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Sample records for network information theory

  1. Information theory and the ethylene genetic network

    PubMed Central

    González-García, José S

    2011-01-01

    The original aim of the Information Theory (IT) was to solve a purely technical problem: to increase the performance of communication systems, which are constantly affected by interferences that diminish the quality of the transmitted information. That is, the theory deals only with the problem of transmitting with the maximal precision the symbols constituting a message. In Shannon's theory messages are characterized only by their probabilities, regardless of their value or meaning. As for its present day status, it is generally acknowledged that Information Theory has solid mathematical foundations and has fruitful strong links with Physics in both theoretical and experimental areas. However, many applications of Information Theory to Biology are limited to using it as a technical tool to analyze biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA or protein sequences. The main point of discussion about the applicability of IT to explain the information flow in biological systems is that in a classic communication channel, the symbols that conform the coded message are transmitted one by one in an independent form through a noisy communication channel, and noise can alter each of the symbols, distorting the message; in contrast, in a genetic communication channel the coded messages are not transmitted in the form of symbols but signaling cascades transmit them. Consequently, the information flow from the emitter to the effector is due to a series of coupled physicochemical processes that must ensure the accurate transmission of the message. In this review we discussed a novel proposal to overcome this difficulty, which consists of the modeling of gene expression with a stochastic approach that allows Shannon entropy (H) to be directly used to measure the amount of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has in relation to the correct decoding of a message transmitted into the nucleus by a signaling pathway. From the value of H we can define a function I that measures the amount of

  2. Information theory and the ethylene genetic network.

    PubMed

    González-García, José S; Díaz, José

    2011-10-01

    The original aim of the Information Theory (IT) was to solve a purely technical problem: to increase the performance of communication systems, which are constantly affected by interferences that diminish the quality of the transmitted information. That is, the theory deals only with the problem of transmitting with the maximal precision the symbols constituting a message. In Shannon's theory messages are characterized only by their probabilities, regardless of their value or meaning. As for its present day status, it is generally acknowledged that Information Theory has solid mathematical foundations and has fruitful strong links with Physics in both theoretical and experimental areas. However, many applications of Information Theory to Biology are limited to using it as a technical tool to analyze biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA or protein sequences. The main point of discussion about the applicability of IT to explain the information flow in biological systems is that in a classic communication channel, the symbols that conform the coded message are transmitted one by one in an independent form through a noisy communication channel, and noise can alter each of the symbols, distorting the message; in contrast, in a genetic communication channel the coded messages are not transmitted in the form of symbols but signaling cascades transmit them. Consequently, the information flow from the emitter to the effector is due to a series of coupled physicochemical processes that must ensure the accurate transmission of the message. In this review we discussed a novel proposal to overcome this difficulty, which consists of the modeling of gene expression with a stochastic approach that allows Shannon entropy (H) to be directly used to measure the amount of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has in relation to the correct decoding of a message transmitted into the nucleus by a signaling pathway. From the value of H we can define a function I that measures the amount of

  3. Recent Developments in Quantitative Graph Theory: Information Inequalities for Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dehmer, Matthias; Sivakumar, Lavanya

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we tackle a challenging problem in quantitative graph theory. We establish relations between graph entropy measures representing the structural information content of networks. In particular, we prove formal relations between quantitative network measures based on Shannon's entropy to study the relatedness of those measures. In order to establish such information inequalities for graphs, we focus on graph entropy measures based on information functionals. To prove such relations, we use known graph classes whose instances have been proven useful in various scientific areas. Our results extend the foregoing work on information inequalities for graphs. PMID:22355362

  4. Recent developments in quantitative graph theory: information inequalities for networks.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Matthias; Sivakumar, Lavanya

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we tackle a challenging problem in quantitative graph theory. We establish relations between graph entropy measures representing the structural information content of networks. In particular, we prove formal relations between quantitative network measures based on Shannon's entropy to study the relatedness of those measures. In order to establish such information inequalities for graphs, we focus on graph entropy measures based on information functionals. To prove such relations, we use known graph classes whose instances have been proven useful in various scientific areas. Our results extend the foregoing work on information inequalities for graphs.

  5. Methods of information theory and algorithmic complexity for network biology.

    PubMed

    Zenil, Hector; Kiani, Narsis A; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We survey and introduce concepts and tools located at the intersection of information theory and network biology. We show that Shannon's information entropy, compressibility and algorithmic complexity quantify different local and global aspects of synthetic and biological data. We show examples such as the emergence of giant components in Erdös-Rényi random graphs, and the recovery of topological properties from numerical kinetic properties simulating gene expression data. We provide exact theoretical calculations, numerical approximations and error estimations of entropy, algorithmic probability and Kolmogorov complexity for different types of graphs, characterizing their variant and invariant properties. We introduce formal definitions of complexity for both labeled and unlabeled graphs and prove that the Kolmogorov complexity of a labeled graph is a good approximation of its unlabeled Kolmogorov complexity and thus a robust definition of graph complexity.

  6. Imperishable Networks: Complexity Theory and Communication Networking-Bridging the Gap Between Algorithmic Information Theory and Communication Networking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    Science, volume 888, 1995, ISSN 0302-9743. [127] Giancoli , Douglas C. General Physics , Prentice Hall, INC, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. [128]Harmon, S. “A...59 3.4 Vulnerability Metrics with physical analogs...theoretical physics for information flow analysis on network and for extraction of patterns of typical network behav- ior. The information traffic can

  7. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory.

  8. Information theory and signal transduction systems: from molecular information processing to network inference.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Siobhan S; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Johnson, Robert; Liepe, Juliane; Smith, Dominic; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2014-11-01

    Sensing and responding to the environment are two essential functions that all biological organisms need to master for survival and successful reproduction. Developmental processes are marshalled by a diverse set of signalling and control systems, ranging from systems with simple chemical inputs and outputs to complex molecular and cellular networks with non-linear dynamics. Information theory provides a powerful and convenient framework in which such systems can be studied; but it also provides the means to reconstruct the structure and dynamics of molecular interaction networks underlying physiological and developmental processes. Here we supply a brief description of its basic concepts and introduce some useful tools for systems and developmental biologists. Along with a brief but thorough theoretical primer, we demonstrate the wide applicability and biological application-specific nuances by way of different illustrative vignettes. In particular, we focus on the characterisation of biological information processing efficiency, examining cell-fate decision making processes, gene regulatory network reconstruction, and efficient signal transduction experimental design.

  9. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed.

  10. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  11. Protein signaling networks from single cell fluctuations and information theory profiling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2011-05-18

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network.

  12. Analysis of Online Social Networks to Understand Information Sharing Behaviors Through Social Cognitive Theory

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the contents of online social networks is an effective process for monitoring and understanding peoples’ behaviors. Since the nature of conversation and information propagation is similar to traditional conversation and learning, one of the popular socio-cognitive methods, social cognitive theory was applied to online social networks to. Two major news topics about colon cancer were chosen to monitor traffic of Twitter messages. The activity of “leaders” on the issue (i.e., news companies or people will prior Twitter activity on topics related to colon cancer) was monitored. In addition, the activity of “followers”, people who never discussed the topics before, but replied to the discussions was also monitored. Topics that produce tangible benefits such as positive outcomes from appropriate preventive actions received dramatically more attention and online social media traffic. Such characteristics can be explained with social cognitive theory and thus present opportunities for effective health campaigns. PMID:25973446

  13. Analysis of Online Social Networks to Understand Information Sharing Behaviors Through Social Cognitive Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the contents of online social networks is an effective process for monitoring and understanding peoples behaviors. Since the nature of conversation and information propagation is similar to traditional conversation and learning, one of the popular socio-cognitive methods, social cognitive theory was applied to online social networks to. Two major news topics about colon cancer were chosen to monitor traffic of Twitter messages. The activity of leaders on the issue (i.e., news companies or people will prior Twitter activity on topics related to colon cancer) was monitored. In addition, the activity of followers , people who never discussed the topics before, but replied to the discussions was also monitored. Topics that produce tangible benefits such as positive outcomes from appropriate preventive actions received dramatically more attention and online social media traffic. Such characteristics can be explained with social cognitive theory and thus present opportunities for effective health campaigns.

  14. Analysis of Online Social Networks to Understand Information Sharing Behaviors Through Social Cognitive Theory.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2014-05-01

    Analyzing the contents of online social networks is an effective process for monitoring and understanding peoples' behaviors. Since the nature of conversation and information propagation is similar to traditional conversation and learning, one of the popular socio-cognitive methods, social cognitive theory was applied to online social networks to. Two major news topics about colon cancer were chosen to monitor traffic of Twitter messages. The activity of "leaders" on the issue (i.e., news companies or people will prior Twitter activity on topics related to colon cancer) was monitored. In addition, the activity of "followers", people who never discussed the topics before, but replied to the discussions was also monitored. Topics that produce tangible benefits such as positive outcomes from appropriate preventive actions received dramatically more attention and online social media traffic. Such characteristics can be explained with social cognitive theory and thus present opportunities for effective health campaigns.

  15. Optimal design of hydrometric monitoring networks with dynamic components based on Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Leonardo; Chacon, Juan; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The EC-FP7 WeSenseIt project proposes the development of a Citizen Observatory of Water, aiming at enhancing environmental monitoring and forecasting with the help of citizens equipped with low-cost sensors and personal devices such as smartphones and smart umbrellas. In this regard, Citizen Observatories may complement the limited data availability in terms of spatial and temporal density, which is of interest, among other areas, to improve hydraulic and hydrological models. At this point, the following question arises: how can citizens, who are part of a citizen observatory, be optimally guided so that the data they collect and send is useful to improve modelling and water management? This research proposes a new methodology to identify the optimal location and timing of potential observations coming from moving sensors of hydrological variables. The methodology is based on Information Theory, which has been widely used in hydrometric monitoring design [1-4]. In particular, the concepts of Joint Entropy, as a measure of the amount of information that is contained in a set of random variables, which, in our case, correspond to the time series of hydrological variables captured at given locations in a catchment. The methodology presented is a step forward in the state of the art because it solves the multiobjective optimisation problem of getting simultaneously the minimum number of informative and non-redundant sensors needed for a given time, so that the best configuration of monitoring sites is found at every particular moment in time. To this end, the existing algorithms have been improved to make them efficient. The method is applied to cases in The Netherlands, UK and Italy and proves to have a great potential to complement the existing in-situ monitoring networks. [1] Alfonso, L., A. Lobbrecht, and R. Price (2010a), Information theory-based approach for location of monitoring water level gauges in polders, Water Resour. Res., 46(3), W03528 [2] Alfonso, L., A

  16. Parametric sensitivity analysis for biochemical reaction networks based on pathwise information theory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stochastic modeling and simulation provide powerful predictive methods for the intrinsic understanding of fundamental mechanisms in complex biochemical networks. Typically, such mathematical models involve networks of coupled jump stochastic processes with a large number of parameters that need to be suitably calibrated against experimental data. In this direction, the parameter sensitivity analysis of reaction networks is an essential mathematical and computational tool, yielding information regarding the robustness and the identifiability of model parameters. However, existing sensitivity analysis approaches such as variants of the finite difference method can have an overwhelming computational cost in models with a high-dimensional parameter space. Results We develop a sensitivity analysis methodology suitable for complex stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters. The proposed approach is based on Information Theory methods and relies on the quantification of information loss due to parameter perturbations between time-series distributions. For this reason, we need to work on path-space, i.e., the set consisting of all stochastic trajectories, hence the proposed approach is referred to as “pathwise”. The pathwise sensitivity analysis method is realized by employing the rigorously-derived Relative Entropy Rate, which is directly computable from the propensity functions. A key aspect of the method is that an associated pathwise Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) is defined, which in turn constitutes a gradient-free approach to quantifying parameter sensitivities. The structure of the FIM turns out to be block-diagonal, revealing hidden parameter dependencies and sensitivities in reaction networks. Conclusions As a gradient-free method, the proposed sensitivity analysis provides a significant advantage when dealing with complex stochastic systems with a large number of parameters. In addition, the knowledge of the structure of the

  17. A new measure based on degree distribution that links information theory and network graph analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Detailed connection maps of human and nonhuman brains are being generated with new technologies, and graph metrics have been instrumental in understanding the general organizational features of these structures. Neural networks appear to have small world properties: they have clustered regions, while maintaining integrative features such as short average pathlengths. Results We captured the structural characteristics of clustered networks with short average pathlengths through our own variable, System Difference (SD), which is computationally simple and calculable for larger graph systems. SD is a Jaccardian measure generated by averaging all of the differences in the connection patterns between any two nodes of a system. We calculated SD over large random samples of matrices and found that high SD matrices have a low average pathlength and a larger number of clustered structures. SD is a measure of degree distribution with high SD matrices maximizing entropic properties. Phi (Φ), an information theory metric that assesses a system’s capacity to integrate information, correlated well with SD - with SD explaining over 90% of the variance in systems above 11 nodes (tested for 4 to 13 nodes). However, newer versions of Φ do not correlate well with the SD metric. Conclusions The new network measure, SD, provides a link between high entropic structures and degree distributions as related to small world properties. PMID:22726594

  18. Transcriptional regulatory network refinement and quantification through kinetic modeling, gene expression microarray data and information theory

    PubMed Central

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Tuncay, Kagan; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarray and other multiplex data hold promise for addressing the challenges of cellular complexity, refined diagnoses and the discovery of well-targeted treatments. A new approach to the construction and quantification of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) is presented that integrates gene expression microarray data and cell modeling through information theory. Given a partial TRN and time series data, a probability density is constructed that is a functional of the time course of transcription factor (TF) thermodynamic activities at the site of gene control, and is a function of mRNA degradation and transcription rate coefficients, and equilibrium constants for TF/gene binding. Results Our approach yields more physicochemical information that compliments the results of network structure delineation methods, and thereby can serve as an element of a comprehensive TRN discovery/quantification system. The most probable TF time courses and values of the aforementioned parameters are obtained by maximizing the probability obtained through entropy maximization. Observed time delays between mRNA expression and activity are accounted for implicitly since the time course of the activity of a TF is coupled by probability functional maximization, and is not assumed to be proportional to expression level of the mRNA type that translates into the TF. This allows one to investigate post-translational and TF activation mechanisms of gene regulation. Accuracy and robustness of the method are evaluated. A kinetic formulation is used to facilitate the analysis of phenomena with a strongly dynamical character while a physically-motivated regularization of the TF time course is found to overcome difficulties due to omnipresent noise and data sparsity that plague other methods of gene expression data analysis. An application to Escherichia coli is presented. Conclusion Multiplex time series data can be used for the construction of the network of

  19. Actor-Network Theory and its role in understanding the implementation of information technology developments in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Actor-Network Theory (ANT) is an increasingly influential, but still deeply contested, approach to understand humans and their interactions with inanimate objects. We argue that health services research, and in particular evaluations of complex IT systems in health service organisations, may benefit from being informed by Actor-Network Theory perspectives. Discussion Despite some limitations, an Actor-Network Theory-based approach is conceptually useful in helping to appreciate the complexity of reality (including the complexity of organisations) and the active role of technology in this context. This can prove helpful in understanding how social effects are generated as a result of associations between different actors in a network. Of central importance in this respect is that Actor-Network Theory provides a lens through which to view the role of technology in shaping social processes. Attention to this shaping role can contribute to a more holistic appreciation of the complexity of technology introduction in healthcare settings. It can also prove practically useful in providing a theoretically informed approach to sampling (by drawing on informants that are related to the technology in question) and analysis (by providing a conceptual tool and vocabulary that can form the basis for interpretations). We draw on existing empirical work in this area and our ongoing work investigating the integration of electronic health record systems introduced as part of England's National Programme for Information Technology to illustrate salient points. Summary Actor-Network Theory needs to be used pragmatically with an appreciation of its shortcomings. Our experiences suggest it can be helpful in investigating technology implementations in healthcare settings. PMID:21040575

  20. A Network Neuroscience of Human Learning: Potential to Inform Quantitative Theories of Brain and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Danielle S; Mattar, Marcelo G

    2017-04-01

    Humans adapt their behavior to their external environment in a process often facilitated by learning. Efforts to describe learning empirically can be complemented by quantitative theories that map changes in neurophysiology to changes in behavior. In this review we highlight recent advances in network science that offer a sets of tools and a general perspective that may be particularly useful in understanding types of learning that are supported by distributed neural circuits. We describe recent applications of these tools to neuroimaging data that provide unique insights into adaptive neural processes, the attainment of knowledge, and the acquisition of new skills, forming a network neuroscience of human learning. While promising, the tools have yet to be linked to the well-formulated models of behavior that are commonly utilized in cognitive psychology. We argue that continued progress will require the explicit marriage of network approaches to neuroimaging data and quantitative models of behavior.

  1. Intervening in Partner Violence against Women: A Grounded Theory Exploration of Informal Network Members' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latta, Rachel E.; Goodman, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of cross-sectional and longitudinal research demonstrates the important contribution of informal social networks to the well-being and safety of female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Most survivors turn to family and friends before, during, and after their involvement with formal services; and many rely solely on…

  2. Network Detection Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, James P.; Lo, Darren; Ahearn, Stephen T.; Phillips, Aaron M.

    Despite the breadth of modern network theory, it can be difficult to apply its results to the task of uncovering terrorist networks: the most useful network analyses are often low-tech, link-following approaches. In the traditional military domain, detection theory has a long history of finding stealthy targets such as submarines. We demonstrate how the detection theory framework leads to a variety of network analysis questions. Some solutions to these leverage existing theory; others require novel techniques - but in each case the solutions contribute to a principled methodology for solving network detection problems. This endeavor is difficult, and the work here represents only a beginning. However, the required mathematics is interesting, being the synthesis of two fields with little common history.

  3. Unravelling the size distribution of social groups with information theory in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, A.; Villuendas, D.; Vesperinas, C.; Abad, M.; Plastino, A.

    2010-07-01

    The minimization of Fisher’s information (MFI) approach of Frieden et al. [Phys. Rev. E 60, 48 (1999)] is applied to the study of size distributions in social groups on the basis of a recently established analogy between scale invariant systems and classical gases [Phys. A 389, 490 (2010)]. Going beyond the ideal gas scenario is seen to be tantamount to simulating the interactions taking place, for a competitive cluster growth process, in a scale-free ideal network - a non-correlated network with a connection-degree’s distribution that mimics the scale-free ideal gas density distribution. We use a scaling rule that allows one to classify the final cluster-size distributions using only one parameter that we call the competitiveness, which can be seen as a measure of the strength of the interactions. We find that both empirical city-size distributions and electoral results can be thus reproduced and classified according to this competitiveness-parameter, that also allow us to infer the maximum number of stable social relationships that one person can maintain, known as the Dunbar number, together with its standard deviation. We discuss the importance of this number in connection with the empirical phenomenon known as “six-degrees of separation”. Finally, we show that scaled city-size distributions of large countries follow, in general, the same universal distribution.

  4. Optimal Observation Network Design for Model Discrimination using Information Theory and Bayesian Model Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, H. V.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater systems are complex and subject to multiple interpretations and conceptualizations due to a lack of sufficient information. As a result, multiple conceptual models are often developed and their mean predictions are preferably used to avoid biased predictions from using a single conceptual model. Yet considering too many conceptual models may lead to high prediction uncertainty and may lose the purpose of model development. In order to reduce the number of models, an optimal observation network design is proposed based on maximizing the Kullback-Leibler (KL) information to discriminate competing models. The KL discrimination function derived by Box and Hill [1967] for one additional observation datum at a time is expanded to account for multiple independent spatiotemporal observations. The Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method is used to incorporate existing data and quantify future observation uncertainty arising from conceptual and parametric uncertainties in the discrimination function. To consider the future observation uncertainty, the Monte Carlo realizations of BMA predicted future observations are used to calculate the mean and variance of posterior model probabilities of the competing models. The goal of the optimal observation network design is to find the number and location of observation wells and sampling rounds such that the highest posterior model probability of a model is larger than a desired probability criterion (e.g., 95%). The optimal observation network design is implemented to a groundwater study in the Baton Rouge area, Louisiana to collect new groundwater heads from USGS wells. The considered sources of uncertainty that create multiple groundwater models are the geological architecture, the boundary condition, and the fault permeability architecture. All possible design solutions are enumerated using high performance computing systems. Results show that total model variance (the sum of within-model variance and between

  5. Information network architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, N. D.

    1985-01-01

    Graphs, charts, diagrams and outlines of information relative to information network architectures for advanced aerospace missions, such as the Space Station, are presented. Local area information networks are considered a likely technology solution. The principle needs for the network are listed.

  6. Complex-disease networks of trait-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) unveiled by information theory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiquan; Lee, Younghee; Chen, James L; Rebman, Ellen; Li, Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Thousands of complex-disease single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been discovered in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, these intragenic SNPs have not been collectively mined to unveil the genetic architecture between complex clinical traits. The authors hypothesize that biological annotations of host genes of trait-associated SNPs may reveal the biomolecular modularity across complex-disease traits and offer insights for drug repositioning. Methods Trait-to-polymorphism (SNPs) associations confirmed in GWAS were used. A novel method to quantify trait–trait similarity anchored in Gene Ontology annotations of human proteins and information theory was developed. The results were then validated with the shortest paths of physical protein interactions between biologically similar traits. Results A network was constructed consisting of 280 significant intertrait similarities among 177 disease traits, which covered 1438 well-validated disease-associated SNPs. Thirty-nine percent of intertrait connections were confirmed by curators, and the following additional studies demonstrated the validity of a proportion of the remainder. On a phenotypic trait level, higher Gene Ontology similarity between proteins correlated with smaller ‘shortest distance’ in protein interaction networks of complexly inherited diseases (Spearman p<2.2×10−16). Further, ‘cancer traits’ were similar to one another, as were ‘metabolic syndrome traits’ (Fisher's exact test p=0.001 and 3.5×10−7, respectively). Conclusion An imputed disease network by information-anchored functional similarity from GWAS trait-associated SNPs is reported. It is also demonstrated that small shortest paths of protein interactions correlate with complex-disease function. Taken together, these findings provide the framework for investigating drug targets with unbiased functional biomolecular networks rather than worn-out single-gene and subjective canonical pathway approaches

  7. Information theory applied to the sparse gene ontology annotation network to predict novel gene function

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ying; Li, Jianrong

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Despite advances in the gene annotation process, the functions of a large portion of the gene products remain insufficiently characterized. In addition, the “in silico” prediction of novel Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for partially characterized gene functions or processes is highly dependent on reverse genetic or function genomics approaches. Results We propose a novel approach, Information Theory-based Semantic Similarity (ITSS), to automatically predict molecular functions of genes based on Gene Ontology annotations. We have demonstrated using a 10-fold cross-validation that the ITSS algorithm obtains prediction accuracies (Precision 97%, Recall 77%) comparable to other machine learning algorithms when applied to similarly dense annotated portions of the GO datasets. In addition, such method can generate highly accurate predictions in sparsely annotated portions of GO, in which previous algorithm failed to do so. As a result, our technique generates an order of magnitude more gene function predictions than previous methods. Further, this paper presents the first historical rollback validation for the predicted GO annotations, which may represent more realistic conditions for an evaluation than generally used cross-validations type of evaluations. By manually assessing a random sample of 100 predictions conducted in a historical roll-back evaluation, we estimate that a minimum precision of 51% (95% confidence interval: 43%–58%) can be achieved for the human GO Annotation file dated 2003. Availability The program is available on request. The 97,732 positive predictions of novel gene annotations from the 2005 GO Annotation dataset are available at http://phenos.bsd.uchicago.edu/mphenogo/prediction_result_2005.txt. PMID:17646340

  8. Improving access to health information for older migrants by using grounded theory and social network analysis to understand their information behaviour and digital technology use.

    PubMed

    Goodall, K T; Newman, L A; Ward, P R

    2014-11-01

    Migrant well-being can be strongly influenced by the migration experience and subsequent degree of mainstream language acquisition. There is little research on how older Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD) migrants who have 'aged in place' find health information, and the role which digital technology plays in this. Although the research for this paper was not focused on cancer, we draw out implications for providing cancer-related information to this group. We interviewed 54 participants (14 men and 40 women) aged 63-94 years, who were born in Italy or Greece, and who migrated to Australia mostly as young adults after World War II. Constructivist grounded theory and social network analysis were used for data analysis. Participants identified doctors, adult children, local television, spouse, local newspaper and radio as the most important information sources. They did not generally use computers, the Internet or mobile phones to access information. Literacy in their birth language, and the degree of proficiency in understanding and using English, influenced the range of information sources accessed and the means used. The ways in which older CALD migrants seek and access information has important implications for how professionals and policymakers deliver relevant information to them about cancer prevention, screening, support and treatment, particularly as information and resources are moved online as part of e-health.

  9. Constructor theory of information

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, David; Marletto, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We propose a theory of information expressed solely in terms of which transformations of physical systems are possible and which are impossible—i.e. in constructor-theoretic terms. It includes conjectured, exact laws of physics expressing the regularities that allow information to be physically instantiated. Although these laws are directly about information, independently of the details of particular physical instantiations, information is not regarded as an a priori mathematical or logical concept, but as something whose nature and properties are determined by the laws of physics alone. This theory solves a problem at the foundations of existing information theory, namely that information and distinguishability are each defined in terms of the other. It also explains the relationship between classical and quantum information, and reveals the single, constructor-theoretic property underlying the most distinctive phenomena associated with the latter, including the lack of in-principle distinguishability of some states, the impossibility of cloning, the existence of pairs of variables that cannot simultaneously have sharp values, the fact that measurement processes can be both deterministic and unpredictable, the irreducible perturbation caused by measurement, and locally inaccessible information (as in entangled systems). PMID:25663803

  10. Constructor theory of information.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, David; Marletto, Chiara

    2015-02-08

    We propose a theory of information expressed solely in terms of which transformations of physical systems are possible and which are impossible-i.e. in constructor-theoretic terms. It includes conjectured, exact laws of physics expressing the regularities that allow information to be physically instantiated. Although these laws are directly about information, independently of the details of particular physical instantiations, information is not regarded as an a priori mathematical or logical concept, but as something whose nature and properties are determined by the laws of physics alone. This theory solves a problem at the foundations of existing information theory, namely that information and distinguishability are each defined in terms of the other. It also explains the relationship between classical and quantum information, and reveals the single, constructor-theoretic property underlying the most distinctive phenomena associated with the latter, including the lack of in-principle distinguishability of some states, the impossibility of cloning, the existence of pairs of variables that cannot simultaneously have sharp values, the fact that measurement processes can be both deterministic and unpredictable, the irreducible perturbation caused by measurement, and locally inaccessible information (as in entangled systems).

  11. Information Networks in Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, William L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes current biomedical information networks, focusing on those with an educational function, and elaborates on the problems encountered in planning, implementing, utilizing and evaluating such networks. Journal of Biocommunication, T. Banks, Educ. TV-431N, U. of Calif., San Francisco 94143. Subscription Rates: individuals and libraries,…

  12. Relativistic Quantum Information Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-20

    In S. Kalara and D.V. Nanopou- los, editors, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Black Holes , Membranes, Wormholes and Superstrings, pages...within the gravitational field of a black hole . We outline the general theory of how the entanglement of polarized photons changes under...relativistic Lorentz transformations, and have studied quantum information transmission in the presence of a black hole . A description of the accretion of

  13. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  14. Classical Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhov, Y.

    We begin with the definition of information gained by knowing that an event A has occurred: iota (A) = -log_2 {{P}}(A). (A dual point of view is also useful (although more evasive), where iota (A) is the amount of information needed to specify event A.) Here and below {{P}} stands for the underlying probability distribution. So the rarer an event A, the more information we gain if we know it has occurred. (More broadly, the rarer an event A, the more impact it will have. For example, the unlikely event that occurred in 1938 when fishermen caught a coelacanth - a prehistoric fish believed to be extinct - required a significant change to beliefs about evolution and biology. On the other hand, the likely event of catching a herring or a tuna would hardly imply any change in theories.)

  15. An information theory account of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to efficiently process information and generate appropriate responses depends on the processes collectively called cognitive control. Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed. A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information. This account treats the brain as an information-processing entity where cognitive control and its underlying brain networks play a pivotal role in dealing with conditions of uncertainty. This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory. PMID:25228875

  16. An information theory account of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to efficiently process information and generate appropriate responses depends on the processes collectively called cognitive control. Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed. A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information. This account treats the brain as an information-processing entity where cognitive control and its underlying brain networks play a pivotal role in dealing with conditions of uncertainty. This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory.

  17. Florida Information Resource Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Francis C.

    1986-01-01

    The Florida Information Resource Network (FIRN) is an effort by the Florida education community and the Florida Legislature to provide an electronic link among all agencies, institutions, and schools in the public education system. The communications link, perhaps one of the most advanced in the nation, has three purposes: (1) to provide equal…

  18. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2015-03-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how information may be specifically communicated and dynamically routed in these systems is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that collective dynamical states systematically control patterns of information sharing and transfer in networks, as measured by delayed mutual information and transfer entropies between activities of a network's units. For oscillatory networks we analyze how individual unit properties, the connectivity structure and external inputs all provide means to flexibly control information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve communication patterns at all levels and show how local interventions within one sub-network may remotely control the non-local network-wide routing of information. This theory helps understanding information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function.

  19. Information cascade on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  20. Computer and information networks.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, M; Aronofsky, J; McKenney, J L; Massy, W F

    1973-10-05

    The most basic conclusion coming out of the EDUCOM seminars is that computer networking must be acknowledged as an important new mode for obtaining information and computation (15). It is a real alternative that needs to be given serious attention in current planning and decision-making. Yet the fact is that many institutions are not taking account of networks when they confer on whether or how to replace their main computer. Articulation of the possibilities of computer networks goes back to the early 1960's and before, and working networks have been in evidence for several years now, both commercially and in universities. What is new, however, is the unmistakable recognition-bordering on a sense of the inevitable-that networks are finally practical and here to stay. The visionary and promotional phases of computer networks are over. It is time for hard-nosed comparative analysis (16). Another conclusion of the seminars has to do with the factors that hinder the fuller development of networking. The major problems to be overcome in applying networks to research and education are political, organizational, and economic in nature rather than technological. This is not to say that the hardware and software problems of linking computers and information systems are completely solved, but they are not the big bottlenecks at present. Research and educational institutions must find ways to organize themselves as well as their computers to work together for greater resource sharing. The coming of age of networks takes on special significance as a result of widespread dissatisfactions expressed with the present computing situation. There is a feeling that the current mode of autonomous, self-sufficient operation in the provision of computing and information services is frequently wasteful, deficient, and unresponsive to users' needs because of duplication of effort from one installation to another, incompatibilities, and inadequate documentation, program support, and user

  1. Network theory for inhomogeneous thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angst, Sebastian; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2016-04-01

    The Onsager-de Groot-Callen transport theory, implemented as a network model, is used to simulate the transient Harman method, which is widely used experimentally to determine all thermoelectric transport coefficients in a single measurement setup. It is shown that this method systematically overestimates the Seebeck coefficient for samples composed of two different materials. As a consequence, the figure of merit is also overestimated, if the thermal coupling of the measurement setup to the environment is weak. For a mixture of metal and semiconductor particles near metal percolation the figure of merit obtained by the Harman method is more than 100% too large. For a correct interpretation of the experimental data, information on composition and microstructure of the sample are indispensable.

  2. Translating the Interconnections between Ecological and Hydrological Processes in a Small Watershed into Process Networks using Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Woo, N. C.; Kim, S.; Yun, J.; Kim, S.; Kang, M.; Cho, C. H.; Chun, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate how field measurements can inform the selection of model frameworks in small watershed applications. Based on the assumption that ecohydrological systems are open and complex, we employ the process network analysis to identify the system state and the subsystems architecture with changing environment conditions. Ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes in a watershed can be viewed as a network of processes of a wide range of scales involving various feedback loops and time delay. Using the KoFlux tower-based measurements of energy, water and CO2 flux time series along with those representing the soil-plant-atmospheric continuum; we evaluated statistical measures of characterizing the organization of the information flows in the system. We used Shannon's information entropy and calculated the mutual information and transfer entropy, following Ruddell and Kumar (2009). Transfer entropy can measure the relative strength and time scale of couplings between the variables. In this analysis, we selected 15 variables associated with ecohydrological processes, which are groundwater table height, water temperature, specific conductivity, soil moisture contents at three depths, ecosystem respiration, gross primary productivity, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, precipitation, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, atmospheric pressure, and solar radiation. The data-driven nature of this investigation may shed a light on reconciling model parsimony with equifinality in small watershed applications. (Acknowledgment: This work and the data used in the study were funded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under Grant Weather Information Service Engine (WISE) project,153-3100-3133-302-350 and Grant CATER 2014-3030, respectively. The KoFlux site was supported by the Long-term Ecological Study and Monitoring of Forest Ecosystem Project of Korea Forest Research Institute.)

  3. Quantum Theory is an Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo M.; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the general framework of operational probabilistic theories (OPT), along with the six axioms from which quantum theory can be derived. We argue that the OPT framework along with a relaxed version of five of the axioms, define a general information theory. We close the paper with considerations about the role of the observer in an OPT, and the interpretation of the von Neumann postulate and the Schrödinger-cat paradox.

  4. Graphical Model Theory for Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William B.

    2002-12-08

    Information processing in sensor networks, with many small processors, demands a theory of computation that allows the minimization of processing effort, and the distribution of this effort throughout the network. Graphical model theory provides a probabilistic theory of computation that explicitly addresses complexity and decentralization for optimizing network computation. The junction tree algorithm, for decentralized inference on graphical probability models, can be instantiated in a variety of applications useful for wireless sensor networks, including: sensor validation and fusion; data compression and channel coding; expert systems, with decentralized data structures, and efficient local queries; pattern classification, and machine learning. Graphical models for these applications are sketched, and a model of dynamic sensor validation and fusion is presented in more depth, to illustrate the junction tree algorithm.

  5. Network Security Validation Using Game Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, Vicky; Gregoriades, Andreas

    Non-functional requirements (NFR) such as network security recently gained widespread attention in distributed information systems. Despite their importance however, there is no systematic approach to validate these requirements given the complexity and uncertainty characterizing modern networks. Traditionally, network security requirements specification has been the results of a reactive process. This however, limited the immunity property of the distributed systems that depended on these networks. Security requirements specification need a proactive approach. Networks' infrastructure is constantly under attack by hackers and malicious software that aim to break into computers. To combat these threats, network designers need sophisticated security validation techniques that will guarantee the minimum level of security for their future networks. This paper presents a game-theoretic approach to security requirements validation. An introduction to game theory is presented along with an example that demonstrates the application of the approach.

  6. Building a Shared Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanat, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of information needs in a business environment focuses on how to build a shared information network. Highlights include the evolution of corporate intelligence systems; results of a survey that examined the information networking needs of large corporations; and a case study of the development of an information network at Citibank N.A.…

  7. On directed information theory and Granger causality graphs.

    PubMed

    Amblard, Pierre-Olivier; Michel, Olivier J J

    2011-02-01

    Directed information theory deals with communication channels with feedback. When applied to networks, a natural extension based on causal conditioning is needed. We show here that measures built from directed information theory in networks can be used to assess Granger causality graphs of stochastic processes. We show that directed information theory includes measures such as the transfer entropy, and that it is the adequate information theoretic framework needed for neuroscience applications, such as connectivity inference problems.

  8. Psychology and social networks: a dynamic network theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Westaby, James D; Pfaff, Danielle L; Redding, Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Research on social networks has grown exponentially in recent years. However, despite its relevance, the field of psychology has been relatively slow to explain the underlying goal pursuit and resistance processes influencing social networks in the first place. In this vein, this article aims to demonstrate how a dynamic network theory perspective explains the way in which social networks influence these processes and related outcomes, such as goal achievement, performance, learning, and emotional contagion at the interpersonal level of analysis. The theory integrates goal pursuit, motivation, and conflict conceptualizations from psychology with social network concepts from sociology and organizational science to provide a taxonomy of social network role behaviors, such as goal striving, system supporting, goal preventing, system negating, and observing. This theoretical perspective provides psychologists with new tools to map social networks (e.g., dynamic network charts), which can help inform the development of change interventions. Implications for social, industrial-organizational, and counseling psychology as well as conflict resolution are discussed, and new opportunities for research are highlighted, such as those related to dynamic network intelligence (also known as cognitive accuracy), levels of analysis, methodological/ethical issues, and the need to theoretically broaden the study of social networking and social media behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Information Recovery in Behavioral Networks

    PubMed Central

    Squartini, Tiziano; Ser-Giacomi, Enrico; Garlaschelli, Diego; Judge, George

    2015-01-01

    In the context of agent based modeling and network theory, we focus on the problem of recovering behavior-related choice information from origin-destination type data, a topic also known under the name of network tomography. As a basis for predicting agents' choices we emphasize the connection between adaptive intelligent behavior, causal entropy maximization, and self-organized behavior in an open dynamic system. We cast this problem in the form of binary and weighted networks and suggest information theoretic entropy-driven methods to recover estimates of the unknown behavioral flow parameters. Our objective is to recover the unknown behavioral values across the ensemble analytically, without explicitly sampling the configuration space. In order to do so, we consider the Cressie-Read family of entropic functionals, enlarging the set of estimators commonly employed to make optimal use of the available information. More specifically, we explicitly work out two cases of particular interest: Shannon functional and the likelihood functional. We then employ them for the analysis of both univariate and bivariate data sets, comparing their accuracy in reproducing the observed trends. PMID:25946169

  10. Scholarly Information Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsparg, Paul

    I review the background and some recent trends of a particular scholarly information network, arXiv.org, and discuss some of its implications for new scholarly publication models. If we were to start from scratch today to design a quality-controlled archive and distribution system for scientific and technical information, it could take a very different form from what has evolved in the past decade from pre-existing print infrastructure. Near-term advances in automated classification systems, authoring tools, and document formats will facilitate efficient datamining and long-term archival stability, and I discuss how these could provide not only more efficient means of accessing and navigating the information, but also more cost-effective means of authentication and quality control. Finally, I illustrate the use of machine learning techniques to analyze, structure, maintain, and evolve a large online corpus of academic literature. An emerging field of research can be identified as part of an existing corpus, permitting the implementation of a more coherent community structure for its network of practitioners.

  11. Geoscience Information Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. L.; Gundersen, L. C.

    2007-12-01

    Geological surveys in the USA have an estimated 2,000-3,000 databases that represent one of the largest, long- term information resources on the geology of the United States and collectively constitute a national geoscience data "backbone" for research and applications. An NSF-supported workshop in February, 2007, among representatives of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and the USGS, recommended that "the nation's geological surveys develop a national geoscience information framework that is distributed, interoperable, uses open source standards and common protocols, respects and acknowledges data ownership, fosters communities of practice to grow, and develops new web services and clients." The AASG and USGS have formally endorsed the workshop recommendations and formed a joint Steering Committee to pursue design and implementation of the Geoscience Information Network (GIN). GIN is taking a modular approach in assembling the network: 1. Agreement on open-source standards and common protocols through the use of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. 2. A data exchange model utilizing the geoscience mark-up language GeoSciML, an OGC GML-based application. 3. A prototype data discovery tool (National Digital Catalogue - NDC) developing under the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program run by the USGS. 4. Data integration tools developed or planned by a number of independent projects. A broader NSF-sponsored workshop in March 2007 examined what direction the geoinformatics community in the US should take towards developing a National Geoinformatics System. The final report stated that, "It was clear that developing such a system should involve a partnership between academia, government, and industry that should be closely connected to the efforts of the U. S. Geological Survey and the state geological surveys..." The GIN is collaborating with 1-G Europe, a coalition of 27 European geological surveys in the One

  12. Informed Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert

    2012-01-01

    There is a widespread idea that in grounded theory (GT) research, the researcher has to delay the literature review until the end of the analysis to avoid contamination--a dictum that might turn educational researchers away from GT. Nevertheless, in this article the author (a) problematizes the dictum of delaying a literature review in classic…

  13. Potential theory for directed networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Lü, Linyuan; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Zhu, Yu-Xiao; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering factors underlying the network formation is a long-standing challenge for data mining and network analysis. In particular, the microscopic organizing principles of directed networks are less understood than those of undirected networks. This article proposes a hypothesis named potential theory, which assumes that every directed link corresponds to a decrease of a unit potential and subgraphs with definable potential values for all nodes are preferred. Combining the potential theory with the clustering and homophily mechanisms, it is deduced that the Bi-fan structure consisting of 4 nodes and 4 directed links is the most favored local structure in directed networks. Our hypothesis receives strongly positive supports from extensive experiments on 15 directed networks drawn from disparate fields, as indicated by the most accurate and robust performance of Bi-fan predictor within the link prediction framework. In summary, our main contribution is twofold: (i) We propose a new mechanism for the local organization of directed networks; (ii) We design the corresponding link prediction algorithm, which can not only testify our hypothesis, but also find out direct applications in missing link prediction and friendship recommendation.

  14. Information: theory, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Greg; Ward, Ryan D; Balsam, Peter D

    2013-11-01

    In the 65 years since its formal specification, information theory has become an established statistical paradigm, providing powerful tools for quantifying probabilistic relationships. Behavior analysis has begun to adopt these tools as a novel means of measuring the interrelations between behavior, stimuli, and contingent outcomes. This approach holds great promise for making more precise determinations about the causes of behavior and the forms in which conditioning may be encoded by organisms. In addition to providing an introduction to the basics of information theory, we review some of the ways that information theory has informed the studies of Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and behavioral neuroscience. In addition to enriching each of these empirical domains, information theory has the potential to act as a common statistical framework by which results from different domains may be integrated, compared, and ultimately unified.

  15. INFORMATION: THEORY, BRAIN, AND BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Greg; Ward, Ryan D.; Balsam, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    In the 65 years since its formal specification, information theory has become an established statistical paradigm, providing powerful tools for quantifying probabilistic relationships. Behavior analysis has begun to adopt these tools as a novel means of measuring the interrelations between behavior, stimuli, and contingent outcomes. This approach holds great promise for making more precise determinations about the causes of behavior and the forms in which conditioning may be encoded by organisms. In addition to providing an introduction to the basics of information theory, we review some of the ways that information theory has informed the studies of Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and behavioral neuroscience. In addition to enriching each of these empirical domains, information theory has the potential to act as a common statistical framework by which results from different domains may be integrated, compared, and ultimately unified. PMID:24122456

  16. Extracting information from multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-06-01

    Multiplex networks are generalized network structures that are able to describe networks in which the same set of nodes are connected by links that have different connotations. Multiplex networks are ubiquitous since they describe social, financial, engineering, and biological networks as well. Extending our ability to analyze complex networks to multiplex network structures increases greatly the level of information that is possible to extract from big data. For these reasons, characterizing the centrality of nodes in multiplex networks and finding new ways to solve challenging inference problems defined on multiplex networks are fundamental questions of network science. In this paper, we discuss the relevance of the Multiplex PageRank algorithm for measuring the centrality of nodes in multilayer networks and we characterize the utility of the recently introduced indicator function Θ ˜ S for describing their mesoscale organization and community structure. As working examples for studying these measures, we consider three multiplex network datasets coming for social science.

  17. Extracting information from multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-06-01

    Multiplex networks are generalized network structures that are able to describe networks in which the same set of nodes are connected by links that have different connotations. Multiplex networks are ubiquitous since they describe social, financial, engineering, and biological networks as well. Extending our ability to analyze complex networks to multiplex network structures increases greatly the level of information that is possible to extract from big data. For these reasons, characterizing the centrality of nodes in multiplex networks and finding new ways to solve challenging inference problems defined on multiplex networks are fundamental questions of network science. In this paper, we discuss the relevance of the Multiplex PageRank algorithm for measuring the centrality of nodes in multilayer networks and we characterize the utility of the recently introduced indicator function Θ̃(S) for describing their mesoscale organization and community structure. As working examples for studying these measures, we consider three multiplex network datasets coming for social science.

  18. Information Networking in Population Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    The rapidly increasing body of knowledge in population education has created the need for systematic and effective information services. Information networking entails sharing resources so that the information needs of all network participants are met. The goals of this manual are to: (1) instill in population education specialists a more…

  19. Publications of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, January through December 1974. [deep space network, Apollo project, information theory, and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formalized technical reporting is described and indexed, which resulted from scientific and engineering work performed, or managed, by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The five classes of publications included are technical reports, technical memorandums, articles from the bimonthly Deep Space Network Progress Report, special publications, and articles published in the open literature. The publications are indexed by author, subject, and publication type and number.

