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Sample records for networks microdomains involved

  1. LDL uptake by Leishmania amazonensis: involvement of membrane lipid microdomains.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, Nuccia N T; Pereira, Miria G; Corrêa, José R; Andrade-Neto, Valter V; Saraiva, Felipe B; Chagas-Lima, Alessandra C; Gondim, Katia C; Torres-Santos, Eduardo C; Folly, Evelize; Saraiva, Elvira M; Cunha-E-Silva, Narcisa L; Soares, Maurilio J; Atella, Georgia C

    2012-04-01

    Leishmania amazonensis lacks a de novo mechanism for cholesterol synthesis and therefore must scavenge this lipid from the host environment. In this study we show that the L. amazonensis takes up and metabolizes human LDL(1) particles in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This mechanism implies the presence of a true LDL receptor because the uptake is blocked by both low temperature and by the excess of non-labelled LDL. This receptor is probably associated with specific microdomains in the membrane of the parasite, such as rafts, because this process is blocked by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCBD). Cholesteryl ester fluorescently-labeled LDL (BODIPY-cholesteryl-LDL) was used to follow the intracellular distribution of this lipid. After uptake it was localized in large compartments along the parasite body. The accumulation of LDL was analyzed by flow cytometry using FITC-labeled LDL particles. Together these data show for the first time that L. amazonensis is able to compensate for its lack of lipid synthesis through the use of a lipid importing machinery largely based on the uptake of LDL particles from the host. Understanding the details of the molecular events involved in this mechanism may lead to the identification of novel targets to block Leishmania infection in human hosts.

  2. Spatio-temporal Remodeling of Functional Membrane Microdomains Organizes the Signaling Networks of a Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Johannes; Klein, Teresa; Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Koch, Gudrun; Franke, Christian; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Sauer, Markus; Lopez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a heterogeneous population of raft domains with varying compositions. However, a mechanism for such diversification is not known. We recently discovered that bacterial membranes organize their signal transduction pathways in functional membrane microdomains (FMMs) that are structurally and functionally similar to the eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this report, we took advantage of the tractability of the prokaryotic model Bacillus subtilis to provide evidence for the coexistence of two distinct families of FMMs in bacterial membranes, displaying a distinctive distribution of proteins specialized in different biological processes. One family of microdomains harbors the scaffolding flotillin protein FloA that selectively tethers proteins specialized in regulating cell envelope turnover and primary metabolism. A second population of microdomains containing the two scaffolding flotillins, FloA and FloT, arises exclusively at later stages of cell growth and specializes in adaptation of cells to stationary phase. Importantly, the diversification of membrane microdomains does not occur arbitrarily. We discovered that bacterial cells control the spatio-temporal remodeling of microdomains by restricting the activation of FloT expression to stationary phase. This regulation ensures a sequential assembly of functionally specialized membrane microdomains to strategically organize signaling networks at the right time during the lifespan of a bacterium. PMID:25909364

  3. Functional microdomains in bacterial membranes

    PubMed Central

    López, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The membranes of eukaryotic cells harbor microdomains known as lipid rafts that contain a variety of signaling and transport proteins. Here we show that bacterial membranes contain microdomains functionally similar to those of eukaryotic cells. These membrane microdomains from diverse bacteria harbor homologs of Flotillin-1, a eukaryotic protein found exclusively in lipid rafts, along with proteins involved in signaling and transport. Inhibition of lipid raft formation through the action of zaragozic acid—a known inhibitor of squalene synthases—impaired biofilm formation and protein secretion but not cell viability. The orchestration of physiological processes in microdomains may be a more widespread feature of membranes than previously appreciated. PMID:20713508

  4. Cholesterol and Sphingomyelin-Containing Model Condensed Lipid Monolayers: Heterogeneities Involving Ordered Microdomains Assessed by Two Cholesterol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Marie-France; Gaibelet, Gérald; Lebrun, Chantal; Tercé, François; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    Lipid monolayers are often considered as model membranes, but they are also the physiologic lipid part of the peripheral envelope of lipoproteins and cytosolic lipid bodies. However, their structural organization is still rather elusive, in particular when both cholesterol and sphingomyelin are present. To investigate such structural organization of hemimembranes, we measured, using alternative current voltammetry, the differential capacitance of condensed phosphatidylcholine-based monolayers as a function of applied potential, which is sensitive to their lipid composition and molecular arrangement. Especially, monolayers containing both sphingomyelin and cholesterol, at 15% w/w, presented specific characteristics of the differential capacitance versus potential curves recorded, which was indicative of specific interactions between these two lipid components. We then compared the behavior of two cholesterol derivatives (at 15% w/w), 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol) and 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol), with that of cholesterol when present in model monolayers. Indeed, these two probes were chosen because of previous findings reporting opposite behaviors within bilayer membranes regarding their interaction with ordered lipids, with only Pyr-met-Chol mimicking cholesterol well. Remarkably, in monolayers containing sphingomyelin or not, Pyr-met-Chol and NBD-Chol presented contrasting behaviors, and Pyr-met-Chol mimicked cholesterol only in the presence of sphingomyelin. These two observations (i.e., optimal amounts of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, and the ability to discriminate between Pyr-met-Chol and NBD-Chol) can be interpreted by the existence of heterogeneities including ordered patches in sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-containing monolayers. Since such monolayer lipid arrangement shares some properties with the raft-type lipid microdomains well-described in sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-containing bilayer membranes, our data thus

  5. A membrane microdomain-associated protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and is required for seedling development.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluska, Frantisek; Samaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lucas, William J; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-05-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein-flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1-positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1-positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development.

  6. A Membrane Microdomain-Associated Protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, Is Involved in a Clathrin-Independent Endocytic Pathway and Is Required for Seedling Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluška, František; Šamaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein–flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1–positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1–positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development. PMID:22589463

  7. Highly enhanced dynamics of microdomains ordering by solvent vapor annealing of thin block copolymer films on polymer network supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarkova, Larisa; Stenbock-Fermor, Anja; Böker, Alexander; Knoll, Armin; IBM Reserach Collaboration; DWI Team

    2014-03-01

    We studied the solvent driven ordering dynamics of block copolymer films supported by a densely cross-linked organic hard mask (HM) designed for lithographic fabrication. We found that the ordering of microphase separated domains on the HM layer proceeds significantly faster as compared to similar films on silicon wafers. This leads to a pronounced enhancement of the dynamics of both the terrace-formation as well as the long-range lateral ordering of the microdomains. The effect is independent on the chemical structure and volume composition of the studied block copolymers (cylinder-/ lamella-forming). Importantly, enhanced ordering is achieved even at a reduced degree of swelling corresponding to an intermediate to strong segregation regime, when similar films on conventional substrate show very limited ordering. In-situ ellipsometric measurements of the swollen films revealed an insignificant increase by 1-3 vol. % in the solvent up-take by HM-supported films. Therefore we attribute the enhanced dynamics to reduced interactions at the block copolymer/HM-support interface. Apart from immediate technological impact in block copolymer-assisted nanolithography, our findings convey novel insight into effects of molecular architecture on polymer-solvent interactions. Forckenbeckstr. 50 52056 Aachen, Germany.

