex neural networks, and synchronization has been proposed as an important mechanism for neural information processing. In this chapter, we discuss synchronization dynamics on complex networks. We first present a general theory and tools to characterize the relationship of some structural measures of networks to their synchronizability (the ability of the networks to achieve complete synchronization) and to the organization of effective synchronization patterns on the networks. Then, we study synchronization in a realistic network of cat cortical connectivity by modeling the nodes (which are cortical areas composed of large ensembles of neurons) by a neural mass model or a subnetwork of interacting neurons. We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns can be understood by the general principles discussed in the first part of the chapter. With weak couplings, the model with subnetworks displays biologically plausible dynamics and the synchronization pattern reveals a hierarchically clustered organization in the network structure. Thus, the study of synchronization of complex networks can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  19. Controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-05-12

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. Although control theory offers mathematical tools for steering engineered and natural systems towards a desired state, a framework to control complex self-organized systems is lacking. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes with time-dependent control that can guide the system's entire dynamics. We apply these tools to several real networks, finding that the number of driver nodes is determined mainly by the network's degree distribution. We show that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control, but that dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled using a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the high-degree nodes.

  20. Combining classification with fMRI-derived complex network measures for potential neurodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Tomer; Wilf, Meytal; Rubin, Denis; Edelman, Shimon; Malach, Rafael; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2013-01-01

    Complex network analysis (CNA), a subset of graph theory, is an emerging approach to the analysis of functional connectivity in the brain, allowing quantitative assessment of network properties such as functional segregation, integration, resilience, and centrality. Here, we show how a classification framework complements complex network analysis by providing an efficient and objective means of selecting the best network model characterizing given functional connectivity data. We describe a novel kernel-sum learning approach, block diagonal optimization (BDopt), which can be applied to CNA features to single out graph-theoretic characteristics and/or anatomical regions of interest underlying discrimination, while mitigating problems of multiple comparisons. As a proof of concept for the method's applicability to future neurodiagnostics, we apply BDopt classification to two resting state fMRI data sets: a trait (between-subjects) classification of patients with schizophrenia vs. controls, and a state (within-subjects) classification of wake vs. sleep, demonstrating powerful discriminant accuracy for the proposed framework. PMID:23671641

  1. Information complexity of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kon, M A; Plaskota, L

    2000-04-01

    This paper studies the question of lower bounds on the number of neurons and examples necessary to program a given task into feed forward neural networks. We introduce the notion of information complexity of a network to complement that of neural complexity. Neural complexity deals with lower bounds for neural resources (numbers of neurons) needed by a network to perform a given task within a given tolerance. Information complexity measures lower bounds for the information (i.e. number of examples) needed about the desired input-output function. We study the interaction of the two complexities, and so lower bounds for the complexity of building and then programming feed-forward nets for given tasks. We show something unexpected a priori--the interaction of the two can be simply bounded, so that they can be studied essentially independently. We construct radial basis function (RBF) algorithms of order n3 that are information-optimal, and give example applications.

  2. Multiscale vulnerability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Boccaletti, Stefano; Buldú, Javier; Criado, Regino; Flores, Julio; Latora, Vito; Pello, Javier; Romance, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel approach to quantify the vulnerability of a complex network, i.e., the capacity of a graph to maintain its functional performance under random damages or malicious attacks. The proposed measure represents a multiscale evaluation of vulnerability, and makes use of combined powers of the links' betweenness. We show that the proposed approach is able to properly describe some cases for which earlier measures of vulnerability fail. The relevant applications of our method for technological network design are outlined.

  3. Exploring complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strogatz, Steven H.

    2001-03-01

    The study of networks pervades all of science, from neurobiology to statistical physics. The most basic issues are structural: how does one characterize the wiring diagram of a food web or the Internet or the metabolic network of the bacterium Escherichia coli? Are there any unifying principles underlying their topology? From the perspective of nonlinear dynamics, we would also like to understand how an enormous network of interacting dynamical systems - be they neurons, power stations or lasers - will behave collectively, given their individual dynamics and coupling architecture. Researchers are only now beginning to unravel the structure and dynamics of complex networks.

  4. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  5. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  6. Homogeneous complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Leszek; Burda, Zdzisław; Wacław, Bartłomiej

    2006-07-01

    We discuss various ensembles of homogeneous complex networks and a Monte-Carlo method of generating graphs from these ensembles. The method is quite general and can be applied to simulate micro-canonical, canonical or grand-canonical ensembles for systems with various statistical weights. It can be used to construct homogeneous networks with desired properties, or to construct a non-trivial scoring function for problems of advanced motif searching.

  7. Complex Semantic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, G. M.; Aguiar, M. S. F.; Carvalho, C. F.; Dantas, D. R.; Cunha, M. V.; Morais, J. H. M.; Pereira, H. B. B.; Miranda, J. G. V.

    Verbal language is a dynamic mental process. Ideas emerge by means of the selection of words from subjective and individual characteristics throughout the oral discourse. The goal of this work is to characterize the complex network of word associations that emerge from an oral discourse from a discourse topic. Because of that, concepts of associative incidence and fidelity have been elaborated and represented the probability of occurrence of pairs of words in the same sentence in the whole oral discourse. Semantic network of words associations were constructed, where the words are represented as nodes and the edges are created when the incidence-fidelity index between pairs of words exceeds a numerical limit (0.001). Twelve oral discourses were studied. The networks generated from these oral discourses present a typical behavior of complex networks and their indices were calculated and their topologies characterized. The indices of these networks obtained from each incidence-fidelity limit exhibit a critical value in which the semantic network has maximum conceptual information and minimum residual associations. Semantic networks generated by this incidence-fidelity limit depict a pattern of hierarchical classes that represent the different contexts used in the oral discourse.

  8. Calibration of a Hall effect displacement measurement system for complex motion analysis using a neural network.

    PubMed

    Northey, G W; Oliver, M L; Rittenhouse, D M

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics studies often require the analysis of position and orientation. Although a variety of transducer and camera systems can be utilized, a common inexpensive alternative is the Hall effect sensor. Hall effect sensors have been used extensively for one-dimensional position analysis but their non-linear behavior and cross-talk effects make them difficult to calibrate for effective and accurate two- and three-dimensional position and orientation analysis. The aim of this study was to develop and calibrate a displacement measurement system for a hydraulic-actuation joystick used for repetitive motion analysis of heavy equipment operators. The system utilizes an array of four Hall effect sensors that are all active during any joystick movement. This built-in redundancy allows the calibration to utilize fully connected feed forward neural networks in conjunction with a Microscribe 3D digitizer. A fully connected feed forward neural network with one hidden layer containing five neurons was developed. Results indicate that the ability of the neural network to accurately predict the x, y and z coordinates of the joystick handle was good with r(2) values of 0.98 and higher. The calibration technique was found to be equally as accurate when used on data collected 5 days after the initial calibration, indicating the system is robust and stable enough to not require calibration every time the joystick is used. This calibration system allowed an infinite number of joystick orientations and positions to be found within the range of joystick motion.

  9. Modification Propagation in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouronte, Mary Luz; Vargas, María Luisa; Moyano, Luis Gregorio; Algarra, Francisco Javier García; Del Pozo, Luis Salvador

    To keep up with rapidly changing conditions, business systems and their associated networks are growing increasingly intricate as never before. By doing this, network management and operation costs not only rise, but are difficult even to measure. This fact must be regarded as a major constraint to system optimization initiatives, as well as a setback to derived economic benefits. In this work we introduce a simple model in order to estimate the relative cost associated to modification propagation in complex architectures. Our model can be used to anticipate costs caused by network evolution, as well as for planning and evaluating future architecture development while providing benefit optimization.

  10. Complex Networks and Socioeconomic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendral, Juan A.; López, Luis; Mendes, Jose F.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2003-04-01

    The study and characterization of complex systems is a fruitful research area nowadays. Special attention has been paid recently to complex networks, where graph and network analysis plays an important role since they reduce a given system to a simpler problem. Using a simple model for the information flow on social networks, we show that the traditional hierarchical topologies frequently used by companies and organizations, are poorly designed in terms of efficiency. Moreover, we prove that this type of structures are the result of the individual aim of monopolizing as much information as possible within the network. As the information is an appropriate measurement of centrality, we conclude that this kind of topology is so attractive for leaders because the global influence each actor has within the network is completely determined by the hierarchical level occupied. The effect on the efficiency caused by a change in a traditional hierarchical topology is also analyzed. In particular, by introducing the possibility of communication on the same level of the hierarchy.

  11. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  12. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network.

    PubMed

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  13. Role models for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, J.; White, D. R.

    2007-11-01

    We present a framework for automatically decomposing (“block-modeling”) the functional classes of agents within a complex network. These classes are represented by the nodes of an image graph (“block model”) depicting the main patterns of connectivity and thus functional roles in the network. Using a first principles approach, we derive a measure for the fit of a network to any given image graph allowing objective hypothesis testing. From the properties of an optimal fit, we derive how to find the best fitting image graph directly from the network and present a criterion to avoid overfitting. The method can handle both two-mode and one-mode data, directed and undirected as well as weighted networks and allows for different types of links to be dealt with simultaneously. It is non-parametric and computationally efficient. The concepts of structural equivalence and modularity are found as special cases of our approach. We apply our method to the world trade network and analyze the roles individual countries play in the global economy.

  14. Complex networks in brain electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, C.; Ruffini, G.; Marco-Pallarés, J.; Fuentemilla, L.; Grau, C.

    2007-08-01

    This letter reports a method to extract a functional network of the human brain from electroencephalogram measurements. A network analysis was performed on the resultant network and the statistics of the cluster coefficient, node degree, path length, and physical distance of the links, were studied. Even given the low electrode count of the experimental data the method was able to extract networks with network parameters that clearly depend on the type of stimulus presented to the subject. This type of analysis opens a door to studying the cerebral networks underlying brain electrical activity, and links the fields of complex networks and cognitive neuroscience.

  15. Online Community Detection for Large Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Wangsheng; Wu, Zhaohui; Li, Shijian

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. To understand complex networks, it is crucial to investigate their community structure. In this paper, we develop an online community detection algorithm with linear time complexity for large complex networks. Our algorithm processes a network edge by edge in the order that the network is fed to the algorithm. If a new edge is added, it just updates the existing community structure in constant time, and does not need to re-compute the whole network. Therefore, it can efficiently process large networks in real time. Our algorithm optimizes expected modularity instead of modularity at each step to avoid poor performance. The experiments are carried out using 11 public data sets, and are measured by two criteria, modularity and NMI (Normalized Mutual Information). The results show that our algorithm's running time is less than the commonly used Louvain algorithm while it gives competitive performance. PMID:25061683

  16. Graph distance for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions.

  17. Graph distance for complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions. PMID:27725690

  18. Statistical mechanics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. Frequently cited examples include the cell, a network of chemicals linked by chemical reactions, and the Internet, a network of routers and computers connected by physical links. While traditionally these systems have been modeled as random graphs, it is increasingly recognized that the topology and evolution of real networks are governed by robust organizing principles. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of complex networks, focusing on the statistical mechanics of network topology and dynamics. After reviewing the empirical data that motivated the recent interest in networks, the authors discuss the main models and analytical tools, covering random graphs, small-world and scale-free networks, the emerging theory of evolving networks, and the interplay between topology and the network's robustness against failures and attacks.

  19. Coupled adaptive complex networks.

    PubMed

    Shai, S; Dobson, S

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings. PMID:23679478

  20. Coupled adaptive complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, S.; Dobson, S.

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings.

  1. Renormalization flows in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Radicchi, Filippo; Barrat, Alain; Fortunato, Santo; Ramasco, José J

    2009-02-01

    Complex networks have acquired a great popularity in recent years, since the graph representation of many natural, social, and technological systems is often very helpful to characterize and model their phenomenology. Additionally, the mathematical tools of statistical physics have proven to be particularly suitable for studying and understanding complex networks. Nevertheless, an important obstacle to this theoretical approach is still represented by the difficulties to draw parallelisms between network science and more traditional aspects of statistical physics. In this paper, we explore the relation between complex networks and a well known topic of statistical physics: renormalization. A general method to analyze renormalization flows of complex networks is introduced. The method can be applied to study any suitable renormalization transformation. Finite-size scaling can be performed on computer-generated networks in order to classify them in universality classes. We also present applications of the method on real networks.

  2. Approaching human language with complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    The interest in modeling and analyzing human language with complex networks is on the rise in recent years and a considerable body of research in this area has already been accumulated. We survey three major lines of linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) characterization of human language as a multi-level system with complex network analysis; 2) linguistic typological research with the application of linguistic networks and their quantitative measures; and 3) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language (determined by the topology of linguistic networks) and microscopic linguistic (e.g., syntactic) features (as the traditional concern of linguistics). We show that the models and quantitative tools of complex networks, when exploited properly, can constitute an operational methodology for linguistic inquiry, which contributes to the understanding of human language and the development of linguistics. We conclude our review with suggestions for future linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language and microscopic linguistic features; 2) expansion of research scope from the global properties to other levels of granularity of linguistic networks; and 3) combination of linguistic network analysis with other quantitative studies of language (such as quantitative linguistics).

  3. Approaching human language with complex networks.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    The interest in modeling and analyzing human language with complex networks is on the rise in recent years and a considerable body of research in this area has already been accumulated. We survey three major lines of linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) characterization of human language as a multi-level system with complex network analysis; 2) linguistic typological research with the application of linguistic networks and their quantitative measures; and 3) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language (determined by the topology of linguistic networks) and microscopic linguistic (e.g., syntactic) features (as the traditional concern of linguistics). We show that the models and quantitative tools of complex networks, when exploited properly, can constitute an operational methodology for linguistic inquiry, which contributes to the understanding of human language and the development of linguistics. We conclude our review with suggestions for future linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language and microscopic linguistic features; 2) expansion of research scope from the global properties to other levels of granularity of linguistic networks; and 3) combination of linguistic network analysis with other quantitative studies of language (such as quantitative linguistics).

  4. Approaching human language with complex networks.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    The interest in modeling and analyzing human language with complex networks is on the rise in recent years and a considerable body of research in this area has already been accumulated. We survey three major lines of linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) characterization of human language as a multi-level system with complex network analysis; 2) linguistic typological research with the application of linguistic networks and their quantitative measures; and 3) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language (determined by the topology of linguistic networks) and microscopic linguistic (e.g., syntactic) features (as the traditional concern of linguistics). We show that the models and quantitative tools of complex networks, when exploited properly, can constitute an operational methodology for linguistic inquiry, which contributes to the understanding of human language and the development of linguistics. We conclude our review with suggestions for future linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language and microscopic linguistic features; 2) expansion of research scope from the global properties to other levels of granularity of linguistic networks; and 3) combination of linguistic network analysis with other quantitative studies of language (such as quantitative linguistics). PMID:24794524

  5. The robustness of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Reka

    2002-03-01

    Many complex networks display a surprising degree of tolerance against errors. For example, organisms and ecosystems exhibit remarkable robustness to large variations in temperature, moisture, and nutrients, and communication networks continue to function despite local failures. This presentation will explore the effects of the network topology on its robust functioning. First, we will consider the topological integrity of several networks under node disruption. Then we will focus on the functional robustness of biological signaling networks, and the decisive role played by the network topology in this robustness.

  6. A Measure of Systems Engineering Effectiveness in Government Acquisition of Complex Information Systems: A Bayesian Belief Network-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doskey, Steven Craig

    2014-01-01

    This research presents an innovative means of gauging Systems Engineering effectiveness through a Systems Engineering Relative Effectiveness Index (SE REI) model. The SE REI model uses a Bayesian Belief Network to map causal relationships in government acquisitions of Complex Information Systems (CIS), enabling practitioners to identify and…

  7. Quantifying networks complexity from information geometry viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Domenico Mancini, Stefano; Pettini, Marco

    2014-04-15

    We consider a Gaussian statistical model whose parameter space is given by the variances of random variables. Underlying this model we identify networks by interpreting random variables as sitting on vertices and their correlations as weighted edges among vertices. We then associate to the parameter space a statistical manifold endowed with a Riemannian metric structure (that of Fisher-Rao). Going on, in analogy with the microcanonical definition of entropy in Statistical Mechanics, we introduce an entropic measure of networks complexity. We prove that it is invariant under networks isomorphism. Above all, considering networks as simplicial complexes, we evaluate this entropy on simplexes and find that it monotonically increases with their dimension.

  8. Quantization Effects on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    Weights of edges in many complex networks we constructed are quantized values of the real weights. To what extent does the quantization affect the properties of a network? In this work, quantization effects on network properties are investigated based on the spectrum of the corresponding Laplacian. In contrast to the intuition that larger quantization level always implies a better approximation of the quantized network to the original one, we find a ubiquitous periodic jumping phenomenon with peak-value decreasing in a power-law relationship in all the real-world weighted networks that we investigated. We supply theoretical analysis on the critical quantization level and the power laws. PMID:27226049

  9. Quantization Effects on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-05-01

    Weights of edges in many complex networks we constructed are quantized values of the real weights. To what extent does the quantization affect the properties of a network? In this work, quantization effects on network properties are investigated based on the spectrum of the corresponding Laplacian. In contrast to the intuition that larger quantization level always implies a better approximation of the quantized network to the original one, we find a ubiquitous periodic jumping phenomenon with peak-value decreasing in a power-law relationship in all the real-world weighted networks that we investigated. We supply theoretical analysis on the critical quantization level and the power laws.

  10. Quantization Effects on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    Weights of edges in many complex networks we constructed are quantized values of the real weights. To what extent does the quantization affect the properties of a network? In this work, quantization effects on network properties are investigated based on the spectrum of the corresponding Laplacian. In contrast to the intuition that larger quantization level always implies a better approximation of the quantized network to the original one, we find a ubiquitous periodic jumping phenomenon with peak-value decreasing in a power-law relationship in all the real-world weighted networks that we investigated. We supply theoretical analysis on the critical quantization level and the power laws. PMID:27226049

  11. Language Networks as Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Max Kueiming; Ou, Sheue-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the late eighties, with a growing discontent with analytical methods in science and the growing power of computers, researchers began to study complex systems such as living organisms, evolution of genes, biological systems, brain neural networks, epidemics, ecology, economy, social networks, etc. In the early nineties, the research…

  12. The physics of communicability in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Hatano, Naomichi; Benzi, Michele

    2012-05-01

    A fundamental problem in the study of complex networks is to provide quantitative measures of correlation and information flow between different parts of a system. To this end, several notions of communicability have been introduced and applied to a wide variety of real-world networks in recent years. Several such communicability functions are reviewed in this paper. It is emphasized that communication and correlation in networks can take place through many more routes than the shortest paths, a fact that may not have been sufficiently appreciated in previously proposed correlation measures. In contrast to these, the communicability measures reviewed in this paper are defined by taking into account all possible routes between two nodes, assigning smaller weights to longer ones. This point of view naturally leads to the definition of communicability in terms of matrix functions, such as the exponential, resolvent, and hyperbolic functions, in which the matrix argument is either the adjacency matrix or the graph Laplacian associated with the network. Considerable insight on communicability can be gained by modeling a network as a system of oscillators and deriving physical interpretations, both classical and quantum-mechanical, of various communicability functions. Applications of communicability measures to the analysis of complex systems are illustrated on a variety of biological, physical and social networks. The last part of the paper is devoted to a review of the notion of locality in complex networks and to computational aspects that by exploiting sparsity can greatly reduce the computational efforts for the calculation of communicability functions for large networks.

  13. "Conjectural" links in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snarskii, A. A.; Zorinets, D. I.; Lande, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces the concept of Conjectural Link for Complex Networks, in particular, social networks. Conjectural Link we understand as an implicit link, not available in the network, but supposed to be present, based on the characteristics of its topology. It is possible, for example, when in the formal description of the network some connections are skipped due to errors, deliberately hidden or withdrawn (e.g. in the case of partial destruction of the network). Introduced a parameter that allows ranking the Conjectural Link. The more this parameter - the more likely that this connection should be present in the network. This paper presents a method of recovery of partially destroyed Complex Networks using Conjectural Links finding. Presented two methods of finding the node pairs that are not linked directly to one another, but have a great possibility of Conjectural Link communication among themselves: a method based on the determination of the resistance between two nodes, and method based on the computation of the lengths of routes between two nodes. Several examples of real networks are reviewed and performed a comparison to know network links prediction methods, not intended to find the missing links in already formed networks.

  14. Heat diffusion: Thermodynamic depth complexity of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escolano, Francisco; Hancock, Edwin R.; Lozano, Miguel A.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we use the Birkhoff-von Neumann decomposition of the diffusion kernel to compute a polytopal measure of graph complexity. We decompose the diffusion kernel into a series of weighted Birkhoff combinations and compute the entropy associated with the weighting proportions (polytopal complexity). The maximum entropy Birkhoff combination can be expressed in terms of matrix permanents. This allows us to introduce a phase-transition principle that links our definition of polytopal complexity to the heat flowing through the network at a given diffusion time. The result is an efficiently computed complexity measure, which we refer to as flow complexity. Moreover, the flow complexity measure allows us to analyze graphs and networks in terms of the thermodynamic depth. We compare our method with three alternative methods described in the literature (Estrada's heterogeneity index, the Laplacian energy, and the von Neumann entropy). Our study is based on 217 protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks including histidine kinases from several species of bacteria. We find a correlation between structural complexity and phylogeny (more evolved species have statistically more complex PPIs). Although our methods outperform the alternatives, we find similarities with Estrada's heterogeneity index in terms of network size independence and predictive power.

  15. Control efficacy of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks.

  16. Control efficacy of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Controlling complex networks has become a forefront research area in network science and engineering. Recent efforts have led to theoretical frameworks of controllability to fully control a network through steering a minimum set of driver nodes. However, in realistic situations not every node is accessible or can be externally driven, raising the fundamental issue of control efficacy: if driving signals are applied to an arbitrary subset of nodes, how many other nodes can be controlled? We develop a framework to determine the control efficacy for undirected networks of arbitrary topology. Mathematically, based on non-singular transformation, we prove a theorem to determine rigorously the control efficacy of the network and to identify the nodes that can be controlled for any given driver nodes. Physically, we develop the picture of diffusion that views the control process as a signal diffused from input signals to the set of controllable nodes. The combination of mathematical theory and physical reasoning allows us not only to determine the control efficacy for model complex networks and a large number of empirical networks, but also to uncover phenomena in network control, e.g., hub nodes in general possess lower control centrality than an average node in undirected networks. PMID:27324438

  17. Information communication on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Akito; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Maruyama, Takahiro; Morioka, Atsushi; Naganuma, Yuki

    2013-02-01

    Since communication networks such as the Internet, which is regarded as a complex network, have recently become a huge scale and a lot of data pass through them, the improvement of packet routing strategies for transport is one of the most significant themes in the study of computer networks. It is especially important to find routing strategies which can bear as many traffic as possible without congestion in complex networks. First, using neural networks, we introduce a strategy for packet routing on complex networks, where path lengths and queue lengths in nodes are taken into account within a framework of statistical physics. Secondly, instead of using shortest paths, we propose efficient paths which avoid hubs, nodes with a great many degrees, on scale-free networks with a weight of each node. We improve the heuristic algorithm proposed by Danila et. al. which optimizes step by step routing properties on congestion by using the information of betweenness, the probability of paths passing through a node in all optimal paths which are defined according to a rule, and mitigates the congestion. We confirm the new heuristic algorithm which balances traffic on networks by achieving minimization of the maximum betweenness in much smaller number of iteration steps. Finally, We model virus spreading and data transfer on peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Using mean-field approximation, we obtain an analytical formulation and emulate virus spreading on the network and compare the results with those of simulation. Moreover, we investigate the mitigation of information traffic congestion in the P2P networks.

  18. Neighborhood properties of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Miranda, José G. V.; Lobão, Thierry Petit

    2006-04-01

    A concept of neighborhood in complex networks is addressed based on the criterion of the minimal number of steps to reach other vertices. This amounts to, starting from a given network R1 , generating a family of networks Rl,l=2,3,… such that, the vertices that are l steps apart in the original R1 , are only 1 step apart in Rl . The higher order networks are generated using Boolean operations among the adjacency matrices Ml that represent Rl . The families originated by the well known linear and the Erdös-Renyi networks are found to be invariant, in the sense that the spectra of Ml are the same, up to finite size effects. A further family originated from small world network is identified.

  19. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  20. Dynamic and interacting complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark E.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible

  1. Network representations of immune system complexity.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Naeha; Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Gottschalk, Rachel A; Germain, Ronald N; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a dynamic multiscale system composed of a hierarchically organized set of molecular, cellular, and organismal networks that act in concert to promote effective host defense. These networks range from those involving gene regulatory and protein-protein interactions underlying intracellular signaling pathways and single-cell responses to increasingly complex networks of in vivo cellular interaction, positioning, and migration that determine the overall immune response of an organism. Immunity is thus not the product of simple signaling events but rather nonlinear behaviors arising from dynamic, feedback-regulated interactions among many components. One of the major goals of systems immunology is to quantitatively measure these complex multiscale spatial and temporal interactions, permitting development of computational models that can be used to predict responses to perturbation. Recent technological advances permit collection of comprehensive datasets at multiple molecular and cellular levels, while advances in network biology support representation of the relationships of components at each level as physical or functional interaction networks. The latter facilitate effective visualization of patterns and recognition of emergent properties arising from the many interactions of genes, molecules, and cells of the immune system. We illustrate the power of integrating 'omics' and network modeling approaches for unbiased reconstruction of signaling and transcriptional networks with a focus on applications involving the innate immune system. We further discuss future possibilities for reconstruction of increasingly complex cellular- and organism-level networks and development of sophisticated computational tools for prediction of emergent immune behavior arising from the concerted action of these networks.

  2. Statistical mechanics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Reka Zsuzsanna

    2001-07-01

    The emergence of order in natural systems is a constant source of inspiration for both physical and biological sciences. While the spatial order characterizing for example the crystals has been the basis of many advances in contemporary physics, most complex systems in nature do not offer such high degree of order. Many of these systems form complex networks whose nodes are the elements of the system and edges represent the interactions between them. Traditionally complex networks have been described by the random graph theory founded in 1959 by Paul Erdoḧs and Alfréd Rényi. One of the defining features of random graphs is that they are statistically homogeneous, and their degree distribution (characterizing the spread in the number of edges starting from a node) is a Poisson distribution. In contrast, recent empirical studies, including the work of our group, indicate that the topology of real networks is much richer than that of random graphs. In particular, the degree distribution of real networks is a power-law, indicating a heterogeneous topology in which the majority of the nodes have a small degree, but there is a significant fraction of highly connected nodes that play an important role in the connectivity of the network. The scale-free topology of real networks has very important consequences on their functioning. For example, we have discovered that scale-free networks are extremely resilient to the random disruption of their nodes. On the other hand, the selective removal of the nodes with highest degree induces a rapid breakdown of the network to isolated subparts that cannot communicate with each other. The non-trivial scaling of the degree distribution of real networks is also an indication of their assembly and evolution. Indeed, our modeling studies have shown us that there are general principles governing the evolution of networks. Most networks start from a small seed and grow by the addition of new nodes which attach to the nodes already in

  3. Porous Soil as Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, R. M.; Santiago, A.; Cárdenas, J. P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Borondo, F.; Losada, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present a complex network model based on a heterogeneous preferential attachment scheme [1,2] to quantify the structure of porous soils [3]. Under this perspective pores are represented by nodes and the space for the flow of fluids between them are represented by links. Pore properties such as position and size are described by fixed states in a metric space, while an affinity function is introduced to bias the attachment probabilities of links according to these properties. We perform an analytical and numerical study of the degree distributions in the soil model and show that under reasonable conditions all the model variants yield a multiscaling behavior in the connectivity degrees, leaving a empirically testable signature of heterogeneity in the topology of pore networks. References [1] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, "Emergence of multiscaling in heterogeneous complex networks". Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 18, 1591 (2007). [2] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, "An extended formalism for preferential attachment in heterogeneous complex networks". Europhys. Lett. 82, 58004 (2008). [3] A. Santiago, R. M. Benito, J. P. Cárdenas, J. C. Losada, A. M. Tarquis and F. Borondo, "Multiscaling of porous soils as heterogeneous complex networks". Nonl. Proc. Geophys. 15, 1-10 (2008).

  4. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  5. Composing Music with Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofan; Tse, Chi K.; Small, Michael

    In this paper we study the network structure in music and attempt to compose music artificially. Networks are constructed with nodes and edges corresponding to musical notes and their co-occurrences. We analyze sample compositions from Bach, Mozart, Chopin, as well as other types of music including Chinese pop music. We observe remarkably similar properties in all networks constructed from the selected compositions. Power-law exponents of degree distributions, mean degrees, clustering coefficients, mean geodesic distances, etc. are reported. With the network constructed, music can be created by using a biased random walk algorithm, which begins with a randomly chosen note and selects the subsequent notes according to a simple set of rules that compares the weights of the edges, weights of the nodes, and/or the degrees of nodes. The newly created music from complex networks will be played in the presentation.

  6. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-04-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function.

  7. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-01-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function. PMID:27067257

  8. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  9. Multilevel Complex Networks and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarelli, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Network theory has been a powerful tool to model isolated complex systems. However, the classical approach does not take into account the interactions often present among different systems. Hence, the scientific community is nowadays concentrating the efforts on the foundations of new mathematical tools for understanding what happens when multiple networks interact. The case of economic and financial networks represents a paramount example of multilevel networks. In the case of trade, trade among countries the different levels can be described by the different granularity of the trading relations. Indeed, we have now data from the scale of consumers to that of the country level. In the case of financial institutions, we have a variety of levels at the same scale. For example one bank can appear in the interbank networks, ownership network and cds networks in which the same institution can take place. In both cases the systemically important vertices need to be determined by different procedures of centrality definition and community detection. In this talk I will present some specific cases of study related to these topics and present the regularities found. Acknowledged support from EU FET Project ``Multiplex'' 317532.

  10. Epidemic processes in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Castellano, Claudio; Van Mieghem, Piet; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and sociotechnical systems. The complex properties of real-world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. A coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes is presented, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, computer, and social scientists share a common interest in studying epidemic spreading and rely on similar models for the description of the diffusion of pathogens, knowledge, and innovation. For this reason, while focusing on the main results and the paradigmatic models in infectious disease modeling, the major results concerning generalized social contagion processes are also presented. Finally, the research activity at the forefront in the study of epidemic spreading in coevolving, coupled, and time-varying networks is reported.

  11. Statistical physics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huafeng

    We live in a connected world. It is of great practical importance and intellectual appeal to understand the networks surrounding us. In this work we study ranking of the nodes in complex networks. In large networks such as World Wide Web (WWW) and citation networks of scientific literature, searching by keywords is a common practice to retrieve useful information. On the WWW, apart from the contents of webpages, the topology of the network itself can be a rich source of information about their relative importance and relevancy to the search query. It is the effective utilization of this topological information [50] which advanced the Google search engine to its present position of the most popular tool on the WWW. The World-Wide Web (WWW) is characterized by a strong community structure in which communities of webpages are densely interconnected by hyperlinks. We study how such network architecture affects the average Google ranking of individual webpages in the community. Using a mean-field approximation, we quantify how the average Google rank of community's webpages depends on the degree to which it is isolated from the rest of the world in both incoming and outgoing directions, and alpha -- the only intrinsic parameter of Google's PageRank algorithm. We proceed with numerical study of simulated networks and empirical study of several internal web-communities within two US universities. The predictions of our mean-field treatment were qualitatively verified in those real-life networks. Furthermore, the value alpha = 0.15 used by Google seems to be optimized for the degree of isolation of communities as they exist in the actual WWW. We then extend Google's PageRank algorithm to citation networks of scientific literature. Unlike hyperlinks, citations cannot be updated after the point of publication. This results in strong aging characteristics of citation networks that affect the performance of the PageRank algorithm. To rectify this we modify the Page

  12. Measurement of complex surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.M.

    1993-05-01

    Several of the components used in coil fabrication involve complex surfaces and dimensions that are not well suited to measurements using conventional dimensional measuring equipment. Some relatively simple techniques that are in use in the SSCL Magnet Systems Division (MSD) for incoming inspection will be described, with discussion of their suitability for specific applications. Components that are submitted for MSD Quality Assurance (QA) dimensional inspection may be divided into two distinct categories; the first category involves components for which there is an approved drawing and for which all nominal dimensions are known; the second category involves parts for which `reverse engineering` is required, the part is available but there are no available drawings or dimensions. This second category typically occurs during development of coil end parts and coil turn filler parts where it is necessary to manually shape the part and then measure it to develop the information required to prepare a drawing for the part.

  13. Blockmodeling techniques for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Brian Joseph

    The class of network models known as stochastic blockmodels has recently been gaining popularity. In this dissertation, we present new work that uses blockmodels to answer questions about networks. We create a blockmodel based on the idea of link communities, which naturally gives rise to overlapping vertex communities. We derive a fast and accurate algorithm to fit the model to networks. This model can be related to another blockmodel, which allows the method to efficiently find nonoverlapping communities as well. We then create a heuristic based on the link community model whose use is to find the correct number of communities in a network. The heuristic is based on intuitive corrections to likelihood ratio tests. It does a good job finding the correct number of communities in both real networks and synthetic networks generated from the link communities model. Two commonly studied types of networks are citation networks, where research papers cite other papers, and coauthorship networks, where authors are connected if they've written a paper together. We study a multi-modal network from a large dataset of Physics publications that is the combination of the two, allowing for directed links between papers as citations, and an undirected edge between a scientist and a paper if they helped to write it. This allows for new insights on the relation between social interaction and scientific production. We also have the publication dates of papers, which lets us track our measures over time. Finally, we create a stochastic model for ranking vertices in a semi-directed network. The probability of connection between two vertices depends on the difference of their ranks. When this model is fit to high school friendship networks, the ranks appear to correspond with a measure of social status. Students have reciprocated and some unreciprocated edges with other students of closely similar rank that correspond to true friendship, and claim an aspirational friendship with a much

  14. Network representations of immune system complexity

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Naeha; Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Gottschalk, Rachel A.; Germain, Ronald N.; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a dynamic multi-scale system composed of a hierarchically organized set of molecular, cellular and organismal networks that act in concert to promote effective host defense. These networks range from those involving gene regulatory and protein-protein interactions underlying intracellular signaling pathways and single cell responses to increasingly complex networks of in vivo cellular interaction, positioning and migration that determine the overall immune response of an organism. Immunity is thus not the product of simple signaling events but rather non-linear behaviors arising from dynamic, feedback-regulated interactions among many components. One of the major goals of systems immunology is to quantitatively measure these complex multi-scale spatial and temporal interactions, permitting development of computational models that can be used to predict responses to perturbation. Recent technological advances permit collection of comprehensive datasets at multiple molecular and cellular levels while advances in network biology support representation of the relationships of components at each level as physical or functional interaction networks. The latter facilitate effective visualization of patterns and recognition of emergent properties arising from the many interactions of genes, molecules, and cells of the immune system. We illustrate the power of integrating ‘omics’ and network modeling approaches for unbiased reconstruction of signaling and transcriptional networks with a focus on applications involving the innate immune system. We further discuss future possibilities for reconstruction of increasingly complex cellular and organism-level networks and development of sophisticated computational tools for prediction of emergent immune behavior arising from the concerted action of these networks. PMID:25625853

  15. Network representations of immune system complexity.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Naeha; Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Gottschalk, Rachel A; Germain, Ronald N; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a dynamic multiscale system composed of a hierarchically organized set of molecular, cellular, and organismal networks that act in concert to promote effective host defense. These networks range from those involving gene regulatory and protein-protein interactions underlying intracellular signaling pathways and single-cell responses to increasingly complex networks of in vivo cellular interaction, positioning, and migration that determine the overall immune response of an organism. Immunity is thus not the product of simple signaling events but rather nonlinear behaviors arising from dynamic, feedback-regulated interactions among many components. One of the major goals of systems immunology is to quantitatively measure these complex multiscale spatial and temporal interactions, permitting development of computational models that can be used to predict responses to perturbation. Recent technological advances permit collection of comprehensive datasets at multiple molecular and cellular levels, while advances in network biology support representation of the relationships of components at each level as physical or functional interaction networks. The latter facilitate effective visualization of patterns and recognition of emergent properties arising from the many interactions of genes, molecules, and cells of the immune system. We illustrate the power of integrating 'omics' and network modeling approaches for unbiased reconstruction of signaling and transcriptional networks with a focus on applications involving the innate immune system. We further discuss future possibilities for reconstruction of increasingly complex cellular- and organism-level networks and development of sophisticated computational tools for prediction of emergent immune behavior arising from the concerted action of these networks. PMID:25625853

  16. Factors Determining Nestedness in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jonhson, Samuel; Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of network structural features is a key task in deciphering complex systems. In this context, the property of network nestedness has aroused a fair amount of interest as regards ecological networks. Indeed, Bastolla et al. introduced a simple measure of network nestedness which opened the door to analytical understanding, allowing them to conclude that biodiversity is strongly enhanced in highly nested mutualistic networks. Here, we suggest a slightly refined version of such a measure of nestedness and study how it is influenced by the most basic structural properties of networks, such as degree distribution and degree-degree correlations (i.e. assortativity). We find that most of the empirically found nestedness stems from heterogeneity in the degree distribution. Once such an influence has been discounted – as a second factor – we find that nestedness is strongly correlated with disassortativity and hence – as random networks have been recently found to be naturally disassortative – they also tend to be naturally nested just as the result of chance. PMID:24069264

  17. Clustering-led complex brain networks approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dazhong; Zhong, Ning

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviewed the meaning of the statistic index and the properties of the complex network models and their physiological explanation. By analyzing existing problems and construction strategies, this paper attempted to construct complex brain networks from a different point of view: that of clustering first and constructing the brain network second. A clustering-guided (or led) construction strategy towards complex brain networks was proposed. The research focused on the discussion of the task-induced brain network. To discover different networks in a single run, a combined-clusters method was applied. Afterwards, a complex local brain network was formed with a complex network method on voxels. In a real test dataset, it was found that the network had small-world characteristics and had no significant scale-free properties. Meanwhile, some key bridge nodes and their characteristics were identified in the local network by calculating the betweenness centrality.

  18. Fuzzy Entropy Method for Quantifying Supply Chain Networks Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jihui; Xu, Junqin

    Supply chain is a special kind of complex network. Its complexity and uncertainty makes it very difficult to control and manage. Supply chains are faced with a rising complexity of products, structures, and processes. Because of the strong link between a supply chain’s complexity and its efficiency the supply chain complexity management becomes a major challenge of today’s business management. The aim of this paper is to quantify the complexity and organization level of an industrial network working towards the development of a ‘Supply Chain Network Analysis’ (SCNA). By measuring flows of goods and interaction costs between different sectors of activity within the supply chain borders, a network of flows is built and successively investigated by network analysis. The result of this study shows that our approach can provide an interesting conceptual perspective in which the modern supply network can be framed, and that network analysis can handle these issues in practice.

  19. Spatial Network Representation Of Complex Living Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korošak, Dean; Rupnik, Marjan

    2008-11-01

    Networks were widely used to describe organizational and functional principles of living organisms across various scales. The topology of such biological complex networks often turned out to be "scale-free," with the power-law distribution of number of links per node, robust and modular with underlying self-similar structure. However, the topology of cytoarchitecture in living tissues has not yet received wide attention from the network perspective. Here we discuss the spatial complex network model of coupled clusters of beta cells in pancreatic islets. Networks of cells in pancreatic islets were constructed from the 2D section images presenting fluorescently labelled intercellular spaces obtained by two-photon laser scanning microscopy of whole pancreas tissue slices, and cells conductances measured electrophysiologically using whole-cell patch-clamp. We find that the heterogeneity of beta cells in intact living islets induces scale-free topology of the tissue network. Furthermore, we show that the islet-like structures visually similar to 2D section images can be obtained using Voronoi diagrams of random points.

  20. Kinetic analysis of complex metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanopoulos, G.

    1996-12-31

    A new methodology is presented for the analysis of complex metabolic networks with the goal of metabolite overproduction. The objective is to locate a small number of reaction steps in a network that have maximum impact on network flux amplification and whose rate can also be increased without functional network derangement. This method extends the concepts of Metabolic Control Analysis to groups of reactions and offers the means for calculating group control coefficients as measures of the control exercised by groups of reactions on the overall network fluxes and intracellular metabolite pools. It is further demonstrated that the optimal strategy for the effective increase of network fluxes, while maintaining an uninterrupted supply of intermediate metabolites, is through the coordinated amplification of multiple (as opposed to a single) reaction steps. Satisfying this requirement invokes the concept of the concentration control to coefficient, which emerges as a critical parameter in the identification of feasible enzymatic modifications with maximal impact on the network flux. A case study of aromatic aminoacid production is provided to illustrate these concepts.

  1. Advances in the Theory of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruani, Fernando

    An exhaustive and comprehensive review on the theory of complex networks would imply nowadays a titanic task, and it would result in a lengthy work containing plenty of technical details of arguable relevance. Instead, this chapter addresses very briefly the ABC of complex network theory, visiting only the hallmarks of the theoretical founding, to finally focus on two of the most interesting and promising current research problems: the study of dynamical processes on transportation networks and the identification of communities in complex networks.

  2. Minimum complexity echo state network.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Tino, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) refers to a new class of state-space models with a fixed state transition structure (the reservoir) and an adaptable readout form the state space. The reservoir is supposed to be sufficiently complex so as to capture a large number of features of the input stream that can be exploited by the reservoir-to-output readout mapping. The field of RC has been growing rapidly with many successful applications. However, RC has been criticized for not being principled enough. Reservoir construction is largely driven by a series of randomized model-building stages, with both researchers and practitioners having to rely on a series of trials and errors. To initialize a systematic study of the field, we concentrate on one of the most popular classes of RC methods, namely echo state network, and ask: What is the minimal complexity of reservoir construction for obtaining competitive models and what is the memory capacity (MC) of such simplified reservoirs? On a number of widely used time series benchmarks of different origin and characteristics, as well as by conducting a theoretical analysis we show that a simple deterministically constructed cycle reservoir is comparable to the standard echo state network methodology. The (short-term) MC of linear cyclic reservoirs can be made arbitrarily close to the proved optimal value.

  3. Controlling synchronous patterns in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weijie; Fan, Huawei; Wang, Ying; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Although the set of permutation symmetries of a complex network could be very large, few of them give rise to stable synchronous patterns. Here we present a general framework and develop techniques for controlling synchronization patterns in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators. Specifically, according to the network permutation symmetry, we design a small-size and weighted network, namely the control network, and use it to control the large-size complex network by means of pinning coupling. We argue mathematically that for any of the network symmetries, there always exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the unstable synchronous pattern associated to this symmetry can be stabilized. The feasibility of the control method is verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world networks and demonstrated experimentally in systems of coupled chaotic circuits. Our studies show the controllability of synchronous patterns in complex networks of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  4. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  5. Community Detection in Quantum Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccin, Mauro; Migdał, Piotr; Johnson, Tomi H.; Bergholm, Ville; Biamonte, Jacob D.