  20. Interdisciplinary and physics challenges of network theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-09-01

    Network theory has unveiled the underlying structure of complex systems such as the Internet or the biological networks in the cell. It has identified universal properties of complex networks, and the interplay between their structure and dynamics. After almost twenty years of the field, new challenges lie ahead. These challenges concern the multilayer structure of most of the networks, the formulation of a network geometry and topology, and the development of a quantum theory of networks. Making progress on these aspects of network theory can open new venues to address interdisciplinary and physics challenges including progress on brain dynamics, new insights into quantum technologies, and quantum gravity.

  1. Multiple-User Quantum Information Theory for Optical Communication Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    recognized to be composed of special cases of quantum mechanics and/or relativity theory. Paul Dirac brought relativity theory to bear on quantum physics, so...Borade, S., Zheng, L., and Trott , M., “Multilevel broadcast networks,” Proceed- ings of the IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Nice

  2. Epistasis analysis using information theory.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Hu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce entropy-based measures derived from information theory for detecting and characterizing epistasis in genetic association studies. We provide a general overview of the methods and highlight some of the modifications that have greatly improved its power for genetic analysis. We end with a few published studies of complex human diseases that have used these measures.

  3. Information thermodynamics on causal networks.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sosuke; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2013-11-01

    We study nonequilibrium thermodynamics of complex information flows induced by interactions between multiple fluctuating systems. Characterizing nonequilibrium dynamics by causal networks (i.e., Bayesian networks), we obtain novel generalizations of the second law of thermodynamics and the fluctuation theorem, which include an informational quantity characterized by the topology of the causal network. Our result implies that the entropy production in a single system in the presence of multiple other systems is bounded by the information flow between these systems. We demonstrate our general result by a simple model of biochemical adaptation.

  4. Quantum Information Theory - an Invitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Reinhard F.

    Quantum information and quantum computers have received a lot of public attention recently. Quantum computers have been advertised as a kind of warp drive for computing, and indeed the promise of the algorithms of Shor and Grover is to perform computations which are extremely hard or even provably impossible on any merely ``classical'' computer.In this article I shall give an account of the basic concepts of quantum information theory is given, staying as much as possible in the area of general agreement.The article is divided into two parts. The first (up to the end of Sect. 2.5) is mostly in plain English, centered around the exploration of what can or cannot be done with quantum systems as information carriers. The second part, Sect. 2.6, then gives a description of the mathematical structures and of some of the tools needed to develop the theory.

  5. Unification of quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeyesinghe, Anura

    We present the unification of many previously disparate results in noisy quantum Shannon theory and the unification of all of noiseless quantum Shannon theory. More specifically we deal here with bipartite, unidirectional, and memoryless quantum Shannon theory. We find all the optimal protocols and quantify the relationship between the resources used, both for the one-shot and for the ensemble case, for what is arguably the most fundamental task in quantum information theory: sharing entangled states between a sender and a receiver. We find that all of these protocols are derived from our one-shot superdense coding protocol and relate nicely to each other. We then move on to noisy quantum information theory and give a simple, direct proof of the "mother" protocol, or rather her generalization to the Fully Quantum Slepian-Wolf protocol (FQSW). FQSW simultaneously accomplishes two goals: quantum communication-assisted entanglement distillation, and state transfer from the sender to the receiver. As a result, in addition to her other "children," the mother protocol generates the state merging primitive of Horodecki, Oppenheim, and Winter as well as a new class of distributed compression protocols for correlated quantum sources, which are optimal for sources described by separable density operators. Moreover, the mother protocol described here is easily transformed into the so-called "father" protocol, demonstrating that the division of single-sender/single-receiver protocols into two families was unnecessary: all protocols in the family are children of the mother.

  6. Studies in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    Quantum information theory started as the backdrop for quantum computing and is often considered only in relation to this technology, which is still in its infancy. But quantum information theory is only partly about quantum computing. While much of the interest in this field is spurred by the possible use of quantum computers for code breaking using fast factoring algorithms, to a physicist interested in deeper issues, it presents an entirely new set of questions based on an entirely different way of looking at the quantum world. This thesis is an exploration of several topics in quantum information theory. But it is also more than this. This thesis explores the new paradigm brought about by quantum information theory---that of physics as the flow of information. The thesis consists of three main parts. The first part describes my work on continuous-variable cluster states, a new platform for quantum computation. This begins with background material discussing classical and quantum computation and emphasizing the physical underpinnings of each, followed by a discussion of two recent unorthodox models of quantum computation. These models are combined into an original proposal for quantum computation using continuous-variable cluster states, including a proposed optical implementation. These are followed by a mathematical result radically simplifying the optical construction. Subsequent work simplifies this connection even further and provides a constructive proposal for scalable generation of large-scale cluster states---necessary if there is to be any hope of using this method in practical quantum computation. Experimental implementation is currently underway by my collaborators at The University of Virginia. The second part describes my work related to the physics of trapped ions, starting with an overview of the basic theory of linear ion traps. Although ion traps are often discussed in terms of their potential use for quantum computation, my work looks at their

  7. Building a Unified Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avram, Henriette D.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses cooperative efforts between research organizations and libraries to create a national information network. Topics discussed include the Linked System Project (LSP); technical processing versus reference and research functions; Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model; the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET); and…

  8. Network Information Management Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatburn, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is implementing a distributed data base management system in which the data are shared among several applications and the host machines are not totally dedicated to a particular application. Since the data and resources are to be shared, the equipment must be operated carefully so that the resources are shared equitably. The current status of the project is discussed and policies, roles, and guidelines are recommended for the organizations involved in the project.

  9. The Changing Landscape of Literacy Curriculum in a Sino-Canada Transnational Education Programme: An Actor-Network Theory Informed Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zheng; Heydon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns an exploratory and interpretive case study of the literacy curricula in a Canadian transnational education programme (Pseudonym: SCS) delivered in China where Ontario secondary school curricula were used at the same time as the Chinese national high school curricula. Using ethnographic tools and actor-network theory, the study…

  10. Advances in the Theory of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruani, Fernando

    An exhaustive and comprehensive review on the theory of complex networks would imply nowadays a titanic task, and it would result in a lengthy work containing plenty of technical details of arguable relevance. Instead, this chapter addresses very briefly the ABC of complex network theory, visiting only the hallmarks of the theoretical founding, to finally focus on two of the most interesting and promising current research problems: the study of dynamical processes on transportation networks and the identification of communities in complex networks.

  11. Ranking Information in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliassi-Rad, Tina; Henderson, Keith

    Given a network, we are interested in ranking sets of nodes that score highest on user-specified criteria. For instance in graphs from bibliographic data (e.g. PubMed), we would like to discover sets of authors with expertise in a wide range of disciplines. We present this ranking task as a Top-K problem; utilize fixed-memory heuristic search; and present performance of both the serial and distributed search algorithms on synthetic and real-world data sets.

  12. Information communication on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Akito; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Maruyama, Takahiro; Morioka, Atsushi; Naganuma, Yuki

    2013-02-01

    Since communication networks such as the Internet, which is regarded as a complex network, have recently become a huge scale and a lot of data pass through them, the improvement of packet routing strategies for transport is one of the most significant themes in the study of computer networks. It is especially important to find routing strategies which can bear as many traffic as possible without congestion in complex networks. First, using neural networks, we introduce a strategy for packet routing on complex networks, where path lengths and queue lengths in nodes are taken into account within a framework of statistical physics. Secondly, instead of using shortest paths, we propose efficient paths which avoid hubs, nodes with a great many degrees, on scale-free networks with a weight of each node. We improve the heuristic algorithm proposed by Danila et. al. which optimizes step by step routing properties on congestion by using the information of betweenness, the probability of paths passing through a node in all optimal paths which are defined according to a rule, and mitigates the congestion. We confirm the new heuristic algorithm which balances traffic on networks by achieving minimization of the maximum betweenness in much smaller number of iteration steps. Finally, We model virus spreading and data transfer on peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Using mean-field approximation, we obtain an analytical formulation and emulate virus spreading on the network and compare the results with those of simulation. Moreover, we investigate the mitigation of information traffic congestion in the P2P networks.

  13. Network of Interdependent Networks: Overview of Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Gao, Jianxi; Huang, Xuqing; Shao, Shuai; Vodenska, Irena; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Paul, Gerald; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    Complex networks appear in almost every aspect of science and technology. Previous work in network theory has focused primarily on analyzing single networks that do not interact with other networks, despite the fact that many real-world networks interact with and depend on each other. Very recently an analytical framework for studying the percolation properties of interacting networks has been introduced. Here we review the analytical framework and the results for percolation laws for a network of networks (NON) formed by n interdependent random networks. The percolation properties of a network of networks differ greatly from those of single isolated networks. In particular, although networks with broad degree distributions, e.g., scale-free networks, are robust when analyzed as single networks, they become vulnerable in a NON. Moreover, because the constituent networks of a NON are connected by node dependencies, a NON is subject to cascading failure. When there is strong interdependent coupling between networks, the percolation transition is discontinuous (is a first-order transition), unlike the well-known continuous second-order transition in single isolated networks. We also review some possible real-world applications of NON theory.

  14. Recoverability in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark

    The fact that the quantum relative entropy is non-increasing with respect to quantum physical evolutions lies at the core of many optimality theorems in quantum information theory and has applications in other areas of physics. In this work, we establish improvements of this entropy inequality in the form of physically meaningful remainder terms. One of the main results can be summarized informally as follows: if the decrease in quantum relative entropy between two quantum states after a quantum physical evolution is relatively small, then it is possible to perform a recovery operation, such that one can perfectly recover one state while approximately recovering the other. This can be interpreted as quantifying how well one can reverse a quantum physical evolution. Our proof method is elementary, relying on the method of complex interpolation, basic linear algebra, and the recently introduced Renyi generalization of a relative entropy difference. The theorem has a number of applications in quantum information theory, which have to do with providing physically meaningful improvements to many known entropy inequalities. This is based on arXiv:1505.04661, now accepted for publication in Proceedings of the Royal Society A. I acknowledge support from startup funds from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU, the NSF under Award No. CCF-1350397, and the DARPA Quiness Program through US Army Research Office award W31P4Q-12-1-0019.

  15. Information Theory, Inference and Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, David J. C.

    2003-10-01

    Information theory and inference, often taught separately, are here united in one entertaining textbook. These topics lie at the heart of many exciting areas of contemporary science and engineering - communication, signal processing, data mining, machine learning, pattern recognition, computational neuroscience, bioinformatics, and cryptography. This textbook introduces theory in tandem with applications. Information theory is taught alongside practical communication systems, such as arithmetic coding for data compression and sparse-graph codes for error-correction. A toolbox of inference techniques, including message-passing algorithms, Monte Carlo methods, and variational approximations, are developed alongside applications of these tools to clustering, convolutional codes, independent component analysis, and neural networks. The final part of the book describes the state of the art in error-correcting codes, including low-density parity-check codes, turbo codes, and digital fountain codes -- the twenty-first century standards for satellite communications, disk drives, and data broadcast. Richly illustrated, filled with worked examples and over 400 exercises, some with detailed solutions, David MacKay's groundbreaking book is ideal for self-learning and for undergraduate or graduate courses. Interludes on crosswords, evolution, and sex provide entertainment along the way. In sum, this is a textbook on information, communication, and coding for a new generation of students, and an unparalleled entry point into these subjects for professionals in areas as diverse as computational biology, financial engineering, and machine learning.

  16. Social Network Theory and Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Alan J., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Social Network Theory and Educational Change" offers a provocative and fascinating exploration of how social networks in schools can impede or facilitate the work of education reform. Drawing on the work of leading scholars, the book comprises a series of studies examining networks among teachers and school leaders, contrasting formal…

  17. Beyond mean field theory: statistical field theory for neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Buice, Michael A; Chow, Carson C

    2014-01-01

    Mean field theories have been a stalwart for studying the dynamics of networks of coupled neurons. They are convenient because they are relatively simple and possible to analyze. However, classical mean field theory neglects the effects of fluctuations and correlations due to single neuron effects. Here, we consider various possible approaches for going beyond mean field theory and incorporating correlation effects. Statistical field theory methods, in particular the Doi–Peliti–Janssen formalism, are particularly useful in this regard. PMID:25243014

  18. Whether information network supplements friendship network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Lili; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Nie, Da-Cheng; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-02-01

    Homophily is a significant mechanism for link prediction in complex network, of which principle describes that people with similar profiles or experiences tend to tie with each other. In a multi-relationship network, friendship among people has been utilized to reinforce similarity of taste for recommendation system whose basic idea is similar to homophily, yet how the taste inversely affects friendship prediction is little discussed. This paper contributes to address the issue by analyzing two benchmark data sets both including user's behavioral information of taste and friendship based on the principle of homophily. It can be found that the creation of friendship tightly associates with personal taste. Especially, the behavioral information of taste involving with popular objects is much more effective to improve the performance of friendship prediction. However, this result seems to be contradictory to the finding in Zhang et al. (2013) that the behavior information of taste involving with popular objects is redundant in recommendation system. We thus discuss this inconformity to comprehensively understand the correlation between them.

  19. The application of information theory to biochemical signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Alex; Cheong, Raymond; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-08-01

    Cell signaling can be thought of fundamentally as an information transmission problem in which chemical messengers relay information about the external environment to the decision centers within a cell. Due to the biochemical nature of cellular signal transduction networks, molecular noise will inevitably limit the fidelity of any messages received and processed by a cell's signal transduction networks, leaving it with an imperfect impression of its environment. Fortunately, Shannon's information theory provides a mathematical framework independent of network complexity that can quantify the amount of information that can be transmitted despite biochemical noise. In particular, the channel capacity can be used to measure the maximum number of stimuli a cell can distinguish based upon the noisy responses of its signaling systems. Here, we provide a primer for quantitative biologists that covers fundamental concepts of information theory, highlights several key considerations when experimentally measuring channel capacity, and describes successful examples of the application of information theoretic analysis to biological signaling.

  20. Network susceptibilities: Theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Manik, Debsankha; Rohden, Martin; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of network susceptibilities quantifying the response of the collective dynamics of a network to small parameter changes. We distinguish two types of susceptibilities: vertex susceptibilities and edge susceptibilities, measuring the responses due to changes in the properties of units and their interactions, respectively. We derive explicit forms of network susceptibilities for oscillator networks close to steady states and offer example applications for Kuramoto-type phase-oscillator models, power grid models, and generic flow models. Focusing on the role of the network topology implies that these ideas can be easily generalized to other types of networks, in particular those characterizing flow, transport, or spreading phenomena. The concept of network susceptibilities is broadly applicable and may straightforwardly be transferred to all settings where networks responses of the collective dynamics to topological changes are essential.

  1. Network susceptibilities: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Debsankha; Rohden, Martin; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of network susceptibilities quantifying the response of the collective dynamics of a network to small parameter changes. We distinguish two types of susceptibilities: vertex susceptibilities and edge susceptibilities, measuring the responses due to changes in the properties of units and their interactions, respectively. We derive explicit forms of network susceptibilities for oscillator networks close to steady states and offer example applications for Kuramoto-type phase-oscillator models, power grid models, and generic flow models. Focusing on the role of the network topology implies that these ideas can be easily generalized to other types of networks, in particular those characterizing flow, transport, or spreading phenomena. The concept of network susceptibilities is broadly applicable and may straightforwardly be transferred to all settings where networks responses of the collective dynamics to topological changes are essential.

  2. Mathematical Theory of Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-31

    This report provides a summary of the grant work by the principal investigators in the area of neural networks . The topics covered deal with...properties) for nets; and the use of neural networks for the control of nonlinear systems.

  3. Information transmission in genetic regulatory networks: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2011-04-01

    Genetic regulatory networks enable cells to respond to changes in internal and external conditions by dynamically coordinating their gene expression profiles. Our ability to make quantitative measurements in these biochemical circuits has deepened our understanding of what kinds of computations genetic regulatory networks can perform, and with what reliability. These advances have motivated researchers to look for connections between the architecture and function of genetic regulatory networks. Transmitting information between a network's inputs and outputs has been proposed as one such possible measure of function, relevant in certain biological contexts. Here we summarize recent developments in the application of information theory to gene regulatory networks. We first review basic concepts in information theory necessary for understanding recent work. We then discuss the functional complexity of gene regulation, which arises from the molecular nature of the regulatory interactions. We end by reviewing some experiments that support the view that genetic networks responsible for early development of multicellular organisms might be maximizing transmitted 'positional information'.

  4. Brain and cognitive reserve: Translation via network control theory.

    PubMed

    Medaglia, John Dominic; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Hamilton, Roy H; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L; Bassett, Danielle S

    2017-04-01

    Traditional approaches to understanding the brain's resilience to neuropathology have identified neurophysiological variables, often described as brain or cognitive "reserve," associated with better outcomes. However, mechanisms of function and resilience in large-scale brain networks remain poorly understood. Dynamic network theory may provide a basis for substantive advances in understanding functional resilience in the human brain. In this perspective, we describe recent theoretical approaches from network control theory as a framework for investigating network level mechanisms underlying cognitive function and the dynamics of neuroplasticity in the human brain. We describe the theoretical opportunities offered by the application of network control theory at the level of the human connectome to understand cognitive resilience and inform translational intervention.

  5. Networking Theories by Iterative Unpacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koichu, Boris

    2014-01-01

    An iterative unpacking strategy consists of sequencing empirically-based theoretical developments so that at each step of theorizing one theory serves as an overarching conceptual framework, in which another theory, either existing or emerging, is embedded in order to elaborate on the chosen element(s) of the overarching theory. The strategy is…

  6. A network theory of mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Borsboom, Denny

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the network approach to psychopathology has been advanced as an alternative way of conceptualizing mental disorders. In this approach, mental disorders arise from direct interactions between symptoms. Although the network approach has led to many novel methodologies and substantive applications, it has not yet been fully articulated as a scientific theory of mental disorders. The present paper aims to develop such a theory, by postulating a limited set of theoretical principles regarding the structure and dynamics of symptom networks. At the heart of the theory lies the notion that symptoms of psychopathology are causally connected through myriads of biological, psychological and societal mechanisms. If these causal relations are sufficiently strong, symptoms can generate a level of feedback that renders them self‐sustaining. In this case, the network can get stuck in a disorder state. The network theory holds that this is a general feature of mental disorders, which can therefore be understood as alternative stable states of strongly connected symptom networks. This idea naturally leads to a comprehensive model of psychopathology, encompassing a common explanatory model for mental disorders, as well as novel definitions of associated concepts such as mental health, resilience, vulnerability and liability. In addition, the network theory has direct implications for how to understand diagnosis and treatment, and suggests a clear agenda for future research in psychiatry and associated disciplines. PMID:28127906

  7. A Complexity Theory of Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-09

    Significant progress has been made in laying the foundations of a complexity theory of neural networks . The fundamental complexity classes have been...identified and studied. The class of problems solvable by small, shallow neural networks has been found to be the same class even if (1) probabilistic...behaviour (2)Multi-valued logic, and (3)analog behaviour, are allowed (subject to certain resonable technical assumptions). Neural networks can be

  8. Information Theory in Biology after 18 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Horton A.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews applications of information theory to biology, concluding that they have not proved very useful. Suggests modifications and extensions to increase the biological relevance of the theory, and speculates about applications in quantifying cell proliferation, chemical homeostasis and aging. (EB)

  9. Information transport in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Cunlai; Li, Siyuan; Yang, Xianxia; Yang, Jian; Wang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study information transport in multiplex networks comprised of two coupled subnetworks. The upper subnetwork, called the logical layer, employs the shortest paths protocol to determine the logical paths for packets transmission, while the lower subnetwork acts as the physical layer, in which packets are delivered by the biased random walk mechanism characterized with a parameter α. Through simulation, we obtain the optimal α corresponding to the maximum network lifetime and the maximum number of the arrival packets. Assortative coupling is better than random coupling and disassortative coupling, since it achieves better transmission performance. Generally, the more homogeneous the lower subnetwork is, the better the transmission performance, which is the opposite for the upper subnetwork. Finally, we propose an attack centrality for nodes based on the topological information of both subnetworks, and investigate the transmission performance under targeted attacks. Our work aids in understanding the spread and robustness issues of multiplex networks and provides some clues about the design of more efficient and robust routing architectures in communication systems.

  10. Queuing theory models for computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1989-01-01

    A set of simple queuing theory models which can model the average response of a network of computers to a given traffic load has been implemented using a spreadsheet. The impact of variations in traffic patterns and intensities, channel capacities, and message protocols can be assessed using them because of the lack of fine detail in the network traffic rates, traffic patterns, and the hardware used to implement the networks. A sample use of the models applied to a realistic problem is included in appendix A. Appendix B provides a glossary of terms used in this paper. This Ames Research Center computer communication network is an evolving network of local area networks (LANs) connected via gateways and high-speed backbone communication channels. Intelligent planning of expansion and improvement requires understanding the behavior of the individual LANs as well as the collection of networks as a whole.

  11. A novel approach to characterize information radiation in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Lin; Li, Chao

    2016-06-01

    The traditional research of information dissemination is mostly based on the virus spreading model that the information is being spread by probability, which does not match very well to the reality, because the information that we receive is always more or less than what was sent. In order to quantitatively describe variations in the amount of information during the spreading process, this article proposes a safety information radiation model on the basis of communication theory, combining with relevant theories of complex networks. This model comprehensively considers the various influence factors when safety information radiates in the network, and introduces some concepts from the communication theory perspective, such as the radiation gain function, receiving gain function, information retaining capacity and information second reception capacity, to describe the safety information radiation process between nodes and dynamically investigate the states of network nodes. On a micro level, this article analyzes the influence of various initial conditions and parameters on safety information radiation through the new model simulation. The simulation reveals that this novel approach can reflect the variation of safety information quantity of each node in the complex network, and the scale-free network has better "radiation explosive power", while the small-world network has better "radiation staying power". The results also show that it is efficient to improve the overall performance of network security by selecting nodes with high degrees as the information source, refining and simplifying the information, increasing the information second reception capacity and decreasing the noises. In a word, this article lays the foundation for further research on the interactions of information and energy between internal components within complex systems.

  12. Time series characterization via horizontal visibility graph and Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Bruna Amin; Carpi, Laura; Rosso, Osvaldo A.; Ravetti, Martín G.

    2016-12-01

    Complex networks theory have gained wider applicability since methods for transformation of time series to networks were proposed and successfully tested. In the last few years, horizontal visibility graph has become a popular method due to its simplicity and good results when applied to natural and artificially generated data. In this work, we explore different ways of extracting information from the network constructed from the horizontal visibility graph and evaluated by Information Theory quantifiers. Most works use the degree distribution of the network, however, we found alternative probability distributions, more efficient than the degree distribution in characterizing dynamical systems. In particular, we find that, when using distributions based on distances and amplitude values, significant shorter time series are required. We analyze fractional Brownian motion time series, and a paleoclimatic proxy record of ENSO from the Pallcacocha Lake to study dynamical changes during the Holocene.

  13. Transmission of information in active networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M. S.; Kurths, J.

    2008-02-01

    Shannon’s capacity theorem is the main concept behind the theory of communication. It says that if the amount of information contained in a signal is smaller than the channel capacity of a physical media of communication, it can be transmitted with arbitrarily small probability of error. This theorem is usually applicable to ideal channels of communication in which the information to be transmitted does not alter the passive characteristics of the channel that basically tries to reproduce the source of information. For an active channel, a network formed by elements that are dynamical systems (such as neurons, chaotic or periodic oscillators), it is unclear if such theorem is applicable, once an active channel can adapt to the input of a signal, altering its capacity. To shed light into this matter, we show, among other results, how to calculate the information capacity of an active channel of communication. Then, we show that the channel capacity depends on whether the active channel is self-excitable or not and that, contrary to a current belief, desynchronization can provide an environment in which large amounts of information can be transmitted in a channel that is self-excitable. An interesting case of a self-excitable active channel is a network of electrically connected Hindmarsh-Rose chaotic neurons.

  14. An introductory review of information theory in the context of computational neuroscience.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Mark D; Ikeda, Shiro; Manton, Jonathan H

    2011-07-01

    This article introduces several fundamental concepts in information theory from the perspective of their origins in engineering. Understanding such concepts is important in neuroscience for two reasons. Simply applying formulae from information theory without understanding the assumptions behind their definitions can lead to erroneous results and conclusions. Furthermore, this century will see a convergence of information theory and neuroscience; information theory will expand its foundations to incorporate more comprehensively biological processes thereby helping reveal how neuronal networks achieve their remarkable information processing abilities.

  15. Effective information spreading based on local information in correlated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Liming; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Using network-based information to facilitate information spreading is an essential task for spreading dynamics in complex networks. Focusing on degree correlated networks, we propose a preferential contact strategy based on the local network structure and local informed density to promote the information spreading. During the spreading process, an informed node will preferentially select a contact target among its neighbors, basing on their degrees or local informed densities. By extensively implementing numerical simulations in synthetic and empirical networks, we find that when only consider the local structure information, the convergence time of information spreading will be remarkably reduced if low-degree neighbors are favored as contact targets. Meanwhile, the minimum convergence time depends non-monotonically on degree-degree correlation, and a moderate correlation coefficient results in the most efficient information spreading. Incorporating the local informed density information into contact strategy, the convergence time of information spreading can be further reduced, and be minimized by an moderately preferential selection.

  16. Towards a predictive theory for genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacik, Gasper

    When cells respond to changes in the environment by regulating the expression levels of their genes, we often draw parallels between these biological processes and engineered information processing systems. One can go beyond this qualitative analogy, however, by analyzing information transmission in biochemical ``hardware'' using Shannon's information theory. Here, gene regulation is viewed as a transmission channel operating under restrictive constraints set by the resource costs and intracellular noise. We present a series of results demonstrating that a theory of information transmission in genetic regulatory circuits feasibly yields non-trivial, testable predictions. These predictions concern strategies by which individual gene regulatory elements, e.g., promoters or enhancers, read out their signals; as well as strategies by which small networks of genes, independently or in spatially coupled settings, respond to their inputs. These predictions can be quantitatively compared to the known regulatory networks and their function, and can elucidate how reproducible biological processes, such as embryonic development, can be orchestrated by networks built out of noisy components. Preliminary successes in the gap gene network of the fruit fly Drosophila indicate that a full ab initio theoretical prediction of a regulatory network is possible, a feat that has not yet been achieved for any real regulatory network. We end by describing open challenges on the path towards such a prediction.

  17. Research into Queueing Network Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    aspects. Kleinrock [33] comments on this result, for example. In 1976, Burke [6] provided the first proof of some of what was occurring in the flow...server first passes through other servers (as for example in Jackson networks with loops) that item is delayed on its return. All current knowledge about...system simplification. A simplification is an operation on the system such that a new system is obtained subject to two requirements. First , the

  18. Operationalizing Network Theory for Ecosystem Service Assessments.

    PubMed

    Dee, Laura E; Allesina, Stefano; Bonn, Aletta; Eklöf, Anna; Gaines, Steven D; Hines, Jes; Jacob, Ute; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Possingham, Hugh; Schröter, Matthias; Thompson, Ross M

    2017-02-01

    Managing ecosystems to provide ecosystem services in the face of global change is a pressing challenge for policy and science. Predicting how alternative management actions and changing future conditions will alter services is complicated by interactions among components in ecological and socioeconomic systems. Failure to understand those interactions can lead to detrimental outcomes from management decisions. Network theory that integrates ecological and socioeconomic systems may provide a path to meeting this challenge. While network theory offers promising approaches to examine ecosystem services, few studies have identified how to operationalize networks for managing and assessing diverse ecosystem services. We propose a framework for how to use networks to assess how drivers and management actions will directly and indirectly alter ecosystem services.

  19. Securing Information with Complex Optical Encryption Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-11

    encryption networks, and to provide effective and reliable solutions for information security. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Optical Encryption...popularization of networking and internet , much research effort is made in the field of information security. Military communication system makes an...objective is to propose the architectures for a number of complex optical encryption networks so as to provide effective and reliable solutions for

  20. Computer-Based Information Networks: Selected Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    The history, purpose, and operation of six computer-based information networks are described in general and nontechnical terms. In the introduction the many definitions of an information network are explored. Ohio College Library Center's network (OCLC) is the first example. OCLC began in 1963, and since early 1973 has been extending its services…

  1. Local Area Networks for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibirige, Harry M.

    This examination of the use of local area networks (LANs) by libraries summarizes the findings of a nationwide survey of 600 libraries and information centers and 200 microcomputer networking system manufacturers and vendors, which was conducted to determine the relevance of currently available networking systems for library and information center…

  2. Quantum mechanics and quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Camp, Wesley William

    The principle aim of this dissertation is to investigate the philosophical application of quantum information theory to interpretational issues regarding the theory of quantum mechanics. Recently, quantum information theory has emerged as a potential source for such an interpretation. The main question with which this dissertation will be concerned is whether or not an information-theoretic interpretation can serve as a conceptually acceptable interpretation of quantum mechanics. It will be argued that some of the more obvious approaches -- that quantum information theory shows us that ultimately the world is made of information, and quantum Bayesianism -- fail as philosophical interpretations of quantum mechanics. However, the information-theoretic approach of Clifton, Bub, and Halvorson introduces Einstein's distinction between principle theories and constructive theories, arguing that quantum mechanics is best understood as an information-theoretic principle theory. While I argue that this particular approach fails, it does offer a viable new philosophical role for information theory. Specifically, an investigation of interpretationally successful principle theories such as Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, and general relativity, shows that the particular principles employed are necessary as constitutive elements of a framework which partially defines the basic explanatory concepts of space, time, and motion. Without such constitutive principles as preconditions for empirical meaning, scientific progress is hampered. It is argued that the philosophical issues in quantum mechanics stem from an analogous conceptual crisis. On the basis of this comparison, the best strategy for resolving these problems is to apply a similar sort of conceptual analysis to quantum mechanics so as to provide an appropriate set of constitutive principles clarifying the conceptual issues at stake. It is further argued that quantum information theory is ideally placed as a novel

  3. Linear control theory for gene network modeling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Bleris, Leonidas

    2010-09-16

    Systems biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims at understanding complex interactions in cells. Here we demonstrate that linear control theory can provide valuable insight and practical tools for the characterization of complex biological networks. We provide the foundation for such analyses through the study of several case studies including cascade and parallel forms, feedback and feedforward loops. We reproduce experimental results and provide rational analysis of the observed behavior. We demonstrate that methods such as the transfer function (frequency domain) and linear state-space (time domain) can be used to predict reliably the properties and transient behavior of complex network topologies and point to specific design strategies for synthetic networks.

  4. Information Processing Theory: Classroom Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slate, John R.; Charlesworth, John R., Jr.

    The information processing model, a theoretical framework of how humans think, reason, and learn, views human cognitive functioning as analogous to the operation of a computer. This paper uses the increased understanding of the information processing model to provide teachers with suggestions for improving the teaching-learning process. Major…

  5. Exploring network theory for mass drug administration.

    PubMed

    Chami, Goylette F; Molyneux, David H; Kontoleon, Andreas A; Dunne, David W

    2013-08-01

    Network theory is a well-established discipline that uses mathematical graphs to describe biological, physical, and social systems. The topologies across empirical networks display strikingly similar organizational properties. In particular, the characteristics of these networks allow computational analysis to contribute data unattainable from examining individual components in isolation. However, the interdisciplinary and quantitative nature of network analysis has yet to be exploited by public health initiatives to distribute preventive chemotherapies. One notable application is the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) Roadmap for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) where there is a need to upscale distribution capacity and to target systematic noncompliers. An understanding of local networks for analysing the distributional properties of community-directed treatment may facilitate sustainable expansion of mass drug-administration (MDA) programs.

  6. Hodge Decomposition of Information Flow on Small-World Networks

    PubMed Central

    Haruna, Taichi; Fujiki, Yuuya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the small-world topology on the composition of information flow on networks. By appealing to the combinatorial Hodge theory, we decompose information flow generated by random threshold networks on the Watts-Strogatz model into three components: gradient, harmonic and curl flows. The harmonic and curl flows represent globally circular and locally circular components, respectively. The Watts-Strogatz model bridges the two extreme network topologies, a lattice network and a random network, by a single parameter that is the probability of random rewiring. The small-world topology is realized within a certain range between them. By numerical simulation we found that as networks become more random the ratio of harmonic flow to the total magnitude of information flow increases whereas the ratio of curl flow decreases. Furthermore, both quantities are significantly enhanced from the level when only network structure is considered for the network close to a random network and a lattice network, respectively. Finally, the sum of these two ratios takes its maximum value within the small-world region. These findings suggest that the dynamical information counterpart of global integration and that of local segregation are the harmonic flow and the curl flow, respectively, and that a part of the small-world region is dominated by internal circulation of information flow. PMID:27733817

  7. Hodge Decomposition of Information Flow on Small-World Networks.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Taichi; Fujiki, Yuuya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the small-world topology on the composition of information flow on networks. By appealing to the combinatorial Hodge theory, we decompose information flow generated by random threshold networks on the Watts-Strogatz model into three components: gradient, harmonic and curl flows. The harmonic and curl flows represent globally circular and locally circular components, respectively. The Watts-Strogatz model bridges the two extreme network topologies, a lattice network and a random network, by a single parameter that is the probability of random rewiring. The small-world topology is realized within a certain range between them. By numerical simulation we found that as networks become more random the ratio of harmonic flow to the total magnitude of information flow increases whereas the ratio of curl flow decreases. Furthermore, both quantities are significantly enhanced from the level when only network structure is considered for the network close to a random network and a lattice network, respectively. Finally, the sum of these two ratios takes its maximum value within the small-world region. These findings suggest that the dynamical information counterpart of global integration and that of local segregation are the harmonic flow and the curl flow, respectively, and that a part of the small-world region is dominated by internal circulation of information flow.

  8. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-01-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function. PMID:27067257

  9. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-04-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function.

  10. Urban traffic-network performance: flow theory and simulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Performance models for urban street networks were developed to describe the response of a traffic network to given travel-demand levels. The three basic traffic flow variables, speed, flow, and concentration, are defined at the network level, and three model systems are proposed. Each system consists of a series of interrelated, consistent functions between the three basic traffic-flow variables as well as the fraction of stopped vehicles in the network. These models are subsequently compared with the results of microscopic simulation of a small test network. The sensitivity of one of the model systems to a variety of network features was also explored. Three categories of features were considered, with the specific features tested listed in parentheses: network topology (block length and street width), traffic control (traffic signal coordination), and traffic characteristics (level of inter-vehicular interaction). Finally, a fundamental issue concerning the estimation of two network-level parameters (from a nonlinear relation in the two-fluid theory) was examined. The principal concern was that of comparability of these parameters when estimated with information from a single vehicle (or small group of vehicles), as done in conjunction with previous field studies, and when estimated with network-level information (i.e., all the vehicles), as is possible with simulation.

  11. Maximizing information exchange between complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Geneston, Elvis L.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    Science is not merely the smooth progressive interaction of hypothesis, experiment and theory, although it sometimes has that form. More realistically the scientific study of any given complex phenomenon generates a number of explanations, from a variety of perspectives, that eventually requires synthesis to achieve a deep level of insight and understanding. One such synthesis has created the field of out-of-equilibrium statistical physics as applied to the understanding of complex dynamic networks. Over the past forty years the concept of complexity has undergone a metamorphosis. Complexity was originally seen as a consequence of memory in individual particle trajectories, in full agreement with a Hamiltonian picture of microscopic dynamics and, in principle, macroscopic dynamics could be derived from the microscopic Hamiltonian picture. The main difficulty in deriving macroscopic dynamics from microscopic dynamics is the need to take into account the actions of a very large number of components. The existence of events such as abrupt jumps, considered by the conventional continuous time random walk approach to describing complexity was never perceived as conflicting with the Hamiltonian view. Herein we review many of the reasons why this traditional Hamiltonian view of complexity is unsatisfactory. We show that as a result of technological advances, which make the observation of single elementary events possible, the definition of complexity has shifted from the conventional memory concept towards the action of non-Poisson renewal events. We show that the observation of crucial processes, such as the intermittent fluorescence of blinking quantum dots as well as the brain’s response to music, as monitored by a set of electrodes attached to the scalp, has forced investigators to go beyond the traditional concept of complexity and to establish closer contact with the nascent field of complex networks. Complex networks form one of the most challenging areas of

  12. Nonequilibrium landscape theory of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Han; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Liang; Wang, Xidi; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-11-05

    The brain map project aims to map out the neuron connections of the human brain. Even with all of the wirings mapped out, the global and physical understandings of the function and behavior are still challenging. Hopfield quantified the learning and memory process of symmetrically connected neural networks globally through equilibrium energy. The energy basins of attractions represent memories, and the memory retrieval dynamics is determined by the energy gradient. However, the realistic neural networks are asymmetrically connected, and oscillations cannot emerge from symmetric neural networks. Here, we developed a nonequilibrium landscape-flux theory for realistic asymmetrically connected neural networks. We uncovered the underlying potential landscape and the associated Lyapunov function for quantifying the global stability and function. We found the dynamics and oscillations in human brains responsible for cognitive processes and physiological rhythm regulations are determined not only by the landscape gradient but also by the flux. We found that the flux is closely related to the degrees of the asymmetric connections in neural networks and is the origin of the neural oscillations. The neural oscillation landscape shows a closed-ring attractor topology. The landscape gradient attracts the network down to the ring. The flux is responsible for coherent oscillations on the ring. We suggest the flux may provide the driving force for associations among memories. We applied our theory to rapid-eye movement sleep cycle. We identified the key regulation factors for function through global sensitivity analysis of landscape topography against wirings, which are in good agreements with experiments.

  13. Multimedia Information Networks in Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangliang; Qi, Guojun; Tsai, Shen-Fu; Tsai, Min-Hsuan; Pozo, Andrey Del; Huang, Thomas S.; Zhang, Xuemei; Lim, Suk Hwan

    The popularity of personal digital cameras and online photo/video sharing community has lead to an explosion of multimedia information. Unlike traditional multimedia data, many new multimedia datasets are organized in a structural way, incorporating rich information such as semantic ontology, social interaction, community media, geographical maps, in addition to the multimedia contents by themselves. Studies of such structured multimedia data have resulted in a new research area, which is referred to as Multimedia Information Networks. Multimedia information networks are closely related to social networks, but especially focus on understanding the topics and semantics of the multimedia files in the context of network structure. This chapter reviews different categories of recent systems related to multimedia information networks, summarizes the popular inference methods used in recent works, and discusses the applications related to multimedia information networks. We also discuss a wide range of topics including public datasets, related industrial systems, and potential future research directions in this field.

  14. Information transduction capacity of noisy biochemical signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Raymond; Rhee, Alex; Wang, Chiaochun Joanne; Nemenman, Ilya; Levchenko, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Molecular noise restricts the ability of an individual cell to resolve input signals of different strengths and gather information about the external environment. Transmitting information through complex signaling networks with redundancies can overcome this limitation. We developed an integrative theoretical and experimental framework, based on the formalism of information theory, to quantitatively predict and measure the amount of information transduced by molecular and cellular networks. Analyzing tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling revealed that individual TNF signaling pathways transduce information sufficient for accurate binary decisions, and an upstream bottleneck limits the information gained via multiple pathways together. Negative feedback to this bottleneck could both alleviate and enhance its limiting effect, despite decreasing noise. Bottlenecks likewise constrain information attained by networks signaling through multiple genes or cells. PMID:21921160

  15. Econophysics: from Game Theory and Information Theory to Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Edward; Moya, Douglas

    2005-03-01

    Rationality is the universal invariant among human behavior, universe physical laws and ordered and complex biological systems. Econophysics isboth the use of physical concepts in Finance and Economics, and the use of Information Economics in Physics. In special, we will show that it is possible to obtain the Quantum Mechanics principles using Information and Game Theory.

  16. Towards understanding the behavior of physical systems using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quax, Rick; Apolloni, Andrea; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2013-09-01

    One of the goals of complex network analysis is to identify the most influential nodes, i.e., the nodes that dictate the dynamics of other nodes. In the case of autonomous systems or transportation networks, highly connected hubs play a preeminent role in diffusing the flow of information and viruses; in contrast, in language evolution most linguistic norms come from the peripheral nodes who have only few contacts. Clearly a topological analysis of the interactions alone is not sufficient to identify the nodes that drive the state of the network. Here we show how information theory can be used to quantify how the dynamics of individual nodes propagate through a system. We interpret the state of a node as a storage of information about the state of other nodes, which is quantified in terms of Shannon information. This information is transferred through interactions and lost due to noise, and we calculate how far it can travel through a network. We apply this concept to a model of opinion formation in a complex social network to calculate the impact of each node by measuring how long its opinion is remembered by the network. Counter-intuitively we find that the dynamics of opinions are not determined by the hubs or peripheral nodes, but rather by nodes with an intermediate connectivity.

  17. A security architecture for health information networks.

    PubMed

    Kailar, Rajashekar; Muralidhar, Vinod

    2007-10-11

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today's healthcare enterprise. Recent work on 'nationwide health information network' architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately.

  18. Information Theory and the Earth's Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    An argument for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia lead to a density distribution which was surprisingly close to the optimum distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  19. Information theory and the earth's density distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    The present paper argues for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia leads to a density distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  20. Bridging genetic networks and queueing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, Arnon; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Yechiali, Uri

    2004-02-01

    One of the main challenges facing biology today is the understanding of the joint action of genes, proteins and RNA molecules, interwoven in intricate interdependencies commonly known as genetic networks. To this end, several mathematical approaches have been introduced to date. In addition to developing the analytical tools required for this task anew, one can utilize knowledge found in existing disciplines, specializing in the representation and analysis of systems featuring similar aspects. We suggest queueing theory as a possible source of such knowledge. This discipline, which focuses on the study of workloads forming in a variety of scenarios, offers an assortment of tools allowing for the derivation of the statistical properties of the inspected systems. We argue that a proper adaptation of modeling techniques and analytical methods used in queueing theory can contribute to the study of genetic regulatory networks. This is demonstrated by presenting a queueing-inspired model of a genetic network of arbitrary size and structure, for which the probability distribution function is derived. This model is further applied to the description of the lac operon regulation mechanism. In addition, we discuss the possible benefits stemming for queueing theory from the interdisciplinary dialogue with molecular biology-in particular, the incorporation of various dynamical behaviours into queueing networks.

  1. Modeling information flow in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo-Ah; Przytycki, Jozef H; Wuchty, Stefan; Przytycka, Teresa M

    2011-06-01

    Large-scale molecular interaction networks are being increasingly used to provide a system level view of cellular processes. Modeling communications between nodes in such huge networks as information flows is useful for dissecting dynamical dependences between individual network components. In the information flow model, individual nodes are assumed to communicate with each other by propagating the signals through intermediate nodes in the network. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the state of the art of research in the network analysis based on information flow models. In the second part, we describe our computational method underlying our recent work on discovering dysregulated pathways in glioma. Motivated by applications to inferring information flow from genotype to phenotype in a very large human interaction network, we generalized previous approaches to compute information flows for a large number of instances and also provided a formal proof for the method.

  2. A Free Object in Quantum Information Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    process of teleporting quantum information with a given entangled state. The third is purely a mathematical construction, the free affine monoid over the...Klein four group. We prove that all three of these objects are isomorphic. Keywords: Information Theory, Quantum Channel, Category, Teleportation ...information theoretic properties are easy to calculate. What are their higher dimensional analogues? (iv) If we attempt to teleport quantum information

  3. Optimizing information flow in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, William

    2009-03-01

    The generation of physicists who turned to the phenomena of life in the 1930s realized that to understand these phenomena one would need to track not just the flow of energy (as in inanimate systems) but also the flow of information. It would take more than a decade before Shannon provided the tools to formalize this intuition, making precise the connection between entropy and information. Since Shannon, many investigators have explored the possibility that biological mechanisms are selected to maximize the efficiency with which information is transmitted or represented, subject to fundamental physical constraints. I will survey these efforts, emphasizing that the same principles are being used in thinking about biological systems at very different levels of organization, from bacteria to brains. Although sometimes submerged under concerns about particular systems, the idea that information flow is optimized provides us with a candidate for a real theory of biological networks, rather than just a collection of parameterized models. I will try to explain why I think the time is right to focus on this grand theoretical goal, pointing to some key open problems and opportunities for connection to emerging experiments.