  8. Ochratoxin A displaces claudins from detergent resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel; Padfield, Philip J; McLaughlin, John; Cannell, Stephanie; O'Neill, Catherine A

    2007-06-29

    Ochratoxin A (OchA) is a food-borne mycotoxin with multiple effects in vivo. Previously, we have demonstrated that the toxin can significantly impair the barrier function of the gut epithelial cell line, Caco-2. Barrier disruption involved loss of claudins 3 and 4, but not claudin 1 from the tight junction complex. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, that OchA is able to remove claudins 3 and 4 from the detergent insoluble membrane microdomains associated with the tight junctions. However, cholesterol distribution within the microdomain was unaffected by the toxin. In addition, the thiol antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine, preserved the microdomain localisation of claudins and also the barrier function of Caco-2 cells. This work suggests that OchA-mediated barrier toxicity is due to removal of claudins from detergent insoluble membrane microdomains. Moreover, loss of microdomain association may be due to oxidative events.

  9. Microdomains, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Thomas, Michael J

    2016-02-19

    Elevated levels of cholesteryl ester (CE)-enriched apoB containing plasma lipoproteins lead to increased foam cell formation, the first step in the development of atherosclerosis. Unregulated uptake of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by circulating monocytes and other peripheral blood cells takes place through scavenger receptors and over time causes disruption in cellular cholesterol homeostasis. As lipoproteins are taken up, their CE core is hydrolyzed by liposomal lipases to generate free cholesterol (FC). FC can be either re-esterified and stored as CE droplets or shuttled to the plasma membrane for ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-mediated efflux. Because cholesterol is an essential component of all cellular membranes, some FC may be incorporated into microdomains or lipid rafts. These platforms are essential for receptor signaling and transduction, requiring rapid assembly and disassembly. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 plays a major role in regulating microdomain cholesterol and is most efficient when lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) packages raft cholesterol into soluble particles that are eventually catabolized by the liver. If FC is not effluxed from the cell, it becomes esterified, CE droplets accumulate and microdomain cholesterol content becomes poorly regulated. This dysregulation leads to prolonged activation of immune cell signaling pathways, resulting in receptor oversensitization. The availability of apoAI or other amphipathic α-helix-rich apoproteins relieves the burden of excess microdomain cholesterol in immune cells allowing a reduction in immune cell proliferation and infiltration, thereby stimulating regression of foam cells in the artery. Therefore, cellular balance between FC and CE is essential for proper immune cell function and prevents chronic immune cell overstimulation and proliferation. PMID:26892966

  10. Lipids and Membrane Microdomains in HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Abdul A.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Several critical steps in the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) – entry, assembly and budding – are complex processes that take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. A growing body of data indicates that these early and late steps in HIV-1 replication take place in specialized plasma membrane microdomains, and that many of the viral and cellular components required for entry, assembly, and budding are concentrated in these microdomains. In particular, a number of studies have shown that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains known as lipid rafts play important roles in multiple steps in the virus replication cycle. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the involvement of lipids and membrane microdomains in HIV-1 replication. PMID:19383519

  11. Transmembrane voltage: Potential to induce lateral microdomains.

    PubMed

    Malinsky, Jan; Tanner, Widmar; Opekarova, Miroslava

    2016-08-01

    Lateral segregation of plasma membrane lipids is a generally accepted phenomenon. Lateral lipid microdomains of specific composition, structure and biological functions are established as a result of simultaneous action of several competing mechanisms which contribute to membrane organization. Various lines of evidence support the conclusion that among those mechanisms, the membrane potential plays significant and to some extent unique role. Above all, clear differences in the microdomain structure as revealed by fluorescence microscopy could be recognized between polarized and depolarized membranes. In addition, recent fluorescence spectroscopy experiments reported depolarization-induced changes in a membrane lipid order. In the context of earlier findings showing that plasma membranes of depolarized cells are less susceptible to detergents and the cells less sensitive to antibiotics or antimycotics treatment we discuss a model, in which membrane potential-driven re-organization of the microdomain structure contributes to maintaining membrane integrity during response to stress, pathogen attack and other challenges involving partial depolarization of the plasma membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26902513

  12. Functional brain networks involved in reality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Metzak, Paul D; Lavigne, Katie M; Woodward, Todd S

    2015-08-01

    Source monitoring refers to the recollection of variables that specify the context and conditions in which a memory episode was encoded. This process involves using the qualitative and quantitative features of a memory trace to distinguish its source. One specific class of source monitoring is reality monitoring, which involves distinguishing internally generated from externally generated information, that is, memories of imagined events from real events. The purpose of the present study was to identify functional brain networks that underlie reality monitoring, using an alternative type of source monitoring as a control condition. On the basis of previous studies on self-referential thinking, it was expected that a medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) based network would be more active during reality monitoring than the control condition, due to the requirement to focus on a comparison of internal (self) and external (other) source information. Two functional brain networks emerged from this analysis, one reflecting increasing task-related activity, and one reflecting decreasing task-related activity. The second network was mPFC based, and was characterized by task-related deactivations in areas resembling the default-mode network; namely, the mPFC, middle temporal gyri, lateral parietal regions, and the precuneus, and these deactivations were diminished during reality monitoring relative to source monitoring, resulting in higher activity during reality monitoring. This result supports previous research suggesting that self-referential thinking involves the mPFC, but extends this to a network-level interpretation of reality monitoring.

  13. HIV-1 Nef disrupts membrane-microdomain-associated anterograde transport for plasma membrane delivery of selected Src family kinases.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyu; Geist, Miriam M; Rudolph, Jochen M; Nickel, Walter; Fackler, Oliver T

    2013-10-01

    HIV-1 Nef, an essential factor in AIDS pathogenesis, boosts virus replication in vivo. As one of its activities in CD4(+) T-lymphocytes, Nef potently retargets the Src family kinase (SFK) Lck but not closely related Fyn from the plasma membrane to recycling endosomes and the trans-Golgi network to tailor T-cell activation and optimize virus replication. Investigating the underlying mechanism we find Lck retargeting involves removal of the kinase from membrane microdomains. Moreover, Nef interferes with rapid vesicular transport of Lck to block anterograde transport and plasma membrane delivery of newly synthesized Lck. The sensitivity of Lck to Nef does not depend on functional domains of Lck but requires membrane insertion of the kinase. Surprisingly, the short N-terminal SH4 domain membrane anchor of Lck is necessary and sufficient to confer sensitivity to Nef-mediated anterograde transport block and microdomain extraction. In contrast, the SH4 domain of Fyn is inert to Nef-mediated manipulation. Nef thus interferes with a specialized membrane microdomain-associated pathway for plasma membrane delivery of newly synthesized Lck whose specificity is determined by the affinity of cargo for these sorting platforms. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of Nef action and the pathways used for SFK plasma membrane delivery. PMID:23601552

  14. Microdomains Associated to Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jonathan; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O; Vaca, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Store Operated Ca(2+) Entry (SOCE), the main Ca(2+) influx mechanism in non-excitable cells, is implicated in the immune response and has been reported to be affected in several pathologies including cancer. The basic molecular constituents of SOCE are Orai, the pore forming unit, and STIM, a multidomain protein with at least two principal functions: one is to sense the Ca(2+) content inside the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum(ER) and the second is to activate Orai channels upon depletion of the ER. The link between Ca(2+) depletion inside the ER and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular media is through a direct association of STIM and Orai, but for this to occur, both molecules have to interact and form clusters where ER and plasma membrane (PM) are intimately apposed. In recent years a great number of components have been identified as participants in SOCE regulation, including regions of plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, the so called lipid rafts, which recruit a complex platform of specialized microdomains, which cells use to regulate spatiotemporal Ca(2+) signals.