    2014-10-01

    Determining community structure is a central topic in the study of complex networks, be it technological, social, biological or chemical, static or in interacting systems. In this paper, we extend the concept of community detection from classical to quantum systems—a crucial missing component of a theory of complex networks based on quantum mechanics. We demonstrate that certain quantum mechanical effects cannot be captured using current classical complex network tools and provide new methods that overcome these problems. Our approaches are based on defining closeness measures between nodes, and then maximizing modularity with hierarchical clustering. Our closeness functions are based on quantum transport probability and state fidelity, two important quantities in quantum information theory. To illustrate the effectiveness of our approach in detecting community structure in quantum systems, we provide several examples, including a naturally occurring light-harvesting complex, LHCII. The prediction of our simplest algorithm, semiclassical in nature, mostly agrees with a proposed partitioning for the LHCII found in quantum chemistry literature, whereas our fully quantum treatment of the problem uncovers a new, consistent, and appropriately quantum community structure.

  6. A quantitative method for determining the robustness of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jun; Wu, Hongrun; Tong, Xiaonian; Zheng, Bojin

    2013-06-01

    Most current studies estimate the invulnerability of complex networks using a qualitative method that analyzes the decay rate of network performance. This method results in confusion over the invulnerability of various types of complex networks. By normalizing network performance and defining a baseline, this paper defines the invulnerability index as the integral of the normalized network performance curve minus the baseline. This quantitative method seeks to measure network invulnerability under both edge and node attacks and provides a definition on the distinguishment of the robustness and fragility of networks. To demonstrate the proposed method, three small-world networks were selected as test beds. The simulation results indicate that the proposed invulnerability index can effectively and accurately quantify network resilience and can deal with both the node and edge attacks. The index can provide a valuable reference for determining network invulnerability in future research.

  7. Benford’s Distribution in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Morzy, Mikołaj; Kajdanowicz, Tomasz; Szymański, Bolesław K.

    2016-01-01

    Many collections of numbers do not have a uniform distribution of the leading digit, but conform to a very particular pattern known as Benford’s distribution. This distribution has been found in numerous areas such as accounting data, voting registers, census data, and even in natural phenomena. Recently it has been reported that Benford’s law applies to online social networks. Here we introduce a set of rigorous tests for adherence to Benford’s law and apply it to verification of this claim, extending the scope of the experiment to various complex networks and to artificial networks created by several popular generative models. Our findings are that neither for real nor for artificial networks there is sufficient evidence for common conformity of network structural properties with Benford’s distribution. We find very weak evidence suggesting that three measures, degree centrality, betweenness centrality and local clustering coefficient, could adhere to Benford’s law for scalefree networks but only for very narrow range of their parameters. PMID:27748398

  8. Benford’s Distribution in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzy, Mikołaj; Kajdanowicz, Tomasz; Szymański, Bolesław K.

    2016-10-01

    Many collections of numbers do not have a uniform distribution of the leading digit, but conform to a very particular pattern known as Benford’s distribution. This distribution has been found in numerous areas such as accounting data, voting registers, census data, and even in natural phenomena. Recently it has been reported that Benford’s law applies to online social networks. Here we introduce a set of rigorous tests for adherence to Benford’s law and apply it to verification of this claim, extending the scope of the experiment to various complex networks and to artificial networks created by several popular generative models. Our findings are that neither for real nor for artificial networks there is sufficient evidence for common conformity of network structural properties with Benford’s distribution. We find very weak evidence suggesting that three measures, degree centrality, betweenness centrality and local clustering coefficient, could adhere to Benford’s law for scalefree networks but only for very narrow range of their parameters.

  9. Complexity Characteristics of Currency Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, A. Z.; Drozdz, S.; Kwapien, J.; Oswiecimka, P.

    2006-11-01

    A large set of daily FOREX time series is analyzed. The corresponding correlation matrices (CM) are constructed for USD, EUR and PLN used as the base currencies. The triangle rule is interpreted as constraints reducing the number of independent returns. The CM spectrum is computed and compared with the cases of shuffled currencies and a fictitious random currency taken as a base currency. The Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) graphs are calculated and the clustering effects for strong currencies are found. It is shown that for MSTs the node rank has power like, scale free behavior. Finally, the scaling exponents are evaluated and found in the range analogous to those identified recently for various complex networks.

  10. Centrality measures for networks with community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Naveen; Singh, Anurag; Cherifi, Hocine

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the network structure, and finding out the influential nodes is a challenging issue in large networks. Identifying the most influential nodes in a network can be useful in many applications like immunization of nodes in case of epidemic spreading, during intentional attacks on complex networks. A lot of research is being done to devise centrality measures which could efficiently identify the most influential nodes in a network. There are two major approaches to this problem: On one hand, deterministic strategies that exploit knowledge about the overall network topology, while on the other end, random strategies are completely agnostic about the network structure. Centrality measures that can deal with a limited knowledge of the network structure are of prime importance. Indeed, in practice, information about the global structure of the overall network is rarely available or hard to acquire. Even if available, the structure of the network might be too large that it is too much computationally expensive to calculate global centrality measures. To that end, a centrality measure is proposed here that requires information only at the community level. Indeed, most of the real-world networks exhibit a community structure that can be exploited efficiently to discover the influential nodes. We performed a comparative evaluation of prominent global deterministic strategies together with stochastic strategies, an available and the proposed deterministic community-based strategy. Effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by performing experiments on synthetic and real-world networks with community structure in the case of immunization of nodes for epidemic control.

  11. Structural measures for multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Federico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Many real-world complex systems consist of a set of elementary units connected by relationships of different kinds. All such systems are better described in terms of multiplex networks, where the links at each layer represent a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes rather than in terms of (single-layer) networks. In this paper we present a general framework to describe and study multiplex networks, whose links are either unweighted or weighted. In particular, we propose a series of measures to characterize the multiplexicity of the systems in terms of (i) basic node and link properties such as the node degree, and the edge overlap and reinforcement, (ii) local properties such as the clustering coefficient and the transitivity, and (iii) global properties related to the navigability of the multiplex across the different layers. The measures we introduce are validated on a genuinely multiplex data set of Indonesian terrorists, where information among 78 individuals are recorded with respect to mutual trust, common operations, exchanged communications, and business relationships.

  12. Structural measures for multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Federico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Many real-world complex systems consist of a set of elementary units connected by relationships of different kinds. All such systems are better described in terms of multiplex networks, where the links at each layer represent a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes rather than in terms of (single-layer) networks. In this paper we present a general framework to describe and study multiplex networks, whose links are either unweighted or weighted. In particular, we propose a series of measures to characterize the multiplexicity of the systems in terms of (i) basic node and link properties such as the node degree, and the edge overlap and reinforcement, (ii) local properties such as the clustering coefficient and the transitivity, and (iii) global properties related to the navigability of the multiplex across the different layers. The measures we introduce are validated on a genuinely multiplex data set of Indonesian terrorists, where information among 78 individuals are recorded with respect to mutual trust, common operations, exchanged communications, and business relationships.

  13. Distance metric learning for complex networks: Towards size-independent comparison of network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbary, Sadegh; Motallebi, Sadegh; Rashidian, Sina; Habibi, Jafar; Movaghar, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Real networks show nontrivial topological properties such as community structure and long-tail degree distribution. Moreover, many network analysis applications are based on topological comparison of complex networks. Classification and clustering of networks, model selection, and anomaly detection are just some applications of network comparison. In these applications, an effective similarity metric is needed which, given two complex networks of possibly different sizes, evaluates the amount of similarity between the structural features of the two networks. Traditional graph comparison approaches, such as isomorphism-based methods, are not only too time consuming but also inappropriate to compare networks with different sizes. In this paper, we propose an intelligent method based on the genetic algorithms for integrating, selecting, and weighting the network features in order to develop an effective similarity measure for complex networks. The proposed similarity metric outperforms state of the art methods with respect to different evaluation criteria.

  14. The noisy voter model on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new analytical method to study stochastic, binary-state models on complex networks. Moving beyond the usual mean-field theories, this alternative approach is based on the introduction of an annealed approximation for uncorrelated networks, allowing to deal with the network structure as parametric heterogeneity. As an illustration, we study the noisy voter model, a modification of the original voter model including random changes of state. The proposed method is able to unfold the dependence of the model not only on the mean degree (the mean-field prediction) but also on more complex averages over the degree distribution. In particular, we find that the degree heterogeneity—variance of the underlying degree distribution—has a strong influence on the location of the critical point of a noise-induced, finite-size transition occurring in the model, on the local ordering of the system, and on the functional form of its temporal correlations. Finally, we show how this latter point opens the possibility of inferring the degree heterogeneity of the underlying network by observing only the aggregate behavior of the system as a whole, an issue of interest for systems where only macroscopic, population level variables can be measured.

  15. The noisy voter model on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new analytical method to study stochastic, binary-state models on complex networks. Moving beyond the usual mean-field theories, this alternative approach is based on the introduction of an annealed approximation for uncorrelated networks, allowing to deal with the network structure as parametric heterogeneity. As an illustration, we study the noisy voter model, a modification of the original voter model including random changes of state. The proposed method is able to unfold the dependence of the model not only on the mean degree (the mean-field prediction) but also on more complex averages over the degree distribution. In particular, we find that the degree heterogeneity—variance of the underlying degree distribution—has a strong influence on the location of the critical point of a noise-induced, finite-size transition occurring in the model, on the local ordering of the system, and on the functional form of its temporal correlations. Finally, we show how this latter point opens the possibility of inferring the degree heterogeneity of the underlying network by observing only the aggregate behavior of the system as a whole, an issue of interest for systems where only macroscopic, population level variables can be measured. PMID:27094773

  16. Higher-order organization of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-07-01

    Networks are a fundamental tool for understanding and modeling complex systems in physics, biology, neuroscience, engineering, and social science. Many networks are known to exhibit rich, lower-order connectivity patterns that can be captured at the level of individual nodes and edges. However, higher-order organization of complex networks--at the level of small network subgraphs--remains largely unknown. Here, we develop a generalized framework for clustering networks on the basis of higher-order connectivity patterns. This framework provides mathematical guarantees on the optimality of obtained clusters and scales to networks with billions of edges. The framework reveals higher-order organization in a number of networks, including information propagation units in neuronal networks and hub structure in transportation networks. Results show that networks exhibit rich higher-order organizational structures that are exposed by clustering based on higher-order connectivity patterns.

  17. Higher-order organization of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-07-01

    Networks are a fundamental tool for understanding and modeling complex systems in physics, biology, neuroscience, engineering, and social science. Many networks are known to exhibit rich, lower-order connectivity patterns that can be captured at the level of individual nodes and edges. However, higher-order organization of complex networks--at the level of small network subgraphs--remains largely unknown. Here, we develop a generalized framework for clustering networks on the basis of higher-order connectivity patterns. This framework provides mathematical guarantees on the optimality of obtained clusters and scales to networks with billions of edges. The framework reveals higher-order organization in a number of networks, including information propagation units in neuronal networks and hub structure in transportation networks. Results show that networks exhibit rich higher-order organizational structures that are exposed by clustering based on higher-order connectivity patterns. PMID:27387949

  18. Exploring the morphospace of communication efficiency in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Joaquín; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Velez de Mendizabal, Nieves; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Betzel, Richard F; Sporns, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Graph theoretical analysis has played a key role in characterizing global features of the topology of complex networks, describing diverse systems such as protein interactions, food webs, social relations and brain connectivity. How system elements communicate with each other depends not only on the structure of the network, but also on the nature of the system's dynamics which are constrained by the amount of knowledge and resources available for communication processes. Complementing widely used measures that capture efficiency under the assumption that communication preferentially follows shortest paths across the network ("routing"), we define analytic measures directed at characterizing network communication when signals flow in a random walk process ("diffusion"). The two dimensions of routing and diffusion efficiency define a morphospace for complex networks, with different network topologies characterized by different combinations of efficiency measures and thus occupying different regions of this space. We explore the relation of network topologies and efficiency measures by examining canonical network models, by evolving networks using a multi-objective optimization strategy, and by investigating real-world network data sets. Within the efficiency morphospace, specific aspects of network topology that differentially favor efficient communication for routing and diffusion processes are identified. Charting regions of the morphospace that are occupied by canonical, evolved or real networks allows inferences about the limits of communication efficiency imposed by connectivity and dynamics, as well as the underlying selection pressures that have shaped network topology.

  19. Network motifs: simple building blocks of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Milo, R; Shen-Orr, S; Itzkovitz, S; Kashtan, N; Chklovskii, D; Alon, U

    2002-10-25

    Complex networks are studied across many fields of science. To uncover their structural design principles, we defined "network motifs," patterns of interconnections occurring in complex networks at numbers that are significantly higher than those in randomized networks. We found such motifs in networks from biochemistry, neurobiology, ecology, and engineering. The motifs shared by ecological food webs were distinct from the motifs shared by the genetic networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae or from those found in the World Wide Web. Similar motifs were found in networks that perform information processing, even though they describe elements as different as biomolecules within a cell and synaptic connections between neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Motifs may thus define universal classes of networks. This approach may uncover the basic building blocks of most networks. PMID:12399590

  20. Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milo, R.; Shen-Orr, S.; Itzkovitz, S.; Kashtan, N.; Chklovskii, D.; Alon, U.

    2002-10-01

    Complex networks are studied across many fields of science. To uncover their structural design principles, we defined ``network motifs,'' patterns of interconnections occurring in complex networks at numbers that are significantly higher than those in randomized networks. We found such motifs in networks from biochemistry, neurobiology, ecology, and engineering. The motifs shared by ecological food webs were distinct from the motifs shared by the genetic networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae or from those found in the World Wide Web. Similar motifs were found in networks that perform information processing, even though they describe elements as different as biomolecules within a cell and synaptic connections between neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Motifs may thus define universal classes of networks. This approach may uncover the basic building blocks of most networks.

  1. Complex networks: A winning strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2013-04-01

    Introducing connections between two distinct networks can tip the balance of power -- at times enhancing the weaker system. The properties of the nodes that are linked together often determine which network claims the competitive advantage.

  2. Network quotients: Structural skeletons of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanghua; MacArthur, Ben D.; Wang, Hui; Xiong, Momiao; Wang, Wei

    2008-10-01

    A defining feature of many large empirical networks is their intrinsic complexity. However, many networks also contain a large degree of structural repetition. An immediate question then arises: can we characterize essential network complexity while excluding structural redundancy? In this article we utilize inherent network symmetry to collapse all redundant information from a network, resulting in a coarse graining which we show to carry the essential structural information of the “parent” network. In the context of algebraic combinatorics, this coarse-graining is known as the “quotient.” We systematically explore the theoretical properties of network quotients and summarize key statistics of a variety of “real-world” quotients with respect to those of their parent networks. In particular, we find that quotients can be substantially smaller than their parent networks yet typically preserve various key functional properties such as complexity (heterogeneity and hub vertices) and communication (diameter and mean geodesic distance), suggesting that quotients constitute the essential structural skeletons of their parent networks. We summarize with a discussion of potential uses of quotients in analysis of biological regulatory networks and ways in which using quotients can reduce the computational complexity of network algorithms.

  3. Measuring preferential attachment in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H.; Néda, Z.; Barabási, A. L.

    2003-02-01

    A key ingredient of many current models proposed to capture the topological evolution of complex networks is the hypothesis that highly connected nodes increase their connectivity faster than their less connected peers, a phenomenon called preferential attachment. Measurements on four networks, namely the science citation network, Internet, actor collaboration and science coauthorship network indicate that the rate at which nodes acquire links depends on the node's degree, offering direct quantitative support for the presence of preferential attachment. We find that for the first two systems the attachment rate depends linearly on the node degree, while for the last two the dependence follows a sublinear power law.

  4. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  5. Minimum-cost control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Hu, Wuhua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Deng, Lei; Tang, Pei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Finding the solution for driving a complex network at the minimum energy cost with a given number of controllers, known as the minimum-cost control problem, is critically important but remains largely open. We propose a projected gradient method to tackle this problem, which works efficiently in both synthetic and real-life networks. The study is then extended to the case where each controller can only be connected to a single network node to have the lowest connection complexity. We obtain the interesting insight that such connections basically avoid high-degree nodes of the network, which is in resonance with recent observations on controllability of complex networks. Our results provide the first technical path to enabling minimum-cost control of complex networks, and contribute new insights to locating the key nodes from a minimum-cost control perspective.

  6. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  7. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  8. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-01-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value. PMID:27165120

  9. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-05-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value.

  10. Investigation of a protein complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaghi, A. R.; Ramezanpour, A.; Karimipour, V.

    2004-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the first eukaryote whose genome has been completely sequenced. It is also the first eukaryotic cell whose proteome (the set of all proteins) and interactome (the network of all mutual interactions between proteins) has been analyzed. In this paper we study the structure of the yeast protein complex network in which weighted edges between complexes represent the number of shared proteins. It is found that the network of protein complexes is a small world network with scale free behavior for many of its distributions. However we find that there are no strong correlations between the weights and degrees of neighboring complexes. To reveal non-random features of the network we also compare it with a null model in which the complexes randomly select their proteins. Finally we propose a simple evolutionary model based on duplication and divergence of proteins.

  11. Contagion on complex networks with persuasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Min; Zhang, Li-Jie; Xu, Xin-Jian; Fu, Xinchu

    2016-03-01

    The threshold model has been widely adopted as a classic model for studying contagion processes on social networks. We consider asymmetric individual interactions in social networks and introduce a persuasion mechanism into the threshold model. Specifically, we study a combination of adoption and persuasion in cascading processes on complex networks. It is found that with the introduction of the persuasion mechanism, the system may become more vulnerable to global cascades, and the effects of persuasion tend to be more significant in heterogeneous networks than those in homogeneous networks: a comparison between heterogeneous and homogeneous networks shows that under weak persuasion, heterogeneous networks tend to be more robust against random shocks than homogeneous networks; whereas under strong persuasion, homogeneous networks are more stable. Finally, we study the effects of adoption and persuasion threshold heterogeneity on systemic stability. Though both heterogeneities give rise to global cascades, the adoption heterogeneity has an overwhelmingly stronger impact than the persuasion heterogeneity when the network connectivity is sufficiently dense.

  12. Analysis of complex systems using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1992-01-01

    The application of neural networks, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies (expert systems, fuzzy logic, and/or genetic algorithms), to some of the problems of complex engineering systems has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of these systems. Typically, the measured variables from the systems are analog variables that must be sampled and normalized to expected peak values before they are introduced into neural networks. Often data must be processed to put it into a form more acceptable to the neural network (e.g., a fast Fourier transformation of the time-series data to produce a spectral plot of the data). Specific applications described include: (1) Diagnostics: State of the Plant (2) Hybrid System for Transient Identification, (3) Sensor Validation, (4) Plant-Wide Monitoring, (5) Monitoring of Performance and Efficiency, and (6) Analysis of Vibrations. Although specific examples described deal with nuclear power plants or their subsystems, the techniques described can be applied to a wide variety of complex engineering systems.

  13. Analysis of complex systems using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. |

    1992-12-31

    The application of neural networks, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies (expert systems, fuzzy logic, and/or genetic algorithms), to some of the problems of complex engineering systems has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of these systems. Typically, the measured variables from the systems are analog variables that must be sampled and normalized to expected peak values before they are introduced into neural networks. Often data must be processed to put it into a form more acceptable to the neural network (e.g., a fast Fourier transformation of the time-series data to produce a spectral plot of the data). Specific applications described include: (1) Diagnostics: State of the Plant (2) Hybrid System for Transient Identification, (3) Sensor Validation, (4) Plant-Wide Monitoring, (5) Monitoring of Performance and Efficiency, and (6) Analysis of Vibrations. Although specific examples described deal with nuclear power plants or their subsystems, the techniques described can be applied to a wide variety of complex engineering systems.

  14. CORRELATION PROFILES AND MOTIFS IN COMPLEX NETWORKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.ALON,U.

    2004-01-16

    Networks have recently emerged as a unifying theme in complex systems research [1]. It is in fact no coincidence that networks and complexity are so heavily intertwined. Any future definition of a complex system should reflect the fact that such systems consist of many mutually interacting components. These components are far from being identical as say electrons in systems studied by condensed matter physics. In a truly complex system each of them has a unique identity allowing one to separate it from the others. The very first question one may ask about such a system is which other components a given component interacts with? This information system wide can be visualized as a graph, whose nodes correspond to individual components of the complex system in question and edges to their mutual interactions. Such a network can be thought of as a backbone of the complex system. Of course, system's dynamics depends not only on the topology of an underlying network but also on the exact form of interaction of components with each other, which can be very different in various complex systems. However, the underlying network may contain clues about the basic design principles and/or evolutionary history of the complex system in question. The goal of this article is to provide readers with a set of useful tools that would help to decide which features of a complex network are there by pure chance alone, and which of them were possibly designed or evolved to their present state.

  15. Revealing the hidden language of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Davis, Darren; Levnajic, Zoran; Janjic, Vuk; Karapandza, Rasa; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated methods for analysing complex networks promise to be of great benefit to almost all scientific disciplines, yet they elude us. In this work, we make fundamental methodological advances to rectify this. We discover that the interaction between a small number of roles, played by nodes in a network, can characterize a network's structure and also provide a clear real-world interpretation. Given this insight, we develop a framework for analysing and comparing networks, which outperforms all existing ones. We demonstrate its strength by uncovering novel relationships between seemingly unrelated networks, such as Facebook, metabolic, and protein structure networks. We also use it to track the dynamics of the world trade network, showing that a country's role of a broker between non-trading countries indicates economic prosperity, whereas peripheral roles are associated with poverty. This result, though intuitive, has escaped all existing frameworks. Finally, our approach translates network topology into everyday language, bringing network analysis closer to domain scientists. PMID:24686408

  16. Revealing the Hidden Language of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Davis, Darren; Levnajic, Zoran; Janjic, Vuk; Karapandza, Rasa; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-04-01

    Sophisticated methods for analysing complex networks promise to be of great benefit to almost all scientific disciplines, yet they elude us. In this work, we make fundamental methodological advances to rectify this. We discover that the interaction between a small number of roles, played by nodes in a network, can characterize a network's structure and also provide a clear real-world interpretation. Given this insight, we develop a framework for analysing and comparing networks, which outperforms all existing ones. We demonstrate its strength by uncovering novel relationships between seemingly unrelated networks, such as Facebook, metabolic, and protein structure networks. We also use it to track the dynamics of the world trade network, showing that a country's role of a broker between non-trading countries indicates economic prosperity, whereas peripheral roles are associated with poverty. This result, though intuitive, has escaped all existing frameworks. Finally, our approach translates network topology into everyday language, bringing network analysis closer to domain scientists.

  17. Revealing the Hidden Language of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Davis, Darren; Levnajic, Zoran; Janjic, Vuk; Karapandza, Rasa; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated methods for analysing complex networks promise to be of great benefit to almost all scientific disciplines, yet they elude us. In this work, we make fundamental methodological advances to rectify this. We discover that the interaction between a small number of roles, played by nodes in a network, can characterize a network's structure and also provide a clear real-world interpretation. Given this insight, we develop a framework for analysing and comparing networks, which outperforms all existing ones. We demonstrate its strength by uncovering novel relationships between seemingly unrelated networks, such as Facebook, metabolic, and protein structure networks. We also use it to track the dynamics of the world trade network, showing that a country's role of a broker between non-trading countries indicates economic prosperity, whereas peripheral roles are associated with poverty. This result, though intuitive, has escaped all existing frameworks. Finally, our approach translates network topology into everyday language, bringing network analysis closer to domain scientists. PMID:24686408

  18. Percolation of localized attack on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai; Huang, Xuqing; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-02-01

    The robustness of complex networks against node failure and malicious attack has been of interest for decades, while most of the research has focused on random attack or hub-targeted attack. In many real-world scenarios, however, attacks are neither random nor hub-targeted, but localized, where a group of neighboring nodes in a network are attacked and fail. In this paper we develop a percolation framework to analytically and numerically study the robustness of complex networks against such localized attack. In particular, we investigate this robustness in Erdős-Rényi networks, random-regular networks, and scale-free networks. Our results provide insight into how to better protect networks, enhance cybersecurity, and facilitate the design of more robust infrastructures.

  19. Complex Networks: from Graph Theory to Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this text is to show the central role played by networks in complex system science. A remarkable feature of network studies is to lie at the crossroads of different disciplines, from mathematics (graph theory, combinatorics, probability theory) to physics (statistical physics of networks) to computer science (network generating algorithms, combinatorial optimization) to biological issues (regulatory networks). New paradigms recently appeared, like that of ‘scale-free networks’ providing an alternative to the random graph model introduced long ago by Erdös and Renyi. With the notion of statistical ensemble and methods originally introduced for percolation networks, statistical physics is of high relevance to get a deep account of topological and statistical properties of a network. Then their consequences on the dynamics taking place in the network should be investigated. Impact of network theory is huge in all natural sciences, especially in biology with gene networks, metabolic networks, neural networks or food webs. I illustrate this brief overview with a recent work on the influence of network topology on the dynamics of coupled excitable units, and the insights it provides about network emerging features, robustness of network behaviors, and the notion of static or dynamic motif.

  20. Controlling complex networks with conformity behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Controlling complex networks accompanied by common conformity behavior is a fundamental problem in social and physical science. Conformity behavior that individuals tend to follow the majority in their neighborhood is common in human society and animal communities. Despite recent progress in understanding controllability of complex networks, the existent controllability theories cannot be directly applied to networks associated with conformity. Here we propose a simple model to incorporate conformity-based decision making into the evolution of a network system, which allows us to employ the exact controllability theory to explore the controllability of such systems. We offer rigorous theoretical results of controllability for representative regular networks. We also explore real networks in different fields and some typical model networks, finding some interesting results that are different from the predictions of structural and exact controllability theory in the absence of conformity. We finally present an example of steering a real social network to some target states to further validate our controllability theory and tools. Our work offers a more realistic understanding of network controllability with conformity behavior and can have potential applications in networked evolutionary games, opinion dynamics and many other complex networked systems.

  1. A random interacting network model for complex networks.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  2. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems.

  3. Managing Complex Network Operation with Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Chen, Yousu; Ma, Jian; Schneider, Kevin P.; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2008-03-26

    Complex networks play an important role in modern societies. Their failures, such as power grid blackouts, would lead to significant disruption of people’s life, industry and commercial activities, and result in massive economic losses. Operation of these complex networks is an extremely challenging task due to their complex structures, wide geographical coverage, complex data/information technology systems, and highly dynamic and nonlinear behaviors. None of the complex network operation is fully automated; human-in-the-loop operation is critical. Given the complexity involved, there may be thousands of possible topological configurations at any given time. During an emergency, it is not uncommon for human operators to examine thousands of possible configurations in near real-time to choose the best option and operate the network effectively. In today’s practice, network operation is largely based on experience with very limited real-time decision support, resulting in inadequate management of complex predictions and inability to anticipate, recognize, and respond to situations caused by human errors, natural disasters, and cyber attacks. A systematic approach is needed to manage the complex operation paradigms and choose the best option in a near-real-time manner. This paper applies predictive analytics techniques to establish a decision support system for complex network operation management and help operators to predict potential network failures and adapt the network to adverse situations. The resultant decision support system enables continuous monitoring of network performance and turns large amounts of data into actionable information. Examples with actual power grid data are presented to demonstrate the capability of this proposed decision support system.

  4. Sustainable growth in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessone, C. J.; Geipel, M. M.; Schweitzer, F.

    2011-12-01

    Based on the analysis of the dependency network in 18 Java projects, we develop a novel model of network growth which considers both preferential attachment and the addition of new nodes with a heterogeneous distribution of their initial degree, k0. Empirically we find that the cumulative distributions of initial and final degrees in the network follow power law behaviours: 1-P(k0)~k01-α, and 1-P(k)~k1-γ, respectively. For the total number of links as a function of the network size, we find empirically K(N)~Nβ, where βin[1.25, 2] (for small N), while converging to β~1 for large N. This indicates a transition from a growth regime with increasing network density towards a sustainable regime, which prevents a collapse due to ever increasing dependencies. Our theoretical framework allows us to predict relations between the exponents α, β, γ, which also link issues of software engineering and developer activity. These relations are verified by means of computer simulations and empirical investigations. They indicate that the growth of real Open Source Software networks occurs on the edge between two regimes, which are dominated either by the initial degree distribution of added nodes, or by the preferential attachment mechanism. Hence, the heterogeneous degree distribution of newly added nodes, found empirically, is essential to describe the laws of sustainable growth in networks.

  5. Structure of Mutualistic Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jun Kyung; Maeng, Seong Eun; Cha, Moon Yong; Lee, Jae Woo

    We consider the structures of six plant-pollinator mutualistic networks. The plants and pollinators are linked by the plant-pollinating relation. We assigned the visiting frequency of pollinators to a plant as a weight of each link. We calculated the cumulative distribution functions of the degree and strength for the networks. We observed a power-law, linear, and stretched exponential dependence of the cumulative distribution function. We also calculated the disparity and the strength of the nodes s(k) with degree k. We observed that the plant-pollinator networks exhibit an disassortative behaviors and nonlinear dependence of the strength on the nodes. In mutualistic networks links with large weight are connected to the neighbors with small degrees.

  6. Self-similarity of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Chaoming; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A

    2005-01-27

    Complex networks have been studied extensively owing to their relevance to many real systems such as the world-wide web, the Internet, energy landscapes and biological and social networks. A large number of real networks are referred to as 'scale-free' because they show a power-law distribution of the number of links per node. However, it is widely believed that complex networks are not invariant or self-similar under a length-scale transformation. This conclusion originates from the 'small-world' property of these networks, which implies that the number of nodes increases exponentially with the 'diameter' of the network, rather than the power-law relation expected for a self-similar structure. Here we analyse a variety of real complex networks and find that, on the contrary, they consist of self-repeating patterns on all length scales. This result is achieved by the application of a renormalization procedure that coarse-grains the system into boxes containing nodes within a given 'size'. We identify a power-law relation between the number of boxes needed to cover the network and the size of the box, defining a finite self-similar exponent. These fundamental properties help to explain the scale-free nature of complex networks and suggest a common self-organization dynamics.

  7. Link prediction in complex networks: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao

    2011-03-01

    Link prediction in complex networks has attracted increasing attention from both physical and computer science communities. The algorithms can be used to extract missing information, identify spurious interactions, evaluate network evolving mechanisms, and so on. This article summaries recent progress about link prediction algorithms, emphasizing on the contributions from physical perspectives and approaches, such as the random-walk-based methods and the maximum likelihood methods. We also introduce three typical applications: reconstruction of networks, evaluation of network evolving mechanism and classification of partially labeled networks. Finally, we introduce some applications and outline future challenges of link prediction algorithms.

  8. Error and attack tolerance of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Jeong, Hawoong; Barabási, Albert-László

    2000-07-01

    Many complex systems display a surprising degree of tolerance against errors. For example, relatively simple organisms grow, persist and reproduce despite drastic pharmaceutical or environmental interventions, an error tolerance attributed to the robustness of the underlying metabolic network. Complex communication networks display a surprising degree of robustness: although key components regularly malfunction, local failures rarely lead to the loss of the global information-carrying ability of the network. The stability of these and other complex systems is often attributed to the redundant wiring of the functional web defined by the systems' components. Here we demonstrate that error tolerance is not shared by all redundant systems: it is displayed only by a class of inhomogeneously wired networks, called scale-free networks, which include the World-Wide Web, the Internet, social networks and cells. We find that such networks display an unexpected degree of robustness, the ability of their nodes to communicate being unaffected even by unrealistically high failure rates. However, error tolerance comes at a high price in that these networks are extremely vulnerable to attacks (that is, to the selection and removal of a few nodes that play a vital role in maintaining the network's connectivity). Such error tolerance and attack vulnerability are generic properties of communication networks.

  9. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the "complement network" of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems. PMID:27456202

  10. Traffic congestion in interconnected complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; Wu, Jiajing; Xia, Yongxiang; Tse, Chi K.

    2014-06-01

    Traffic congestion in isolated complex networks has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Coupled network models have recently been developed to facilitate further understanding of real complex systems. Analysis of traffic congestion in coupled complex networks, however, is still relatively unexplored. In this paper, we try to explore the effect of interconnections on traffic congestion in interconnected Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. We find that assortative coupling can alleviate traffic congestion more readily than disassortative and random coupling when the node processing capacity is allocated based on node usage probability. Furthermore, the optimal coupling probability can be found for assortative coupling. However, three types of coupling preferences achieve similar traffic performance if all nodes share the same processing capacity. We analyze interconnected Internet autonomous-system-level graphs of South Korea and Japan and obtain similar results. Some practical suggestions are presented to optimize such real-world interconnected networks accordingly.

  11. Distinguishing fiction from non-fiction with complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, David M.; Carr, Lincoln D.; Jones, Linnea K.; Stevanak, Joe T.

    2014-03-01

    Complex Network Measures are applied to networks constructed from texts in English to demonstrate an initial viability in textual analysis. Texts from novels and short stories obtained from Project Gutenberg and news stories obtained from NPR are selected. Unique word stems in a text are used as nodes in an associated unweighted undirected network, with edges connecting words occurring within a certain number of words somewhere in the text. Various combinations of complex network measures are computed for each text's network. Fisher's Linear Discriminant analysis is used to build a parameter optimizing the ability to separate the texts according to their genre. Success rates in the 70% range for correctly distinguishing fiction from non-fiction were obtained using edges defined as within four words, using 400 word samples from 400 texts from each of the two genres with some combinations of measures such as the power-law exponents of degree distributions and clustering coefficients.

  12. Benchmarking Measures of Network Influence

    PubMed Central

    Bramson, Aaron; Vandermarliere, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying key agents for the transmission of diseases (ideas, technology, etc.) across social networks has predominantly relied on measures of centrality on a static base network or a temporally flattened graph of agent interactions. Various measures have been proposed as the best trackers of influence, such as degree centrality, betweenness, and k-shell, depending on the structure of the connectivity. We consider SIR and SIS propagation dynamics on a temporally-extruded network of observed interactions and measure the conditional marginal spread as the change in the magnitude of the infection given the removal of each agent at each time: its temporal knockout (TKO) score. We argue that this TKO score is an effective benchmark measure for evaluating the accuracy of other, often more practical, measures of influence. We find that none of the network measures applied to the induced flat graphs are accurate predictors of network propagation influence on the systems studied; however, temporal networks and the TKO measure provide the requisite targets for the search for effective predictive measures. PMID:27670635

  13. Benchmarking Measures of Network Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramson, Aaron; Vandermarliere, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Identifying key agents for the transmission of diseases (ideas, technology, etc.) across social networks has predominantly relied on measures of centrality on a static base network or a temporally flattened graph of agent interactions. Various measures have been proposed as the best trackers of influence, such as degree centrality, betweenness, and k-shell, depending on the structure of the connectivity. We consider SIR and SIS propagation dynamics on a temporally-extruded network of observed interactions and measure the conditional marginal spread as the change in the magnitude of the infection given the removal of each agent at each time: its temporal knockout (TKO) score. We argue that this TKO score is an effective benchmark measure for evaluating the accuracy of other, often more practical, measures of influence. We find that none of the network measures applied to the induced flat graphs are accurate predictors of network propagation influence on the systems studied; however, temporal networks and the TKO measure provide the requisite targets for the search for effective predictive measures.

  14. Measurement of Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjoka, Mina

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the popularity of online social networks (OSN) has risen to unprecedented levels, with the most popular ones having hundreds of millions of users. This success has generated interest within the networking community and has given rise to a number of measurement and characterization studies, which provide a first step towards their…

  15. Topological Strata of Weighted Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Petri, Giovanni; Scolamiero, Martina; Donato, Irene; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The statistical mechanical approach to complex networks is the dominant paradigm in describing natural and societal complex systems. The study of network properties, and their implications on dynamical processes, mostly focus on locally defined quantities of nodes and edges, such as node degrees, edge weights and -more recently- correlations between neighboring nodes. However, statistical methods quickly become cumbersome when dealing with many-body properties and do not capture the precise mesoscopic structure of complex networks. Here we introduce a novel method, based on persistent homology, to detect particular non-local structures, akin to weighted holes within the link-weight network fabric, which are invisible to existing methods. Their properties divide weighted networks in two broad classes: one is characterized by small hierarchically nested holes, while the second displays larger and longer living inhomogeneities. These classes cannot be reduced to known local or quasilocal network properties, because of the intrinsic non-locality of homological properties, and thus yield a new classification built on high order coordination patterns. Our results show that topology can provide novel insights relevant for many-body interactions in social and spatial networks. Moreover, this new method creates the first bridge between network theory and algebraic topology, which will allow to import the toolset of algebraic methods to complex systems. PMID:23805226

  16. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems. PMID:27456202

  17. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-07-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems.

  18. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance. PMID:26465526

  19. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance.

  20. An Adaptive Complex Network Model for Brain Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gomez Portillo, Ignacio J.; Gleiser, Pablo M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain functional networks are graph representations of activity in the brain, where the vertices represent anatomical regions and the edges their functional connectivity. These networks present a robust small world topological structure, characterized by highly integrated modules connected sparsely by long range links. Recent studies showed that other topological properties such as the degree distribution and the presence (or absence) of a hierarchical structure are not robust, and show different intriguing behaviors. In order to understand the basic ingredients necessary for the emergence of these complex network structures we present an adaptive complex network model for human brain functional networks. The microscopic units of the model are dynamical nodes that represent active regions of the brain, whose interaction gives rise to complex network structures. The links between the nodes are chosen following an adaptive algorithm that establishes connections between dynamical elements with similar internal states. We show that the model is able to describe topological characteristics of human brain networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. In particular, when the dynamical rules of the model allow for integrated processing over the entire network scale-free non-hierarchical networks with well defined communities emerge. On the other hand, when the dynamical rules restrict the information to a local neighborhood, communities cluster together into larger ones, giving rise to a hierarchical structure, with a truncated power law degree distribution. PMID:19738902

  1. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  2. Maximizing information exchange between complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Geneston, Elvis L.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    Science is not merely the smooth progressive interaction of hypothesis, experiment and theory, although it sometimes has that form. More realistically the scientific study of any given complex phenomenon generates a number of explanations, from a variety of perspectives, that eventually requires synthesis to achieve a deep level of insight and understanding. One such synthesis has created the field of out-of-equilibrium statistical physics as applied to the understanding of complex dynamic networks. Over the past forty years the concept of complexity has undergone a metamorphosis. Complexity was originally seen as a consequence of memory in individual particle trajectories, in full agreement with a Hamiltonian picture of microscopic dynamics and, in principle, macroscopic dynamics could be derived from the microscopic Hamiltonian picture. The main difficulty in deriving macroscopic dynamics from microscopic dynamics is the need to take into account the actions of a very large number of components. The existence of events such as abrupt jumps, considered by the conventional continuous time random walk approach to describing complexity was never perceived as conflicting with the Hamiltonian view. Herein we review many of the reasons why this traditional Hamiltonian view of complexity is unsatisfactory. We show that as a result of technological advances, which make the observation of single elementary events possible, the definition of complexity has shifted from the conventional memory concept towards the action of non-Poisson renewal events. We show that the observation of crucial processes, such as the intermittent fluorescence of blinking quantum dots as well as the brain’s response to music, as monitored by a set of electrodes attached to the scalp, has forced investigators to go beyond the traditional concept of complexity and to establish closer contact with the nascent field of complex networks. Complex networks form one of the most challenging areas of

  3. Core organization of directed complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2013-03-01

    The recursive removal of leaves (dead end vertices) and their neighbors from an undirected network results, when this pruning algorithm stops, in a so-called core of the network. This specific subgraph should be distinguished from k-cores, which are principally different subgraphs in networks. If the vertex mean degree of a network is sufficiently large, the core is a giant cluster containing a finite fraction of vertices. We find that generalization of this pruning algorithm to directed networks provides a significantly more complex picture of cores. By implementing a rate equation approach to this pruning procedure for directed uncorrelated networks, we identify a set of cores progressively embedded into each other in a network and describe their birth points and structure.

  4. Dynamics on Complex Networks and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Matías, Manuel A.; Kurths, Jürgen; Ott, Edward

    2006-12-01

    At the eight-year anniversary of Watts and Strogatz’s work on the collective dynamics of small-world networks and seven years after Barabási and Albert’s discovery of scale-free networks, the area of dynamical processes on complex networks is at the forefront of the current research on nonlinear dynamics and complex systems. This volume brings together a selection of original contributions in complementary topics of statistical physics, nonlinear dynamics and biological sciences, and is expected to provide the reader with a comprehensive up-to-date representation of this rapidly developing area.

  5. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network ``mobile'' can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

  6. Complex Network from Pseudoperiodic Time Series: Topology versus Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Small, M.

    2006-06-01

    We construct complex networks from pseudoperiodic time series, with each cycle represented by a single node in the network. We investigate the statistical properties of these networks for various time series and find that time series with different dynamics exhibit distinct topological structures. Specifically, noisy periodic signals correspond to random networks, and chaotic time series generate networks that exhibit small world and scale free features. We show that this distinction in topological structure results from the hierarchy of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the chaotic attractor. Standard measures of structure in complex networks can therefore be applied to distinguish different dynamic regimes in time series. Application to human electrocardiograms shows that such statistical properties are able to differentiate between the sinus rhythm cardiograms of healthy volunteers and those of coronary care patients.

  7. Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Sean; Kath, William; Motter, Adilson

    2012-02-01

    The response of complex networks to perturbations is of critical importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, power system design, and cell reprogramming. These systems have the property that localized perturbations can propagate through the network, causing the system as a whole to change behavior and possibly collapse. We will show how this same mechanism can actually be exploited to prevent such failures and, more generally, control a network's behavior. This strategy is based on counteracting a deleterious perturbation through the judicious application of additional, compensatory perturbations---a prospect recently demonstrated heuristically in metabolic and food-web networks. Here, we introduce a method to identify such compensatory perturbations in general complex networks, under arbitrary constraints that restrict the interventions one can actually implement in real systems. Our method accounts for the full nonlinear time evolution of real complex networks, and in fact capitalizes on this behavior to bring the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Altogether, these results provide a new framework for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of complex networks in various domains.

  8. Shock waves on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Mones, Enys; Araújo, Nuno A. M.; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable nodes, we introduce the concept of node-basin size, a purely topological property which we show to be strongly correlated to the average load of a node. PMID:24821422

  9. Quantum-classical transitions in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto; Armano, Giuliano

    2013-04-01

    The inherent properties of specific physical systems can be used as metaphors for investigation of the behavior of complex networks. This insight has already been put into practice in previous work, e.g., studying the network evolution in terms of phase transitions of quantum gases or representing distances among nodes as if they were particle energies. This paper shows that the emergence of different structures in complex networks, such as the scale-free and the winner-takes-all networks, can be represented in terms of a quantum-classical transition for quantum gases. In particular, we propose a model of fermionic networks that allows us to investigate the network evolution and its dependence on the system temperature. Simulations, performed in accordance with the cited model, clearly highlight the separation between classical random and winner-takes-all networks, in full correspondence with the separation between classical and quantum regions for quantum gases. We deem this model useful for the analysis of synthetic and real complex networks.