  4. Predicting Information Flows in Network Traffic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinich, Melvin J.; Molyneux, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses information flow in networks and predicting network traffic and describes a study that uses time series analysis on a day's worth of Internet log data. Examines nonlinearity and traffic invariants, and suggests that prediction of network traffic may not be possible with current techniques. (Author/LRW)

  5. Mutual information in a dilute, asymmetric neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Elliot

    We study the computational properties of a neural network consisting of binary neurons with dilute asymmetric synaptic connections. This simple model allows us to simulate large networks which can reflect more of the architecture and dynamics of real neural networks. Our main goal is to determine the dynamical behavior that maximizes the network's ability to perform computations. To this end, we apply information theory, measuring the average mutual information between pairs of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Communication of information between neurons is an essential requirement for collective computation. Previous workers have demonstrated that neural networks with asymmetric connections undergo a transition from ordered to chaotic behavior as certain network parameters, such as the connectivity, are changed. We find that the average mutual information has a peak near the order-chaos transition, implying that the network can most efficiently communicate information between cells in this region. The mutual information peak becomes increasingly pronounced when the basic model is extended to incorporate more biologically realistic features, such as a variable threshold and nonlinear summation of inputs. We find that the peak in mutual information near the phase transition is a robust feature of the system for a wide range of assumptions about post-synaptic integration.

  6. Information jet: Handling noisy big data from weakly disconnected network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurongzeb, Deeder

    Sudden aggregation (information jet) of large amount of data is ubiquitous around connected social networks, driven by sudden interacting and non-interacting events, network security threat attacks, online sales channel etc. Clustering of information jet based on time series analysis and graph theory is not new but little work is done to connect them with particle jet statistics. We show pre-clustering based on context can element soft network or network of information which is critical to minimize time to calculate results from noisy big data. We show difference between, stochastic gradient boosting and time series-graph clustering. For disconnected higher dimensional information jet, we use Kallenberg representation theorem (Kallenberg, 2005, arXiv:1401.1137) to identify and eliminate jet similarities from dense or sparse graph.

  7. Basing quantum theory on information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard

    2008-03-01

    I consider information-based derivations of the quantum formalism, in a framework encompassing quantum and classical theory and a broad spectrum of theories serving as foils to them. The most ambitious hope for such a derivation is a role analogous to Einstein's development of the dynamics and kinetics of macroscopic bodies, and later of their gravitational interactions, on the basis of simple principles with clear operational meanings and experimental consequences. Short of this, it could still provide a principled understanding of the features of quantum mechanics that account for its greater-than-classical information-processing power, helping guide the search for new quantum algorithms and protocols. I summarize the convex operational framework for theories, and discuss information-processing in theories therein. Results include the fact that information that can be obtained without disturbance is inherently classical, generalized no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, exponentially secure bit commitment in all non-classical theories without entanglement, properties of theories that allow teleportation, and properties of theories that allow ``remote steering'' of ensembles using entanglement. Joint work with collaborators including Jonathan Barrett, Matthew Leifer, Alexander Wilce, Oscar Dahlsten, and Ben Toner.

  8. Exploring network operations for data and information networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Bing; Su, Jing; Ma, Fei; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhao, Xiyang; Yao, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Barabási and Albert, in 1999, formulated scale-free models based on some real networks: World-Wide Web, Internet, metabolic and protein networks, language or sexual networks. Scale-free networks not only appear around us, but also have high qualities in the world. As known, high quality information networks can transfer feasibly and efficiently data, clearly, their topological structures are very important for data safety. We build up network operations for constructing large scale of dynamic networks from smaller scale of network models having good property and high quality. We focus on the simplest operators to formulate complex operations, and are interesting on the closeness of operations to desired network properties.

  9. Conditioned reinforcement and information theory reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Cunningham, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The idea that stimuli might function as conditioned reinforcers because of the information they convey about primary reinforcers has a long history in the study of learning. However, formal application of information theory to conditioned reinforcement has been largely abandoned in modern theorizing because of its failures with respect to observing behavior. In this paper we show how recent advances in the application of information theory to Pavlovian conditioning offer a novel approach to conditioned reinforcement. The critical feature of this approach is that calculations of information are based on reductions of uncertainty about expected time to primary reinforcement signaled by a conditioned reinforcer. Using this approach, we show that previous failures of information theory with observing behavior can be remedied, and that the resulting framework produces predictions similar to Delay Reduction Theory in both observing-response and concurrent-chains procedures. We suggest that the similarity of these predictions might offer an analytically grounded reason for why Delay Reduction Theory has been a successful theory of conditioned reinforcement. Finally, we suggest that the approach provides a formal basis for the assertion that conditioned reinforcement results from Pavlovian conditioning and may provide an integrative approach encompassing both domains.

  10. A Security Architecture for Health Information Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kailar, Rajashekar

    2007-01-01

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today’s healthcare enterprise. Recent work on ‘nationwide health information network’ architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately. PMID:18693862

  11. A Comparison of Geographic Information Systems, Complex Networks, and Other Models for Analyzing Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Technical Monitor); Kuby, Michael; Tierney, Sean; Roberts, Tyler; Upchurch, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews six classes of models that are used for studying transportation network topologies. The report is motivated by two main questions. First, what can the "new science" of complex networks (scale-free, small-world networks) contribute to our understanding of transport network structure, compared to more traditional methods? Second, how can geographic information systems (GIS) contribute to studying transport networks? The report defines terms that can be used to classify different kinds of models by their function, composition, mechanism, spatial and temporal dimensions, certainty, linearity, and resolution. Six broad classes of models for analyzing transport network topologies are then explored: GIS; static graph theory; complex networks; mathematical programming; simulation; and agent-based modeling. Each class of models is defined and classified according to the attributes introduced earlier. The paper identifies some typical types of research questions about network structure that have been addressed by each class of model in the literature.

  12. Network Theory Tools for RNA Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; Petingi, Louis; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    An introduction into the usage of graph or network theory tools for the study of RNA molecules is presented. By using vertices and edges to define RNA secondary structures as tree and dual graphs, we can enumerate, predict, and design RNA topologies. Graph connectivity and associated Laplacian eigenvalues relate to biological properties of RNA and help understand RNA motifs as well as build, by computational design, various RNA target structures. Importantly, graph theoretical representations of RNAs reduce drastically the conformational space size and therefore simplify modeling and prediction tasks. Ongoing challenges remain regarding general RNA design, representation of RNA pseudoknots, and tertiary structure prediction. Thus, developments in network theory may help advance RNA biology. PMID:25414570

  13. Network Theory Tools for RNA Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Petingi, Louis; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    An introduction into the usage of graph or network theory tools for the study of RNA molecules is presented. By using vertices and edges to define RNA secondary structures as tree and dual graphs, we can enumerate, predict, and design RNA topologies. Graph connectivity and associated Laplacian eigenvalues relate to biological properties of RNA and help understand RNA motifs as well as build, by computational design, various RNA target structures. Importantly, graph theoretical representations of RNAs reduce drastically the conformational space size and therefore simplify modeling and prediction tasks. Ongoing challenges remain regarding general RNA design, representation of RNA pseudoknots, and tertiary structure prediction. Thus, developments in network theory may help advance RNA biology.

  14. Scientific Information Networks: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallee, Jacques

    The technical feasibility of a continental information network for astronomy has been demonstrated in the course of a two-month experiment conducted jointly by Dearborn Observatory of Northwestern University and the Stanford University Computation Center. The experiment simulated a scientific information network based on a high-level retrieval…

  15. Post Disaster Governance, Complexity and Network Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lassa, Jonatan A.

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to understand the organizational network typology of large­-scale disaster intervention in developing countries and to understand the complexity of post-­disaster intervention, through the use of network theory based on empirical data from post-­tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, during 2005/­2007. The findings suggest that the ‘ degrees of separation’ (or network diameter) between any two organizations in the field is 5, thus reflecting ‘small­ world’ realities and therefore making no significant difference with the real human networks, as found in previous experiments. There are also significant loops in the network reflecting the fact that some actors tend to not cooperate, which challenges post­ disaster coordination. The findings show the landscape of humanitarian actors is not randomly distributed. Many actors were connected to each other through certain hubs, while hundreds of actors make ‘scattered’ single ‘principal-­client’ links. The paper concludes that by understanding the distribution of degree, centrality, ‘degrees of separation’ and visualization of the network, authorities can improve their understanding of the realities of coordination, from macro to micro scales. PMID:26236562

  16. The application of information theory to biochemical signaling systems

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Alex; Cheong, Raymond; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Cell signaling can be thought of fundamentally as an information transmission problem in which chemical messengers relay information about the external environment to the decision centers within a cell. Due to the biochemical nature of cellular signal transduction networks, molecular noise will inevitably limit the fidelity of any messages received and processed by a cell’s signal transduction networks, leaving it with an imperfect impression of its environment. Fortunately, Shannon’s information theory provides a mathematical framework independent of network complexity that can quantify the amount of information that can be transmitted despite biochemical noise. In particular, the channel capacity can be used to measure the maximum number of stimuli a cell can distinguish based upon the noisy responses of its signaling systems. Here, we provide a primer for quantitative biologists that covers fundamental concepts of information theory, highlights several key considerations when experimentally measuring channel capacity, and describes successful examples of the application of information theoretic analysis to biological signaling. PMID:22872091

  17. Evaluation of the Performance of Information Theory-Based Methods and Cross-Correlation to Estimate the Functional Connectivity in Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Matteo; Nieus, Thierry; Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Functional connectivity of in vitro neuronal networks was estimated by applying different statistical algorithms on data collected by Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs). First we tested these “connectivity methods” on neuronal network models at an increasing level of complexity and evaluated the performance in terms of ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and PPC (Positive Precision Curve), a new defined complementary method specifically developed for functional links identification. Then, the algorithms better estimated the actual connectivity of the network models, were used to extract functional connectivity from cultured cortical networks coupled to MEAs. Among the proposed approaches, Transfer Entropy and Joint-Entropy showed the best results suggesting those methods as good candidates to extract functional links in actual neuronal networks from multi-site recordings. PMID:19652720

  18. Federal Information in the Networked Environment: A Perspective from the Coalition for Networked Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheverie, Joan F.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the development of strategies for providing access to and services for U.S. federal government information in higher education using the global information infrastructure, from the perspective of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI). Discusses the preservation of electronic information and networked information discovery and…

  19. Network theory and its applications in economic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my Ph.D. research: i) developing theoretical framework of complex networks; and ii) applying complex networks models to quantitatively analyze economics systems. In part I, we focus on developing theories of interdependent networks, which includes two chapters: 1) We develop a mathematical framework to study the percolation of interdependent networks under targeted-attack and find that when the highly connected nodes are protected and have lower probability to fail, in contrast to single scale-free (SF) networks where the percolation threshold pc = 0, coupled SF networks are significantly more vulnerable with pc significantly larger than zero. 2) We analytically demonstrates that clustering, which quantifies the propensity for two neighbors of the same vertex to also be neighbors of each other, significantly increases the vulnerability of the system. In part II, we apply the complex networks models to study economics systems, which also includes two chapters: 1) We study the US corporate governance network, in which nodes representing directors and links between two directors representing their service on common company boards, and propose a quantitative measure of information and influence transformation in the network. Thus we are able to identify the most influential directors in the network. 2) We propose a bipartite networks model to simulate the risk propagation process among commercial banks during financial crisis. With empirical bank's balance sheet data in 2007 as input to the model, we find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation during the financial crisis between 2008 and 2011. The results suggest that complex networks model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the

  20. Effective information spreading based on local information in correlated networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Wei; Pan, Liming; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Using network-based information to facilitate information spreading is an essential task for spreading dynamics in complex networks. Focusing on degree correlated networks, we propose a preferential contact strategy based on the local network structure and local informed density to promote the information spreading. During the spreading process, an informed node will preferentially select a contact target among its neighbors, basing on their degrees or local informed densities. By extensively implementing numerical simulations in synthetic and empirical networks, we find that when only consider the local structure information, the convergence time of information spreading will be remarkably reduced if low-degree neighbors are favored as contact targets. Meanwhile, the minimum convergence time depends non-monotonically on degree-degree correlation, and a moderate correlation coefficient results in the most efficient information spreading. Incorporating the local informed density information into contact strategy, the convergence time of information spreading can be further reduced, and be minimized by an moderately preferential selection. PMID:27910882

  1. Noise enhances information transfer in hierarchical networks.

    PubMed

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Holyst, Janusz A; Sloot, Peter M A

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of noise on information transmission in the form of packages shipped between nodes of hierarchical networks. Numerical simulations are performed for artificial tree networks, scale-free Ravasz-Barabási networks as well for a real network formed by email addresses of former Enron employees. Two types of noise are considered. One is related to packet dynamics and is responsible for a random part of packets paths. The second one originates from random changes in initial network topology. We find that the information transfer can be enhanced by the noise. The system possesses optimal performance when both kinds of noise are tuned to specific values, this corresponds to the Stochastic Resonance phenomenon. There is a non-trivial synergy present for both noisy components. We found also that hierarchical networks built of nodes of various degrees are more efficient in information transfer than trees with a fixed branching factor.

  2. Noise enhances information transfer in hierarchical networks

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Holyst, Janusz A.; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of noise on information transmission in the form of packages shipped between nodes of hierarchical networks. Numerical simulations are performed for artificial tree networks, scale-free Ravasz-Barabási networks as well for a real network formed by email addresses of former Enron employees. Two types of noise are considered. One is related to packet dynamics and is responsible for a random part of packets paths. The second one originates from random changes in initial network topology. We find that the information transfer can be enhanced by the noise. The system possesses optimal performance when both kinds of noise are tuned to specific values, this corresponds to the Stochastic Resonance phenomenon. There is a non-trivial synergy present for both noisy components. We found also that hierarchical networks built of nodes of various degrees are more efficient in information transfer than trees with a fixed branching factor. PMID:23390574

  3. Network meta-analysis, electrical networks and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Rücker, Gerta

    2012-12-01

    Network meta-analysis is an active field of research in clinical biostatistics. It aims to combine information from all randomized comparisons among a set of treatments for a given medical condition. We show how graph-theoretical methods can be applied to network meta-analysis. A meta-analytic graph consists of vertices (treatments) and edges (randomized comparisons). We illustrate the correspondence between meta-analytic networks and electrical networks, where variance corresponds to resistance, treatment effects to voltage, and weighted treatment effects to current flows. Based thereon, we then show that graph-theoretical methods that have been routinely applied to electrical networks also work well in network meta-analysis. In more detail, the resulting consistent treatment effects induced in the edges can be estimated via the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse of the Laplacian matrix. Moreover, the variances of the treatment effects are estimated in analogy to electrical effective resistances. It is shown that this method, being computationally simple, leads to the usual fixed effect model estimate when applied to pairwise meta-analysis and is consistent with published results when applied to network meta-analysis examples from the literature. Moreover, problems of heterogeneity and inconsistency, random effects modeling and including multi-armed trials are addressed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Theory of correlations in stochastic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Iris; Sompolinsky, Haim

    1994-10-01

    One of the main experimental tools in probing the interactions between neurons has been the measurement of the correlations in their activity. In general, however, the interpretation of the observed correlations is difficult since the correlation between a pair of neurons is influenced not only by the direct interaction between them but also by the dynamic state of the entire network to which they belong. Thus a comparison between the observed correlations and the predictions from specific model networks is needed. In this paper we develop a theory of neuronal correlation functions in large networks comprising several highly connected subpopulations and obeying stochastic dynamic rules. When the networks are in asynchronous states, the cross correlations are relatively weak, i.e., their amplitude relative to that of the autocorrelations is of order of 1/N, N being the size of the interacting populations. Using the weakness of the cross correlations, general equations that express the matrix of cross correlations in terms of the mean neuronal activities and the effective interaction matrix are presented. The effective interactions are the synaptic efficacies multiplied by the gain of the postsynaptic neurons. The time-delayed cross-correlation matrix can be expressed as a sum of exponentially decaying modes that correspond to the (nonorthogonal) eigenvectors of the effective interaction matrix. The theory is extended to networks with random connectivity, such as randomly dilute networks. This allows for a comparison between the contribution from the internal common input and that from the direct interactions to the correlations of monosynaptically coupled pairs. A closely related quantity is the linear response of the neurons to external time-dependent perturbations. We derive the form of the dynamic linear response function of neurons in the above architecture in terms of the eigenmodes of the effective interaction matrix. The behavior of the correlations and the

  5. Information Foraging Theory in Software Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    accomplished Publications Define the theory Objective 1: Define an information foraging theory (IFT) for software maintenance Lawrance et al. (to...appear) Lawrance et al. 2010 Ko et al. 2012 Burnett et al. 2011 Piorkowski et al. 2012b (in review) Develop and empirically evaluate...computational models Objective 2: Develop predictive computational models for programmer navigation Lawrance et al. 2010 Lawrance et al. (to appear

  6. A Mathematical Theory of System Information Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-27

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0232 A Mathematical Theory of System Information Flow Michael Mislove ADMINISTRATORS OF THE TULANE EDUCATIONAL FUND THE 6823...MM-YYYY) 17-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 27MAR2013 - 31MAR2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Mathematical Theory of System...Bierhorst Department of Mathematics Tulane University 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  7. Reasonable fermionic quantum information theories require relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis, Nicolai

    2016-03-01

    We show that any quantum information theory based on anticommuting operators must be supplemented by a superselection rule deeply rooted in relativity to establish a reasonable notion of entanglement. While quantum information may be encoded in the fermionic Fock space, the unrestricted theory has a peculiar feature: the marginals of bipartite pure states need not have identical entropies, which leads to an ambiguous definition of entanglement. We solve this problem, by proving that it is removed by relativity, i.e., by the parity superselection rule that arises from Lorentz invariance via the spin-statistics connection. Our results hence unveil a fundamental conceptual inseparability of quantum information and the causal structure of relativistic field theory.

  8. Dynamic Sampling and Information Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett D.; Byrd, Tommy A.; Mugler, Andrew; Sun, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Cells use biochemical networks to translate environmental information into intracellular responses. These responses can be highly dynamic, but how the information is encoded in these dynamics remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the dynamic encoding of information in the ATP-induced calcium responses of fibroblast cells, using a vectorial, or multi-time-point, measure from information theory. We find that the amount of extracted information depends on physiological constraints such as the sampling rate and memory capacity of the downstream network, and is affected differentially by intrinsic vs. extrinsic noise. By comparing to a minimal physical model, we find, surprisingly, that the information is often insensitive to the detailed structure of the underlying dynamics, and instead the decoding mechanism acts as a simple low-pass filter. These results demonstrate the mechanisms and limitations of dynamic information storage in cells.

  9. Connectivism and Information Literacy: Moving from Learning Theory to Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Transue, Beth M.

    2013-01-01

    Connectivism is an emerging learning theory positing that knowledge comprises networked relationships and that learning comprises the ability to successfully navigate through these networks. Successful pedagogical strategies involve the instructor helping students to identify, navigate, and evaluate information from their learning networks. Many…

  10. Information theory, spectral geometry, and quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Achim; Martin, Robert

    2008-01-18

    We show that there exists a deep link between the two disciplines of information theory and spectral geometry. This allows us to obtain new results on a well-known quantum gravity motivated natural ultraviolet cutoff which describes an upper bound on the spatial density of information. Concretely, we show that, together with an infrared cutoff, this natural ultraviolet cutoff beautifully reduces the path integral of quantum field theory on curved space to a finite number of ordinary integrations. We then show, in particular, that the subsequent removal of the infrared cutoff is safe.

  11. Pathways, Networks, and Systems: Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph H. Nadeau; John D. Lambris

    2004-10-30

    The international conference provided a unique opportunity for theoreticians and experimenters to exchange ideas, strategies, problems, challenges, language and opportunities in both formal and informal settings. This dialog is an important step towards developing a deep and effective integration of theory and experiments in studies of systems biology in humans and model organisms.

  12. Information flow analysis of interactome networks.

    PubMed

    Missiuro, Patrycja Vasilyev; Liu, Kesheng; Zou, Lihua; Ross, Brian C; Zhao, Guoyan; Liu, Jun S; Ge, Hui

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies of cellular networks have revealed modular organizations of genes and proteins. For example, in interactome networks, a module refers to a group of interacting proteins that form molecular complexes and/or biochemical pathways and together mediate a biological process. However, it is still poorly understood how biological information is transmitted between different modules. We have developed information flow analysis, a new computational approach that identifies proteins central to the transmission of biological information throughout the network. In the information flow analysis, we represent an interactome network as an electrical circuit, where interactions are modeled as resistors and proteins as interconnecting junctions. Construing the propagation of biological signals as flow of electrical current, our method calculates an information flow score for every protein. Unlike previous metrics of network centrality such as degree or betweenness that only consider topological features, our approach incorporates confidence scores of protein-protein interactions and automatically considers all possible paths in a network when evaluating the importance of each protein. We apply our method to the interactome networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that the likelihood of observing lethality and pleiotropy when a protein is eliminated is positively correlated with the protein's information flow score. Even among proteins of low degree or low betweenness, high information scores serve as a strong predictor of loss-of-function lethality or pleiotropy. The correlation between information flow scores and phenotypes supports our hypothesis that the proteins of high information flow reside in central positions in interactome networks. We also show that the ranks of information flow scores are more consistent than that of betweenness when a large amount of noisy data is added to an interactome. Finally, we combine gene expression

  13. Hierarchical social networks and information flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Luis; F. F. Mendes, Jose; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2002-12-01

    Using a simple model for the information flow on social networks, we show that the traditional hierarchical topologies frequently used by companies and organizations, are poorly designed in terms of efficiency. Moreover, we prove that this type of structures are the result of the individual aim of monopolizing as much information as possible within the network. As the information is an appropriate measurement of centrality, we conclude that this kind of topology is so attractive for leaders, because the global influence each actor has within the network is completely determined by the hierarchical level occupied.

  14. The Teen Health Information Network (THINK).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzel, Judith; Erickson, Su

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Teen Health Information Network (THINK), a grant-funded partnership of Aurora, Illinois, public libraries, schools, and community agencies to provide materials, information, and programming on issues related to teen health. Seven appendixes provide detailed information on survey results, collection evaluation and development,…

  15. Curriculum Theory and Library and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarry, Kevin J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses curriculum theory in the context of professional education for library and information science, and outlines steps necessary for curriculum planning: (1) diagnosis of needs; (2) formulation of objectives; (3) selection of content from the universe of knowledge; (4) selection of learning experience; (5) organization of learning materials;…

  16. Neural networks as perpetual information generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englisch, Harald; Xiao, Yegao; Yao, Kailun

    1991-07-01

    The information gain in a neural network cannot be larger than the bit capacity of the synapses. It is shown that the equation derived by Engel et al. [Phys. Rev. A 42, 4998 (1990)] for the strongly diluted network with persistent stimuli contradicts this condition. Furthermore, for any time step the correct equation is derived by taking the correlation between random variables into account.

  17. Applied Hypergame Theory for Network Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    every aspect of people’s lives , running businesses and governments alike. Almost daily we are given indicators that poor defense of networks creates the...for alarm, but only because these systems, that are so important to people’s daily lives , can be attacked, damaged and destroyed. Less reliance on... longer isolated to just the information present on the systems themselves, but now SCADA systems that run essential services for a nation’s citizens are

  18. Network thermodynamics and complexity: a transition to relational systems theory.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, D C

    2001-07-01

    Most systems of interest in today's world are highly structured and highly interactive. They cannot be reduced to simple components without losing a great deal of their system identity. Network thermodynamics is a marriage of classical and non-equilibrium thermodynamics along with network theory and kinetics to provide a practical framework for handling these systems. The ultimate result of any network thermodynamic model is still a set of state vector equations. But these equations are built in a new informative way so that information about the organization of the system is identifiable in the structure of the equations. The domain of network thermodynamics is all of physical systems theory. By using the powerful circuit simulator, the Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE), as a general systems simulator, any highly non-linear stiff system can be simulated. Furthermore, the theoretical findings of network thermodynamics are important new contributions. The contribution of a metric structure to thermodynamics compliments and goes beyond other recent work in this area. The application of topological reasoning through Tellegen's theorem shows that a mathematical structure exists into which all physical systems can be represented canonically. The old results in non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to Onsager can be reinterpreted and extended using these new, more holistic concepts about systems. Some examples are given. These are but a few of the many applications of network thermodynamics that have been proven to extend our capacity for handling the highly interactive, non-linear systems that populate both biology and chemistry. The presentation is carried out in the context of the recent growth of the field of complexity science. In particular, the context used for this discussion derives from the work of the mathematical biologist, Robert Rosen.

  19. Computational inference of neural information flow networks.

    PubMed

    Smith, V Anne; Yu, Jing; Smulders, Tom V; Hartemink, Alexander J; Jarvis, Erich D

    2006-11-24

    Determining how information flows along anatomical brain pathways is a fundamental requirement for understanding how animals perceive their environments, learn, and behave. Attempts to reveal such neural information flow have been made using linear computational methods, but neural interactions are known to be nonlinear. Here, we demonstrate that a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) inference algorithm we originally developed to infer nonlinear transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data collected with microarrays is also successful at inferring nonlinear neural information flow networks from electrophysiology data collected with microelectrode arrays. The inferred networks we recover from the songbird auditory pathway are correctly restricted to a subset of known anatomical paths, are consistent with timing of the system, and reveal both the importance of reciprocal feedback in auditory processing and greater information flow to higher-order auditory areas when birds hear natural as opposed to synthetic sounds. A linear method applied to the same data incorrectly produces networks with information flow to non-neural tissue and over paths known not to exist. To our knowledge, this study represents the first biologically validated demonstration of an algorithm to successfully infer neural information flow networks.

  20. Quantification of image quality using information theory.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Takanaga; Maeda, Hisatoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Imai, Kuniharu

    2011-12-01

    Aims of present study were to examine usefulness of information theory in visual assessment of image quality. We applied first order approximation of the Shannon's information theory to compute information losses (IL). Images of a contrast-detail mammography (CDMAM) phantom were acquired with computed radiographies for various radiation doses. Information content was defined as the entropy Σp( i )log(1/p ( i )), in which detection probabilities p ( i ) were calculated from distribution of detection rate of the CDMAM. IL was defined as the difference between information content and information obtained. IL decreased with increases in the disk diameters (P < 0.0001, ANOVA) and in the radiation doses (P < 0.002, F-test). Sums of IL, which we call total information losses (TIL), were closely correlated with the image quality figures (r = 0.985). TIL was dependent on the distribution of image reading ability of each examinee, even when average reading ratio was the same in the group. TIL was shown to be sensitive to the observers' distribution of image readings and was expected to improve the evaluation of image quality.

  1. Theorising big IT programmes in healthcare: strong structuration theory meets actor-network theory.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Stones, Rob

    2010-05-01

    The UK National Health Service is grappling with various large and controversial IT programmes. We sought to develop a sharper theoretical perspective on the question "What happens - at macro-, meso- and micro-level - when government tries to modernise a health service with the help of big IT?" Using examples from data fragments at the micro-level of clinical work, we considered how structuration theory and actor-network theory (ANT) might be combined to inform empirical investigation. Giddens (1984) argued that social structures and human agency are recursively linked and co-evolve. ANT studies the relationships that link people and technologies in dynamic networks. It considers how discourses become inscribed in data structures and decision models of software, making certain network relations irreversible. Stones' (2005) strong structuration theory (SST) is a refinement of Giddens' work, systematically concerned with empirical research. It views human agents as linked in dynamic networks of position-practices. A quadripartite approcach considers [a] external social structures (conditions for action); [b] internal social structures (agents' capabilities and what they 'know' about the social world); [c] active agency and actions and [d] outcomes as they feed back on the position-practice network. In contrast to early structuration theory and ANT, SST insists on disciplined conceptual methodology and linking this with empirical evidence. In this paper, we adapt SST for the study of technology programmes, integrating elements from material interactionism and ANT. We argue, for example, that the position-practice network can be a socio-technical one in which technologies in conjunction with humans can be studied as 'actants'. Human agents, with their complex socio-cultural frames, are required to instantiate technology in social practices. Structurally relevant properties inscribed and embedded in technological artefacts constrain and enable human agency. The fortunes

  2. Stoichiometric network theory for nonequilibrium biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Beard, Daniel A; Liang, Shou-dan

    2003-02-01

    We introduce the basic concepts and develop a theory for nonequilibrium steady-state biochemical systems applicable to analyzing large-scale complex isothermal reaction networks. In terms of the stoichiometric matrix, we demonstrate both Kirchhoff's flux law sigma(l)J(l)=0 over a biochemical species, and potential law sigma(l) mu(l)=0 over a reaction loop. They reflect mass and energy conservation, respectively. For each reaction, its steady-state flux J can be decomposed into forward and backward one-way fluxes J = J+ - J-, with chemical potential difference deltamu = RT ln(J-/J+). The product -Jdeltamu gives the isothermal heat dissipation rate, which is necessarily non-negative according to the second law of thermodynamics. The stoichiometric network theory (SNT) embodies all of the relevant fundamental physics. Knowing J and deltamu of a biochemical reaction, a conductance can be computed which directly reflects the level of gene expression for the particular enzyme. For sufficiently small flux a linear relationship between J and deltamu can be established as the linear flux-force relation in irreversible thermodynamics, analogous to Ohm's law in electrical circuits.

  3. 78 FR 17418 - Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Rural Health Information Technology Network... award under the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant (RHITND) to Grace... relinquishing its fiduciary responsibilities for the Rural Health Information Technology Network...

  4. An Information Theory of Hydrophobic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1998-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect is a central concept in rationalizing the structure and stability of proteins in solution. However, a consensus has not been achieved on a molecular scale physical theory explaining the broad array of hydrophobic effects. Here we present an information theory designed to achieve consensus by identifying and limiting the physical information and assumptions sufficient to predict hydrophobic effects. The information theory is based upon the study of the probabilities of occupancy by water molecule centers of molecular scale volumes observed in neat liquid water. Predictions for hydrophobic effects can be extracted from this probability distribution. Simulation results show that this probability distribution is accurately predicted by a maximum entropy model using the two moments that are obtained from the experimental liquid density and the experimental radial distribution of oxygen atoms. We show the role of solvent molecule correlation functions of higher order than pairs. We show that this two moment model predicts known atomic scale hydrophobic effects: hydrophobic solubilities, potentials of mean force, and hydrophobic effects on conformational equilibria. We comment on the kinship between the two moment maximum entropy model and the earlier Pratt-Chandler theory of hydrophobic effects. We show that the model predicts the entropy convergence emphasized by high sensitivity calorimetry on the thermal denaturation of globular proteins and explains why this entropy convergence is insensitive to solute molecular details within the broad category of hydrophobic solutes. Finally, we consider the pressure denaturation of globular proteins and discuss the perspective that emerges from the information theory treatment: increasing pressure squeezes water molecules into the protein globule eventually separating hydrophobic components analogously to the separation of hydrophobic solutes in formation of clathrate hydrates.

  5. Reverse Engineering Cellular Networks with Information Theoretic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, Alejandro F.; Ross, John; Banga, Julio R.

    2013-01-01

    Building mathematical models of cellular networks lies at the core of systems biology. It involves, among other tasks, the reconstruction of the structure of interactions between molecular components, which is known as network inference or reverse engineering. Information theory can help in the goal of extracting as much information as possible from the available data. A large number of methods founded on these concepts have been proposed in the literature, not only in biology journals, but in a wide range of areas. Their critical comparison is difficult due to the different focuses and the adoption of different terminologies. Here we attempt to review some of the existing information theoretic methodologies for network inference, and clarify their differences. While some of these methods have achieved notable success, many challenges remain, among which we can mention dealing with incomplete measurements, noisy data, counterintuitive behaviour emerging from nonlinear relations or feedback loops, and computational burden of dealing with large data sets. PMID:24709703

  6. Information theory in living systems, methods, applications, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, Robert A; Frieden, B Roy

    2007-02-01

    Living systems are distinguished in nature by their ability to maintain stable, ordered states far from equilibrium. This is despite constant buffeting by thermodynamic forces that, if unopposed, will inevitably increase disorder. Cells maintain a steep transmembrane entropy gradient by continuous application of information that permits cellular components to carry out highly specific tasks that import energy and export entropy. Thus, the study of information storage, flow and utilization is critical for understanding first principles that govern the dynamics of life. Initial biological applications of information theory (IT) used Shannon's methods to measure the information content in strings of monomers such as genes, RNA, and proteins. Recent work has used bioinformatic and dynamical systems to provide remarkable insights into the topology and dynamics of intracellular information networks. Novel applications of Fisher-, Shannon-, and Kullback-Leibler informations are promoting increased understanding of the mechanisms by which genetic information is converted to work and order. Insights into evolution may be gained by analysis of the the fitness contributions from specific segments of genetic information as well as the optimization process in which the fitness are constrained by the substrate cost for its storage and utilization. Recent IT applications have recognized the possible role of nontraditional information storage structures including lipids and ion gradients as well as information transmission by molecular flux across cell membranes. Many fascinating challenges remain, including defining the intercellular information dynamics of multicellular organisms and the role of disordered information storage and flow in disease.

  7. Dynamic information theory and information description of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiusan

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we develop dynamic statistical information theory established by the author. Starting from the ideas that the state variable evolution equations of stochastic dynamic systems, classical and quantum nonequilibrium statistical physical systems and special electromagnetic field systems can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equations and the definitions of dynamic information and dynamic entropy, we derive the evolution equations of dynamic information and dynamic entropy that describe the evolution laws of dynamic information. These four kinds of evolution equations are of the same mathematical type. They show in unison when information transmits in coordinate space outside the systems that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes, and that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. When space noise can be neglected, an information wave will appear. If we only consider the information change inside the systems, dynamic information evolution equations reduce to information equations corresponding to the dynamic equations which describe evolution laws of the above dynamic systems. This reveals that the evolution laws of respective dynamic systems can be described by information equations in a unified fashion. Hence, the evolution processes of these dynamic systems can be abstracted as the evolution processes of information. Furthermore, we present the formulas for information flow, information dissipation rate, and entropy production rate. We prove that the information production probably emerges in a dynamic system with internal attractive interaction between the elements, and derive a formula for this information

  8. Child Rights Information Network Newsletter, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purbrick, Becky, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These three newsletter issues communicate activities of the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) and report on information resources and worldwide activities concerning children and child rights. The January 1997 issue profiles CRIN members in Costa Rica, Tanzania, Germany, and Switzerland; and provides updates on the activities of projects…

  9. Information Retrieval as a Network Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the function of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Z39.50 protocol, which allows for construction of information "servers"--i.e., resources attached to a computer communications network that can be accessed by client machines to retrieve information. The relationship of Z39.5 to other OSI protocols is explained. (23…

  10. Protecting Personal Information on Social Networking Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Almost everyone uses social networking sites like Facebook, MySpace, and LinkedIn. Since Facebook is the most popular site in the history of the Internet, this article will focus on how one can protect his/her personal information and how that extends to protecting the private information of others.

  11. Distributing Executive Information Systems through Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrod, James I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Many colleges and universities will soon adopt distributed systems for executive information and decision support. Distribution of shared information through computer networks will improve decision-making processes dramatically on campuses. Critical success factors include administrative support, favorable organizational climate, ease of use,…

  12. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Florent; Lavaux, Guilhem; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-WEB, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  13. Biological impacts and context of network theory

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-05

    Many complex systems can be represented and analyzed as networks, and examples that have benefited from this approach span the natural sciences. For instance, we now know that systems as disparate as the World-Wide Web, the Internet, scientific collaborations, food webs, protein interactions and metabolism all have common features in their organization, the most salient of which are their scale-free connectivity distributions and their small-world behavior. The recent availability of large scale datasets that span the proteome or metabolome of an organism have made it possible to elucidate some of the organizational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. We expect that combining the currently separate layers of information from gene regulatory-, signal transduction-, protein interaction- and metabolic networks will dramatically enhance our understanding of cellular function and dynamics.

  14. Weight-Control Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... from our online catalog . ​ Tips for Healthy Eating & Physical Activity For Adults For Pregnancy For Parents For Older ... topics.​​​​​ ​Discover up-to-date information on nutrition, physical activity, and weight control WIN Health Topics A-Z ...

  15. Fisheries Information Network in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balachandran, Sarojini

    During the early 1980s the Indonesian government made a policy decision to develop fisheries as an important sector of the national economy. In doing so, it recognized the need for the collection and dissemination of fisheries research information not only for the scientists themselves, but also for the ultimate transfer of technology through…

  16. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé Ribalta, Albert; Granell, Clara; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer networks with community structure. The final goal is to understand and quantify, if the existence of well-defined community structure at the level of individual layers, together with the multilayer structure of the whole network, enhances or deteriorates the diffusion of packets of information.

  17. Information and Entropy in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2004-11-01

    We look at certain thought experiments based upon the 'delayed choice' and 'quantum eraser' interference experiments, which present a complementarity between information gathered from a quantum measurement and interference effects. It has been argued that these experiments show the Bohm interpretation of quantum theory is untenable. We demonstrate that these experiments depend critically upon the assumption that a quantum optics device can operate as a measuring device, and show that, in the context of these experiments, it cannot be consistently understood in this way. By contrast, we then show how the notion of 'active information' in the Bohm interpretation provides a coherent explanation of the phenomena shown in these experiments. We then examine the relationship between information and entropy. The thought experiment connecting these two quantities is the Szilard Engine version of Maxwell's Demon, and it has been suggested that quantum measurement plays a key role in this. We provide the first complete description of the operation of the Szilard Engine as a quantum system. This enables us to demonstrate that the role of quantum measurement suggested is incorrect, and further, that the use of information theory to resolve Szilard's paradox is both unnecessary and insufficient. Finally we show that, if the concept of 'active information' is extended to cover thermal density matrices, then many of the conceptual problems raised by this paradox appear to be resolved.

  18. Information processing in convex operational theories

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Howard Nelch; Wilce, Alexander G

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the source and extent of the greater-than-classical information processing power of quantum systems, one wants to characterize both classical and quantum mechanics as points in a broader space of possible theories. One approach to doing this, pioneered by Abramsky and Coecke, is to abstract the essential categorical features of classical and quantum mechanics that support various information-theoretic constraints and possibilities, e.g., the impossibility of cloning in the latter, and the possibility of teleportation in both. Another approach, pursued by the authors and various collaborators, is to begin with a very conservative, and in a sense very concrete, generalization of classical probability theory--which is still sufficient to encompass quantum theory--and to ask which 'quantum' informational phenomena can be reproduced in this much looser setting. In this paper, we review the progress to date in this second programme, and offer some suggestions as to how to link it with the categorical semantics for quantum processes developed by Abramsky and Coecke.

  19. An information-based network approach for protein classification

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaogeng; Zhao, Xin; Yau, Stephen S. T.

    2017-01-01

    Protein classification is one of the critical problems in bioinformatics. Early studies used geometric distances and polygenetic-tree to classify proteins. These methods use binary trees to present protein classification. In this paper, we propose a new protein classification method, whereby theories of information and networks are used to classify the multivariate relationships of proteins. In this study, protein universe is modeled as an undirected network, where proteins are classified according to their connections. Our method is unsupervised, multivariate, and alignment-free. It can be applied to the classification of both protein sequences and structures. Nine examples are used to demonstrate the efficiency of our new method. PMID:28350835

  20. Adaptive Local Information Transfer in Random Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    Living systems such as gene regulatory networks and neuronal networks have been supposed to work close to dynamical criticality, where their information-processing ability is optimal at the whole-system level. We investigate how this global information-processing optimality is related to the local information transfer at each individual-unit level. In particular, we introduce an internal adjustment process of the local information transfer and examine whether the former can emerge from the latter. We propose an adaptive random Boolean network model in which each unit rewires its incoming arcs from other units to balance stability of its information processing based on the measurement of the local information transfer pattern. First, we show numerically that random Boolean networks can self-organize toward near dynamical criticality in our model. Second, the proposed model is analyzed by a mean-field theory. We recognize that the rewiring rule has a bootstrapping feature. The stationary indegree distribution is calculated semi-analytically and is shown to be close to dynamical criticality in a broad range of model parameter values.

  1. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  2. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate.

    PubMed

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  3. Groups, information theory, and Einstein's likelihood principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicuro, Gabriele; Tempesta, Piergiulio

    2016-04-01

    We propose a unifying picture where the notion of generalized entropy is related to information theory by means of a group-theoretical approach. The group structure comes from the requirement that an entropy be well defined with respect to the composition of independent systems, in the context of a recently proposed generalization of the Shannon-Khinchin axioms. We associate to each member of a large class of entropies a generalized information measure, satisfying the additivity property on a set of independent systems as a consequence of the underlying group law. At the same time, we also show that Einstein's likelihood function naturally emerges as a byproduct of our informational interpretation of (generally nonadditive) entropies. These results confirm the adequacy of composable entropies both in physical and social science contexts.

  4. Groups, information theory, and Einstein's likelihood principle.

    PubMed

    Sicuro, Gabriele; Tempesta, Piergiulio

    2016-04-01

    We propose a unifying picture where the notion of generalized entropy is related to information theory by means of a group-theoretical approach. The group structure comes from the requirement that an entropy be well defined with respect to the composition of independent systems, in the context of a recently proposed generalization of the Shannon-Khinchin axioms. We associate to each member of a large class of entropies a generalized information measure, satisfying the additivity property on a set of independent systems as a consequence of the underlying group law. At the same time, we also show that Einstein's likelihood function naturally emerges as a byproduct of our informational interpretation of (generally nonadditive) entropies. These results confirm the adequacy of composable entropies both in physical and social science contexts.

  5. Possibilistic systems within a general information theory

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, C.

    1999-06-01

    The author surveys possibilistic systems theory and place it in the context of Imprecise Probabilities and General Information Theory (GIT). In particular, he argues that possibilistic systems hold a distinct position within a broadly conceived, synthetic GIT. The focus is on systems and applications which are semantically grounded by empirical measurement methods (statistical counting), rather than epistemic or subjective knowledge elicitation or assessment methods. Regarding fuzzy measures as special provisions, and evidence measures (belief and plausibility measures) as special fuzzy measures, thereby he can measure imprecise probabilities directly and empirically from set-valued frequencies (random set measurement). More specifically, measurements of random intervals yield empirical fuzzy intervals. In the random set (Dempster-Shafer) context, probability and possibility measures stand as special plausibility measures in that their distributionality (decomposability) maps directly to an aggregable structure of the focal classes of their random sets. Further, possibility measures share with imprecise probabilities the ability to better handle open world problems where the universe of discourse is not specified in advance. In addition to empirically grounded measurement methods, possibility theory also provides another crucial component of a full systems theory, namely prediction methods in the form of finite (Markov) processes which are also strictly analogous to the probabilistic forms.

  6. Minimum energy information fusion in sensor networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G

    1999-05-11

    In this paper we consider how to organize the sharing of information in a distributed network of sensors and data processors so as to provide explanations for sensor readings with minimal expenditure of energy. We point out that the Minimum Description Length principle provides an approach to information fusion that is more naturally suited to energy minimization than traditional Bayesian approaches. In addition we show that for networks consisting of a large number of identical sensors Kohonen self-organization provides an exact solution to the problem of combing the sensor outputs into minimal description length explanations.

  7. Astrophysical data analysis with information field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enßlin, Torsten

    2014-12-05

    Non-parametric imaging and data analysis in astrophysics and cosmology can be addressed by information field theory (IFT), a means of Bayesian, data based inference on spatially distributed signal fields. IFT is a statistical field theory, which permits the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. It exploits spatial correlations of the signal fields even for nonlinear and non-Gaussian signal inference problems. The alleviation of a perception threshold for recovering signals of unknown correlation structure by using IFT will be discussed in particular as well as a novel improvement on instrumental self-calibration schemes. IFT can be applied to many areas. Here, applications in in cosmology (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure) and astrophysics (galactic magnetism, radio interferometry) are presented.

  8. Information theory applications for biological sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Vinga, Susana

    2014-05-01

    Information theory (IT) addresses the analysis of communication systems and has been widely applied in molecular biology. In particular, alignment-free sequence analysis and comparison greatly benefited from concepts derived from IT, such as entropy and mutual information. This review covers several aspects of IT applications, ranging from genome global analysis and comparison, including block-entropy estimation and resolution-free metrics based on iterative maps, to local analysis, comprising the classification of motifs, prediction of transcription factor binding sites and sequence characterization based on linguistic complexity and entropic profiles. IT has also been applied to high-level correlations that combine DNA, RNA or protein features with sequence-independent properties, such as gene mapping and phenotype analysis, and has also provided models based on communication systems theory to describe information transmission channels at the cell level and also during evolutionary processes. While not exhaustive, this review attempts to categorize existing methods and to indicate their relation with broader transversal topics such as genomic signatures, data compression and complexity, time series analysis and phylogenetic classification, providing a resource for future developments in this promising area.