  15. Phosphoprotein Associated with Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Microdomains (Pag), a Novel Ubiquitously Expressed Transmembrane Adaptor Protein, Binds the Protein Tyrosine Kinase Csk and Is Involved in Regulation of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brdic̆ka, Tomás̆; Pavlis̆tová, Dagmar; Leo, Albrecht; Bruyns, Eddy; Kor̆ínek, Vladimír; Angelisová, Pavla; Scherer, Jeanette; Shevchenko, Andrej; Shevchenko, Anna; Hilgert, Ivan; C̆erný, Jan; Drbal, Karel; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Kornacker, Birgit; Hor̆ejs̆í, Václav; Schraven, Burkhart

    2000-01-01

    According to a recently proposed hypothesis, initiation of signal transduction via immunoreceptors depends on interactions of the engaged immunoreceptor with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEMs). In this study, we describe a novel GEM-associated transmembrane adaptor protein, termed phosphoprotein associated with GEMs (PAG). PAG comprises a short extracellular domain of 16 amino acids and a 397-amino acid cytoplasmic tail containing ten tyrosine residues that are likely phosphorylated by Src family kinases. In lymphoid cell lines and in resting peripheral blood α/β T cells, PAG is expressed as a constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated protein and binds the major negative regulator of Src kinases, the tyrosine kinase Csk. After activation of peripheral blood α/β T cells, PAG becomes rapidly dephosphorylated and dissociates from Csk. Expression of PAG in COS cells results in recruitment of endogenous Csk, altered Src kinase activity, and impaired phosphorylation of Src-specific substrates. Moreover, overexpression of PAG in Jurkat cells downregulates T cell receptor–mediated activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells. These findings collectively suggest that in the absence of external stimuli, the PAG–Csk complex transmits negative regulatory signals and thus may help to keep resting T cells in a quiescent state. PMID:10790433

  16. Time-course of cortical networks involved in working memory

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Phan; Caggiano, Daniel M.; Geyer, Alexandra; Lewis, Jenn; Cohn, Joseph; Tucker, Don M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of the most studied cognitive constructs. Although many neuroimaging studies have identified brain networks involved in WM, the time course of these networks remains unclear. In this paper we use dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) to capture neural signals during performance of a standard WM task, the n-back task, and a blend of principal components analysis and independent components analysis (PCA/ICA) to statistically identify networks of WM and their time courses. Results reveal a visual cortex centric network, that also includes the posterior cingulate cortex, that is active prior to stimulus onset and that appears to reflect anticipatory, attention-related processes. After stimulus onset, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, lateral prefrontal prefrontal cortex, and temporal poles become associated with the prestimulus network. This second network appears to reflect executive control processes. Following activation of the second network, the cortices of the temporo-parietal junction with the temporal lobe structures seen in the first and second networks re-engage. This third network appears to reflect activity of the ventral attention network involved in control of attentional reorientation. The results point to important temporal features of network dynamics that integrate multiple subsystems of the ventral attention network with the default mode network in the performance of working memory tasks. PMID:24523686

  17. Demonstrations of neural network computations involving students.

    PubMed

    May, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    David Marr famously proposed three levels of analysis (implementational, algorithmic, and computational) for understanding information processing systems such as the brain. While two of these levels are commonly taught in neuroscience courses (the implementational level through neurophysiology and the computational level through systems/cognitive neuroscience), the algorithmic level is typically neglected. This leaves an explanatory gap in students' understanding of how, for example, the flow of sodium ions enables cognition. Neural networks bridge these two levels by demonstrating how collections of interacting neuron-like units can give rise to more overtly cognitive phenomena. The demonstrations in this paper are intended to facilitate instructors' introduction and exploration of how neurons "process information."

  18. Demonstrations of Neural Network Computations Involving Students

    PubMed Central

    May, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    David Marr famously proposed three levels of analysis (implementational, algorithmic, and computational) for understanding information processing systems such as the brain. While two of these levels are commonly taught in neuroscience courses (the implementational level through neurophysiology and the computational level through systems/cognitive neuroscience), the algorithmic level is typically neglected. This leaves an explanatory gap in students’ understanding of how, for example, the flow of sodium ions enables cognition. Neural networks bridge these two levels by demonstrating how collections of interacting neuron-like units can give rise to more overtly cognitive phenomena. The demonstrations in this paper are intended to facilitate instructors’ introduction and exploration of how neurons “process information.” PMID:23493501

  19. Analysis of lipid-composition changes in plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Hideo; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Sphingolipids accumulate in plasma membrane microdomain sites, such as caveolae or lipid rafts. Such microdomains are considered to be important nexuses for signal transduction, although changes in the microdomain lipid components brought about by signaling are poorly understood. Here, we applied a cationic colloidal silica bead method to analyze plasma membrane lipids from monolayer cells cultured in a 10 cm dish. The detergent-resistant fraction from the silica bead-coated membrane was analyzed by LC-MS/MS to evaluate the microdomain lipids. This method revealed that glycosphingolipids composed the microdomains as a substitute for sphingomyelin (SM) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (tMEFs) from an SM synthase 1/2 double KO (DKO) mouse. The rate of formation of the detergent-resistant region was unchanged compared with that of WT-tMEFs. C2-ceramide (Cer) stimulation caused greater elevations in diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid levels than in Cer levels within the microdomains of WT-tMEFs. We also found that lipid changes in the microdomains of SM-deficient DKO-tMEFs caused by serum stimulation occurred in the same manner as that of WT-tMEFs. This practical method for analyzing membrane lipids will facilitate future comprehensive analyses of membrane microdomain-associated responses.