  10. Analysis of complex networks using aggressive abstraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin.; Willard, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler (but equivalent) representation, the required analysis is performed using the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit abstractions that are simultaneously dramatically simplifying and property preserving we call these aggressive abstractions -- and which can therefore be analyzed using the proposed approach. We then introduce and develop two forms of aggressive abstraction: 1.) finite state abstraction, in which dynamical networks with uncountable state spaces are modeled using finite state systems, and 2.) onedimensional abstraction, whereby high dimensional network dynamics are captured in a meaningful way using a single scalar variable. In each case, the property preserving nature of the abstraction process is rigorously established and efficient algorithms are presented for computing the abstraction. The considerable potential of the proposed approach to complex networks analysis is illustrated through case studies involving vulnerability analysis of technological networks and predictive analysis for social processes.

  11. The price of complexity in financial networks

    PubMed Central

    May, Robert M.; Roukny, Tarik; Stiglitz, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Financial institutions form multilayer networks by engaging in contracts with each other and by holding exposures to common assets. As a result, the default probability of one institution depends on the default probability of all of the other institutions in the network. Here, we show how small errors on the knowledge of the network of contracts can lead to large errors in the probability of systemic defaults. From the point of view of financial regulators, our findings show that the complexity of financial networks may decrease the ability to mitigate systemic risk, and thus it may increase the social cost of financial crises. PMID:27555583

  12. The price of complexity in financial networks.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; May, Robert M; Roukny, Tarik; Stiglitz, Joseph E

    2016-09-01

    Financial institutions form multilayer networks by engaging in contracts with each other and by holding exposures to common assets. As a result, the default probability of one institution depends on the default probability of all of the other institutions in the network. Here, we show how small errors on the knowledge of the network of contracts can lead to large errors in the probability of systemic defaults. From the point of view of financial regulators, our findings show that the complexity of financial networks may decrease the ability to mitigate systemic risk, and thus it may increase the social cost of financial crises. PMID:27555583

  13. The price of complexity in financial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; May, Robert M.; Roukny, Tarik; Stiglitz, Joseph E.

    2016-09-01

    Financial institutions form multilayer networks by engaging in contracts with each other and by holding exposures to common assets. As a result, the default probability of one institution depends on the default probability of all of the other institutions in the network. Here, we show how small errors on the knowledge of the network of contracts can lead to large errors in the probability of systemic defaults. From the point of view of financial regulators, our findings show that the complexity of financial networks may decrease the ability to mitigate systemic risk, and thus it may increase the social cost of financial crises.

  14. Correlated measurement error hampers association network inference.

    PubMed

    Kaduk, Mateusz; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Vis, Daniel J; Reijmers, Theo; van der Greef, Jan; Smilde, Age K; Hendriks, Margriet M W B

    2014-09-01

    Modern chromatography-based metabolomics measurements generate large amounts of data in the form of abundances of metabolites. An increasingly popular way of representing and analyzing such data is by means of association networks. Ideally, such a network can be interpreted in terms of the underlying biology. A property of chromatography-based metabolomics data is that the measurement error structure is complex: apart from the usual (random) instrumental error there is also correlated measurement error. This is intrinsic to the way the samples are prepared and the analyses are performed and cannot be avoided. The impact of correlated measurement errors on (partial) correlation networks can be large and is not always predictable. The interplay between relative amounts of uncorrelated measurement error, correlated measurement error and biological variation defines this impact. Using chromatography-based time-resolved lipidomics data obtained from a human intervention study we show how partial correlation based association networks are influenced by correlated measurement error. We show how the effect of correlated measurement error on partial correlations is different for direct and indirect associations. For direct associations the correlated measurement error usually has no negative effect on the results, while for indirect associations, depending on the relative size of the correlated measurement error, results can become unreliable. The aim of this paper is to generate awareness of the existence of correlated measurement errors and their influence on association networks. Time series lipidomics data is used for this purpose, as it makes it possible to visually distinguish the correlated measurement error from a biological response. Underestimating the phenomenon of correlated measurement error will result in the suggestion of biologically meaningful results that in reality rest solely on complicated error structures. Using proper experimental designs that allow

  15. Phase transitions in complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Shane

    Two phase transitions in complex networks are analyzed. The first of these is a percolation transition, in which the network develops a macroscopic connected component as edges are added to it. Recent work has shown that if edges are added "competitively" to an undirected network, the onset of percolation is abrupt or "explosive." A new variant of explosive percolation is introduced here for directed networks, whose critical behavior is explored using numerical simulations and finite-size scaling theory. This process is also characterized by a very rapid percolation transition, but it is not as sudden as in undirected networks. The second phase transition considered here is the emergence of instability in Boolean networks, a class of dynamical systems that are widely used to model gene regulation. The dynamics, which are determined by the network topology and a set of update rules, may be either stable or unstable, meaning that small perturbations to the state of the network either die out or grow to become macroscopic. Here, this transition is analytically mapped onto a well-studied percolation problem, which can be used to predict the average steady-state distance between perturbed and unperturbed trajectories. This map applies to specific Boolean networks with few restrictions on network topology, but can only be applied to two commonly used types of update rules. Finally, a method is introduced for predicting the stability of Boolean networks with a much broader range of update rules. The network is assumed to have a given complex topology, subject only to a locally tree-like condition, and the update rules may be correlated with topological features of the network. While past work has addressed the separate effects of topology and update rules on stability, the present results are the first widely applicable approach to studying how these effects interact. Numerical simulations agree with the theory and show that such correlations between topology and update

  16. Characterizing time series: when Granger causality triggers complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Tian; Cui, Yindong; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen; Liu, Chong

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach to characterize time series with noise perturbations in both the time and frequency domains by combining Granger causality and complex networks. We construct directed and weighted complex networks from time series and use representative network measures to describe their physical and topological properties. Through analyzing the typical dynamical behaviors of some physical models and the MIT-BIHMassachusetts Institute of Technology-Beth Israel Hospital. human electrocardiogram data sets, we show that the proposed approach is able to capture and characterize various dynamics and has much potential for analyzing real-world time series of rather short length.

  17. Generalizations of the clustering coefficient to weighted complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saramäki, Jari; Kivelä, Mikko; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2007-02-01

    The recent high level of interest in weighted complex networks gives rise to a need to develop new measures and to generalize existing ones to take the weights of links into account. Here we focus on various generalizations of the clustering coefficient, which is one of the central characteristics in the complex network theory. We present a comparative study of the several suggestions introduced in the literature, and point out their advantages and limitations. The concepts are illustrated by simple examples as well as by empirical data of the world trade and weighted coauthorship networks.

  18. Analysis and perturbation of degree correlation in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Tao; Li, Jian-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Degree correlation is an important topological property common to many real-world networks such as the protein-protein interactions and the metabolic networks. In the letter, the statistical measures for characterizing the degree correlation in networks are investigated analytically. We give an exact proof of the consistency for the statistical measures, and reveal the general linear relation in the degree correlation, which provides a simple and interesting perspective on the analysis of the degree correlation in complex networks. By using the general linear analysis, we investigate the perturbation of the degree correlation in complex networks caused by the simple structural variation such as the “rich club”. The results show that the assortativity of homogeneous networks such as the Erdős-Rényi graphs is easily strongly affected by the simple structural changes, while it has only a slight variation for heterogeneous networks with broad degree distribution such as the scale-free networks. Clearly, the homogeneous networks are more sensitive to the perturbation than the heterogeneous networks.

  19. Cascade defense via routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Lan; Du, Wen-Bo; Hong, Chen

    2015-05-01

    As the cascading failures in networked traffic systems are becoming more and more serious, research on cascade defense in complex networks has become a hotspot in recent years. In this paper, we propose a traffic-based cascading failure model, in which each packet in the network has its own source and destination. When cascade is triggered, packets will be redistributed according to a given routing strategy. Here, a global hybrid (GH) routing strategy, which uses the dynamic information of the queue length and the static information of nodes' degree, is proposed to defense the network cascade. Comparing GH strategy with the shortest path (SP) routing, efficient routing (ER) and global dynamic (GD) routing strategies, we found that GH strategy is more effective than other routing strategies in improving the network robustness against cascading failures. Our work provides insight into the robustness of networked traffic systems.

  20. Cascade-based attacks on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2002-12-01

    We live in a modern world supported by large, complex networks. Examples range from financial markets to communication and transportation systems. In many realistic situations the flow of physical quantities in the network, as characterized by the loads on nodes, is important. We show that for such networks where loads can redistribute among the nodes, intentional attacks can lead to a cascade of overload failures, which can in turn cause the entire or a substantial part of the network to collapse. This is relevant for real-world networks that possess a highly heterogeneous distribution of loads, such as the Internet and power grids. We demonstrate that the heterogeneity of these networks makes them particularly vulnerable to attacks in that a large-scale cascade may be triggered by disabling a single key node. This brings obvious concerns on the security of such systems.

  1. Mapping stochastic processes onto complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, A. H.; Reza Jafari, G.; Davoudi, J.; Peinke, J.; Reza Rahimi Tabar, M.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a method by which stochastic processes are mapped onto complex networks. As examples, we construct the networks for such time series as those for free-jet and low-temperature helium turbulence, the German stock market index (the DAX), and white noise. The networks are further studied by contrasting their geometrical properties, such as the mean length, diameter, clustering, and average number of connections per node. By comparing the network properties of the original time series investigated with those for the shuffled and surrogate series, we are able to quantify the effect of the long-range correlations and the fatness of the probability distribution functions of the series on the networks constructed. Most importantly, we demonstrate that the time series can be reconstructed with high precision by means of a simple random walk on their corresponding networks.

  2. Opinion control in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2015-03-01

    In many political elections, the electorate appears to be a composite of partisan and independent voters. Given that partisans are not likely to convert to a different party, an important goal for a political party could be to mobilize independent voters toward the party with the help of strong leadership, mass media, partisans, and the effects of peer-to-peer influence. Based on the exact solution of classical voter model dynamics in the presence of perfectly partisan voters (i.e., zealots), we propose a computational method that uses pinning control strategy to maximize the share of a party in a social network of independent voters. The party, corresponding to the controller or zealots, optimizes the nodes to be controlled given the information about the connectivity of independent voters and the set of nodes that the opposing party controls. We show that controlling hubs is generally a good strategy, but the optimized strategy is even better. The superiority of the optimized strategy is particularly eminent when the independent voters are connected as directed (rather than undirected) networks.

  3. Analysis and applications of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrow, James Peter

    This thesis is concerned with three main areas of complex networks research. One is on developing and testing new methods to find communities, especially methods that do not need knowledge of the entire network. The second is on the application of shells and their usage when characterizing and identifying important network properties. Finally, we offer several contributions toward the usage of complex networks as a tool for studying social dynamics. The study of communities, densely interconnected subsets of nodes, is a difficult and important problem. Methods to identify communities are developed which have the rare ability to function with only local knowledge of the network. A new bench-marking and evaluation procedure is introduced to compare the performance of both existing and new local community algorithms. Using shells, we introduce a new matrix structure that allows for quantitative comparison and visualization of networks of all sizes, even extremely large ones. This "portrait" encodes a great deal of information including dimensionality and regularity, and imparts immediate intuition about the network at hand. A distance metric generated by comparing two portraits allows one to test if, e.g., two networks were created by the same underlying generating mechanism. Generalizations to weighted networks are studied, as is applicability to the Graph Isomorphism problem. We introduce the Patron-Artwork model as a new means of generating a distribution of fame or knowledge from an underlying social network, and give a full analysis for a network where all members are neighbors. In addition, the so-called Small World Phenomenon has been studied in the context of social networks, specifically that of Kleinberg navigation. We studied the impact of modifying the underlying Kleinberg lattice by introducing an anisotropy: the lattice is either stretched along one axis or long-distance connections are made more favorable along a preferred direction.

  4. The architecture of complex weighted networks

    PubMed Central

    Barrat, A.; Barthélemy, M.; Pastor-Satorras, R.; Vespignani, A.

    2004-01-01

    Networked structures arise in a wide array of different contexts such as technological and transportation infrastructures, social phenomena, and biological systems. These highly interconnected systems have recently been the focus of a great deal of attention that has uncovered and characterized their topological complexity. Along with a complex topological structure, real networks display a large heterogeneity in the capacity and intensity of the connections. These features, however, have mainly not been considered in past studies where links are usually represented as binary states, i.e., either present or absent. Here, we study the scientific collaboration network and the world-wide air-transportation network, which are representative examples of social and large infrastructure systems, respectively. In both cases it is possible to assign to each edge of the graph a weight proportional to the intensity or capacity of the connections among the various elements of the network. We define appropriate metrics combining weighted and topological observables that enable us to characterize the complex statistical properties and heterogeneity of the actual strength of edges and vertices. This information allows us to investigate the correlations among weighted quantities and the underlying topological structure of the network. These results provide a better description of the hierarchies and organizational principles at the basis of the architecture of weighted networks. PMID:15007165

  5. Network model of bilateral power markets based on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yang; Liu, Junyong; Li, Furong; Yan, Zhanxin; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    The bilateral power transaction (BPT) mode becomes a typical market organization with the restructuring of electric power industry, the proper model which could capture its characteristics is in urgent need. However, the model is lacking because of this market organization's complexity. As a promising approach to modeling complex systems, complex networks could provide a sound theoretical framework for developing proper simulation model. In this paper, a complex network model of the BPT market is proposed. In this model, price advantage mechanism is a precondition. Unlike other general commodity transactions, both of the financial layer and the physical layer are considered in the model. Through simulation analysis, the feasibility and validity of the model are verified. At same time, some typical statistical features of BPT network are identified. Namely, the degree distribution follows the power law, the clustering coefficient is low and the average path length is a bit long. Moreover, the topological stability of the BPT network is tested. The results show that the network displays a topological robustness to random market member's failures while it is fragile against deliberate attacks, and the network could resist cascading failure to some extent. These features are helpful for making decisions and risk management in BPT markets.

  6. Robust Reconstruction of Complex Networks from Sparse Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing complex networks from measurable data is a fundamental problem for understanding and controlling collective dynamics of complex networked systems. However, a significant challenge arises when we attempt to decode structural information hidden in limited amounts of data accompanied by noise and in the presence of inaccessible nodes. Here, we develop a general framework for robust reconstruction of complex networks from sparse and noisy data. Specifically, we decompose the task of reconstructing the whole network into recovering local structures centered at each node. Thus, the natural sparsity of complex networks ensures a conversion from the local structure reconstruction into a sparse signal reconstruction problem that can be addressed by using the lasso, a convex optimization method. We apply our method to evolutionary games, transportation, and communication processes taking place in a variety of model and real complex networks, finding that universal high reconstruction accuracy can be achieved from sparse data in spite of noise in time series and missing data of partial nodes. Our approach opens new routes to the network reconstruction problem and has potential applications in a wide range of fields.

  7. Contagion on complex networks with persuasion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Min; Zhang, Li-Jie; Xu, Xin-Jian; Fu, Xinchu

    2016-01-01

    The threshold model has been widely adopted as a classic model for studying contagion processes on social networks. We consider asymmetric individual interactions in social networks and introduce a persuasion mechanism into the threshold model. Specifically, we study a combination of adoption and persuasion in cascading processes on complex networks. It is found that with the introduction of the persuasion mechanism, the system may become more vulnerable to global cascades, and the effects of persuasion tend to be more significant in heterogeneous networks than those in homogeneous networks: a comparison between heterogeneous and homogeneous networks shows that under weak persuasion, heterogeneous networks tend to be more robust against random shocks than homogeneous networks; whereas under strong persuasion, homogeneous networks are more stable. Finally, we study the effects of adoption and persuasion threshold heterogeneity on systemic stability. Though both heterogeneities give rise to global cascades, the adoption heterogeneity has an overwhelmingly stronger impact than the persuasion heterogeneity when the network connectivity is sufficiently dense. PMID:27029498

  8. Assembly of complex plant–fungus networks

    PubMed Central

    Toju, Hirokazu; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Olesen, Jens M.; Thompson, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Species in ecological communities build complex webs of interaction. Although revealing the architecture of these networks is fundamental to understanding ecological and evolutionary dynamics in nature, it has been difficult to characterize the structure of most species-rich ecological systems. By overcoming this limitation through next-generation sequencing technology, we herein uncover the network architecture of below-ground plant–fungus symbioses, which are ubiquitous to terrestrial ecosystems. The examined symbiotic network of a temperate forest in Japan includes 33 plant species and 387 functionally and phylogenetically diverse fungal taxa, and the overall network architecture differs fundamentally from that of other ecological networks. In contrast to results for other ecological networks and theoretical predictions for symbiotic networks, the plant–fungus network shows moderate or relatively low levels of interaction specialization and modularity and an unusual pattern of ‘nested’ network architecture. These results suggest that species-rich ecological networks are more architecturally diverse than previously recognized. PMID:25327887

  9. Contagion on complex networks with persuasion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Min; Zhang, Li-Jie; Xu, Xin-Jian; Fu, Xinchu

    2016-01-01

    The threshold model has been widely adopted as a classic model for studying contagion processes on social networks. We consider asymmetric individual interactions in social networks and introduce a persuasion mechanism into the threshold model. Specifically, we study a combination of adoption and persuasion in cascading processes on complex networks. It is found that with the introduction of the persuasion mechanism, the system may become more vulnerable to global cascades, and the effects of persuasion tend to be more significant in heterogeneous networks than those in homogeneous networks: a comparison between heterogeneous and homogeneous networks shows that under weak persuasion, heterogeneous networks tend to be more robust against random shocks than homogeneous networks; whereas under strong persuasion, homogeneous networks are more stable. Finally, we study the effects of adoption and persuasion threshold heterogeneity on systemic stability. Though both heterogeneities give rise to global cascades, the adoption heterogeneity has an overwhelmingly stronger impact than the persuasion heterogeneity when the network connectivity is sufficiently dense. PMID:27029498

  10. Analytical and experimental study on complex compressed air pipe network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yushou; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the working characteristics of complex compressed air networks, numerical methods are widely used which are based on finite element technology or intelligent algorithms. However, the effectiveness of the numerical methods is limited. In this paper, to provide a new method to optimize the design and the air supply strategy of the complex compressed air pipe network, firstly, a novel method to analyze the topology structure of the compressed air flow in the pipe network is initially proposed. A matrix is used to describe the topology structure of the compressed air flow. Moreover, based on the analysis of the pressure loss of the pipe network, the relationship between the pressure and the flow of the compressed air is derived, and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment in a complex pipe network is proposed. Finally, to inspect the effectiveness of the method, an experiment with a complex network is designed. The pressure and the flow of airflow in the network are measured and studied. The results of the study show that, the predicted results with the proposed method have a good consistency with the experimental results, and that verifies the air flow prediction method of the complex pipe network. This research proposes a new method to analyze the compressed air network and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment, which can predicate the fluctuation of the pressure according to the flow of compressed air, and predicate the fluctuation of the flow according to the pressure in a segment of a complex pipe network.

  11. Social networks as embedded complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Clancy, Thomas R

    2010-09-01

    As systems evolve over time, their natural tendency is to become increasingly more complex. Studies in the field of complex systems have generated new perspectives on management in social organizations such as hospitals. Much of this research appears as a natural extension of the cross-disciplinary field of systems theory. This is the 15th in a series of articles applying complex systems science to the traditional management concepts of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling. In this article, the authors discuss healthcare social networks as a hierarchy of embedded complex adaptive systems. The authors further examine the use of social network analysis tools as a means to understand complex communication patterns and reduce medical errors.

  12. Complex-linear invariants of biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Karp, Robert L; Pérez Millán, Mercedes; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Dickenstein, Alicia; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2012-10-21

    The nonlinearities found in molecular networks usually prevent mathematical analysis of network behaviour, which has largely been studied by numerical simulation. This can lead to difficult problems of parameter determination. However, molecular networks give rise, through mass-action kinetics, to polynomial dynamical systems, whose steady states are zeros of a set of polynomial equations. These equations may be analysed by algebraic methods, in which parameters are treated as symbolic expressions whose numerical values do not have to be known in advance. For instance, an "invariant" of a network is a polynomial expression on selected state variables that vanishes in any steady state. Invariants have been found that encode key network properties and that discriminate between different network structures. Although invariants may be calculated by computational algebraic methods, such as Gröbner bases, these become computationally infeasible for biologically realistic networks. Here, we exploit Chemical Reaction Network Theory (CRNT) to develop an efficient procedure for calculating invariants that are linear combinations of "complexes", or the monomials coming from mass action. We show how this procedure can be used in proving earlier results of Horn and Jackson and of Shinar and Feinberg for networks of deficiency at most one. We then apply our method to enzyme bifunctionality, including the bacterial EnvZ/OmpR osmolarity regulator and the mammalian 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase glycolytic regulator, whose networks have deficiencies up to four. We show that bifunctionality leads to different forms of concentration control that are robust to changes in initial conditions or total amounts. Finally, we outline a systematic procedure for using complex-linear invariants to analyse molecular networks of any deficiency.

  13. Complex Dynamics in Information Sharing Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Bruce

    This study examines the roll-out of an electronic knowledge base in a medium-sized professional services firm over a six year period. The efficiency of such implementation is a key business problem in IT systems of this type. Data from usage logs provides the basis for analysis of the dynamic evolution of social networks around the depository during this time. The adoption pattern follows an "s-curve" and usage exhibits something of a power law distribution, both attributable to network effects, and network position is associated with organisational performance on a number of indicators. But periodicity in usage is evident and the usage distribution displays an exponential cut-off. Further analysis provides some evidence of mathematical complexity in the periodicity. Some implications of complex patterns in social network data for research and management are discussed. The study provides a case study demonstrating the utility of the broad methodological approach.

  14. Micro-macro analysis of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Massimo; Possamai, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems have attracted considerable interest because of their wide range of applications, and are often studied via a "classic" approach: study a specific system, find a complex network behind it, and analyze the corresponding properties. This simple methodology has produced a great deal of interesting results, but relies on an often implicit underlying assumption: the level of detail on which the system is observed. However, in many situations, physical or abstract, the level of detail can be one out of many, and might also depend on intrinsic limitations in viewing the data with a different level of abstraction or precision. So, a fundamental question arises: do properties of a network depend on its level of observability, or are they invariant? If there is a dependence, then an apparently correct network modeling could in fact just be a bad approximation of the true behavior of a complex system. In order to answer this question, we propose a novel micro-macro analysis of complex systems that quantitatively describes how the structure of complex networks varies as a function of the detail level. To this extent, we have developed a new telescopic algorithm that abstracts from the local properties of a system and reconstructs the original structure according to a fuzziness level. This way we can study what happens when passing from a fine level of detail ("micro") to a different scale level ("macro"), and analyze the corresponding behavior in this transition, obtaining a deeper spectrum analysis. The obtained results show that many important properties are not universally invariant with respect to the level of detail, but instead strongly depend on the specific level on which a network is observed. Therefore, caution should be taken in every situation where a complex network is considered, if its context allows for different levels of observability.

  15. Micro-Macro Analysis of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Marchiori, Massimo; Possamai, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems have attracted considerable interest because of their wide range of applications, and are often studied via a “classic” approach: study a specific system, find a complex network behind it, and analyze the corresponding properties. This simple methodology has produced a great deal of interesting results, but relies on an often implicit underlying assumption: the level of detail on which the system is observed. However, in many situations, physical or abstract, the level of detail can be one out of many, and might also depend on intrinsic limitations in viewing the data with a different level of abstraction or precision. So, a fundamental question arises: do properties of a network depend on its level of observability, or are they invariant? If there is a dependence, then an apparently correct network modeling could in fact just be a bad approximation of the true behavior of a complex system. In order to answer this question, we propose a novel micro-macro analysis of complex systems that quantitatively describes how the structure of complex networks varies as a function of the detail level. To this extent, we have developed a new telescopic algorithm that abstracts from the local properties of a system and reconstructs the original structure according to a fuzziness level. This way we can study what happens when passing from a fine level of detail (“micro”) to a different scale level (“macro”), and analyze the corresponding behavior in this transition, obtaining a deeper spectrum analysis. The obtained results show that many important properties are not universally invariant with respect to the level of detail, but instead strongly depend on the specific level on which a network is observed. Therefore, caution should be taken in every situation where a complex network is considered, if its context allows for different levels of observability. PMID:25635812

  16. Community detection by signaling on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2008-07-01

    Based on a signaling process of complex networks, a method for identification of community structure is proposed. For a network with n nodes, every node is assumed to be a system which can send, receive, and record signals. Each node is taken as the initial signal source to excite the whole network one time. Then the source node is associated with an n -dimensional vector which records the effects of the signaling process. By this process, the topological relationship of nodes on the network could be transferred into a geometrical structure of vectors in n -dimensional Euclidean space. Then the best partition of groups is determined by F statistics and the final community structure is given by the K -means clustering method. This method can detect community structure both in unweighted and weighted networks. It has been applied to ad hoc networks and some real networks such as the Zachary karate club network and football team network. The results indicate that the algorithm based on the signaling process works well.

  17. Structurally robust control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role.

  18. Size reduction of complex networks preserving modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, A.; Duch, J.; Fernández, A.; Gómez, S.

    2007-06-01

    The ubiquity of modular structure in real-world complex networks is the focus of attention in many trials to understand the interplay between network topology and functionality. The best approaches to the identification of modular structure are based on the optimization of a quality function known as modularity. However this optimization is a hard task provided that the computational complexity of the problem is in the non-deterministic polynomial-time hard (NP-hard) class. Here we propose an exact method for reducing the size of weighted (directed and undirected) complex networks while maintaining their modularity. This size reduction allows use of heuristic algorithms that optimize modularity for a better exploration of the modularity landscape. We compare the modularity obtained in several real complex-networks by using the extremal optimization algorithm, before and after the size reduction, showing the improvement obtained. We speculate that the proposed analytical size reduction could be extended to an exact coarse graining of the network in the scope of real-space renormalization.

  19. Size reduction of complex networks preserving modularity

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Duch, J.; Fernandez, A.; Gomez, S.

    2008-12-24

    The ubiquity of modular structure in real-world complex networks is being the focus of attention in many trials to understand the interplay between network topology and functionality. The best approaches to the identification of modular structure are based on the optimization of a quality function known as modularity. However this optimization is a hard task provided that the computational complexity of the problem is in the NP-hard class. Here we propose an exact method for reducing the size of weighted (directed and undirected) complex networks while maintaining invariant its modularity. This size reduction allows the heuristic algorithms that optimize modularity for a better exploration of the modularity landscape. We compare the modularity obtained in several real complex-networks by using the Extremal Optimization algorithm, before and after the size reduction, showing the improvement obtained. We speculate that the proposed analytical size reduction could be extended to an exact coarse graining of the network in the scope of real-space renormalization.

  20. Characterizing English Poetic Style Using Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxas-Villanueva, Ranzivelle Marianne; Nambatac, Maelori Krista; Tapang, Giovanni

    Complex networks have been proven useful in characterizing written texts. Here, we use networks to probe if there exist a similarity within, and difference across, era as reflected within the poem's structure. In literary history, boundary lines are set to distinguish the change in writing styles through time. We obtain the network parameters and motif frequencies of 845 poems published from 1522 to 1931 and relate this to the writing of the Elizabethan, 17th Century, Augustan, Romantic and Victorian eras. Analysis of the different network parameters shows a significant difference of the Augustan era (1667-1780) with the rest. The network parameters and the convex hull and centroids of the motif frequencies reflect the adjectival sequence pattern of the poems of the Augustan era.

  1. Identifying community structure in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chenxi; Duan, Yubing

    2015-07-01

    A wide variety of applications could be formulated to resolve the problem of finding all communities from a given network, ranging from social and biological network analysis to web mining and searching. In this study, we propose the concept of virtual attractive strength between each pair of node in networks, and then give the definition of community structure based on the proposed attractive strength. Furthermore, we present a community detection method by moving vertices to the clusters that produce the largest attractive strengths to them until the division of network reaches unchanged. Experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the proposed approach has favorite effectiveness and fast convergence speed, which provides an efficient method for exploring and analyzing complex systems.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, G; Barabási, A L

    2001-06-11

    The evolution of many complex systems, including the World Wide Web, business, and citation networks, is encoded in the dynamic web describing the interactions between the system's constituents. Despite their irreversible and nonequilibrium nature these networks follow Bose statistics and can undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. Addressing the dynamical properties of these nonequilibrium systems within the framework of equilibrium quantum gases predicts that the "first-mover-advantage," "fit-get-rich," and "winner-takes-all" phenomena observed in competitive systems are thermodynamically distinct phases of the underlying evolving networks.

  3. Optimal synchronization of directed complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Taylor, Dane; Sun, Jie

    2016-09-01

    We study optimal synchronization of networks of coupled phase oscillators. We extend previous theory for optimizing the synchronization properties of undirected networks to the important case of directed networks. We derive a generalized synchrony alignment function that encodes the interplay between the network structure and the oscillators' natural frequencies and serves as an objective measure for the network's degree of synchronization. Using the generalized synchrony alignment function, we show that a network's synchronization properties can be systematically optimized. This framework also allows us to study the properties of synchrony-optimized networks, and in particular, investigate the role of directed network properties such as nodal in- and out-degrees. For instance, we find that in optimally rewired networks, the heterogeneity of the in-degree distribution roughly matches the heterogeneity of the natural frequency distribution, but no such relationship emerges for out-degrees. We also observe that a network's synchronization properties are promoted by a strong correlation between the nodal in-degrees and the natural frequencies of oscillators, whereas the relationship between the nodal out-degrees and the natural frequencies has comparatively little effect. This result is supported by our theory, which indicates that synchronization is promoted by a strong alignment of the natural frequencies with the left singular vectors corresponding to the largest singular values of the Laplacian matrix.

  4. Extractive summarization using complex networks and syntactic dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amancio, Diego R.; Nunes, Maria G. V.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2012-02-01

    The realization that statistical physics methods can be applied to analyze written texts represented as complex networks has led to several developments in natural language processing, including automatic summarization and evaluation of machine translation. Most importantly, so far only a few metrics of complex networks have been used and therefore there is ample opportunity to enhance the statistics-based methods as new measures of network topology and dynamics are created. In this paper, we employ for the first time the metrics betweenness, vulnerability and diversity to analyze written texts in Brazilian Portuguese. Using strategies based on diversity metrics, a better performance in automatic summarization is achieved in comparison to previous work employing complex networks. With an optimized method the Rouge score (an automatic evaluation method used in summarization) was 0.5089, which is the best value ever achieved for an extractive summarizer with statistical methods based on complex networks for Brazilian Portuguese. Furthermore, the diversity metric can detect keywords with high precision, which is why we believe it is suitable to produce good summaries. It is also shown that incorporating linguistic knowledge through a syntactic parser does enhance the performance of the automatic summarizers, as expected, but the increase in the Rouge score is only minor. These results reinforce the suitability of complex network methods for improving automatic summarizers in particular, and treating text in general.

  5. An exploration of graph metric reproducibility in complex brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Telesford, Qawi K.; Burdette, Jonathan H.; Laurienti, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    The application of graph theory to brain networks has become increasingly popular in the neuroimaging community. These investigations and analyses have led to a greater understanding of the brain's complex organization. More importantly, it has become a useful tool for studying the brain under various states and conditions. With the ever expanding popularity of network science in the neuroimaging community, there is increasing interest to validate the measurements and calculations derived from brain networks. Underpinning these studies is the desire to use brain networks in longitudinal studies or as clinical biomarkers to understand changes in the brain. A highly reproducible tool for brain imaging could potentially prove useful as a clinical tool. In this review, we examine recent studies in network reproducibility and their implications for analysis of brain networks. PMID:23717257

  6. Turbulence measurements over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupniewicz, Charles E.; Kamada, Ray F.; Schacher, Gordon E.

    1989-07-01

    Horizontal turbulence measurements obtained from 22 wind sensors located on 9 towers in a mountainous coastal area are described and categorized by stability and terrain. Vector wind time series are high-pass filtered, and lateral and longitudinal wind speed variance is calculated for averaging times ranging from 15 s to 2 h. Parameterizations of the functional dependence of variance on averaging time are discussed, and a modification of Panofsky's (1988) uniform terrain technique applicable to complex terrain is presented. The parameterization is applied to the data and shown to be more realistic than a less complicated power law technique. The parameter values are shown to be different than the flat terrain cases of Kaimal et al. (1972), and are primarily a function of sensor location within the complex terrain. The parameters are also examined in terms of their dependence upon season, stability, marine boundary-layer height, and measurement height.

  7. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity method, which use Gene Ontology (GO) annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm IPCA which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm OIIP based on the new weighted Protein-Protein interaction networks for identifying protein complexes. Results The algorithm OIIP is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm OIIP has higher F-measure and accuracy compared to other competing approaches. PMID:22165991

  8. Discriminating complex networks through supervised NDR and Bayesian classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ke-Sheng; Rong, Li-Li; Yu, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating complex networks is a particularly important task for the purpose of the systematic study of networks. In order to discriminate unknown networks exactly, a large set of network measurements are needed to be taken into account for comprehensively considering network properties. However, as we demonstrate in this paper, these measurements are nonlinear correlated with each other in general, resulting in a wide variety of redundant measurements which unintentionally explain the same aspects of network properties. To solve this problem, we adopt supervised nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NDR) to eliminate the nonlinear redundancy and visualize networks in a low-dimensional projection space. Though unsupervised NDR can achieve the same aim, we illustrate that supervised NDR is more appropriate than unsupervised NDR for discrimination task. After that, we perform Bayesian classifier (BC) in the projection space to discriminate the unknown network by considering the projection score vectors as the input of the classifier. We also demonstrate the feasibility and effectivity of this proposed method in six extensive research real networks, ranging from technological to social or biological. Moreover, the effectiveness and advantage of the proposed method is proved by the contrast experiments with the existing method.

  9. The complex network of musical tastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldú, Javier M.; Cano, P.; Koppenberger, M.; Almendral, Juan A.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-06-01

    We present an empirical study of the evolution of a social network constructed under the influence of musical tastes. The network is obtained thanks to the selfless effort of a broad community of users who share playlists of their favourite songs with other users. When two songs co-occur in a playlist a link is created between them, leading to a complex network where songs are the fundamental nodes. In this representation, songs in the same playlist could belong to different musical genres, but they are prone to be linked by a certain musical taste (e.g. if songs A and B co-occur in several playlists, an user who likes A will probably like also B). Indeed, playlist collections such as the one under study are the basic material that feeds some commercial music recommendation engines. Since playlists have an input date, we are able to evaluate the topology of this particular complex network from scratch, observing how its characteristic parameters evolve in time. We compare our results with those obtained from an artificial network defined by means of a null model. This comparison yields some insight on the evolution and structure of such a network, which could be used as ground data for the development of proper models. Finally, we gather information that can be useful for the development of music recommendation engines and give some hints about how top-hits appear.

  10. The Kuramoto model in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Peron, Thomas K. DM.; Ji, Peng; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of an ensemble of oscillators is an emergent phenomenon present in several complex systems, ranging from social and physical to biological and technological systems. The most successful approach to describe how coherent behavior emerges in these complex systems is given by the paradigmatic Kuramoto model. This model has been traditionally studied in complete graphs. However, besides being intrinsically dynamical, complex systems present very heterogeneous structure, which can be represented as complex networks. This report is dedicated to review main contributions in the field of synchronization in networks of Kuramoto oscillators. In particular, we provide an overview of the impact of network patterns on the local and global dynamics of coupled phase oscillators. We cover many relevant topics, which encompass a description of the most used analytical approaches and the analysis of several numerical results. Furthermore, we discuss recent developments on variations of the Kuramoto model in networks, including the presence of noise and inertia. The rich potential for applications is discussed for special fields in engineering, neuroscience, physics and Earth science. Finally, we conclude by discussing problems that remain open after the last decade of intensive research on the Kuramoto model and point out some promising directions for future research.

  11. Realizing Wisdom Theory in Complex Learning Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Ayse

    2009-01-01

    The word "wisdom" is rarely seen in contemporary technology and learning discourse. This conceptual paper aims to provide some clear principles that answer the question: How can we establish wisdom in complex learning networks? By considering the nature of contemporary calls for wisdom the paper provides a metatheoretial framework to evaluate the…

  12. Controlling extreme events on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network "mobile" can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  13. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  14. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics.

  15. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics. PMID:27108847

  16. Disease Surveillance on Complex Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jose L; Srinivasan, Ravi; Brownstein, John S; Galvani, Alison P; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2016-07-01

    As infectious disease surveillance systems expand to include digital, crowd-sourced, and social network data, public health agencies are gaining unprecedented access to high-resolution data and have an opportunity to selectively monitor informative individuals. Contact networks, which are the webs of interaction through which diseases spread, determine whether and when individuals become infected, and thus who might serve as early and accurate surveillance sensors. Here, we evaluate three strategies for selecting sensors-sampling the most connected, random, and friends of random individuals-in three complex social networks-a simple scale-free network, an empirical Venezuelan college student network, and an empirical Montreal wireless hotspot usage network. Across five different surveillance goals-early and accurate detection of epidemic emergence and peak, and general situational awareness-we find that the optimal choice of sensors depends on the public health goal, the underlying network and the reproduction number of the disease (R0). For diseases with a low R0, the most connected individuals provide the earliest and most accurate information about both the onset and peak of an outbreak. However, identifying network hubs is often impractical, and they can be misleading if monitored for general situational awareness, if the underlying network has significant community structure, or if R0 is high or unknown. Taking a theoretical approach, we also derive the optimal surveillance system for early outbreak detection but find that real-world identification of such sensors would be nearly impossible. By contrast, the friends-of-random strategy offers a more practical and robust alternative. It can be readily implemented without prior knowledge of the network, and by identifying sensors with higher than average, but not the highest, epidemiological risk, it provides reasonably early and accurate information.

  17. Disease Surveillance on Complex Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jose L; Srinivasan, Ravi; Brownstein, John S; Galvani, Alison P; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2016-07-01

    As infectious disease surveillance systems expand to include digital, crowd-sourced, and social network data, public health agencies are gaining unprecedented access to high-resolution data and have an opportunity to selectively monitor informative individuals. Contact networks, which are the webs of interaction through which diseases spread, determine whether and when individuals become infected, and thus who might serve as early and accurate surveillance sensors. Here, we evaluate three strategies for selecting sensors-sampling the most connected, random, and friends of random individuals-in three complex social networks-a simple scale-free network, an empirical Venezuelan college student network, and an empirical Montreal wireless hotspot usage network. Across five different surveillance goals-early and accurate detection of epidemic emergence and peak, and general situational awareness-we find that the optimal choice of sensors depends on the public health goal, the underlying network and the reproduction number of the disease (R0). For diseases with a low R0, the most connected individuals provide the earliest and most accurate information about both the onset and peak of an outbreak. However, identifying network hubs is often impractical, and they can be misleading if monitored for general situational awareness, if the underlying network has significant community structure, or if R0 is high or unknown. Taking a theoretical approach, we also derive the optimal surveillance system for early outbreak detection but find that real-world identification of such sensors would be nearly impossible. By contrast, the friends-of-random strategy offers a more practical and robust alternative. It can be readily implemented without prior knowledge of the network, and by identifying sensors with higher than average, but not the highest, epidemiological risk, it provides reasonably early and accurate information. PMID:27415615

  18. Complexity in neuronal noise depends on network interconnectivity.

    PubMed

    Serletis, Demitre; Zalay, Osbert C; Valiante, Taufik A; Bardakjian, Berj L; Carlen, Peter L

    2011-06-01

    "Noise," or noise-like activity (NLA), defines background electrical membrane potential fluctuations at the cellular level of the nervous system, comprising an important aspect of brain dynamics. Using whole-cell voltage recordings from fast-spiking stratum oriens interneurons and stratum pyramidale neurons located in the CA3 region of the intact mouse hippocampus, we applied complexity measures from dynamical systems theory (i.e., 1/f(γ) noise and correlation dimension) and found evidence for complexity in neuronal NLA, ranging from high- to low-complexity dynamics. Importantly, these high- and low-complexity signal features were largely dependent on gap junction and chemical synaptic transmission. Progressive neuronal isolation from the surrounding local network via gap junction blockade (abolishing gap junction-dependent spikelets) and then chemical synaptic blockade (abolishing excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials), or the reverse order of these treatments, resulted in emergence of high-complexity NLA dynamics. Restoring local network interconnectivity via blockade washout resulted in resolution to low-complexity behavior. These results suggest that the observed increase in background NLA complexity is the result of reduced network interconnectivity, thereby highlighting the potential importance of the NLA signal to the study of network state transitions arising in normal and abnormal brain dynamics (such as in epilepsy, for example). PMID:21347547

  19. A complex-centric view of protein network evolution.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Nir; Kupiec, Martin; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded

    2009-07-01

    The recent availability of protein-protein interaction networks for several species makes it possible to study protein complexes in an evolutionary context. In this article, we present a novel network-based framework for reconstructing the evolutionary history of protein complexes. Our analysis is based on generalizing evolutionary measures for single proteins to the level of whole subnetworks, comprehensively considering a broad set of computationally derived complexes and accounting for both sequence and interaction changes. Specifically, we compute sets of orthologous complexes across species, and use these to derive evolutionary rate and age measures for protein complexes. We observe significant correlations between the evolutionary properties of a complex and those of its member proteins, suggesting that protein complexes form early in evolution and evolve as coherent units. Additionally, our approach enables us to directly quantify the extent to which gene duplication has played a role in the evolution of complexes. We find that about one quarter of the sets of orthologous complexes have originated from evolutionary cores of homodimers that underwent duplication and divergence, testifying to the important role of gene duplication in protein complex evolution. PMID:19465379

  20. Analysis of complex causal networks through time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, R.; van de Giesen, N.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a new way of looking at (the relations between) groups of signals. In complex networks, such as in landscapes and ecosystems, multiple factors influence each other either through direct causal relations or indirectly through intermediate variables. To puzzle apart the causal relations in a complex network on the basis of measured time series, is not trivial. The method developed here allows us to do excalty that. Using relations that can be derived by (classical) multiple input multiple output system identification, we construct underlying networks of linear time-invariant systems that describe the direct relations between the different signals. The structure of this underlying network can provide valuable information about which signals are dominant, which relations between signals are dominant, and which signals affect each other through another signal in stead of directly. Feedback is easily identified using this approach. We show that the Eigenvalues of the underlying network determine the stability of the network as a whole. Applications are foreseen in for instance the fields of data-driven climate modeling as well as other research involving time series analysis in complex networks.