  9. Directedness of information flow in mobile phone communication networks.

    PubMed

    Peruani, Fernando; Tabourier, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    Without having direct access to the information that is being exchanged, traces of information flow can be obtained by looking at temporal sequences of user interactions. These sequences can be represented as causality trees whose statistics result from a complex interplay between the topology of the underlying (social) network and the time correlations among the communications. Here, we study causality trees in mobile-phone data, which can be represented as a dynamical directed network. This representation of the data reveals the existence of super-spreaders and super-receivers. We show that the tree statistics, respectively the information spreading process, are extremely sensitive to the in-out degree correlation exhibited by the users. We also learn that a given information, e.g., a rumor, would require users to retransmit it for more than 30 hours in order to cover a macroscopic fraction of the system. Our analysis indicates that topological node-node correlations of the underlying social network, while allowing the existence of information loops, they also promote information spreading. Temporal correlations, and therefore causality effects, are only visible as local phenomena and during short time scales. Consequently, the very idea that there is (intentional) information spreading beyond a small vecinity is called into question. These results are obtained through a combination of theory and data analysis techniques.

  10. Does information theory explain biological evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battail, G.

    1997-11-01

    It is suggested that Dawkins' model of evolution needs error-correction coding in the genome replication process. Nested coding is moreover assumed. Consequences of these hypotheses are drawn using fundamental results of information theory. Genome replication is dealt with independently of phenotype encoding, which pertains to semantics. The proposed hypotheses enable explaining facts of genetics and evolution, including the existence of redundant DNA (the introns), the observed correlation between the rate of mutations on the one hand, the genome length and the redundancy rate on the other hand, the discreteness of species and the trend of eukaryotes evolution towards complexity.

  11. Random matrix techniques in quantum information theory

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benoît; Nechita, Ion

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this review is to present some of the latest developments using random techniques, and in particular, random matrix techniques in quantum information theory. Our review is a blend of a rather exhaustive review and of more detailed examples—coming mainly from research projects in which the authors were involved. We focus on two main topics, random quantum states and random quantum channels. We present results related to entropic quantities, entanglement of typical states, entanglement thresholds, the output set of quantum channels, and violations of the minimum output entropy of random channels.

  12. Theory And Uses Of A Broad Band Coaxial Cable Information System In The Hospital Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Allan I.; Harder, Edward L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper explains the theory and operation of local area networks which employ broadband coaxial cable communication technology. Such networks combine data, voice and T.V. communications on a single one-half inch diameter coaxial cable. The 300 Megahertz (MHZ) bandwidth of the network also provides multiple high speed (multi-million bit per second) data channels required for medical image processing applications. The theory is then applied to the development of the total facility (hospital complex) Information Network providing services which include security, facilities management, data processing, and emergency paging as well as medical image data transmissions.

  13. Information filtering on coupled social networks.

    PubMed

    Nie, Da-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Kui

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on the coupled social networks (CSN), we propose a hybrid algorithm to nonlinearly integrate both social and behavior information of online users. Filtering algorithm, based on the coupled social networks, considers the effects of both social similarity and personalized preference. Experimental results based on two real datasets, Epinions and Friendfeed, show that the hybrid pattern can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also enlarge the recommendation coverage while adopting global metric. Further empirical analyses demonstrate that the mutual reinforcement and rich-club phenomenon can also be found in coupled social networks where the identical individuals occupy the core position of the online system. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the structure and function of coupled social networks.

  14. Information Filtering on Coupled Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Da-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Kui

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on the coupled social networks (CSN), we propose a hybrid algorithm to nonlinearly integrate both social and behavior information of online users. Filtering algorithm, based on the coupled social networks, considers the effects of both social similarity and personalized preference. Experimental results based on two real datasets, Epinions and Friendfeed, show that the hybrid pattern can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also enlarge the recommendation coverage while adopting global metric. Further empirical analyses demonstrate that the mutual reinforcement and rich-club phenomenon can also be found in coupled social networks where the identical individuals occupy the core position of the online system. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the structure and function of coupled social networks. PMID:25003525

  15. Optimal Network Modularity for Information Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematzadeh, Azadeh; Ferrara, Emilio; Flammini, Alessandro; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the impact of community structure on information diffusion with the linear threshold model. Our results demonstrate that modular structure may have counterintuitive effects on information diffusion when social reinforcement is present. We show that strong communities can facilitate global diffusion by enhancing local, intracommunity spreading. Using both analytic approaches and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal network modularity, where global diffusion requires the minimal number of early adopters.

  16. Nonlinear adaptive networks: A little theory, a few applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Qian, S.; Barnes, C.W.; Bisset, K.R.; Bruce, G.M.; Lee, K.; Lee, L.A.; Mead, W.C.; O'Rourke, M.K.; Thode, L.E. ); Lee, Y.C.; Flake, G.W. Maryland Univ., College Park, MD ); Poli, I.J. Bologna Univ. )

    1990-01-01

    We present the theory of nonlinear adaptive networks and discuss a few applications. In particular, we review the theory of feedforward backpropagation networks. We than present the theory of the Connectionist Normalized Linear Spline network in both its feedforward and iterated modes. Also, we briefly discuss the theory of stochastic cellular automata. We then discuss applications to chaotic time series tidal prediction in Venice Lagoon, sonar transient detection, control of nonlinear processes, balancing a double inverted pendulum and design advice for free electron lasers. 26 refs., 23 figs.

  17. A brief review of molecular information theory

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that we could build molecular communications systems can be advanced by investigating how actual molecules from living organisms function. Information theory provides tools for such an investigation. This review describes how we can compute the average information in the DNA binding sites of any genetic control protein and how this can be extended to analyze its individual sites. A formula equivalent to Claude Shannon’s channel capacity can be applied to molecular systems and used to compute the efficiency of protein binding. This efficiency is often 70% and a brief explanation for that is given. The results imply that biological systems have evolved to function at channel capacity, which means that we should be able to build molecular communications that are just as robust as our macroscopic ones. PMID:22110566

  18. An information theory of image gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.

    1991-01-01

    Shannon's mathematical theory of communication is extended to image gathering. Expressions are obtained for the total information that is received with a single image-gathering channel and with parallel channels. It is concluded that the aliased signal components carry information even though these components interfere with the within-passband components in conventional image gathering and restoration, thereby degrading the fidelity and visual quality of the restored image. An examination of the expression for minimum mean-square-error, or Wiener-matrix, restoration from parallel image-gathering channels reveals a method for unscrambling the within-passband and aliased signal components to restore spatial frequencies beyond the sampling passband out to the spatial frequency response cutoff of the optical aperture.

  19. An anti-attack model based on complex network theory in P2P networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Lu, Songnian; Zhao, Dandan; Zhang, Aixin; Li, Jianhua

    2012-04-01

    Complex network theory is a useful way to study many real systems. In this paper, an anti-attack model based on complex network theory is introduced. The mechanism of this model is based on a dynamic compensation process and a reverse percolation process in P2P networks. The main purpose of the paper is: (i) a dynamic compensation process can turn an attacked P2P network into a power-law (PL) network with exponential cutoff; (ii) a local healing process can restore the maximum degree of peers in an attacked P2P network to a normal level; (iii) a restoring process based on reverse percolation theory connects the fragmentary peers of an attacked P2P network together into a giant connected component. In this way, the model based on complex network theory can be effectively utilized for anti-attack and protection purposes in P2P networks.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Theory of Neural Information Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias

    2006-04-01

    It is difficult not to be amazed by the ability of the human brain to process, to structure and to memorize information. Even by the toughest standards the behaviour of this network of about 1011 neurons qualifies as complex, and both the scientific community and the public take great interest in the growing field of neuroscience. The scientific endeavour to learn more about the function of the brain as an information processing system is here a truly interdisciplinary one, with important contributions from biology, computer science, physics, engineering and mathematics as the authors quite rightly point out in the introduction of their book. The role of the theoretical disciplines here is to provide mathematical models of information processing systems and the tools to study them. These models and tools are at the centre of the material covered in the book by Coolen, Kühn and Sollich. The book is divided into five parts, providing basic introductory material on neural network models as well as the details of advanced techniques to study them. A mathematical appendix complements the main text. The range of topics is extremely broad, still the presentation is concise and the book well arranged. To stress the breadth of the book let me just mention a few keywords here: the material ranges from the basics of perceptrons and recurrent network architectures to more advanced aspects such as Bayesian learning and support vector machines; Shannon's theory of information and the definition of entropy are discussed, and a chapter on Amari's information geometry is not missing either. Finally the statistical mechanics chapters cover Gardner theory and the replica analysis of the Hopfield model, not without being preceded by a brief introduction of the basic concepts of equilibrium statistical physics. The book also contains a part on effective theories of the macroscopic dynamics of neural networks. Many dynamical aspects of neural networks are usually hard to find in the

  1. Networked Information Resources. SPEC Kit 253.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiler, Richard, Comp.; Plum, Terry, Comp.

    1999-01-01

    This SPEC Kit, published six times per year, examines how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) libraries have structured themselves to identify networked information resources in the market, to evaluate them for purchase, to make purchasing decisions, to publicize them, and to assess their continued utility. In the summer of 1999, the survey…

  2. OASIS: Prototyping Graphical Interfaces to Networked Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes the latest modifications being made to OASIS, a front-end enhancement to the University of California's MELVYL online union catalog. Highlights include the X Windows interface; multiple database searching to act as an information network; Lisp implementation for flexible data representation; and OASIS commands and features to help…

  3. The Embedded Self: A Social Networks Approach to Identity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mark H.; Lynn, Freda B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that key sociological theories of self and identity view the self as fundamentally rooted in networks of interpersonal relationships, empirical research investigating how personal network structure influences the self is conspicuously lacking. To address this gap, we examine links between network structure and role identity…

  4. A Complexity Theory of Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-14

    Significant results have been obtained on the computation complexity of analog neural networks , and distribute voting. The computing power and...learning algorithms for limited precision analog neural networks have been investigated. Lower bounds for constant depth, polynomial size analog neural ... networks , and a limited version of discrete neural networks have been obtained. The work on distributed voting has important applications for distributed

  5. MIDER: Network Inference with Mutual Information Distance and Entropy Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, Alejandro F.; Ross, John; Morán, Federico; Banga, Julio R.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of links among variables from a given dataset is a task referred to as network inference or reverse engineering. It is an open problem in bioinformatics and systems biology, as well as in other areas of science. Information theory, which uses concepts such as mutual information, provides a rigorous framework for addressing it. While a number of information-theoretic methods are already available, most of them focus on a particular type of problem, introducing assumptions that limit their generality. Furthermore, many of these methods lack a publicly available implementation. Here we present MIDER, a method for inferring network structures with information theoretic concepts. It consists of two steps: first, it provides a representation of the network in which the distance among nodes indicates their statistical closeness. Second, it refines the prediction of the existing links to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions and to assign directionality. The method accepts as input time-series data related to some quantitative features of the network nodes (such as e.g. concentrations, if the nodes are chemical species). It takes into account time delays between variables, and allows choosing among several definitions and normalizations of mutual information. It is general purpose: it may be applied to any type of network, cellular or otherwise. A Matlab implementation including source code and data is freely available (http://www.iim.csic.es/~gingproc/mider.html). The performance of MIDER has been evaluated on seven different benchmark problems that cover the main types of cellular networks, including metabolic, gene regulatory, and signaling. Comparisons with state of the art information–theoretic methods have demonstrated the competitive performance of MIDER, as well as its versatility. Its use does not demand any a priori knowledge from the user; the default settings and the adaptive nature of the method provide good results for a wide

  6. Complementarity and entanglement in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, Tracey Edward

    This research investigates two inherently quantum mechanical phenomena, namely complementarity and entanglement, from an information-theoretic perspective. Beyond philosophical implications, a thorough grasp of these concepts is crucial for advancing our understanding of foundational issues in quantum mechanics, as well as in studying how the use of quantum systems might enhance the performance of certain information processing tasks. The primary goal of this thesis is to shed light on the natures and interrelationships of these phenomena by approaching them from the point of view afforded by information theory. We attempt to better understand these pillars of quantum mechanics by studying the various ways in which they govern the manipulation of information, while at the same time gaining valuable insight into the roles they play in specific applications. The restrictions that nature places on the distribution of correlations in a multipartite quantum system play fundamental roles in the evolution of such systems and yield vital insights into the design of protocols for the quantum control of ensembles with potential applications in the field of quantum computing. By augmenting the existing formalism for quantifying entangled correlations, we show how this entanglement sharing behavior may be studied in increasingly complex systems of both theoretical and experimental significance. Further, our results shed light on the dynamical generation and evolution of multipartite entanglement by demonstrating that individual members of an ensemble of identical systems coupled to a common probe can become entangled with one another, even when they do not interact directly. The findings presented in this thesis support the conjecture that Hilbert space dimension is an objective property of a quantum system since it constrains the number of valid conceptual divisions of the system into subsystems. These arbitrary observer-induced distinctions are integral to the theory since

  7. 76 FR 67750 - Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Homeland Security... Applicants for Appointment to Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Homeland Security has determined that the renewal of the Homeland Security Information...

  8. Information diffusion in structured online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Yini; Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, due to the word-of-mouth effect, online social networks have been considered to be efficient approaches to conduct viral marketing, which makes it of great importance to understand the diffusion dynamics in online social networks. However, most research on diffusion dynamics in epidemiology and existing social networks cannot be applied directly to characterize online social networks. In this paper, we propose models to characterize the information diffusion in structured online social networks with push-based forwarding mechanism. We introduce the term user influence to characterize the average number of times that messages are browsed which is incurred by a given type user generating a message, and study the diffusion threshold, above which the user influence of generating a message will approach infinity. We conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly. These results are of use in understanding the diffusion dynamics in online social networks and also critical for advertisers in viral marketing who want to estimate the user influence before posting an advertisement.

  9. Improving information filtering via network manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuguo; Zeng, An

    2012-12-01

    The recommender system is a very promising way to address the problem of overabundant information for online users. Although the information filtering for the online commercial systems has received much attention recently, almost all of the previous works are dedicated to design new algorithms and consider the user-item bipartite networks as given and constant information. However, many problems for recommender systems such as the cold-start problem (i.e., low recommendation accuracy for the small-degree items) are actually due to the limitation of the underlying user-item bipartite networks. In this letter, we propose a strategy to enhance the performance of the already existing recommendation algorithms by directly manipulating the user-item bipartite networks, namely adding some virtual connections to the networks. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, show that our method can remarkably improves the recommendation performance. Specifically, it not only improves the recommendations accuracy (especially for the small-degree items), but also helps the recommender systems generate more diverse and novel recommendations.

  10. Insights into the organization of biochemical regulatory networks using graph theory analyses.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi

    2009-02-27

    Graph theory has been a valuable mathematical modeling tool to gain insights into the topological organization of biochemical networks. There are two types of insights that may be obtained by graph theory analyses. The first provides an overview of the global organization of biochemical networks; the second uses prior knowledge to place results from multivariate experiments, such as microarray data sets, in the context of known pathways and networks to infer regulation. Using graph analyses, biochemical networks are found to be scale-free and small-world, indicating that these networks contain hubs, which are proteins that interact with many other molecules. These hubs may interact with many different types of proteins at the same time and location or at different times and locations, resulting in diverse biological responses. Groups of components in networks are organized in recurring patterns termed network motifs such as feedback and feed-forward loops. Graph analysis revealed that negative feedback loops are less common and are present mostly in proximity to the membrane, whereas positive feedback loops are highly nested in an architecture that promotes dynamical stability. Cell signaling networks have multiple pathways from some input receptors and few from others. Such topology is reminiscent of a classification system. Signaling networks display a bow-tie structure indicative of funneling information from extracellular signals and then dispatching information from a few specific central intracellular signaling nexuses. These insights show that graph theory is a valuable tool for gaining an understanding of global regulatory features of biochemical networks.

  11. New Learning Communities: Collaboration, Networking, and Information Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Philip; Perry, Susan; Lippincott, Joan K.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the New Learning Communities (NLC) program developed by CNI (Coalition for Networked Information) to support pioneers in education who use networking and networked information to support student-centered teaching and learning. Highlights include computer networks in higher education, especially the Internet; information literacy skills;…

  12. Network Anomaly Detection System with Optimized DS Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    Network anomaly detection has been focused on by more people with the fast development of computer network. Some researchers utilized fusion method and DS evidence theory to do network anomaly detection but with low performance, and they did not consider features of network—complicated and varied. To achieve high detection rate, we present a novel network anomaly detection system with optimized Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (ODS) and regression basic probability assignment (RBPA) function. In this model, we add weights for each senor to optimize DS evidence theory according to its previous predict accuracy. And RBPA employs sensor's regression ability to address complex network. By four kinds of experiments, we find that our novel network anomaly detection model has a better detection rate, and RBPA as well as ODS optimization methods can improve system performance significantly. PMID:25254258

  13. Characterization of vehicle behavior with information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Andre L. L.; Cavalcante, Tamer S. G.; Almeida, Eliana S.; Frery, Alejandro C.; Rosso, Osvaldo A.

    2015-10-01

    This work proposes the use of Information Theory for the characterization of vehicles behavior through their velocities. Three public data sets were used: (i) Mobile Century data set collected on Highway I-880, near Union City, California; (ii) Borlänge GPS data set collected in the Swedish city of Borlänge; and (iii) Beijing taxicabs data set collected in Beijing, China, where each vehicle speed is stored as a time series. The Bandt-Pompe methodology combined with the Complexity-Entropy plane were used to identify different regimes and behaviors. The global velocity is compatible with a correlated noise with f - k Power Spectrum with k ≥ 0. With this we identify traffic behaviors as, for instance, random velocities ( k ≃ 0) when there is congestion, and more correlated velocities ( k ≃ 3) in the presence of free traffic flow.

  14. Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience "does not…

  15. Reinforce Networking Theory with OPNET Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Jinhua; Xiang, Weidong; Wang, Shengquan

    2007-01-01

    As networking systems have become more complex and expensive, hands-on experiments based on networking simulation have become essential for teaching the key computer networking topics to students. The simulation approach is the most cost effective and highly useful because it provides a virtual environment for an assortment of desirable features…

  16. A Preliminary Theory of Dark Network Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Rene M.; Raab, Jorg; Milward, H. Brinton

    2012-01-01

    A crucial contemporary policy question for governments across the globe is how to cope with international crime and terrorist networks. Many such "dark" networks--that is, networks that operate covertly and illegally--display a remarkable level of resilience when faced with shocks and attacks. Based on an in-depth study of three cases…

  17. Theoretical approaches for the dynamics of complex biological systems from information of networks

    PubMed Central

    MOCHIZUKI, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Modern biology has provided many examples of large networks describing the interactions between multiple species of bio-molecules. It is believed that the dynamics of molecular activities based on such networks are the origin of biological functions. On the other hand, we have a limited understanding for dynamics of molecular activity based on networks. To overcome this problem, we have developed two structural theories, by which the important aspects of the dynamical properties of the system are determined only from information on the network structure, without assuming other quantitative details. The first theory, named Linkage Logic, determines a subset of molecules in regulatory networks, by which any long-term dynamical behavior of the whole system can be identified/controlled. The second theory, named Structural Sensitivity Analysis, determines the sensitivity responses of the steady state of chemical reaction networks to perturbations of the reaction rate. The first and second theories investigate the dynamical properties of regulatory and reaction networks, respectively. The first theory targets the attractors of the regulatory network systems, whereas the second theory applies only to the steady states of the reaction network systems, but predicts their detailed behavior. To demonstrate the utility of our methods several biological network systems, and show they are practically useful to analyze behaviors of biological systems. PMID:27725468

  18. Percolation theory on interdependent networks based on epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Seung-Woo; Bizhani, Golnoosh; Christensen, Claire; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2012-01-01

    We consider percolation on interdependent locally treelike networks, recently introduced by Buldyrev S. V. et al., Nature, 464 (2010) 1025, and demonstrate that the problem can be simplified conceptually by deleting all references to cascades of failures. Such cascades do exist, but their explicit treatment just complicates the theory —which is a straightforward extension of the usual epidemic spreading theory on a single network. Our method has the added benefits that it is directly formulated in terms of an order parameter and its modular structure can be easily extended to other problems, e.g. to any number of interdependent networks, or to networks with dependency links.

  19. Mean-field theory of echo state networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massar, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2013-04-01

    Dynamical systems driven by strong external signals are ubiquitous in nature and engineering. Here we study “echo state networks,” networks of a large number of randomly connected nodes, which represent a simple model of a neural network, and have important applications in machine learning. We develop a mean-field theory of echo state networks. The dynamics of the network is captured by the evolution law, similar to a logistic map, for a single collective variable. When the network is driven by many independent external signals, this collective variable reaches a steady state. But when the network is driven by a single external signal, the collective variable is non stationary but can be characterized by its time averaged distribution. The predictions of the mean-field theory, including the value of the largest Lyapunov exponent, are compared with the numerical integration of the equations of motion.

  20. Identification of Boolean Networks Using Premined Network Topology Information.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Han, Huaxiang; Zhang, Weidong

    2017-02-01

    This brief aims to reduce the data requirement for the identification of Boolean networks (BNs) by using the premined network topology information. First, a matching table is created and used for sifting the true from the false dependences among the nodes in the BNs. Then, a dynamic extension to matching table is developed to enable the dynamic locating of matching pairs to start as soon as possible. Next, based on the pseudocommutative property of the semitensor product, a position-transform mining is carried out to further improve data utilization. Combining the above, the topology of the BNs can be premined for the subsequent identification. Examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of reducing the data requirement. Some excellent features, such as the online and parallel processing ability, are also demonstrated.

  1. Optimal Learning Paths in Information Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rodi, G. C.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Tria, F.

    2015-01-01

    Each sphere of knowledge and information could be depicted as a complex mesh of correlated items. By properly exploiting these connections, innovative and more efficient navigation strategies could be defined, possibly leading to a faster learning process and an enduring retention of information. In this work we investigate how the topological structure embedding the items to be learned can affect the efficiency of the learning dynamics. To this end we introduce a general class of algorithms that simulate the exploration of knowledge/information networks standing on well-established findings on educational scheduling, namely the spacing and lag effects. While constructing their learning schedules, individuals move along connections, periodically revisiting some concepts, and sometimes jumping on very distant ones. In order to investigate the effect of networked information structures on the proposed learning dynamics we focused both on synthetic and real-world graphs such as subsections of Wikipedia and word-association graphs. We highlight the existence of optimal topological structures for the simulated learning dynamics whose efficiency is affected by the balance between hubs and the least connected items. Interestingly, the real-world graphs we considered lead naturally to almost optimal learning performances. PMID:26030508

  2. Quantum complexity: Quantum mutual information, complex networks, and emergent phenomena in quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, David L.

    Emerging quantum simulator technologies provide a new challenge to quantum many body theory. Quantifying the emergent order in and predicting the dynamics of such complex quantum systems requires a new approach. We develop such an approach based on complex network analysis of quantum mutual information. First, we establish the usefulness of quantum mutual information complex networks by reproducing the phase diagrams of transverse Ising and Bose-Hubbard models. By quantifying the complexity of quantum cellular automata we then demonstrate the applicability of complex network theory to non-equilibrium quantum dynamics. We conclude with a study of student collaboration networks, correlating a student's role in a collaboration network with their grades. This work thus initiates a quantitative theory of quantum complexity and provides a new tool for physics education research. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  3. Pairwise network information and nonlinear correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot A.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    Reconstructing the structural connectivity between interacting units from observed activity is a challenge across many different disciplines. The fundamental first step is to establish whether or to what extent the interactions between the units can be considered pairwise and, thus, can be modeled as an interaction network with simple links corresponding to pairwise interactions. In principle, this can be determined by comparing the maximum entropy given the bivariate probability distributions to the true joint entropy. In many practical cases, this is not an option since the bivariate distributions needed may not be reliably estimated or the optimization is too computationally expensive. Here we present an approach that allows one to use mutual informations as a proxy for the bivariate probability distributions. This has the advantage of being less computationally expensive and easier to estimate. We achieve this by introducing a novel entropy maximization scheme that is based on conditioning on entropies and mutual informations. This renders our approach typically superior to other methods based on linear approximations. The advantages of the proposed method are documented using oscillator networks and a resting-state human brain network as generic relevant examples.

  4. Pairwise network information and nonlinear correlations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elliot A; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    Reconstructing the structural connectivity between interacting units from observed activity is a challenge across many different disciplines. The fundamental first step is to establish whether or to what extent the interactions between the units can be considered pairwise and, thus, can be modeled as an interaction network with simple links corresponding to pairwise interactions. In principle, this can be determined by comparing the maximum entropy given the bivariate probability distributions to the true joint entropy. In many practical cases, this is not an option since the bivariate distributions needed may not be reliably estimated or the optimization is too computationally expensive. Here we present an approach that allows one to use mutual informations as a proxy for the bivariate probability distributions. This has the advantage of being less computationally expensive and easier to estimate. We achieve this by introducing a novel entropy maximization scheme that is based on conditioning on entropies and mutual informations. This renders our approach typically superior to other methods based on linear approximations. The advantages of the proposed method are documented using oscillator networks and a resting-state human brain network as generic relevant examples.

  5. An Attractor Network in the Hippocampus: Theory and Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the CA3 system as an attractor or autoassociation network is described. Based on the proposal that CA3-CA3 autoassociative networks are important for episodic or event memory in which space is a component (place in rodents and spatial view in primates), it has been shown behaviorally that the…

  6. A Systems Theory View of Organizations as Communication Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Donald F.

    Focusing on the analysis of communication networks within organizations with an eye toward implications for study of external communication, this paper (1) develops a systems theory/communication view of the nature of formal organizations, (2) illustrates the notion of holistic organizational communication networks in organizations which include…

  7. Domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Johnny

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we continue the study of domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory initiated by Keye Martin and Bob Coecke in 2002. The first part of the thesis is focused on exploring the domain theoretic properties of qubit channels. We discover that the Scott continuous qubit channels are exactly those that are unital or constant. We then prove that the unital qubit channels form a continuous dcpo, and identify various measurements on them. We show that Holevo capacity is a measurement on unital qubit channels, and discover the natural measurement in this setting. We find that qubit channels also form a continuous dcpo, but capacity fails to be a measurement. In the second part we focus on the study of exact dcpos, a domain theoretic structure, closely related to continuous dcpos, possessed by quantum states. Exact dcpos admit a topology, called the exact topology, and we show that the exact topology has an order theoretic characterization similar to the characterization of the Scott topology on continuous dcpos. We then explore the connection between exact and continuous dcpos; first, by identifying an important set of points, called the split points, that distinguishes between exact and continuous structures; second, by exploring a continuous completion of exact dcpos, and showing that we can recover the exact topology from the Scott topology of the completion.

  8. Curriculum Theory Network [CTN 4: Winter 1969-70].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, John, Ed.

    This issue of the journal of the "Curriculum Theory Network" contains four major articles on aspects of the curriculum. Karplus, using Science Curriculum Improvement Study as an example, presents three guidelines for developing elementary school science curricula: separate "experience" and "concept" goals; use developmental and learning theories;…

  9. Social Capital Theory: Implications for Women's Networking and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes social capital theory as a framework for exploring women's networking and social capital resources. It presents the foundational assumptions of the theory, the benefits and risks of social capital engagement, a feminist critique of social capital, and the role of social capital in adult learning.

  10. Critical Theory and Information Studies: A Marcusean Infusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyati, Ajit K.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of library and information science, also known as information studies, critical theory is often not included in debates about the discipline's theoretical foundations. This paper argues that the critical theory of Herbert Marcuse, in particular, has a significant contribution to make to the field of information studies. Marcuse's…

  11. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the Deep Space Network (DSN) information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990s. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies, such as the following: computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  12. Network Theory Analysis of Antibody-Antigen Reactivity Data: The Immune Trees at Birth and Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; Merbl, Yifat; Quintana, Francisco J.; Tauber, Alfred I.; Cohen, Irun R.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2011-01-01

    Motivation New antigen microarray technology enables parallel recording of antibody reactivities with hundreds of antigens. Such data affords system level analysis of the immune system's organization using methods and approaches from network theory. Here we measured the reactivity of 290 antigens (for both the IgG and IgM isotypes) of 10 healthy mothers and their term newborns. We constructed antigen correlation networks (or immune networks) whose nodes are the antigens and the edges are the antigen-antigen reactivity correlations, and we also computed their corresponding minimum spanning trees (MST) – maximal information reduced sub-graphs. We quantify the network organization (topology) in terms of the network theory divergence rate measure and rank the antigen importance in the full antigen correlation networks by the eigen-value centrality measure. This analysis makes possible the characterization and comparison of the IgG and IgM immune networks at birth (newborns) and adulthood (mothers) in terms of topology and node importance. Results Comparison of the immune network topology at birth and adulthood revealed partial conservation of the IgG immune network topology, and significant reorganization of the IgM immune networks. Inspection of the antigen importance revealed some dominant (in terms of high centrality) antigens in the IgG and IgM networks at birth, which retain their importance at adulthood. PMID:21408156

  13. Predicting Networked Strategic Behavior via Machine Learning and Game Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-13

    Report: Predicting Networked Strategic Behavior via Machine Learning and Game Theory The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report...2211 machine learning, game theory , microeconomics, behavioral data REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...Strategic Behavior via Machine Learning and Game Theory Report Title The funding for this project was used to develop basic models, methodology

  14. The problem of applying information theory to efficient image transmission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakrison, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The main ideas of Shannon's (1948, 1960) theory of source encoding with a fidelity constraint, more commonly known as rate distortion theory, are summarized. The theory was specifically intended to provide a theoretical basis for efficient transmission of information such as images. What the theory has to contribute to the problem is demonstrated. Difficulties that impeded application of the theory to image transmission, and current efforts to solve these difficulties are discussed.

  15. Trends in information theory-based chemical structure codification.

    PubMed

    Barigye, Stephen J; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Bonchev, Danail

    2014-08-01

    This report offers a chronological review of the most relevant applications of information theory in the codification of chemical structure information, through the so-called information indices. Basically, these are derived from the analysis of the statistical patterns of molecular structure representations, which include primitive global chemical formulae, chemical graphs, or matrix representations. Finally, new approaches that attempt to go "back to the roots" of information theory, in order to integrate other information-theoretic measures in chemical structure coding are discussed.

  16. Utilizing general information theories for uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Uncertainties enter into a complex problem from many sources: variability, errors, and lack of knowledge. A fundamental question arises in how to characterize the various kinds of uncertainty and then combine within a problem such as the verification and validation of a structural dynamics computer model, reliability of a dynamic system, or a complex decision problem. Because uncertainties are of different types (e.g., random noise, numerical error, vagueness of classification), it is difficult to quantify all of them within the constructs of a single mathematical theory, such as probability theory. Because different kinds of uncertainty occur within a complex modeling problem, linkages between these mathematical theories are necessary. A brief overview of some of these theories and their constituents under the label of Generalized lnforrnation Theory (GIT) is presented, and a brief decision example illustrates the importance of linking at least two such theories.

  17. Essential elements of online information networks on invasive alien species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, A.; Sellers, E.; Grosse, A.; Xie, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to be effective, information must be placed in the proper context and organized in a manner that is logical and (preferably) standardized. Recently, invasive alien species (IAS) scientists have begun to create online networks to share their information concerning IAS prevention and control. At a special networking session at the Beijing International Symposium on Biological Invasions, an online Eastern Asia-North American IAS Information Network (EA-NA Network) was proposed. To prepare for the development of this network, and to provide models for other regional collaborations, we compare four examples of global, regional, and national online IAS information networks: the Global Invasive Species Information Network, the Invasives Information Network of the Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network, the Chinese Species Information System, and the Invasive Species Information Node of the US National Biological Information Infrastructure. We conclude that IAS networks require a common goal, dedicated leaders, effective communication, and broad endorsement, in order to obtain sustainable, long-term funding and long-term stability. They need to start small, use the experience of other networks, partner with others, and showcase benefits. Global integration and synergy among invasive species networks will succeed with contributions from both the top-down and the bottom-up. ?? 2006 Springer.

  18. Lewis Information Network (LINK): Background and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center supports many research facilities with many isolated buildings, including wind tunnels, test cells, and research laboratories. These facilities are all located on a 350 acre campus adjacent to the Cleveland Hopkins Airport. The function of NASA-Lewis is to do basic and applied research in all areas of aeronautics, fluid mechanics, materials and structures, space propulsion, and energy systems. These functions require a great variety of remote high speed, high volume data communications for computing and interactive graphic capabilities. In addition, new requirements for local distribution of intercenter video teleconferencing and data communications via satellite have developed. To address these and future communications requirements for the next 15 yrs, a project team was organized to design and implement a new high speed communication system that would handle both data and video information in a common lab-wide Local Area Network. The project team selected cable television broadband coaxial cable technology as the communications medium and first installation of in-ground cable began in the summer of 1980. The Lewis Information Network (LINK) became operational in August 1982 and has become the backbone of all data communications and video.

  19. Genetic networks: between theory and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottani, Samuel; Mazurie, Aurélien

    Thanks to an increasing availability of data on cell components and progress in computers and computer science, a long awaited paradigm shift is running in biology from reductionism to holistic approaches. One of the consequences is the huge development of network-related representations of cell activity and an increasing involvement of researchers from computer science, physics and mathematics in their analysis. But what are the promises of these approaches for the biologist? What is the available biological data sustaining them and is it sufficient? After a presentation of the interaction network view of the cell, we shall focus on studies on gene network structure and dynamics. Then we shall discuss the difficulties of these approaches and their theoretical and practical usefulness for the biologist.

  20. On the genesis of the idiotypic network theory.

    PubMed

    Civello, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The idiotypic network theory (INT) was conceived by the Danish immunologist Niels Kaj Jerne in 1973/1974. It proposes an overall view of the immune system as a network of lymphocytes and antibodies. The paper tries to offer a reconstruction of the genesis of the theory, now generally discarded and of mostly historical interest, first of all, by taking into account the context in which Jerne's theoretical proposal was advanced. It is argued the theory challenged, in a sense, the supremacy of the clonal selection theory (CST), this being regarded as the predominant paradigm in the immunological scenario. As CST found shortcomings in explaining certain phenomena, anomalies, one could view INT as a competing paradigm claiming to be able to make sense of such phenomena in its own conceptual framework. After a summary outline of the historical background and some relevant terminological elucidations, a narrative of the various phases of elaboration of the theory is proposed, up to its official public presentation.

  1. USING INFORMATION THEORY TO DEFINE A SUSTAINABILITY INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information theory has many applications in Ecology and Environmental science, such as a biodiversity indicator, as a measure of evolution, a measure of distance from thermodynamic equilibrium, and as a measure of system organization. Fisher Information, in particular, provides a...

  2. Information Theory Density Matrix for a Simple Quantum System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, William J.

    1979-01-01

    Derives the density matrix that best describes, according to information theory, a one-dimensional single particle quantum system when the only information available is the values for the linear and quadratic position-momentum moments. (Author/GA)

  3. Dempster-Shafer information measures in category theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, Joseph S. J.

    2016-05-01

    In the Dempster Shafer context, one can construct new types of information measures based on belief and plausibility functions. These measures differ from those in Shannon's theory because, in his theory, information measures are based on probability functions. Other types of information measures were discovered by Kampe de Feriet and his colleagues in the French and Italian schools of mathematics. The objective of this paper is to construct a new category of information. I use category theory to construct a general setting in which the various types of information measures are special cases.

  4. Spectral Entropies as Information-Theoretic Tools for Complex Network Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Domenico, Manlio; Biamonte, Jacob

    2016-10-01

    Any physical system can be viewed from the perspective that information is implicitly represented in its state. However, the quantification of this information when it comes to complex networks has remained largely elusive. In this work, we use techniques inspired by quantum statistical mechanics to define an entropy measure for complex networks and to develop a set of information-theoretic tools, based on network spectral properties, such as Rényi q entropy, generalized Kullback-Leibler and Jensen-Shannon divergences, the latter allowing us to define a natural distance measure between complex networks. First, we show that by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between an observed network and a parametric network model, inference of model parameter(s) by means of maximum-likelihood estimation can be achieved and model selection can be performed with appropriate information criteria. Second, we show that the information-theoretic metric quantifies the distance between pairs of networks and we can use it, for instance, to cluster the layers of a multilayer system. By applying this framework to networks corresponding to sites of the human microbiome, we perform hierarchical cluster analysis and recover with high accuracy existing community-based associations. Our results imply that spectral-based statistical inference in complex networks results in demonstrably superior performance as well as a conceptual backbone, filling a gap towards a network information theory.

  5. Unravelling the Social Network: Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread popularity of social networking sites (SNSs) amongst children and young people in compulsory education, relatively little scholarly work has explored the fundamental issues at stake. This paper makes an original contribution to the field by locating the study of this online activity within the broader terrain of social…

  6. Realizing Wisdom Theory in Complex Learning Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Ayse

    2009-01-01

    The word "wisdom" is rarely seen in contemporary technology and learning discourse. This conceptual paper aims to provide some clear principles that answer the question: How can we establish wisdom in complex learning networks? By considering the nature of contemporary calls for wisdom the paper provides a metatheoretial framework to evaluate the…

  7. Information spread in networks: Games, optimal control, and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafer, Ali

    This thesis focuses on designing efficient mechanisms for controlling information spread in networks. We consider two models for information spread. The first one is the well-known distributed averaging dynamics. The second model is a nonlinear one that describes virus spread in computer and biological networks. We seek to design optimal, robust, and stabilizing controllers under practical constraints. For distributed averaging networks, we study the interaction between a network designer and an adversary. We consider two types of attacks on the network. In Attack-I, the adversary strategically disconnects a set of links to prevent the nodes from reaching consensus. Meanwhile, the network designer assists the nodes in reaching consensus by changing the weights of a limited number of links in the network. We formulate two problems to describe this competition where the order in which the players act is reversed in the two problems. Although the canonical equations provided by the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (MP) seem to be intractable, we provide an alternative characterization for the optimal strategies that makes connection to potential theory. Further, we provide a sufficient condition for the existence of a saddle-point equilibrium (SPE) for the underlying zero-sum game. In Attack-II, the designer and the adversary are both capable of altering the measurements of all nodes in the network by injecting global signals. We impose two constraints on both players: a power constraint and an energy constraint. We assume that the available energy to each player is not sufficient to operate at maximum power throughout the horizon of the game. We show the existence of an SPE and derive the optimal strategies in closed form for this attack scenario. As an alternative to the "network designer vs. adversary" framework, we investigate the possibility of stabilizing unknown network diffusion processes using a distributed mechanism, where the uncertainty is due to an attack

  8. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining.

    PubMed

    Kovács, István A; Mizsei, Réka; Csermely, Péter

    2015-09-08

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of extensive data sets, by revealing the large-scale structure of complex networks in a comprehensible form.

  9. A Theory of Dark Network Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    status movement (social mobility); physical connection (road, river , or bridge connecting two points); formal ties (organizational hierarchy); and...much direct oversight on operatives who should remain dispersed. In 2008, Colombian police arrested a Lebanese crime kingpin in Bogota , named...schools to practice flights down the Hudson River corridor, are presented in the 9/11 Commission Report. Operational security of the Hamburg Network

  10. VIOLIN: vaccine investigation and online information network.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zuoshuang; Todd, Thomas; Ku, Kim P; Kovacic, Bethany L; Larson, Charles B; Chen, Fang; Hodges, Andrew P; Tian, Yuying; Olenzek, Elizabeth A; Zhao, Boyang; Colby, Lesley A; Rush, Howard G; Gilsdorf, Janet R; Jourdian, George W; He, Yongqun

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines are among the most efficacious and cost-effective tools for reducing morbidity and mortality caused by infectious diseases. The vaccine investigation and online information network (VIOLIN) is a web-based central resource, allowing easy curation, comparison and analysis of vaccine-related research data across various human pathogens (e.g. Haemophilus influenzae, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Plasmodium falciparum) of medical importance and across humans, other natural hosts and laboratory animals. Vaccine-related peer-reviewed literature data have been downloaded into the database from PubMed and are searchable through various literature search programs. Vaccine data are also annotated, edited and submitted to the database through a web-based interactive system that integrates efficient computational literature mining and accurate manual curation. Curated information includes general microbial pathogenesis and host protective immunity, vaccine preparation and characteristics, stimulated host responses after vaccination and protection efficacy after challenge. Vaccine-related pathogen and host genes are also annotated and available for searching through customized BLAST programs. All VIOLIN data are available for download in an eXtensible Markup Language (XML)-based data exchange format. VIOLIN is expected to become a centralized source of vaccine information and to provide investigators in basic and clinical sciences with curated data and bioinformatics tools for vaccine research and development. VIOLIN is publicly available at http://www.violinet.org.

  11. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the DSN information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990's. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies--i.e., computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  12. Intra- Versus Intersex Aggression: Testing Theories of Sex Differences Using Aggression Networks.

    PubMed

    Wölfer, Ralf; Hewstone, Miles

    2015-08-01

    Two theories offer competing explanations of sex differences in aggressive behavior: sexual-selection theory and social-role theory. While each theory has specific strengths and limitations depending on the victim's sex, research hardly differentiates between intrasex and intersex aggression. In the present study, 11,307 students (mean age = 14.96 years; 50% girls, 50% boys) from 597 school classes provided social-network data (aggression and friendship networks) as well as physical (body mass index) and psychosocial (gender and masculinity norms) information. Aggression networks were used to disentangle intra- and intersex aggression, whereas their class-aggregated sex differences were analyzed using contextual predictors derived from sexual-selection and social-role theories. As expected, results revealed that sexual-selection theory predicted male-biased sex differences in intrasex aggression, whereas social-role theory predicted male-biased sex differences in intersex aggression. Findings suggest the value of explaining sex differences separately for intra- and intersex aggression with a dual-theory framework covering both evolutionary and normative components.

  13. Parsimonious modeling with information filtering networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfuss, Wolfram; Massara, Guido Previde; Di Matteo, T.; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a methodology to construct parsimonious probabilistic models. This method makes use of information filtering networks to produce a robust estimate of the global sparse inverse covariance from a simple sum of local inverse covariances computed on small subparts of the network. Being based on local and low-dimensional inversions, this method is computationally very efficient and statistically robust, even for the estimation of inverse covariance of high-dimensional, noisy, and short time series. Applied to financial data our method results are computationally more efficient than state-of-the-art methodologies such as Glasso producing, in a fraction of the computation time, models that can have equivalent or better performances but with a sparser inference structure. We also discuss performances with sparse factor models where we notice that relative performances decrease with the number of factors. The local nature of this approach allows us to perform computations in parallel and provides a tool for dynamical adaptation by partial updating when the properties of some variables change without the need of recomputing the whole model. This makes this approach particularly suitable to handle big data sets with large numbers of variables. Examples of practical application for forecasting, stress testing, and risk allocation in financial systems are also provided.

  14. Nonlinear neural networks. II. Information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. L.; Grensing, D.; Huber, A.; Kühn, R.

    1988-01-01

    Information processing in nonlinear neural networks with a finite number q of stored patterns is studied. Each network is characterized completely by its synaptic kernel Q. At low temperatures, the nonlinearity typically results in 2q-2- q metastable, pure states in addition to the q retrieval states that are associated with the q stored patterns. These spurious states start appearing at a temperaturetilde T_q , which depends on q. We give sufficient conditions to guarantee that the retrieval states bifurcate first at a critical temperature T c and thattilde T_q / T c → 0 as q→∞. Hence, there is a large temperature range where only the retrieval states and certain symmetric mixtures thereof exist. The latter are unstable, as they appear at T c . For clipped synapses, the bifurcation and stability structure is analyzed in detail and shown to approach that of the (linear) Hopfield model as q→∞. We also investigate memories that forget and indicate how forgetfulness can be explained in terms of the eigenvalue spectrum of the synaptic kernel Q.