  20. Frontoparietal networks involved in categorization and item working memory.

    PubMed

    Braunlich, Kurt; Gomez-Lavin, Javier; Seger, Carol A

    2015-02-15

    Categorization and memory for specific items are fundamental processes that allow us to apply knowledge to novel stimuli. This study directly compares categorization and memory using delay match to category (DMC) and delay match to sample (DMS) tasks. In DMC participants view and categorize a stimulus, maintain the category across a delay, and at the probe phase view another stimulus and indicate whether it is in the same category or not. In DMS, a standard item working memory task, participants encode and maintain a specific individual item, and at probe decide if the stimulus is an exact match or not. Constrained Principal Components Analysis was used to identify and compare activity within neural networks associated with these tasks, and we relate these networks to those that have been identified with resting state-fMRI. We found that two frontoparietal networks of particular interest. The first network included regions associated with the dorsal attention network and frontoparietal salience network; this network showed patterns of activity consistent with a role in rapid orienting to and processing of complex stimuli. The second uniquely involved regions of the frontoparietal central-executive network; this network responded more slowly following each stimulus and showed a pattern of activity consistent with a general role in role in decision-making across tasks. Additional components were identified that were associated with visual, somatomotor and default mode networks. PMID:25482265

  1. Brij detergents reveal new aspects of membrane microdomain in erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Casadei, Bruna Renata; De Oliveira Carvalho, Patrícia; Riske, Karin A; Barbosa, Raquel De Melo; De Paula, Eneida; Domingues, Cleyton Crepaldi

    2014-09-01

    Membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids (rafts), and specific proteins are involved in important physiological functions. However their structure, size and stability are still controversial. Given that detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) are in the liquid-ordered state and are rich in raft-like components, they might correspond to rafts at least to some extent. Here we monitor the lateral order of biological membranes by characterizing DRMs from erythrocytes obtained with Brij-98, Brij-58, and TX-100 at 4 °C and 37 °C. All DRMs were enriched in cholesterol and contained the raft markers flotillin-2 and stomatin. However, sphingomyelin (SM) was only found to be enriched in TX-100-DRMs - a detergent that preferentially solubilizes the membrane inner leaflet - while Band 3 was present solely in Brij-DRMs. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra showed that the acyl chain packing of Brij-DRMs was lower than TX-100-DRMs, providing evidence of their diverse lipid composition. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the SM fraction of the DRMs was enriched in lignoceric acid, which should specifically contribute to the resistance of SM to detergents. These results indicate that lipids from the outer leaflet, particularly SM, are essential for the formation of the liquid-ordered phase of DRMs. At last, the differential solubilization process induced by Brij-98 and TX-100 was monitored using giant unilamellar vesicles. This study suggests that Brij and TX-100-DRMs reflect different degrees of lateral order of the membrane microdomains. Additionally, Brij DRMs are composed by both inner and outer leaflet components, making them more physiologically relevant than TX-100-DRMs to the studies of membrane rafts.

  2. Social Network Influence on Father Involvement in Childrearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dave

    Predictors of fathers' involvement in childrearing activities were investigated as part of a study of the ecology of urban childrearing in five western societies. Selected on the basis of a stratified random sample technique, participants were 96 white fathers from intact families having a 3-year-old child. Network theory provided three hypotheses…

  3. Oxysterols: Influence on plasma membrane rafts microdomains and development of ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Filomenko, Rodolphe; Fourgeux, Cynthia; Bretillon, Lionel; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène

    2015-07-01

    Oxidation of cholesterol into oxysterols is a major way of elimination of cholesterol from the liver and extrahepatic tissues, including the brain and the retina. Oxysterols are involved in various cellular processes. Numerous links have been established between oxysterols and several disorders such as neurodegenerative pathologies, retinopathies and atherosclerosis. Different components of the lipid layer such as sphingolipids, sterols and proteins participate to membrane fluidity and forme lipid rafts microdomains. Few data are available on the links between lipids rafts and oxysterols. The purpose of this review is to suggest the potential role of lipid rafts microdomains in the development of retinopathies with special emphasis and opening perspectives of their interactions with oxysterols. Actually cholesterol oxidation mechanism may have deleterious effect on its ability to support rafts formation .This review suggest that the effect of oxysterols of lipid rafts would probably depend on the oxysterol molecule and cell type.

  4. Contributions of quantitative proteomics to understanding membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu Zi; Foster, Leonard J.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane microdomains, e.g., lipid rafts and caveolae, are crucial cell surface organelles responsible for many cellular signaling and communication events, which makes the characterization of their proteomes both interesting and valuable. They are large cellular complexes comprised of specific proteins and lipids, yet they are simple enough in composition to be amenable to modern LC/MS/MS methods for proteomics. However, the proteomic characterization of membrane microdomains by traditional qualitative mass spectrometry is insufficient for distinguishing true components of the microdomains from copurifying contaminants or for evaluating dynamic changes in the proteome compositions. In this review, we discuss the contributions quantitative proteomics has made to our understanding of the biology of membrane microdomains. PMID:19578161

  5. Formation mechanism for a hybrid supramolecular network involving cooperative interactions.

    PubMed

    Mura, Manuela; Silly, Fabien; Burlakov, Victor; Castell, Martin R; Briggs, G Andrew D; Kantorovich, Lev N

    2012-04-27

    A novel mechanism of hybrid assembly of molecules on surfaces is proposed stemming from interactions between molecules and on-surface metal atoms which eventually got trapped inside the network pores. Based on state-of-the-art theoretical calculations, we find that the new mechanism relies on formation of molecule-metal atom pairs which, together with molecules themselves, participate in the assembly growth. Most remarkably, the dissociation of pairs is facilitated by a cooperative interaction involving many molecules. This new mechanism is illustrated on a low coverage Melamine hexagonal network on the Au(111) surface where multiple events of gold atoms trapping via a set of so-called "gate" transitions are found by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations based on transition rates obtained using ab initio density functional theory calculations and the nudged elastic band method. Simulated STM images of gold atoms trapped in the pores of the Melamine network predict that the atoms should appear as bright spots inside Melamine hexagons. No trapping was found at large Melamine coverages, however. These predictions have been supported by preliminary STM experiments which show bright spots inside Melamine hexagons at low Melamine coverages, while empty pores are mostly observed at large coverages. Therefore, we suggest that bright spots sometimes observed in the pores of molecular assemblies on metal surfaces may be attributed to trapped substrate metal atoms. We believe that this type of mechanism could be used for delivering adatom species of desired functionality (e.g., magnetic) into the pores of hydrogen-bonded networks serving as templates for their capture. PMID:22680886

  6. Lipid Microdomains: Structural Correlations, Fluctuations, and Formation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-03-01

    Compositional lipid microdomains (“lipid rafts”) in mammalian plasma membranes are believed to facilitate many important cellular processes. While several physically distinct scenarios predicting the presence of finite-sized microdomains in vivo have been proposed in the past, direct experimental verification or falsification of model predictions has remained elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the combination of the spatial correlation and temporal fluctuation spectra of the lipid domains can be employed to unambiguously differentiate between the existing theoretical scenarios. Furthermore, the differentiation of the raft formation mechanisms using this methodology can be achieved by collecting data at physiologically relevant conditions without the need to tune control parameters.