  1. Analyzing complex networks evolution through Information Theory quantifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Laura C.; Rosso, Osvaldo A.; Saco, Patricia M.; Ravetti, Martín Gómez

    2011-01-01

    A methodology to analyze dynamical changes in complex networks based on Information Theory quantifiers is proposed. The square root of the Jensen-Shannon divergence, a measure of dissimilarity between two probability distributions, and the MPR Statistical Complexity are used to quantify states in the network evolution process. Three cases are analyzed, the Watts-Strogatz model, a gene network during the progression of Alzheimer's disease and a climate network for the Tropical Pacific region to study the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamic. We find that the proposed quantifiers are able not only to capture changes in the dynamics of the processes but also to quantify and compare states in their evolution.

  2. Complexity measures in magnetoencephalography: measuring "disorder" in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Matthew J; Hall, Emma L; Robson, Siân E; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Liddle, Elizabeth B; Liddle, Peter F; Robinson, Stephen E; Morris, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    This paper details a methodology which, when applied to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, is capable of measuring the spatio-temporal dynamics of 'disorder' in the human brain. Our method, which is based upon signal entropy, shows that spatially separate brain regions (or networks) generate temporally independent entropy time-courses. These time-courses are modulated by cognitive tasks, with an increase in local neural processing characterised by localised and transient increases in entropy in the neural signal. We explore the relationship between entropy and the more established time-frequency decomposition methods, which elucidate the temporal evolution of neural oscillations. We observe a direct but complex relationship between entropy and oscillatory amplitude, which suggests that these metrics are complementary. Finally, we provide a demonstration of the clinical utility of our method, using it to shed light on aberrant neurophysiological processing in schizophrenia. We demonstrate significantly increased task induced entropy change in patients (compared to controls) in multiple brain regions, including a cingulo-insula network, bilateral insula cortices and a right fronto-parietal network. These findings demonstrate potential clinical utility for our method and support a recent hypothesis that schizophrenia can be characterised by abnormalities in the salience network (a well characterised distributed network comprising bilateral insula and cingulate cortices).

  3. Complexity Measures in Magnetoencephalography: Measuring "Disorder" in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Matthew J.; Hall, Emma L.; Robson, Siân E.; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Liddle, Peter F.; Robinson, Stephen E.; Morris, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper details a methodology which, when applied to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, is capable of measuring the spatio-temporal dynamics of ‘disorder’ in the human brain. Our method, which is based upon signal entropy, shows that spatially separate brain regions (or networks) generate temporally independent entropy time-courses. These time-courses are modulated by cognitive tasks, with an increase in local neural processing characterised by localised and transient increases in entropy in the neural signal. We explore the relationship between entropy and the more established time-frequency decomposition methods, which elucidate the temporal evolution of neural oscillations. We observe a direct but complex relationship between entropy and oscillatory amplitude, which suggests that these metrics are complementary. Finally, we provide a demonstration of the clinical utility of our method, using it to shed light on aberrant neurophysiological processing in schizophrenia. We demonstrate significantly increased task induced entropy change in patients (compared to controls) in multiple brain regions, including a cingulo-insula network, bilateral insula cortices and a right fronto-parietal network. These findings demonstrate potential clinical utility for our method and support a recent hypothesis that schizophrenia can be characterised by abnormalities in the salience network (a well characterised distributed network comprising bilateral insula and cingulate cortices). PMID:25886553

  4. Universal resilience patterns in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianxi; Barzel, Baruch; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-02-18

    Resilience, a system's ability to adjust its activity to retain its basic functionality when errors, failures and environmental changes occur, is a defining property of many complex systems. Despite widespread consequences for human health, the economy and the environment, events leading to loss of resilience--from cascading failures in technological systems to mass extinctions in ecological networks--are rarely predictable and are often irreversible. These limitations are rooted in a theoretical gap: the current analytical framework of resilience is designed to treat low-dimensional models with a few interacting components, and is unsuitable for multi-dimensional systems consisting of a large number of components that interact through a complex network. Here we bridge this theoretical gap by developing a set of analytical tools with which to identify the natural control and state parameters of a multi-dimensional complex system, helping us derive effective one-dimensional dynamics that accurately predict the system's resilience. The proposed analytical framework allows us systematically to separate the roles of the system's dynamics and topology, collapsing the behaviour of different networks onto a single universal resilience function. The analytical results unveil the network characteristics that can enhance or diminish resilience, offering ways to prevent the collapse of ecological, biological or economic systems, and guiding the design of technological systems resilient to both internal failures and environmental changes. PMID:26887493

  5. Universal resilience patterns in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianxi; Barzel, Baruch; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-02-18

    Resilience, a system's ability to adjust its activity to retain its basic functionality when errors, failures and environmental changes occur, is a defining property of many complex systems. Despite widespread consequences for human health, the economy and the environment, events leading to loss of resilience--from cascading failures in technological systems to mass extinctions in ecological networks--are rarely predictable and are often irreversible. These limitations are rooted in a theoretical gap: the current analytical framework of resilience is designed to treat low-dimensional models with a few interacting components, and is unsuitable for multi-dimensional systems consisting of a large number of components that interact through a complex network. Here we bridge this theoretical gap by developing a set of analytical tools with which to identify the natural control and state parameters of a multi-dimensional complex system, helping us derive effective one-dimensional dynamics that accurately predict the system's resilience. The proposed analytical framework allows us systematically to separate the roles of the system's dynamics and topology, collapsing the behaviour of different networks onto a single universal resilience function. The analytical results unveil the network characteristics that can enhance or diminish resilience, offering ways to prevent the collapse of ecological, biological or economic systems, and guiding the design of technological systems resilient to both internal failures and environmental changes.

  6. Circulation system complex networks and teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Zhi, Rong; Feng, Ai-Xia

    2011-07-01

    In terms of the characteristic topology parameters of climate complex networks, the spatial connection structural complexity of the circulation system and the influence of four teleconnection patterns are quantitatively described. Results of node degrees for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) mid-high latitude (30° N-90° N) circulation system (NHS) networks with and without the Arctic Oscillations (AO), the North Atlantic Oscillations (NAO) and the Pacific—North American pattern (PNA) demonstrate that the teleconnections greatly shorten the mean shortest path length of the networks, thus being advantageous to the rapid transfer of local fluctuation information over the network and to the stability of the NHS. The impact of the AO on the NHS connection structure is most important and the impact of the NAO is the next important. The PNA is a relatively independent teleconnection, and its role in the NHS is mainly manifested in the connection between the NHS and the tropical circulation system (TRS). As to the Southern Hemisphere mid-high latitude (30° S-90° S) circulation system (SHS), the impact of the Antarctic Arctic Oscillations (AAO) on the structural stability of the system is most important. In addition, there might be a stable correlation dipole (AACD) in the SHS, which also has important influence on the structure of the SHS networks.

  7. Disease Surveillance on Complex Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Jose L.; Srinivasan, Ravi; Brownstein, John S.; Galvani, Alison P.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2016-01-01

    As infectious disease surveillance systems expand to include digital, crowd-sourced, and social network data, public health agencies are gaining unprecedented access to high-resolution data and have an opportunity to selectively monitor informative individuals. Contact networks, which are the webs of interaction through which diseases spread, determine whether and when individuals become infected, and thus who might serve as early and accurate surveillance sensors. Here, we evaluate three strategies for selecting sensors—sampling the most connected, random, and friends of random individuals—in three complex social networks—a simple scale-free network, an empirical Venezuelan college student network, and an empirical Montreal wireless hotspot usage network. Across five different surveillance goals—early and accurate detection of epidemic emergence and peak, and general situational awareness—we find that the optimal choice of sensors depends on the public health goal, the underlying network and the reproduction number of the disease (R0). For diseases with a low R0, the most connected individuals provide the earliest and most accurate information about both the onset and peak of an outbreak. However, identifying network hubs is often impractical, and they can be misleading if monitored for general situational awareness, if the underlying network has significant community structure, or if R0 is high or unknown. Taking a theoretical approach, we also derive the optimal surveillance system for early outbreak detection but find that real-world identification of such sensors would be nearly impossible. By contrast, the friends-of-random strategy offers a more practical and robust alternative. It can be readily implemented without prior knowledge of the network, and by identifying sensors with higher than average, but not the highest, epidemiological risk, it provides reasonably early and accurate information. PMID:27415615

  8. The Generalization Complexity Measure for Continuous Input Data

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Sergio A.; Osenda, Omar; Jerez, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce in this work an extension for the generalization complexity measure to continuous input data. The measure, originally defined in Boolean space, quantifies the complexity of data in relationship to the prediction accuracy that can be expected when using a supervised classifier like a neural network, SVM, and so forth. We first extend the original measure for its use with continuous functions to later on, using an approach based on the use of the set of Walsh functions, consider the case of having a finite number of data points (inputs/outputs pairs), that is, usually the practical case. Using a set of trigonometric functions a model that gives a relationship between the size of the hidden layer of a neural network and the complexity is constructed. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the introduced complexity measure, by using the generated model, to the problem of estimating an adequate neural network architecture for real-world data sets. PMID:24983000

  9. The generalization complexity measure for continuous input data.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Iván; Cannas, Sergio A; Osenda, Omar; Jerez, José M; Franco, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We introduce in this work an extension for the generalization complexity measure to continuous input data. The measure, originally defined in Boolean space, quantifies the complexity of data in relationship to the prediction accuracy that can be expected when using a supervised classifier like a neural network, SVM, and so forth. We first extend the original measure for its use with continuous functions to later on, using an approach based on the use of the set of Walsh functions, consider the case of having a finite number of data points (inputs/outputs pairs), that is, usually the practical case. Using a set of trigonometric functions a model that gives a relationship between the size of the hidden layer of a neural network and the complexity is constructed. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the introduced complexity measure, by using the generated model, to the problem of estimating an adequate neural network architecture for real-world data sets.

  10. Can syntactic networks indicate morphological complexity of a language?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Xu, Chunshan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the complex-network approaches are employed to investigate the word form networks and the lemma networks extracted from dependency syntactic treebanks of fifteen different languages. The results show that it is possible to classify human languages by means of the main parameters of complex networks. The complex-network approaches can obtain language classifications as precise as achieved by contemporary word order typology. Clustering experiments point to the fact that the difference between the word form networks and the lemma networks can make for a better classification of languages. In short, the dependency syntactic networks can reflect morphological variation degrees and morphological complexity.

  11. Universality at Breakdown of Quantum Transport on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulvelis, Nikolaj; Dolgushev, Maxim; Mülken, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    We consider single-particle quantum transport on parametrized complex networks. Based on general arguments regarding the spectrum of the corresponding Hamiltonian, we derive bounds for a measure of the global transport efficiency defined by the time-averaged return probability. For treelike networks, we show analytically that a transition from efficient to inefficient transport occurs depending on the (average) functionality of the nodes of the network. In the infinite system size limit, this transition can be characterized by an exponent which is universal for all treelike networks. Our findings are corroborated by analytic results for specific deterministic networks, dendrimers and Vicsek fractals, and by Monte Carlo simulations of iteratively built scale-free trees.

  12. Post Disaster Governance, Complexity and Network Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lassa, Jonatan A.

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to understand the organizational network typology of large­-scale disaster intervention in developing countries and to understand the complexity of post-­disaster intervention, through the use of network theory based on empirical data from post-­tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, during 2005/­2007. The findings suggest that the ‘ degrees of separation’ (or network diameter) between any two organizations in the field is 5, thus reflecting ‘small­ world’ realities and therefore making no significant difference with the real human networks, as found in previous experiments. There are also significant loops in the network reflecting the fact that some actors tend to not cooperate, which challenges post­ disaster coordination. The findings show the landscape of humanitarian actors is not randomly distributed. Many actors were connected to each other through certain hubs, while hundreds of actors make ‘scattered’ single ‘principal-­client’ links. The paper concludes that by understanding the distribution of degree, centrality, ‘degrees of separation’ and visualization of the network, authorities can improve their understanding of the realities of coordination, from macro to micro scales. PMID:26236562

  13. Robust Multiobjective Controllability of Complex Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Gao, Huijun; Du, Wei; Lu, Jianquan; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Kurths, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses robust multiobjective identification of driver nodes in the neuronal network of a cat's brain, in which uncertainties in determination of driver nodes and control gains are considered. A framework for robust multiobjective controllability is proposed by introducing interval uncertainties and optimization algorithms. By appropriate definitions of robust multiobjective controllability, a robust nondominated sorting adaptive differential evolution (NSJaDE) is presented by means of the nondominated sorting mechanism and the adaptive differential evolution (JaDE). The simulation experimental results illustrate the satisfactory performance of NSJaDE for robust multiobjective controllability, in comparison with six statistical methods and two multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs): nondominated sorting genetic algorithms II (NSGA-II) and nondominated sorting composite differential evolution. It is revealed that the existence of uncertainties in choosing driver nodes and designing control gains heavily affects the controllability of neuronal networks. We also unveil that driver nodes play a more drastic role than control gains in robust controllability. The developed NSJaDE and obtained results will shed light on the understanding of robustness in controlling realistic complex networks such as transportation networks, power grid networks, biological networks, etc.

  14. The complex networks approach for authorship attribution of books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Ali; Darooneh, Amir H.; Shariati, Ashrafalsadat

    2012-04-01

    Authorship analysis by means of textual features is an important task in linguistic studies. We employ complex networks theory to tackle this disputed problem. In this work, we focus on some measurable quantities of word co-occurrence network of each book for authorship characterization. Based on the network features, attribution probability is defined for authorship identification. Furthermore, two scaling exponents, q-parameter and α-exponent, are combined to classify personal writing style with acceptable high resolution power. The q-parameter, generally known as the nonextensivity measure, is calculated for degree distribution and the α-exponent comes from a power law relationship between number of links and number of nodes in the co-occurrence network constructed for different books written by each author. The applicability of the presented method is evaluated in an experiment with thirty six books of five Persian litterateurs. Our results show high accuracy rate in authorship attribution.

  15. Partially ordered sets in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Wu, Tie-Jun

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a partial-order relation is defined among vertices of a network to describe which vertex is more important than another on its contribution to the connectivity of the network. A maximum linearly ordered subset of vertices is defined as a chain and the chains sharing the same end-vertex are grouped as a family. Through combining the same vertices appearing in different chains, a directed chain graph is obtained. Based on these definitions, a series of new network measurements, such as chain length distribution, family diversity distribution, as well as the centrality of families, are proposed. By studying the partially ordered sets in three kinds of real-world networks, many interesting results are revealed. For instance, the similar approximately power-law chain length distribution may be attributed to a chain-based positive feedback mechanism, i.e. new vertices prefer to participate in longer chains, which can be inferred by combining the notable preferential attachment rule with a well-ordered recommendation manner. Moreover, the relatively large average incoming degree of the chain graphs may indicate an efficient substitution mechanism in these networks. Most of the partially ordered set-based properties cannot be explained by the current well-known scale-free network models; therefore, we are required to propose more appropriate network models in the future.

  16. Analysis of remote synchronization in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Cardillo, Alessio; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Fortuna, Luigi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    A novel regime of synchronization, called remote synchronization, where the peripheral nodes form a phase synchronized cluster not including the hub, was recently observed in star motifs [Bergner et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 026208 (2012)]. We show the existence of a more general dynamical state of remote synchronization in arbitrary networks of coupled oscillators. This state is characterized by the synchronization of pairs of nodes that are not directly connected via a physical link or any sequence of synchronized nodes. This phenomenon is almost negligible in networks of phase oscillators as its underlying mechanism is the modulation of the amplitude of those intermediary nodes between the remotely synchronized units. Our findings thus show the ubiquity and robustness of these states and bridge the gap from their recent observation in simple toy graphs to complex networks. PMID:24387542

  17. Stochastic competitive learning in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Christiano; Zhao, Liang

    2012-03-01

    Competitive learning is an important machine learning approach which is widely employed in artificial neural networks. In this paper, we present a rigorous definition of a new type of competitive learning scheme realized on large-scale networks. The model consists of several particles walking within the network and competing with each other to occupy as many nodes as possible, while attempting to reject intruder particles. The particle's walking rule is composed of a stochastic combination of random and preferential movements. The model has been applied to solve community detection and data clustering problems. Computer simulations reveal that the proposed technique presents high precision of community and cluster detections, as well as low computational complexity. Moreover, we have developed an efficient method for estimating the most likely number of clusters by using an evaluator index that monitors the information generated by the competition process itself. We hope this paper will provide an alternative way to the study of competitive learning..

  18. Complex network approach to fractional time series

    SciTech Connect

    Manshour, Pouya

    2015-10-15

    In order to extract correlation information inherited in stochastic time series, the visibility graph algorithm has been recently proposed, by which a time series can be mapped onto a complex network. We demonstrate that the visibility algorithm is not an appropriate one to study the correlation aspects of a time series. We then employ the horizontal visibility algorithm, as a much simpler one, to map fractional processes onto complex networks. The degree distributions are shown to have parabolic exponential forms with Hurst dependent fitting parameter. Further, we take into account other topological properties such as maximum eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix and the degree assortativity, and show that such topological quantities can also be used to predict the Hurst exponent, with an exception for anti-persistent fractional Gaussian noises. To solve this problem, we take into account the Spearman correlation coefficient between nodes' degrees and their corresponding data values in the original time series.

  19. Different Epidemic Models on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Small, Michael; Fu, Xin-Chu

    2009-07-01

    Models for diseases spreading are not just limited to SIS or SIR. For instance, for the spreading of AIDS/HIV, the susceptible individuals can be classified into different cases according to their immunity, and similarly, the infected individuals can be sorted into different classes according to their infectivity. Moreover, some diseases may develop through several stages. Many authors have shown that the individuals' relation can be viewed as a complex network. So in this paper, in order to better explain the dynamical behavior of epidemics, we consider different epidemic models on complex networks, and obtain the epidemic threshold for each case. Finally, we present numerical simulations for each case to verify our results.

  20. Complex networks analysis of obstructive nephropathy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, M.; Boccaletti, S.

    2011-09-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy (ON) is one of the most frequent and complex diseases affecting children, characterized by an abnormal flux of the urine, due to a partial or complete obstruction of the urinary tract; as a consequence, urine may accumulate in the kidney and disturb the normal operation of the organ. Despite important advances, pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this contribution, the topology of complex networks, based on vectors of features of control and ON subjects, is related with the severity of the pathology. Nodes in these networks represent genetic and metabolic profiles, while connections between them indicate an abnormal relation between their expressions. Resulting topologies allow discriminating ON subjects and detecting which genetic or metabolic elements are responsible for the malfunction.

  1. Strong correlations between text quality and complex networks features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiqueira, L.; Nunes, M. G. V.; Oliveira, O. N., Jr.; F. Costa, L. da

    2007-01-01

    Concepts of complex networks have been used to obtain metrics that were correlated to text quality established by scores assigned by human judges. Texts produced by high-school students in Portuguese were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and shortest path were obtained. Another metric was derived from the dynamics of the network growth, based on the variation of the number of connected components. The scores assigned by the human judges according to three text quality criteria (coherence and cohesion, adherence to standard writing conventions and theme adequacy/development) were correlated with the network measurements. Text quality for all three criteria was found to decrease with increasing average values of outdegrees, clustering coefficient and deviation from the dynamics of network growth. Among the criteria employed, cohesion and coherence showed the strongest correlation, which probably indicates that the network measurements are able to capture how the text is developed in terms of the concepts represented by the nodes in the networks. Though based on a particular set of texts and specific language, the results presented here point to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  2. Complex growing networks with intrinsic vertex fitness

    SciTech Connect

    Bedogne, C.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2006-10-15

    One of the major questions in complex network research is to identify the range of mechanisms by which a complex network can self organize into a scale-free state. In this paper we investigate the interplay between a fitness linking mechanism and both random and preferential attachment. In our models, each vertex is assigned a fitness x, drawn from a probability distribution {rho}(x). In Model A, at each time step a vertex is added and joined to an existing vertex, selected at random, with probability p and an edge is introduced between vertices with fitnesses x and y, with a rate f(x,y), with probability 1-p. Model B differs from Model A in that, with probability p, edges are added with preferential attachment rather than randomly. The analysis of Model A shows that, for every fixed fitness x, the network's degree distribution decays exponentially. In Model B we recover instead a power-law degree distribution whose exponent depends only on p, and we show how this result can be generalized. The properties of a number of particular networks are examined.

  3. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  4. Universal resilience patterns in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jianxi; Barzel, Baruch; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-02-01

    Resilience, a system’s ability to adjust its activity to retain its basic functionality when errors, failures and environmental changes occur, is a defining property of many complex systems. Despite widespread consequences for human health, the economy and the environment, events leading to loss of resilience—from cascading failures in technological systems to mass extinctions in ecological networks—are rarely predictable and are often irreversible. These limitations are rooted in a theoretical gap: the current analytical framework of resilience is designed to treat low-dimensional models with a few interacting components, and is unsuitable for multi-dimensional systems consisting of a large number of components that interact through a complex network. Here we bridge this theoretical gap by developing a set of analytical tools with which to identify the natural control and state parameters of a multi-dimensional complex system, helping us derive effective one-dimensional dynamics that accurately predict the system’s resilience. The proposed analytical framework allows us systematically to separate the roles of the system’s dynamics and topology, collapsing the behaviour of different networks onto a single universal resilience function. The analytical results unveil the network characteristics that can enhance or diminish resilience, offering ways to prevent the collapse of ecological, biological or economic systems, and guiding the design of technological systems resilient to both internal failures and environmental changes.

  5. Simulating Operation of a Complex Sensor Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther; Clare, Loren; Woo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Simulation Tool for ASCTA Microsensor Network Architecture (STAMiNA) ["ASCTA" denotes the Advanced Sensors Collaborative Technology Alliance.] is a computer program for evaluating conceptual sensor networks deployed over terrain to provide military situational awareness. This or a similar program is needed because of the complexity of interactions among such diverse phenomena as sensing and communication portions of a network, deployment of sensor nodes, effects of terrain, data-fusion algorithms, and threat characteristics. STAMiNA is built upon a commercial network-simulator engine, with extensions to include both sensing and communication models in a discrete-event simulation environment. Users can define (1) a mission environment, including terrain features; (2) objects to be sensed; (3) placements and modalities of sensors, abilities of sensors to sense objects of various types, and sensor false alarm rates; (4) trajectories of threatening objects; (5) means of dissemination and fusion of data; and (6) various network configurations. By use of STAMiNA, one can simulate detection of targets through sensing, dissemination of information by various wireless communication subsystems under various scenarios, and fusion of information, incorporating such metrics as target-detection probabilities, false-alarm rates, and communication loads, and capturing effects of terrain and threat.

  6. Vulnerability of complex networks under path-based attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Cun-Lai; Cui, Wei

    2015-02-01

    We investigate vulnerability of complex networks including model networks and real-world networks subject to path-based attacks. Specifically, we remove approximately the longest simple path from a network iteratively until there are no paths left in the network. We propose two algorithms, the random augmenting approach (RPA) and the Hamilton-path based approach (HPA), for finding the approximately longest simple path in a network. Results demonstrate that steps of longest-path attacks increase with network density linearly for random networks, while exponentially increasing for scale-free networks. The more homogeneous the degree distribution is, the more fragile the network, which is different from the previous results of node or edge attacks. HPA is generally more efficient than RPA in the longest-path attacks of complex networks. These findings further help us understand the vulnerability of complex systems, better protect complex systems, and design more tolerant complex systems.

  7. A descriptive study of fracture networks in rocks using complex network metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Elizabeth; Velasco-Hernández, Jorge X.; Romero-Salcedo, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we describe the static topological fracture structure of five rock samples from three regions in Eastern Mexico by the application of centrality and communicability measures used in the area of complex networks. The information obtained from fracture images is used to characterize the fracture networks. The analysis is divided into two groups of characteristics. The first provides a general summary of the fracture network through the description of the number of nodes, edges, diameter, radius, lengths and clustering coefficients. A second group of features centers on the description of communicability in the network by means of three indexes recently proposed. In addition, we apply centrality measures (betweenness, closeness, eigenvector and eccentricity) for quantifying the importance of nodes in the entire network. Finally, we identify a topology for fracture networks using a classification based on the degree of communicability. The most important results obtained in this work are focused in the topological characteristic patterns found in fracture networks applying the approach of complex networks that in general provide local and global parameters of connectivity and communicability.

  8. Complex Network Structure Influences Processing in Long-Term and Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitevitch, Michael S.; Chan, Kit Ying; Roodenrys, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks describe how entities in systems interact; the structure of such networks is argued to influence processing. One measure of network structure, clustering coefficient, C, measures the extent to which neighbors of a node are also neighbors of each other. Previous psycholinguistic experiments found that the C of phonological…

  9. Boolean modeling of collective effects in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Norrell, Johannes; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Complex systems are often modeled as Boolean networks in attempts to capture their logical structure and reveal its dynamical consequences. Approximating the dynamics of continuous variables by discrete values and Boolean logic gates may, however, introduce dynamical possibilities that are not accessible to the original system. We show that large random networks of variables coupled through continuous transfer functions often fail to exhibit the complex dynamics of corresponding Boolean models in the disordered (chaotic) regime, even when each individual function appears to be a good candidate for Boolean idealization. A suitably modified Boolean theory explains the behavior of systems in which information does not propagate faithfully down certain chains of nodes. Model networks incorporating calculated or directly measured transfer functions reported in the literature on transcriptional regulation of genes are described by the modified theory. PMID:19658525

  10. Boolean modeling of collective effects in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Norrell, Johannes; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2009-06-01

    Complex systems are often modeled as Boolean networks in attempts to capture their logical structure and reveal its dynamical consequences. Approximating the dynamics of continuous variables by discrete values and Boolean logic gates may, however, introduce dynamical possibilities that are not accessible to the original system. We show that large random networks of variables coupled through continuous transfer functions often fail to exhibit the complex dynamics of corresponding Boolean models in the disordered (chaotic) regime, even when each individual function appears to be a good candidate for Boolean idealization. A suitably modified Boolean theory explains the behavior of systems in which information does not propagate faithfully down certain chains of nodes. Model networks incorporating calculated or directly measured transfer functions reported in the literature on transcriptional regulation of genes are described by the modified theory. PMID:19658525

  11. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Cheng-jun; Liu, Hong-jun; Li, Yan-hui

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Phase transitions in Pareto optimal complex networks.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Luís F; Solé, Ricard

    2015-09-01

    The organization of interactions in complex systems can be described by networks connecting different units. These graphs are useful representations of the local and global complexity of the underlying systems. The origin of their topological structure can be diverse, resulting from different mechanisms including multiplicative processes and optimization. In spatial networks or in graphs where cost constraints are at work, as it occurs in a plethora of situations from power grids to the wiring of neurons in the brain, optimization plays an important part in shaping their organization. In this paper we study network designs resulting from a Pareto optimization process, where different simultaneous constraints are the targets of selection. We analyze three variations on a problem, finding phase transitions of different kinds. Distinct phases are associated with different arrangements of the connections, but the need of drastic topological changes does not determine the presence or the nature of the phase transitions encountered. Instead, the functions under optimization do play a determinant role. This reinforces the view that phase transitions do not arise from intrinsic properties of a system alone, but from the interplay of that system with its external constraints.

  13. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  14. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  15. Hybrid recommendation methods in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiasconaro, A.; Tumminello, M.; Nicosia, V.; Latora, V.; Mantegna, R. N.

    2015-07-01

    We propose two recommendation methods, based on the appropriate normalization of already existing similarity measures, and on the convex combination of the recommendation scores derived from similarity between users and between objects. We validate the proposed measures on three data sets, and we compare the performance of our methods to other recommendation systems recently proposed in the literature. We show that the proposed similarity measures allow us to attain an improvement of performances of up to 20% with respect to existing nonparametric methods, and that the accuracy of a recommendation can vary widely from one specific bipartite network to another, which suggests that a careful choice of the most suitable method is highly relevant for an effective recommendation on a given system. Finally, we study how an increasing presence of random links in the network affects the recommendation scores, finding that one of the two recommendation algorithms introduced here can systematically outperform the others in noisy data sets.

  16. Degree Distribution in Quantum Walks on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccin, Mauro; Johnson, Tomi; Biamonte, Jacob; Kais, Sabre; Migdał, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    In this theoretical study, we analyze quantum walks on complex networks, which model network-based processes ranging from quantum computing to biology and even sociology. Specifically, we analytically relate the average long-time probability distribution for the location of a unitary quantum walker to that of a corresponding classical walker. The distribution of the classical walker is proportional to the distribution of degrees, which measures the connectivity of the network nodes and underlies many methods for analyzing classical networks, including website ranking. The quantum distribution becomes exactly equal to the classical distribution when the walk has zero energy, and at higher energies, the difference, the so-called quantumness, is bounded by the energy of the initial state. We give an example for which the quantumness equals a Rényi entropy of the normalized weighted degrees, guiding us to regimes for which the classical degree-dependent result is recovered and others for which quantum effects dominate.

  17. An improved acquaintance immunization strategy for complex network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Dongyi

    2015-11-21

    The acquaintance immunization strategy is a common strategy to suppress epidemic on complex network which achieves a seemingly perfect balance between cost and effectiveness compared with other canonical immunization strategies. However, the acquaintance immunization strategy fails to take the time-varying factor and local information of nodes into consideration, which limits its effectiveness in some specific network topology. Our improved immunization strategy is based on a new mathematical model Network Structure Index (NSI), which digs deep to measure the connection property and surrounding influence of a node's neighbor nodes to better determine the importance of nodes during immunization. Both mathematical derivation and the simulation program tested on various network topology support our idea that this improved acquaintance immunization strategy protects more nodes from infection and immunizes important nodes more efficiently than the original strategies. As to say, our strategy has more adaptability and achieves a more reasonable balanced point between cost and effectiveness.

  18. An improved acquaintance immunization strategy for complex network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Dongyi

    2015-11-21

    The acquaintance immunization strategy is a common strategy to suppress epidemic on complex network which achieves a seemingly perfect balance between cost and effectiveness compared with other canonical immunization strategies. However, the acquaintance immunization strategy fails to take the time-varying factor and local information of nodes into consideration, which limits its effectiveness in some specific network topology. Our improved immunization strategy is based on a new mathematical model Network Structure Index (NSI), which digs deep to measure the connection property and surrounding influence of a node's neighbor nodes to better determine the importance of nodes during immunization. Both mathematical derivation and the simulation program tested on various network topology support our idea that this improved acquaintance immunization strategy protects more nodes from infection and immunizes important nodes more efficiently than the original strategies. As to say, our strategy has more adaptability and achieves a more reasonable balanced point between cost and effectiveness. PMID:26300068

  19. Complex Networks Analysis of Manual and Machine Translations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amancio, Diego R.; Antiqueira, Lucas; Pardo, Thiago A. S.; da F. Costa, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.; Nunes, Maria G. V.

    Complex networks have been increasingly used in text analysis, including in connection with natural language processing tools, as important text features appear to be captured by the topology and dynamics of the networks. Following previous works that apply complex networks concepts to text quality measurement, summary evaluation, and author characterization, we now focus on machine translation (MT). In this paper we assess the possible representation of texts as complex networks to evaluate cross-linguistic issues inherent in manual and machine translation. We show that different quality translations generated by MT tools can be distinguished from their manual counterparts by means of metrics such as in- (ID) and out-degrees (OD), clustering coefficient (CC), and shortest paths (SP). For instance, we demonstrate that the average OD in networks of automatic translations consistently exceeds the values obtained for manual ones, and that the CC values of source texts are not preserved for manual translations, but are for good automatic translations. This probably reflects the text rearrangements humans perform during manual translation. We envisage that such findings could lead to better MT tools and automatic evaluation metrics.

  20. Network Enrichment Analysis in Complex Experiments*

    PubMed Central

    Shojaie, Ali; Michailidis, George

    2010-01-01

    Cellular functions of living organisms are carried out through complex systems of interacting components. Including such interactions in the analysis, and considering sub-systems defined by biological pathways instead of individual components (e.g. genes), can lead to new findings about complex biological mechanisms. Networks are often used to capture such interactions and can be incorporated in models to improve the efficiency in estimation and inference. In this paper, we propose a model for incorporating external information about interactions among genes (proteins/metabolites) in differential analysis of gene sets. We exploit the framework of mixed linear models and propose a flexible inference procedure for analysis of changes in biological pathways. The proposed method facilitates the analysis of complex experiments, including multiple experimental conditions and temporal correlations among observations. We propose an efficient iterative algorithm for estimation of the model parameters and show that the proposed framework is asymptotically robust to the presence of noise in the network information. The performance of the proposed model is illustrated through the analysis of gene expression data for environmental stress response (ESR) in yeast, as well as simulated data sets. PMID:20597848

  1. Optimization of transport protocols in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Chen, Jiancong; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xian-He; Zhang, Ding-Xue

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, an optimal routing strategy is proposed to enhance the traffic capacity of complex networks. In order to avoid nodes overloading, the new algorithm is derived on the basis of generalized betweenness centrality which gives an estimate of traffic handled by the node for a route set. Since the nodes with large betweenness centrality are more susceptible to traffic congestion, the traffic can be improved, as our strategy, by redistributing traffic load from nodes with large betweenness centrality to nodes with small betweenness centrality in the proceeding of computing collective routing table. Particularly, depending on a parameter that controls the optimization scale, the new routing can not only enlarge traffic capacity of networks more, but also enhance traffic efficiency with smaller average path length. Comparing results of previous routing strategies, it is shown that the present improved routing performs more effectively.

  2. Building and measuring a high performance network architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William T.C.; Toole, Timothy; Fisher, Chuck; Dugan, Jon; Wheeler, David; Wing, William R; Nickless, William; Goddard, Gregory; Corbato, Steven; Love, E. Paul; Daspit, Paul; Edwards, Hal; Mercer, Linden; Koester, David; Decina, Basil; Dart, Eli; Paul Reisinger, Paul; Kurihara, Riki; Zekauskas, Matthew J; Plesset, Eric; Wulf, Julie; Luce, Douglas; Rogers, James; Duncan, Rex; Mauth, Jeffery

    2001-04-20

    Once a year, the SC conferences present a unique opportunity to create and build one of the most complex and highest performance networks in the world. At SC2000, large-scale and complex local and wide area networking connections were demonstrated, including large-scale distributed applications running on different architectures. This project was designed to use the unique opportunity presented at SC2000 to create a testbed network environment and then use that network to demonstrate and evaluate high performance computational and communication applications. This testbed was designed to incorporate many interoperable systems and services and was designed for measurement from the very beginning. The end results were key insights into how to use novel, high performance networking technologies and to accumulate measurements that will give insights into the networks of the future.

  3. From time series to complex networks: the visibility graph.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Bartolo; Ballesteros, Fernando; Luque, Jordi; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    In this work we present a simple and fast computational method, the visibility algorithm, that converts a time series into a graph. The constructed graph inherits several properties of the series in its structure. Thereby, periodic series convert into regular graphs, and random series do so into random graphs. Moreover, fractal series convert into scale-free networks, enhancing the fact that power law degree distributions are related to fractality, something highly discussed recently. Some remarkable examples and analytical tools are outlined to test the method's reliability. Many different measures, recently developed in the complex network theory, could by means of this new approach characterize time series from a new point of view.

  4. Paths to synchronization on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Moreno, Yamir; Arenas, Alex

    2007-01-19

    The understanding of emergent collective phenomena in natural and social systems has driven the interest of scientists from different disciplines during decades. Among these phenomena, the synchronization of a set of interacting individuals or units has been intensively studied because of its ubiquity in the natural world. In this Letter, we show how for fixed coupling strengths local patterns of synchronization emerge differently in homogeneous and heterogeneous complex networks, driving the process towards a certain global synchronization degree following different paths. The dependence of the dynamics on the coupling strength and on the topology is unveiled. This study provides a new perspective and tools to understand this emerging phenomena. PMID:17358685

  5. Intervality and coherence in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Johnson, Samuel; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2016-06-01

    Food webs-networks of predators and prey-have long been known to exhibit "intervality": species can generally be ordered along a single axis in such a way that the prey of any given predator tend to lie on unbroken compact intervals. Although the meaning of this axis-usually identified with a "niche" dimension-has remained a mystery, it is assumed to lie at the basis of the highly non-trivial structure of food webs. With this in mind, most trophic network modelling has for decades been based on assigning species a niche value by hand. However, we argue here that intervality should not be considered the cause but rather a consequence of food-web structure. First, analysing a set of 46 empirical food webs, we find that they also exhibit predator intervality: the predators of any given species are as likely to be contiguous as the prey are, but in a different ordering. Furthermore, this property is not exclusive of trophic networks: several networks of genes, neurons, metabolites, cellular machines, airports, and words are found to be approximately as interval as food webs. We go on to show that a simple model of food-web assembly which does not make use of a niche axis can nevertheless generate significant intervality. Therefore, the niche dimension (in the sense used for food-web modelling) could in fact be the consequence of other, more fundamental structural traits. We conclude that a new approach to food-web modelling is required for a deeper understanding of ecosystem assembly, structure, and function, and propose that certain topological features thought to be specific of food webs are in fact common to many complex networks. PMID:27368797

  6. Intervality and coherence in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Johnson, Samuel; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2016-06-01

    Food webs—networks of predators and prey—have long been known to exhibit "intervality": species can generally be ordered along a single axis in such a way that the prey of any given predator tend to lie on unbroken compact intervals. Although the meaning of this axis—usually identified with a "niche" dimension—has remained a mystery, it is assumed to lie at the basis of the highly non-trivial structure of food webs. With this in mind, most trophic network modelling has for decades been based on assigning species a niche value by hand. However, we argue here that intervality should not be considered the cause but rather a consequence of food-web structure. First, analysing a set of 46 empirical food webs, we find that they also exhibit predator intervality: the predators of any given species are as likely to be contiguous as the prey are, but in a different ordering. Furthermore, this property is not exclusive of trophic networks: several networks of genes, neurons, metabolites, cellular machines, airports, and words are found to be approximately as interval as food webs. We go on to show that a simple model of food-web assembly which does not make use of a niche axis can nevertheless generate significant intervality. Therefore, the niche dimension (in the sense used for food-web modelling) could in fact be the consequence of other, more fundamental structural traits. We conclude that a new approach to food-web modelling is required for a deeper understanding of ecosystem assembly, structure, and function, and propose that certain topological features thought to be specific of food webs are in fact common to many complex networks.

  7. Intervality and coherence in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Johnson, Samuel; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2016-06-01

    Food webs-networks of predators and prey-have long been known to exhibit "intervality": species can generally be ordered along a single axis in such a way that the prey of any given predator tend to lie on unbroken compact intervals. Although the meaning of this axis-usually identified with a "niche" dimension-has remained a mystery, it is assumed to lie at the basis of the highly non-trivial structure of food webs. With this in mind, most trophic network modelling has for decades been based on assigning species a niche value by hand. However, we argue here that intervality should not be considered the cause but rather a consequence of food-web structure. First, analysing a set of 46 empirical food webs, we find that they also exhibit predator intervality: the predators of any given species are as likely to be contiguous as the prey are, but in a different ordering. Furthermore, this property is not exclusive of trophic networks: several networks of genes, neurons, metabolites, cellular machines, airports, and words are found to be approximately as interval as food webs. We go on to show that a simple model of food-web assembly which does not make use of a niche axis can nevertheless generate significant intervality. Therefore, the niche dimension (in the sense used for food-web modelling) could in fact be the consequence of other, more fundamental structural traits. We conclude that a new approach to food-web modelling is required for a deeper understanding of ecosystem assembly, structure, and function, and propose that certain topological features thought to be specific of food webs are in fact common to many complex networks.

  8. Review of Public Safety in Viewpoint of Complex Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Chengcheng; Weng Wenguo; Yuan Hongyong

    2010-05-21

    In this paper, a brief review of public safety in viewpoint of complex networks is presented. Public safety incidents are divided into four categories: natural disasters, industry accidents, public health and social security, in which the complex network approaches and theories are need. We review how the complex network methods was developed and used in the studies of the three kinds of public safety incidents. The typical public safety incidents studied by the complex network methods in this paper are introduced, including the natural disaster chains, blackouts on electric power grids and epidemic spreading. Finally, we look ahead to the application prospects of the complex network theory on public safety.

  9. Hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xing-yuan Hu, Xiao-peng

    2014-02-15

    This paper investigates hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks. When the complex dynamical networks could be synchronized up to an equilibrium or periodic orbit, a hybrid feedback controller is designed to realize the different component of vector of node could be synchronized up to different desired scaling function in complex dynamical networks with time delay. Hybrid function projective synchronization (HFPS) in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and HFPS in complex dynamical networks with time-varying coupling delay are researched, respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  10. Imaging complex nutrient dynamics in mycelial networks.

    PubMed

    Fricker, M D; Lee, J A; Bebber, D P; Tlalka, M; Hynes, J; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Boddy, L

    2008-08-01

    Transport networks are vital components of multi-cellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and plant vasculature, are branching trees whose architecture is thought to determine universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, the transport systems of many multi-cellular fungi do not fit into this conceptual framework, as they have evolved to explore a patchy environment in search of new resources, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. These fungi grow as a foraging mycelium, formed by the branching and fusion of threadlike hyphae, that gives rise to a complex network. To function efficiently, the mycelial network must both transport nutrients between spatially separated source and sink regions and also maintain its integrity in the face of continuous attack by mycophagous insects or random damage. Here we review the development of novel imaging approaches and software tools that we have used to characterise nutrient transport and network formation in foraging mycelia over a range of spatial scales. On a millimetre scale, we have used a combination of time-lapse confocal imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to quantify the rate of diffusive transport through the unique vacuole system in individual hyphae. These data then form the basis of a simulation model to predict the impact of such diffusion-based movement on a scale of several millimetres. On a centimetre scale, we have used novel photon-counting scintillation imaging techniques to visualize radiolabel movement in small microcosms. This approach has revealed novel N-transport phenomena, including rapid, preferential N-resource allocation to C-rich sinks, induction of simultaneous bi-directional transport, abrupt switching between different pre-existing transport routes, and a strong pulsatile component to transport in some species. Analysis of the pulsatile transport component using Fourier

  11. Combinatorial Laplacian and entropy of simplicial complexes associated with complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletić, S.; Rajković, M.

    2012-09-01

    Simplicial complexes represent useful and accurate models of complex networks and complex systems in general. We explore the properties of spectra of combinatorial Laplacian operator of simplicial complexes and show its relationship with connectivity properties of the Q-vector and with connectivities of cliques in the simplicial clique complex. We demonstrate the need for higher order analysis in complex networks and compare the results with ordinary graph spectra. Methods and results are obtained using social network of the Zachary karate club.

  12. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  13. Topological Phenotypes in Complex Leaf Venation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Lasser, Jana; Daly, Douglas; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-03-01

    The leaves of vascular plants contain highly complex venation networks consisting of recursively nested, hierarchically organized loops. We analyze the topology of the venation of leaves from ca. 200 species belonging to ca. 10 families, defining topological metrics that quantify the hierarchical nestedness of the network cycles. We find that most of the venation variability can be described by a two dimensional phenotypic space, where one dimension consists of a linear combination of geometrical metrics and the other dimension of topological, previously uncharacterized metrics. We show how this new topological dimension in the phenotypic space significantly improves identification of leaves from fragments, by calculating a ``leaf fingerprint'' from the topology and geometry of the higher order veins. Further, we present a simple model suggesting that the topological phenotypic traits can be explained by noise effects and variations in the timing of higher order vein developmental events. This work opens the path to (a) new quantitative identification techniques for leaves which go beyond simple geometric traits such as vein density and (b) topological quantification of other planar or almost planar networks such as arterial vaculature in the neocortex and lung tissue.