  15. Training Records And Information Network UNIX Version

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Michael

    1996-12-01

    TRAIN-UNIX is used to track training requirements, qualifications, training completion and schedule training, classrooms and instructors. TRAIN-UNIX is a requirements-based system. When the identified training requirements for specific jobs are entered into the system, the employees manager or responsible training person assigns jobs to an employee. TRAIN-UNIX will then assemble an Individual Training Plan (ITP) with all courses required. ITP''s can also be modified to add any special training directed or identified by management, best business practices, procedures, etc. TRAIN-UNIX also schedules and tracks conferences, seminars, and required reading. TRAIN-UNIX is a secure database system on a server accessible via the network. Access to the user functions (scheduling, data entry, ITP modification etc.) within TRAIN-UNIX are granted by function, as needed, by the system administrator. An additional level of security allows those who access TRAIN-UNIX to only add, modify or view information for the organizations to which they belong. TRAIN-UNIX scheduling function allows network access to scheduling of students. As a function of the scheduling process, TRAIN-UNIX checks to insure that the student is a valid employee, not double booked, and the instructor and classroom are not double booked. TRAIN-UNIX will report pending lapse of courses or qualifications. This ability to know the lapse of training along with built in training requesting function allows the training deliverers to forecast training needs.

  16. Bayesian information fusion networks for biosurveillance applications.

    PubMed

    Mnatsakanyan, Zaruhi R; Burkom, Howard S; Coberly, Jacqueline S; Lombardo, Joseph S

    2009-01-01

    This study introduces new information fusion algorithms to enhance disease surveillance systems with Bayesian decision support capabilities. A detection system was built and tested using chief complaints from emergency department visits, International Classification of Diseases Revision 9 (ICD-9) codes from records of outpatient visits to civilian and military facilities, and influenza surveillance data from health departments in the National Capital Region (NCR). Data anomalies were identified and distribution of time offsets between events in the multiple data streams were established. The Bayesian Network was built to fuse data from multiple sources and identify influenza-like epidemiologically relevant events. Results showed increased specificity compared with the alerts generated by temporal anomaly detection algorithms currently deployed by NCR health departments. Further research should be done to investigate correlations between data sources for efficient fusion of the collected data.

  17. Integrated condition monitoring of space information network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhilin; Li, Xinming; Li, Yachen; Yu, Shaolin

    2015-11-01

    In order to solve the integrated condition monitoring problem in space information network, there are three works finished including analyzing the characteristics of tasks process and system health monitoring, adopting the automata modeling method, and respectively establishing the models for state inference and state determination. The state inference model is a logic automaton and is gotten by concluding engineering experiences. The state determination model is a double-layer automaton, the lower automaton is responsible for parameter judge and the upper automaton is responsible for state diagnosis. At last, the system state monitoring algorithm has been proposed, which realizes the integrated condition monitoring for task process and system health, and can avoid the false alarm.

  18. Improving clustering by imposing network information

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Susanne; Horenko, Illia

    2015-01-01

    Cluster analysis is one of the most popular data analysis tools in a wide range of applied disciplines. We propose and justify a computationally efficient and straightforward-to-implement way of imposing the available information from networks/graphs (a priori available in many application areas) on a broad family of clustering methods. The introduced approach is illustrated on the problem of a noninvasive unsupervised brain signal classification. This task is faced with several challenging difficulties such as nonstationary noisy signals and a small sample size, combined with a high-dimensional feature space and huge noise-to-signal ratios. Applying this approach results in an exact unsupervised classification of very short signals, opening new possibilities for clustering methods in the area of a noninvasive brain-computer interface. PMID:26601225

  19. Implications of information theory in optical fibre communications.

    PubMed

    Agrell, Erik; Alvarado, Alex; Kschischang, Frank R

    2016-03-06

    Recent decades have witnessed steady improvements in our ability to harness the information-carrying capability of optical fibres. Will this process continue, or will progress eventually stall? Information theory predicts that all channels have a limited capacity depending on the available transmission resources, and thus it is inevitable that the pace of improvements will slow. However, information theory also provides insights into how transmission resources should, in principle, best be exploited, and thus may serve as a guide for where to look for better ways to squeeze more out of a precious resource. This tutorial paper reviews the basic concepts of information theory and their application in fibre-optic communications.

  20. Complex network theory, streamflow, and hydrometric monitoring system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, M. J.; Fleming, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Network theory is applied to an array of streamflow gauges located in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia (BC) and Yukon, Canada. The goal of the analysis is to assess whether insights from this branch of mathematical graph theory can be meaningfully applied to hydrometric data, and, more specifically, whether it may help guide decisions concerning stream gauge placement so that the full complexity of the regional hydrology is efficiently captured. The streamflow data, when represented as a complex network, have a global clustering coefficient and average shortest path length consistent with small-world networks, which are a class of stable and efficient networks common in nature, but the observed degree distribution did not clearly indicate a scale-free network. Stability helps ensure that the network is robust to the loss of nodes; in the context of a streamflow network, stability is interpreted as insensitivity to station removal at random. Community structure is also evident in the streamflow network. A network theoretic community detection algorithm identified separate communities, each of which appears to be defined by the combination of its median seasonal flow regime (pluvial, nival, hybrid, or glacial, which in this region in turn mainly reflects basin elevation) and geographic proximity to other communities (reflecting shared or different daily meteorological forcing). Furthermore, betweenness analyses suggest a handful of key stations which serve as bridges between communities and might be highly valued. We propose that an idealized sampling network should sample high-betweenness stations, small-membership communities which are by definition rare or undersampled relative to other communities, and index stations having large numbers of intracommunity links, while retaining some degree of redundancy to maintain network robustness.

  1. Social Network Theory in Engineering Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Peter A.

    Collaborative groups are important both in the learning environment of engineering education and, in the real world, the business of engineering design. Selecting appropriate individuals to form an effective group and monitoring a group's progress are important aspects of successful task performance. This exploratory study looked at using the concepts of cognitive social structures, structural balance, and centrality from social network analysis as well as the measures of emotional intelligence. The concepts were used to analyze potential team members to examine if an individual's ability to perceive emotion in others and the self and to use, understand, and manage those emotions are a factor in a group's performance. The students from a capstone design course in computer engineering were used as volunteer subjects. They were formed into groups and assigned a design exercise to determine whether and which of the above-mentioned tools would be effective in both selecting teams and predicting the quality of the resultant design. The results were inconclusive with the exception of an individual's ability to accurately perceive emotions. The instruments that were successful were the Self-Monitoring scale and the accuracy scores derived from cognitive social structures and Level IV of network levels of analysis.

  2. The use of information theory in evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Adami, Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Information is a key concept in evolutionary biology. Information stored in a biological organism's genome is used to generate the organism and to maintain and control it. Information is also that which evolves. When a population adapts to a local environment, information about this environment is fixed in a representative genome. However, when an environment changes, information can be lost. At the same time, information is processed by animal brains to survive in complex environments, and the capacity for information processing also evolves. Here, I review applications of information theory to the evolution of proteins and to the evolution of information processing in simulated agents that adapt to perform a complex task.

  3. Kinetic energy decomposition scheme based on information theory.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-15

    We proposed a novel kinetic energy decomposition analysis based on information theory. Since the Hirshfeld partitioning for electron densities can be formulated in terms of Kullback-Leibler information deficiency in information theory, a similar partitioning for kinetic energy densities was newly proposed. The numerical assessments confirm that the current kinetic energy decomposition scheme provides reasonable chemical pictures for ionic and covalent molecules, and can also estimate atomic energies using a correction with viral ratios.

  4. Generic, network schema agnostic sparse tensor factorization for single-pass clustering of heterogeneous information networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jibing; Meng, Qinggang; Deng, Su; Huang, Hongbin; Wu, Yahui; Badii, Atta

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous information networks (e.g. bibliographic networks and social media networks) that consist of multiple interconnected objects are ubiquitous. Clustering analysis is an effective method to understand the semantic information and interpretable structure of the heterogeneous information networks, and it has attracted the attention of many researchers in recent years. However, most studies assume that heterogeneous information networks usually follow some simple schemas, such as bi-typed networks or star network schema, and they can only cluster one type of object in the network each time. In this paper, a novel clustering framework is proposed based on sparse tensor factorization for heterogeneous information networks, which can cluster multiple types of objects simultaneously in a single pass without any network schema information. The types of objects and the relations between them in the heterogeneous information networks are modeled as a sparse tensor. The clustering issue is modeled as an optimization problem, which is similar to the well-known Tucker decomposition. Then, an Alternating Least Squares (ALS) algorithm and a feasible initialization method are proposed to solve the optimization problem. Based on the tensor factorization, we simultaneously partition different types of objects into different clusters. The experimental results on both synthetic and real-world datasets have demonstrated that our proposed clustering framework, STFClus, can model heterogeneous information networks efficiently and can outperform state-of-the-art clustering algorithms as a generally applicable single-pass clustering method for heterogeneous network which is network schema agnostic.

  5. Generic, network schema agnostic sparse tensor factorization for single-pass clustering of heterogeneous information networks

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinggang; Deng, Su; Huang, Hongbin; Wu, Yahui; Badii, Atta

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous information networks (e.g. bibliographic networks and social media networks) that consist of multiple interconnected objects are ubiquitous. Clustering analysis is an effective method to understand the semantic information and interpretable structure of the heterogeneous information networks, and it has attracted the attention of many researchers in recent years. However, most studies assume that heterogeneous information networks usually follow some simple schemas, such as bi-typed networks or star network schema, and they can only cluster one type of object in the network each time. In this paper, a novel clustering framework is proposed based on sparse tensor factorization for heterogeneous information networks, which can cluster multiple types of objects simultaneously in a single pass without any network schema information. The types of objects and the relations between them in the heterogeneous information networks are modeled as a sparse tensor. The clustering issue is modeled as an optimization problem, which is similar to the well-known Tucker decomposition. Then, an Alternating Least Squares (ALS) algorithm and a feasible initialization method are proposed to solve the optimization problem. Based on the tensor factorization, we simultaneously partition different types of objects into different clusters. The experimental results on both synthetic and real-world datasets have demonstrated that our proposed clustering framework, STFClus, can model heterogeneous information networks efficiently and can outperform state-of-the-art clustering algorithms as a generally applicable single-pass clustering method for heterogeneous network which is network schema agnostic. PMID:28245222

  6. Quantum Information Processing with Modular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Clayton; Inlek, Ismail V.; Hucul, David; Sosnova, Ksenia; Vittorini, Grahame; Monroe, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Trapped atomic ions are qubit standards for the production of entangled states in quantum information science and metrology applications. Trapped ions can exhibit very long coherence times, external fields can drive strong local interactions via phonons, and remote qubits can be entangled via photons. Transferring quantum information across spatially separated ion trap modules for a scalable quantum network architecture relies on the juxtaposition of both phononic and photonic buses. We report the successful combination of these protocols within and between two ion trap modules on a unit structure of this architecture where the remote entanglement generation rate exceeds the experimentally measured decoherence rate. Additionally, we report an experimental implementation of a technique to maintain phase coherence between spatially and temporally distributed quantum gate operations, a crucial prerequisite for scalability. Finally, we discuss our progress towards addressing the issue of uncontrolled cross-talk between photonic qubits and memory qubits by implementing a second ion species, Barium, to generate the photonic link. This work is supported by the ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, the DARPA Quiness Program, the ARO MURI on Hybrid Quantum Circuits, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Transduction, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  7. Percolation theory applied to measures of fragmentation in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiping; Paul, Gerald; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo; Borgatti, Stephen P.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-04-01

    We apply percolation theory to a recently proposed measure of fragmentation F for social networks. The measure F is defined as the ratio between the number of pairs of nodes that are not connected in the fragmented network after removing a fraction q of nodes and the total number of pairs in the original fully connected network. We compare F with the traditional measure used in percolation theory, P∞ , the fraction of nodes in the largest cluster relative to the total number of nodes. Using both analytical and numerical methods from percolation, we study Erdős-Rényi and scale-free networks under various types of node removal strategies. The removal strategies are random removal, high degree removal, and high betweenness centrality removal. We find that for a network obtained after removal (all strategies) of a fraction q of nodes above percolation threshold, P∞≈(1-F)1/2 . For fixed P∞ and close to percolation threshold (q=qc) , we show that 1-F better reflects the actual fragmentation. Close to qc , for a given P∞ , 1-F has a broad distribution and it is thus possible to improve the fragmentation of the network. We also study and compare the fragmentation measure F and the percolation measure P∞ for a real social network of workplaces linked by the households of the employees and find similar results.

  8. Application of Ecological Network Theory to the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Foster, James A.; Krone, Stephen M.; Forney, Larry J.

    2008-01-01

    In healthy humans, many microbial consortia constitute rich ecosystems with dozens to hundreds of species, finely tuned to functions relevant to human health. Medical interventions, lifestyle changes, and the normal rhythms of life sometimes upset the balance in microbial ecosystems, facilitating pathogen invasions or causing other clinically relevant problems. Some diseases, such as bacterial vaginosis, have exactly this sort of community etiology. Mathematical network theory is ideal for studying the ecological networks of interacting species that comprise the human microbiome. Theoretical networks require little consortia specific data to provide insight into both normal and disturbed microbial community functions, but it is easy to incorporate additional empirical data as it becomes available. We argue that understanding some diseases, such as bacterial vaginosis, requires a shift of focus from individual bacteria to (mathematical) networks of interacting populations, and that known emergent properties of these networks will provide insights that would be otherwise elusive. PMID:19259330

  9. From information theory to quantitative description of steric effects.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Mojtaba; Safari, Zahra

    2016-07-21

    Immense efforts have been made in the literature to apply the information theory descriptors for investigating the electronic structure theory of various systems. In the present study, the information theoretic quantities, such as Fisher information, Shannon entropy, Onicescu information energy, and Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy, have been used to present a quantitative description for one of the most widely used concepts in chemistry, namely the steric effects. Taking the experimental steric scales for the different compounds as benchmark sets, there are reasonable linear relationships between the experimental scales of the steric effects and theoretical values of steric energies calculated from information theory functionals. Perusing the results obtained from the information theoretic quantities with the two representations of electron density and shape function, the Shannon entropy has the best performance for the purpose. On the one hand, the usefulness of considering the contributions of functional groups steric energies and geometries, and on the other hand, dissecting the effects of both global and local information measures simultaneously have also been explored. Furthermore, the utility of the information functionals for the description of steric effects in several chemical transformations, such as electrophilic and nucleophilic reactions and host-guest chemistry, has been analyzed. The functionals of information theory correlate remarkably with the stability of systems and experimental scales. Overall, these findings show that the information theoretic quantities can be introduced as quantitative measures of steric effects and provide further evidences of the quality of information theory toward helping theoreticians and experimentalists to interpret different problems in real systems.

  10. New scaling relation for information transfer in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunju; Davies, Paul; Walker, Sara Imari

    2015-01-01

    We quantify characteristics of the informational architecture of two representative biological networks: the Boolean network model for the cell-cycle regulatory network of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Davidich et al. 2008 PLoS ONE 3, e1672 (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0001672)) and that of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Li et al. 2004 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101, 4781–4786 (doi:10.1073/pnas.0305937101)). We compare our results for these biological networks with the same analysis performed on ensembles of two different types of random networks: Erdös–Rényi and scale-free. We show that both biological networks share features in common that are not shared by either random network ensemble. In particular, the biological networks in our study process more information than the random networks on average. Both biological networks also exhibit a scaling relation in information transferred between nodes that distinguishes them from random, where the biological networks stand out as distinct even when compared with random networks that share important topological properties, such as degree distribution, with the biological network. We show that the most biologically distinct regime of this scaling relation is associated with a subset of control nodes that regulate the dynamics and function of each respective biological network. Information processing in biological networks is therefore interpreted as an emergent property of topology (causal structure) and dynamics (function). Our results demonstrate quantitatively how the informational architecture of biologically evolved networks can distinguish them from other classes of network architecture that do not share the same informational properties. PMID:26701883

  11. Can computational goals inform theories of vision?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L

    2015-04-01

    One of the most lasting contributions of Marr's posthumous book is his articulation of the different "levels of analysis" that are needed to understand vision. Although a variety of work has examined how these different levels are related, there is comparatively little examination of the assumptions on which his proposed levels rest, or the plausibility of the approach Marr articulated given those assumptions. Marr placed particular significance on computational level theory, which specifies the "goal" of a computation, its appropriateness for solving a particular problem, and the logic by which it can be carried out. The structure of computational level theory is inherently teleological: What the brain does is described in terms of its purpose. I argue that computational level theory, and the reverse-engineering approach it inspires, requires understanding the historical trajectory that gave rise to functional capacities that can be meaningfully attributed with some sense of purpose or goal, that is, a reconstruction of the fitness function on which natural selection acted in shaping our visual abilities. I argue that this reconstruction is required to distinguish abilities shaped by natural selection-"natural tasks" -from evolutionary "by-products" (spandrels, co-optations, and exaptations), rather than merely demonstrating that computational goals can be embedded in a Bayesian model that renders a particular behavior or process rational.

  12. Theory of interface: category theory, directed networks and evolution of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Taichi

    2013-11-01

    Biological networks have two modes. The first mode is static: a network is a passage on which something flows. The second mode is dynamic: a network is a pattern constructed by gluing functions of entities constituting the network. In this paper, first we discuss that these two modes can be associated with the category theoretic duality (adjunction) and derive a natural network structure (a path notion) for each mode by appealing to the category theoretic universality. The path notion corresponding to the static mode is just the usual directed path. The path notion for the dynamic mode is called lateral path which is the alternating path considered on the set of arcs. Their general functionalities in a network are transport and coherence, respectively. Second, we introduce a betweenness centrality of arcs for each mode and see how the two modes are embedded in various real biological network data. We find that there is a trade-off relationship between the two centralities: if the value of one is large then the value of the other is small. This can be seen as a kind of division of labor in a network into transport on the network and coherence of the network. Finally, we propose an optimization model of networks based on a quality function involving intensities of the two modes in order to see how networks with the above trade-off relationship can emerge through evolution. We show that the trade-off relationship can be observed in the evolved networks only when the dynamic mode is dominant in the quality function by numerical simulations. We also show that the evolved networks have features qualitatively similar to real biological networks by standard complex network analysis.

  13. Electronic Information and Applications in Musicology and Music Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Mary Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes electronic publishing and information resources in the field of music. Topics addressed include bibliographic citations of books, journal articles, scores, and sound recordings; bibliographic utilities; computer network resources; electronic music applications; tutorial and laboratory projects; interactive multimedia publications; and…

  14. How mirror-touch informs theories of synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Beat; Lunke, Katrin; Rothen, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Ward and Banissy provide an excellent overview of the state of mirror-touch research in order to advance this field. They present a comparison of two prominent theoretical approaches for understanding mirror-touch phenomena. According to the threshold theory, the phenomena arise as a result of a hyperactive mirror neuron system. According to the Self-Other Theory, they are due to disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. Here, we explore how these two theories can inform theories of synesthesia more generally. We conclude that both theories are not suited as general models of synesthesia.

  15. Analysis and improvement of vehicle information sharing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hang; He, Kun; Qu, Yingchun; Wang, Pu

    2016-06-01

    Based on large-scale mobile phone data, mobility demand was estimated and locations of vehicles were inferred in the Boston area. Using the spatial distribution of vehicles, we analyze the vehicle information sharing network generated by the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications. Although a giant vehicle cluster is observed, the coverage and the efficiency of the information sharing network remain limited. Consequently, we propose a method to extend the information sharing network's coverage by adding long-range connections between targeted vehicle clusters. Furthermore, we employ the optimal design strategy discovered in square lattice to improve the efficiency of the vehicle information sharing network.

  16. Evaluating Action Learning: A Critical Realist Complex Network Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, John G.

    2010-01-01

    This largely theoretical paper will argue the case for the usefulness of applying network and complex adaptive systems theory to an understanding of action learning and the challenge it is evaluating. This approach, it will be argued, is particularly helpful in the context of improving capability in dealing with wicked problems spread around…

  17. Organizational Application of Social Networking Information Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reppert, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative research study using the Delphi method is to provide a framework for leaders to develop their own social networks. By exploring concerns in four areas, leaders may be able to better plan, implement, and manage social networking systems in organizations. The areas addressed are: (a) social networking using…

  18. Community readiness for a computer-based health information network.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Naomi E; Berry, Michelle M

    2006-01-01

    The need for timely and accurate communication among healthcare providers has prompted the development of computer-based health information networks that allow patient and client information to be shared among agencies. This article reports the findings of a study to assess whether residents of an upstate New York community were ready for a computer-based health information network to facilitate delivery of long term care services. Focus group sessions, which involved both consumers and professionals, revealed that security of personal information was of concern to healthcare providers, attorneys, and consumers. Physicians were the most enthusiastic about the possibility of a computer-based health information network. Consumers and other healthcare professionals, including nurses, indicated that such a network would be helpful to them personally. Nurses and other healthcare professionals need to be knowledgeable about the use of computer-based health information networks and other electronic information systems as this trend continues to spread across the U.S.

  19. Analysis of the enzyme network involved in cattle milk production using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Sholeh; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Masoudi Nejad, Ali; Nasiri, Mohammad; Asgari, Yazdan

    2015-06-01

    Understanding cattle metabolism and its relationship with milk products is important in bovine breeding. A systemic view could lead to consequences that will result in a better understanding of existing concepts. Topological indices and quantitative characterizations mostly result from the application of graph theory on biological data. In the present work, the enzyme network involved in cattle milk production was reconstructed and analyzed based on available bovine genome information using several public datasets (NCBI, Uniprot, KEGG, and Brenda). The reconstructed network consisted of 3605 reactions named by KEGG compound numbers and 646 enzymes that catalyzed the corresponding reactions. The characteristics of the directed and undirected network were analyzed using Graph Theory. The mean path length was calculated to be4.39 and 5.41 for directed and undirected networks, respectively. The top 11 hub enzymes whose abnormality could harm bovine health and reduce milk production were determined. Therefore, the aim of constructing the enzyme centric network was twofold; first to find out whether such network followed the same properties of other biological networks, and second, to find the key enzymes. The results of the present study can improve our understanding of milk production in cattle. Also, analysis of the enzyme network can help improve the modeling and simulation of biological systems and help design desired phenotypes to increase milk production quality or quantity.

  20. REGIME CHANGES IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: AN INFORMATION THEORY APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present our efforts at developing an ecological system using Information Theory. We derive an expression for Fisher Information based on sampling of the system trajectory as it evolves in the state space. The Fisher Information index as we have derived it captures the characte...

  1. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  2. Information integration based predictions about the conscious states of a spiking neural network.

    PubMed

    Gamez, David

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes how Tononi's information integration theory of consciousness was used to make detailed predictions about the distribution of phenomenal states in a spiking neural network. This network had approximately 18,000 neurons and 700,000 connections and it used models of emotion and imagination to control the eye movements of a virtual robot and avoid 'negative' stimuli. The first stage in the analysis was the development of a formal definition of Tononi's theory of consciousness. The network was then analysed for information integration and detailed predictions were made about the distribution of consciousness for each time step of recorded activity. This work demonstrates how an artificial system can be analysed for consciousness using a particular theory and in the future this approach could be used to make predictions about the phenomenal states associated with biological systems.

  3. Inferring Boolean network states from partial information

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Networks of molecular interactions regulate key processes in living cells. Therefore, understanding their functionality is a high priority in advancing biological knowledge. Boolean networks are often used to describe cellular networks mathematically and are fitted to experimental datasets. The fitting often results in ambiguities since the interpretation of the measurements is not straightforward and since the data contain noise. In order to facilitate a more reliable mapping between datasets and Boolean networks, we develop an algorithm that infers network trajectories from a dataset distorted by noise. We analyze our algorithm theoretically and demonstrate its accuracy using simulation and microarray expression data. PMID:24006954

  4. Theory of rumour spreading in complex social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekovee, M.; Moreno, Y.; Bianconi, G.; Marsili, M.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a general stochastic model for the spread of rumours, and derive mean-field equations that describe the dynamics of the model on complex social networks (in particular, those mediated by the Internet). We use analytical and numerical solutions of these equations to examine the threshold behaviour and dynamics of the model on several models of such networks: random graphs, uncorrelated scale-free networks and scale-free networks with assortative degree correlations. We show that in both homogeneous networks and random graphs the model exhibits a critical threshold in the rumour spreading rate below which a rumour cannot propagate in the system. In the case of scale-free networks, on the other hand, this threshold becomes vanishingly small in the limit of infinite system size. We find that the initial rate at which a rumour spreads is much higher in scale-free networks than in random graphs, and that the rate at which the spreading proceeds on scale-free networks is further increased when assortative degree correlations are introduced. The impact of degree correlations on the final fraction of nodes that ever hears a rumour, however, depends on the interplay between network topology and the rumour spreading rate. Our results show that scale-free social networks are prone to the spreading of rumours, just as they are to the spreading of infections. They are relevant to the spreading dynamics of chain emails, viral advertising and large-scale information dissemination algorithms on the Internet.

  5. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  6. Percolation theory and fragmentation measures in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiping; Paul, Gerald; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo; Borgatti, Stephen P.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2007-05-01

    We study the statistical properties of a recently proposed social networks measure of fragmentation F after removal of a fraction q of nodes or links from the network. The measure F is defined as the ratio of the number of pairs of nodes that are not connected in the fragmented network to the total number of pairs in the original fully connected network. We compare this measure with the one traditionally used in percolation theory, P∞, the fraction of nodes in the largest cluster relative to the total number of nodes. Using both analytical and numerical methods, we study Erdős-Rényi (ER) and scale-free (SF) networks under various node removal strategies. We find that for a network obtained after removal of a fraction q of nodes above criticality, P∞≈(1-F). For fixed P∞ and close to criticality, we show that 1-F better reflects the actual fragmentation. For a given P∞, 1-F has a broad distribution and thus one can improve significantly the fragmentation of the network. We also study and compare the fragmentation measure F and the percolation measure P∞ for a real national social network of workplaces linked by the households of the employees and find similar results.

  7. How Fast Can Networks Synchronize? A Random Matrix Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2004-03-01

    Pulse-coupled oscillators constitute a paradigmatic class of dynamical systems interacting on networks because they model a variety of biological systems including flashing fireflies and chirping crickets as well as pacemaker cells of the heart and neural networks. Synchronization is one of the most simple and most prevailing kinds of collective dynamics on such networks. Here we study collective synchronization [1] of pulse-coupled oscillators interacting on asymmetric random networks. Using random matrix theory we analytically determine the speed of synchronization in such networks in dependence on the dynamical and network parameters [2]. The speed of synchronization increases with increasing coupling strengths. Surprisingly, however, it stays finite even for infinitely strong interactions. The results indicate that the speed of synchronization is limited by the connectivity of the network. We discuss the relevance of our findings to general equilibration processes on complex networks. [5mm] [1] M. Timme, F. Wolf, T. Geisel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89:258701 (2002). [2] M. Timme, F. Wolf, T. Geisel, cond-mat/0306512 (2003).

  8. Objectivism in Information Utilization: Theory and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, Mark R.; And Others

    A self-report scale was constructed and validated that measures individual differences in objectivism--the tendency to base one's judgments and beliefs upon empirical information and rational considerations. Validity data showed that, compared to people who score low on the Objectivism Scale, highly objective individuals enjoy thinking more, rely…

  9. TOWARDS A SUSTAINABILITY INDEX USING INFORMATION THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We explore the use of Fisher Information as a basis for an index of sustainability. Sustainability of an ecosystem refers to the robustness of a preferred dynamic regime to human and natural disturbances. Ecosystems under perturbations of varying regularity and intensity can ei...

  10. Information theories for time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Daeyeoul; Maamache, Mustapha; Menouar, Salah; Nahm, In Hyun

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator based on invariant operator method. > Time dependence of entropies and entropic uncertainty relation. > Characteristics of Shannon information and Fisher information. > Application of information theories to particular systems that have time-dependent behavior. - Abstract: Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator are described on the basis of invariant operator method. We obtained entropic uncertainty relation of the system and discussed whether it is always larger than or equal to the physically allowed minimum value. Shannon information and Fisher information are derived by means of density operator that satisfies Liouville-von Neumann equation and their characteristics are investigated. Shannon information is independent of time, but Fisher information is explicitly dependent on time as the time functions of the Hamiltonian vary. We can regard that the Fisher information is a local measure since its time behavior is largely affected by local arrangements of the density, whilst the Shannon information plays the role of a global measure of the spreading of density. To promote the understanding, our theory is applied to special systems, the so-called quantum oscillator with time-dependent frequency and strongly pulsating mass system.

  11. Exploring the Combination of Dempster-Shafer Theory and Neural Network for Predicting Trust and Distrust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Ying; Sun, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    In social media, trust and distrust among users are important factors in helping users make decisions, dissect information, and receive recommendations. However, the sparsity and imbalance of social relations bring great difficulties and challenges in predicting trust and distrust. Meanwhile, there are numerous inducing factors to determine trust and distrust relations. The relationship among inducing factors may be dependency, independence, and conflicting. Dempster-Shafer theory and neural network are effective and efficient strategies to deal with these difficulties and challenges. In this paper, we study trust and distrust prediction based on the combination of Dempster-Shafer theory and neural network. We firstly analyze the inducing factors about trust and distrust, namely, homophily, status theory, and emotion tendency. Then, we quantify inducing factors of trust and distrust, take these features as evidences, and construct evidence prototype as input nodes of multilayer neural network. Finally, we propose a framework of predicting trust and distrust which uses multilayer neural network to model the implementing process of Dempster-Shafer theory in different hidden layers, aiming to overcome the disadvantage of Dempster-Shafer theory without optimization method. Experimental results on a real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  12. Influence Function Learning in Information Diffusion Networks

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nan; Liang, Yingyu; Balcan, Maria-Florina; Song, Le

    2015-01-01

    Can we learn the influence of a set of people in a social network from cascades of information diffusion? This question is often addressed by a two-stage approach: first learn a diffusion model, and then calculate the influence based on the learned model. Thus, the success of this approach relies heavily on the correctness of the diffusion model which is hard to verify for real world data. In this paper, we exploit the insight that the influence functions in many diffusion models are coverage functions, and propose a novel parameterization of such functions using a convex combination of random basis functions. Moreover, we propose an efficient maximum likelihood based algorithm to learn such functions directly from cascade data, and hence bypass the need to specify a particular diffusion model in advance. We provide both theoretical and empirical analysis for our approach, showing that the proposed approach can provably learn the influence function with low sample complexity, be robust to the unknown diffusion models, and significantly outperform existing approaches in both synthetic and real world data. PMID:25973445

  13. Response to Patrick Love's "Informal Theory": A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nancy J.; Guido, Florence M.

    2012-01-01

    This rejoinder to Patrick Love's article, "Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice," which appears earlier in this issue of the "Journal of College Student Development", was written at the invitation of the Editor. In the critique, we point out the weaknesses of many of Love's arguments and propositions. We provide an alternative…

  14. Information dynamics in small-world Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Lizier, Joseph T; Pritam, Siddharth; Prokopenko, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Small-world networks have been one of the most influential concepts in complex systems science, partly due to their prevalence in naturally occurring networks. It is often suggested that this prevalence is due to an inherent capability to store and transfer information efficiently. We perform an ensemble investigation of the computational capabilities of small-world networks as compared to ordered and random topologies. To generate dynamic behavior for this experiment, we imbue the nodes in these networks with random Boolean functions. We find that the ordered phase of the dynamics (low activity in dynamics) and topologies with low randomness are dominated by information storage, while the chaotic phase (high activity in dynamics) and topologies with high randomness are dominated by information transfer. Information storage and information transfer are somewhat balanced (crossed over) near the small-world regime, providing quantitative evidence that small-world networks do indeed have a propensity to combine comparably large information storage and transfer capacity.

  15. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  16. Discovery of Information Diffusion Process in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanho; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Park, Jonghun

    Information diffusion analysis in social networks is of significance since it enables us to deeply understand dynamic social interactions among users. In this paper, we introduce approaches to discovering information diffusion process in social networks based on process mining. Process mining techniques are applied from three perspectives: social network analysis, process discovery and community recognition. We then present experimental results by using a real-life social network data. The proposed techniques are expected to employ as new analytical tools in online social networks such as blog and wikis for company marketers, politicians, news reporters and online writers.

  17. Optimal multi-community network modularity for information diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaocan; Du, Ruping; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Studies demonstrate that community structure plays an important role in information spreading recently. In this paper, we investigate the impact of multi-community structure on information diffusion with linear threshold model. We utilize extended GN network that contains four communities and analyze dynamic behaviors of information that spreads on it. And we discover the optimal multi-community network modularity for information diffusion based on the social reinforcement. Results show that, within the appropriate range, multi-community structure will facilitate information diffusion instead of hindering it, which accords with the results derived from two-community network.

  18. PREFACE: Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, A.; Boccaletti, S.; Caldarelli, G.; Chessa, A.; Latora, V.; Motter, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    The field of complex networks is one of the most active areas in contemporary statistical physics. Ten years after seminal work initiated the modern study of networks, interest in the field is in fact still growing, as indicated by the ever increasing number of publications in network science. The reason for such a resounding success is most likely the simplicity and broad significance of the approach that, through graph theory, allows researchers to address a variety of different complex systems within a common framework. This special issue comprises a selection of contributions presented at the workshop 'Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology' held in July 2007 in Pula (Cagliari), Italy as a satellite of the general conference STATPHYS23. The contributions cover a wide range of problems that are currently among the most important questions in the area of complex networks and that are likely to stimulate future research. The issue is organised into four sections. The first two sections describe 'methods' to study the structure and the dynamics of complex networks, respectively. After this methodological part, the issue proceeds with a section on applications to biological systems. The issue closes with a section concentrating on applications to the study of social and technological networks. The first section, entitled Methods: The Structure, consists of six contributions focused on the characterisation and analysis of structural properties of complex networks: The paper Motif-based communities in complex networks by Arenas et al is a study of the occurrence of characteristic small subgraphs in complex networks. These subgraphs, known as motifs, are used to define general classes of nodes and their communities by extending the mathematical expression of the Newman-Girvan modularity. The same line of research, aimed at characterising network structure through the analysis of particular subgraphs, is explored by Bianconi and Gulbahce in Algorithm

  19. Informed consent in Texas: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Mark J; Engelhardt, H Tristram

    2004-04-01

    The legal basis of informed consent in Texas may on first examination suggest an unqualified affirmation of persons as the source of authority over themselves. This view of individuals in the practice of informed consent tends to present persons outside of any social context in general and outside of their families in particular. The actual functioning of law and medical practice in Texas, however, is far more complex. This study begins with a brief overview of the roots of Texas law and public policy regarding informed consent. This surface account is then contrasted with examples drawn from the actual functioning of Texas law: Texas legislation regarding out-of-hospital do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders. As a default approach to medical decision-making when patients lose decisional capacity and have failed to appoint a formal proxy or establish their wishes, this law establishes a defeasible presumption in favor of what the law characterizes as "qualified relatives" who can function as decision-makers for those terminal family members who lose decisional capacity. The study shows how, in the face of a general affirmation of the autonomy of individuals as if they were morally and socially isolated agents, space is nevertheless made for families to choose on behalf of their own members. The result is a multi-tier public morality, one affirming individuals as morally authoritative and the other recognizing the decisional standing of families.

  20. Twenty Years of Delila and Molecular Information Theory

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    A brief personal history is given about how information theory can be applied to binding sites of genetic control molecules on nucleic acids. The primary example used is ribosome binding sites in Escherichia coli. Once the sites are aligned, the information needed to describe the sites can be computed using Claude Shannon’s method. This is displayed by a computer graphic called a sequence logo. The logo represents an average binding site, and the mathematics easily allows one to determine the components of this average. That is, given a set of binding sites, the information for individual binding sites can also be computed. One can go further and predict the information of sites that are not in the original data set. Information theory also allows one to model the flexibility of ribosome binding sites, and this led us to a simple model for ribosome translational initiation in which the molecular components fit together only when the ribosome is at a good ribosome binding site. Since information theory is general, the same mathematics applies to human splice junctions, where we can predict the effect of sequence changes that cause human genetic diseases and cancer. The second example given is the Pribnow ‘box’ which, when viewed by the information theory method, reveals a mechanism for initiation of both transcription and DNA replication. Replication, transcription, splicing, and translation into protein represent the central dogma, so these examples show how molecular information theory is contributing to our knowledge of basic biology. PMID:18084638

  1. Extracting spatial information from networks with low-order eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Blondel, Vincent D.; Van Dooren, Paul

    2013-03-01

    We consider the problem of inferring meaningful spatial information in networks from incomplete information on the connection intensity between the nodes of the network. We consider two spatially distributed networks: a population migration flow network within the US, and a network of mobile phone calls between cities in Belgium. For both networks we use the eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix constructed from the link intensities to obtain informative visualizations and capture natural geographical subdivisions. We observe that some low-order eigenvectors localize very well and seem to reveal small geographically cohesive regions that match remarkably well with political and administrative boundaries. We discuss possible explanations for this observation by describing diffusion maps and localized eigenfunctions. In addition, we discuss a possible connection with the weighted graph cut problem, and provide numerical evidence supporting the idea that lower-order eigenvectors point out local cuts in the network. However, we do not provide a formal and rigorous justification for our observations.

  2. Lithofacies identification using multiple adaptive resonance theory neural networks and group decision expert system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, H.-C.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Chen, H.-C.; Rocky, Durrans S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithofacies identification supplies qualitative information about rocks. Lithofacies represent rock textures and are important components of hydrocarbon reservoir description. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly and different geologists may provide different interpretations. In this paper, we present a low-cost intelligent system consisting of three adaptive resonance theory neural networks and a rule-based expert system to consistently and objectively identify lithofacies from well-log data. The input data are altered into different forms representing different perspectives of observation of lithofacies. Each form of input is processed by a different adaptive resonance theory neural network. Among these three adaptive resonance theory neural networks, one neural network processes the raw continuous data, another processes categorial data, and the third processes fuzzy-set data. Outputs from these three networks are then combined by the expert system using fuzzy inference to determine to which facies the input data should be assigned. Rules are prioritized to emphasize the importance of firing order. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural networks, the adaptability of fuzzy logic, and the expertise of geologists to infer facies of the rocks. This approach is applied to the Appleton Field, an oil field located in Escambia County, Alabama. The hybrid intelligence system predicts lithofacies identity from log data with 87.6% accuracy. This prediction is more accurate than those of single adaptive resonance theory networks, 79.3%, 68.0% and 66.0%, using raw, fuzzy-set, and categorical data, respectively, and by an error-backpropagation neural network, 57.3%. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling and dynamical topology properties of VANET based on complex networks theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Jie

    2015-01-15

    Vehicular Ad hoc Network (VANET) is a special subset of multi-hop Mobile Ad hoc Networks in which vehicles can not only communicate with each other but also with the fixed equipments along the roads through wireless interfaces. Recently, it has been discovered that essential systems in real world share similar properties. When they are regarded as networks, among which the dynamic topology structure of VANET system is an important issue. Many real world networks are actually growing with preferential attachment like Internet, transportation system and telephone network. Those phenomena have brought great possibility in finding a strategy to calibrate and control the topology parameters which can help find VANET topology change regulation to relieve traffic jam, prevent traffic accident and improve traffic safety. VANET is a typical complex network which has its basic characteristics. In this paper, we focus on the macroscopic Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) inter-vehicle communication network with complex network theory. In particular, this paper is the first one to propose a method analyzing the topological structure and performance of VANET and present the communications in VANET from a new perspective. Accordingly, we propose degree distribution, clustering coefficient and the short path length of complex network to implement our strategy by numerical example and simulation. All the results demonstrate that VANET shows small world network features and is characterized by a truncated scale-free degree distribution with power-law degree distribution. The average path length of the network is simulated numerically, which indicates that the network shows small-world property and is rarely affected by the randomness. What’s more, we carry out extensive simulations of information propagation and mathematically prove the power law property when γ > 2. The results of this study provide useful information for VANET optimization from a

  4. Modeling and dynamical topology properties of VANET based on complex networks theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Vehicular Ad hoc Network (VANET) is a special subset of multi-hop Mobile Ad hoc Networks in which vehicles can not only communicate with each other but also with the fixed equipments along the roads through wireless interfaces. Recently, it has been discovered that essential systems in real world share similar properties. When they are regarded as networks, among which the dynamic topology structure of VANET system is an important issue. Many real world networks are actually growing with preferential attachment like Internet, transportation system and telephone network. Those phenomena have brought great possibility in finding a strategy to calibrate and control the topology parameters which can help find VANET topology change regulation to relieve traffic jam, prevent traffic accident and improve traffic safety. VANET is a typical complex network which has its basic characteristics. In this paper, we focus on the macroscopic Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) inter-vehicle communication network with complex network theory. In particular, this paper is the first one to propose a method analyzing the topological structure and performance of VANET and present the communications in VANET from a new perspective. Accordingly, we propose degree distribution, clustering coefficient and the short path length of complex network to implement our strategy by numerical example and simulation. All the results demonstrate that VANET shows small world network features and is characterized by a truncated scale-free degree distribution with power-law degree distribution. The average path length of the network is simulated numerically, which indicates that the network shows small-world property and is rarely affected by the randomness. What's more, we carry out extensive simulations of information propagation and mathematically prove the power law property when γ > 2. The results of this study provide useful information for VANET optimization from a

  5. Chemical reaction network approaches to Biochemical Systems Theory.

    PubMed

    Arceo, Carlene Perpetua P; Jose, Editha C; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Mendoza, Eduardo R

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a framework to represent a Biochemical Systems Theory (BST) model (in either GMA or S-system form) as a chemical reaction network with power law kinetics. Using this representation, some basic properties and the application of recent results of Chemical Reaction Network Theory regarding steady states of such systems are shown. In particular, Injectivity Theory, including network concordance [36] and the Jacobian Determinant Criterion [43], a "Lifting Theorem" for steady states [26] and the comprehensive results of Müller and Regensburger [31] on complex balanced equilibria are discussed. A partial extension of a recent Emulation Theorem of Cardelli for mass action systems [3] is derived for a subclass of power law kinetic systems. However, it is also shown that the GMA and S-system models of human purine metabolism [10] do not display the reactant-determined kinetics assumed by Müller and Regensburger and hence only a subset of BST models can be handled with their approach. Moreover, since the reaction networks underlying many BST models are not weakly reversible, results for non-complex balanced equilibria are also needed.

  6. Blending Formal and Informal Learning Networks for Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerkawski, Betül C.

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of social software and the advance of web-based technologies, online learning networks provide invaluable opportunities for learning, whether formal or informal. Unlike top-down, instructor-centered, and carefully planned formal learning settings, informal learning networks offer more bottom-up, student-centered participatory…

  7. 78 FR 7797 - Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) AGENCY: OPS/OCIO, DHS. ACTION: Committee Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSIN AC) will meet on February 27th-28th, 2013 in Washington, DC....

  8. Nonlinear effective-medium theory of disordered spring networks.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, M; Broedersz, C P; MacKintosh, F C

    2012-02-01

    Disordered soft materials, such as fibrous networks in biological contexts, exhibit a nonlinear elastic response. We study such nonlinear behavior with a minimal model for networks on lattice geometries with simple Hookian elements with disordered spring constant. By developing a mean-field approach to calculate the differential elastic bulk modulus for the macroscopic network response of such networks under large isotropic deformations, we provide insight into the origins of the strain stiffening and softening behavior of these systems. We find that the nonlinear mechanics depends only weakly on the lattice geometry and is governed by the average network connectivity. In particular, the nonlinear response is controlled by the isostatic connectivity, which depends strongly on the applied strain. Our predictions for the strain dependence of the isostatic point as well as the strain-dependent differential bulk modulus agree well with numerical results in both two and three dimensions. In addition, by using a mapping between the disordered network and a regular network with random forces, we calculate the nonaffine fluctuations of the deformation field and compare them to the numerical results. Finally, we discuss the limitations and implications of the developed theory.

  9. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  10. Information Diffusion in Facebook-Like Social Networks Under Information Overload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Xing, Kai; Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2013-07-01

    Research on social networks has received remarkable attention, since many people use social networks to broadcast information and stay connected with their friends. However, due to the information overload in social networks, it becomes increasingly difficult for users to find useful information. This paper takes Facebook-like social networks into account, and models the process of information diffusion under information overload. The term view scope is introduced to model the user information-processing capability under information overload, and the average number of times a message appears in view scopes after it is generated is proposed to characterize the information diffusion efficiency. Through theoretical analysis, we find that factors such as network structure and view scope number have no impact on the information diffusion efficiency, which is a surprising result. To verify the results, we conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly.