  7. Overexpression of BAX INHIBITOR-1 Links Plasma Membrane Microdomain Proteins to Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshiki; Aki, Toshihiko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2015-01-01

    BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor widely conserved in plants and animals. Overexpression of BI-1 enhances tolerance to stress-induced cell death in plant cells, although the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement is unclear. We recently found that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BI-1 is involved in the metabolism of sphingolipids, such as the synthesis of 2-hydroxy fatty acids, suggesting the involvement of sphingolipids in the cell death regulatory mechanism downstream of BI-1. Here, we show that BI-1 affects cell death-associated components localized in sphingolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane in rice (Oryza sativa) cells. The amount of 2-hydroxy fatty acid-containing glucosylceramide increased in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM; a biochemical counterpart of plasma membrane microdomains) fraction obtained from BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. Comparative proteomics analysis showed quantitative changes of DRM proteins in BI-1-overexpressing cells. In particular, the protein abundance of FLOTILLIN HOMOLOG (FLOT) and HYPERSENSITIVE-INDUCED REACTION PROTEIN3 (HIR3) markedly decreased in DRM of BI-1-overexpressing cells. Loss-of-function analysis demonstrated that FLOT and HIR3 are required for cell death by oxidative stress and salicylic acid, suggesting that the decreased levels of these proteins directly contribute to the stress-tolerant phenotypes in BI-1-overexpressing rice cells. These findings provide a novel biological implication of plant membrane microdomains in stress-induced cell death, which is negatively modulated by BI-1 overexpression via decreasing the abundance of a set of key proteins involved in cell death. PMID:26297139

  8. Dynamic functional brain networks involved in simple visual discrimination learning.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, Nélida María; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, Jorge Luis

    2014-10-01

    Visual discrimination tasks have been widely used to evaluate many types of learning and memory processes. However, little is known about the brain regions involved at different stages of visual discrimination learning. We used cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry to evaluate changes in regional brain oxidative metabolism during visual discrimination learning in a water-T maze at different time points during training. As compared with control groups, the results of the present study reveal the gradual activation of cortical (prefrontal and temporal cortices) and subcortical brain regions (including the striatum and the hippocampus) associated to the mastery of a simple visual discrimination task. On the other hand, the brain regions involved and their functional interactions changed progressively over days of training. Regions associated with novelty, emotion, visuo-spatial orientation and motor aspects of the behavioral task seem to be relevant during the earlier phase of training, whereas a brain network comprising the prefrontal cortex was found along the whole learning process. This study highlights the relevance of functional interactions among brain regions to investigate learning and memory processes. PMID:24937013

  9. In silico Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Involved in Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Bita, Craita E.; Perrakis, Andreas; Manioudaki, Maria E.; Krokida, Afroditi; Kaloudas, Dimitrios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs) which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37, and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening. PMID:27625653

  10. In silico Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Involved in Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Bita, Craita E.; Perrakis, Andreas; Manioudaki, Maria E.; Krokida, Afroditi; Kaloudas, Dimitrios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs) which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37, and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening.

  11. In silico Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Involved in Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Bita, Craita E; Perrakis, Andreas; Manioudaki, Maria E; Krokida, Afroditi; Kaloudas, Dimitrios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs) which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37, and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening.

  12. In silico Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Involved in Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Bita, Craita E; Perrakis, Andreas; Manioudaki, Maria E; Krokida, Afroditi; Kaloudas, Dimitrios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex developmental programme partly mediated by transcriptional regulatory networks. Several transcription factors (TFs) which are members of gene families such as MADS-box and ERF were shown to play a significant role in ripening through interconnections into an intricate network. The accumulation of large datasets of expression profiles corresponding to different stages of tomato fruit ripening and the availability of bioinformatics tools for their analysis provide an opportunity to identify TFs which might regulate gene clusters with similar co-expression patterns. We identified two TFs, a SlWRKY22-like and a SlER24 transcriptional activator which were shown to regulate modules by using the LeMoNe algorithm for the analysis of our microarray datasets representing four stages of fruit ripening, breaker, turning, pink and red ripe. The WRKY22-like module comprised a subgroup of six various calcium sensing transcripts with similar to the TF expression patterns according to real time PCR validation. A promoter motif search identified a cis acting element, the W-box, recognized by WRKY TFs that was present in the promoter region of all six calcium sensing genes. Moreover, publicly available microarray datasets of similar ripening stages were also analyzed with LeMoNe resulting in TFs such as SlERF.E1, SlERF.C1, SlERF.B2, SLERF.A2, SlWRKY24, SLWRKY37, and MADS-box/TM29 which might also play an important role in regulation of ripening. These results suggest that the SlWRKY22-like might be involved in the coordinated regulation of expression of the six calcium sensing genes. Conclusively the LeMoNe tool might lead to the identification of putative TF targets for further physiological analysis as regulators of tomato fruit ripening. PMID:27625653

  13. Learning in rich networks involves both positive and negative associations.

    PubMed

    Roembke, Tanja C; Wasserman, Edward A; McMurray, Bob

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive behaviors are believed to be shaped by both positive (the strengthening of correct associations) and negative (the pruning of incorrect associations or the building of inhibitory associations) forms of associative learning. However, there has been little direct documentation of how these basic processes participate in the learning of rich associative networks that support cognitive behaviors like categorization. Although negative associative learning is an important component of theories of development, it is not clear whether it involves acquiring specific (experience-dependent) content or represents a more general aspect of (experience-expectant) development. The authors thus trained pigeons on a complex many-to-many learning paradigm previously established as an analog to human word learning. Pigeons learned to map 16 objects onto 16 distinct report tokens; the authors manipulated the amount of negative associative learning that could occur by restricting which tokens were available as incorrect options. In testing, accuracy was lower on trials with foils that had not been presented with a target than on trials with previously experienced foils. Moreover, when the correct token was withheld, pigeons preferred foils novel to the target object over previously experienced foils. A second experiment replicated these results and further found that these effects only emerged after some positive associations had been acquired. Findings indicate that the learning of rich associative networks does not depend solely on positive associative learning, but also on negative associative learning; this conclusion has important implications for basic learning theories in both animals and humans, as well as for theories of development. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27336324

  14. Identification of Resting State Networks Involved in Executive Function.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Joanna; McNulty, Jonathan P; Boran, Lorraine; Roche, Richard A P; Delany, David; Bokde, Arun L W

    2016-06-01

    The structural networks in the human brain are consistent across subjects, and this is reflected also in that functional networks across subjects are relatively consistent. These findings are not only present during performance of a goal oriented task but there are also consistent functional networks during resting state. It suggests that goal oriented activation patterns may be a function of component networks identified using resting state. The current study examines the relationship between resting state networks measured and patterns of neural activation elicited during a Stroop task. The association between the Stroop-activated networks and the resting state networks was quantified using spatial linear regression. In addition, we investigated if the degree of spatial association of resting state networks with the Stroop task may predict performance on the Stroop task. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the Stroop activated network can be decomposed into a number of resting state networks, which were primarily associated with attention, executive function, visual perception, and the default mode network. The close spatial correspondence between the functional organization of the resting brain and task-evoked patterns supports the relevance of resting state networks in cognitive function. PMID:26935902

  15. Identification of Resting State Networks Involved in Executive Function.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Joanna; McNulty, Jonathan P; Boran, Lorraine; Roche, Richard A P; Delany, David; Bokde, Arun L W

    2016-06-01

    The structural networks in the human brain are consistent across subjects, and this is reflected also in that functional networks across subjects are relatively consistent. These findings are not only present during performance of a goal oriented task but there are also consistent functional networks during resting state. It suggests that goal oriented activation patterns may be a function of component networks identified using resting state. The current study examines the relationship between resting state networks measured and patterns of neural activation elicited during a Stroop task. The association between the Stroop-activated networks and the resting state networks was quantified using spatial linear regression. In addition, we investigated if the degree of spatial association of resting state networks with the Stroop task may predict performance on the Stroop task. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the Stroop activated network can be decomposed into a number of resting state networks, which were primarily associated with attention, executive function, visual perception, and the default mode network. The close spatial correspondence between the functional organization of the resting brain and task-evoked patterns supports the relevance of resting state networks in cognitive function.