  14. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  15. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  16. A Complex Network Approach to Stylometry.

    PubMed

    Amancio, Diego Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Statistical methods have been widely employed to study the fundamental properties of language. In recent years, methods from complex and dynamical systems proved useful to create several language models. Despite the large amount of studies devoted to represent texts with physical models, only a limited number of studies have shown how the properties of the underlying physical systems can be employed to improve the performance of natural language processing tasks. In this paper, I address this problem by devising complex networks methods that are able to improve the performance of current statistical methods. Using a fuzzy classification strategy, I show that the topological properties extracted from texts complement the traditional textual description. In several cases, the performance obtained with hybrid approaches outperformed the results obtained when only traditional or networked methods were used. Because the proposed model is generic, the framework devised here could be straightforwardly used to study similar textual applications where the topology plays a pivotal role in the description of the interacting agents. PMID:26313921

  17. A Complex Network Approach to Stylometry

    PubMed Central

    Amancio, Diego Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Statistical methods have been widely employed to study the fundamental properties of language. In recent years, methods from complex and dynamical systems proved useful to create several language models. Despite the large amount of studies devoted to represent texts with physical models, only a limited number of studies have shown how the properties of the underlying physical systems can be employed to improve the performance of natural language processing tasks. In this paper, I address this problem by devising complex networks methods that are able to improve the performance of current statistical methods. Using a fuzzy classification strategy, I show that the topological properties extracted from texts complement the traditional textual description. In several cases, the performance obtained with hybrid approaches outperformed the results obtained when only traditional or networked methods were used. Because the proposed model is generic, the framework devised here could be straightforwardly used to study similar textual applications where the topology plays a pivotal role in the description of the interacting agents. PMID:26313921

  18. A system for measuring complex dielectric properties of thin films at submillimeter wavelengths using an open hemispherical cavity and a vector network analyzer.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rezwanur; Taylor, P C; Scales, John A

    2013-08-01

    Quasi-optical (QO) methods of dielectric spectroscopy are well established in the millimeter and submillimeter frequency bands. These methods exploit standing wave structure in the sample produced by a transmitted Gaussian beam to achieve accurate, low-noise measurement of the complex permittivity of the sample [e.g., J. A. Scales and M. Batzle, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 062906 (2006); R. N. Clarke and C. B. Rosenberg, J. Phys. E 15, 9 (1982); T. M. Hirovnen, P. Vainikainen, A. Lozowski, and A. V. Raisanen, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 45, 780 (1996)]. In effect the sample itself becomes a low-Q cavity. On the other hand, for optically thin samples (films of thickness much less than a wavelength) or extremely low loss samples (loss tangents below 10(-5)) the QO approach tends to break down due to loss of signal. In such a case it is useful to put the sample in a high-Q cavity and measure the perturbation of the cavity modes. Provided that the average mode frequency divided by the shift in mode frequency is less than the Q (quality factor) of the mode, then the perturbation should be resolvable. Cavity perturbation techniques are not new, but there are technological difficulties in working in the millimeter/submillimeter wave region. In this paper we will show applications of cavity perturbation to the dielectric characterization of semi-conductor thin films of the type used in the manufacture of photovoltaics in the 100 and 350 GHz range. We measured the complex optical constants of hot-wire chemical deposition grown 1-μm thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film on borosilicate glass substrate. The real part of the refractive index and dielectric constant of the glass-substrate varies from frequency-independent to linearly frequency-dependent. We also see power-law behavior of the frequency-dependent optical conductivity from 316 GHz (9.48 cm(-1)) down to 104 GHz (3.12 cm(-1)). PMID:24007073

  19. A system for measuring complex dielectric properties of thin films at submillimeter wavelengths using an open hemispherical cavity and a vector network analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur; Taylor, P. C.; Scales, John A.

    2013-08-01

    Quasi-optical (QO) methods of dielectric spectroscopy are well established in the millimeter and submillimeter frequency bands. These methods exploit standing wave structure in the sample produced by a transmitted Gaussian beam to achieve accurate, low-noise measurement of the complex permittivity of the sample [e.g., J. A. Scales and M. Batzle, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 062906 (2006);, 10.1063/1.2172403 R. N. Clarke and C. B. Rosenberg, J. Phys. E 15, 9 (1982);, 10.1088/0022-3735/15/1/002 T. M. Hirovnen, P. Vainikainen, A. Lozowski, and A. V. Raisanen, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 45, 780 (1996)], 10.1109/19.516996. In effect the sample itself becomes a low-Q cavity. On the other hand, for optically thin samples (films of thickness much less than a wavelength) or extremely low loss samples (loss tangents below 10-5) the QO approach tends to break down due to loss of signal. In such a case it is useful to put the sample in a high-Q cavity and measure the perturbation of the cavity modes. Provided that the average mode frequency divided by the shift in mode frequency is less than the Q (quality factor) of the mode, then the perturbation should be resolvable. Cavity perturbation techniques are not new, but there are technological difficulties in working in the millimeter/submillimeter wave region. In this paper we will show applications of cavity perturbation to the dielectric characterization of semi-conductor thin films of the type used in the manufacture of photovoltaics in the 100 and 350 GHz range. We measured the complex optical constants of hot-wire chemical deposition grown 1-μm thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film on borosilicate glass substrate. The real part of the refractive index and dielectric constant of the glass-substrate varies from frequency-independent to linearly frequency-dependent. We also see power-law behavior of the frequency-dependent optical conductivity from 316 GHz (9.48 cm-1) down to 104 GHz (3.12 cm-1).

  20. Complex networks approach to geophysical time series analysis: Detecting paleoclimate transitions via recurrence networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, R. V.; Zou, Y.; Donges, J. F.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present a new approach for analysing structural properties of time series from complex systems. Starting from the concept of recurrences in phase space, the recurrence matrix of a time series is interpreted as the adjacency matrix of an associated complex network which links different points in time if the evolution of the considered states is very similar. A critical comparison of these recurrence networks with similar existing techniques is presented, revealing strong conceptual benefits of the new approach which can be considered as a unifying framework for transforming time series into complex networks that also includes other methods as special cases. Based on different model systems, we demonstrate that there are fundamental interrelationships between the topological properties of recurrence networks and the statistical properties of the phase space density of the underlying dynamical system. Hence, the network description yields new quantitative characteristics of the dynamical complexity of a time series, which substantially complement existing measures of recurrence quantification analysis. Finally, we illustrate the potential of our approach for detecting hidden dynamical transitions from geoscientific time series by applying it to different paleoclimate records. In particular, we are able to resolve previously unknown climatic regime shifts in East Africa during the last about 4 million years, which might have had a considerable influence on the evolution of hominids in the area.

  1. Computerized measures of visual complexity.

    PubMed

    Machado, Penousal; Romero, Juan; Nadal, Marcos; Santos, Antonino; Correia, João; Carballal, Adrián

    2015-09-01

    Visual complexity influences people's perception of, preference for, and behaviour toward many classes of objects, from artworks to web pages. The ability to predict people's impression of the complexity of different kinds of visual stimuli holds, therefore, great potential for many domains, basic and applied. Here we use edge detection operations and several image metrics based on image compression error and Zipf's law to estimate the visual complexity of images. The experiments involved 800 images, each previously rated by thirty participants on perceived complexity. In a first set of experiments we analysed the correlation of individual features with the average human response, obtaining correlations up to rs = .771. In a second set of experiments we employed Machine Learning techniques to predict the average visual complexity score attributed by humans to each stimuli. The best configurations obtained a correlation of rs = .832. The average prediction error of the Machine Learning system over the set of all stimuli was .096 in a normalized 0 to 1 interval, showing that it is possible to predict, with high accuracy human responses. Overall, edge density and compression error were the strongest predictors of human complexity ratings.

  2. Dynamics-based scalability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Gatenby, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    We address the fundamental issue of network scalability in terms of dynamics and topology. In particular, we consider different network topologies and investigate, for every given topology, the dependence of certain dynamical properties on the network size. By focusing on network synchronizability, we find both analytically and numerically that globally coupled networks and random networks are scalable, but locally coupled regular networks are not. Scale-free networks are scalable for certain types of node dynamics. We expect our findings to provide insights into the ubiquity and workings of networks arising in nature and to be potentially useful for designing technological networks as well. PMID:18999478

  3. Dynamical complexity in the C.elegans neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonopoulos, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Bountis, T. C.

    2016-09-01

    We model the neuronal circuit of the C.elegans soil worm in terms of a Hindmarsh-Rose system of ordinary differential equations, dividing its circuit into six communities which are determined via the Walktrap and Louvain methods. Using the numerical solution of these equations, we analyze important measures of dynamical complexity, namely synchronicity, the largest Lyapunov exponent, and the ΦAR auto-regressive integrated information theory measure. We show that ΦAR provides a useful measure of the information contained in the C.elegans brain dynamic network. Our analysis reveals that the C.elegans brain dynamic network generates more information than the sum of its constituent parts, and that attains higher levels of integrated information for couplings for which either all its communities are highly synchronized, or there is a mixed state of highly synchronized and desynchronized communities.

  4. Topological and Dynamical Complexity of Random Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainrib, Gilles; Touboul, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Random neural networks are dynamical descriptions of randomly interconnected neural units. These show a phase transition to chaos as a disorder parameter is increased. The microscopic mechanisms underlying this phase transition are unknown and, similar to spin glasses, shall be fundamentally related to the behavior of the system. In this Letter, we investigate the explosion of complexity arising near that phase transition. We show that the mean number of equilibria undergoes a sharp transition from one equilibrium to a very large number scaling exponentially with the dimension on the system. Near criticality, we compute the exponential rate of divergence, called topological complexity. Strikingly, we show that it behaves exactly as the maximal Lyapunov exponent, a classical measure of dynamical complexity. This relationship unravels a microscopic mechanism leading to chaos which we further demonstrate on a simpler disordered system, suggesting a deep and underexplored link between topological and dynamical complexity.

  5. Characterizing global evolutions of complex systems via intermediate network representations.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Koji; Hirata, Yoshito; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in measurement techniques have enabled us to observe the time series of many components simultaneously. Thus, it is important to understand not only the dynamics of individual time series but also their interactions. Although there are many methods for analysing the interaction between two or more time series, there are very few methods that describe global changes of the interactions over time. Here, we propose an approach to visualise time evolution for the global changes of the interactions in complex systems. This approach consists of two steps. In the first step, we construct a meta-time series of networks. In the second step, we analyse and visualise this meta-time series by using distance and recurrence plots. Our two-step approach involving intermediate network representations elucidates the half-a-day periodicity of foreign exchange markets and a singular functional network in the brain related to perceptual alternations. PMID:22639731

  6. Characterizing global evolutions of complex systems via intermediate network representations.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Koji; Hirata, Yoshito; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in measurement techniques have enabled us to observe the time series of many components simultaneously. Thus, it is important to understand not only the dynamics of individual time series but also their interactions. Although there are many methods for analysing the interaction between two or more time series, there are very few methods that describe global changes of the interactions over time. Here, we propose an approach to visualise time evolution for the global changes of the interactions in complex systems. This approach consists of two steps. In the first step, we construct a meta-time series of networks. In the second step, we analyse and visualise this meta-time series by using distance and recurrence plots. Our two-step approach involving intermediate network representations elucidates the half-a-day periodicity of foreign exchange markets and a singular functional network in the brain related to perceptual alternations.

  7. Enhancing synchronization based on complex gradient networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2007-05-01

    The ubiquity of scale-free networks in nature and technological applications and the finding that such networks may be more difficult to synchronize than homogeneous networks pose an interesting phenomenon for study in network science. We argue and demonstrate that, in the presence of some proper gradient fields, scale-free networks can be more synchronizable than homogeneous networks. The gradient structure can in fact arise naturally in any weighted and asymmetrical networks; based on this we propose a coupling scheme that permits effective synchronous dynamics on the network. The synchronization scheme is verified by eigenvalue analysis and by direct numerical simulations using networks of nonidentical chaotic oscillators. PMID:17677146

  8. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, Roger G

    2014-07-31

    This effort was a collaboration with Youssef Marzouk of MIT, Omar Knio of Duke University (at the time at Johns Hopkins University) and Habib Najm of Sandia National Laboratories. The objective of this effort was to develop the mathematical and algorithmic capacity to analyze complex networks under uncertainty. Of interest were chemical reaction networks and smart grid networks. The statements of work for USC focused on the development of stochastic reduced models for uncertain networks. The USC team was led by Professor Roger Ghanem and consisted of one graduate student and a postdoc. The contributions completed by the USC team consisted of 1) methodology and algorithms to address the eigenvalue problem, a problem of significance in the stability of networks under stochastic perturbations, 2) methodology and algorithms to characterize probability measures on graph structures with random flows. This is an important problem in characterizing random demand (encountered in smart grid) and random degradation (encountered in infrastructure systems), as well as modeling errors in Markov Chains (with ubiquitous relevance !). 3) methodology and algorithms for treating inequalities in uncertain systems. This is an important problem in the context of models for material failure and network flows under uncertainty where conditions of failure or flow are described in the form of inequalities between the state variables.

  9. Correlation of automorphism group size and topological properties with program-size complexity evaluations of graphs and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenil, Hector; Soler-Toscano, Fernando; Dingle, Kamaludin; Louis, Ard A.

    2014-06-01

    We show that numerical approximations of Kolmogorov complexity (K) of graphs and networks capture some group-theoretic and topological properties of empirical networks, ranging from metabolic to social networks, and of small synthetic networks that we have produced. That K and the size of the group of automorphisms of a graph are correlated opens up interesting connections to problems in computational geometry, and thus connects several measures and concepts from complexity science. We derive these results via two different Kolmogorov complexity approximation methods applied to the adjacency matrices of the graphs and networks. The methods used are the traditional lossless compression approach to Kolmogorov complexity, and a normalised version of a Block Decomposition Method (BDM) based on algorithmic probability theory.

  10. Early diagnosis of complex diseases by molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and dynamical network biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Xiangdong; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have been carried out for early diagnosis of complex diseases by finding accurate and robust biomarkers specific to respective diseases. In particular, recent rapid advance of high-throughput technologies provides unprecedented rich information to characterize various disease genotypes and phenotypes in a global and also dynamical manner, which significantly accelerates the study of biomarkers from both theoretical and clinical perspectives. Traditionally, molecular biomarkers that distinguish disease samples from normal samples are widely adopted in clinical practices due to their ease of data measurement. However, many of them suffer from low coverage and high false-positive rates or high false-negative rates, which seriously limit their further clinical applications. To overcome those difficulties, network biomarkers (or module biomarkers) attract much attention and also achieve better performance because a network (or subnetwork) is considered to be a more robust form to characterize diseases than individual molecules. But, both molecular biomarkers and network biomarkers mainly distinguish disease samples from normal samples, and they generally cannot ensure to identify predisease samples due to their static nature, thereby lacking ability to early diagnosis. Based on nonlinear dynamical theory and complex network theory, a new concept of dynamical network biomarkers (DNBs, or a dynamical network of biomarkers) has been developed, which is different from traditional static approaches, and the DNB is able to distinguish a predisease state from normal and disease states by even a small number of samples, and therefore has great potential to achieve "real" early diagnosis of complex diseases. In this paper, we comprehensively review the recent advances and developments on molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and DNBs in particular, focusing on the biomarkers for early diagnosis of complex diseases considering a small number of samples and high

  11. Structural and functional clusters of complex brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemanová, Lucia; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    Recent research using the complex network approach has revealed a rich and complicated network topology in the cortical connectivity of mammalian brains. It is of importance to understand the implications of such complex network structures in the functional organization of the brain activities. Here we study this problem from the viewpoint of dynamical complex networks. We investigate synchronization dynamics on the corticocortical network of the cat by modeling each node (cortical area) of the network with a sub-network of interacting excitable neurons. We find that the network displays clustered synchronization behavior, and the dynamical clusters coincide with the topological community structures observed in the anatomical network. Our results provide insights into the relationship between the global organization and the functional specialization of the brain cortex.

  12. Robustness of complex networks with an improved breakdown probability against cascading failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Xiong, Qingyu; Shi, Xin; Wang, Kai; Shi, Weiren

    2016-08-01

    The robustness of complex network is a core issue in complex network research. We agree that not all overload nodes will be removed from the network in real networks because some effective measures can be taken to protect them. But only a few researches consider this issue. Based on previous researches, we propose a cascading model with an improved breakdown probability. Different from previous breakdown probability model, the current model brings in some parameters to explore the optimal distribution strategy of the protection resources. Furthermore, we quantify the allocation of the protection resources. We explore the relationship between the parameters of our cascading model and the robustness of three networks (two typical networks and one real network), based on which we find out the optimal value of the parameter. It in turn helps us to quantify the allocation of protection resources and form an optimal protection strategy. Our work may be helpful for improving the robustness of complex networks.

  13. The XIOM. Oceanographic measurement network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerez, F.; Gómez Aguar, J.; Espino, M.; Puigdefàbregas, J.; . Cateura, J.; López, J.

    2009-04-01

    DESCRIPTION The XIOM network for oceanographic and coastal meteorological measurements (Xarxa d'Instrumentació Oceanogràfica I Meteorològica) is owned by the Catalan regional government. His deployment is to better understanding of processes that take place in the Spanish Catalan coast, in the NW Mediterranean. The XIOM sea measurement network is formed by the following equipment: 3 directional buoys. 1 scalar buoy. 4 meteo-oceanographical buoys (providing the currents measurements). 2 tide gauge stations. INSTRUMENTATION Wave buoys sends a HF radio signal to a receiver station at the coast and are equipped with ARGOS allocators to allow recovery in case on drift. The receiver stations area composed by antenna, A/D signal converter and the computer. The signal is processed ant the spectral and statistical parameters are sent through internet connection to the main computer. Meteo-oceanographical buoys sends data by satellite (ORBCOMM system) and it's received by e-mail directly in the main computer. Tidal gauges are locally connected to internet connection and sends the data to a main computer. A vast amount of data is collected. In case of waves the main parameters are Hs (significant wave height) spectral and statistical, Tp (peak period), and mean direction of waves in the peak of spectrum. Another parameters are: Tz (mean period), main directional spread, spectral width, and up to 25 different parameters obtained from spectral moments and statistical calculations. In case of meteo-oceanographical buoys, the parameters are velocity of the current, direction of the current and temperature, all of them at -1 m and -15 m. The buoys are equipped also with a standard meteorological station in its upper part that measures parameters like wind velocity and its direction. Tidal gauges measure sea level and water temperature. DATA FLOW In Xiom network, one ftp server centralizes all the directional and scalar buoy's data. It's located at the UPC (Universitat Polit

  14. Impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyuan; Li, Changpin; Wu, Yujiang

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy complex networks. A novel comparison principle is built for the fractional impulsive system. Then a synchronization criterion is established for the fractional T-S fuzzy complex networks by utilizing the comparison principle. The method is also illustrated by applying the fractional T-S fuzzy Rössler's complex networks. PMID:27586628

  15. Complexity measurement based on information theory and kolmogorov complexity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Leong Ting; Terrazas, Germán; Zenil, Hector; Alexander, Cameron; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades many definitions of complexity have been proposed. Most of these definitions are based either on Shannon's information theory or on Kolmogorov complexity; these two are often compared, but very few studies integrate the two ideas. In this article we introduce a new measure of complexity that builds on both of these theories. As a demonstration of the concept, the technique is applied to elementary cellular automata and simulations of the self-organization of porphyrin molecules.

  16. Complexity measures, emergence, and multiparticle correlations.

    PubMed

    Galla, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2012-04-01

    We study correlation measures for complex systems. First, we investigate some recently proposed measures based on information geometry. We show that these measures can increase under local transformations as well as under discarding particles, thereby questioning their interpretation as a quantifier for complexity or correlations. We then propose a refined definition of these measures, investigate its properties, and discuss its numerical evaluation. As an example, we study coupled logistic maps and study the behavior of the different measures for that case. Finally, we investigate other local effects during the coarse graining of the complex system. PMID:22680558

  17. Complexity measures, emergence, and multiparticle correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2012-04-01

    We study correlation measures for complex systems. First, we investigate some recently proposed measures based on information geometry. We show that these measures can increase under local transformations as well as under discarding particles, thereby questioning their interpretation as a quantifier for complexity or correlations. We then propose a refined definition of these measures, investigate its properties, and discuss its numerical evaluation. As an example, we study coupled logistic maps and study the behavior of the different measures for that case. Finally, we investigate other local effects during the coarse graining of the complex system.

  18. PREFACE: Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, A.; Boccaletti, S.; Caldarelli, G.; Chessa, A.; Latora, V.; Motter, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    The field of complex networks is one of the most active areas in contemporary statistical physics. Ten years after seminal work initiated the modern study of networks, interest in the field is in fact still growing, as indicated by the ever increasing number of publications in network science. The reason for such a resounding success is most likely the simplicity and broad significance of the approach that, through graph theory, allows researchers to address a variety of different complex systems within a common framework. This special issue comprises a selection of contributions presented at the workshop 'Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology' held in July 2007 in Pula (Cagliari), Italy as a satellite of the general conference STATPHYS23. The contributions cover a wide range of problems that are currently among the most important questions in the area of complex networks and that are likely to stimulate future research. The issue is organised into four sections. The first two sections describe 'methods' to study the structure and the dynamics of complex networks, respectively. After this methodological part, the issue proceeds with a section on applications to biological systems. The issue closes with a section concentrating on applications to the study of social and technological networks. The first section, entitled Methods: The Structure, consists of six contributions focused on the characterisation and analysis of structural properties of complex networks: The paper Motif-based communities in complex networks by Arenas et al is a study of the occurrence of characteristic small subgraphs in complex networks. These subgraphs, known as motifs, are used to define general classes of nodes and their communities by extending the mathematical expression of the Newman-Girvan modularity. The same line of research, aimed at characterising network structure through the analysis of particular subgraphs, is explored by Bianconi and Gulbahce in Algorithm

  19. Identification of hybrid node and link communities in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-03-01

    Identifying communities in complex networks is an effective means for analyzing complex systems, with applications in diverse areas such as social science, engineering, biology and medicine. Finding communities of nodes and finding communities of links are two popular schemes for network analysis. These schemes, however, have inherent drawbacks and are inadequate to capture complex organizational structures in real networks. We introduce a new scheme and an effective approach for identifying complex mixture structures of node and link communities, called hybrid node-link communities. A central piece of our approach is a probabilistic model that accommodates node, link and hybrid node-link communities. Our extensive experiments on various real-world networks, including a large protein-protein interaction network and a large network of semantically associated words, illustrated that the scheme for hybrid communities is superior in revealing network characteristics. Moreover, the new approach outperformed the existing methods for finding node or link communities separately.

  20. A Novel BA Complex Network Model on Color Template Matching

    PubMed Central

    Han, Risheng; Yue, Guangxue; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    A novel BA complex network model of color space is proposed based on two fundamental rules of BA scale-free network model: growth and preferential attachment. The scale-free characteristic of color space is discovered by analyzing evolving process of template's color distribution. And then the template's BA complex network model can be used to select important color pixels which have much larger effects than other color pixels in matching process. The proposed BA complex network model of color space can be easily integrated into many traditional template matching algorithms, such as SSD based matching and SAD based matching. Experiments show the performance of color template matching results can be improved based on the proposed algorithm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study about how to model the color space of images using a proper complex network model and apply the complex network model to template matching. PMID:25243235

  1. Pattern recognition tool based on complex network-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Dalcimar; Backes, André Ricardo; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-02-01

    This work proposed a generalization of the method proposed by the authors: 'A complex network-based approach for boundary shape analysis'. Instead of modelling a contour into a graph and use complex networks rules to characterize it, here, we generalize the technique. This way, the work proposes a mathematical tool for characterization signals, curves and set of points. To evaluate the pattern description power of the proposal, an experiment of plat identification based on leaf veins image are conducted. Leaf vein is a taxon characteristic used to plant identification proposes, and one of its characteristics is that these structures are complex, and difficult to be represented as a signal or curves and this way to be analyzed in a classical pattern recognition approach. Here, we model the veins as a set of points and model as graphs. As features, we use the degree and joint degree measurements in a dynamic evolution. The results demonstrates that the technique has a good power of discrimination and can be used for plant identification, as well as other complex pattern recognition tasks.

  2. Structure and function of complex brain networks.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several modules or network communities that are interlinked by hub regions mediating communication processes between modules. Recent network analyses have shown that network hubs form a densely linked collective called a "rich club," centrally positioned for attracting and dispersing signal traffic. In parallel, recordings of resting and task-evoked neural activity have revealed distinct resting-state networks that contribute to functions in distinct cognitive domains. Network methods are increasingly applied in a clinical context, and their promise for elucidating neural substrates of brain and mental disorders is discussed.

  3. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  4. Oscillations in interconnected complex networks under intentional attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Ping; Xia, Yongxiang; Tan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks are interconnected with each other. In this paper, we study the traffic dynamics in interconnected complex networks under an intentional attack. We find that with the shortest time delay routing strategy, the traffic dynamics can show the stable state, periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillations, when the capacity redundancy parameter changes. Moreover, compared with isolated complex networks, oscillations always take place in interconnected networks more easily. Thirdly, in interconnected networks, oscillations are affected strongly by the coupling probability and coupling preference.

  5. Recent Progress in Some Active Topics on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Guo, L.; Jiang, J.; Chi, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Q. A.; Cai, X.

    2015-04-01

    Complex networks have been extensively studied across many fields, especially in interdisciplinary areas. It has since long been recognized that topological structures and dynamics are important aspects for capturing the essence of complex networks. The recent years have also witnessed the emergence of several new elements which play important roles in network study. By combining the results of different research orientations in our group, we provide here a review of the recent advances in regards to spectral graph theory, opinion dynamics, interdependent networks, graph energy theory and temporal networks. We hope this will be helpful for the newcomers of those fields to discover new intriguing topics.

  6. Knowledge spillover processes as complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    We introduce the model of knowledge spillover on networks. Knowledge spillover is a major source of economic growth; and is a representative externality in economic phenomena. We show that the model has the following four characteristics: (1) the long-run growth rate is not relevant to the mean degree, but is determined by the mean degree of the nearest neighbors; (2) the productivity level of a firm is proportional to the degree of the firm; (3) the long-run growth rate increases with the increasing heterogeneity of the network; and (4) of three representative networks, the largest growth rate is in scale-free networks and the least in regular networks.

  7. Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Appella, E.; Anderson, C.

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in techniques such as NMR and EPR spectroscopy have enabled the elucidation of how proteins undergo structural changes to act in concert in complex networks. The three minireviews in this series highlight current findings and the capabilities of new methodologies for unraveling the dynamic changes controlling diverse cellular functions. They represent a sampling of the cutting-edge research presented at the 17th Meeting of Methods in Protein Structure Analysis, MPSA2008, in Sapporo, Japan, 26-29 August, 2008 (http://www.iapsap.bnl.gov). The first minireview, by Christensen and Klevit, reports on a structure-based yeast two-hybrid method for identifying E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that interact with the E3 BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer ligase to generate either mono- or polyubiquitinated products. This method demonstrated for the first time that the BRCA1/BARD1 E3 can interact with 10 different E2 enzymes. Interestingly, the interaction with multiple E2 enzymes displayed unique ubiquitin-transfer properties, a feature expected to be common among other RING and U-box E3s. Further characterization of new E3 ligases and the E2 enzymes that interact with them will greatly enhance our understanding of ubiquitin transfer and facilitate studies of roles of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in protein processing and trafficking. Stein et al., in the second minireview, describe recent progress in defining the binding specificity of different peptide-binding domains. The authors clearly point out that transient peptide interactions mediated by both post-translational modifications and disordered regions ensure a high level of specificity. They postulate that a regulatory code may dictate the number of combinations of domains and post-translational modifications needed to achieve the required level of interaction specificity. Moreover, recognition alone is not enough to obtain a stable complex, especially in a complex cellular environment. Increasing

  8. Sequential defense against random and intentional attacks in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Cheng, Shin-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is first proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and validate its effectiveness and reliability via canonical complex network models and real-world large-scale network topology. The results show that the sequential defense mechanism greatly improves the network robustness and mitigates the possibility of network disruption by acquiring limited attack status information from a small subset of nodes in the network.

  9. Sequential defense against random and intentional attacks in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Cheng, Shin-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is first proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and validate its effectiveness and reliability via canonical complex network models and real-world large-scale network topology. The results show that the sequential defense mechanism greatly improves the network robustness and mitigates the possibility of network disruption by acquiring limited attack status information from a small subset of nodes in the network.

  10. A simple model clarifies the complicated relationships of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bojin; Wu, Hongrun; Kuang, Li; Qin, Jun; Du, Wenhua; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Deyi

    2014-08-01

    Real-world networks such as the Internet and WWW have many common traits. Until now, hundreds of models were proposed to characterize these traits for understanding the networks. Because different models used very different mechanisms, it is widely believed that these traits origin from different causes. However, we find that a simple model based on optimisation can produce many traits, including scale-free, small-world, ultra small-world, Delta-distribution, compact, fractal, regular and random networks. Moreover, by revising the proposed model, the community-structure networks are generated. By this model and the revised versions, the complicated relationships of complex networks are illustrated. The model brings a new universal perspective to the understanding of complex networks and provide a universal method to model complex networks from the viewpoint of optimisation.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging and quantification of complex vascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Paul R.; Ameer-Beg, Simon M.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Hodgkiss, Richard J.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Wilson, John; Prise, Vivien E.

    2003-10-01

    The understanding of tumour angiogenesis and response to vascular-targeted drugs are of increasing interest in cancer research. We present 3D images of the in vivo tumour vasculature captured utilising multi-photon microscopy together with the results of manual and semi-automated delineation of the vascular network using novel in-house-developed software and algorithms. The software presented is aimed at aiding in these investigations and other problems where linear or dendritic structures are to be delineated from 3D data sets. A new algorithm, CHARM, based on a compact Hough transform and the formation of a radial map, has been used to automatically locate vessel centres and measure diameters. The robustness of this algorithm to image smoothing and noise has been investigated. Statistical information characterising the network in terms of vascular parameters as well as more complex analyses, such as fractal dimension, are now possible and examples are presented.

  12. Weighted complex network analysis of travel routes on the Singapore public transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Harold; Lim, Sonja; Zhang, Tianyou; Fu, Xiuju; Lee, Gary Kee Khoon; Hung, Terence Gih Guang; Di, Pan; Prakasam, Silvester; Wong, Limsoon

    2010-12-01

    The structure and properties of public transportation networks have great implications for urban planning, public policies and infectious disease control. We contribute a complex weighted network analysis of travel routes on the Singapore rail and bus transportation systems. We study the two networks using both topological and dynamical analyses. Our results provide additional evidence that a dynamical study adds to the information gained by traditional topological analysis, providing a richer view of complex weighted networks. For example, while initial topological measures showed that the rail network is almost fully connected, dynamical measures highlighted hub nodes that experience disproportionately large traffic. The dynamical assortativity of the bus networks also differed from its topological counterpart. In addition, inspection of the weighted eigenvector centralities highlighted a significant difference in traffic flows for both networks during weekdays and weekends, suggesting the importance of adding a temporal perspective missing from many previous studies.

  13. Optimal attack strategy of complex networks based on tabu search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ye; Wu, Jun; Tan, Yue-jin

    2016-01-01

    The problem of network disintegration has broad applications and recently has received growing attention, such as network confrontation and disintegration of harmful networks. This paper presents an optimized attack strategy model for complex networks and introduces the tabu search into the network disintegration problem to identify the optimal attack strategy, which is a heuristic optimization algorithm and rarely applied to the study of network robustness. The efficiency of the proposed solution was verified by comparing it with other attack strategies used in various model networks and real-world network. Numerical experiments suggest that our solution can improve the effect of network disintegration and that the "best" choice for node failure attacks can be identified through global searches. Our understanding of the optimal attack strategy may also shed light on a new property of the nodes within network disintegration and deserves additional study.

  14. On the robustness of complex heterogeneous gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Moreno, Yamir; Floría, Luis M

    2005-04-01

    We analyze a continuous gene expression model on the underlying topology of a complex heterogeneous network. Numerical simulations aimed at studying the chaotic and periodic dynamics of the model are performed. The results clearly indicate that there is a region in which the dynamical and structural complexity of the system avoid chaotic attractors. However, contrary to what has been reported for Random Boolean Networks, the chaotic phase cannot be completely suppressed, which has important bearings on network robustness and gene expression modeling.

  15. Converting PSO dynamics into complex network - Initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhacek, Michal; Janostik, Jakub; Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper it is presented the initial study on the possibility of capturing the inner dynamic of Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm into a complex network structure. Inspired in previous works there are two different approaches for creating the complex network presented in this paper. Visualizations of the networks are presented and commented. The possibilities for future applications of the proposed design are given in detail.

  16. Analysis of complex contagions in random multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaǧan, Osman; Gligor, Virgil

    2012-09-01

    We study the diffusion of influence in random multiplex networks where links can be of r different types, and, for a given content (e.g., rumor, product, or political view), each link type is associated with a content-dependent parameter ci in [0,∞] that measures the relative bias type i links have in spreading this content. In this setting, we propose a linear threshold model of contagion where nodes switch state if their “perceived” proportion of active neighbors exceeds a threshold τ. Namely a node connected to mi active neighbors and ki-mi inactive neighbors via type i links will turn active if ∑cimi/∑ciki exceeds its threshold τ. Under this model, we obtain the condition, probability and expected size of global spreading events. Our results extend the existing work on complex contagions in several directions by (i) providing solutions for coupled random networks whose vertices are neither identical nor disjoint, (ii) highlighting the effect of content on the dynamics of complex contagions, and (iii) showing that content-dependent propagation over a multiplex network leads to a subtle relation between the giant vulnerable component of the graph and the global cascade condition that is not seen in the existing models in the literature.

  17. Algorithms and Requirements for Measuring Network Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Guojun

    2002-12-08

    This report unveils new algorithms for actively measuring (not estimating) available bandwidths with very low intrusion, computing cross traffic, thus estimating the physical bandwidth, provides mathematical proof that the algorithms are accurate, and addresses conditions, requirements, and limitations for new and existing algorithms for measuring network bandwidths. The paper also discusses a number of important terminologies and issues for network bandwidth measurement, and introduces a fundamental parameter -Maximum Burst Size that is critical for implementing algorithms based on multiple packets.

  18. Heterogeneous multidimensional scaling for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Ma, Xiaodi; Fu, Chenbo; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Guijun; Yu, Li

    2015-07-01

    Many real-world networks are essentially heterogeneous, where the nodes have different abilities to gain connections. Such networks are difficult to be embedded into low-dimensional Euclidean space if we ignore the heterogeneity and treat all the nodes equally. In this paper, based on a newly defined heterogeneous distance and a generalized network distance under the constraints of network and triangle inequalities, respectively, we propose a new heterogeneous multidimensional scaling method (HMDS) to embed different networks into proper Euclidean spaces. We find that HMDS behaves much better than the traditional multidimensional scaling method (MDS) in embedding different artificial and real-world networks into Euclidean spaces. Besides, we also propose a method to estimate the appropriate dimensions of Euclidean spaces for different networks, and find that the estimated dimensions are quite close to the real dimensions for those geometrical networks under study. These methods thus can help to better understand the evolution of real-world networks, and have practical importance in network visualization, community detection, link prediction and localization of wireless sensors.

  19. Temporal node centrality in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoungshick; Anderson, Ross

    2012-02-01

    Many networks are dynamic in that their topology changes rapidly--on the same time scale as the communications of interest between network nodes. Examples are the human contact networks involved in the transmission of disease, ad hoc radio networks between moving vehicles, and the transactions between principals in a market. While we have good models of static networks, so far these have been lacking for the dynamic case. In this paper we present a simple but powerful model, the time-ordered graph, which reduces a dynamic network to a static network with directed flows. This enables us to extend network properties such as vertex degree, closeness, and betweenness centrality metrics in a very natural way to the dynamic case. We then demonstrate how our model applies to a number of interesting edge cases, such as where the network connectivity depends on a small number of highly mobile vertices or edges, and show that our centrality definition allows us to track the evolution of connectivity. Finally we apply our model and techniques to two real-world dynamic graphs of human contact networks and then discuss the implication of temporal centrality metrics in the real world.

  20. Temporal node centrality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungshick; Anderson, Ross

    2012-02-01

    Many networks are dynamic in that their topology changes rapidly—on the same time scale as the communications of interest between network nodes. Examples are the human contact networks involved in the transmission of disease, ad hoc radio networks between moving vehicles, and the transactions between principals in a market. While we have good models of static networks, so far these have been lacking for the dynamic case. In this paper we present a simple but powerful model, the time-ordered graph, which reduces a dynamic network to a static network with directed flows. This enables us to extend network properties such as vertex degree, closeness, and betweenness centrality metrics in a very natural way to the dynamic case. We then demonstrate how our model applies to a number of interesting edge cases, such as where the network connectivity depends on a small number of highly mobile vertices or edges, and show that our centrality definition allows us to track the evolution of connectivity. Finally we apply our model and techniques to two real-world dynamic graphs of human contact networks and then discuss the implication of temporal centrality metrics in the real world.

  1. Orthogonality of decision boundaries in complex-valued neural networks.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    This letter presents some results of an analysis on the decision boundaries of complex-valued neural networks whose weights, threshold values, input and output signals are all complex numbers. The main results may be summarized as follows. (1) A decision boundary of a single complex-valued neuron consists of two hypersurfaces that intersect orthogonally, and divides a decision region into four equal sections. The XOR problem and the detection of symmetry problem that cannot be solved with two-layered real-valued neural networks, can be solved by two-layered complex-valued neural networks with the orthogonal decision boundaries, which reveals a potent computational power of complex-valued neural nets. Furthermore, the fading equalization problem can be successfully solved by the two-layered complex-valued neural network with the highest generalization ability. (2) A decision boundary of a three-layered complex-valued neural network has the orthogonal property as a basic structure, and its two hypersurfaces approach orthogonality as all the net inputs to each hidden neuron grow. In particular, most of the decision boundaries in the three-layered complex-valued neural network inetersect orthogonally when the network is trained using Complex-BP algorithm. As a result, the orthogonality of the decision boundaries improves its generalization ability. (3) The average of the learning speed of the Complex-BP is several times faster than that of the Real-BP. The standard deviation of the learning speed of the Complex-BP is smaller than that of the Real-BP. It seems that the complex-valued neural network and the related algorithm are natural for learning complex-valued patterns for the above reasons.

  2. Natural Time Analysis and Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlis, Nicholas; Skordas, Efthimios; Lazaridou, Mary; Varotsos, Panayiotis

    2013-04-01

    Here, we review the analysis of complex time series in a new time domain, termed natural time, introduced by our group [1,2]. This analysis conforms to the desire to reduce uncertainty and extract signal information as much as possible [3]. It enables [4] the distinction between the two origins of self-similarity when analyzing data from complex systems, i.e., whether self-similarity solely results from long-range temporal correlations (the process's memory only) or solely from the process's increments infinite variance (heavy tails in their distribution). Natural time analysis captures the dynamical evolution of a complex system and identifies [5] when the system enters a critical stage. Hence, this analysis plays a key role in predicting forthcoming catastrophic events in general. Relevant examples, compiled in a recent monograph [6], have been presented in diverse fields, including Solid State Physics [7], Statistical Physics (for example systems exhibiting self-organized criticality [8]), Cardiology [9,10], Earth Sciences [11] (Geophysics, Seismology), Environmental Sciences (e.g. see Ref. [12]), etc. Other groups have proposed and developed a network approach to earthquake events with encouraging results. A recent study [13] reveals that this approach is strengthened if we combine it with natural time analysis. In particular, we find [13,14] that the study of the spatial distribution of the variability [15] of the order parameter fluctuations, defined in natural time, provides important information on the dynamical evolution of the system. 1. P. Varotsos, N. Sarlis, and E. Skordas, Practica of Athens Academy, 76, 294-321, 2001. 2. P.A. Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, and E.S. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E, 66, 011902 , 2002. 3. S. Abe, N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, H.K. Tanaka and P.A. Varotsos, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 170601, 2005. 4. P.A. Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, E.S. Skordas, H.K. Tanaka and M.S. Lazaridou, Phys. Rev. E, 74, 021123, 2006. 5. P.Varotsos, N. V. Sarlis, E. S. Skordas

  3. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  4. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  5. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring. PMID:27627320

  6. Instantiating a Global Network Measurement Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, Brian L.; Boote, Jeff; Boyd, Eric; Brown, Aaron; Grigoriev, Maxim; Metzger, Joe; Swany, Martin; Zekauskas, Matt; Zurawski, Jason

    2008-12-15

    perfSONAR is a web services-based infrastructure for collecting and publishing network performance monitoring. A primary goal of perfSONAR is making it easier to solve end-to-end performance problems on paths crossing several networks. It contains a set of services delivering performance measurements in a federated environment. These services act as an intermediate layer, between the performance measurement tools and the diagnostic or visualization applications. This layer is aimed at making and exchanging performance measurements across multiple networks and multiple user communities, using well-defined protocols. This paper summarizes the key perfSONAR components, and describes how they are deployed by the US-LHC community to monitor the networks distributing LHC data from CERN. All monitoring data described herein is publicly available, and we hope the availability of this data via a standard schema will inspire others to contribute to the effort by building network data analysis applications that use perfSONAR.

  7. Identifying node importance in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ping; Fan, Wenli; Mei, Shengwei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel node importance evaluation method from the perspective of the existence of mutual dependence among nodes. The node importance comprises its initial importance and the importance contributions from both the adjacent and non-adjacent nodes according to the dependence strength between them. From the simulation analyses on an example network and the ARPA network, we observe that our method can well identify the node importance. Then, the cascading failures on the Netscience and E-mail networks demonstrate that the networks are more vulnerable when continuously removing the important nodes identified by our method, which further proves the accuracy of our method.

  8. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  9. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible. PMID:27563967

  10. Identify influential spreaders in complex networks, the role of neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Tang, Ming; Zhou, Tao; Do, Younghae

    2016-06-01

    Identifying the most influential spreaders is an important issue in controlling the spreading processes in complex networks. Centrality measures are used to rank node influence in a spreading dynamics. Here we propose a node influence measure based on the centrality of a node and its neighbors' centrality, which we call the neighborhood centrality. By simulating the spreading processes in six real-world networks, we find that the neighborhood centrality greatly outperforms the basic centrality of a node such as the degree and coreness in ranking node influence and identifying the most influential spreaders. Interestingly, we discover a saturation effect in considering the neighborhood of a node, which is not the case of the larger the better. Specifically speaking, considering the 2-step neighborhood of nodes is a good choice that balances the cost and performance. If further step of neighborhood is taken into consideration, there is no obvious improvement and even decrease in the ranking performance. The saturation effect may be informative for studies that make use of the local structure of a node to determine its importance in the network.