  11. Integrated information theory: from consciousness to its physical substrate.

    PubMed

    Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie; Massimini, Marcello; Koch, Christof

    2016-07-01

    In this Opinion article, we discuss how integrated information theory accounts for several aspects of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. Integrated information theory starts from the essential properties of phenomenal experience, from which it derives the requirements for the physical substrate of consciousness. It argues that the physical substrate of consciousness must be a maximum of intrinsic cause-effect power and provides a means to determine, in principle, the quality and quantity of experience. The theory leads to some counterintuitive predictions and can be used to develop new tools for assessing consciousness in non-communicative patients.

  12. Knowledge Communities and Information Network Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter R.

    The growing convergence of research library functions with a knowledge network infrastructure is beginning to have a transforming influence on the conduct of university research and instruction. Computing and communication network technologies are forcing a re-examination of institutional missions, the policies that support knowledge transmission,…

  13. Distribution of Information in Ad Hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT Ad-hoc networks are distributed, self-organized networks which do not need a fixed infrastructure. Entities in...73 V . CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK ............................75 A. OVERVIEW ..........................................75 B. CONCLUSIONS...statistical analysis on the results. Finally, Chapter V concludes the research and provides suggestions for further research. 7 II. BACKGROUND A

  14. The Elderly and Their Informal Social Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, J. Victor

    1989-01-01

    A sample of 334 people aged 56 and older living in British Columbia were interviewed about their supportive social network. Four supportive roles were investigated: caretaker, helper, confident, and advisor. The research supports earlier findings about the vulnerability of widows over 74 years old. They are most in need of networks. (Author/JOW)

  15. Applications of Information Theory for Ecohydrology Model Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Drewry, D.

    2013-12-01

    Earth System Models are becoming more complicated and complex as detailed formulations of physical and biological processes operating at multiple scales are integrated together to simulate the connections and feedbacks of the whole system. A prime example of this increase in process fidelity is the terrestrial land surface, where meteorological and hydrological processes drive and interact with the biological functioning of vegetation, together controlling carbon, water, and energy fluxes with the atmosphere. Ecohydrological models that capture these couplings and feedbacks may intentionally or unintentionally create self-organizing or "emergent" dynamics that do not exist when a single model component is used in isolation. It is therefore critical that model diagnostics begin to directly inspect model output for its fidelity to emergent system-scale patterns including observed couplings, feedbacks, thresholds, and controls. Information Theory provides a general class of methods that are able to directly measure coupling, control, and feedback. We apply these methods to compare observations and model results in the context of the Midwest US agro-ecosystem. We utilize a state-of-the-art ecohydrological model, MLCan, which has been extensively validated against eddy covariance observations of carbon, water and energy exchange collected at the Bondville, Illinois FLUXNET site. Using a dynamical process network approach in which system couplings are resolved as directional information flows, we show that MLCan does well at reproducing observed system-scale couplings, feedbacks, thresholds, and controls. We identify important exceptions that point to necessary model improvements. By applying these methods in addition to the standard residual error analysis, it is possible to move beyond asking whether an Earth System Model gets the "right answers", and to instead examine whether the model captures the emergent system-scale structures necessary to be correct for the

  16. Information Flow Between Resting-State Networks

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Ibai; Erramuzpe, Asier; Escudero, Iñaki; Mateos, Beatriz; Cabrera, Alberto; Marinazzo, Daniele; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto J.; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The resting brain dynamics self-organize into a finite number of correlated patterns known as resting-state networks (RSNs). It is well known that techniques such as independent component analysis can separate the brain activity at rest to provide such RSNs, but the specific pattern of interaction between RSNs is not yet fully understood. To this aim, we propose here a novel method to compute the information flow (IF) between different RSNs from resting-state magnetic resonance imaging. After hemodynamic response function blind deconvolution of all voxel signals, and under the hypothesis that RSNs define regions of interest, our method first uses principal component analysis to reduce dimensionality in each RSN to next compute IF (estimated here in terms of transfer entropy) between the different RSNs by systematically increasing k (the number of principal components used in the calculation). When k=1, this method is equivalent to computing IF using the average of all voxel activities in each RSN. For k≥1, our method calculates the k multivariate IF between the different RSNs. We find that the average IF among RSNs is dimension dependent, increasing from k=1 (i.e., the average voxel activity) up to a maximum occurring at k=5 and to finally decay to zero for k≥10. This suggests that a small number of components (close to five) is sufficient to describe the IF pattern between RSNs. Our method—addressing differences in IF between RSNs for any generic data—can be used for group comparison in health or disease. To illustrate this, we have calculated the inter-RSN IF in a data set of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to find that the most significant differences between AD and controls occurred for k=2, in addition to AD showing increased IF w.r.t. controls. The spatial localization of the k=2 component, within RSNs, allows the characterization of IF differences between AD and controls. PMID:26177254

  17. Phase response theory extended to nonoscillatory network components

    PubMed Central

    Sieling, Fred H.; Archila, Santiago; Hooper, Ryan; Canavier, Carmen C.; Prinz, Astrid A.

    2012-01-01

    New tools for analysis of oscillatory networks using phase response theory (PRT) under the assumption of pulsatile coupling have been developed steadily since the 1980s, but none have yet allowed for analysis of mixed systems containing nonoscillatory elements. This caveat has excluded the application of PRT to most real systems, which are often mixed. We show that a recently developed tool, the functional phase resetting curve (fPRC), provides a serendipitous benefit: it allows incorporation of nonoscillatory elements into systems of oscillators where PRT can be applied. We validate this method in a model system of neural oscillators and a biological system, the pyloric network of crustacean decapods. PMID:23004844

  18. Network selection, Information filtering and Scalable computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changqing

    This dissertation explores two application scenarios of sparsity pursuit method on large scale data sets. The first scenario is classification and regression in analyzing high dimensional structured data, where predictors corresponds to nodes of a given directed graph. This arises in, for instance, identification of disease genes for the Parkinson's diseases from a network of candidate genes. In such a situation, directed graph describes dependencies among the genes, where direction of edges represent certain causal effects. Key to high-dimensional structured classification and regression is how to utilize dependencies among predictors as specified by directions of the graph. In this dissertation, we develop a novel method that fully takes into account such dependencies formulated through certain nonlinear constraints. We apply the proposed method to two applications, feature selection in large margin binary classification and in linear regression. We implement the proposed method through difference convex programming for the cost function and constraints. Finally, theoretical and numerical analyses suggest that the proposed method achieves the desired objectives. An application to disease gene identification is presented. The second application scenario is personalized information filtering which extracts the information specifically relevant to a user, predicting his/her preference over a large number of items, based on the opinions of users who think alike or its content. This problem is cast into the framework of regression and classification, where we introduce novel partial latent models to integrate additional user-specific and content-specific predictors, for higher predictive accuracy. In particular, we factorize a user-over-item preference matrix into a product of two matrices, each representing a user's preference and an item preference by users. Then we propose a likelihood method to seek a sparsest latent factorization, from a class of over

  19. Information Processing in Social Insect Networks

    PubMed Central

    Waters, James S.; Fewell, Jennifer H.

    2012-01-01

    Investigating local-scale interactions within a network makes it possible to test hypotheses about the mechanisms of global network connectivity and to ask whether there are general rules underlying network function across systems. Here we use motif analysis to determine whether the interactions within social insect colonies resemble the patterns exhibited by other animal associations or if they exhibit characteristics of biological regulatory systems. Colonies exhibit a predominance of feed-forward interaction motifs, in contrast to the densely interconnected clique patterns that characterize human interaction and animal social networks. The regulatory motif signature supports the hypothesis that social insect colonies are shaped by selection for network patterns that integrate colony functionality at the group rather than individual level, and demonstrates the utility of this approach for analysis of selection effects on complex systems across biological levels of organization. PMID:22815740

  20. Objectivism in information utilization: theory and measurement.

    PubMed

    Leary, M R; Shepperd, J A; McNeil, M S; Jenkins, T B; Barnes, B D

    1986-01-01

    A self-report scale was constructed and validated that measures individual differences in objectivism--the tendency to base one's judgments and beliefs on empirical information and rational considerations. Validity data showed that, compared to people who score low on the Objectivism Scale, highly objective individuals enjoy thinking more, rely more on observable facts when making decisions, and place less emphasis on subjective and intuitive styles of decision making. Among graduate students in psychology, objectivism correlated positively with ratings of research-oriented careers, but negatively with ratings of mental health careers; also, highly objective students were more critical of nonobjective psychological assessment techniques and placed greater importance on research. Objectivism also predicted preferences for newspaper articles, college course selections, and the criteria respondents use when making decisions.

  1. The g-theorem and quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Horacio; Landea, Ignacio Salazar; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2016-10-01

    We study boundary renormalization group flows between boundary conformal field theories in 1 + 1 dimensions using methods of quantum information theory. We define an entropic g-function for theories with impurities in terms of the relative entanglement entropy, and we prove that this g-function decreases along boundary renormalization group flows. This entropic g-theorem is valid at zero temperature, and is independent from the g-theorem based on the thermal partition function. We also discuss the mutual information in boundary RG flows, and how it encodes the correlations between the impurity and bulk degrees of freedom. Our results provide a quantum-information understanding of (boundary) RG flow as increase of distinguishability between the UV fixed point and the theory along the RG flow.

  2. Surfactant self-assembly in oppositely charged polymer networks. Theory.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Per

    2009-10-01

    The interaction of ionic surfactants with polyion networks of opposite charge in an aqueous environment is analyzed theoretically by applying a recent theory of surfactant ion-polyion complex salts (J. Colloid. Int. Sci. 2009, 332, 183). The theory takes into account attractive and repulsive polyion-mediated interactions between the micelles, the deformation of the polymer network, the mixing of micelles, polyion chains, and simple ions with water, and the hydrophobic free energy at the micelle surface. The theory is used to calculate binding isotherms, swelling isotherms, surfactant aggregation numbers, compositions of complexes,and phase structure under various conditions. Factors controlling the gel volume transition and conditions for core/shell phase coexistence are investigated in detail, as well as the influence of salt. In particular, the interplay between electrostatic and elastic interactions is highlighted. Results from theory are compared with experimental data reported in the literature. The agreement is found to be semiquantitative or qualitative. The theory explains both the discrete volume transition observed in systems where the surfactant is in excess over the polyion and the core/shell phase coexistence in systems where the polyion is in excess.

  3. Spreading dynamics of an e-commerce preferential information model on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chen; Li, Tao; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuanmei; Liu, Xiongding

    2017-02-01

    In order to study the influence of the preferential degree and the heterogeneity of underlying networks on the spread of preferential e-commerce information, we propose a novel susceptible-infected-beneficial model based on scale-free networks. The spreading dynamics of the preferential information are analyzed in detail using the mean-field theory. We determine the basic reproductive number and equilibria. The theoretical analysis indicates that the basic reproductive number depends mainly on the preferential degree and the topology of the underlying networks. We prove the global stability of the information-elimination equilibrium. The permanence of preferential information and the global attractivity of the information-prevailing equilibrium are also studied in detail. Some numerical simulations are presented to verify the theoretical results.

  4. A proposed concept for a crustal dynamics information management network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohman, G. M.; Renfrow, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The findings of a requirements and feasibility analysis of the present and potential producers, users, and repositories of space-derived geodetic information are summarized. A proposed concept is presented for a crustal dynamics information management network that would apply state of the art concepts of information management technology to meet the expanding needs of the producers, users, and archivists of this geodetic information.

  5. Information channel capacity in the field theory estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sładkowski, J.; Syska, J.

    2012-12-01

    The construction of the information capacity for the vector position parameter in the Minkowskian space-time is presented. This lays the statistical foundations of the kinematical term of the Lagrangian of the physical action for many field theory models, derived by the extremal physical information method of Frieden and Soffer.

  6. Year 7 Students, Information Literacy, and Transfer: A Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, James E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the views of year 7 students, teacher librarians, and teachers in three state secondary schools in rural New South Wales, Australia, on information literacy and transfer. The aims of the study included the development of a grounded theory in relation to information literacy and transfer in these schools. The study's perspective…

  7. An Information-Related Systems Theory of Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Melvin

    1973-01-01

    The author suggests that a systems theory of counseling should have an adequate theoretical foundation in the way various types of systems handle information. Using the works of W. R. Ashby as a basis, the paper is a beginning attempt to establish this foundation. It describes how information can be used to maintain homeostasis and protect key…

  8. Minimal model of a heat engine: information theory approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Segal, Dvira

    2010-07-01

    We construct a generic model for a heat engine using information theory concepts, attributing irreversible energy dissipation to the information transmission channels. Using several forms for the channel capacity, classical and quantum, we demonstrate that our model recovers both the Carnot principle in the reversible limit, and the universal maximum power efficiency expression of nonreversible thermodynamics in the linear response regime. We expect the model to be very useful as a testbed for studying fundamental topics in thermodynamics, and for providing new insights into the relationship between information theory and actual thermal devices.

  9. An integration of integrated information theory with fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Adam B.

    2014-01-01

    To truly eliminate Cartesian ghosts from the science of consciousness, we must describe consciousness as an aspect of the physical. Integrated Information Theory states that consciousness arises from intrinsic information generated by dynamical systems; however existing formulations of this theory are not applicable to standard models of fundamental physical entities. Modern physics has shown that fields are fundamental entities, and in particular that the electromagnetic field is fundamental. Here I hypothesize that consciousness arises from information intrinsic to fundamental fields. This hypothesis unites fundamental physics with what we know empirically about the neuroscience underlying consciousness, and it bypasses the need to consider quantum effects. PMID:24550877

  10. An integration of integrated information theory with fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Adam B

    2014-01-01

    To truly eliminate Cartesian ghosts from the science of consciousness, we must describe consciousness as an aspect of the physical. Integrated Information Theory states that consciousness arises from intrinsic information generated by dynamical systems; however existing formulations of this theory are not applicable to standard models of fundamental physical entities. Modern physics has shown that fields are fundamental entities, and in particular that the electromagnetic field is fundamental. Here I hypothesize that consciousness arises from information intrinsic to fundamental fields. This hypothesis unites fundamental physics with what we know empirically about the neuroscience underlying consciousness, and it bypasses the need to consider quantum effects.

  11. Individual Differences in Information Processing in Networked Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    frequently face the problem of information overload . The amount of information available for a decision is often much larger than a person can process to make...team performance and can lead to information overload if it is coupled with high information push activity. Similarly, heuristic decisions as a...today’s networks, individuals frequently face the problem of information overload : the amount of information available for a decision far ex- ceeds the

  12. A quantitative approach to measure road network information based on edge diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xun; Zhang, Hong; Lan, Tian; Cao, Weiwei; He, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The measure of map information has been one of the key issues in assessing cartographic quality and map generalization algorithms. It is also important for developing efficient approaches to transfer geospatial information. Road network is the most common linear object in real world. Approximately describe road network information will benefit road map generalization, navigation map production and urban planning. Most of current approaches focused on node diversities and supposed that all the edges are the same, which is inconsistent to real-life condition, and thus show limitations in measuring network information. As real-life traffic flow are directed and of different quantities, the original undirected vector road map was first converted to a directed topographic connectivity map. Then in consideration of preferential attachment in complex network study and rich-club phenomenon in social network, the from and to weights of each edge are assigned. The from weight of a given edge is defined as the connectivity of its end node to the sum of the connectivities of all the neighbors of the from nodes of the edge. After getting the from and to weights of each edge, edge information, node information and the whole network structure information entropies could be obtained based on information theory. The approach has been applied to several 1 square mile road network samples. Results show that information entropies based on edge diversities could successfully describe the structural differences of road networks. This approach is a complementarity to current map information measurements, and can be extended to measure other kinds of geographical objects.

  13. Random matrix theory for analyzing the brain functional network in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Wang, Li; Yang, Yong; Li, Jiajia; Wu, Ying; Lin, Pan

    2016-11-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood neuropsychiatric disorder and affects approximately 6 -7 % of children worldwide. Here, we investigate the statistical properties of undirected and directed brain functional networks in ADHD patients based on random matrix theory (RMT), in which the undirected functional connectivity is constructed based on correlation coefficient and the directed functional connectivity is measured based on cross-correlation coefficient and mutual information. We first analyze the functional connectivity and the eigenvalues of the brain functional network. We find that ADHD patients have increased undirected functional connectivity, reflecting a higher degree of linear dependence between regions, and increased directed functional connectivity, indicating stronger causality and more transmission of information among brain regions. More importantly, we explore the randomness of the undirected and directed functional networks using RMT. We find that for ADHD patients, the undirected functional network is more orderly than that for normal subjects, which indicates an abnormal increase in undirected functional connectivity. In addition, we find that the directed functional networks are more random, which reveals greater disorder in causality and more chaotic information flow among brain regions in ADHD patients. Our results not only further confirm the efficacy of RMT in characterizing the intrinsic properties of brain functional networks but also provide insights into the possibilities RMT offers for improving clinical diagnoses and treatment evaluations for ADHD patients.

  14. Random matrix theory for analyzing the brain functional network in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Wang, Li; Yang, Yong; Li, Jiajia; Wu, Ying; Lin, Pan

    2016-11-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood neuropsychiatric disorder and affects approximately 6-7% of children worldwide. Here, we investigate the statistical properties of undirected and directed brain functional networks in ADHD patients based on random matrix theory (RMT), in which the undirected functional connectivity is constructed based on correlation coefficient and the directed functional connectivity is measured based on cross-correlation coefficient and mutual information. We first analyze the functional connectivity and the eigenvalues of the brain functional network. We find that ADHD patients have increased undirected functional connectivity, reflecting a higher degree of linear dependence between regions, and increased directed functional connectivity, indicating stronger causality and more transmission of information among brain regions. More importantly, we explore the randomness of the undirected and directed functional networks using RMT. We find that for ADHD patients, the undirected functional network is more orderly than that for normal subjects, which indicates an abnormal increase in undirected functional connectivity. In addition, we find that the directed functional networks are more random, which reveals greater disorder in causality and more chaotic information flow among brain regions in ADHD patients. Our results not only further confirm the efficacy of RMT in characterizing the intrinsic properties of brain functional networks but also provide insights into the possibilities RMT offers for improving clinical diagnoses and treatment evaluations for ADHD patients.

  15. On information flow in relay networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, A.

    Preliminary investigations conducted by El Gamal and Cover (1980) have shown that a max-flow min-cut interpretation for the capacity expressions of the classes of degraded and semideterministic relay channels can be found. In this paper it is shown that such an interpretation can also be found for fairly general classes of discrete memoryless relay networks. Cover and El Gamal (1979) have obtained general lower and upper bounds to capacity. However, the capacity of the general relay channel is not known. Past results are here extended to establish the capacity of deterministic relay networks with no interference and degraded relay networks. A general upper bound is given to the capacity of any relay network with this upper bound being a natural generalization of Theorem 4 in the study conducted by Cover and El Gamal (1979).

  16. Complex Dynamics in Information Sharing Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Bruce

    This study examines the roll-out of an electronic knowledge base in a medium-sized professional services firm over a six year period. The efficiency of such implementation is a key business problem in IT systems of this type. Data from usage logs provides the basis for analysis of the dynamic evolution of social networks around the depository during this time. The adoption pattern follows an "s-curve" and usage exhibits something of a power law distribution, both attributable to network effects, and network position is associated with organisational performance on a number of indicators. But periodicity in usage is evident and the usage distribution displays an exponential cut-off. Further analysis provides some evidence of mathematical complexity in the periodicity. Some implications of complex patterns in social network data for research and management are discussed. The study provides a case study demonstrating the utility of the broad methodological approach.

  17. Information Dynamics as Foundation for Network Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    networks. Dozens of research breakthroughs have been made, ranging from geometry and topology to signal processing and communication protocol , from...breakthroughs have been made, ranging from geometry and topology to signal processing and communication protocol , from network optimization to systems...software simulator running higher-layer protocols on a PC host, configurable RF front- ends (RouterStation Pro from Ubiquiti), and digital switch. We

  18. Modelling mechanical characteristics of microbial biofilms by network theory

    PubMed Central

    Ehret, Alexander E.; Böl, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we present a constitutive model to describe the mechanical behaviour of microbial biofilms based on classical approaches in the continuum theory of polymer networks. Although the model is particularly developed for the well-studied biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, it could easily be adapted to other biofilms. The basic assumption behind the model is that the network of extracellular polymeric substances can be described as a superposition of worm-like chain networks, each connected by transient junctions of a certain lifetime. Several models that were applied to biofilms previously are included in the presented approach as special cases, and for small shear strains, the governing equations are those of four parallel Maxwell elements. Rheological data given in the literature are very adequately captured by the proposed model, and the simulated response for a series of compression tests at large strains is in good qualitative agreement with reported experimental behaviour. PMID:23034354

  19. Topological analysis of metabolic networks based on petri net theory.

    PubMed

    Zevedei-Oancea, Ionela; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Petri net concepts provide additional tools for the modelling of metabolic networks. Here, the similarities between the counterparts in traditional biochemical modelling and Petri net theory are discussed. For example the stoichiometry matrix of a metabolic network corresponds to the incidence matrix of the Petri net. The flux modes and conservation relations have the T-invariants, respectively, P-invariants as counterparts. We reveal the biological meaning of some notions specific to the Petri net framework (traps, siphons, deadlocks, liveness). We focus on the topological analysis rather than on the analysis of the dynamic behaviour. The treatment of external metabolites is discussed. Some simple theoretical examples are presented for illustration. Also the Petri nets corresponding to some biochemical networks are built to support our results. For example, the role of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) in Trypanosoma brucei metabolism is evaluated by detecting siphons and traps. All Petri net properties treated in this contribution are exemplified on a system extracted from nucleotide metabolism.

  20. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  1. Towards a Semiotic Information Position Framework for Network Centric Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Centric Warfare Topics Information and Knowledge Exploration Information and Knowledge Exploitation Concepts, Theory , and Policy Saša...Transformation Roadmaps are based on the NCW theory [45], and NEC is at the core of 16th ICCRTS: Collective C2 in Multinational Civil-Military Operations...situational awareness, has long been a key aspect of military theory . For instance, Clausewitz talked about the “fog of war” [12, p. 104] and Sun Tzu wrote

  2. The Case of Mandy: Applying Holland's Theory and Cognitive Information Processing Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Robert C.; Wright, Laura K.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the application of Holland's theory and cognitive information processing theory to the case of a college student who was deciding about a major and a future career. The outcome of the student's case, her personal reactions, and practical implications, are discussed. (Author/GCP)

  3. Conceptions and Practice of Information Literacy in Academic Libraries: Espoused Theories and Theories-in-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Paulette A.

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the relationships between conceptions and practice of information literacy in academic libraries. To create a structure for the investigation, the research adopted the framework of Argyris and Schon (1974) in which professional practice is examined via theories of action, namely espoused theories and…

  4. Network theory to understand microarray studies of complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Benson, Mikael; Breitling, Rainer

    2006-09-01

    Complex diseases, such as allergy, diabetes and obesity depend on altered interactions between multiple genes, rather than changes in a single causal gene. DNA microarray studies of a complex disease often implicate hundreds of genes in the pathogenesis. This indicates that many different mechanisms and pathways are involved. How can we understand such complexity? How can hypotheses be formulated and tested? One approach is to organize the data in network models and to analyze these in a top-down manner. Globally, networks in nature are often characterized by a small number of highly connected nodes, while the majority of nodes have few connections. The highly connected nodes serve as hubs that affect many other nodes. Such hubs have key roles in the network. In yeast cells, for example, deletion of highly connected proteins is associated with increased lethality, compared to deletion of less connected proteins. This suggests the biological relevance of networks. Moving down in the network structure, there may be sub-networks or modules with specific functions. These modules may be further dissected to analyze individual nodes. In the context of DNA microarray studies of complex diseases, gene-interaction networks may contain modules of co-regulated or interacting genes that have distinct biological functions. Such modules may be linked to specific gene polymorphisms, transcription factors, cellular functions and disease mechanisms. Genes that are reliably active only in the context of their modules can be considered markers for the activity of the modules and may thus be promising candidates for biomarkers or therapeutic targets. This review aims to give an introduction to network theory and how it can be applied to microarray studies of complex diseases.

  5. Processing information system for highly specialized information in corporate networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, M. O.; Kovalev, I. V.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Brezitskaya, VV; Prohorovich, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    The new structure for formation system and management system for highly specialized information in corporate systems is offered. The main distinguishing feature of this structure is that it involves the processing of multilingual information in a single user request.

  6. Complex Network Theory Applied to the Growth of Kuala Lumpur's Public Urban Rail Transit Network.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Ujang, Norsidah; Hamid, Hussain Bin; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the number of studies involving complex network applications in transportation has increased steadily as scholars from various fields analyze traffic networks. Nonetheless, research on rail network growth is relatively rare. This research examines the evolution of the Public Urban Rail Transit Networks of Kuala Lumpur (PURTNoKL) based on complex network theory and covers both the topological structure of the rail system and future trends in network growth. In addition, network performance when facing different attack strategies is also assessed. Three topological network characteristics are considered: connections, clustering and centrality. In PURTNoKL, we found that the total number of nodes and edges exhibit a linear relationship and that the average degree stays within the interval [2.0488, 2.6774] with heavy-tailed distributions. The evolutionary process shows that the cumulative probability distribution (CPD) of degree and the average shortest path length show good fit with exponential distribution and normal distribution, respectively. Moreover, PURTNoKL exhibits clear cluster characteristics; most of the nodes have a 2-core value, and the CPDs of the centrality's closeness and betweenness follow a normal distribution function and an exponential distribution, respectively. Finally, we discuss four different types of network growth styles and the line extension process, which reveal that the rail network's growth is likely based on the nodes with the biggest lengths of the shortest path and that network protection should emphasize those nodes with the largest degrees and the highest betweenness values. This research may enhance the networkability of the rail system and better shape the future growth of public rail networks.

  7. Tensor Networks for Lattice Gauge Theories with Continuous Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss how to formulate lattice gauge theories in the tensor-network language. In this way, we obtain both a consistent-truncation scheme of the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories and a tensor-network variational ansatz for gauge-invariant states that can be used in actual numerical computations. Our construction is also applied to the simplest realization of the quantum link models or gauge magnets and provides a clear way to understand their microscopic relation with the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories. We also introduce a new set of gauge-invariant operators that modify continuously Rokhsar-Kivelson wave functions and can be used to extend the phase diagrams of known models. As an example, we characterize the transition between the deconfined phase of the Z2 lattice gauge theory and the Rokhsar-Kivelson point of the U (1 ) gauge magnet in 2D in terms of entanglement entropy. The topological entropy serves as an order parameter for the transition but not the Schmidt gap.

  8. Mechanizing Proof Theory: Resource-Aware Logics and Proof Transformations to Extract Implicit Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    yielding information useful in mathematics and in computing. Resource-aware logics restrict the number of times an assumption may be used in a proof and...family of quasi-structures any cut-reduction reduces the total number of formula-occurrences in the proof-network. As indicated in section (1.1.2), the...problems in practice, say, in number theory or in combinatorics - at least not without additional extensive work on the practical conditions of their

  9. Game theory for Wireless Sensor Networks: a survey.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Liang; Kwok, Ngai-Ming; Chen, Sheng-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Game theory (GT) is a mathematical method that describes the phenomenon of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers. In particular, the theory has been proven very useful in the design of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This article surveys the recent developments and findings of GT, its applications in WSNs, and provides the community a general view of this vibrant research area. We first introduce the typical formulation of GT in the WSN application domain. The roles of GT are described that include routing protocol design, topology control, power control and energy saving, packet forwarding, data collection, spectrum allocation, bandwidth allocation, quality of service control, coverage optimization, WSN security, and other sensor management tasks. Then, three variations of game theory are described, namely, the cooperative, non-cooperative, and repeated schemes. Finally, existing problems and future trends are identified for researchers and engineers in the field.

  10. Game Theory for Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Liang; Kwok, Ngai-Ming; Chen, Sheng-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Game theory (GT) is a mathematical method that describes the phenomenon of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers. In particular, the theory has been proven very useful in the design of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This article surveys the recent developments and findings of GT, its applications in WSNs, and provides the community a general view of this vibrant research area. We first introduce the typical formulation of GT in the WSN application domain. The roles of GT are described that include routing protocol design, topology control, power control and energy saving, packet forwarding, data collection, spectrum allocation, bandwidth allocation, quality of service control, coverage optimization, WSN security, and other sensor management tasks. Then, three variations of game theory are described, namely, the cooperative, non-cooperative, and repeated schemes. Finally, existing problems and future trends are identified for researchers and engineers in the field. PMID:23012533

  11. Mining Heterogeneous Social Networks for Egocentric Information Abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Te; Lin, Shou-De

    Social network is a powerful data structure that allows the depiction of relationship information between entities. However, real-world social networks are sometimes too complex for human to pursue further analysis. In this work, an unsupervised mechanism is proposed for egocentric information abstraction in heterogeneous social networks. To achieve this goal, we propose a vector space representation for heterogeneous social networks to identify combination of relations as features and compute statistical dependencies as feature values. These features, either linear or eyelie, intend to capture the semantic information in the surrounding environment of the ego. Then we design three abstraction measures to distill representative and important information to construct the abstracted graphs for visual presentation. The evaluations conducted on a real world movie datasct and an artificial crime dataset demonstrate that the abstractions can indeed retain significant information and facilitate more accurate and efficient human analysis.

  12. Complexity measurement based on information theory and kolmogorov complexity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Leong Ting; Terrazas, Germán; Zenil, Hector; Alexander, Cameron; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades many definitions of complexity have been proposed. Most of these definitions are based either on Shannon's information theory or on Kolmogorov complexity; these two are often compared, but very few studies integrate the two ideas. In this article we introduce a new measure of complexity that builds on both of these theories. As a demonstration of the concept, the technique is applied to elementary cellular automata and simulations of the self-organization of porphyrin molecules.

  13. Informal payment for health care and the theory of 'INXIT'.

    PubMed

    Gaal, Peter; McKee, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Informal payments are known to be widespread in the post-communist health care systems of Central and Eastern Europe. However, their role and nature remains contentious, with the debate characterized by much polemic. This paper steps back from this debate to examine the theoretical basis for understanding the persistence of informal payments. The authors develop a cognitive behavioural model of informal payment, which draws on the theory of government failure and extends Hirschman's theory of 'exit, voice, loyalty', the behavioural responses to 'decline in firms, organizations and states'. It is argued that informal payment represents another possible behavioural reaction: 'inxit', which becomes important when the channels of exit and voice are blocked. The theory is applied to explain informal payments in Hungary, but can be shown to be relevant to other countries facing similar issues. The paper examines the proposed policies to tackle informal payments, and on the basis of the theory of 'inxit' it advocates that solutions should contain an appropriate balance between exit and voice to optimize the chances of maintaining a good standard of public services.

  14. Information Security Analysis Using Game Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicher, Bob G; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Information security analysis can be performed using game theory implemented in dynamic simulations of Agent Based Models (ABMs). Such simulations can be verified with the results from game theory analysis and further used to explore larger scale, real world scenarios involving multiple attackers, defenders, and information assets. Our approach addresses imperfect information and scalability that allows us to also address previous limitations of current stochastic game models. Such models only consider perfect information assuming that the defender is always able to detect attacks; assuming that the state transition probabilities are fixed before the game assuming that the players actions are always synchronous; and that most models are not scalable with the size and complexity of systems under consideration. Our use of ABMs yields results of selected experiments that demonstrate our proposed approach and provides a quantitative measure for realistic information systems and their related security scenarios.

  15. Medical libraries, bioinformatics, and networked information: a coming convergence?

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C

    1999-01-01

    Libraries will be changed by technological and social developments that are fueled by information technology, bioinformatics, and networked information. Libraries in highly focused settings such as the health sciences are at a pivotal point in their development as the synthesis of historically diverse and independent information sources transforms health care institutions. Boundaries are breaking down between published literature and research data, between research databases and clinical patient data, and between consumer health information and professional literature. This paper focuses on the dynamics that are occurring with networked information sources and the roles that libraries will need to play in the world of medical informatics in the early twenty-first century. PMID:10550026

  16. Vulnerability Assessment Tools for Complex Information Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Takehiro Takahashi No Cliff Zou No Yong Huang No Jie Sun No Sheng Xiao No Yan Cai No Songlin Cai No Hanping Feng No Jonathan Lee No X.C. Lin No Jinghua Hu...Transactions on Modeling and Simulation, 2004. 31. Yongguang Zhang, Wenke Lee, and Yi-an Huang , “Intrusion Detection Techniques for Mobile Wireless Networks...Energy-Efficient Wireless Networks with Real-Time Constraints", Proc. of 45th IEEE Conf. Decision and Control, pp. 2997-3002, Dec. 2006. 29. Y. Huang , W

  17. Information Theory - The Bridge Connecting Bounded Rational Game Theory and Statistical Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2005-01-01

    A long-running difficulty with conventional game theory has been how to modify it to accommodate the bounded rationality of all red-world players. A recurring issue in statistical physics is how best to approximate joint probability distributions with decoupled (and therefore far more tractable) distributions. This paper shows that the same information theoretic mathematical structure, known as Product Distribution (PD) theory, addresses both issues. In this, PD theory not only provides a principle formulation of bounded rationality and a set of new types of mean field theory in statistical physics; it also shows that those topics are fundamentally one and the same.

  18. Exploring security and privacy issues in hospital information system: an Information Boundary Theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Nasriah; Stanton, Jeffrey; Stam, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    A small community hospital (67 beds) in Central New York was undergoing a major technological change within the organization, as they move from the use of several legacy information systems to a hospital-wide information system. The focus of the present research is to explore the privacy and security information issues using a framework called Information Boundary Theory [Stanton, 2002]. IBT explains the motivational factors that lead to the revelation or disclosing of information.

  19. Grower Communication Networks: Information Sources for Organic Farmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Chelsi; Grossman, Julie; Warren, Sarah T.; Cubbage, Fred

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study to determine which information sources organic growers use to inform farming practices by conducting in-depth semi-structured interviews with 23 organic farmers across 17 North Carolina counties. Effective information sources included: networking, agricultural organizations, universities, conferences, Extension, Web…

  20. Information Systems and Networks for Technology Transfer. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, John; Szentivanyi, Tibor

    Results of a survey of the information resources available in industrialized countries which might be used in a United Nations technology transfer program for developing countries are presented. Information systems and networks, organized information collections of a scientific and technical character, and the machinery used to disseminate this…

  1. Finding Quasi-Optimal Network Topologies for Information Transmission in Active Networks

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Murilo S.; de Carvalho, Josué X.; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2008-01-01

    This work clarifies the relation between network circuit (topology) and behaviour (information transmission and synchronization) in active networks, e.g. neural networks. As an application, we show how one can find network topologies that are able to transmit a large amount of information, possess a large number of communication channels, and are robust under large variations of the network coupling configuration. This theoretical approach is general and does not depend on the particular dynamic of the elements forming the network, since the network topology can be determined by finding a Laplacian matrix (the matrix that describes the connections and the coupling strengths among the elements) whose eigenvalues satisfy some special conditions. To illustrate our ideas and theoretical approaches, we use neural networks of electrically connected chaotic Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. PMID:18941516

  2. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  3. Improving gene regulatory network inference using network topology information.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajay; Chetty, Madhu; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-09-01

    Inferring the gene regulatory network (GRN) structure from data is an important problem in computational biology. However, it is a computationally complex problem and approximate methods such as heuristic search techniques, restriction of the maximum-number-of-parents (maxP) for a gene, or an optimal search under special conditions are required. The limitations of a heuristic search are well known but literature on the detailed analysis of the widely used maxP technique is lacking. The optimal search methods require large computational time. We report the theoretical analysis and experimental results of the strengths and limitations of the maxP technique. Further, using an optimal search method, we combine the strengths of the maxP technique and the known GRN topology to propose two novel algorithms. These algorithms are implemented in a Bayesian network framework and tested on biological, realistic, and in silico networks of different sizes and topologies. They overcome the limitations of the maxP technique and show superior computational speed when compared to the current optimal search algorithms.

  4. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  5. The Philosophy of Information as an Underlying and Unifying Theory of Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomic, Taeda

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Philosophical analyses of theoretical principles underlying these sub-domains reveal philosophy of information as underlying meta-theory of information science. Method: Conceptual research on the knowledge sub-domains in information science and philosophy and analysis of their mutual connection. Analysis: Similarities between…

  6. Discovery of novel tumor suppressor p53 response elements using information theory

    PubMed Central

    Lyakhov, Ilya G.; Krishnamachari, Annangarachari; Schneider, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate method for locating genes under tumor suppressor p53 control that is based on a well-established mathematical theory and built using naturally occurring, experimentally proven p53 sites is essential in understanding the complete p53 network. We used a molecular information theory approach to create a flexible model for p53 binding. By searching around transcription start sites in human chromosomes 1 and 2, we predicted 16 novel p53 binding sites and experimentally demonstrated that 15 of the 16 (94%) sites were bound by p53. Some were also bound by the related proteins p63 and p73. Thirteen of the adjacent genes were controlled by at least one of the proteins. Eleven of the 16 sites (69%) had not been identified previously. This molecular information theory approach can be extended to any genetic system to predict new sites for DNA-binding proteins. PMID:18495754

  7. Are Social Networking Websites Educational? Information Capsule. Volume 0909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2009-01-01

    More and more school districts across the country are joining social networking sites, such as Facebook and MySpace. This Information Capsule discusses the frequency with which school districts are using social networking sites, how districts are using the sites, and potential drawbacks associated with their use. Issues for districts to consider…

  8. Emerging Communities: Integrating Networked Information into Library Services (Book Review).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afifi, Marianne

    1995-01-01

    Reviews this collection of papers, edited by Ann P. Bishop, which present the current state of networking as it relates to libraries and the community. Recommends the book as a compendium of lessons, learned and to be learned, as networked information becomes an integral and necessary part of the library world. (JMV)

  9. The Network Information Management System (NIMS) in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to better manage enormous amounts of administrative, engineering, and management data that is distributed worldwide, a study was conducted which identified the need for a network support system. The Network Information Management System (NIMS) will provide the Deep Space Network with the tools to provide an easily accessible source of valid information to support management activities and provide a more cost-effective method of acquiring, maintaining, and retrieval data.

  10. Developing Visualization Techniques for Semantics-based Information Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Hall, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Information systems incorporating complex network structured information spaces with a semantic underpinning - such as hypermedia networks, semantic networks, topic maps, and concept maps - are being deployed to solve some of NASA s critical information management problems. This paper describes some of the human interaction and navigation problems associated with complex semantic information spaces and describes a set of new visual interface approaches to address these problems. A key strategy is to leverage semantic knowledge represented within these information spaces to construct abstractions and views that will be meaningful to the human user. Human-computer interaction methodologies will guide the development and evaluation of these approaches, which will benefit deployed NASA systems and also apply to information systems based on the emerging Semantic Web.

  11. Architectural Design for the Global Legal Information Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we provide a summary of our activities regarding the goals, requirements analysis, design, and prototype implementation for the Global Legal Information Network, a joint effort between the Law Library of Congress and NASA.

  12. Tufts academic health information network: concept and scenario.

    PubMed

    Stearns, N S

    1986-04-01

    Tufts University School of Medicine's new health sciences education building, the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Health Communications, will house a modern medical library and computer center, classrooms, auditoria, and media facilities. The building will also serve as the center for an information and communication network linking the medical school and adjacent New England Medical Center, Tufts' primary teaching hospital, with Tufts Associated Teaching Hospitals throughout New England. Ultimately, the Tufts network will join other gateway networks, information resource facilities, health care institutions, and medical schools throughout the world. The center and the network are intended to facilitate and improve the education of health professionals, the delivery of health care to patients, the conduct of research, and the implementation of administrative management approaches that should provide more efficient utilization of resources and save dollars. A model and scenario show how health care delivery and health care education are integrated through better use of information transfer technologies by health information specialists, practitioners, and educators.

  13. Order from noise: Toward a social theory of geographic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, B.S.; Chrisman, N.R.

    2006-01-01

    In the so-called Information Age, it is surprising that the concept of information is imprecisely defined and almost taken for granted. Historic and recent geographic information science (GIScience) literature relies on two conflicting metaphors, often espoused by the same author in adjacent paragraphs. The metaphor of invariance, derived from telecommunications engineering, defines information as a thing to be transported without loss through a conduit. Another metaphor, originating in the utopian movements of the 19th century, locates information within a hierarchy of refinement-a stopping place on the path to convert mere data into higher forms of knowledge and perhaps to wisdom. Both metaphors rely on long-forgotten debates outside geography and preclude us from seeing that there are important social and ethical concerns in the relationship between geographic information technologies and society. We examine the conflicts between competing metaphors and propose a social theory of geographic information. ?? 2006 by Association of American Geographers.

  14. A Holistic Approach to Networked Information Systems Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-15

    Supply in Systems with Solar Panels and Storage”, Industrial & Systems Engineering Research Conference, Nashville, TN. (Presenter: Gautam), 2015 P4...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0159 A Holistic Approach to Networked Information Systems Design and Analysis P.R. Kumar TEXAS ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION...necessary if the abstract is to be limited. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release A Holistic Approach to Networked Information Systems

  15. Networks, Netwar, and Information-Age Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    ball” (named for Buckminster Fuller ); it does not resemble a pyramid. The design is flat. Ideally, there is no single, central leadership, com- mand...Arquilla and Ronfeldt (1996) and Ronfeldt, Arquilla, Fuller , and Fuller (forthcoming). Also see Arquilla and Ronfeldt (1997). Networks, Netwar, and...Comment on the Zapatista ‘Netwar’,” in Arquilla and Ronfeldt (1997), pp. 369–391. Ronfeldt, David, John Arquilla, Graham Fuller , and Melissa Fuller , The

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Information and Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisert, Jens; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-02-01

    Quantum many-body models describing natural systems or materials and physical systems assembled piece by piece in the laboratory for the purpose of realizing quantum information processing share an important feature: intricate correlations that originate from the coherent interaction between a large number of constituents. In recent years it has become manifest that the cross-fertilization between research devoted to quantum information science and to quantum many-body physics leads to new ideas, methods, tools, and insights in both fields. Issues of criticality, quantum phase transitions, quantum order and magnetism that play a role in one field find relations to the classical simulation of quantum systems, to error correction and fault tolerance thresholds, to channel capacities and to topological quantum computation, to name but a few. The structural similarities of typical problems in both fields and the potential for pooling of ideas then become manifest. Notably, methods and ideas from quantum information have provided fresh approaches to long-standing problems in strongly correlated systems in the condensed matter context, including both numerical methods and conceptual insights. Focus on quantum information and many-body theory Contents TENSOR NETWORKS Homogeneous multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz tensor networks for quantum critical systems M Rizzi, S Montangero, P Silvi, V Giovannetti and Rosario Fazio Concatenated tensor network states R Hübener, V Nebendahl and W Dür Entanglement renormalization in free bosonic systems: real-space versus momentum-space renormalization group transforms G Evenbly and G Vidal Finite-size geometric entanglement from tensor network algorithms Qian-Qian Shi, Román Orús, John Ove Fjærestad and Huan-Qiang Zhou Characterizing symmetries in a projected entangled pair state D Pérez-García, M Sanz, C E González-Guillén, M M Wolf and J I Cirac Matrix product operator representations B Pirvu, V Murg, J I Cirac

  17. MINDS - Medical Information Network Decision Support System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Information Technology, Department of Health and Human Services, 2005 7. The Lewin Group, Inc., “Health Information Technology Leadership Panel: Final...University of Chicago Kurt Rossman Laboratories for Radiologic Image Research (www- radiology.uchicago.edu/krl/) 8. University of Michigan Department

  18. Information Product Quality in Network Centric Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    sense) is laid out in Lee and Baskerville [7], consistent with Yin [8]. Figure 16 shows Yin’s conceptualization applied to the NCOCF case study...Information science,” Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 50(12), 1051 – 1063. [11] Lee, A.S., and R.L. Baskerville . 2003

  19. Coordinated Economic Development and the Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, D. K.

    This is a discussion of some of the problems that the Advisory Organization for Gulf Industries (AOGI) will face when it undertakes (1) to organize both an information center (node) that will serve the information needs of the Gulf States of Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Oman; and (2) to compile an…

  20. Sender–receiver systems and applying information theory for quantitative synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Barcena Menendez, Diego; Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Isalan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sender–receiver (S–R) systems abound in biology, with communication systems sending information in various forms. Information theory provides a quantitative basis for analysing these processes and is being applied to study natural genetic, enzymatic and neural networks. Recent advances in synthetic biology are providing us with a wealth of artificial S–R systems, giving us quantitative control over networks with a finite number of well-characterised components. Combining the two approaches can help to predict how to maximise signalling robustness, and will allow us to make increasingly complex biological computers. Ultimately, pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology will require moving beyond engineering the flow of information and towards building more sophisticated circuits that interpret biological meaning. PMID:25282688

  1. Sender-receiver systems and applying information theory for quantitative synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Barcena Menendez, Diego; Senthivel, Vivek Raj; Isalan, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Sender-receiver (S-R) systems abound in biology, with communication systems sending information in various forms. Information theory provides a quantitative basis for analysing these processes and is being applied to study natural genetic, enzymatic and neural networks. Recent advances in synthetic biology are providing us with a wealth of artificial S-R systems, giving us quantitative control over networks with a finite number of well-characterised components. Combining the two approaches can help to predict how to maximise signalling robustness, and will allow us to make increasingly complex biological computers. Ultimately, pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology will require moving beyond engineering the flow of information and towards building more sophisticated circuits that interpret biological meaning.