  16. Dissociable networks involved in spatial and temporal order source retrieval.

    PubMed

    Ekstrom, Arne D; Copara, Milagros S; Isham, Eve A; Wang, Wei-chun; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2011-06-01

    Space and time are important components of our episodic memories. Without this information, we cannot determine the "where and when" of our recent memories, rendering it difficult to disambiguate individual episodes from each other. The neural underpinnings of spatial and temporal order memory in humans remain unclear, in part because of difficulties in disentangling the contributions of these two types of source information. To address this issue, we conducted an experiment in which participants first navigated a virtual city, experiencing unique routes in a specific temporal order and learning about the spatial layout of the city. Spatial and temporal order information were dissociated in our task such that learning one type of information did not facilitate the other behaviorally. This allowed us to then address the extent to which the two types of information involved functionally distinct or overlapping brain areas. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants retrieved information about the relative distance of stores within the city (spatial task) and the temporal order of stores from each other (temporal task). Comparable hippocampal activity was observed during these two tasks, but greater prefrontal activity was seen during temporal order retrieval whereas greater parahippocampal activity was seen during spatial retrieval. We suggest that while the brain possesses dissociable networks for maintaining and representing spatial layout and temporal order components of episodic memory, this information may converge into a common representation for source memory in areas such as the hippocampus.

  17. Determination of microdomain size of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes by luminescence quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, U.P.; Zhong, Y.; Zdanowicz, V.S.

    1993-12-31

    The size of the hydrophobic microdomains of a hydrolyzed copolymer of maleic anhydride and hexyl vinyl ether has been measured in aqueous lithium chloride solutions by luminescence quenching using a photon counting technique. Several probe-quencher combinations were employed, including tris(2,2`-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) with 9-methylanthracene, pyrene with benzophenone, and pyrene with nonyl-phenyl ketone. For the last of these, the number of repeat units per microdomain was found to be 46, irrespective of polyacid concentration or extent of micellization due to variations in pH. With the other probe-quencher systems approximately the same number was obtained at pH 4.5 where the polyacid is close to completely micellized. At higher pH values, where micellization is incomplete, special effects were observed which are ascribed to nonmicellar binding of probe or quencher.

  18. STIM1-dependent Ca2+ microdomains are required for myofilament remodeling and signaling in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Cory; Alam, Mohammad Afaque; Sullivan, Ryan; Mancarella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    In non-excitable cells stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a key element in the generation of Ca2+ signals that lead to gene expression, migration and cell proliferation. A growing body of literature suggests that STIM1 plays a key role in the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the precise mechanisms involving STIM-dependent Ca2+ signaling in the heart are not clearly established. Here, we have investigated the STIM1-associated Ca2+ signals in cardiomyocytes and their relevance to pathological cardiac remodeling. We show that mice with inducible, cardiac-restricted, ablation of STIM1 exhibited left ventricular reduced contractility, which was corroborated by impaired single cell contractility. The spatial properties of STIM1-dependent Ca2+ signals determine restricted Ca2+ microdomains that regulate myofilament remodeling and activate spatially segregated pro-hypertrophic factors. Indeed, mice lacking STIM1 showed less adverse structural remodeling in response to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. These results highlight how STIM1-dependent Ca2+ microdomains have a major impact on intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling and cellular signaling, even when excitation-contraction coupling is present. PMID:27150728

  19. A host cell membrane microdomain is a critical factor for organelle discharge by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2016-10-01

    Host cell microdomains are involved in the attachment, entry, and replication of intracellular microbial pathogens. Entry into the host cell of Toxoplasma gondii and the subsequent survival of this protozoan parasite are tightly coupled with the proteins secreted from organelle called rhoptry. The rhoptry proteins are rapidly discharged into clusters of vesicles, called evacuoles, which are then delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) or nucleus. In this study, we examined the roles of two host cell microdomain components, cholesterol and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), in evacuole formation. The acute depletion of cholesterol from the host cell plasma membrane blocked evacuole formation but not invasion. Whereas the lack of host cell GPI also altered evacuole formation but not invasion, instead inducing excess evacuole formation. The latter effect was not influenced by the evacuole-inhibiting effects of host cell cholesterol depletion, indicating the independent roles of host GPI and cholesterol in evacuole formation. In addition, the excess formation of evacuoles resulted in the enhanced recruitment of host mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum to PVs, which in turn stimulated the growth of the parasite. PMID:27217289

  20. Tonoplast of Beta vulgaris L. contains detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ozolina, Natalia V; Nesterkina, Irina S; Kolesnikova, Ekaterina V; Salyaev, Ryurik K; Nurminsky, Vadim N; Rakevich, Alexander L; Martynovich, Evgueni F; Chernyshov, Michael Yu

    2013-03-01

    The experiments conducted on tonoplast of Beta vulgaris L. roots were performed to identify detergent-resistant lipid-protein microdomains (DRMs, interpreted as lipid rafts).The presence of DRMs can be found when dynamic clustering of sphingolipids, sterols, saturated fatty acids is registered, and the insolubility of these microdomains in nonionic detergents at low temperatures is proven. The elucidation of tonoplast microdomains has been based on results obtained with the aid of high-speed centrifuging in the sucrose gradient. The experiments have shown that tonoplast microdomains are rich in sphingolipids, free sterols and saturated fatty acids (such a lipid content is also typical of lipid-protein microdomains of other membranes), while only few phospholipids are present in tonoplast microdomains. The presence of microdomains has been confirmed by fluorescence and confocal microscopy using filipin and Laurdan as fluorescent probes. The experiments with Laurdan have shown that tonoplast microdomains are characterized by a high order compared to characteristics of the rest of the tonoplast. Thus, the presence of detergent-resistant lipid-protein microdomains in the tonoplast has been demonstrated.

  1. Plasma Membrane Microdomains Are Essential for Rac1-RbohB/H-Mediated Immunity in Rice.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Minoru; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kawano, Yoji; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Shimamoto, Ko

    2016-08-01

    Numerous plant defense-related proteins are thought to congregate in plasma membrane microdomains, which consist mainly of sphingolipids and sterols. However, the extent to which microdomains contribute to defense responses in plants is unclear. To elucidate the relationship between microdomains and innate immunity in rice (Oryza sativa), we established lines in which the levels of sphingolipids containing 2-hydroxy fatty acids were decreased by knocking down two genes encoding fatty acid 2-hydroxylases (FAH1 and FAH2) and demonstrated that microdomains were less abundant in these lines. By testing these lines in a pathogen infection assay, we revealed that microdomains play an important role in the resistance to rice blast fungus infection. To illuminate the mechanism by which microdomains regulate immunity, we evaluated changes in protein composition, revealing that microdomains are required for the dynamics of the Rac/ROP small GTPase Rac1 and respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) in response to chitin elicitor. Furthermore, FAHs are essential for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after chitin treatment. Together with the observation that RbohB, a defense-related NADPH oxidase that interacts with Rac1, is localized in microdomains, our data indicate that microdomains are required for chitin-induced immunity through ROS signaling mediated by the Rac1-RbohB pathway. PMID:27465023