  11. Balance between Noise and Information Flow Maximizes Set Complexity of Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Kesseli, Juha; Nykter, Matti

    2013-01-01

    Boolean networks have been used as a discrete model for several biological systems, including metabolic and genetic regulatory networks. Due to their simplicity they offer a firm foundation for generic studies of physical systems. In this work we show, using a measure of context-dependent information, set complexity, that prior to reaching an attractor, random Boolean networks pass through a transient state characterized by high complexity. We justify this finding with a use of another measure of complexity, namely, the statistical complexity. We show that the networks can be tuned to the regime of maximal complexity by adding a suitable amount of noise to the deterministic Boolean dynamics. In fact, we show that for networks with Poisson degree distributions, all networks ranging from subcritical to slightly supercritical can be tuned with noise to reach maximal set complexity in their dynamics. For networks with a fixed number of inputs this is true for near-to-critical networks. This increase in complexity is obtained at the expense of disruption in information flow. For a large ensemble of networks showing maximal complexity, there exists a balance between noise and contracting dynamics in the state space. In networks that are close to critical the intrinsic noise required for the tuning is smaller and thus also has the smallest effect in terms of the information processing in the system. Our results suggest that the maximization of complexity near to the state transition might be a more general phenomenon in physical systems, and that noise present in a system may in fact be useful in retaining the system in a state with high information content. PMID:23516395

  12. Decision support systems and methods for complex networks

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak Chung; Ma, Jian; Mackey, Patrick S; Chen, Yousu; Schneider, Kevin P

    2012-02-28

    Methods and systems for automated decision support in analyzing operation data from a complex network. Embodiments of the present invention utilize these algorithms and techniques not only to characterize the past and present condition of a complex network, but also to predict future conditions to help operators anticipate deteriorating and/or problem situations. In particular, embodiments of the present invention characterize network conditions from operation data using a state estimator. Contingency scenarios can then be generated based on those network conditions. For at least a portion of all of the contingency scenarios, risk indices are determined that describe the potential impact of each of those scenarios. Contingency scenarios with risk indices are presented visually as graphical representations in the context of a visual representation of the complex network. Analysis of the historical risk indices based on the graphical representations can then provide trends that allow for prediction of future network conditions.

  13. Measuring the functional sequence complexity of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Durston, Kirk K; Chiu, David KY; Abel, David L; Trevors, Jack T

    2007-01-01

    Background Abel and Trevors have delineated three aspects of sequence complexity, Random Sequence Complexity (RSC), Ordered Sequence Complexity (OSC) and Functional Sequence Complexity (FSC) observed in biosequences such as proteins. In this paper, we provide a method to measure functional sequence complexity. Methods and Results We have extended Shannon uncertainty by incorporating the data variable with a functionality variable. The resulting measured unit, which we call Functional bit (Fit), is calculated from the sequence data jointly with the defined functionality variable. To demonstrate the relevance to functional bioinformatics, a method to measure functional sequence complexity was developed and applied to 35 protein families. Considerations were made in determining how the measure can be used to correlate functionality when relating to the whole molecule and sub-molecule. In the experiment, we show that when the proposed measure is applied to the aligned protein sequences of ubiquitin, 6 of the 7 highest value sites correlate with the binding domain. Conclusion For future extensions, measures of functional bioinformatics may provide a means to evaluate potential evolving pathways from effects such as mutations, as well as analyzing the internal structural and functional relationships within the 3-D structure of proteins. PMID:18062814

  14. Optimal structure of complex networks for minimizing traffic congestion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Cupertino, Thiago Henrique; Park, Kwangho; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Jin, Xiaogang

    2007-12-01

    To design complex networks to minimize traffic congestion, it is necessary to understand how traffic flow depends on network structure. We study data packet flow on complex networks, where the packet delivery capacity of each node is not fixed. The optimal configuration of capacities to minimize traffic congestion is derived and the critical packet generating rate is determined, below which the network is at a free flow state but above which congestion occurs. Our analysis reveals a direct relation between network topology and traffic flow. Optimal network structure, free of traffic congestion, should have two features: uniform distribution of load over all nodes and small network diameter. This finding is confirmed by numerical simulations. Our analysis also makes it possible to theoretically compare the congestion conditions for different types of complex networks. In particular, we find that network with low critical generating rate is more susceptible to congestion. The comparison has been made on the following complex-network topologies: random, scale-free, and regular.

  15. Entropic origin of disassortativity in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Samuel; Torres, Joaquín J; Marro, J; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2010-03-12

    Why are most empirical networks, with the prominent exception of social ones, generically degree-degree anticorrelated? To answer this long-standing question, we define the ensemble of correlated networks and obtain the associated Shannon entropy. Maximum entropy can correspond to either assortative (correlated) or disassortative (anticorrelated) configurations, but in the case of highly heterogeneous, scale-free networks a certain disassortativity is predicted--offering a parsimonious explanation for the question above. Our approach provides a neutral model from which, in the absence of further knowledge regarding network evolution, one can obtain the expected value of correlations. When empirical observations deviate from the neutral predictions--as happens for social networks--one can then infer that there are specific correlating mechanisms at work.

  16. Assessing Low-Intensity Relationships in Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Andreas; Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten; Zweig, Katharina Anna; Horvát, Emőke-Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Many large network data sets are noisy and contain links representing low-intensity relationships that are difficult to differentiate from random interactions. This is especially relevant for high-throughput data from systems biology, large-scale ecological data, but also for Web 2.0 data on human interactions. In these networks with missing and spurious links, it is possible to refine the data based on the principle of structural similarity, which assesses the shared neighborhood of two nodes. By using similarity measures to globally rank all possible links and choosing the top-ranked pairs, true links can be validated, missing links inferred, and spurious observations removed. While many similarity measures have been proposed to this end, there is no general consensus on which one to use. In this article, we first contribute a set of benchmarks for complex networks from three different settings (e-commerce, systems biology, and social networks) and thus enable a quantitative performance analysis of classic node similarity measures. Based on this, we then propose a new methodology for link assessment called z* that assesses the statistical significance of the number of their common neighbors by comparison with the expected value in a suitably chosen random graph model and which is a consistently top-performing algorithm for all benchmarks. In addition to a global ranking of links, we also use this method to identify the most similar neighbors of each single node in a local ranking, thereby showing the versatility of the method in two distinct scenarios and augmenting its applicability. Finally, we perform an exploratory analysis on an oceanographic plankton data set and find that the distribution of microbes follows similar biogeographic rules as those of macroorganisms, a result that rejects the global dispersal hypothesis for microbes.

  17. Assessing Low-Intensity Relationships in Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Andreas; Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten; Zweig, Katharina Anna; Horvát, Emőke-Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Many large network data sets are noisy and contain links representing low-intensity relationships that are difficult to differentiate from random interactions. This is especially relevant for high-throughput data from systems biology, large-scale ecological data, but also for Web 2.0 data on human interactions. In these networks with missing and spurious links, it is possible to refine the data based on the principle of structural similarity, which assesses the shared neighborhood of two nodes. By using similarity measures to globally rank all possible links and choosing the top-ranked pairs, true links can be validated, missing links inferred, and spurious observations removed. While many similarity measures have been proposed to this end, there is no general consensus on which one to use. In this article, we first contribute a set of benchmarks for complex networks from three different settings (e-commerce, systems biology, and social networks) and thus enable a quantitative performance analysis of classic node similarity measures. Based on this, we then propose a new methodology for link assessment called z* that assesses the statistical significance of the number of their common neighbors by comparison with the expected value in a suitably chosen random graph model and which is a consistently top-performing algorithm for all benchmarks. In addition to a global ranking of links, we also use this method to identify the most similar neighbors of each single node in a local ranking, thereby showing the versatility of the method in two distinct scenarios and augmenting its applicability. Finally, we perform an exploratory analysis on an oceanographic plankton data set and find that the distribution of microbes follows similar biogeographic rules as those of macroorganisms, a result that rejects the global dispersal hypothesis for microbes. PMID:27096435

  18. Assessing Low-Intensity Relationships in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, Andreas; Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten; Zweig, Katharina Anna; Horvát, Emőke-Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Many large network data sets are noisy and contain links representing low-intensity relationships that are difficult to differentiate from random interactions. This is especially relevant for high-throughput data from systems biology, large-scale ecological data, but also for Web 2.0 data on human interactions. In these networks with missing and spurious links, it is possible to refine the data based on the principle of structural similarity, which assesses the shared neighborhood of two nodes. By using similarity measures to globally rank all possible links and choosing the top-ranked pairs, true links can be validated, missing links inferred, and spurious observations removed. While many similarity measures have been proposed to this end, there is no general consensus on which one to use. In this article, we first contribute a set of benchmarks for complex networks from three different settings (e-commerce, systems biology, and social networks) and thus enable a quantitative performance analysis of classic node similarity measures. Based on this, we then propose a new methodology for link assessment called z* that assesses the statistical significance of the number of their common neighbors by comparison with the expected value in a suitably chosen random graph model and which is a consistently top-performing algorithm for all benchmarks. In addition to a global ranking of links, we also use this method to identify the most similar neighbors of each single node in a local ranking, thereby showing the versatility of the method in two distinct scenarios and augmenting its applicability. Finally, we perform an exploratory analysis on an oceanographic plankton data set and find that the distribution of microbes follows similar biogeographic rules as those of macroorganisms, a result that rejects the global dispersal hypothesis for microbes. PMID:27096435

  19. Unified functional network and nonlinear time series analysis for complex systems science: The pyunicorn package.

    PubMed

    Donges, Jonathan F; Heitzig, Jobst; Beronov, Boyan; Wiedermann, Marc; Runge, Jakob; Feng, Qing Yi; Tupikina, Liubov; Stolbova, Veronika; Donner, Reik V; Marwan, Norbert; Dijkstra, Henk A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the pyunicorn (Pythonic unified complex network and recurrence analysis toolbox) open source software package for applying and combining modern methods of data analysis and modeling from complex network theory and nonlinear time series analysis. pyunicorn is a fully object-oriented and easily parallelizable package written in the language Python. It allows for the construction of functional networks such as climate networks in climatology or functional brain networks in neuroscience representing the structure of statistical interrelationships in large data sets of time series and, subsequently, investigating this structure using advanced methods of complex network theory such as measures and models for spatial networks, networks of interacting networks, node-weighted statistics, or network surrogates. Additionally, pyunicorn provides insights into the nonlinear dynamics of complex systems as recorded in uni- and multivariate time series from a non-traditional perspective by means of recurrence quantification analysis, recurrence networks, visibility graphs, and construction of surrogate time series. The range of possible applications of the library is outlined, drawing on several examples mainly from the field of climatology. PMID:26627561

  20. Unified functional network and nonlinear time series analysis for complex systems science: The pyunicorn package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, Jonathan F.; Heitzig, Jobst; Beronov, Boyan; Wiedermann, Marc; Runge, Jakob; Feng, Qing Yi; Tupikina, Liubov; Stolbova, Veronika; Donner, Reik V.; Marwan, Norbert; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the pyunicorn (Pythonic unified complex network and recurrence analysis toolbox) open source software package for applying and combining modern methods of data analysis and modeling from complex network theory and nonlinear time series analysis. pyunicorn is a fully object-oriented and easily parallelizable package written in the language Python. It allows for the construction of functional networks such as climate networks in climatology or functional brain networks in neuroscience representing the structure of statistical interrelationships in large data sets of time series and, subsequently, investigating this structure using advanced methods of complex network theory such as measures and models for spatial networks, networks of interacting networks, node-weighted statistics, or network surrogates. Additionally, pyunicorn provides insights into the nonlinear dynamics of complex systems as recorded in uni- and multivariate time series from a non-traditional perspective by means of recurrence quantification analysis, recurrence networks, visibility graphs, and construction of surrogate time series. The range of possible applications of the library is outlined, drawing on several examples mainly from the field of climatology.

  1. Analysis of complex network performance and heuristic node removal strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanpour, Ehsan; Chen, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Removing important nodes from complex networks is a great challenge in fighting against criminal organizations and preventing disease outbreaks. Six network performance metrics, including four new metrics, are applied to quantify networks' diffusion speed, diffusion scale, homogeneity, and diameter. In order to efficiently identify nodes whose removal maximally destroys a network, i.e., minimizes network performance, ten structured heuristic node removal strategies are designed using different node centrality metrics including degree, betweenness, reciprocal closeness, complement-derived closeness, and eigenvector centrality. These strategies are applied to remove nodes from the September 11, 2001 hijackers' network, and their performance are compared to that of a random strategy, which removes randomly selected nodes, and the locally optimal solution (LOS), which removes nodes to minimize network performance at each step. The computational complexity of the 11 strategies and LOS is also analyzed. Results show that the node removal strategies using degree and betweenness centralities are more efficient than other strategies.

  2. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field. PMID:27318646

  3. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field.

  4. Hierarchical Organization Unveiled by Functional Connectivity in Complex Brain Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changsong; Zemanová, Lucia; Zamora, Gorka; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    How do diverse dynamical patterns arise from the topology of complex networks? We study synchronization dynamics in the cortical brain network of the cat, which displays a hierarchically clustered organization, by modeling each node (cortical area) with a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons. We find that in the biologically plausible regime the dynamics exhibits a hierarchical modular organization, in particular, revealing functional clusters coinciding with the anatomical communities at different scales. Our results provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  5. Toward link predictability of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Linyuan; Pan, Liming; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The organization of real networks usually embodies both regularities and irregularities, and, in principle, the former can be modeled. The extent to which the formation of a network can be explained coincides with our ability to predict missing links. To understand network organization, we should be able to estimate link predictability. We assume that the regularity of a network is reflected in the consistency of structural features before and after a random removal of a small set of links. Based on the perturbation of the adjacency matrix, we propose a universal structural consistency index that is free of prior knowledge of network organization. Extensive experiments on disparate real-world networks demonstrate that (i) structural consistency is a good estimation of link predictability and (ii) a derivative algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art link prediction methods in both accuracy and robustness. This analysis has further applications in evaluating link prediction algorithms and monitoring sudden changes in evolving network mechanisms. It will provide unique fundamental insights into the above-mentioned academic research fields, and will foster the development of advanced information filtering technologies of interest to information technology practitioners. PMID:25659742

  6. Doubly stochastic coherence in complex neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Jianjun

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with various topological structures is investigated under the co-presence of two independently additive and multiplicative Gaussian white noises, in which particular attention is paid to the neuronal networks spiking regularity. As the additive noise intensity and the multiplicative noise intensity are simultaneously adjusted to optimal values, the temporal periodicity of the output of the system reaches the maximum, indicating the occurrence of doubly stochastic coherence. The network topology randomness exerts different influences on the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation for dissimilar coupling strength regimes. At a small coupling strength, the spiking regularity shows nearly no difference in the regular, small-world, and completely random networks. At an intermediate coupling strength, the temporal periodicity in a small-world neuronal network can be improved slightly by adding a small fraction of long-range connections. At a large coupling strength, the dynamical behavior of the neurons completely loses the resonance property with regard to the additive noise intensity or the multiplicative noise intensity, and the spiking regularity decreases considerably with the increase of the network topology randomness. The network topology randomness plays more of a depressed role than a favorable role in improving the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation in the neuronal network research study.

  7. Toward link predictability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Pan, Liming; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Stanley, H Eugene

    2015-02-24

    The organization of real networks usually embodies both regularities and irregularities, and, in principle, the former can be modeled. The extent to which the formation of a network can be explained coincides with our ability to predict missing links. To understand network organization, we should be able to estimate link predictability. We assume that the regularity of a network is reflected in the consistency of structural features before and after a random removal of a small set of links. Based on the perturbation of the adjacency matrix, we propose a universal structural consistency index that is free of prior knowledge of network organization. Extensive experiments on disparate real-world networks demonstrate that (i) structural consistency is a good estimation of link predictability and (ii) a derivative algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art link prediction methods in both accuracy and robustness. This analysis has further applications in evaluating link prediction algorithms and monitoring sudden changes in evolving network mechanisms. It will provide unique fundamental insights into the above-mentioned academic research fields, and will foster the development of advanced information filtering technologies of interest to information technology practitioners.

  8. Onset of synchronization in complex gradient networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Huang, Liang; Guan, Shuguang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2008-09-01

    Recently, it has been found that the synchronizability of a scale-free network can be enhanced by introducing some proper gradient in the coupling. This result has been obtained by using eigenvalue-spectrum analysis under the assumption of identical node dynamics. Here we obtain an analytic formula for the onset of synchronization by incorporating the Kuramoto model on gradient scale-free networks. Our result provides quantitative support for the enhancement of synchronization in such networks, further justifying their ubiquity in natural and in technological systems. PMID:19045491

  9. Evolutionary vaccination dilemma in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Alessio; Reyes-Suárez, Catalina; Naranjo, Fernando; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-09-01

    In this work we analyze the evolution of voluntary vaccination in networked populations by entangling the spreading dynamics of an influenza-like disease with an evolutionary framework taking place at the end of each influenza season so that individuals take or do not take the vaccine upon their previous experience. Our framework thus puts in competition two well-known dynamical properties of scale-free networks: the fast propagation of diseases and the promotion of cooperative behaviors. Our results show that when vaccine is perfect, scale-free networks enhance the vaccination behavior with respect to random graphs with homogeneous connectivity patterns. However, when imperfection appears we find a crossover effect so that the number of infected (vaccinated) individuals increases (decreases) with respect to homogeneous networks, thus showing the competition between the aforementioned properties of scale-free graphs. PMID:24125308

  10. Local rewiring rules for evolving complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, E. R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of link rewiring are considered for the class of directed networks where each node has the same fixed out-degree. We model a network generated by three mechanisms that are present in various networked systems; growth, global rewiring and local rewiring. During a rewiring phase a node is randomly selected, one of its out-going edges is detached from its destination then re-attached to the network in one of two possible ways; either globally to a randomly selected node, or locally to a descendant of a descendant of the originally selected node. Although the probability of attachment to a node increases with its connectivity, the probability of detachment also increases, the result is an exponential degree distribution with a small number of outlying nodes that have extremely large degree. We explain these outliers by identifying the circumstances for which a set of nodes can grow to very high degree.

  11. Evolutionary vaccination dilemma in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, Alessio; Reyes-Suárez, Catalina; Naranjo, Fernando; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-09-01

    In this work we analyze the evolution of voluntary vaccination in networked populations by entangling the spreading dynamics of an influenza-like disease with an evolutionary framework taking place at the end of each influenza season so that individuals take or do not take the vaccine upon their previous experience. Our framework thus puts in competition two well-known dynamical properties of scale-free networks: the fast propagation of diseases and the promotion of cooperative behaviors. Our results show that when vaccine is perfect, scale-free networks enhance the vaccination behavior with respect to random graphs with homogeneous connectivity patterns. However, when imperfection appears we find a crossover effect so that the number of infected (vaccinated) individuals increases (decreases) with respect to homogeneous networks, thus showing the competition between the aforementioned properties of scale-free graphs.

  12. Locating influential nodes in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Malliaros, Fragkiskos D.; Rossi, Maria-Evgenia G.; Vazirgiannis, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling spreading processes in networks is an important topic with many diverse applications, including information dissemination, disease propagation and viral marketing. It is of crucial importance to identify which entities act as influential spreaders that can propagate information to a large portion of the network, in order to ensure efficient information diffusion, optimize available resources or even control the spreading. In this work, we capitalize on the properties of the K-truss decomposition, a triangle-based extension of the core decomposition of graphs, to locate individual influential nodes. Our analysis on real networks indicates that the nodes belonging to the maximal K-truss subgraph show better spreading behavior compared to previously used importance criteria, including node degree and k-core index, leading to faster and wider epidemic spreading. We further show that nodes belonging to such dense subgraphs, dominate the small set of nodes that achieve the optimal spreading in the network. PMID:26776455

  13. Locating influential nodes in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malliaros, Fragkiskos D.; Rossi, Maria-Evgenia G.; Vazirgiannis, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling spreading processes in networks is an important topic with many diverse applications, including information dissemination, disease propagation and viral marketing. It is of crucial importance to identify which entities act as influential spreaders that can propagate information to a large portion of the network, in order to ensure efficient information diffusion, optimize available resources or even control the spreading. In this work, we capitalize on the properties of the K-truss decomposition, a triangle-based extension of the core decomposition of graphs, to locate individual influential nodes. Our analysis on real networks indicates that the nodes belonging to the maximal K-truss subgraph show better spreading behavior compared to previously used importance criteria, including node degree and k-core index, leading to faster and wider epidemic spreading. We further show that nodes belonging to such dense subgraphs, dominate the small set of nodes that achieve the optimal spreading in the network.

  14. Limited-path-length entanglement percolation in quantum complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuquet, Martí; Calsamiglia, John

    2011-03-01

    We study entanglement distribution in quantum complex networks where nodes are connected by bipartite entangled states. These networks are characterized by a complex structure, which dramatically affects how information is transmitted through them. For pure quantum state links, quantum networks exhibit a remarkable feature absent in classical networks: it is possible to effectively rewire the network by performing local operations on the nodes. We propose a family of such quantum operations that decrease the entanglement percolation threshold of the network and increase the size of the giant connected component. We provide analytic results for complex networks with an arbitrary (uncorrelated) degree distribution. These results are in good agreement with numerical simulations, which also show enhancement in correlated and real-world networks. The proposed quantum preprocessing strategies are not robust in the presence of noise. However, even when the links consist of (noisy) mixed-state links, one can send quantum information through a connecting path with a fidelity that decreases with the path length. In this noisy scenario, complex networks offer a clear advantage over regular lattices, namely, the fact that two arbitrary nodes can be connected through a relatively small number of steps, known as the small-world effect. We calculate the probability that two arbitrary nodes in the network can successfully communicate with a fidelity above a given threshold. This amounts to working out the classical problem of percolation with a limited path length. We find that this probability can be significant even for paths limited to few connections and that the results for standard (unlimited) percolation are soon recovered if the path length exceeds by a finite amount the average path length, which in complex networks generally scales logarithmically with the size of the network.

  15. Limited-path-length entanglement percolation in quantum complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Cuquet, Marti; Calsamiglia, John

    2011-03-15

    We study entanglement distribution in quantum complex networks where nodes are connected by bipartite entangled states. These networks are characterized by a complex structure, which dramatically affects how information is transmitted through them. For pure quantum state links, quantum networks exhibit a remarkable feature absent in classical networks: it is possible to effectively rewire the network by performing local operations on the nodes. We propose a family of such quantum operations that decrease the entanglement percolation threshold of the network and increase the size of the giant connected component. We provide analytic results for complex networks with an arbitrary (uncorrelated) degree distribution. These results are in good agreement with numerical simulations, which also show enhancement in correlated and real-world networks. The proposed quantum preprocessing strategies are not robust in the presence of noise. However, even when the links consist of (noisy) mixed-state links, one can send quantum information through a connecting path with a fidelity that decreases with the path length. In this noisy scenario, complex networks offer a clear advantage over regular lattices, namely, the fact that two arbitrary nodes can be connected through a relatively small number of steps, known as the small-world effect. We calculate the probability that two arbitrary nodes in the network can successfully communicate with a fidelity above a given threshold. This amounts to working out the classical problem of percolation with a limited path length. We find that this probability can be significant even for paths limited to few connections and that the results for standard (unlimited) percolation are soon recovered if the path length exceeds by a finite amount the average path length, which in complex networks generally scales logarithmically with the size of the network.

  16. Log-periodic oscillations due to discrete effects in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, Julian; Fronczak, Piotr; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2007-06-01

    We show how discretization affects two major characteristics in complex networks: internode distances (measured as the shortest number of edges between network sites) and average path length, and as a result there are log-periodic oscillations of the above quantities. The effect occurs both in numerical network models as well as in such real systems as coauthorship, language, food, and public transport networks. Analytical description of these oscillations fits well numerical simulations. We consider a simple case of the network optimization problem, arguing that discrete effects can lead to a nontrivial solution.

  17. The complexity and robustness of metro networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrible, Sybil; Kennedy, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Transportation systems, being real-life examples of networks, are particularly interesting to analyze from the viewpoint of the new and rapidly emerging field of network science. Two particular concepts seem to be particularly relevant: scale-free patterns and small-worlds. By looking at 33 metro systems in the world, this paper adapts network science methodologies to the transportation literature, and offers one application to the robustness of metros; here, metro refers to urban rail transit with exclusive right-of-way, whether it is underground, at grade or elevated. We find that most metros are indeed scale-free (with scaling factors ranging from 2.10 to 5.52) and small-worlds; they show atypical behaviors, however, with increasing size. In particular, the presence of transfer-hubs (stations hosting more than three lines) results in relatively large scaling factors. The analysis provides insights/recommendations for increasing the robustness of metro networks. Smaller networks should focus on creating transfer stations, thus generating cycles to offer alternative routes. For larger networks, few stations seem to detain a certain monopole on transferring, it is therefore important to create additional transfers, possibly at the periphery of city centers; the Tokyo system seems to remarkably incorporate these properties.

  18. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  19. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  20. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing.

    PubMed

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-27

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  1. Linguistic complex networks: Rationale, application, interpretation, and directions. Reply to comments on "Approaching human language with complex networks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    Amid the enthusiasm for real-world networks of the new millennium, the enquiry into linguistic networks is flourishing not only as a productive branch of the new networks science but also as a promising approach to linguistic research. Although the complex network approach constitutes a potential opportunity to make linguistics a science, the world of linguistics seems unprepared to embrace it. For one thing, linguistics has been largely unaffected by quantitative methods. Those who are accustomed to qualitative linguistic methods may find it hard to appreciate the application of quantitative properties of language such as frequency and length, not to mention quantitative properties of language modeled as networks. With this in mind, in our review [1] we restrict ourselves to the basics of complex networks and the new insights into human language with the application of complex networks. For another, while breaking new grounds and posing new challenges for linguistics, the complex network approach to human language as a new tradition of linguistic research is faced with challenges and unsolved issues of its own. It is no surprise that the comments on our review, especially their skepticism and suggestions, focus on various different aspects of the complex network approach to human language. We are grateful to all the insightful and penetrating comments, which, together with our review, mark a significant impetus to linguistic research from the complex network approach. In this reply, we would like to address four major issues of the complex network approach to human language, namely, a) its theoretical rationale, b) its application in linguistic research, c) interpretation of the results, and d) directions of future research.

  2. The guitar chord-generating algorithm based on complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tao; Wang, Yi-fan; Du, Dan; Liu, Miao-miao; Siddiqi, Awais

    2016-02-01

    This paper aims to generate chords for popular songs automatically based on complex network. Firstly, according to the characteristics of guitar tablature, six chord networks of popular songs by six pop singers are constructed and the properties of all networks are concluded. By analyzing the diverse chord networks, the accompaniment regulations and features are shown, with which the chords can be generated automatically. Secondly, in terms of the characteristics of popular songs, a two-tiered network containing a verse network and a chorus network is constructed. With this network, the verse and chorus can be composed respectively with the random walk algorithm. Thirdly, the musical motif is considered for generating chords, with which the bad chord progressions can be revised. This method can make the accompaniments sound more melodious. Finally, a popular song is chosen for generating chords and the new generated accompaniment sounds better than those done by the composers.

  3. Mathematical modelling of complex contagion on clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'sullivan, David J.; O'Keeffe, Gary; Fennell, Peter; Gleeson, James

    2015-09-01

    The spreading of behavior, such as the adoption of a new innovation, is influenced bythe structure of social networks that interconnect the population. In the experiments of Centola (Science, 2010), adoption of new behavior was shown to spread further and faster across clustered-lattice networks than across corresponding random networks. This implies that the “complex contagion” effects of social reinforcement are important in such diffusion, in contrast to “simple” contagion models of disease-spread which predict that epidemics would grow more efficiently on random networks than on clustered networks. To accurately model complex contagion on clustered networks remains a challenge because the usual assumptions (e.g. of mean-field theory) regarding tree-like networks are invalidated by the presence of triangles in the network; the triangles are, however, crucial to the social reinforcement mechanism, which posits an increased probability of a person adopting behavior that has been adopted by two or more neighbors. In this paper we modify the analytical approach that was introduced by Hebert-Dufresne et al. (Phys. Rev. E, 2010), to study disease-spread on clustered networks. We show how the approximation method can be adapted to a complex contagion model, and confirm the accuracy of the method with numerical simulations. The analytical results of the model enable us to quantify the level of social reinforcement that is required to observe—as in Centola’s experiments—faster diffusion on clustered topologies than on random networks.

  4. Defining and identifying cograph communities in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Songwei; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Nastos, James; Wang, Yijie; Zhang, Xindong; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    Community or module detection is a fundamental problem in complex networks. Most of the traditional algorithms available focus only on vertices in a subgraph that are densely connected among themselves while being loosely connected to the vertices outside the subgraph, ignoring the topological structure of the community. However, in most cases one needs to make further analysis on the interior topological structure of communities to obtain various meaningful subgroups. We thus propose a novel community referred to as a cograph community, which has a well-understood structure. The well-understood structure of cographs and their corresponding cotree representation allows for an immediate identification of structurally-equivalent subgroups. We develop an algorithm called the Edge P4 centrality-based divisive algorithm (EPCA) to detect these cograph communities; this algorithm is efficient, free of parameters and independent of additional measures mainly due to the novel local edge P4 centrality measure. Further, we compare the EPCA with algorithms from the existing literature on synthetic, social and biological networks to show it has superior or competitive performance in accuracy. In addition to the computational advantages over other community-detection algorithms, the EPCA provides a simple means of discovering both dense and sparse subgroups based on structural equivalence or homogeneous roles which may otherwise go undetected by other algorithms which rely on edge density measures for finding subgroups.

  5. Kolmogorov complexity of epithelial pattern formation: the role of regulatory network configuration.

    PubMed

    Flann, Nicholas S; Mohamadlou, Hamid; Podgorski, Gregory J

    2013-05-01

    The tissues of multicellular organisms are made of differentiated cells arranged in organized patterns. This organization emerges during development from the coupling of dynamic intra- and intercellular regulatory networks. This work applies the methods of information theory to understand how regulatory network structure both within and between cells relates to the complexity of spatial patterns that emerge as a consequence of network operation. A computational study was performed in which undifferentiated cells were arranged in a two dimensional lattice, with gene expression in each cell regulated by identical intracellular randomly generated Boolean networks. Cell-cell contact signalling between embryonic cells is modeled as coupling among intracellular networks so that gene expression in one cell can influence the expression of genes in adjacent cells. In this system, the initially identical cells differentiate and form patterns of different cell types. The complexity of network structure, temporal dynamics and spatial organization is quantified through the Kolmogorov-based measures of normalized compression distance and set complexity. Results over sets of random networks that operate in the ordered, critical and chaotic domains demonstrate that: (1) ordered and critical networks tend to create the most information-rich patterns; (2) signalling configurations in which cell-to-cell communication is non-directional mostly produce simple patterns irrespective of the internal network domain; and (3) directional signalling configurations, similar to those that function in planar cell polarity, produce the most complex patterns, but only when the intracellular networks function in non-chaotic domains.

  6. Interplay between collective behavior and spreading dynamics on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kezan; Ma, Zhongjun; Jia, Zhen; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2012-12-01

    There are certain correlations between collective behavior and spreading dynamics on some real complex networks. Based on the dynamical characteristics and traditional physical models, we construct several new bidirectional network models of spreading phenomena. By theoretical and numerical analysis of these models, we find that the collective behavior can inhibit spreading behavior, but, conversely, this spreading behavior can accelerate collective behavior. The spread threshold of spreading network is obtained by using the Lyapunov function method. The results show that an effective spreading control method is to enhance the individual awareness to collective behavior. Many real-world complex networks can be thought of in terms of both collective behavior and spreading dynamics and therefore to better understand and control such complex networks systems, our work may provide a basic framework.

  7. Introduction to Focus Issue: Mesoscales in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendral, Juan A.; Criado, Regino; Leyva, Inmaculada; Buldú, Javier M.; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Although the functioning of real complex networks is greatly determined by modularity, the majority of articles have focused, until recently, on either their local scale structure or their macroscopical properties. However, neither of these descriptions can adequately describe the important features that complex networks exhibit due to their organization in modules. This Focus Issue precisely presents the state of the art on the study of complex networks at that intermediate level. The reader will find out why this mesoscale level has become an important topic of research through the latest advances carried out to improve our understanding of the dynamical behavior of modular networks. The contributions presented here have been chosen to cover, from different viewpoints, the many open questions in the field as different aspects of community definition and detection algorithms, moduli overlapping, dynamics on modular networks, interplay between scales, and applications to biological, social, and technological fields.

  8. Introduction to focus issue: mesoscales in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Juan A; Criado, Regino; Leyva, Inmaculada; Buldú, Javier M; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Although the functioning of real complex networks is greatly determined by modularity, the majority of articles have focused, until recently, on either their local scale structure or their macroscopical properties. However, neither of these descriptions can adequately describe the important features that complex networks exhibit due to their organization in modules. This Focus Issue precisely presents the state of the art on the study of complex networks at that intermediate level. The reader will find out why this mesoscale level has become an important topic of research through the latest advances carried out to improve our understanding of the dynamical behavior of modular networks. The contributions presented here have been chosen to cover, from different viewpoints, the many open questions in the field as different aspects of community definition and detection algorithms, moduli overlapping, dynamics on modular networks, interplay between scales, and applications to biological, social, and technological fields. PMID:21456843

  9. The interconnected rhizosphere: High network complexity dominates rhizosphere assemblages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin E; Shi, Zhou J; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Firestone, Mary K

    2016-08-01

    While interactions between roots and microorganisms have been intensively studied, we know little about interactions among root-associated microbes. We used random matrix theory-based network analysis of 16S rRNA genes to identify bacterial networks associated with wild oat (Avena fatua) over two seasons in greenhouse microcosms. Rhizosphere networks were substantially more complex than those in surrounding soils, indicating the rhizosphere has a greater potential for interactions and niche-sharing. Network complexity increased as plants grew, even as diversity decreased, highlighting that community organisation is not captured by univariate diversity. Covariations were predominantly positive (> 80%), suggesting that extensive mutualistic interactions may occur among rhizosphere bacteria; we identified quorum-based signalling as one potential strategy. Putative keystone taxa often had low relative abundances, suggesting low-abundance taxa may significantly contribute to rhizosphere function. Network complexity, a previously undescribed property of the rhizosphere microbiome, appears to be a defining characteristic of this habitat. PMID:27264635

  10. Network Compression as a Quality Measure for Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Loic; Reimann, Matthias; Stewart, A. Francis; Schroeder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients. PMID:22719828

  11. Turing instability in reaction-diffusion models on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Yusuke; Izuhara, Hirofumi; Machida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the Turing instability in reaction-diffusion models defined on complex networks is studied. Here, we focus on three types of models which generate complex networks, i.e. the Erdős-Rényi, the Watts-Strogatz, and the threshold network models. From analysis of the Laplacian matrices of graphs generated by these models, we numerically reveal that stable and unstable regions of a homogeneous steady state on the parameter space of two diffusion coefficients completely differ, depending on the network architecture. In addition, we theoretically discuss the stable and unstable regions in the cases of regular enhanced ring lattices which include regular circles, and networks generated by the threshold network model when the number of vertices is large enough.

  12. Protein-protein interaction networks (PPI) and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Goliaei, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    The physical interaction of proteins which lead to compiling them into large densely connected networks is a noticeable subject to investigation. Protein interaction networks are useful because of making basic scientific abstraction and improving biological and biomedical applications. Based on principle roles of proteins in biological function, their interactions determine molecular and cellular mechanisms, which control healthy and diseased states in organisms. Therefore, such networks facilitate the understanding of pathogenic (and physiologic) mechanisms that trigger the onset and progression of diseases. Consequently, this knowledge can be translated into effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, the results of several studies have proved that the structure and dynamics of protein networks are disturbed in complex diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Based on such relationship, a novel paradigm is suggested in order to confirm that the protein interaction networks can be the target of therapy for treatment of complex multi-genic diseases rather than individual molecules with disrespect the network. PMID:25436094

  13. Visual analysis and exploration of complex corporate shareholder networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekušová, Tatiana; Kohlhammer, Jörn

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of large corporate shareholder network structures is an important task in corporate governance, in financing, and in financial investment domains. In a modern economy, large structures of cross-corporation, cross-border shareholder relationships exist, forming complex networks. These networks are often difficult to analyze with traditional approaches. An efficient visualization of the networks helps to reveal the interdependent shareholding formations and the controlling patterns. In this paper, we propose an effective visualization tool that supports the financial analyst in understanding complex shareholding networks. We develop an interactive visual analysis system by combining state-of-the-art visualization technologies with economic analysis methods. Our system is capable to reveal patterns in large corporate shareholder networks, allows the visual identification of the ultimate shareholders, and supports the visual analysis of integrated cash flow and control rights. We apply our system on an extensive real-world database of shareholder relationships, showing its usefulness for effective visual analysis.

  14. The Analysis of Complex Structure for China Education Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhu-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    We collected the data of the documents and their links of China Education and Research Network’s which construct the complex directed network China Education Network (CEN) with large amount of documents with their edges (URLs). This paper analyzes some statistical properties, including degree distributions, average path length, clustering coefficient, and the community structure of China Education Network basing on the practical data. By analyzing the practical data, we found that the in-degree and out-degree distribution of the CEN has power-law tail and the network displays both properties of small world and scale free. The CEN has a considerably small average path length and its clustering coefficient is in the mediate. As a large scale complex network, China Education Network clearly present its community structure in which the colleges in a school constitute communities generally with a large modularity.

  15. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control.

    PubMed

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications. PMID:26274112

  16. Research on the complex network of the UNSPSC ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingying; Zou, Shengrong; Gu, Aihua; Wei, Li; Zhou, Ta

    The UNSPSC ontology mainly applies to the classification system of the e-business and governments buying the worldwide products and services, and supports the logic structure of classification of the products and services. In this paper, the related technologies of the complex network were applied to analyzing the structure of the ontology. The concept of the ontology was corresponding to the node of the complex network, and the relationship of the ontology concept was corresponding to the edge of the complex network. With existing methods of analysis and performance indicators in the complex network, analyzing the degree distribution and community of the ontology, and the research will help evaluate the concept of the ontology, classify the concept of the ontology and improve the efficiency of semantic matching.

  17. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  18. Correlations in complex networks under attack.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Animesh; Mitra, Bivas; Ganguly, Niloy; Peruani, Fernando

    2012-09-01

    For any initially correlated network after any kind of attack where either nodes or edges are removed, we obtain general expressions for the degree-degree probability matrix and degree distribution. We show that the proposed analytical approach predicts the correct topological changes after the attack by comparing the evolution of the assortativity coefficient for different attack strategies and intensities in theory and simulations. We find that it is possible to turn an initially assortative network into a disassortative one, and vice versa, by fine-tuning removal of either nodes or edges. For an initially uncorrelated network, on the other hand, we discover that only a targeted edge-removal attack can induce such correlations. PMID:23030979

  19. Applying complex networks to evaluate precipitation patterns over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciemer, Catrin; Boers, Niklas; Barbosa, Henrique; Kurths, Jürgen; Rammig, Anja

    2016-04-01

    The climate of South America exhibits pronounced differences between the wet- and the dry-season, which are accompanied by specific synoptic events like changes in the location of the South American Low Level Jet (SALLJ) and the establishment of the South American Convergence Zone (SACZ). The onset of these events can be related to the presence of typical large-scale precipitation patterns over South America, as previous studies have shown[1,2]. The application of complex network methods to precipitation data recently received increased scientific attention for the special case of extreme events, as it is possible with such methods to analyze the spatiotemporal correlation structure as well as possible teleconnections of these events[3,4]. In these approaches the correlation between precipitation datasets is calculated by means of Event Synchronization which restricts their applicability to extreme precipitation events. In this work, we propose a method which is able to consider not only extreme precipitation but complete time series. A direct application of standard similarity measures in order to correlate precipitation time series is impossible due to their intricate statistical properties as the large amount of zeros. Therefore, we introduced and evaluated a suitable modification of Pearson's correlation coefficient to construct spatial correlation networks of precipitation. By analyzing the characteristics of spatial correlation networks constructed on the basis of this new measure, we are able to determine coherent areas of similar precipitation patterns, spot teleconnections of correlated areas, and detect central regions for precipitation correlation. By analyzing the change of the network over the year[5], we are also able to determine local and global changes in precipitation correlation patterns. Additionally, global network characteristics as the network connectivity yield indications for beginning and end of wet- and dry season. In order to identify

  20. 2D pattern evolution constrained by complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, L. E. C.; Costa, L. da F.

    2007-03-01

    Complex networks have established themselves in recent years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modelling several complex natural and artificial systems. In the same time in which the structural intricacies of such networks are being revealed and understood, efforts have also been directed at investigating how such connectivity properties define and constrain the dynamics of systems unfolding on such structures. However, less attention has been focused on hybrid systems, i.e. involving more than one type of network and/or dynamics. Several real systems present such an organization, e.g. the dynamics of a disease coexisting with the dynamics of the immune system. The current paper investigates a specific system involving diffusive (linear and nonlinear) dynamics taking place in a regular network while interacting with a complex network of defensive agents following Erdös Rényi (ER) and Barabási Albert (BA) graph models with moveable nodes. More specifically, the complex network is expected to control, and if possible, to extinguish the diffusion of some given unwanted process (e.g. fire, oil spilling, pest dissemination, and virus or bacteria reproduction during an infection). Two types of pattern evolution are considered: Fick and Gray Scott. The nodes of the defensive network then interact with the diffusing patterns and communicate between themselves in order to control the diffusion. The main findings include the identification of higher efficiency for the BA control networks and the presence of relapses in the case of the ER model.

  1. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  2. Targeting the dynamics of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Zanin, Massimiliano; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We report on a generic procedure to steer (target) a network's dynamics towards a given, desired evolution. The problem is here tackled through a Master Stability Function approach, assessing the stability of the aimed dynamics, and through a selection of nodes to be targeted. We show that the degree of a node is a crucial element in this selection process, and that the targeting mechanism is most effective in heterogeneous scale-free architectures. This makes the proposed approach applicable to the large majority of natural and man-made networked systems. PMID:22563525

  3. Targeting the dynamics of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Zanin, Massimiliano; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    We report on a generic procedure to steer (target) a network's dynamics towards a given, desired evolution. The problem is here tackled through a Master Stability Function approach, assessing the stability of the aimed dynamics, and through a selection of nodes to be targeted. We show that the degree of a node is a crucial element in this selection process, and that the targeting mechanism is most effective in heterogeneous scale-free architectures. This makes the proposed approach applicable to the large majority of natural and man-made networked systems.