  2. Semantic overlay network for large-scale spatial information indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yue; Cao, Kai; Qu, Tianshan; Wang, Zhongmin

    2013-08-01

    The increased demand for online services of spatial information poses new challenges to the combined filed of Computer Science and Geographic Information Science. Amongst others, these include fast indexing of spatial data in distributed networks. In this paper we propose a novel semantic overlay network for large-scale multi-dimensional spatial information indexing, called SON_LSII, which has a hybrid structure integrating a semantic quad-tree and Chord ring. The SON_LSII is a small world overlay network that achieves a very competitive trade-off between indexing efficiency and maintenance overhead. To create SON_LSII, we use an effective semantic clustering strategy that considers two aspects, i.e., the semantic of spatial information that peer holds in overlay network and physical network performances. Based on SON_LSII, a mapping method is used to reduce the multi-dimensional features into a single dimension and an efficient indexing algorithm is presented to support complex range queries of the spatial information with a massive number of concurrent users. The results from extensive experiments demonstrate that SON_LSII is superior to existing overlay networks in various respects, including scalability, maintenance, rate of indexing hits, indexing logical hops, and adaptability. Thus, the proposed SON_LSII can be used for large-scale spatial information indexing.

  3. Information routing driven by background chatter in a signaling network.

    PubMed

    Domedel-Puig, Núria; Rué, Pau; Pons, Antonio J; García-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2011-12-01

    Living systems are capable of processing multiple sources of information simultaneously. This is true even at the cellular level, where not only coexisting signals stimulate the cell, but also the presence of fluctuating conditions is significant. When information is received by a cell signaling network via one specific input, the existence of other stimuli can provide a background activity -or chatter- that may affect signal transmission through the network and, therefore, the response of the cell. Here we study the modulation of information processing by chatter in the signaling network of a human cell, specifically, in a Boolean model of the signal transduction network of a fibroblast. We observe that the level of external chatter shapes the response of the system to information carrying signals in a nontrivial manner, modulates the activity levels of the network outputs, and effectively determines the paths of information flow. Our results show that the interactions and node dynamics, far from being random, confer versatility to the signaling network and allow transitions between different information-processing scenarios.

  4. Automated Physico-Chemical Cell Model Development through Information Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Ortoleva

    2005-11-29

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive models of the chemical responses of microbial cells to variations in their surroundings. The application of these models is optimization of environmental remediation and energy-producing biotechnical processes.The principles on which our project is based are as follows: chemical thermodynamics and kinetics; automation of calibration through information theory; integration of multiplex data (e.g. cDNA microarrays, NMR, proteomics), cell modeling, and bifurcation theory to overcome cellular complexity; and the use of multiplex data and information theory to calibrate and run an incomplete model. In this report we review four papers summarizing key findings and a web-enabled, multiple module workflow we have implemented that consists of a set of interoperable systems biology computational modules.

  5. Sailor: Maryland's Online Public Information Network. Sailor Network Assessment Final Report: Findings and Future Sailor Network Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertot, John Carlo; McClure, Charles R.

    This report describes the results of an assessment of Sailor, Maryland's Online Public Information Network, which provides statewide Internet connection to 100% of Maryland public libraries. The concept of a "statewide networked environment" includes information services, products, hardware and software, telecommunications…

  6. The analysis of network transmission method for welding robot information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Weide; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Donghua; Wang, Hongbo

    2011-12-01

    On the asis of User Datagram Protocol (UserDatagram Protocol, UDP), to do some improvement and design a welding robot network communication protocol (welding robot network communicate protocol: WRNCP), working on the fields of the transport layer and application layer of TCP / IP protocol. According to the characteristics of video data, to design the radio push-type (Broadcast Push Model, BPM) transmission method, improving the efficiency and stability of video transmission.and to designed the network information transmission system, used for real-time control of welding robot network.

  7. The analysis of network transmission method for welding robot information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Weide; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Donghua; Wang, Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    On the asis of User Datagram Protocol (UserDatagram Protocol, UDP), to do some improvement and design a welding robot network communication protocol (welding robot network communicate protocol: WRNCP), working on the fields of the transport layer and application layer of TCP / IP protocol. According to the characteristics of video data, to design the radio push-type (Broadcast Push Model, BPM) transmission method, improving the efficiency and stability of video transmission.and to designed the network information transmission system, used for real-time control of welding robot network.

  8. Network algorithms for information analysis using the Titan Toolkit.

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, William Clarence, III; Baumes, Jeffrey; Wilson, Andrew T.; Wylie, Brian Neil; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-07-01

    The analysis of networked activities is dramatically more challenging than many traditional kinds of analysis. A network is defined by a set of entities (people, organizations, banks, computers, etc.) linked by various types of relationships. These entities and relationships are often uninteresting alone, and only become significant in aggregate. The analysis and visualization of these networks is one of the driving factors behind the creation of the Titan Toolkit. Given the broad set of problem domains and the wide ranging databases in use by the information analysis community, the Titan Toolkit's flexible, component based pipeline provides an excellent platform for constructing specific combinations of network algorithms and visualizations.

  9. C. elegans locomotion analysis using algorithmic information theory.

    PubMed

    Skandari, Roghieh; Le Bihan, Nicolas; Manton, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the use of algorithmic information theory to analyse C. elegans datasets. The ability of complexity measures to detect similarity in animals' behaviours is demonstrated and their strengths are compared to methods such as histograms. Introduced quantities are illustrated on a couple of real two-dimensional C. elegans datasets to investigate the thermotaxis and chemotaxis behaviours.

  10. Verbal Information Processing Paradigms: A Review of Theory and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Karen J.

    The purpose of this resarch was to develop a model of verbal information processing for use in subsequent analyses of the construct and predictive validity of the current Department of Defense military selection and classification battery, the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) 8/9/10. The theory and research methods of selected…

  11. Evaluating hydrological model performance using information theory-based metrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accuracy-based model performance metrics not necessarily reflect the qualitative correspondence between simulated and measured streamflow time series. The objective of this work was to use the information theory-based metrics to see whether they can be used as complementary tool for hydrologic m...

  12. Bridging disparate symptoms of schizophrenia: a triple network dysfunction theory.

    PubMed

    Nekovarova, Tereza; Fajnerova, Iveta; Horacek, Jiri; Spaniel, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with variable symptomatology, traditionally divided into positive and negative symptoms, and cognitive deficits. However, the etiology of this disorder has yet to be fully understood. Recent findings suggest that alteration of the basic sense of self-awareness may be an essential distortion of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In addition, extensive research of social and mentalizing abilities has stressed the role of distortion of social skills in schizophrenia.This article aims to propose and support a concept of a triple brain network model of the dysfunctional switching between default mode and central executive network (CEN) related to the aberrant activity of the salience network. This model could represent a unitary mechanism of a wide array of symptom domains present in schizophrenia including the deficit of self (self-awareness and self-representation) and theory of mind (ToM) dysfunctions along with the traditional positive, negative and cognitive domains. We review previous studies which document the dysfunctions of self and ToM in schizophrenia together with neuroimaging data that support the triple brain network model as a common neuronal substrate of this dysfunction.

  13. 75 FR 44800 - Notice of Meeting of the Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee, Tuesday...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... SECURITY Notice of Meeting of the Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee, Tuesday, August... meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) will meet from... Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee is to identify issues and provide to...

  14. 78 FR 71631 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... SECURITY Committee Name: Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) AGENCY... Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network... Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) is an advisory body to the...

  15. Do Brain Networks Evolve by Maximizing Their Information Flow Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Chris G.; Srivastava, Shambhavi; Pinto, Sandro E. de S.; Baptista, Murilo S.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a working hypothesis supported by numerical simulations that brain networks evolve based on the principle of the maximization of their internal information flow capacity. We find that synchronous behavior and capacity of information flow of the evolved networks reproduce well the same behaviors observed in the brain dynamical networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, networks of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with graphs given by these brain networks. We make a strong case to verify our hypothesis by showing that the neural networks with the closest graph distance to the brain networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans are the Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks evolved with coupling strengths that maximize information flow capacity. Surprisingly, we find that global neural synchronization levels decrease during brain evolution, reflecting on an underlying global no Hebbian-like evolution process, which is driven by no Hebbian-like learning behaviors for some of the clusters during evolution, and Hebbian-like learning rules for clusters where neurons increase their synchronization. PMID:26317592

  16. Phase transitions for information diffusion in random clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsu; Shin, Joongbo; Kwak, Namju; Jung, Kyomin

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions for the phase transitions of information diffusion in complex networks. Using the random clustered network model, a generalisation of the Chung-Lu random network model incorporating clustering, we examine the effect of clustering under the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) epidemic diffusion model with heterogeneous contact rates. For this purpose, we exploit the branching process to analyse information diffusion in random unclustered networks with arbitrary contact rates, and provide novel iterative algorithms for estimating the conditions and sizes of global cascades, respectively. Showing that a random clustered network can be mapped into a factor graph, which is a locally tree-like structure, we successfully extend our analysis to random clustered networks with heterogeneous contact rates. We then identify the conditions for phase transitions of information diffusion using our method. Interestingly, for various contact rates, we prove that random clustered networks with higher clustering coefficients have strictly lower phase transition points for any given degree sequence. Finally, we confirm our analytical results with numerical simulations of both synthetically-generated and real-world networks.

  17. Do Brain Networks Evolve by Maximizing Their Information Flow Capacity?

    PubMed

    Antonopoulos, Chris G; Srivastava, Shambhavi; Pinto, Sandro E de S; Baptista, Murilo S

    2015-08-01

    We propose a working hypothesis supported by numerical simulations that brain networks evolve based on the principle of the maximization of their internal information flow capacity. We find that synchronous behavior and capacity of information flow of the evolved networks reproduce well the same behaviors observed in the brain dynamical networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, networks of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with graphs given by these brain networks. We make a strong case to verify our hypothesis by showing that the neural networks with the closest graph distance to the brain networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans are the Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks evolved with coupling strengths that maximize information flow capacity. Surprisingly, we find that global neural synchronization levels decrease during brain evolution, reflecting on an underlying global no Hebbian-like evolution process, which is driven by no Hebbian-like learning behaviors for some of the clusters during evolution, and Hebbian-like learning rules for clusters where neurons increase their synchronization.

  18. Information exchange and the robustness of organizational networks

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Watts, Duncan J.; Sabel, Charles F.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of information exchange is an important but understudied aspect of collective communication, coordination, and problem solving in a wide range of distributed systems, both physical (e.g., the Internet) and social (e.g., business firms). In this paper, we introduce a model of organizational networks according to which links are added incrementally to a hierarchical backbone and test the resulting networks under variable conditions of information exchange. Our main result is the identification of a class of multiscale networks that reduce, over a wide range of environments, the likelihood that individual nodes will suffer congestion-related failure and that the network as a whole will disintegrate when failures do occur. We call this dual robustness property of multiscale networks “ultrarobustness.” Furthermore, we find that multiscale networks attain most of their robustness with surprisingly few link additions, suggesting that ultrarobust organizational networks can be generated in an efficient and scalable manner. Our results are directly relevant to the relief of congestion in communication networks and also more broadly to activities, like distributed problem solving, that require individuals to exchange information in an unpredictable manner. PMID:14528009

  19. An Information Theory Approach to Nonlinear, Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, David M.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Using the problem of ion channel thermodynamics as an example, we illustrate the idea of building up complex thermodynamic models by successively adding physical information. We present a new formulation of information algebra that generalizes methods of both information theory and statistical mechanics. From this foundation we derive a theory for ion channel kinetics, identifying a nonequilibrium ‘process’ free energy functional in addition to the well-known integrated work functionals. The Gibbs-Maxwell relation for the free energy functional is a Green-Kubo relation, applicable arbitrarily far from equilibrium, that captures the effect of non-local and time-dependent behavior from transient thermal and mechanical driving forces. Comparing the physical significance of the Lagrange multipliers to the canonical ensemble suggests definitions of nonequilibrium ensembles at constant capacitance or inductance in addition to constant resistance. Our result is that statistical mechanical descriptions derived from a few primitive algebraic operations on information can be used to create experimentally-relevant and computable models. By construction, these models may use information from more detailed atomistic simulations. Two surprising consequences to be explored in further work are that (in)distinguishability factors are automatically predicted from the problem formulation and that a direct analogue of the second law for thermodynamic entropy production is found by considering information loss in stochastic processes. The information loss identifies a novel contribution from the instantaneous information entropy that ensures non-negative loss. PMID:22966210

  20. An Information Theory Approach to Nonlinear, Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David M; Beck, Thomas L; Rempe, Susan B

    2011-10-01

    Using the problem of ion channel thermodynamics as an example, we illustrate the idea of building up complex thermodynamic models by successively adding physical information. We present a new formulation of information algebra that generalizes methods of both information theory and statistical mechanics. From this foundation we derive a theory for ion channel kinetics, identifying a nonequilibrium 'process' free energy functional in addition to the well-known integrated work functionals. The Gibbs-Maxwell relation for the free energy functional is a Green-Kubo relation, applicable arbitrarily far from equilibrium, that captures the effect of non-local and time-dependent behavior from transient thermal and mechanical driving forces. Comparing the physical significance of the Lagrange multipliers to the canonical ensemble suggests definitions of nonequilibrium ensembles at constant capacitance or inductance in addition to constant resistance. Our result is that statistical mechanical descriptions derived from a few primitive algebraic operations on information can be used to create experimentally-relevant and computable models. By construction, these models may use information from more detailed atomistic simulations. Two surprising consequences to be explored in further work are that (in)distinguishability factors are automatically predicted from the problem formulation and that a direct analogue of the second law for thermodynamic entropy production is found by considering information loss in stochastic processes. The information loss identifies a novel contribution from the instantaneous information entropy that ensures non-negative loss.

  1. Reconstruction of transcriptional network from microarray data using combined mutual information and network-assisted regression.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-D; Qi, Y-X; Jiang, Z-L

    2011-03-01

    Many methods had been developed on inferring transcriptional network from gene expression. However, it is still necessary to design new method that discloses more detailed and exact network information. Using network-assisted regression, the authors combined the averaged three-way mutual information (AMI3) and non-linear ordinary differential equation (ODE) model to infer the transcriptional network, and to obtain both the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics. Synthetic and experimental data were used to evaluate the performance of the above approach. In comparison with the previous methods based on mutual information, AMI3 obtained higher precision with the same sensitivity. To describe the regulatory dynamics between transcription factors and target genes, network-assisted regression and regression without network, respectively, were applied in the steady-state and time series microarray data. The results revealed that comparing with regression without network, network-assisted regression increased the precision, but decreased the fitting goodness. Then, the authors reconstructed the transcriptional network of Escherichia coli and simulated the regulatory dynamics of genes. Furthermore, the authors' approach identified potential transcription factors regulating yeast cell cycle. In conclusion, network-assisted regression, combined AMI3 and ODE model, was a more precisely to infer the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics of transcriptional network from microarray data. [Includes supplementary material].

  2. Social networks predict selective observation and information spread in ravens

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.; Bugnyar, Thomas; Hoppitt, William; Mikus, Nace; Schwab, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation and learning, we investigated transmission of information in two raven (Corvus corax) groups. First, we quantified social connections in each group by constructing networks on affiliative interactions, aggressive interactions and proximity. We then seeded novel information by training one group member on a novel task and allowing others to observe. In each group, an observation network based on who observed whose task-solving behaviour was strongly correlated with networks based on affiliative interactions and proximity. Ravens with high social centrality (strength, eigenvector, information centrality) in the affiliative interaction network were also central in the observation network, possibly as a result of solving the task sooner. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that the order that ravens first solved the task was best predicted by connections in the affiliative interaction network in a group of subadult ravens, and by social rank and kinship (which influenced affiliative interactions) in a group of juvenile ravens. Our results demonstrate that not all social connections are equally effective at predicting the patterns of selective observation and information transmission. PMID:27493780

  3. Social networks predict selective observation and information spread in ravens.

    PubMed

    Kulahci, Ipek G; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Bugnyar, Thomas; Hoppitt, William; Mikus, Nace; Schwab, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation and learning, we investigated transmission of information in two raven (Corvus corax) groups. First, we quantified social connections in each group by constructing networks on affiliative interactions, aggressive interactions and proximity. We then seeded novel information by training one group member on a novel task and allowing others to observe. In each group, an observation network based on who observed whose task-solving behaviour was strongly correlated with networks based on affiliative interactions and proximity. Ravens with high social centrality (strength, eigenvector, information centrality) in the affiliative interaction network were also central in the observation network, possibly as a result of solving the task sooner. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that the order that ravens first solved the task was best predicted by connections in the affiliative interaction network in a group of subadult ravens, and by social rank and kinship (which influenced affiliative interactions) in a group of juvenile ravens. Our results demonstrate that not all social connections are equally effective at predicting the patterns of selective observation and information transmission.

  4. Extraction of hidden information by efficient community detection in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooyoung; Lee, Juyong; Gross, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Currently, we are overwhelmed by a deluge of experimental data, and network physics has the potential to become an invaluable method to increase our understanding of large interacting datasets. However, this potential is often unrealized for two reasons: uncovering the hidden community structure of a network, known as community detection, is difficult, and further, even if one has an idea of this community structure, it is not a priori obvious how to efficiently use this information. Here, to address both of these issues, we, first, identify optimal community structure of given networks in terms of modularity by utilizing a recently introduced community detection method. Second, we develop an approach to use this community information to extract hidden information from a network. When applied to a protein-protein interaction network, the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art methods that use only the local information of a network. The method is generally applicable to networks from many areas. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 20120001222).

  5. Competition between Homophily and Information Entropy Maximization in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichang; Liang, Xiao; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    In social networks, it is conventionally thought that two individuals with more overlapped friends tend to establish a new friendship, which could be stated as homophily breeding new connections. While the recent hypothesis of maximum information entropy is presented as the possible origin of effective navigation in small-world networks. We find there exists a competition between information entropy maximization and homophily in local structure through both theoretical and experimental analysis. This competition suggests that a newly built relationship between two individuals with more common friends would lead to less information entropy gain for them. We demonstrate that in the evolution of the social network, both of the two assumptions coexist. The rule of maximum information entropy produces weak ties in the network, while the law of homophily makes the network highly clustered locally and the individuals would obtain strong and trust ties. A toy model is also presented to demonstrate the competition and evaluate the roles of different rules in the evolution of real networks. Our findings could shed light on the social network modeling from a new perspective. PMID:26334994

  6. Stochastical modeling for Viral Disease: Statistical Mechanics and Network Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Deem, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical methods of statistical mechanics are developed and applied to study the immunological response against viral disease, such as dengue. We use this theory to show how the immune response to four different dengue serotypes may be sculpted. It is the ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. Here we propose to utilize a scale free network based stochastic model to investigate the mitigation strategies and analyze the risk.

  7. A Danger-Theory-Based Immune Network Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Xiao, Xin; Shi, Yuanquan

    2013-01-01

    Existing artificial immune optimization algorithms reflect a number of shortcomings, such as premature convergence and poor local search ability. This paper proposes a danger-theory-based immune network optimization algorithm, named dt-aiNet. The danger theory emphasizes that danger signals generated from changes of environments will guide different levels of immune responses, and the areas around danger signals are called danger zones. By defining the danger zone to calculate danger signals for each antibody, the algorithm adjusts antibodies' concentrations through its own danger signals and then triggers immune responses of self-regulation. So the population diversity can be maintained. Experimental results show that the algorithm has more advantages in the solution quality and diversity of the population. Compared with influential optimization algorithms, CLONALG, opt-aiNet, and dopt-aiNet, the algorithm has smaller error values and higher success rates and can find solutions to meet the accuracies within the specified function evaluation times. PMID:23483853

  8. Connectomics and graph theory analyses: Novel insights into network abnormalities in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Kocher, Madison; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of neural networks in epilepsy has become increasingly relevant in the context of translational research, given that localized forms of epilepsy are more likely to be related to abnormal function within specific brain networks, as opposed to isolated focal brain pathology. It is notable that variability in clinical outcomes from epilepsy treatment may be a reflection of individual patterns of network abnormalities. As such, network endophenotypes may be important biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. Despite its exceptional potential, measuring abnormal networks in translational research has been thus far constrained by methodologic limitations. Fortunately, recent advancements in neuroscience, particularly in the field of connectomics, permit a detailed assessment of network organization, dynamics, and function at an individual level. Data from the personal connectome can be assessed using principled forms of network analyses based on graph theory, which may disclose patterns of organization that are prone to abnormal dynamics and epileptogenesis. Although the field of connectomics is relatively new, there is already a rapidly growing body of evidence to suggest that it can elucidate several important and fundamental aspects of abnormal networks to epilepsy. In this article, we provide a review of the emerging evidence from connectomics research regarding neural network architecture, dynamics, and function related to epilepsy. We discuss how connectomics may bring together pathophysiologic hypotheses from conceptual and basic models of epilepsy and in vivo biomarkers for clinical translational research. By providing neural network information unique to each individual, the field of connectomics may help to elucidate variability in clinical outcomes and open opportunities for personalized medicine approaches to epilepsy. Connectomics involves complex and rich data from each subject, thus collaborative efforts to enable the

  9. The information transmission in community networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Chuan-Jian; Wu, Jian-Liang; Liu, Bin

    2013-09-01

    The community structure has been empirically found in many real networks. This paper proposes an efficient Double Shortest Path routing strategy trying to avoid the modules of traffic congestion, which means that we adopt the shortest routing strategy both in the inter-modules and in the intra-module. Simulations show that this routing algorithm is superior to the traditional shortest path routing protocol with appropriate selection of the tunable parameters. In addition, this algorithm can also be improved by integrating it with several alternative routing strategies.

  10. Informational theories of consciousness: a review and extension.

    PubMed

    Aleksander, Igor; Gamez, David

    2011-01-01

    In recent years a number of people have suggested that there is a close link between conscious experience and the differentiation and integration of information in certain areas of the brain. The balance between differentiation and integration is often called information integration, and a number of algorithms for measuring it have been put forward, which can be used to make predictions about consciousness and to understand the relationships between neurons in a network. One of the key problems with the current information integration measures is that they take a lot of computer processing power, which limits their application to networks of around a dozen neurons. There are also more general issues about whether the current algorithms accurately reflect the consciousness associated with a system. This paper addresses these issues by exploring a new automata-based algorithm for the calculation of information integration. To benchmark different approaches we implemented the Balduzzi and Tononi algorithm as a plugin to the SpikeStream neural simulator, and used it to carry out some preliminary comparisons of the liveliness and Φ measures on simple four neuron networks.

  11. Symmetric polynomials in information theory: Entropy and subentropy

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsa, Richard; Mitchison, Graeme

    2015-06-15

    Entropy and other fundamental quantities of information theory are customarily expressed and manipulated as functions of probabilities. Here we study the entropy H and subentropy Q as functions of the elementary symmetric polynomials in the probabilities and reveal a series of remarkable properties. Derivatives of all orders are shown to satisfy a complete monotonicity property. H and Q themselves become multivariate Bernstein functions and we derive the density functions of their Levy-Khintchine representations. We also show that H and Q are Pick functions in each symmetric polynomial variable separately. Furthermore, we see that H and the intrinsically quantum informational quantity Q become surprisingly closely related in functional form, suggesting a special significance for the symmetric polynomials in quantum information theory. Using the symmetric polynomials, we also derive a series of further properties of H and Q.

  12. Large negative numbers in number theory, thermodynamics, information theory, and human thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2016-10-01

    We show how the abstract analytic number theory of Maier, Postnikov, and others can be extended to include negative numbers and apply this to thermodynamics, information theory, and human thermodynamics. In particular, we introduce a certain large number N 0 on the "zero level" with a high multiplicity number q i ≫ 1 related to the physical concept of gap in the spectrum. We introduce a general notion of "hole," similar to the Dirac hole in physics, in the theory. We also consider analogs of thermodynamical notions in human thermodynamics, in particular, in connection with the role of the individual in history.

  13. Entropy and information causality in general probabilistic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Barrett, Jonathan; Orloff Clark, Lisa; Leifer, Matthew; Spekkens, Robert; Stepanik, Nicholas; Wilce, Alex; Wilke, Robin

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the concept of entropy in probabilistic theories more general than quantum mechanics, with particular reference to the notion of information causality (IC) recently proposed by Pawlowski et al (2009 arXiv:0905.2292). We consider two entropic quantities, which we term measurement and mixing entropy. In the context of classical and quantum theory, these coincide, being given by the Shannon and von Neumann entropies, respectively; in general, however, they are very different. In particular, while measurement entropy is easily seen to be concave, mixing entropy need not be. In fact, as we show, mixing entropy is not concave whenever the state space is a non-simplicial polytope. Thus, the condition that measurement and mixing entropies coincide is a strong constraint on possible theories. We call theories with this property monoentropic. Measurement entropy is subadditive, but not in general strongly subadditive. Equivalently, if we define the mutual information between two systems A and B by the usual formula I(A: B)=H(A)+H(B)-H(AB), where H denotes the measurement entropy and AB is a non-signaling composite of A and B, then it can happen that I(A:BC)theory in which measurement entropy is strongly subadditive, and also satisfies a version of the Holevo bound, is informationally causal, and on the other hand we observe that Popescu-Rohrlich boxes, which violate IC, also violate strong subadditivity. We also explore the interplay between measurement and mixing entropy and various natural conditions on theories that arise in quantum axiomatics.

  14. Creating Possible Selves: Information Disclosure Behaviour on Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigates the creation of alternative identities or possible selves on social networks by examining self-presentation and self-disclosure as elements of the information disclosure behaviour of Facebook users. Method. An online questionnaire was distributed amongst library and information science students at Bar-Ilan…

  15. Museum Information Networks. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenhall, Robert G.

    Several museum information processing systems are discussed in relation to their underlying assumptions regarding museum information and networking needs that have resulted in inadequate service to some kinds of museums, particularly historical museums. Rather than any of these systems, a modular approach is proposed that would allow each museum…

  16. Temporal variability of the optimal monitoring setup assessed using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahle, Marcus; Hohenbrink, Tobias L.; Dietrich, Ottfried; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    Hydrology is rich in methods that use information theory to evaluate monitoring networks. Yet in most existing studies, only the available data set as a whole is used, which neglects the intraannual variability of the hydrological system. In this paper, we demonstrate how this variability can be considered by extending monitoring evaluation to subsets of the available data. Therefore, we separately evaluated time windows of fixed length, which were shifted through the data set, and successively extended time windows. We used basic information theory measures and a greedy ranking algorithm based on the criterion of maximum information/minimum redundancy. The network investigated monitored surface and groundwater levels at quarter-hourly intervals and was located at an artificially drained lowland site in the Spreewald region in north-east Germany. The results revealed that some of the monitoring stations were of value permanently while others were needed only temporally. The prevailing meteorological conditions, particularly the amount of precipitation, affected the degree of similarity between the water levels measured. The hydrological system tended to act more individually during periods of no or little rainfall. The optimal monitoring setup, its stability, and the monitoring effort necessary were influenced by the meteorological forcing. Altogether, the methodology presented can help achieve a monitoring network design that has a more even performance or covers the conditions of interest (e.g., floods or droughts) best.

  17. Information Specialists Supporting Learning in the Networked Environment: A Review of Trends and Issues in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Philippa

    2000-01-01

    Information specialists have an educational role to play in networked learner support. Information intermediaries must explore new perspectives on their professional roles, extend knowledge of educational theory and technology, and develop skills in multidisciplinary teamwork and change agency. (Contains 103 references.) (SK)

  18. What Information Theory Says about Bounded Rational Best Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Probability Collectives (PC) provides the information-theoretic extension of conventional full-rationality game theory to bounded rational games. Here an explicit solution to the equations giving the bounded rationality equilibrium of a game is presented. Then PC is used to investigate games in which the players use bounded rational best-response strategies. Next it is shown that in the continuum-time limit, bounded rational best response games result in a variant of the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory. It is then shown that for team (shared-payoff) games, this variant of replicator dynamics is identical to Newton-Raphson iterative optimization of the shared utility function.

  19. Smooth information flow in temperature climate network reflects mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    A directed climate network is constructed by Granger causality analysis of air temperature time series from a regular grid covering the whole Earth. Using winner-takes-all network thresholding approach, a structure of a smooth information flow is revealed, hidden to previous studies. The relevance of this observation is confirmed by comparison with the air mass transfer defined by the wind field. Their close relation illustrates that although the information transferred due to the causal influence is not a physical quantity, the information transfer is tied to the transfer of mass and energy.

  20. Reference Service in the Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Charles A.

    Reference service is defined as the mediation by a librarian between the need structures of users and the structures of information resources. The general process by which reference librarians accomplish this is outlined as including the phases of question clarification, question translation, search strategy formulation, search execution, delivery…

  1. A Kansas Integrated Commercialization Information Network (KICIN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambler, C.; And Others

    A consortium of Kansas economic development service providers is building a web of virtual satellite offices that will demonstrate the delivery of economic development services in all areas of Kansas. These "offices" will use the Internet and a novel information delivery system to reach small and medium-sized businesses and individuals…

  2. Informant Accuracy in Social Network Data II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, H. Russell; Killworth, Peter D.

    1977-01-01

    Repeats an earlier study by the authors concerning informants' ability to report their communication accurately and confirms results indicating that people do not know those with whom they communicate. Expands the original experimental design and offers recommendations for future research. (MH)

  3. Preventing Terrorism Using Information Sharing Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    in fusing information and providing valuable intelligence that thwarted a terrorist attack at Disneyland . A videotape was received that contained a...creditable threat of a Sarin gas attack at Disneyland . The LA TEW conducted the initial analysis of the tape and the initial investigation that

  4. Design of surface-water data networks for regional information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, Marshall E.; Gilroy, E.J.; Tasker, Gary D.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a technique, Network Analysis of Regional Information (NARI), and the existing computer procedures that have been developed for the specification of the regional information-cost relation for several statistical parameters of streamflow. The measure of information used is the true standard error of estimate of a regional logarithmic regression. The cost is a function of the number of stations at which hydrologic data are collected and the number of years for which the data are collected. The technique can be used to obtain either (1) a minimum cost network that will attain a prespecified accuracy and reliability or (2) a network that maximizes information given a set of budgetary and time constraints.

  5. Enhancing topology adaptation in information-sharing social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimini, Giulio; Chen, Duanbing; Medo, Matúš; Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

    2012-04-01

    The advent of the Internet and World Wide Web has led to unprecedent growth of the information available. People usually face the information overload by following a limited number of sources which best fit their interests. It has thus become important to address issues like who gets followed and how to allow people to discover new and better information sources. In this paper we conduct an empirical analysis of different online social networking sites and draw inspiration from its results to present different source selection strategies in an adaptive model for social recommendation. We show that local search rules which enhance the typical topological features of real social communities give rise to network configurations that are globally optimal. These rules create networks which are effective in information diffusion and resemble structures resulting from real social systems.

  6. Diffusion processes of fragmentary information on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xun; Cao, Lang

    2016-05-01

    Compartmental models of diffusion over contact networks have proven representative of real-life propagation phenomena among interacting individuals. However, there is a broad class of collective spreading mechanisms departing from compartmental representations, including those for diffusive objects capable of fragmentation and transmission unnecessarily as a whole. Here, we consider a continuous-state susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model as an ideal limit-case of diffusion processes of fragmentary information on networks, where individuals possess fractions of the information content and update them by selectively exchanging messages with partners in the vicinity. Specifically, we incorporate local information, such as neighbors' node degrees and carried contents, into the individual partner choice, and examine the roles of a variety of such strategies in the information diffusion process, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Our method provides an effective and flexible route of modulating continuous-state diffusion dynamics on networks and has potential in a wide array of practical applications.

  7. How multiple social networks affect user awareness: The information diffusion process in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weihua; Tang, Shaoting; Fang, Wenyi; Guo, Quantong; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-10-01

    The information diffusion process in single complex networks has been extensively studied, especially for modeling the spreading activities in online social networks. However, individuals usually use multiple social networks at the same time, and can share the information they have learned from one social network to another. This phenomenon gives rise to a new diffusion process on multiplex networks with more than one network layer. In this paper we account for this multiplex network spreading by proposing a model of information diffusion in two-layer multiplex networks. We develop a theoretical framework using bond percolation and cascading failure to describe the intralayer and interlayer diffusion. This allows us to obtain analytical solutions for the fraction of informed individuals as a function of transmissibility T and the interlayer transmission rate θ . Simulation results show that interaction between layers can greatly enhance the information diffusion process. And explosive diffusion can occur even if the transmissibility of the focal layer is under the critical threshold, due to interlayer transmission.

  8. How multiple social networks affect user awareness: The information diffusion process in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihua; Tang, Shaoting; Fang, Wenyi; Guo, Quantong; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-10-01

    The information diffusion process in single complex networks has been extensively studied, especially for modeling the spreading activities in online social networks. However, individuals usually use multiple social networks at the same time, and can share the information they have learned from one social network to another. This phenomenon gives rise to a new diffusion process on multiplex networks with more than one network layer. In this paper we account for this multiplex network spreading by proposing a model of information diffusion in two-layer multiplex networks. We develop a theoretical framework using bond percolation and cascading failure to describe the intralayer and interlayer diffusion. This allows us to obtain analytical solutions for the fraction of informed individuals as a function of transmissibility T and the interlayer transmission rate θ. Simulation results show that interaction between layers can greatly enhance the information diffusion process. And explosive diffusion can occur even if the transmissibility of the focal layer is under the critical threshold, due to interlayer transmission.

  9. Transportation and dynamic networks: Models, theory, and applications to supply chains, electric power, and financial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zugang

    Network systems, including transportation and logistic systems, electric power generation and distribution networks as well as financial networks, provide the critical infrastructure for the functioning of our societies and economies. The understanding of the dynamic behavior of such systems is also crucial to national security and prosperity. The identification of new connections between distinct network systems is the inspiration for the research in this dissertation. In particular, I answer two questions raised by Beckmann, McGuire, and Winsten (1956) and Copeland (1952) over half a century ago, which are, respectively, how are electric power flows related to transportation flows and does money flow like water or electricity? In addition, in this dissertation, I achieve the following: (1) I establish the relationships between transportation networks and three other classes of complex network systems: supply chain networks, electric power generation and transmission networks, and financial networks with intermediation. The establishment of such connections provides novel theoretical insights as well as new pricing mechanisms, and efficient computational methods. (2) I develop new modeling frameworks based on evolutionary variational inequality theory that capture the dynamics of such network systems in terms of the time-varying flows and incurred costs, prices, and, where applicable, profits. This dissertation studies the dynamics of such network systems by addressing both internal competition and/or cooperation, and external changes, such as varying costs and demands. (3) I focus, in depth, on electric power supply chains. By exploiting the relationships between transportation networks and electric power supply chains, I develop a large-scale network model that integrates electric power supply chains and fuel supply markets. The model captures both the economic transactions as well as the physical transmission constraints. The model is then applied to the New

  10. Ranking streamflow model performance based on Information theory metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Gonzalo; Pachepsky, Yakov; Pan, Feng; Wagener, Thorsten; Nicholson, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy-based model performance metrics not necessarily reflect the qualitative correspondence between simulated and measured streamflow time series. The objective of this work was to use the information theory-based metrics to see whether they can be used as complementary tool for hydrologic model evaluation and selection. We simulated 10-year streamflow time series in five watersheds located in Texas, North Carolina, Mississippi, and West Virginia. Eight model of different complexity were applied. The information-theory based metrics were obtained after representing the time series as strings of symbols where different symbols corresponded to different quantiles of the probability distribution of streamflow. The symbol alphabet was used. Three metrics were computed for those strings - mean information gain that measures the randomness of the signal, effective measure complexity that characterizes predictability and fluctuation complexity that characterizes the presence of a pattern in the signal. The observed streamflow time series has smaller information content and larger complexity metrics than the precipitation time series. Watersheds served as information filters and and streamflow time series were less random and more complex than the ones of precipitation. This is reflected the fact that the watershed acts as the information filter in the hydrologic conversion process from precipitation to streamflow. The Nash Sutcliffe efficiency metric increased as the complexity of models increased, but in many cases several model had this efficiency values not statistically significant from each other. In such cases, ranking models by the closeness of the information-theory based parameters in simulated and measured streamflow time series can provide an additional criterion for the evaluation of hydrologic model performance.

  11. Mean-field theory of assortative networks of phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Ott, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Employing the Kuramoto model as an illustrative example, we show how the use of the mean-field approximation can be applied to large networks of phase oscillators with assortativity. We then use the ansatz of Ott and Antonsen (Chaos, 19 (2008) 037113) to reduce the mean-field kinetic equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. The resulting formulation is illustrated by application to a network Kuramoto problem with degree assortativity and correlation between the node degrees and the natural oscillation frequencies. Good agreement is found between the solutions of the reduced set of ordinary differential equations obtained from our theory and full simulations of the system. These results highlight the ability of our method to capture all the phase transitions (bifurcations) and system attractors. One interesting result is that degree assortativity can induce transitions from a steady macroscopic state to a temporally oscillating macroscopic state through both (presumed) Hopf and SNIPER (saddle-node, infinite period) bifurcations. Possible use of these techniques to a broad class of phase oscillator network problems is discussed.

  12. Scalable Networked Information Processing Environment (SNIPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Fagg, G.E.; Moore, K.; Dongarra, J.J. |; Geist, A.

    1997-11-01

    SNIPE is a metacomputing system that aims to provide a reliable, secure, fault tolerant environment for long term distributed computing applications and data stores across the global Internet. This system combines global naming and replication of both processing and data to support large scale information processing applications leading to better availability and reliability than currently available with typical cluster computing and/or distributed computer environments.

  13. [The problem of information value in microvascular networks].

    PubMed

    Krupatkin, A I

    2011-01-01

    The methodology of quantitative estimation of information value in microvascular networks is proposed for the first time with the use of wavelet analysis of skin blood flow oscillations registrated by laser Doppler flowmetry at 30 healthy persons and 56 patients after hand injuries and diseases. It includes calculation of relative indices for the information preservation, the predomination of preserved information and the efficacy of information. The most deviation from multistable information regimen happened after formation of resonance oscillations: the general quantity of information decreased but the preservation of predominated information increased. The preservation of trophic myogenic information predominated after reduction of sympathetic influences. With the increase in the number of information channels the quantity of information increased but its preservation varied. Sensory peptidergic nerve fibres were activated during local heating to 34 degrees C at dorsal forearm skin. This information was the most effective at the beginning of heating during the growth of blood flow to the plateau level. Blood flow oscillations represented in wavelet spectrum serve as operators build on the basis of effective information. These oscillations play not only hemodynamic role but are the bearers of information in microvascular networks.

  14. Robust Classification of Information Networks by Consistent Graph Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Shi; Han, Jiawei; Gu, Quanquan

    2015-09-01

    Graph regularization-based methods have achieved great success for network classification by making the label-link consistency assumption, i.e., if two nodes are linked together, they are likely to belong to the same class. However, in a real-world network, there exist links that connect nodes of different classes. These inconsistent links raise a big challenge for graph regularization and deteriorate the classification performance significantly. To address this problem, we propose a novel algorithm, namely Consistent Graph Learning, which is robust to the inconsistent links of a network. In particular, given a network and a small number of labeled nodes, we aim at learning a consistent network with more consistent and fewer inconsistent links than the original network. Since the link information of a network is naturally represented by a set of relation matrices, the learning of a consistent network is reduced to learning consistent relation matrices under some constraints. More specifically, we achieve it by joint graph regularization on the nuclear norm minimization of consistent relation matrices together with ℓ1-norm minimization on the difference matrices between the original relation matrices and the learned consistent ones subject to certain constraints. Experiments on both homogeneous and heterogeneous network datasets show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  15. A survey on fuzzy theory applied in geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feiquan; Cui, Weihong; Chen, Houwu

    2009-10-01

    The real world is an infinite complex and very huge systems, the phenomenon and processes in this world have many complex relations among them. It is consecutive and cannot be treated as a determined one as the traditional geographic information system does; What's more, the uncertainty and fuzziness exist in every stage of data processing of GIS, from data collection, data storage to data analysis etc, so it is very meaningful to apply fuzzy theory in GIS for its ability to handle fuzziness and uncertainty of spatial data. The paper talks about the current situation of fuzzy theory applied in GIS, including the classification of application fields, its main methods, principles etc. The detailed fields we concerned include spatial object modeling, spatial reasoning, spatial analysis, spatial data mining, and reliability analysis of GIS data and so on. Furthermore, we put forward some development foregrounds and research orientations of fuzzy theory applied in GIS.

  16. Maximum information entropy: a foundation for ecological theory.

    PubMed

    Harte, John; Newman, Erica A

    2014-07-01

    The maximum information entropy (MaxEnt) principle is a successful method of statistical inference that has recently been applied to ecology. Here, we show how MaxEnt can accurately predict patterns such as species-area relationships (SARs) and abundance distributions in macroecology and be a foundation for ecological theory. We discuss the conceptual foundation of the principle, why it often produces accurate predictions of probability distributions in science despite not incorporating explicit mechanisms, and how mismatches between predictions and data can shed light on driving mechanisms in ecology. We also review possible future extensions of the maximum entropy theory of ecology (METE), a potentially important foundation for future developments in ecological theory.

  17. Scalable Hierarchical Network Management System for Displaying Network Information in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jude (Inventor); Schlecht, Leslie (Inventor); McCabe, James D. (Inventor); LeKashman, John Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A network management system has SNMP agents distributed at one or more sites, an input output module at each site, and a server module located at a selected site for communicating with input output modules, each of which is configured for both SNMP and HNMP communications. The server module is configured exclusively for HNMP communications, and it communicates with each input output module according to the HNMP. Non-iconified, informationally complete views are provided of network elements to aid in network management.

  18. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    PubMed

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  19. Models, Entropy and Information of Temporal Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

    Temporal social networks are characterized by heterogeneous duration of contacts, which can either follow a power-law distribution, such as in face-to-face interactions, or a Weibull distribution, such as in mobile-phone communication. Here we model the dynamics of face-to-face interaction and mobile phone communication by a reinforcement dynamics, which explains the data observed in these different types of social interactions. We quantify the information encoded in the dynamics of these networks by the entropy of temporal networks. Finally, we show evidence that human dynamics is able to modulate the information present in social network dynamics when it follows circadian rhythms and when it is interfacing with a new technology such as the mobile-phone communication technology.