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging to determine the potential motor network connectivity between the involved and non-involved hemispheres in stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Hee; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sang Hyeon; Cha, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Youn; Han, Bong Soo; You, Sung H

    2015-01-01

    Hemiparetic stroke is a common motor network disorder that affects a wide range of functional movements due to cortical and subcortical network lesions in stroke patients. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to examine structural brain damage, but the integrity and connectivity of the whole brain are poorly understood. Hence, advanced neuroimaging with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been developed to better localize fiber architecture and connectivity in the motor network or pathways that are responsible for motor impairments in hemiparetic stroke. To ascertain motor network connectivity between the involved and non-involved hemispheres in stroke patients, we analyzed the DTI data from all right hemiparetic stroke patients using fractional anisotropy (FA) and network parameters, including node degree and edge betweenness centrality (EBC). The FA values were substantially lower in the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere. Similarly, the node degree and EBC were significantly lower in the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere. The present brain network analysis may provide a useful neuropathway marker for accurate diagnosis and therapeutic intervention.

  3. Building Leadership Capacity in the Involving Network State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Dorthe; Tangkjaer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    New partnerships, cross-organisational collaborations and co-creation, digitalisation, involvement of citizens, public design and innovation stand out as new and emerging solutions in welfare delivery. However, New Public Management (NPM) seems to represent a historical repertoire of perspectives and tools that falls short of dealing with public…

  4. Unpacking Parent Involvement: Korean American Parents' Collective Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Minjung

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which a group of Korean American parents perceived and responded to institutional inequalities in a family-school partnership. In their school, which had a growing Asian population, the dominant group's middle-class perspective on parent involvement became normal and operated as an overarching structure. Drawing…

  5. Regulation of T-cell receptor signalling by membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Razzaq, Tahir M; Ozegbe, Patricia; Jury, Elizabeth C; Sembi, Phupinder; Blackwell, Nathan M; Kabouridis, Panagiotis S

    2004-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence suggesting that the plasma membrane of mammalian cells is compartmentalized by functional lipid raft microdomains. These structures are assemblies of specialized lipids and proteins and have been implicated in diverse biological functions. Analysis of their protein content using proteomics and other methods revealed enrichment of signalling proteins, suggesting a role for these domains in intracellular signalling. In T lymphocytes, structure/function experiments and complementary pharmacological studies have shown that raft microdomains control the localization and function of proteins which are components of signalling pathways regulated by the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR). Based on these studies, a model for TCR phosphorylation in lipid rafts is presented. However, despite substantial progress in the field, critical questions remain. For example, it is unclear if membrane rafts represent a homogeneous population and if their structure is modified upon TCR stimulation. In the future, proteomics and the parallel development of complementary analytical methods will undoubtedly contribute in further delineating the role of lipid rafts in signal transduction mechanisms. PMID:15554919

  6. Molecular networks involved in the immune control of BK polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Girmanova, Eva; Brabcova, Irena; Klema, Jiri; Hribova, Petra; Wohlfartova, Mariana; Skibova, Jelena; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%-80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%-10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n = 11), infected asymptomatic patients (n = 9), and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n = 10). Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI) (P < 0.05), and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  7. Two networks involved in producing and realizing plans.

    PubMed

    Crescentini, Cristiano; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Vallesi, Antonino; Shallice, Tim

    2012-06-01

    Planning is essential for normal daily activities. Although the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is thought to be crucially involved in planning, it remains to be understood whether this contribution is attributable to working memory requirements of the tasks and when it occurs, whether during initial planning or during subsequent plan execution. Here, we compared patterns of activation observed when participants planned and executed their plans to solve Tower of Hanoi problems to when they had to memorize and reproduce externally presented sequences of moves. The DLPFC was preferentially active during initial planning relative to both plan execution and initial memorization of sequences of moves. By contrast, plan execution relied on posterior temporal areas, inferior frontal regions and the dorsolateral premotor cortex. We attribute activation in DLPFC to generation and evaluation of abstract sequences of responses, and activation in the regions underlying plan execution to rehearsal of planned sequences of moves. PMID:22433287

  8. Characterizing individual differences in reward sensitivity from the brain networks involved in response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Costumero, Víctor; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A "disinhibited" cognitive profile has been proposed for individuals with high reward sensitivity, characterized by increased engagement in goal-directed responses and reduced processing of negative or unexpected cues, which impairs adequate behavioral regulation after feedback in these individuals. This pattern is manifested through deficits in inhibitory control and/or increases in RT variability. In the present work, we aimed to test whether this profile is associated with the activity of functional networks during a stop-signal task using independent component analysis (ICA). Sixty-one participants underwent fMRI while performing a stop-signal task, during which a manual response had to be inhibited. ICA was used to mainly replicate the functional networks involved in the task (Zhang and Li, 2012): two motor networks involved in the go response, the left and right fronto-parietal networks for stopping, a midline error-processing network, and the default-mode network (DMN), which was further subdivided into its anterior and posterior parts. Reward sensitivity was mainly associated with greater activity of motor networks, reduced activity in the midline network during correct stop trials and, behaviorally, increased RT variability. All these variables explained 36% of variance of the SR scores. This pattern of associations suggests that reward sensitivity involves greater motor engagement in the dominant response, more distractibility and reduced processing of salient or unexpected events, which may lead to disinhibited behavior.

  9. Characterizing individual differences in reward sensitivity from the brain networks involved in response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Costumero, Víctor; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A "disinhibited" cognitive profile has been proposed for individuals with high reward sensitivity, characterized by increased engagement in goal-directed responses and reduced processing of negative or unexpected cues, which impairs adequate behavioral regulation after feedback in these individuals. This pattern is manifested through deficits in inhibitory control and/or increases in RT variability. In the present work, we aimed to test whether this profile is associated with the activity of functional networks during a stop-signal task using independent component analysis (ICA). Sixty-one participants underwent fMRI while performing a stop-signal task, during which a manual response had to be inhibited. ICA was used to mainly replicate the functional networks involved in the task (Zhang and Li, 2012): two motor networks involved in the go response, the left and right fronto-parietal networks for stopping, a midline error-processing network, and the default-mode network (DMN), which was further subdivided into its anterior and posterior parts. Reward sensitivity was mainly associated with greater activity of motor networks, reduced activity in the midline network during correct stop trials and, behaviorally, increased RT variability. All these variables explained 36% of variance of the SR scores. This pattern of associations suggests that reward sensitivity involves greater motor engagement in the dominant response, more distractibility and reduced processing of salient or unexpected events, which may lead to disinhibited behavior. PMID:26343318

  10. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force-distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties. PMID:27335750

  11. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force-distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties.