  4. Mapping Creativity: Creativity Measurements Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Igor Reszka; Cruz, Roberto Moraes

    2014-01-01

    This article borrowed network analysis tools to discover how the construct formed by the set of all measures of creativity configures itself. To this end, using a variant of the meta-analytical method, a database was compiled simulating 42,381 responses to 974 variables centered on 64 creativity measures. Results, although preliminary, indicate…

  5. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-12-01

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

  6. Structural permeability of complex networks to control signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Iudice, Francesco; Garofalo, Franco; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Many biological, social and technological systems can be described as complex networks. The goal of affecting their behaviour has motivated recent work focusing on the relationship between the network structure and its propensity to be controlled. While this work has provided insight into several relevant problems, a comprehensive approach to address partial and complete controllability of networks is still lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing a framework to maximize the diffusion of the control signals through a network, while taking into account physical and economic constraints that inevitably arise in applications. This approach allows us to introduce the network permeability, a unified metric of the propensity of a network to be controllable. The analysis of the permeability of several synthetic and real networks enables us to extract some structural features that deepen our quantitative understanding of the ease with which specific controllability requirements can be met.

  7. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-12-19

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

  8. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks. PMID:25524835

  9. Random field Ising model and community structure in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.-W.; Jeong, H.; Noh, J. D.

    2006-04-01

    We propose a method to determine the community structure of a complex network. In this method the ground state problem of a ferromagnetic random field Ising model is considered on the network with the magnetic field Bs = +∞, Bt = -∞, and Bi≠s,t=0 for a node pair s and t. The ground state problem is equivalent to the so-called maximum flow problem, which can be solved exactly numerically with the help of a combinatorial optimization algorithm. The community structure is then identified from the ground state Ising spin domains for all pairs of s and t. Our method provides a criterion for the existence of the community structure, and is applicable equally well to unweighted and weighted networks. We demonstrate the performance of the method by applying it to the Barabási-Albert network, Zachary karate club network, the scientific collaboration network, and the stock price correlation network. (Ising, Potts, etc.)

  10. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.228702], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects.

  11. Vulnerability of complex networks under three-level-tree attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yao-hui; Han, Ji-hong; Lin, Yi; Liu, Lin

    2016-11-01

    We investigate vulnerability of complex networks including model networks and real world networks subject to three-level-tree attack. Specifically, we remove three different three-level-tree structures: RRN (Random Root Node), MaxDRN (Max Degree Root Node) and MinDRN (Min Degree Root Node) from a network iteratively until there is no three-level-tree left. Results demonstrate that random network is more robust than scale-free network against three tree attacks, and the robustness of random network decreases as the < k > increases. And scale-free network shows different characteristics in different tree attack modes. The robustness of scale-free is not affected by the < k > parameters for RRN, but increases as the < k > increases for MinDRN. The important thing is that MaxDRN is the most effective in the three tree attack modes, especially for scale-free network. These findings supplement and extend the previous attack results on nodes and edges, and can thus help us better explain the vulnerability of different networks, and provide an insight into more tolerant real complex systems design.

  12. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009)], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects. PMID:25375546

  13. Prioritizing protein complexes implicated in human diseases by network optimization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The detection of associations between protein complexes and human inherited diseases is of great importance in understanding mechanisms of diseases. Dysfunctions of a protein complex are usually defined by its member disturbance and consequently result in certain diseases. Although individual disease proteins have been widely predicted, computational methods are still absent for systematically investigating disease-related protein complexes. Results We propose a method, MAXCOM, for the prioritization of candidate protein complexes. MAXCOM performs a maximum information flow algorithm to optimize relationships between a query disease and candidate protein complexes through a heterogeneous network that is constructed by combining protein-protein interactions and disease phenotypic similarities. Cross-validation experiments on 539 protein complexes show that MAXCOM can rank 382 (70.87%) protein complexes at the top against protein complexes constructed at random. Permutation experiments further confirm that MAXCOM is robust to the network structure and parameters involved. We further analyze protein complexes ranked among top ten for breast cancer and demonstrate that the SWI/SNF complex is potentially associated with breast cancer. Conclusions MAXCOM is an effective method for the discovery of disease-related protein complexes based on network optimization. The high performance and robustness of this approach can facilitate not only pathologic studies of diseases, but also the design of drugs targeting on multiple proteins. PMID:24565064

  14. A complex-network perspective on Alexander's wholeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and can be described by precise mathematical language. However, it remains somehow mysterious and elusive, and therefore hard to grasp. This paper develops a complex network perspective on the wholeness to better understand the nature of order or beauty for sustainable design. I bring together a set of complexity-science subjects such as complex networks, fractal geometry, and in particular underlying scaling hierarchy derived by head/tail breaks - a classification scheme and a visualization tool for data with a heavy-tailed distribution, in order to make Alexander's profound thoughts more accessible to design practitioners and complexity-science researchers. Through several case studies (some of which Alexander studied), I demonstrate that the complex-network perspective helps reduce the mystery of wholeness and brings new insights to Alexander's thoughts on the concept of wholeness or objective beauty that exists in fine and deep structure. The complex-network perspective enables us to see things in their wholeness, and to better understand how the kind of structural beauty emerges from local actions guided by the 15 fundamental properties, and in particular by differentiation and adaptation processes. The wholeness goes beyond current complex network theory towards design or creation of living structures.

  15. An entropy-driven matrix completion (E-MC) approach to complex network mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koochakzadeh, Ali; Pal, Piya

    2016-05-01

    Mapping the topology of a complex network in a resource-efficient manner is a challenging problem with applications in internet mapping, social network inference, and so forth. We propose a new entropy driven algorithm leveraging ideas from matrix completion, to map the network using monitors (or sensors) which, when placed on judiciously selected nodes, are capable of discovering their immediate neighbors. The main challenge is to maximize the portion of discovered network using only a limited number of available monitors. To this end, (i) a new measure of entropy or uncertainty is associated with each node, in terms of the currently discovered edges incident on that node, and (ii) a greedy algorithm is developed to select a candidate node for monitor placement based on its entropy. Utilizing the fact that many complex networks of interest (such as social networks), have a low-rank adjacency matrix, a matrix completion algorithm, namely 1-bit matrix completion, is combined with the greedy algorithm to further boost its performance. The low rank property of the network adjacency matrix can be used to extrapolate a portion of missing edges, and consequently update the node entropies, so as to efficiently guide the network discovery algorithm towards placing monitors on the nodes that can turn out to be more informative. Simulations performed on a variety of real world networks such as social networks and peer networks demonstrate the superior performance of the matrix-completion guided approach in discovering the network topology.

  16. A Comparison of Geographic Information Systems, Complex Networks, and Other Models for Analyzing Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Technical Monitor); Kuby, Michael; Tierney, Sean; Roberts, Tyler; Upchurch, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews six classes of models that are used for studying transportation network topologies. The report is motivated by two main questions. First, what can the "new science" of complex networks (scale-free, small-world networks) contribute to our understanding of transport network structure, compared to more traditional methods? Second, how can geographic information systems (GIS) contribute to studying transport networks? The report defines terms that can be used to classify different kinds of models by their function, composition, mechanism, spatial and temporal dimensions, certainty, linearity, and resolution. Six broad classes of models for analyzing transport network topologies are then explored: GIS; static graph theory; complex networks; mathematical programming; simulation; and agent-based modeling. Each class of models is defined and classified according to the attributes introduced earlier. The paper identifies some typical types of research questions about network structure that have been addressed by each class of model in the literature.

  17. The complexity of crime network data: a case study of its consequences for crime control and the study of networks.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Amir; Mondani, Hernan

    2015-01-01

    The field of social network analysis has received increasing attention during the past decades and has been used to tackle a variety of research questions, from prevention of sexually transmitted diseases to humanitarian relief operations. In particular, social network analyses are becoming an important component in studies of criminal networks and in criminal intelligence analysis. At the same time, intelligence analyses and assessments have become a vital component of modern approaches in policing, with policy implications for crime prevention, especially in the fight against organized crime. In this study, we have a unique opportunity to examine one specific Swedish street gang with three different datasets. These datasets are the most common information sources in studies of criminal networks: intelligence, surveillance and co-offending data. We use the data sources to build networks, and compare them by computing distance, centrality, and clustering measures. This study shows the complexity factor by which different data sources about the same object of study have a fundamental impact on the results. The same individuals have different importance ranking depending on the dataset and measure. Consequently, the data source plays a vital role in grasping the complexity of the phenomenon under study. Researchers, policy makers, and practitioners should therefore pay greater attention to the biases affecting the sources of the analysis, and be cautious when drawing conclusions based on intelligence assessments and limited network data. This study contributes to strengthening social network analysis as a reliable tool for understanding and analyzing criminality and criminal networks. PMID:25775130

  18. The complexity of crime network data: a case study of its consequences for crime control and the study of networks.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Amir; Mondani, Hernan

    2015-01-01

    The field of social network analysis has received increasing attention during the past decades and has been used to tackle a variety of research questions, from prevention of sexually transmitted diseases to humanitarian relief operations. In particular, social network analyses are becoming an important component in studies of criminal networks and in criminal intelligence analysis. At the same time, intelligence analyses and assessments have become a vital component of modern approaches in policing, with policy implications for crime prevention, especially in the fight against organized crime. In this study, we have a unique opportunity to examine one specific Swedish street gang with three different datasets. These datasets are the most common information sources in studies of criminal networks: intelligence, surveillance and co-offending data. We use the data sources to build networks, and compare them by computing distance, centrality, and clustering measures. This study shows the complexity factor by which different data sources about the same object of study have a fundamental impact on the results. The same individuals have different importance ranking depending on the dataset and measure. Consequently, the data source plays a vital role in grasping the complexity of the phenomenon under study. Researchers, policy makers, and practitioners should therefore pay greater attention to the biases affecting the sources of the analysis, and be cautious when drawing conclusions based on intelligence assessments and limited network data. This study contributes to strengthening social network analysis as a reliable tool for understanding and analyzing criminality and criminal networks.

  19. The Complexity of Crime Network Data: A Case Study of Its Consequences for Crime Control and the Study of Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Amir; Mondani, Hernan

    2015-01-01

    The field of social network analysis has received increasing attention during the past decades and has been used to tackle a variety of research questions, from prevention of sexually transmitted diseases to humanitarian relief operations. In particular, social network analyses are becoming an important component in studies of criminal networks and in criminal intelligence analysis. At the same time, intelligence analyses and assessments have become a vital component of modern approaches in policing, with policy implications for crime prevention, especially in the fight against organized crime. In this study, we have a unique opportunity to examine one specific Swedish street gang with three different datasets. These datasets are the most common information sources in studies of criminal networks: intelligence, surveillance and co-offending data. We use the data sources to build networks, and compare them by computing distance, centrality, and clustering measures. This study shows the complexity factor by which different data sources about the same object of study have a fundamental impact on the results. The same individuals have different importance ranking depending on the dataset and measure. Consequently, the data source plays a vital role in grasping the complexity of the phenomenon under study. Researchers, policy makers, and practitioners should therefore pay greater attention to the biases affecting the sources of the analysis, and be cautious when drawing conclusions based on intelligence assessments and limited network data. This study contributes to strengthening social network analysis as a reliable tool for understanding and analyzing criminality and criminal networks. PMID:25775130

  20. Vulnerability analysis for complex networks using aggressive abstraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin L.

    2010-06-01

    Large, complex networks are ubiquitous in nature and society, and there is great interest in developing rigorous, scalable methods for identifying and characterizing their vulnerabilities. This paper presents an approach for analyzing the dynamics of complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler, but mathematically equivalent, representation, the required analysis is performed on the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit vulnerability-preserving, finite state abstractions, and develop efficient algorithms for computing these abstractions. We then propose a vulnerability analysis methodology which combines these finite state abstractions with formal analytics from theoretical computer science to yield a comprehensive vulnerability analysis process for networks of realworld scale and complexity. The potential of the proposed approach is illustrated with a case study involving a realistic electric power grid model and also with brief discussions of biological and social network examples.

  1. Role of dimensionality in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Samuraí; da Silva, L. R.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Deep connections are known to exist between scale-free networks and non-Gibbsian statistics. For example, typical degree distributions at the thermodynamical limit are of the form , where the q-exponential form optimizes the nonadditive entropy Sq (which, for q → 1, recovers the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy). We introduce and study here d-dimensional geographically-located networks which grow with preferential attachment involving Euclidean distances through . Revealing the connection with q-statistics, we numerically verify (for d = 1, 2, 3 and 4) that the q-exponential degree distributions exhibit, for both q and k, universal dependences on the ratio αA/d. Moreover, the q = 1 limit is rapidly achieved by increasing αA/d to infinity. PMID:27320047

  2. Vital nodes identification in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Chen, Duanbing; Ren, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Real networks exhibit heterogeneous nature with nodes playing far different roles in structure and function. To identify vital nodes is thus very significant, allowing us to control the outbreak of epidemics, to conduct advertisements for e-commercial products, to predict popular scientific publications, and so on. The vital nodes identification attracts increasing attentions from both computer science and physical societies, with algorithms ranging from simply counting the immediate neighbors to complicated machine learning and message passing approaches. In this review, we clarify the concepts and metrics, classify the problems and methods, as well as review the important progresses and describe the state of the art. Furthermore, we provide extensive empirical analyses to compare well-known methods on disparate real networks, and highlight the future directions. In spite of the emphasis on physics-rooted approaches, the unification of the language and comparison with cross-domain methods would trigger interdisciplinary solutions in the near future.

  3. Epidemic reemergence in adaptive complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Xiao, G.; Cheong, S. A.; Fu, X.; Wong, L.; Ma, S.; Cheng, T. H.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic nature of a system gives rise to dynamical features of epidemic spreading, such as oscillation and bistability. In this paper, by studying the epidemic spreading in growing networks, in which susceptible nodes may adaptively break the connections with infected ones yet avoid being isolated, we reveal a phenomenon, epidemic reemergence, where the number of infected nodes is incubated at a low level for a long time and then erupts for a short time. The process may repeat several times before the infection finally vanishes. Simulation results show that all three factors, namely the network growth, the connection breaking, and the isolation avoidance, are necessary for epidemic reemergence to happen. We present a simple theoretical analysis to explain the process of reemergence in detail. Our study may offer some useful insights, helping explain the phenomenon of repeated epidemic explosions.

  4. Complexity and fragility in ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Solé, R V; Montoya, J M

    2001-10-01

    A detailed analysis of three species-rich ecosystem food webs has shown that they display skewed distributions of connections. Such graphs of interaction are, in fact, shared by a number of biological and technological networks, which have been shown to display a very high homeostasis against random removals of nodes. Here, we analyse the responses of these ecological graphs to both random and selective perturbations (directed against the most-connected species). Our results suggest that ecological networks are very robust against random removals but can be extremely fragile when selective attacks are used. These observations have important consequences for biodiversity dynamics and conservation issues, current estimations of extinction rates and the relevance and definition of keystone species. PMID:11571051

  5. Role of dimensionality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Samuraí; da Silva, L. R.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2016-06-01

    Deep connections are known to exist between scale-free networks and non-Gibbsian statistics. For example, typical degree distributions at the thermodynamical limit are of the form , where the q-exponential form optimizes the nonadditive entropy Sq (which, for q → 1, recovers the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy). We introduce and study here d-dimensional geographically-located networks which grow with preferential attachment involving Euclidean distances through . Revealing the connection with q-statistics, we numerically verify (for d = 1, 2, 3 and 4) that the q-exponential degree distributions exhibit, for both q and k, universal dependences on the ratio αA/d. Moreover, the q = 1 limit is rapidly achieved by increasing αA/d to infinity.

  6. Does network complexity help organize Babel's library?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; González, Iván; Vidal, Gerardo; Fuentes, Miguel Angel

    2016-04-01

    In this work we show that global topological properties of co-occurrent word networks constructed from texts, seem to be the fingerprint of meaningful sentences. We observe that many statistical properties of these networks depend on the frequency of words, however, others seem to be strictly determined by the grammar. Our results suggest that seems to be a lower bound of sense that depends on the correlation between mean word connectivity and word connectivity correlation. This property, in addition to being only present in meaningful texts, and absent in, until now, not decoded texts such as the Voynich manuscript, would also be exclusive for natural languages, allowing us to discriminate between these and formal texts.

  7. Discriminating word senses with tourist walks in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Thiago C.; Amancio, Diego R.

    2013-07-01

    Patterns of topological arrangement are widely used for both animal and human brains in the learning process. Nevertheless, automatic learning techniques frequently overlook these patterns. In this paper, we apply a learning technique based on the structural organization of the data in the attribute space to the problem of discriminating the senses of 10 polysemous words. Using two types of characterization of meanings, namely semantical and topological approaches, we have observed significative accuracy rates in identifying the suitable meanings in both techniques. Most importantly, we have found that the characterization based on the deterministic tourist walk improves the disambiguation process when one compares with the discrimination achieved with traditional complex networks measurements such as assortativity and clustering coefficient. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such deterministic walk has been applied to such a kind of problem. Therefore, our finding suggests that the tourist walk characterization may be useful in other related applications.

  8. Complex networks from space-filling bearings.

    PubMed

    Kranz, J J; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional space-filling bearings are dense packings of disks that can rotate without slip. We consider the entire first family of bearings for loops of four disks and propose a hierarchical construction of their contact network. We provide analytic expressions for the clustering coefficient and degree distribution, revealing bipartite scale-free behavior with a tunable degree exponent depending on the bearing parameters. We also analyze their average shortest path and percolation properties.

  9. Resilience of complex networks to random breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Gerald; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2005-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate f{sub c}, the fraction of nodes that are randomly removed before global connectivity is lost, for networks with scale-free and bimodal degree distributions. Our results differ from the results predicted by an equation for f{sub c} proposed by Cohen et al. We discuss the reasons for this disagreement and clarify the domain for which the proposed equation is valid.

  10. Complex stock trading network among investors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2010-11-01

    We provide an empirical investigation aimed at uncovering the statistical properties of intricate stock trading networks based on the order flow data of a highly liquid stock (Shenzhen Development Bank) listed on Shenzhen Stock Exchange during the whole year of 2003. By reconstructing the limit order book, we can extract detailed information of each executed order for each trading day and demonstrate that the trade size distributions for different trading days exhibit power-law tails and that most of the estimated power-law exponents are well within the Lévy stable regime. Based on the records of order matching among investors, we can construct a stock trading network for each trading day, in which the investors are mapped into nodes and each transaction is translated as a direct edge from the seller to the buyer with the trade size as its weight. We find that all the trading networks comprise a giant component and have power-law degree distributions and disassortative architectures. In particular, the degrees are correlated with order sizes by a power-law function. By regarding the size of executed order as its fitness, the fitness model can reproduce the empirical power-law degree distribution.

  11. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.

  12. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis. PMID:27079515

  13. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.

  14. Deterministic ripple-spreading model for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Ming; Leeson, Mark S.; Hines, Evor L.; di Paolo, Ezequiel

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a deterministic complex network model, which is inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon. The motivations and main advantages of the model are the following: (i) The establishment of many real-world networks is a dynamic process, where it is often observed that the influence of a few local events spreads out through nodes, and then largely determines the final network topology. Obviously, this dynamic process involves many spatial and temporal factors. By simulating the natural ripple-spreading process, this paper reports a very natural way to set up a spatial and temporal model for such complex networks. (ii) Existing relevant network models are all stochastic models, i.e., with a given input, they cannot output a unique topology. Differently, the proposed ripple-spreading model can uniquely determine the final network topology, and at the same time, the stochastic feature of complex networks is captured by randomly initializing ripple-spreading related parameters. (iii) The proposed model can use an easily manageable number of ripple-spreading related parameters to precisely describe a network topology, which is more memory efficient when compared with traditional adjacency matrix or similar memory-expensive data structures. (iv) The ripple-spreading model has a very good potential for both extensions and applications.

  15. Exploration of Interfacial Hydration Networks of Target-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeszenői, Norbert; Bálint, Mónika; Horváth, István; van der Spoel, David; Hetényi, Csaba

    2016-01-25

    Interfacial hydration strongly influences interactions between biomolecules. For example, drug-target complexes are often stabilized by hydration networks formed between hydrophilic residues and water molecules at the interface. Exhaustive exploration of hydration networks is challenging for experimental as well as theoretical methods due to high mobility of participating water molecules. In the present study, we introduced a tool for determination of the complete, void-free hydration structures of molecular interfaces. The tool was applied to 31 complexes including histone proteins, a HIV-1 protease, a G-protein-signaling modulator, and peptide ligands of various lengths. The complexes contained 344 experimentally determined water positions used for validation, and excellent agreement with these was obtained. High-level cooperation between interfacial water molecules was detected by a new approach based on the decomposition of hydration networks into static and dynamic network regions (subnets). Besides providing hydration structures at the atomic level, our results uncovered hitherto hidden networking fundaments of integrity and stability of complex biomolecular interfaces filling an important gap in the toolkit of drug design and structural biochemistry. The presence of continuous, static regions of the interfacial hydration network was found necessary also for stable complexes of histone proteins participating in chromatin assembly and epigenetic regulation.

  16. Using Neural Networks to Describe Complex Phase Transformation Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1999-05-24

    Final microstructures can often be the end result of a complex sequence of phase transformations. Fundamental analyses may be used to model various stages of the overall behavior but they are often impractical or cumbersome when considering multicomponent systems covering a wide range of compositions. Neural network analysis may be a useful alternative method of identifying and describing phase transformation beavior. A neural network model for ferrite prediction in stainless steel welds is described. It is shown that the neural network analysis provides valuable information that accounts for alloying element interactions. It is suggested that neural network analysis may be extremely useful for analysis when more fundamental approaches are unavailable or overly burdensome.

  17. Complex Network for a Crisis Contagion on AN Interbank System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Mariano

    2012-09-01

    The main focus of this research is the contagion of a financial crisis on an interbank debt network. In order to simulate the crisis propagation a weighted community complex network based on growth strategy has been created. The contagion is described by a new way of disease propagation perspective based on the concept of a financial virus. The model reproduces the existence of TBTF banks and shows the impact that an initial TBTF bank crash produces in the interbank network depending on the magnitude of the initial crash and on the resistance that the network offers against the contagion propagation.

  18. Temporal properties of dynamic processes on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turalska, Malgorzata A.

    Many social, biological and technological systems can be viewed as complex networks with a large number of interacting components. However despite recent advancements in network theory, a satisfactory description of dynamic processes arising in such cooperative systems is a subject of ongoing research. In this dissertation the emergence of dynamical complexity in networks of interacting stochastic oscillators is investigated. In particular I demonstrate that networks of two and three state stochastic oscillators present a second-order phase transition with respect to the strength of coupling between individual units. I show that at the critical point fluctuations of the global order parameter are characterized by an inverse-power law distribution and I assess their renewal properties. Additionally, I study the effect that different types of perturbation have on dynamical properties of the model. I discuss the relevance of those observations for the transmission of information between complex systems.

  19. Evaluating the importance of nodes in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Xiong, Qingyu; Shi, Weiren; Shi, Xin; Wang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Evaluating the importance of nodes for complex networks is of great significance to the research of survivability and robusticity of networks. This paper proposes an effective ranking method based on degree value and the importance of lines. It can well identify the importance of bridge nodes with lower computational complexity. Firstly, the properties of nodes that are connected to a line are used to compute the importance of the line. Then, the contribution of nodes to the importance of lines is calculated. Finally, degree of nodes and the contribution of nodes to the importance of lines are considered to rank the importance of nodes. Five real networks are used as test data. The experimental results show that our method can effectively evaluate the importance of nodes for complex networks.

  20. Pattern formation in oscillatory complex networks consisting of excitable nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xuhong; Xia, Qinzhi; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Lisheng; Hu, Gang; Mi, Yuanyuan

    2011-05-01

    Oscillatory dynamics of complex networks has recently attracted great attention. In this paper we study pattern formation in oscillatory complex networks consisting of excitable nodes. We find that there exist a few center nodes and small skeletons for most oscillations. Complicated and seemingly random oscillatory patterns can be viewed as well-organized target waves propagating from center nodes along the shortest paths, and the shortest loops passing through both the center nodes and their driver nodes play the role of oscillation sources. Analyzing simple skeletons we are able to understand and predict various essential properties of the oscillations and effectively modulate the oscillations. These methods and results will give insights into pattern formation in complex networks and provide suggestive ideas for studying and controlling oscillations in neural networks.

  1. Radial basis function networks and complexity regularization in function learning.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we apply the method of complexity regularization to derive estimation bounds for nonlinear function estimation using a single hidden layer radial basis function network. Our approach differs from previous complexity regularization neural-network function learning schemes in that we operate with random covering numbers and l(1) metric entropy, making it possible to consider much broader families of activation functions, namely functions of bounded variation. Some constraints previously imposed on the network parameters are also eliminated this way. The network is trained by means of complexity regularization involving empirical risk minimization. Bounds on the expected risk in terms of the sample size are obtained for a large class of loss functions. Rates of convergence to the optimal loss are also derived.

  2. Using mapping entropy to identify node centrality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Tingyuan; Guo, Zheng; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The problem of finding the best strategy to attack a network or immunize a population with a minimal number of nodes has attracted much current research interest. The assessment of node importance has been a fundamental issue in the research of complex networks. In this paper, we propose a new concept called mapping entropy (ME) to identify the importance of a node in the complex network. The concept is established according to the local information which considers the correlation among all neighbors of a node. We evaluate the efficiency of the centrality by static and dynamic attacks on standard network models and real-world networks. The simulation result shows that the new centrality is more efficient than traditional attack strategies, whether it is static or dynamic.

  3. Adaptive clustering algorithm for community detection in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhenqing; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Community structure is common in various real-world networks; methods or algorithms for detecting such communities in complex networks have attracted great attention in recent years. We introduced a different adaptive clustering algorithm capable of extracting modules from complex networks with considerable accuracy and robustness. In this approach, each node in a network acts as an autonomous agent demonstrating flocking behavior where vertices always travel toward their preferable neighboring groups. An optimal modular structure can emerge from a collection of these active nodes during a self-organization process where vertices constantly regroup. In addition, we show that our algorithm appears advantageous over other competing methods (e.g., the Newman-fast algorithm) through intensive evaluation. The applications in three real-world networks demonstrate the superiority of our algorithm to find communities that are parallel with the appropriate organization in reality. PMID:18999501

  4. Modeling the propagation of mobile malware on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanping; Liu, Chao; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Yihao; Wei, Zuxue

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the spreading behavior of malware across mobile devices is addressed. By introducing complex networks to model mobile networks, which follows the power-law degree distribution, a novel epidemic model for mobile malware propagation is proposed. The spreading threshold that guarantees the dynamics of the model is calculated. Theoretically, the asymptotic stability of the malware-free equilibrium is confirmed when the threshold is below the unity, and the global stability is further proved under some sufficient conditions. The influences of different model parameters as well as the network topology on malware propagation are also analyzed. Our theoretical studies and numerical simulations show that networks with higher heterogeneity conduce to the diffusion of malware, and complex networks with lower power-law exponents benefit malware spreading.

  5. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Grant C; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-03-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: 'local scale' competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies.

  6. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Grant C.; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: ‘local scale’ competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies. PMID:23339246

  7. Unified functional network and nonlinear time series analysis for complex systems science: The pyunicorn package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, Jonathan; Heitzig, Jobst; Beronov, Boyan; Wiedermann, Marc; Runge, Jakob; Feng, Qing Yi; Tupikina, Liubov; Stolbova, Veronika; Donner, Reik; Marwan, Norbert; Dijkstra, Henk; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the pyunicorn (Pythonic unified complex network and recurrence analysis toolbox) open source software package for applying and combining modern methods of data analysis and modeling from complex network theory and nonlinear time series analysis. pyunicorn is a fully object-oriented and easily parallelizable package written in the language Python. It allows for the construction of functional networks such as climate networks in climatology or functional brain networks in neuroscience representing the structure of statistical interrelationships in large data sets of time series and, subsequently, investigating this structure using advanced methods of complex network theory such as measures and models for spatial networks, networks of interacting networks, node-weighted statistics, or network surrogates. Additionally, pyunicorn provides insights into the nonlinear dynamics of complex systems as recorded in uni- and multivariate time series from a non-traditional perspective by means of recurrence quantification analysis, recurrence networks, visibility graphs, and construction of surrogate time series. The range of possible applications of the library is outlined, drawing on several examples mainly from the field of climatology. pyunicorn is available online at https://github.com/pik-copan/pyunicorn. Reference: J.F. Donges, J. Heitzig, B. Beronov, M. Wiedermann, J. Runge, Q.-Y. Feng, L. Tupikina, V. Stolbova, R.V. Donner, N. Marwan, H.A. Dijkstra, and J. Kurths, Unified functional network and nonlinear time series analysis for complex systems science: The pyunicorn package, Chaos 25, 113101 (2015), DOI: 10.1063/1.4934554, Preprint: arxiv.org:1507.01571 [physics.data-an].

  8. Complex networks as an emerging property of hierarchical preferential attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Allard, Antoine; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J.

    2015-12-01

    Real complex systems are not rigidly structured; no clear rules or blueprints exist for their construction. Yet, amidst their apparent randomness, complex structural properties universally emerge. We propose that an important class of complex systems can be modeled as an organization of many embedded levels (potentially infinite in number), all of them following the same universal growth principle known as preferential attachment. We give examples of such hierarchy in real systems, for instance, in the pyramid of production entities of the film industry. More importantly, we show how real complex networks can be interpreted as a projection of our model, from which their scale independence, their clustering, their hierarchy, their fractality, and their navigability naturally emerge. Our results suggest that complex networks, viewed as growing systems, can be quite simple, and that the apparent complexity of their structure is largely a reflection of their unobserved hierarchical nature.

  9. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  10. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks.

    PubMed

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  11. Transittability of complex networks and its applications to regulatory biomolecular networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Xiang; Wu, Lin; Wang, Jianxin; Liu, Juan; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    We have often observed unexpected state transitions of complex systems. We are thus interested in how to steer a complex system from an unexpected state to a desired state. Here we introduce the concept of transittability of complex networks, and derive a new sufficient and necessary condition for state transittability which can be efficiently verified. We define the steering kernel as a minimal set of steering nodes to which control signals must directly be applied for transition between two specific states of a network, and propose a graph-theoretic algorithm to identify the steering kernel of a network for transition between two specific states. We applied our algorithm to 27 real complex networks, finding that sizes of steering kernels required for transittability are much less than those for complete controllability. Furthermore, applications to regulatory biomolecular networks not only validated our method but also identified the steering kernel for their phenotype transitions.

  12. Transittability of complex networks and its applications to regulatory biomolecular networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang-Xiang; Wu, Lin; Wang, Jianxin; Liu, Juan; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    We have often observed unexpected state transitions of complex systems. We are thus interested in how to steer a complex system from an unexpected state to a desired state. Here we introduce the concept of transittability of complex networks, and derive a new sufficient and necessary condition for state transittability which can be efficiently verified. We define the steering kernel as a minimal set of steering nodes to which control signals must directly be applied for transition between two specific states of a network, and propose a graph-theoretic algorithm to identify the steering kernel of a network for transition between two specific states. We applied our algorithm to 27 real complex networks, finding that sizes of steering kernels required for transittability are much less than those for complete controllability. Furthermore, applications to regulatory biomolecular networks not only validated our method but also identified the steering kernel for their phenotype transitions. PMID:24769565

  13. Combining complex networks and data mining: Why and how

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, M.; Papo, D.; Sousa, P. A.; Menasalvas, E.; Nicchi, A.; Kubik, E.; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-05-01

    The increasing power of computer technology does not dispense with the need to extract meaningful information out of data sets of ever growing size, and indeed typically exacerbates the complexity of this task. To tackle this general problem, two methods have emerged, at chronologically different times, that are now commonly used in the scientific community: data mining and complex network theory. Not only do complex network analysis and data mining share the same general goal, that of extracting information from complex systems to ultimately create a new compact quantifiable representation, but they also often address similar problems too. In the face of that, a surprisingly low number of researchers turn out to resort to both methodologies. One may then be tempted to conclude that these two fields are either largely redundant or totally antithetic. The starting point of this review is that this state of affairs should be put down to contingent rather than conceptual differences, and that these two fields can in fact advantageously be used in a synergistic manner. An overview of both fields is first provided, some fundamental concepts of which are illustrated. A variety of contexts in which complex network theory and data mining have been used in a synergistic manner are then presented. Contexts in which the appropriate integration of complex network metrics can lead to improved classification rates with respect to classical data mining algorithms and, conversely, contexts in which data mining can be used to tackle important issues in complex network theory applications are illustrated. Finally, ways to achieve a tighter integration between complex networks and data mining, and open lines of research are discussed.

  14. Local modularity for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Tao; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Ke; Li, Jian-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Ke; Liu, Cui-Cui; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-01

    Community detection is a topic of interest in the study of complex networks such as the protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks. In recent years, various methods were proposed to detect community structures of the networks. Here, a kind of local modularity with tunable parameter is derived from the Newman-Girvan modularity by a special self-loop strategy that depends on the community division of the networks. By the self-loop strategy, one can easily control the definition of modularity, and the resulting modularity can be optimized by using the existing modularity optimization algorithms. The local modularity is used as the target function for community detection, and a self-consistent method is proposed for the optimization of the local modularity. We analyze the behaviors of the local modularity and show the validity of the local modularity in detecting community structures on various networks.

  15. Reconstruction of complex cracks by exterior measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutitskii, Pavel; Liu, Jijun; Sini, Mourad

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we deal with the acoustic inverse scattering problem for reconstructing complex cracks from the far field map, which models the diffraction of waves by thin two-sided cylindrical screens. A complex crack is characterized by its shape, the type of boundary data and the boundary coefficients (surface impedance). We give explicit formulas which can be used to reconstruct the shape of the crack, distinguish its type of boundary conditions and reconstruct the possible material coefficients on it by using the far-field map. Some numerical examples are also presented. Similar results could be given using near field measurements.

  16. COMPLEX NETWORKS IN CLIMATE SCIENCE: PROGRESS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K; Chawla, Nitesh; Ganguly, Auroop R

    2010-01-01

    Networks have been used to describe and model a wide range of complex systems, both natural as well as man-made. One particularly interesting application in the earth sciences is the use of complex networks to represent and study the global climate system. In this paper, we motivate this general approach, explain the basic methodology, report on the state of the art (including our contributions), and outline open questions and opportunities for future research. Datasets and systems that can be represented as interaction networks (or graphs), broadly defined as any collection of interrelated objects or entities, have received considerable attention both from a theoretical viewpoint as well as various application domains; examples include the analysis of social networks, chemical interactions between proteins, the behavior of financial markets, and many others. Recently, the study of complex networks - that is, networks which exhibit non-trivial topological properties - has permeated numerous fields and disciplines spanning the physical, social, and computational sciences. So why do networks enjoy such broad appeal? Briefly, it is their ability to serve at once as a data representation, as an analysis framework, and as a visualization tool. The analytic capabilities in particular are quite powerful, as networks can uncover structure and patterns at multiple scales, ranging from local properties to global phenomena, and thus help better understand the characteristics of complex systems. We focus on one particular application of networks in the earth sciences, namely, the construction and analysis of climate networks. Identifying and analyzing patterns in global climate is an important task of growing scientific, social, and political interest, with the goal of deepening our understanding of the complex processes underlying observed phenomena. To this end, we make the case that complex networks offer a compelling perspective for capturing the dynamics of the climate

  17. Landmine detection and classification with complex-valued hybrid neural network using scattering parameters dataset.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chung; Bose, N K

    2005-05-01

    Neural networks have been applied to landmine detection from data generated by different kinds of sensors. Real-valued neural networks have been used for detecting landmines from scattering parameters measured by ground penetrating radar (GPR) after disregarding phase information. This paper presents results using complex-valued neural networks, capable of phase-sensitive detection followed by classification. A two-layer hybrid neural network structure incorporating both supervised and unsupervised learning is proposed to detect and then classify the types of landmines. Tests are also reported on a benchmark data. PMID:15941001

  18. Efficiency of attack strategies on complex model and real-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingeri, Michele; Cassi, Davide; Vincenzi, Simone

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the efficiency of attack strategies to network nodes when targeting several complex model and real-world networks. We tested 5 attack strategies, 3 of which were introduced in this work for the first time, to attack 3 model networks (Erdos and Renyi, Barabasi and Albert preferential attachment network, and scale-free network configuration models) and 3 real networks (Gnutella peer-to-peer network, email network of the University of Rovira i Virgili, and immunoglobulin interaction network). Nodes were removed sequentially according to the importance criterion defined by the attack strategy, and we used the size of the largest connected component (LCC) as a measure of network damage. We found that the efficiency of attack strategies (fraction of nodes to be deleted for a given reduction of LCC size) depends on the topology of the network, although attacks based on either the number of connections of a node or betweenness centrality were often the most efficient strategies. Sequential deletion of nodes in decreasing order of betweenness centrality was the most efficient attack strategy when targeting real-world networks. The relative efficiency of attack strategies often changed during the sequential removal of nodes, especially for networks with power-law degree distribution.

  19. Phase transition of light on complex quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Halu, Arda; Garnerone, Silvano; Vezzani, Alessandro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in quantum optics and atomic physics allow for an unprecedented level of control over light-matter interactions, which can be exploited to investigate new physical phenomena. In this work we are interested in the role played by the topology of quantum networks describing coupled optical cavities and local atomic degrees of freedom. In particular, using a mean-field approximation, we study the phase diagram of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model on complex networks topologies, and we characterize the transition between a Mott-like phase of localized polaritons and a superfluid phase. We found that, for complex topologies, the phase diagram is nontrivial and well defined in the thermodynamic limit only if the hopping coefficient scales like the inverse of the maximal eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix of the network. Furthermore we provide numerical evidences that, for some complex network topologies, this scaling implies an asymptotically vanishing hopping coefficient in the limit of large network sizes. The latter result suggests the interesting possibility of observing quantum phase transitions of light on complex quantum networks even with very small couplings between the optical cavities.

  20. Unveiling the hidden structure of complex stochastic biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, Angelo; Li, Xin; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2014-02-01

    Complex Markov models are widely used and powerful predictive tools to analyze stochastic biochemical processes. However, when the network of states is unknown, it is necessary to extract information from the data to partially build the network and estimate the values of the rates. The short-time behavior of the first-passage time distributions between two states in linear chains has been shown recently to behave as a power of time with an exponent equal to the number of intermediate states. For a general Markov model we derive the complete Taylor expansion of the first-passage time distribution between two arbitrary states. By combining algebraic methods and graph theory approaches it is shown that the first term of the Taylor expansion is determined by the shortest path from the initial state to the final state. When this path is unique, we prove that the coefficient of the first term can be written in terms of the product of the transition rates along the path. It is argued that the application of our results to first-return times may be used to estimate the dependence of rates on external parameters in experimentally measured time distributions.

  1. Psychometric Measurement Models and Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sese, Albert; Palmer, Alfonso L.; Montano, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of measurement models in psychometrics by means of dimensionality reduction techniques such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is a very common practice. In recent times, an upsurge of interest in the study of artificial neural networks apt to computing a principal component extraction has been observed. Despite this interest, the…

  2. Complex interdependent supply chain networks: Cascading failure and robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Jing, Ke; He, Jie; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-02-01

    A supply chain network is a typical interdependent network composed of an undirected cyber-layer network and a directed physical-layer network. To analyze the robustness of this complex interdependent supply chain network when it suffers from disruption events that can cause nodes to fail, we use a cascading failure process that focuses on load propagation. We consider load propagation via connectivity links as node failure spreads through one layer of an interdependent network, and we develop a priority redistribution strategy for failed loads subject to flow constraint. Using a giant component function and a one-to-one directed interdependence relation between nodes in a cyber-layer network and physical-layer network, we construct time-varied functional equations to quantify the dynamic process of failed loads propagation in an interdependent network. Finally, we conduct a numerical simulation for two cases, i.e., single node removal and multiple node removal at the initial disruption. The simulation results show that when we increase the number of removed nodes in an interdependent supply chain network its robustness undergoes a first-order discontinuous phase transition, and that even removing a small number of nodes will cause it to crash.

  3. Synchronization in complex oscillator networks and smart grids.

    PubMed

    Dörfler, Florian; Chertkov, Michael; Bullo, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A widely adopted model of a coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous phase oscillators, a graph describing the interaction among them, and diffusive and sinusoidal coupling. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here, we present a unique, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, nonequilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters; they are statistically correct for almost all networks; and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks, such as electrical power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex network scenarios and in smart grid applications.

  4. Synchronization in complex oscillator networks and smart grids

    PubMed Central

    Dörfler, Florian; Chertkov, Michael; Bullo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A widely adopted model of a coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous phase oscillators, a graph describing the interaction among them, and diffusive and sinusoidal coupling. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here, we present a unique, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, nonequilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters; they are statistically correct for almost all networks; and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks, such as electrical power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex network scenarios and in smart grid applications. PMID:23319658

  5. Synchronization in Complex Oscillator Networks and Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfler, Florian; Chertkov, Michael; Bullo, Francesco

    2012-07-24

    The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among them. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here we present a novel, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, non-equilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters, or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters, they are statistically correct for almost all networks, and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks such as electric power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex networks scenarios and in smart grid applications.

  6. Theory of rumour spreading in complex social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekovee, M.; Moreno, Y.; Bianconi, G.; Marsili, M.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a general stochastic model for the spread of rumours, and derive mean-field equations that describe the dynamics of the model on complex social networks (in particular, those mediated by the Internet). We use analytical and numerical solutions of these equations to examine the threshold behaviour and dynamics of the model on several models of such networks: random graphs, uncorrelated scale-free networks and scale-free networks with assortative degree correlations. We show that in both homogeneous networks and random graphs the model exhibits a critical threshold in the rumour spreading rate below which a rumour cannot propagate in the system. In the case of scale-free networks, on the other hand, this threshold becomes vanishingly small in the limit of infinite system size. We find that the initial rate at which a rumour spreads is much higher in scale-free networks than in random graphs, and that the rate at which the spreading proceeds on scale-free networks is further increased when assortative degree correlations are introduced. The impact of degree correlations on the final fraction of nodes that ever hears a rumour, however, depends on the interplay between network topology and the rumour spreading rate. Our results show that scale-free social networks are prone to the spreading of rumours, just as they are to the spreading of infections. They are relevant to the spreading dynamics of chain emails, viral advertising and large-scale information dissemination algorithms on the Internet.

  7. Effective centrality and explosive synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, A.; Villacorta-Atienza, J. A.; Leyva, I.; Almendral, J. A.; Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Boccaletti, S.

    2015-12-01

    Synchronization of networked oscillators is known to depend fundamentally on the interplay between the dynamics of the graph's units and the microscopic arrangement of the network's structure. We here propose an effective network whose topological properties reflect the interplay between the topology and dynamics of the original network. On that basis, we are able to introduce the effective centrality, a measure that quantifies the role and importance of each network's node in the synchronization process. In particular, in the context of explosive synchronization, we use such a measure to assess the propensity of a graph to sustain an irreversible transition to synchronization. We furthermore discuss a strategy to induce the explosive behavior in a generic network, by acting only upon a fraction of its nodes.