  20. Morphological brain network assessed using graph theory and network filtration in deaf adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Hyekyoung; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Suh, Myung-Whan; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ha; Lee, Dong Soo

    2014-09-01

    Prolonged deprivation of auditory input can change brain networks in pre- and postlingual deaf adults by brain-wide reorganization. To investigate morphological changes in these brains voxel-based morphometry, voxel-wise correlation with the primary auditory cortex, and whole brain network analyses using morphological covariance were performed in eight prelingual deaf, eleven postlingual deaf, and eleven hearing adults. Network characteristics based on graph theory and network filtration based on persistent homology were examined. Gray matter density in the primary auditor cortex was preserved in prelingual deafness, while it tended to decrease in postlingual deafness. Unlike postlingual, prelingual deafness showed increased bilateral temporal connectivity of the primary auditory cortex compared to the hearing adults. Of the graph theory-based characteristics, clustering coefficient, betweenness centrality, and nodal efficiency all increased in prelingual deafness, while all the parameters of postlingual deafness were similar to the hearing adults. Patterns of connected components changing during network filtration were different between prelingual deafness and hearing adults according to the barcode, dendrogram, and single linkage matrix representations, while these were the same in postlingual deafness. Nodes in fronto-limbic and left temporal components were closely coupled, and nodes in the temporo-parietal component were loosely coupled, in prelingual deafness. Patterns of connected components changing in postlingual deafness were the same as hearing adults. We propose that the preserved density of auditory cortex associated with increased connectivity in prelingual deafness, and closer coupling between certain brain areas, represent distinctive reorganization of auditory and related cortices compared with hearing or postlingual deaf adults. The differential network reorganization in the prelingual deaf adults could be related to the absence of auditory speech

  1. Integrating network structure and dynamic information for better routing strategy on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-Gai; Wong, Eric W. M.; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2009-06-01

    We study information packet routing processes on scale-free networks by mimicking the Internet traffic delivery strategies. We incorporate both the global network structure information and local queuing information in the dynamic processes. We propose several new routing strategies to guide the packet routing. The performance of the routing strategies is measured by the average transit time of the packets as well as their dependence on the traffic amount. We find that the routing strategies which integrate both global network structure information and local dynamic information perform much better than the traditional shortest-path routing protocol which takes into account only the global topological information. Moreover, from comparative studies of these routing strategies, we observe that some of our proposed methods can decrease the average transit time of packets but the performance is closely dependent on the total amount of traffic while some other proposed methods can have good performance independent of the total amount of traffic with hyper-excellent average transit time of packets. Also, numerical results show that our proposed methods integrating network structure information and local dynamic information can work much better than the methods recently proposed in [S. Sreenivasan, R. Cohen, E. López, Z. Toroczkai, H.E. Stanley, Phys. Rev. E 75 (2007) 036105, Zhi-Xi Wu, Gang Peng, Eric W.M. Wong, Kai-Hau Yeung, J. Stat. Mech. (2008) P11002.], which only considered network structure information.

  2. Constructing gene co-expression networks and predicting functions of unknown genes by random matrix theory

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhong, Jianxin; Gao, Haichun; Khan, Latifur; Thompson, Dorothea K; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    Background Large-scale sequencing of entire genomes has ushered in a new age in biology. One of the next grand challenges is to dissect the cellular networks consisting of many individual functional modules. Defining co-expression networks without ambiguity based on genome-wide microarray data is difficult and current methods are not robust and consistent with different data sets. This is particularly problematic for little understood organisms since not much existing biological knowledge can be exploited for determining the threshold to differentiate true correlation from random noise. Random matrix theory (RMT), which has been widely and successfully used in physics, is a powerful approach to distinguish system-specific, non-random properties embedded in complex systems from random noise. Here, we have hypothesized that the universal predictions of RMT are also applicable to biological systems and the correlation threshold can be determined by characterizing the correlation matrix of microarray profiles using random matrix theory. Results Application of random matrix theory to microarray data of S. oneidensis, E. coli, yeast, A. thaliana, Drosophila, mouse and human indicates that there is a sharp transition of nearest neighbour spacing distribution (NNSD) of correlation matrix after gradually removing certain elements insider the matrix. Testing on an in silico modular model has demonstrated that this transition can be used to determine the correlation threshold for revealing modular co-expression networks. The co-expression network derived from yeast cell cycling microarray data is supported by gene annotation. The topological properties of the resulting co-expression network agree well with the general properties of biological networks. Computational evaluations have showed that RMT approach is sensitive and robust. Furthermore, evaluation on sampled expression data of an in silico modular gene system has showed that under-sampled expressions do not affect the

  3. Information theory, animal communication, and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Laurance R.; McCowan, Brenda; Johnston, Simon; Hanser, Sean F.

    2011-02-01

    We present ongoing research in the application of information theory to animal communication systems with the goal of developing additional detectors and estimators for possible extraterrestrial intelligent signals. Regardless of the species, for intelligence (i.e., complex knowledge) to be transmitted certain rules of information theory must still be obeyed. We demonstrate some preliminary results of applying information theory to socially complex marine mammal species (bottlenose dolphins and humpback whales) as well as arboreal squirrel monkeys, because they almost exclusively rely on vocal signals for their communications, producing signals which can be readily characterized by signal analysis. Metrics such as Zipf's Law and higher-order information-entropic structure are emerging as indicators of the communicative complexity characteristic of an "intelligent message" content within these animals' signals, perhaps not surprising given these species' social complexity. In addition to human languages, for comparison we also apply these metrics to pulsar signals—perhaps (arguably) the most "organized" of stellar systems—as an example of astrophysical systems that would have to be distinguished from an extraterrestrial intelligence message by such information theoretic filters. We also look at a message transmitted from Earth (Arecibo Observatory) that contains a lot of meaning but little information in the mathematical sense we define it here. We conclude that the study of non-human communication systems on our own planet can make a valuable contribution to the detection of extraterrestrial intelligence by providing quantitative general measures of communicative complexity. Studying the complex communication systems of other intelligent species on our own planet may also be one of the best ways to deprovincialize our thinking about extraterrestrial communication systems in general.

  4. Lattice gauge theory simulations in the quantum information era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmonte, M.; Montangero, S.

    2016-07-01

    The many-body problem is ubiquitous in the theoretical description of physical phenomena, ranging from the behaviour of elementary particles to the physics of electrons in solids. Most of our understanding of many-body systems comes from analysing the symmetric properties of Hamiltonian and states: the most striking examples are gauge theories such as quantum electrodynamics, where a local symmetry strongly constrains the microscopic dynamics. The physics of such gauge theories is relevant for the understanding of a diverse set of systems, including frustrated quantum magnets and the collective dynamics of elementary particles within the standard model. In the last few years, several approaches have been put forward to tackle the complex dynamics of gauge theories using quantum information concepts. In particular, quantum simulation platforms have been put forward for the realisation of synthetic gauge theories, and novel classical simulation algorithms based on quantum information concepts have been formulated. In this review, we present an introduction to these approaches, illustrating the basics concepts and highlighting the connections between apparently very different fields, and report the recent developments in this new thriving field of research.

  5. Dynamic Spectrum Sharing with Limited Network State Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    possibly different) messages to a set of mobile receivers . We have studied limited feedback schemes for both single-user Orthogonal Frequency...in which the broadcast node sequentially receives feedback from the mobiles and decides when to stop receiving additional feedback and begin data...concerned with the costs and benefits of learning and exchanging Network State Information (NSI) among cooperative nodes in a wireless network. NSI

  6. Using complex networks towards information retrieval and diagnostics in multidimensional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Soumya Jyoti; Azharuddin, Mohammad; Sen, Debanjan; Savale, Smruti; Datta, Himadri; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Roy, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    We present a fresh and broad yet simple approach towards information retrieval in general and diagnostics in particular by applying the theory of complex networks on multidimensional, dynamic images. We demonstrate a successful use of our method with the time series generated from high content thermal imaging videos of patients suffering from the aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) disease. Remarkably, network analyses of thermal imaging time series of contact lens users and patients upon whom Laser-Assisted in situ Keratomileusis (Lasik) surgery has been conducted, exhibit pronounced similarity with results obtained from ADDE patients. We also propose a general framework for the transformation of multidimensional images to networks for futuristic biometry. Our approach is general and scalable to other fluctuation-based devices where network parameters derived from fluctuations, act as effective discriminators and diagnostic markers. PMID:26626047

  7. Using complex networks towards information retrieval and diagnostics in multidimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Soumya Jyoti; Azharuddin, Mohammad; Sen, Debanjan; Savale, Smruti; Datta, Himadri; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Roy, Soumen

    2015-12-01

    We present a fresh and broad yet simple approach towards information retrieval in general and diagnostics in particular by applying the theory of complex networks on multidimensional, dynamic images. We demonstrate a successful use of our method with the time series generated from high content thermal imaging videos of patients suffering from the aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) disease. Remarkably, network analyses of thermal imaging time series of contact lens users and patients upon whom Laser-Assisted in situ Keratomileusis (Lasik) surgery has been conducted, exhibit pronounced similarity with results obtained from ADDE patients. We also propose a general framework for the transformation of multidimensional images to networks for futuristic biometry. Our approach is general and scalable to other fluctuation-based devices where network parameters derived from fluctuations, act as effective discriminators and diagnostic markers.

  8. Russian and Chinese Information Warfare: Theory and Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Integral neurolinguistic programming •Placing essential programs into the conscious or sub- conscious mind •Subconscious suggestions that modify human...Generators of special rays •Optical systems • Neurolinguistic programming •Computer psychotechnology •The mass media •Audiovisual effects •Special effects...Information Warfare: Theory and Practice 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  9. Generalised squeezing and information theory approach to quantum entanglement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vourdas, A.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the usual one- and two-mode squeezing are based on reducible representations of the SU(1,1) group. Generalized squeezing is introduced with the use of different SU(1,1) rotations on each irreducible sector. Two-mode squeezing entangles the modes and information theory methods are used to study this entanglement. The entanglement of three modes is also studied with the use of the strong subadditivity property of the entropy.

  10. Use of information theory to study genome sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Masanori; Sato, Keiko

    2000-12-01

    The genome sequence carries information about life as an order of four bases. It is considered that this order indicates a special code structure. In this paper we discuss how the mutual entropy, the main concept in Shannon's communication theory, can be used to study genome sequences, and how a measure introduced in our previous paper [10] for the analysis of similarities of code structures is applied for examining the coding structure of several species, in particular, HIV-1.

  11. Information theory, atoms in molecules, and molecular similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajski, Roman F.; Parr, Robert G.

    2000-08-01

    Using information theory, it is argued that from among possible definitions of what an atom is when it is in a molecule, a particular one merits special attention. Namely, it is the atom defined by the "stockholders partitioning" of a molecule invented by Hirshfeld [(1977) Theor. Chim. Acta 44, 129]. The theoretical tool used is the minimum entropy deficiency principle (minimum missing information principle) of Kullback and Liebler [(1951) Ann. Math. Stat. 22, 79]. A corresponding analysis is given of the problem of assessing similarity between molecules or pieces of molecules.

  12. Reservation information sharing enhancement for deflection routing in OBS network.

    PubMed

    Gao, Donghui; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2005-03-07

    The resource contention problem is critical in Just-Enough-Time (JET) based optical burst switching (OBS) networks. Although deflection routing (DR) reduces the contention probability in some degree, it does not give much improvement under heavy traffic load. This paper analyzed the inducement causing contention in OBS networks, and proposed Resource Information Sharing Enhancement (RISE) scheme. Theoretical analysis shows that this scheme achieves shorter length of the detour path than normal DR. We simulated this scheme on both full mesh network and practical 14-node NSFNET. The simulation results show that it gives at best 2 orders magnitude improvement in reducing the burst contention probability over its previous routing approaches.

  13. Gravity effects on information filtering and network evolving.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Chen, Lingjiao; Liu, Chuang; Yang, Chengcheng; Wang, Xueqi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on the gravity principle of classical physics, we propose a tunable gravity-based model, which considers tag usage pattern to weigh both the mass and distance of network nodes. We then apply this model in solving the problems of information filtering and network evolving. Experimental results on two real-world data sets, Del.icio.us and MovieLens, show that it can not only enhance the algorithmic performance, but can also better characterize the properties of real networks. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the effect of gravity model.

  14. Enhanced reliable transmission control protocol for spatial information networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhihong; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Junfeng

    2009-12-01

    Satellites channels are generally featured by high bit error rate (BER), long propagation delay, large bandwidth-delay product (BDP) and so on. This tends to make the traditional TCP suffer from serious performance degradation in satellite networks. Therefore, a TCP-compatible reliable transmission protocol (i.e., TCP-AX) for spatial information networks is proposed in this paper. And a bandwidth probing mechanism is designed to distinguish network congestion and link error. Simulation results show that TCP-AX has better performance than some popular enhanced TCP protocols.

  15. Algorithmic information theory and the hidden variable question

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    The admissibility of certain nonlocal hidden-variable theories are explained via information theory. Consider a pair of Stern-Gerlach devices with fixed nonparallel orientations that periodically perform spin measurements on identically prepared pairs of electrons in the singlet spin state. Suppose the outcomes are recorded as binary strings l and r (with l sub n and r sub n denoting their n-length prefixes). The hidden-variable theories considered here require that there exists a recursive function which may be used to transform l sub n into r sub n for any n. This note demonstrates that such a theory cannot reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics. Specifically, consider an ensemble of outcome pairs (l,r). From the associated probability measure, the Shannon entropies H sub n and H bar sub n for strings l sub n and pairs (l sub n, r sub n) may be formed. It is shown that such a theory requires that the absolute value of H bar sub n - H sub n be bounded - contrasting the quantum mechanical prediction that it grow with n.

  16. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 6: Networking and Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Six papers and two abstracts of papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on networking and telecommunications issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "Looking to the Year 2000: Alternatives in Campus Data Networking" (Noam H. Artz and Daniel A. Updegrove),…

  17. Telecommunications Information Network: A Model for On-Demand Transfer of Medical Information. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzi, Nancy M.; And Others

    This report describes and evaluates the first year of a demonstration project to develop an on-demand telecommunications network linking four remote hospitals in southwestern Ohio to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. The Telecommunications Information Network (TIN) is designed to allow health care professionals at those hospitals to…

  18. Information flow in layered networks of non-monotonic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittler Neves, Fabio; Martim Schubert, Benno; Erichsen, Rubem, Jr.

    2015-07-01

    Layered neural networks are feedforward structures that yield robust parallel and distributed pattern recognition. Even though much attention has been paid to pattern retrieval properties in such systems, many aspects of their dynamics are not yet well characterized or understood. In this work we study, at different temperatures, the memory activity and information flows through layered networks in which the elements are the simplest binary odd non-monotonic function. Our results show that, considering a standard Hebbian learning approach, the network information content has its maximum always at the monotonic limit, even though the maximum memory capacity can be found at non-monotonic values for small enough temperatures. Furthermore, we show that such systems exhibit rich macroscopic dynamics, including not only fixed point solutions of its iterative map, but also cyclic and chaotic attractors that also carry information.

  19. Shifts in the architecture of the Nationwide Health Information Network.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Leslie; Sundwall, David; Lenert, Michael Edward

    2012-01-01

    In the midst of a US $30 billion USD investment in the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) and electronic health records systems, a significant change in the architecture of the NwHIN is taking place. Prior to 2010, the focus of information exchange in the NwHIN was the Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO). Since 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has been sponsoring policies that promote an internet-like architecture that encourages point to-point information exchange and private health information exchange networks. The net effect of these activities is to undercut the limited business model for RHIOs, decreasing the likelihood of their success, while making the NwHIN dependent on nascent technologies for community level functions such as record locator services. These changes may impact the health of patients and communities. Independent, scientifically focused debate is needed on the wisdom of ONC's proposed changes in its strategy for the NwHIN.

  20. Interspecific social networks promote information transmission in wild songbirds.

    PubMed

    Farine, Damien R; Aplin, Lucy M; Sheldon, Ben C; Hoppitt, William

    2015-03-22

    Understanding the functional links between social structure and population processes is a central aim of evolutionary ecology. Multiple types of interactions can be represented by networks drawn for the same population, such as kinship, dominance or affiliative networks, but the relative importance of alternative networks in modulating population processes may not be clear. We illustrate this problem, and a solution, by developing a framework for testing the importance of different types of association in facilitating the transmission of information. We apply this framework to experimental data from wild songbirds that form mixed-species flocks, recording the arrival (patch discovery) of individuals to novel foraging sites. We tested whether intraspecific and interspecific social networks predicted the spread of information about novel food sites, and found that both contributed to transmission. The likelihood of acquiring information per unit of connection to knowledgeable individuals increased 22-fold for conspecifics, and 12-fold for heterospecifics. We also found that species varied in how much information they produced, suggesting that some species play a keystone role in winter foraging flocks. More generally, these analyses demonstrate that this method provides a powerful approach, using social networks to quantify the relative transmission rates across different social relationships.

  1. Dynamics of sensory thalamocortical synaptic networks during information processing states.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A

    2004-11-01

    The thalamocortical network consists of the pathways that interconnect the thalamus and neocortex, including thalamic sensory afferents, corticothalamic and thalamocortical pathways. These pathways are essential to acquire, analyze, store and retrieve sensory information. However, sensory information processing mostly occurs during behavioral arousal, when activity in thalamus and neocortex consists of an electrographic sign of low amplitude fast activity, known as activation, which is caused by several neuromodulator systems that project to the thalamocortical network. Logically, in order to understand how the thalamocortical network processes sensory information it is essential to study its response properties during states of activation. This paper reviews the temporal and spatial response properties of synaptic pathways in the whisker thalamocortical network of rodents during activated states as compared to quiescent (non-activated) states. The evidence shows that these pathways are differentially regulated via the effects of neuromodulators as behavioral contingencies demand. Thus, during activated states, the temporal and spatial response properties of pathways in the thalamocortical network are transformed to allow the processing of sensory information.

  2. Robustness and information propagation in attractors of Random Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Gupta, Abhishekh; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-01-01

    Attractors represent the long-term behaviors of Random Boolean Networks. We study how the amount of information propagated between the nodes when on an attractor, as quantified by the average pairwise mutual information (I(A)), relates to the robustness of the attractor to perturbations (R(A)). We find that the dynamical regime of the network affects the relationship between I(A) and R(A). In the ordered and chaotic regimes, I(A) is anti-correlated with R(A), implying that attractors that are highly robust to perturbations have necessarily limited information propagation. Between order and chaos (for so-called "critical" networks) these quantities are uncorrelated. Finite size effects cause this behavior to be visible for a range of networks, from having a sensitivity of 1 to the point where I(A) is maximized. In this region, the two quantities are weakly correlated and attractors can be almost arbitrarily robust to perturbations without restricting the propagation of information in the network.

  3. Information and entropy in neural networks and interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafee, Fariel

    In this dissertation we present a study of certain characteristics of interacting systems that are related to information. The first is periodicity, correlation and other information-related properties of neural networks of integrate-and-fire type. We also form quasiclassical and quantum generalizations of such networks and identify the similarities and differences with the classical prototype. We indicate why entropy may be an important concept for a neural network and why a generalization of the definition of entropy may be required. Like neural networks, large ensembles of similar units that interact also need a generalization of classical information-theoretic concepts. We extend the concept of Shannon entropy in a novel way, which may be relevant when we have such interacting systems, and show how it differs from Shannon entropy and other generalizations, such as Tsallis entropy. We indicate how classical stochasticity may arise in interactions with an entangled environment in a quantum system in terms of Shannon's and generalized entropies and identify the differences. Such differences are also indicated in the use of certain prior probability distributions to fit data as per Bayesian rules. We also suggest possible quantum versions of pattern recognition, which is the principal goal of information processing in most neural networks.

  4. Should the model for risk-informed regulation be game theory rather than decision theory?

    PubMed

    Bier, Vicki M; Lin, Shi-Woei

    2013-02-01

    Risk analysts frequently view the regulation of risks as being largely a matter of decision theory. According to this view, risk analysis methods provide information on the likelihood and severity of various possible outcomes; this information should then be assessed using a decision-theoretic approach (such as cost/benefit analysis) to determine whether the risks are acceptable, and whether additional regulation is warranted. However, this view ignores the fact that in many industries (particularly industries that are technologically sophisticated and employ specialized risk and safety experts), risk analyses may be done by regulated firms, not by the regulator. Moreover, those firms may have more knowledge about the levels of safety at their own facilities than the regulator does. This creates a situation in which the regulated firm has both the opportunity-and often also the motive-to provide inaccurate (in particular, favorably biased) risk information to the regulator, and hence the regulator has reason to doubt the accuracy of the risk information provided by regulated parties. Researchers have argued that decision theory is capable of dealing with many such strategic interactions as well as game theory can. This is especially true in two-player, two-stage games in which the follower has a unique best strategy in response to the leader's strategy, as appears to be the case in the situation analyzed in this article. However, even in such cases, we agree with Cox that game-theoretic methods and concepts can still be useful. In particular, the tools of mechanism design, and especially the revelation principle, can simplify the analysis of such games because the revelation principle provides rigorous assurance that it is sufficient to analyze only games in which licensees truthfully report their risk levels, making the problem more manageable. Without that, it would generally be necessary to consider much more complicated forms of strategic behavior (including

  5. 47 CFR 64.2008 - Notice required for use of customer proprietary network information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network information. 64.2008 Section 64.2008 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Customer Proprietary Network Information § 64.2008 Notice required for use of customer proprietary network...

  6. Information dynamics of brain-heart physiological networks during sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faes, L.; Nollo, G.; Jurysta, F.; Marinazzo, D.

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes an integrated approach, framed in the emerging fields of network physiology and information dynamics, for the quantitative analysis of brain-heart interaction networks during sleep. With this approach, the time series of cardiac vagal autonomic activity and brain wave activities measured respectively as the normalized high frequency component of heart rate variability and the EEG power in the δ, θ, α, σ, and β bands, are considered as realizations of the stochastic processes describing the dynamics of the heart system and of different brain sub-systems. Entropy-based measures are exploited to quantify the predictive information carried by each (sub)system, and to dissect this information into a part actively stored in the system and a part transferred to it from the other connected systems. The application of this approach to polysomnographic recordings of ten healthy subjects led us to identify a structured network of sleep brain-brain and brain-heart interactions, with the node described by the β EEG power acting as a hub which conveys the largest amount of information flowing between the heart and brain nodes. This network was found to be sustained mostly by the transitions across different sleep stages, as the information transfer was weaker during specific stages than during the whole night, and vanished progressively when moving from light sleep to deep sleep and to REM sleep.

  7. Enabling information management systems in tactical network environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Marco; Uszok, Andrzej; Suri, Niranjan; Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.; Ceccio, Philip J.; Hanna, James P.; Sinclair, Asher

    2009-05-01

    Net-Centric Information Management (IM) and sharing in tactical environments promises to revolutionize forward command and control capabilities by providing ubiquitous shared situational awareness to the warfighter. This vision can be realized by leveraging the tactical and Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET) which provide the underlying communications infrastructure, but, significant technical challenges remain. Enabling information management in these highly dynamic environments will require multiple support services and protocols which are affected by, and highly dependent on, the underlying capabilities and dynamics of the tactical network infrastructure. In this paper we investigate, discuss, and evaluate the effects of realistic tactical and mobile communications network environments on mission-critical information management systems. We motivate our discussion by introducing the Advanced Information Management System (AIMS) which is targeted for deployment in tactical sensor systems. We present some operational requirements for AIMS and highlight how critical IM support services such as discovery, transport, federation, and Quality of Service (QoS) management are necessary to meet these requirements. Our goal is to provide a qualitative analysis of the impact of underlying assumptions of availability and performance of some of the critical services supporting tactical information management. We will also propose and describe a number of technologies and capabilities that have been developed to address these challenges, providing alternative approaches for transport, service discovery, and federation services for tactical networks.

  8. Temporal Evolution Of Information In Neural Networks With Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giahi Saravani, Aram; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent neural networks are pivotal for information processing in the brain. Here we analyze how the information content of a neural population is altered by dynamic feedback of a stimulus estimated from the network activity. We find that the temporal evolution of the Fisher information in the model with feedback is bounded by the Fisher information in a network of pure integrators. The available information in the feedback model saturates with a time constant and to a final level both determined by the match between the estimator weights and the feedback weights. This network then encodes signals specifically from either the beginning or the end of the stimulus presentation, depending on this match. These results are relevant to recent experimental measurements of psychophysical kernels indicating that earlier stimuli have a stronger influence on perceptual discriminations than more recent stimuli. We discuss consequences of this description for choice correlations, a measure of how individual neuronal responses relate to perceptual estimates. McNair Foundation, Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University.

  9. Unpacking complexity in public health interventions with the Actor-Network Theory.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Angèle; Potvin, Louise

    2016-08-04

    This article proposes a sociologically informed theoretical and methodological framework to address the complexity of public health interventions (PHI). It first proposes three arguments in favour of using the Actor-Network Theory (ANT) for the framework. ANT: (1) deals with systems made of human and non-human entities and proposes a relational view of action; (2) provides an understanding of the intervention-context interactions and (3) is a tool for opening the intervention's black box. Three principles derived from ANT addressing theoretical problems with conceptualisation of PHI as complex systems are proposed: (1) to focus on the process of connecting the network entities instead of their stabilised form; (2) both human and non-human entities composing networks have performative capacities and (3) network and intervention shape one another. Three methodological guidelines are further derived: (1) the researcher's task consists in documenting the events that transform the network and intervention; (2) events must be ordered chronologically to represent the intervention's evolution and (3) a broad range of data is needed to capture complex interventions' evolution. Using ANT as a guide, this paper helps reconcile technicist and social views of PHI and provides a mean to integrate process and effect studies of interventions.

  10. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate.

  11. Information Dissemination of Public Health Emergency on Social Networks and Intelligent Computation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhi; Mao, Huajuan; Hu, Xiaohua; Hu, Feng; Sun, Xuemin; Jing, Zaiping; Duan, Yunsuo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the extensive social influence, public health emergency has attracted great attention in today's society. The booming social network is becoming a main information dissemination platform of those events and caused high concerns in emergency management, among which a good prediction of information dissemination in social networks is necessary for estimating the event's social impacts and making a proper strategy. However, information dissemination is largely affected by complex interactive activities and group behaviors in social network; the existing methods and models are limited to achieve a satisfactory prediction result due to the open changeable social connections and uncertain information processing behaviors. ACP (artificial societies, computational experiments, and parallel execution) provides an effective way to simulate the real situation. In order to obtain better information dissemination prediction in social networks, this paper proposes an intelligent computation method under the framework of TDF (Theory-Data-Feedback) based on ACP simulation system which was successfully applied to the analysis of A (H1N1) Flu emergency. PMID:26609303

  12. Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior

    PubMed Central

    Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a ‘three degrees of influence’ property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations. PMID:22711416

  13. Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior.

    PubMed

    Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-20

    Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a 'three degrees of influence' property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations.

  14. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  15. Role of information theoretic uncertainty relations in quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jizba, Petr; Dunningham, Jacob A.; Joo, Jaewoo

    2015-04-15

    Uncertainty relations based on information theory for both discrete and continuous distribution functions are briefly reviewed. We extend these results to account for (differential) Rényi entropy and its related entropy power. This allows us to find a new class of information-theoretic uncertainty relations (ITURs). The potency of such uncertainty relations in quantum mechanics is illustrated with a simple two-energy-level model where they outperform both the usual Robertson–Schrödinger uncertainty relation and Shannon entropy based uncertainty relation. In the continuous case the ensuing entropy power uncertainty relations are discussed in the context of heavy tailed wave functions and Schrödinger cat states. Again, improvement over both the Robertson–Schrödinger uncertainty principle and Shannon ITUR is demonstrated in these cases. Further salient issues such as the proof of a generalized entropy power inequality and a geometric picture of information-theoretic uncertainty relations are also discussed.

  16. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells.

  17. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Onesto, Valentina; Cosentino, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cesarelli, Mario; Amato, Francesco; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect. PMID:27403421

  18. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells. PMID:26082788

  19. Informational dynamics of vasomotion in microvascular networks: a review.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, R K; Chakravarthy, V S

    2011-02-01

    Vasomotion refers to spontaneous oscillation of small vessels observed in many microvascular beds. It is an intrinsic phenomenon unrelated to cardiac rhythm or neural and hormonal regulation. Vasomotion is found to be particularly prominent under conditions of metabolic stress. In spite of a significant existent literature on vasomotion, its physiological and pathophysiological roles are not clear. It is thought that modulation of vasomotion by vasoactive substances released by metabolizing tissue plays a role in ensuring optimal delivery of nutrients to the tissue. Vasomotion rhythms exhibit a great variety of temporal patterns from regular oscillations to chaos. The nature of vasomotion rhythm is believed to be significant to its function, with chaotic vasomotion offering several physiological advantages over regular, periodic vasomotion. In this article, we emphasize that vasomotion is best understood as a network phenomenon. When there is a local metabolic demand in tissue, an ideal vascular response should extend beyond local microvasculature, with coordinated changes over multiple vascular segments. Mechanisms of information transfer over a vessel network have been discussed in the literature. The microvascular system may be regarded as a network of dynamic elements, interacting, either over the vascular anatomical network via gap junctions, or physiologically by exchange of vasoactive substances. Drawing analogies with spatiotemporal patterns in neuronal networks of central nervous system, we ask if properties like synchronization/desynchronization of vasomotors have special significance to microcirculation. Thus the contemporary literature throws up a novel view of microcirculation as a network that exhibits complex, spatiotemporal and informational dynamics.

  20. Integrated information theory of consciousness: an updated account.

    PubMed

    Tononi, G

    2012-12-01

    This article presents an updated account of integrated information theory of consciousness (liT) and some of its implications. /IT stems from thought experiments that lead to phenomenological axioms (existence, compositionality, information, integration, exclusion) and corresponding ontological postulates. The information axiom asserts that every experience is spec~fic - it is what it is by differing in its particular way from a large repertoire of alternatives. The integration axiom asserts that each experience is unified- it cannot be reduced to independent components. The exclusion axiom asserts that every experience is definite - it is limited to particular things and not others and flows at a particular speed and resolution. /IT formalizes these intuitions with postulates. The information postulate states that only "differences that make a difference" from the intrinsic perpective of a system matter: a mechanism generates cause-effect information if its present state has selective past causes and selective future effects within a system. The integration postulate states that only information that is irreducible matters: mechanisms generate integrated information only to the extent that the information they generate cannot be partitioned into that generated within independent components. The exclusion postulate states that only maxima of integrated information matter: a mechanism specifies only one maximally irreducible set of past causes and future effects - a concept. A complex is a set of elements specifying a maximally irreducible constellation of concepts, where the maximum is evaluated over elements and at the optimal spatiatemporal scale. Its concepts specify a maximally integrated conceptual information structure or quale, which is identical with an experience. Finally, changes in information integration upon exposure to the environment reflect a system's ability to match the causal structure of the world. After introducing an updated definition of

  1. Does theory inform practice in health promotion in Australia?

    PubMed

    Jones, Sandra C; Donovan, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous papers discussing the importance of improving the link between health promotion researchers and practitioners. Several reviews have been undertaken to determine the extent to which health promotion research is disseminated to, and utilized by, practitioners in the development and implementation of health promotion programs. These studies have generally been limited to reviews of literature rather than directly gathering data from practitioners. This paper reports on a survey of Australian health promotion practitioners undertaken to investigate the extent to which they are aware of, understand and utilize the major health promotion theories and models derived from research in the areas of psychology and communication. We found that none of the theories or models included in this study-the 'standard' theories and models taught in health promotion courses, and included in the leading textbooks-were used by more than 50% of practitioners in their work. The only models being used by more than one-third of the practitioners were PRECEDE-PROCEED and the Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model. The paper concludes with possible explanations for the low level of utilization of theories and models, and suggestions for increasing their usage based on information sources accessed by these practitioners.

  2. Strategies on the Implementation of China's Logistics Information Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yahui; Li, Wei; Guo, Xuwen

    The economic globalization and trend of e-commerce network have determined that the logistics industry will be rapidly developed in the 21st century. In order to achieve the optimal allocation of resources, a worldwide rapid and sound customer service system should be established. The establishment of a corresponding modern logistics system is the inevitable choice of this requirement. It is also the inevitable choice for the development of modern logistics industry in China. The perfect combination of modern logistics and information network can better promote the development of the logistics industry. Through the analysis of Status of Logistics Industry in China, this paper summed up the domestic logistics enterprise logistics information system in the building of some common problems. According to logistics information systems planning methods and principles set out logistics information system to optimize the management model.

  3. Analysis of co-occurrence networks with clique occurrence information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bin; Li, Yixiao

    2014-12-01

    Most of co-occurrence networks only record co-occurrence relationships between two entities, and ignore the weights of co-occurrence cliques whose size is bigger than two. However, this ignored information may help us to gain insight into the co-occurrence phenomena of systems. In this paper, we analyze co-occurrence networks with clique occurrence information (CNCI) thoroughly. First, we describe the components of CNCIs and discuss the generation of clique occurrence information. And then, to illustrate the importance and usefulness of clique occurrence information, several metrics, i.e. single occurrence rate, average size of maximal co-occurrence cliques and four types of co-occurrence coefficients etc., are given. Moreover, some applications, such as combining co-occurrence frequency with structure-oriented centrality measures, are also discussed.

  4. Teaching Information Seeking: Relating Information Literacy Education to Theories of Information Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limberg, Louise; Sundin, Olof

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The article argues for a closer association between information seeking research and the practices of teaching information seeking. Findings are presented from a research project on information seeking, didactics and learning (IDOL) investigating librarians' and teachers' experiences of teaching information seeking. Method: Thirteen…

  5. Spiking neural networks for higher-level information fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomberger, Neil A.; Waxman, Allen M.; Pait, Felipe M.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to higher-level (2+) information fusion and knowledge representation using semantic networks composed of coupled spiking neuron nodes. Networks of spiking neurons have been shown to exhibit synchronization, in which sub-assemblies of nodes become phase locked to one another. This phase locking reflects the tendency of biological neural systems to produce synchronized neural assemblies, which have been hypothesized to be involved in feature binding. The approach in this paper embeds spiking neurons in a semantic network, in which a synchronized sub-assembly of nodes represents a hypothesis about a situation. Likewise, multiple synchronized assemblies that are out-of-phase with one another represent multiple hypotheses. The initial network is hand-coded, but additional semantic relationships can be established by associative learning mechanisms. This approach is demonstrated with a simulated scenario involving the tracking of suspected criminal vehicles between meeting places in an urban environment.

  6. Estimation of the limit of detection using information theory measures.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón; Marco, Santiago

    2014-01-31

    Definitions of the limit of detection (LOD) based on the probability of false positive and/or false negative errors have been proposed over the past years. Although such definitions are straightforward and valid for any kind of analytical system, proposed methodologies to estimate the LOD are usually simplified to signals with Gaussian noise. Additionally, there is a general misconception that two systems with the same LOD provide the same amount of information on the source regardless of the prior probability of presenting a blank/analyte sample. Based upon an analogy between an analytical system and a binary communication channel, in this paper we show that the amount of information that can be extracted from an analytical system depends on the probability of presenting the two different possible states. We propose a new definition of LOD utilizing information theory tools that deals with noise of any kind and allows the introduction of prior knowledge easily. Unlike most traditional LOD estimation approaches, the proposed definition is based on the amount of information that the chemical instrumentation system provides on the chemical information source. Our findings indicate that the benchmark of analytical systems based on the ability to provide information about the presence/absence of the analyte (our proposed approach) is a more general and proper framework, while converging to the usual values when dealing with Gaussian noise.

  7. Feasibility Evaluation of an On-site Generator Network by the Cooperative Game Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Taketo; Fujii, Yasumasa; Yamaji, Kenji

    On-site generator, such as CGS (cogeneration system), is allegedly considered to be an effective end-use energy system in order to accomplish primary energy conservation, CO2 emission mitigation and system cost reduction, which characteristics eventually improve the whole performance of an existing energy system for the future. Considering the drawback of installing an end-use CGS into the customer with small or middle scale floor space, however, it is difficult to achieve those distinctive features because the thermal-electricity ratio of CGS does not always be in agreement with that of customer energy demand. In order to overcome that matching deficiency, it is hence better to organize an on-site generator network based on mutual electricity and heating transmission. But focusing on some cogenerators underlying their behaviors on maximizing their own profits, this on-site network, which situation corresponds to a grand coalition, is not necessarily established because of each cogenerator’s motivation to form a partial coalition and acquire its own profit as much as possible. In this paper, we attempt to analyze the optimal operation of an on-site generator network and identify by applying the nucleolus of the cooperative game theory the optimal benefit allocation strategy in order for the cogenerators to construct the network. Regarding the installation site of this network, the center of Tokyo area is assumed, which locational information includes floor space and so forth through a GIS (geographic information system) database. The results from the nucleolus suggest that all districts should impartially obtain the benefit from organizing network for the purpose of jointly attaining the system total cost reduction.

  8. Chaotic, informational and synchronous behaviour of multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M. S.; Szmoski, R. M.; Pereira, R. F.; Pinto, S. E. De Souza

    2016-03-01

    The understanding of the relationship between topology and behaviour in interconnected networks would allow to charac- terise and predict behaviour in many real complex networks since both are usually not simultaneously known. Most previous studies have focused on the relationship between topology and synchronisation. In this work, we provide analytical formulas that shows how topology drives complex behaviour: chaos, information, and weak or strong synchronisation; in multiplex net- works with constant Jacobian. We also study this relationship numerically in multiplex networks of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. Whereas behaviour in the analytically tractable network is a direct but not trivial consequence of the spectra of eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix, where behaviour may strongly depend on the break of symmetry in the topology of interconnections, in Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks the nonlinear nature of the chemical synapses breaks the elegant mathematical connec- tion between the spectra of eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix and the behaviour of the network, creating networks whose behaviour strongly depends on the nature (chemical or electrical) of the inter synapses.

  9. Integrated information theory of consciousness: an updated account.

    PubMed

    Tononi, G

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an updated account of integrated information theory of consciousness (IIT) and some of its implications. IIT stems from thought experiments that lead to phenomenological axioms and ontological postulates. The information axiom asserts that every experience is one out of many, i.e. specific - it is what it is by differing in its particular way from a large repertoire of alternatives. The integration axiom asserts that each experience is one, i.e. unified - it cannot be reduced to independent components. The exclusion axiom asserts that every experience is definite - it is limited to particular things and not others and flows at a particular speed and resolution. IIT formalizes these intuitions with three postulates. The information postulate states that only "differences that make a difference" from the intrinsic perspective of a system matter: a mechanism generates cause-effect information if its present state has specific past causes and specific future effects within a system. The integration postulate states that only information that is irreducible matters: mechanisms generate integrated information only to the extent that the information they generate cannot be partitioned into that generated within independent components. The exclusion postulate states that only maxima of integrated information matter: a mechanism specifies only one maximally irreducible set of past causes and future effects - a concept. A complex is a set of elements specifying a maximally irreducible constellation of concepts, where the maximum is evaluated at the optimal spatio-temporal scale. Its concepts specify a maximally integrated conceptual information structure or quale, which is identical with an experience. Finally, changes in information integration upon exposure to the environment reflect a system's ability to match the causal structure of the world. After introducing an updated definition of information integration and related quantities, the article

  10. Topology for efficient information dissemination in ad-hoc networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, E.; Okino, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the information dissemination problem in ad-hoc wirless networks. First, we analyze the probability of successful broadcast, assuming: the nodes are uniformly distributed, the available area has a lower bould relative to the total number of nodes, and there is zero knowledge of the overall topology of the network. By showing that the probability of such events is small, we are motivated to extract good graph topologies to minimize the overall transmissions. Three algorithms are used to generate topologies of the network with guaranteed connectivity. These are the minimum radius graph, the relative neighborhood graph and the minimum spanning tree. Our simulation shows that the relative neighborhood graph has certain good graph properties, which makes it suitable for efficient information dissemination.

  11. A novel information cascade model in online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chao; He, Wenbo; Niu, Jianwei; Xie, Zhongyu

    2016-02-01

    The spread and diffusion of information has become one of the hot issues in today's social network analysis. To analyze the spread of online social network information and the attribute of cascade, in this paper, we discuss the spread of two kinds of users' decisions for city-wide activities, namely the "want to take part in the activity" and "be interested in the activity", based on the users' attention in "DouBan" and the data of the city-wide activities. We analyze the characteristics of the activity-decision's spread in these aspects: the scale and scope of the cascade subgraph, the structure characteristic of the cascade subgraph, the topological attribute of spread tree, and the occurrence frequency of cascade subgraph. On this basis, we propose a new information spread model. Based on the classical independent diffusion model, we introduce three mechanisms, equal probability, similarity of nodes, and popularity of nodes, which can generate and affect the spread of information. Besides, by conducting the experiments in six different kinds of network data set, we compare the effects of three mechanisms above mentioned, totally six specific factors, on the spread of information, and put forward that the node's popularity plays an important role in the information spread.

  12. On a theory of stability for nonlinear stochastic chemical reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2015-05-14

    We present elements of a stability theory for small, stochastic, nonlinear chemical reaction networks. Steady state probability distributions are computed with zero-information (ZI) closure, a closure algorithm that solves chemical master equations of small arbitrary nonlinear reactions. Stochastic models can be linearized around the steady state with ZI-closure, and the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix can be readily computed. Eigenvalues govern the relaxation of fluctuation autocorrelation functions at steady state. Autocorrelation functions reveal the time scales of phenomena underlying the dynamics of nonlinear reaction networks. In accord with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, these functions are found to be congruent to response functions to small perturbations. Significant differences are observed in the stability of nonlinear reacting systems between deterministic and stochastic modeling formalisms.

  13. On a theory of stability for nonlinear stochastic chemical reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2015-01-01

    We present elements of a stability theory for small, stochastic, nonlinear chemical reaction networks. Steady state probability distributions are computed with zero-information (ZI) closure, a closure algorithm that solves chemical master equations of small arbitrary nonlinear reactions. Stochastic models can be linearized around the steady state with ZI-closure, and the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix can be readily computed. Eigenvalues govern the relaxation of fluctuation autocorrelation functions at steady state. Autocorrelation functions reveal the time scales of phenomena underlying the dynamics of nonlinear reaction networks. In accord with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, these functions are found to be congruent to response functions to small perturbations. Significant differences are observed in the stability of nonlinear reacting systems between deterministic and stochastic modeling formalisms. PMID:25978877

  14. Jumpstarting the Information Design for a Community Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Misha W.; Schwartz, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process and outcome of an effort to develop an information design for a community network's Web site. Topics include user-centered design techniques, diffusion of innovations literature, targeting innovators and early adopters, the use of focus groups, and usability tests. (Author/LRW)

  15. Copyright Aspects of CATV as Utilized in Information Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachrach, Morton W.

    It can be expected that Cable Antenna Television (CATV) systems will serve as conduits for tomorrow's information networks. CATV holds promise for fulfilling this need because of its broad-band multi-channel capability. CATV can be thought of as having two basic functions. i.e., retransmitting TV programs, and initiating its own programs and…

  16. Maximizing Information Diffusion in the Cyber-physical Integrated Network.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongliang; Lv, Shaohe; Jiao, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Juan

    2015-11-11

    Nowadays, our living environment has been embedded with smart objects, such as smart sensors, smart watches and smart phones. They make cyberspace and physical space integrated by their abundant abilities of sensing, communication and computation, forming a cyber-physical integrated network. In order to maximize information diffusion in such a network, a group of objects are selected as the forwarding points. To optimize the selection, a minimum connected dominating set (CDS) strategy is adopted. However, existing approaches focus on minimizing the size of the CDS, neglecting an important factor: the weight of links. In this paper, we propose a distributed maximizing the probability of information diffusion (DMPID) algorithm in the cyber-physical integrated network. Unlike previous approaches that only consider the size of CDS selection, DMPID also considers the information spread probability that depends on the weight of links. To weaken the effects of excessively-weighted links, we also present an optimization strategy that can properly balance the two factors. The results of extensive simulation show that DMPID can nearly double the information diffusion probability, while keeping a reasonable size of selection with low overhead in different distributed networks.

  17. The Implications of a Mixed Media Network for Information Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, John W.

    A mixed media network for information interchange is what we are always likely to have. Amid the current permutations of the storage and distribution media we see the emergence of two trends -- toward the common denominators of electronic display on the TV system and of digital processing and control. The economic implications of a mixed network…

  18. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  19. Installing an Integrated Information System in a Centralized Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, Andrew D.

    1992-01-01

    Many schools are looking at ways to centralize the distribution and retrieval of video, voice, and data transmissions in an integrate information system (IIS). A centralized system offers greater control of hardware and software. Describes media network planning to retrofit an Illinois' high school with a fiber optic-based IIS. (MLF)

  20. Future Prospects for Network-Based Multimedia Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulick, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the current status of 4 developments that will determine the emergence of generally available multimedia information services: high-bandwidth networks; inexpensive user appliances capable of handling multimedia; adoption of standards for representation, compression, packaging, and transmission; and development of a corpus of multimedia…