  8. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  9. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  10. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  11. Baboon (Papio anubis) social complexity--a network approach.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Julia; Ross, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    Although many studies have analyzed the causes and consequences of social relationships, few studies have explicitly assessed how measures of social relationships are affected by the choice of behaviors used to quantify them. The use of many behaviors to measure social relationships in primates has long been advocated, but it was analytically difficult to implement this framework into primatological work. However, recent advances in social network analysis (SNA) now allow the comparison of multiple networks created from different behaviors. Here we use our database of baboon social behavior (Papio anubis, Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria) to investigate (i) to what extent social networks created from different behaviors overlap, (ii) to what extent individuals occupy similar social positions in these networks and (iii) how sex affects social network position in this population of baboons. We used data on grooming, aggression, displacement, mounting and presenting, which were collected over a 15-month period. We calculated network parameters separately for each behavior. Networks based on displacement, mounting and presenting were very similar to each other, whereas grooming and aggression networks differed both from each other and from mounting, displacement and presenting networks. Overall, individual network positions were strongly affected by sex. Individuals central in one network tended to be central in most other networks as well, whereas other measures such as clustering coefficient were found to vary depending on the behavior analyzed. Thus, our results suggest that a baboon's social environment is best described by a multiplex network based on affiliative, aggressive and sexual behavior. Modern SNA provides a number of useful tools that will help us to better understand animals' social environment. We also discuss potential caveats related to their use.

  12. Complex network theory, streamflow, and hydrometric monitoring system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, M. J.; Fleming, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Network theory is applied to an array of streamflow gauges located in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia (BC) and Yukon, Canada. The goal of the analysis is to assess whether insights from this branch of mathematical graph theory can be meaningfully applied to hydrometric data, and, more specifically, whether it may help guide decisions concerning stream gauge placement so that the full complexity of the regional hydrology is efficiently captured. The streamflow data, when represented as a complex network, have a global clustering coefficient and average shortest path length consistent with small-world networks, which are a class of stable and efficient networks common in nature, but the observed degree distribution did not clearly indicate a scale-free network. Stability helps ensure that the network is robust to the loss of nodes; in the context of a streamflow network, stability is interpreted as insensitivity to station removal at random. Community structure is also evident in the streamflow network. A network theoretic community detection algorithm identified separate communities, each of which appears to be defined by the combination of its median seasonal flow regime (pluvial, nival, hybrid, or glacial, which in this region in turn mainly reflects basin elevation) and geographic proximity to other communities (reflecting shared or different daily meteorological forcing). Furthermore, betweenness analyses suggest a handful of key stations which serve as bridges between communities and might be highly valued. We propose that an idealized sampling network should sample high-betweenness stations, small-membership communities which are by definition rare or undersampled relative to other communities, and index stations having large numbers of intracommunity links, while retaining some degree of redundancy to maintain network robustness.

  13. Renormalization Group for Critical Phenomena in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, S.; Brunson, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of statistical models on a novel class of complex “Hanoi” networks. Such modeling is often the cornerstone for the understanding of many dynamical processes in complex networks. Hanoi networks are special because they integrate small-world hierarchies common to many social and economical structures with the inevitable geometry of the real world these structures exist in. In addition, their design allows exact results to be obtained with the venerable renormalization group (RG). Our treatment will provide a detailed, pedagogical introduction to RG. In particular, we will study the Ising model with RG, for which the fixed points are determined and the RG flow is analyzed. We show that the small-world bonds result in non-universal behavior. It is shown that a diversity of different behaviors can be observed with seemingly small changes in the structure of hierarchical networks generally, and we provide a general theory to describe our findings. PMID:22194725

  14. Dynamics of Social Complex Networks: Some Insights into Recent Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Sergi

    Social networks analysis (that is, the study of interactions among social actors from a structural viewpoint) has a long tradition covering several decades [1, 2, 3]. This sort of study has usually been performed over small social networks, and the limitation of size has conditioned the visibility of complexity [4, 5]. However, the situation has changed significantly in recent times due to basically two reasons. First, there is an increasing availability of larger social datasets (obtained in most cases from information and communication technologies). Secondly, a large number of physicists and other scholars from complexity science have started to take active interest in the field. New perspectives and tools have been provided by these ‘newcomers’, which in combination with the expertise and knowledge accumulated by ‘classical’ social network analysts, has formed the basis of a multidisciplinary field suitably termed the science of networks [6, 7].

  15. Improved efficient routing strategy on two-layer complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Han, Weizhan; Guo, Qing; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Junfang; Wang, Zhihao

    2016-10-01

    The traffic dynamics of multi-layer networks has become a hot research topic since many networks are comprised of two or more layers of subnetworks. Due to its low traffic capacity, the traditional shortest path routing (SPR) protocol is susceptible to congestion on two-layer complex networks. In this paper, we propose an efficient routing strategy named improved global awareness routing (IGAR) strategy which is based on the betweenness centrality of nodes in the two layers. With the proposed strategy, the routing paths can bypass hub nodes of both layers to enhance the transport efficiency. Simulation results show that the IGAR strategy can bring much better traffic capacity than the SPR and the global awareness routing (GAR) strategies. Because of the significantly improved traffic performance, this study is helpful to alleviate congestion of the two-layer complex networks.

  16. Complex networks in the Euclidean space of communicability distances.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2012-06-01

    We study the properties of complex networks embedded in a Euclidean space of communicability distances. The communicability distance between two nodes is defined as the difference between the weighted sum of walks self-returning to the nodes and the weighted sum of walks going from one node to the other. We give some indications that the communicability distance identifies the least crowded routes in networks where simultaneous submission of packages is taking place. We define an index Q based on communicability and shortest path distances, which allows reinterpreting the "small-world" phenomenon as the region of minimum Q in the Watts-Strogatz model. It also allows the classification and analysis of networks with different efficiency of spatial uses. Consequently, the communicability distance displays unique features for the analysis of complex networks in different scenarios.

  17. Optimal navigation for characterizing the role of the nodes in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we explore how the approach of optimal navigation (Cajueiro (2009) [33]) can be used to evaluate the centrality of a node and to characterize its role in a network. Using the subway network of Boston and the London rapid transit rail as proxies for complex networks, we show that the centrality measures inherited from the approach of optimal navigation may be considered if one desires to evaluate the centrality of the nodes using other pieces of information beyond the geometric properties of the network. Furthermore, evaluating the correlations between these inherited measures and classical measures of centralities such as the degree of a node and the characteristic path length of a node, we have found two classes of results. While for the London rapid transit rail, these inherited measures can be easily explained by these classical measures of centrality, for the Boston underground transportation system we have found nontrivial results.

  18. Complex weak values in quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsa, Richard

    2007-10-15

    In the weak value formalism of Aharonov et al., the weak value A{sub w} of any observable A is generally a complex number. We derive a physical interpretation of its value in terms of the shift in the measurement pointer's mean position and mean momentum. In particular, we show that the mean position shift contains a term jointly proportional to the imaginary part of the weak value and the rate at which the pointer is spreading in space as it enters the measurement interaction.

  19. Inference, simulation, modeling, and analysis of complex networks, with special emphasis on complex networks in systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Claire Petra

    Across diverse fields ranging from physics to biology, sociology, and economics, the technological advances of the past decade have engendered an unprecedented explosion of data on highly complex systems with thousands, if not millions of interacting components. These systems exist at many scales of size and complexity, and it is becoming ever-more apparent that they are, in fact, universal, arising in every field of study. Moreover, they share fundamental properties---chief among these, that the individual interactions of their constituent parts may be well-understood, but the characteristic behaviour produced by the confluence of these interactions---by these complex networks---is unpredictable; in a nutshell, the whole is more than the sum of its parts. There is, perhaps, no better illustration of this concept than the discoveries being made regarding complex networks in the biological sciences. In particular, though the sequencing of the human genome in 2003 was a remarkable feat, scientists understand that the "cellular-level blueprints" for the human being are cellular-level parts lists, but they say nothing (explicitly) about cellular-level processes. The challenge of modern molecular biology is to understand these processes in terms of the networks of parts---in terms of the interactions among proteins, enzymes, genes, and metabolites---as it is these processes that ultimately differentiate animate from inanimate, giving rise to life! It is the goal of systems biology---an umbrella field encapsulating everything from molecular biology to epidemiology in social systems---to understand processes in terms of fundamental networks of core biological parts, be they proteins or people. By virtue of the fact that there are literally countless complex systems, not to mention tools and techniques used to infer, simulate, analyze, and model these systems, it is impossible to give a truly comprehensive account of the history and study of complex systems. The author

  20. Topological interactive analysis of power system and its communication module: A complex network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Yu, Jie; Cao, Jinde; Ni, Ming; Yu, Wenjie

    2014-12-01

    Power system and its communication system, which can be called a cyber-physical system, are interconnected and interdependent on each other. This paper considers the interaction problem between power system and its communication module from the perspective of the topological structure. Firstly, some structural properties and centrality measures of complex networks are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, novel interactive measures are proposed to describe the interactive system in terms of topologies. Finally, based on these metrics, the statistical properties and the interactive relationships of the main power system and its communication module (abstracted as two complex heterogeneous networks) of one province in China are investigated.

  1. Distance measures for dynamic citation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommarito, Michael J.; Katz, Daniel Martin; Zelner, Jonathan L.; Fowler, James H.

    2010-10-01

    Acyclic digraphs arise in many natural and artificial processes. Among the broader set, dynamic citation networks represent an important type of acyclic digraph. For example, the study of such networks includes the spread of ideas through academic citations, the spread of innovation through patent citations, and the development of precedent in common law systems. The specific dynamics that produce such acyclic digraphs not only differentiate them from other classes of graphs, but also provide guidance for the development of meaningful distance measures. In this article, we develop and apply our sink distance measure together with the single-linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm to both a two-dimensional directed preferential attachment model as well as empirical data drawn from the first quarter-century of decisions of the United States Supreme Court. Despite applying the simplest combination of distance measure and clustering algorithm, analysis reveals that more accurate and more interpretable clusterings are produced by this scheme.

  2. Opinion Dynamics on Complex Networks with Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru; Chi, Li-Ping

    2008-04-01

    The Ising or Potts models of ferromagnetism have been widely used to describe locally interacting social or economic systems. We consider a related model, introduced by Sznajd to describe the evolution of consensus in the scale-free networks with the tunable strength (noted by Q) of community structure. In the Sznajd model, the opinion or state of any spins can only be changed by the influence of neighbouring pairs of similar connection spins. Such pairs can polarize their neighbours. Using asynchronous updating, it is found that the smaller the community strength Q, the larger the slope of the exponential relaxation time distribution. Then the effect of the initial up- spin concentration p as a function of the final all up probability E is investigated by taking different initialization strategies, the random node-chosen initialization strategy has no difference under different community strengths, while the strategies of community node-chosen initialization and hub node-chosen initialization are different in final probability under different Q, and the latter one is more effective in reaching final state.

  3. A weighted small world network measure for assessing functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Marcos; Bernat, Edward M; He, Bin; Aviyente, Selin

    2013-01-15

    There is a growing need to develop measures that can characterize complex patterns of functional connectivity among brain regions. Graph theoretic measures have emerged as an important way to characterize the multivariate connectivity between nodes in a network, which have been successfully applied to neurophysiologic activity. In this paper, we propose a new small-world measure based on advances in both the bivariate measures underlying the graph theoretic approach, as well as in the definition of the measure for weighted graphs. Specifically, we recently proposed a new bivariate time-frequency phase-synchrony (TFPS) measure, which quantifies the dynamic nature of the interactions between neuronal oscillations with a higher time-frequency resolution than previous approaches and is better at isolating relevant activity. The proposed graph theoretic measures, weighted clustering coefficient and path length, represent a new approach to the calculation of weighted graph measures based on this improved bivariate TFPS measure. The new graph theoretic measures are applied to two datasets. The first is a well-known social network, Zachary's Karate Club. The second application contains event-related potential (ERP) indexing the well-known error-related negativity (ERN) component related to cognitive control. Results indicate that the new measures outperform the previously published weighted graph measures, and produces expectable results for both applications.

  4. Mesocopic comparison of complex networks based on periodic orbits.

    PubMed

    Stoop, R; Joller, J

    2011-03-01

    Complex noiseless dynamical systems can be represented in a compressed manner by unstable periodic orbits. It is unknown, however, how to use this technique to obtain a suitable notion of similarity among them, how to extend such an approach to more general complex networks, and how to apply such a method in the important case of noisy systems. Our approach provides a solution to these questions. For a proof-of-concept, we consider Drosophila's precopulatory courtship, where our method reveals the existence of a complex grammar (similar to those found in complex physical systems and in language), leading to the conclusion that the observed grammar is very unlikely the product of chance.

  5. Mesocopic comparison of complex networks based on periodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, R.; Joller, J.

    2011-03-01

    Complex noiseless dynamical systems can be represented in a compressed manner by unstable periodic orbits. It is unknown, however, how to use this technique to obtain a suitable notion of similarity among them, how to extend such an approach to more general complex networks, and how to apply such a method in the important case of noisy systems. Our approach provides a solution to these questions. For a proof-of-concept, we consider Drosophila's precopulatory courtship, where our method reveals the existence of a complex grammar (similar to those found in complex physical systems and in language), leading to the conclusion that the observed grammar is very unlikely the product of chance.

  6. Complex networks with scale-free nature and hierarchical modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Ambika, G.

    2015-09-01

    Generative mechanisms which lead to empirically observed structure of networked systems from diverse fields like biology, technology and social sciences form a very important part of study of complex networks. The structure of many networked systems like biological cell, human society and World Wide Web markedly deviate from that of completely random networks indicating the presence of underlying processes. Often the main process involved in their evolution is the addition of links between existing nodes having a common neighbor. In this context we introduce an important property of the nodes, which we call mediating capacity, that is generic to many networks. This capacity decreases rapidly with increase in degree, making hubs weak mediators of the process. We show that this property of nodes provides an explanation for the simultaneous occurrence of the observed scale-free structure and hierarchical modularity in many networked systems. This also explains the high clustering and small-path length seen in real networks as well as non-zero degree-correlations. Our study also provides insight into the local process which ultimately leads to emergence of preferential attachment and hence is also important in understanding robustness and control of real networks as well as processes happening on real networks.

  7. Power-Hop: A Pervasive Observation for Real Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Papalexakis, Evangelos; Hooi, Bryan; Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been shown to exhibit universal properties, with one of the most consistent patterns being the scale-free degree distribution, but are there regularities obeyed by the r-hop neighborhood in real networks? We answer this question by identifying another power-law pattern that describes the relationship between the fractions of node pairs C(r) within r hops and the hop count r. This scale-free distribution is pervasive and describes a large variety of networks, ranging from social and urban to technological and biological networks. In particular, inspired by the definition of the fractal correlation dimension D2 on a point-set, we consider the hop-count r to be the underlying distance metric between two vertices of the network, and we examine the scaling of C(r) with r. We find that this relationship follows a power-law in real networks within the range 2 ≤ r ≤ d, where d is the effective diameter of the network, that is, the 90-th percentile distance. We term this relationship as power-hop and the corresponding power-law exponent as power-hop exponent h. We provide theoretical justification for this pattern under successful existing network models, while we analyze a large set of real and synthetic network datasets and we show the pervasiveness of the power-hop. PMID:26974560

  8. Power-Hop: A Pervasive Observation for Real Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Papalexakis, Evangelos; Hooi, Bryan; Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been shown to exhibit universal properties, with one of the most consistent patterns being the scale-free degree distribution, but are there regularities obeyed by the r-hop neighborhood in real networks? We answer this question by identifying another power-law pattern that describes the relationship between the fractions of node pairs C(r) within r hops and the hop count r. This scale-free distribution is pervasive and describes a large variety of networks, ranging from social and urban to technological and biological networks. In particular, inspired by the definition of the fractal correlation dimension D2 on a point-set, we consider the hop-count r to be the underlying distance metric between two vertices of the network, and we examine the scaling of C(r) with r. We find that this relationship follows a power-law in real networks within the range 2 ≤ r ≤ d, where d is the effective diameter of the network, that is, the 90-th percentile distance. We term this relationship as power-hop and the corresponding power-law exponent as power-hop exponent h. We provide theoretical justification for this pattern under successful existing network models, while we analyze a large set of real and synthetic network datasets and we show the pervasiveness of the power-hop. PMID:26974560

  9. Complex and unexpected dynamics in simple genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Yanika; Ullner, Ekkehard; Alagha, Afnan; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Nesbeth, Darren; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    One aim of synthetic biology is to construct increasingly complex genetic networks from interconnected simpler ones to address challenges in medicine and biotechnology. However, as systems increase in size and complexity, emergent properties lead to unexpected and complex dynamics due to nonlinear and nonequilibrium properties from component interactions. We focus on four different studies of biological systems which exhibit complex and unexpected dynamics. Using simple synthetic genetic networks, small and large populations of phase-coupled quorum sensing repressilators, Goodwin oscillators, and bistable switches, we review how coupled and stochastic components can result in clustering, chaos, noise-induced coherence and speed-dependent decision making. A system of repressilators exhibits oscillations, limit cycles, steady states or chaos depending on the nature and strength of the coupling mechanism. In large repressilator networks, rich dynamics can also be exhibited, such as clustering and chaos. In populations of Goodwin oscillators, noise can induce coherent oscillations. In bistable systems, the speed with which incoming external signals reach steady state can bias the network towards particular attractors. These studies showcase the range of dynamical behavior that simple synthetic genetic networks can exhibit. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of mathematical modeling to analyze nonlinearity and inhomogeneity within these systems.

  10. On the origins of hierarchy in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Goñi, Joaquín; Solé, Ricard V.; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchy seems to pervade complexity in both living and artificial systems. Despite its relevance, no general theory that captures all features of hierarchy and its origins has been proposed yet. Here we present a formal approach resulting from the convergence of theoretical morphology and network theory that allows constructing a 3D morphospace of hierarchies and hence comparing the hierarchical organization of ecological, cellular, technological, and social networks. Embedded within large voids in the morphospace of all possible hierarchies, four major groups are identified. Two of them match the expected from random networks with similar connectivity, thus suggesting that nonadaptive factors are at work. Ecological and gene networks define the other two, indicating that their topological order is the result of functional constraints. These results are consistent with an exploration of the morphospace, using in silico evolved networks. PMID:23898177

  11. Symmetries, Cluster Synchronization, and Isolated Desynchronization in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Louis

    2015-03-01

    Many networks are observed to produce patterns of synchronized clusters, but it has been difficult to predict these clusters in general or understand the conditions for their formation. We show the intimate connection between network symmetry and cluster synchronization. We apply computational group theory to reveal the clusters and determine their stability. In complex networks the symmetries can number in the millions, billions, and more. The connection between symmetry and cluster synchronization is experimentally explored using an electro-optic network. We observe and explain a surprising and common phenomenon (isolated desynchronization) in which some clusters lose synchrony while leaving others connected to them synchronized. We show the isolated desynchronization is intimately related to the decomposition of the group of symmetries into subgroups. The results could guide the design of new power grid systems or lead to new understanding of the dynamical behavior of networks ranging from neural to social.

  12. Knowledge Discovery in Spectral Data by Means of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Papo, David; Solís, José Luis González; Espinosa, Juan Carlos Martínez; Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Anda, Pascual Palomares; Sevilla-Escoboza, Ricardo; Boccaletti, Stefano; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Sousa, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, complex networks have widely been applied to the study of many natural and man-made systems, and to the extraction of meaningful information from the interaction structures created by genes and proteins. Nevertheless, less attention has been devoted to metabonomics, due to the lack of a natural network representation of spectral data. Here we define a technique for reconstructing networks from spectral data sets, where nodes represent spectral bins, and pairs of them are connected when their intensities follow a pattern associated with a disease. The structural analysis of the resulting network can then be used to feed standard data-mining algorithms, for instance for the classification of new (unlabeled) subjects. Furthermore, we show how the structure of the network is resilient to the presence of external additive noise, and how it can be used to extract relevant knowledge about the development of the disease. PMID:24957895

  13. Network-Thinking: Graphs to Analyze Microbial Complexity and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Corel, Eduardo; Lopez, Philippe; Méheust, Raphaël; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The tree model and tree-based methods have played a major, fruitful role in evolutionary studies. However, with the increasing realization of the quantitative and qualitative importance of reticulate evolutionary processes, affecting all levels of biological organization, complementary network-based models and methods are now flourishing, inviting evolutionary biology to experience a network-thinking era. We show how relatively recent comers in this field of study, that is, sequence-similarity networks, genome networks, and gene families–genomes bipartite graphs, already allow for a significantly enhanced usage of molecular datasets in comparative studies. Analyses of these networks provide tools for tackling a multitude of complex phenomena, including the evolution of gene transfer, composite genes and genomes, evolutionary transitions, and holobionts. PMID:26774999

  14. On the origins of hierarchy in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Goñi, Joaquín; Solé, Ricard V; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos

    2013-08-13

    Hierarchy seems to pervade complexity in both living and artificial systems. Despite its relevance, no general theory that captures all features of hierarchy and its origins has been proposed yet. Here we present a formal approach resulting from the convergence of theoretical morphology and network theory that allows constructing a 3D morphospace of hierarchies and hence comparing the hierarchical organization of ecological, cellular, technological, and social networks. Embedded within large voids in the morphospace of all possible hierarchies, four major groups are identified. Two of them match the expected from random networks with similar connectivity, thus suggesting that nonadaptive factors are at work. Ecological and gene networks define the other two, indicating that their topological order is the result of functional constraints. These results are consistent with an exploration of the morphospace, using in silico evolved networks.

  15. Divisibility patterns of natural numbers on a complex network.

    PubMed

    Shekatkar, Snehal M; Bhagwat, Chandrasheel; Ambika, G

    2015-09-16

    Investigation of divisibility properties of natural numbers is one of the most important themes in the theory of numbers. Various tools have been developed over the centuries to discover and study the various patterns in the sequence of natural numbers in the context of divisibility. In the present paper, we study the divisibility of natural numbers using the framework of a growing complex network. In particular, using tools from the field of statistical inference, we show that the network is scale-free but has a non-stationary degree distribution. Along with this, we report a new kind of similarity pattern for the local clustering, which we call "stretching similarity", in this network. We also show that the various characteristics like average degree, global clustering coefficient and assortativity coefficient of the network vary smoothly with the size of the network. Using analytical arguments we estimate the asymptotic behavior of global clustering and average degree which is validated using numerical analysis.

  16. Divisibility patterns of natural numbers on a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Bhagwat, Chandrasheel; Ambika, G.

    2015-09-01

    Investigation of divisibility properties of natural numbers is one of the most important themes in the theory of numbers. Various tools have been developed over the centuries to discover and study the various patterns in the sequence of natural numbers in the context of divisibility. In the present paper, we study the divisibility of natural numbers using the framework of a growing complex network. In particular, using tools from the field of statistical inference, we show that the network is scale-free but has a non-stationary degree distribution. Along with this, we report a new kind of similarity pattern for the local clustering, which we call “stretching similarity”, in this network. We also show that the various characteristics like average degree, global clustering coefficient and assortativity coefficient of the network vary smoothly with the size of the network. Using analytical arguments we estimate the asymptotic behavior of global clustering and average degree which is validated using numerical analysis.

  17. Modeling pedestrian's conformity violation behavior: a complex network based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuping; Hu, Qizhou; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Pedestrian injuries and fatalities present a problem all over the world. Pedestrian conformity violation behaviors, which lead to many pedestrian crashes, are common phenomena at the signalized intersections in China. The concepts and metrics of complex networks are applied to analyze the structural characteristics and evolution rules of pedestrian network about the conformity violation crossings. First, a network of pedestrians crossing the street is established, and the network's degree distributions are analyzed. Then, by using the basic idea of SI model, a spreading model of pedestrian illegal crossing behavior is proposed. Finally, through simulation analysis, pedestrian's illegal crossing behavior trends are obtained in different network structures and different spreading rates. Some conclusions are drawn: as the waiting time increases, more pedestrians will join in the violation crossing once a pedestrian crosses on red firstly. And pedestrian's conformity violation behavior will increase as the spreading rate increases.

  18. Network-Thinking: Graphs to Analyze Microbial Complexity and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Corel, Eduardo; Lopez, Philippe; Méheust, Raphaël; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The tree model and tree-based methods have played a major, fruitful role in evolutionary studies. However, with the increasing realization of the quantitative and qualitative importance of reticulate evolutionary processes, affecting all levels of biological organization, complementary network-based models and methods are now flourishing, inviting evolutionary biology to experience a network-thinking era. We show how relatively recent comers in this field of study, that is, sequence-similarity networks, genome networks, and gene families-genomes bipartite graphs, already allow for a significantly enhanced usage of molecular datasets in comparative studies. Analyses of these networks provide tools for tackling a multitude of complex phenomena, including the evolution of gene transfer, composite genes and genomes, evolutionary transitions, and holobionts.

  19. Link Prediction in Complex Networks: A Mutual Information Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Fei; Xia, Yongxiang; Zhu, Boyao

    2014-01-01

    Topological properties of networks are widely applied to study the link-prediction problem recently. Common Neighbors, for example, is a natural yet efficient framework. Many variants of Common Neighbors have been thus proposed to further boost the discriminative resolution of candidate links. In this paper, we reexamine the role of network topology in predicting missing links from the perspective of information theory, and present a practical approach based on the mutual information of network structures. It not only can improve the prediction accuracy substantially, but also experiences reasonable computing complexity. PMID:25207920

  20. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    ScienceCinema

    Olaf Sporns

    2016-07-12

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  1. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    SciTech Connect

    Olaf Sporns

    2008-01-23

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  2. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    SciTech Connect

    Sporns, Olaf

    2008-01-23

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life. How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood. In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  3. Hierarchicality of Trade Flow Networks Reveals Complexity of Products

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peiteng; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Bo; Luo, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    With globalization, countries are more connected than before by trading flows, which amounts to at least trillion dollars today. Interestingly, around percents of exports consist of intermediate products in global. Therefore, the trade flow network of particular product with high added values can be regarded as value chains. The problem is weather we can discriminate between these products from their unique flow network structure? This paper applies the flow analysis method developed in ecology to 638 trading flow networks of different products. We claim that the allometric scaling exponent can be used to characterize the degree of hierarchicality of a flow network, i.e., whether the trading products flow on long hierarchical chains. Then, it is pointed out that the flow networks of products with higher added values and complexity like machinary, transport equipment etc. have larger exponents, meaning that their trade flow networks are more hierarchical. As a result, without the extra data like global input-output table, we can identify the product categories with higher complexity, and the relative importance of a country in the global value chain by the trading network solely. PMID:24905753

  4. A computational model for cancer growth by using complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José G. V.

    2008-09-01

    In this work we propose a computational model to investigate the proliferation of cancerous cell by using complex networks. In our model the network represents the structure of available space in the cancer propagation. The computational scheme considers a cancerous cell randomly included in the complex network. When the system evolves the cells can assume three states: proliferative, non-proliferative, and necrotic. Our results were compared with experimental data obtained from three human lung carcinoma cell lines. The computational simulations show that the cancerous cells have a Gompertzian growth. Also, our model simulates the formation of necrosis, increase of density, and resources diffusion to regions of lower nutrient concentration. We obtain that the cancer growth is very similar in random and small-world networks. On the other hand, the topological structure of the small-world network is more affected. The scale-free network has the largest rates of cancer growth due to hub formation. Finally, our results indicate that for different average degrees the rate of cancer growth is related to the available space in the network.

  5. Hierarchicality of trade flow networks reveals complexity of products.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiteng; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Bo; Luo, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    With globalization, countries are more connected than before by trading flows, which amounts to at least 36 trillion dollars today. Interestingly, around 30-60 percents of exports consist of intermediate products in global. Therefore, the trade flow network of particular product with high added values can be regarded as value chains. The problem is weather we can discriminate between these products from their unique flow network structure? This paper applies the flow analysis method developed in ecology to 638 trading flow networks of different products. We claim that the allometric scaling exponent η can be used to characterize the degree of hierarchicality of a flow network, i.e., whether the trading products flow on long hierarchical chains. Then, it is pointed out that the flow networks of products with higher added values and complexity like machinary, transport equipment etc. have larger exponents, meaning that their trade flow networks are more hierarchical. As a result, without the extra data like global input-output table, we can identify the product categories with higher complexity, and the relative importance of a country in the global value chain by the trading network solely.

  6. Hierarchicality of trade flow networks reveals complexity of products.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiteng; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Bo; Luo, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    With globalization, countries are more connected than before by trading flows, which amounts to at least 36 trillion dollars today. Interestingly, around 30-60 percents of exports consist of intermediate products in global. Therefore, the trade flow network of particular product with high added values can be regarded as value chains. The problem is weather we can discriminate between these products from their unique flow network structure? This paper applies the flow analysis method developed in ecology to 638 trading flow networks of different products. We claim that the allometric scaling exponent η can be used to characterize the degree of hierarchicality of a flow network, i.e., whether the trading products flow on long hierarchical chains. Then, it is pointed out that the flow networks of products with higher added values and complexity like machinary, transport equipment etc. have larger exponents, meaning that their trade flow networks are more hierarchical. As a result, without the extra data like global input-output table, we can identify the product categories with higher complexity, and the relative importance of a country in the global value chain by the trading network solely. PMID:24905753

  7. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  8. Continuous symmetry measures for complex symmetry group.

    PubMed

    Dryzun, Chaim

    2014-04-01

    Symmetry is a fundamental property of nature, used extensively in physics, chemistry, and biology. The Continuous symmetry measures (CSM) is a method for estimating the deviation of a given system from having a certain perfect symmetry, which enables us to formulate quantitative relation between symmetry and other physical properties. Analytical procedures for calculating the CSM of all simple cyclic point groups are available for several years. Here, we present a methodology for calculating the CSM of any complex point group, including the dihedral, tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral symmetry groups. We present the method and analyze its performances and errors. We also introduce an analytical method for calculating the CSM of the linear symmetry groups. As an example, we apply these methods for examining the symmetry of water, the symmetry maps of AB4 complexes, and the symmetry of several Lennard-Jones clusters.

  9. Spam Source Clustering by Constructing Spammer Network with Correlation Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jeongkyu; Kim, Seunghwan

    Spam filtering is one of the most challenging problems in electric message systems. In general, recent studies on specifying real spam source are based on content filtering because spammers usually falsify their origin. We propose a method to specify spam source based on structural analysis with complex network. We assume that each spam sources either has the same victim list or uses the same spam-hosting program. We treat spam source - target relationship as a bipartite network and construct weighted spam source network by network projection using correlation measure. We find that community clustering methods are inappropriate with spammer network. We group spammers with gradient-based grouping, which uses correlations between nodes as gradient between nodes. We convert them into local minima, which helps to cluster spammers into a few spam source groups. We investigate the weblog spam data with the proposed method and validate it. The method that we propose can be applied to diverse categorization problems, such as multiple text categorization and network subunit clustering.

  10. Analysis of the airport network of India as a complex weighted network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagler, Ganesh

    2008-05-01

    Transportation infrastructure of a country is one of the most important indicators of its economic growth. Here we study the Airport Network of India (ANI) which represents India’s domestic civil aviation infrastructure as a complex network. We find that ANI, a network of domestic airports connected by air links, is a small-world network characterized by a truncated power-law degree distribution and has a signature of hierarchy. We investigate ANI as a weighted network to explore its various properties and compare them with their topological counterparts. The traffic in ANI, as in the World-wide Airport Network (WAN), is found to be accumulated on interconnected groups of airports and is concentrated between large airports. In contrast to WAN, ANI is found to be having disassortative mixing which is offset by the traffic dynamics. The analysis indicates possible mechanism of formation of a national transportation network, which is different from that on a global scale.

  11. Advanced Algorithms for Local Routing Strategy on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Benchuan; Chen, Bokui; Gao, Yachun; Tse, Chi K.; Dong, Chuanfei; Miao, Lixin; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant improvement on network performance provided by global routing strategies, their applications are still limited to small-scale networks, due to the need for acquiring global information of the network which grows and changes rapidly with time. Local routing strategies, however, need much less local information, though their transmission efficiency and network capacity are much lower than that of global routing strategies. In view of this, three algorithms are proposed and a thorough investigation is conducted in this paper. These algorithms include a node duplication avoidance algorithm, a next-nearest-neighbor algorithm and a restrictive queue length algorithm. After applying them to typical local routing strategies, the critical generation rate of information packets Rc increases by over ten-fold and the average transmission time 〈T〉 decreases by 70–90 percent, both of which are key physical quantities to assess the efficiency of routing strategies on complex networks. More importantly, in comparison with global routing strategies, the improved local routing strategies can yield better network performance under certain circumstances. This is a revolutionary leap for communication networks, because local routing strategy enjoys great superiority over global routing strategy not only in terms of the reduction of computational expense, but also in terms of the flexibility of implementation, especially for large-scale networks. PMID:27434502

  12. Exploring complex networks via topological embedding on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aste, Tomaso; Gramatica, Ruggero; Di Matteo, T

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate that graphs embedded on surfaces are a powerful and practical tool to generate, to characterize, and to simulate networks with a broad range of properties. Any network can be embedded on a surface with sufficiently high genus and therefore the study of topologically embedded graphs is non-restrictive. We show that the local properties of the network are affected by the surface genus which determines the average degree, which influences the degree distribution, and which controls the clustering coefficient. The global properties of the graph are also strongly affected by the surface genus which is constraining the degree of interwovenness, changing the scaling properties of the network from large-world kind (small genus) to small- and ultrasmall-world kind (large genus). Two elementary moves allow the exploration of all networks embeddable on a given surface and naturally introduce a tool to develop a statistical mechanics description for these networks. Within such a framework, we study the properties of topologically embedded graphs which dynamically tend to lower their energy towards a ground state with a given reference degree distribution. We show that the cooling dynamics between high and low "temperatures" is strongly affected by the surface genus with the manifestation of a glass-like transition occurring when the distance from the reference distribution is low. We prove, with examples, that topologically embedded graphs can be built in a way to contain arbitrary complex networks as subgraphs. This method opens a new avenue to build geometrically embedded networks on hyperbolic manifolds.

  13. Advanced Algorithms for Local Routing Strategy on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benchuan; Chen, Bokui; Gao, Yachun; Tse, Chi K; Dong, Chuanfei; Miao, Lixin; Wang, Binghong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant improvement on network performance provided by global routing strategies, their applications are still limited to small-scale networks, due to the need for acquiring global information of the network which grows and changes rapidly with time. Local routing strategies, however, need much less local information, though their transmission efficiency and network capacity are much lower than that of global routing strategies. In view of this, three algorithms are proposed and a thorough investigation is conducted in this paper. These algorithms include a node duplication avoidance algorithm, a next-nearest-neighbor algorithm and a restrictive queue length algorithm. After applying them to typical local routing strategies, the critical generation rate of information packets Rc increases by over ten-fold and the average transmission time 〈T〉 decreases by 70-90 percent, both of which are key physical quantities to assess the efficiency of routing strategies on complex networks. More importantly, in comparison with global routing strategies, the improved local routing strategies can yield better network performance under certain circumstances. This is a revolutionary leap for communication networks, because local routing strategy enjoys great superiority over global routing strategy not only in terms of the reduction of computational expense, but also in terms of the flexibility of implementation, especially for large-scale networks. PMID:27434502

  14. Magnitude Characterization Using Complex Networks in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasten, D.; Comte, D.; Munoz, V.

    2013-12-01

    Studies using complex networks are applied to many systems, like traffic, social networks, internet and earth science. In this work we make an analysis using complex networks applied to magnitude of seismicity in the central zone of Chile, we use the preferential attachment in order to construct a seismic network using local magnitudes and the hypocenters of a seismic data set in central Chile. In order to work with a complete catalogue in magnitude, the data associated with the linear part of the Gutenberg-Richter law, with magnitudes greater than 2.7, were taken. We then make a grid in space, so that each seismic event falls into a certain cell, depending on the location of its hypocenter. Now the network is constructed: the first node corresponds to the cell where the first seismic event occurs. The node has an associated number which is the magnitude of the event which occured in it, and a probability is assigned to the node. The probability is a nonlinear mapping of the magnitude (a Gaussian function was taken), so that nodes with lower magnitude events are more likely to be attached to. Each time a new node is added to the network, it is attached to the previous node which has the larger probability; the link is directed from the previous node to the new node. In this way, a directed network is constructed, with a ``preferential attachment''-like growth model, using the magnitudes as the parameter to determine the probability of attachment to future nodes. Several events could occur in the same node. In this case, the probability is calculated using the average of the magnitudes of the events occuring in that node. Once the directed network is finished, the corresponding undirected network is constructed, by making all links symmetric, and eliminating the loops which may appear when two events occur in the same cell. The resulting directed network is found to be scale free (with very low values of the power-law distribution exponent), whereas the undirected

  15. Minimum steering node set of complex networks and its applications to biomolecular networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Many systems of interests in practices can be represented as complex networks. For biological systems, biomolecules do not perform their functions alone but interact with each other to form so-called biomolecular networks. A system is said to be controllable if it can be steered from any initial state to any other final state in finite time. The network controllability has become essential to study the dynamics of the networks and understand the importance of individual nodes in the networks. Some interesting biological phenomena have been discovered in terms of the structural controllability of biomolecular networks. Most of current studies investigate the structural controllability of networks in notion of the minimum driver node sets (MDSs). In this study, the authors analyse the network structural controllability in notion of the minimum steering node sets (MSSs). They first develop a graph-theoretic algorithm to identify the MSS for a given network and then apply it to several biomolecular networks. Application results show that biomolecules identified in the MSSs play essential roles in corresponding biological processes. Furthermore, the application results indicate that the MSSs can reflect the network dynamics and node importance in controlling the networks better than the MDSs.

  16. Breaking down Complex Saproxylic Communities: Understanding Sub-Networks Structure and Implications to Network Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Javier; Marcos-García, Ma. Ángeles; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Rico-Gray, Víctor; Brustel, Hervé; Galante, Eduardo; Micó, Estefanía

    2012-01-01

    Saproxylic insect communities inhabiting tree hollow microhabitats correspond with large food webs which simultaneously are constituted by multiple types of plant-animal and animal-animal interactions, according to the use of trophic resources (wood- and insect-dependent sub-networks), or to trophic habits or interaction types (xylophagous, saprophagous, xylomycetophagous, predators and commensals). We quantitatively assessed which properties of specialised networks were present in a complex networks involving different interacting types such as saproxylic community, and how they can be organised in trophic food webs. The architecture, interacting patterns and food web composition were evaluated along sub-networks, analysing their implications to network robustness from random and directed extinction simulations. A structure of large and cohesive modules with weakly connected nodes was observed throughout saproxylic sub-networks, composing the main food webs constituting this community. Insect-dependent sub-networks were more modular than wood-dependent sub-networks. Wood-dependent sub-networks presented higher species degree, connectance, links, linkage density, interaction strength, and were less specialised and more aggregated than insect-dependent sub-networks. These attributes defined high network robustness in wood-dependent sub-networks. Finally, our results emphasise the relevance of modularity, differences among interacting types and interrelations among them in modelling the structure of saproxylic communities and in determining their stability. PMID:23028763

  17. Using contrast patterns between true complexes and random subgraphs in PPI networks to predict unknown protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanzhong; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2016-01-01

    Most protein complex detection methods utilize unsupervised techniques to cluster densely connected nodes in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, in spite of the fact that many true complexes are not dense subgraphs. Supervised methods have been proposed recently, but they do not answer why a group of proteins are predicted as a complex, and they have not investigated how to detect new complexes of one species by training the model on the PPI data of another species. We propose a novel supervised method to address these issues. The key idea is to discover emerging patterns (EPs), a type of contrast pattern, which can clearly distinguish true complexes from random subgraphs in a PPI network. An integrative score of EPs is defined to measure how likely a subgraph of proteins can form a complex. New complexes thus can grow from our seed proteins by iteratively updating this score. The performance of our method is tested on eight benchmark PPI datasets and compared with seven unsupervised methods, two supervised and one semi-supervised methods under five standards to assess the quality of the predicted complexes. The results show that in most cases our method achieved a better performance, sometimes significantly. PMID:26868667

  18. Using contrast patterns between true complexes and random subgraphs in PPI networks to predict unknown protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanzhong; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2016-01-01

    Most protein complex detection methods utilize unsupervised techniques to cluster densely connected nodes in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, in spite of the fact that many true complexes are not dense subgraphs. Supervised methods have been proposed recently, but they do not answer why a group of proteins are predicted as a complex, and they have not investigated how to detect new complexes of one species by training the model on the PPI data of another species. We propose a novel supervised method to address these issues. The key idea is to discover emerging patterns (EPs), a type of contrast pattern, which can clearly distinguish true complexes from random subgraphs in a PPI network. An integrative score of EPs is defined to measure how likely a subgraph of proteins can form a complex. New complexes thus can grow from our seed proteins by iteratively updating this score. The performance of our method is tested on eight benchmark PPI datasets and compared with seven unsupervised methods, two supervised and one semi-supervised methods under five standards to assess the quality of the predicted complexes. The results show that in most cases our method achieved a better performance, sometimes significantly.

  19. Methods of information theory and algorithmic complexity for network biology.

    PubMed

    Zenil, Hector; Kiani, Narsis A; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We survey and introduce concepts and tools located at the intersection of information theory and network biology. We show that Shannon's information entropy, compressibility and algorithmic complexity quantify different local and global aspects of synthetic and biological data. We show examples such as the emergence of giant components in Erdös-Rényi random graphs, and the recovery of topological properties from numerical kinetic properties simulating gene expression data. We provide exact theoretical calculations, numerical approximations and error estimations of entropy, algorithmic probability and Kolmogorov complexity for different types of graphs, characterizing their variant and invariant properties. We introduce formal definitions of complexity for both labeled and unlabeled graphs and prove that the Kolmogorov complexity of a labeled graph is a good approximation of its unlabeled Kolmogorov complexity and thus a robust definition of graph complexity.

  20. Orthogonal least squares based complex-valued functional link network.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Faijul; Savitha, Ramasamy; Amin, Muhammad Ilias; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2012-08-01

    Functional link networks are single-layered neural networks that impose nonlinearity in the input layer using nonlinear functions of the original input variables. In this paper, we present a fully complex-valued functional link network (CFLN) with multivariate polynomials as the nonlinear functions. Unlike multilayer neural networks, the CFLN is free from local minima problem, and it offers very fast learning of parameters because of its linear structure. Polynomial based CFLN does not require an activation function which is a major concern in the complex-valued neural networks. However, it is important to select a smaller subset of polynomial terms (monomials) for faster and better performance since the number of all possible monomials may be quite large. Here, we use the orthogonal least squares (OLS) method in a constructive fashion (starting from lower degree to higher) for the selection of a parsimonious subset of monomials. It is argued here that computing CFLN in purely complex domain is advantageous than in double-dimensional real domain, in terms of number of connection parameters, faster design, and possibly generalization performance. Simulation results on a function approximation, wind prediction with real-world data, and a nonlinear channel equalization problem exhibit that the OLS based CFLN yields very simple structure having favorable performance.