  12. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) with force–distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties. PMID:27335750

  13. The HIV coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Infection by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. HIV gp120 enlarged, and stabilized the structure of lipid rafts on neuronal dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2; nSMase2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that enhanced the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by promoting a PKA-dependent phopshorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (that masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses, and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse, and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced three-fold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from enhancing the surface localization and clustering of NMDA receptors, while disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize following gp120. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV-infection by interfering with the traffic of NMDA receptors. PMID:22114277

  14. Global dynamics of bidirectional associative memory neural networks involving transmission delays and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Sree Hari Rao, V; Phaneendra, Bh R.M.

    1999-04-01

    In this article, a model describing the activation dynamics of bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks involving transmission delays was considered. The concept of BAM networks employed in this work is improved and it includes the earlier notions known in the literature and is applied to a wider class of networks. Further, we introduced a new notion, as a measure of restoring stability and termed it as a dead zone. In this article, the influence of the presence of dead zones on the global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium pattern was investigated. Existence and uniqueness of an equilibrium pattern under fairly general and easily verifiable conditions were also established.

  15. Detection of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masami; Shimada, Yukiko; Inomata, Mitsushi; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko . E-mail: iwashita@tmig.or.jp

    2006-12-22

    The C-terminal domain (D4) of perfringolysin O binds selectively to cholesterol in cholesterol-rich microdomains. To address the issue of whether cholesterol-rich microdomains exist in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, we expressed D4 as a fusion protein with EGFP in MEF cells. More than half of the EGFP-D4 expressed in stable cell clones was bound to membranes in raft fractions. Depletion of membrane cholesterol with {beta}-cyclodextrin reduced the amount of EGFP-D4 localized in raft fractions, confirming EGFP-D4 binding to cholesterol-rich microdomains. Subfractionation of the raft fractions showed most of the EGFP-D4 bound to the plasma membrane rather than to intracellular membranes. Taken together, these results strongly suggest the existence of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

  16. P2Y₁ receptor-dependent diacylglycerol signaling microdomains in β cells promote insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne; Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Tengholm, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) controls numerous cell functions by regulating the localization of C1-domain-containing proteins, including protein kinase C (PKC), but little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of the lipid. Here, we explored plasma membrane DAG dynamics in pancreatic β cells and determined whether DAG signaling is involved in secretagogue-induced pulsatile release of insulin. Single MIN6 cells, primary mouse β cells, and human β cells within intact islets were transfected with translocation biosensors for DAG, PKC activity, or insulin secretion and imaged with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Muscarinic receptor stimulation triggered stable, homogenous DAG elevations, whereas glucose induced short-lived (7.1 ± 0.4 s) but high-amplitude elevations (up to 109 ± 10% fluorescence increase) in spatially confined membrane regions. The spiking was mimicked by membrane depolarization and suppressed after inhibition of exocytosis or of purinergic P2Y₁, but not P2X receptors, reflecting involvement of autocrine purinoceptor activation after exocytotic release of ATP. Each DAG spike caused local PKC activation with resulting dissociation of its substrate protein MARCKS from the plasma membrane. Inhibition of spiking reduced glucose-induced pulsatile insulin secretion. Thus, stimulus-specific DAG signaling patterns appear in the plasma membrane, including distinct microdomains, which have implications for the kinetic control of exocytosis and other membrane-associated processes.

  17. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods. PMID:26793137

  18. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  19. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods. PMID:26793137

  20. Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited impact on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental involvement, we hypothesized that involving parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures involving 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the impact of an intervention without parental involvement with one that included active parental involvement by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental involvement was not necessary to improve the intervention's impact on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial impact was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental involvement is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to involve parents. PMID:26821548

  1. Stability of dead zone bidirectional associative memory neural networks involving time delays.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Sree Hari; Rao, P Raja Sekhara

    2002-02-01

    A mathematical model describing the dynamical interactions of bidirectional associative memory networks involving transmission delays is considered. The influence of a dead zone or a zone of noactivation on the global stability is investigated and various easily verifiable sets of sufficient conditions are established. The asymptotic nature of solutions when the given system of equations does not possess an equilibrium pattern is discussed.

  2. Community (in) Colleges: The Relationship Between Online Network Involvement and Academic Outcomes at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Eliza D.; McFarland, Daniel A.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Deil-Amen, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explores the relationship between online social network involvement and academic outcomes among community college students. Prior theory hypothesizes that socio-academic moments are especially important for the integration of students into community colleges and that integration is related to academic outcomes. Online social…

  3. Students' Involvement in Social Networking and Attitudes towards Its Integration into Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umoh, Ukeme Ekpedeme; Etuk, Etuk Nssien

    2016-01-01

    The study examined Students' Involvement in Social Networking and attitudes towards its Integration into Teaching. The study was carried out in the University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. The population of the study consisted of 17,618 undergraduate students enrolled into full time degree programmes in the University of Uyo for 2014/2015…

  4. Cambodian Parental Involvement: The Role of Parental Beliefs, Social Networks, and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Sothy; Szmodis, Whitney; Mulsow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The role of social capital (parental beliefs, social networks, and trust) as a predictor of parental involvement in Cambodian children's education was examined, controlling for human capital (family socioeconomic status). Parents of elementary students (n = 273) were interviewed face to face in Cambodia. Teacher contact scored highest,…

  5. Activation of Src family kinase yes induced by Shiga toxin binding to globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3/CD77) in low density, detergent-insoluble microdomains.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Y U; Mori, T; Nakajima, H; Katagiri, C; Taguchi, T; Takeda, T; Kiyokawa, N; Fujimoto, J

    1999-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is an enterotoxin produced by Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which binds specifically to globotriaosylceramide, Gb3, on the cell surface and causes cell death. We previously demonstrated that Stx induced apoptosis in human renal tubular cell line ACHN cells (Taguchi, T., Uchida, H., Kiyokawa, N., Mori, T., Sato, N., Horie, H., Takeda, T and Fujimoto, J. (1998) Kidney Int. 53, 1681-1688). To study the early signal transduction after Stx addition, Gb3-enriched microdomains were prepared from ACHN cells by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of Triton X-100 lysate as buoyant, detergent-insoluble microdomains (DIM). Gb3 was only recovered in DIM and was associated with Src family kinase Yes. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of proteins in the DIM fraction increased by 10 min and returned to the resting level by 30 min after the addition of Stx. Since the kinase activity of Yes changed with the same kinetics, Yes was thought to be responsible for the hyperphosphorylation observed in DIM proteins. Unexpectedly, however, all of the Yes kinase activity was obtained in the high density, detergent-soluble fraction. Yes was assumed to be activated and show increased Triton X-100 solubility in the early phase of retrograde endocytosis of Stx-Gb3 complex. Since Yes activation by the Stx addition was suppressed by filipin pretreatment, Gb3-enriched microdomains containing cholesterol were deeply involved in Stx signal transduction.

  6. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending

    PubMed Central

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent’s central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology. PMID:21734302

  7. Block Copolymer Bottlebrushes: New Routes to Ever Smaller Microdomain Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh; Speetjens, Frank

    Block copolymer self-assembly presents exciting opportunities for the development of nanotemplates for advanced lithography applications, wherein the microdomain sizes (~10-100 nm) are governed by the total copolymer degree of polymerization, N. However, this methodology is limited in its smallest achievable length scale, since AB diblock copolymers self-assemble only above a critical N that depends on the magnitude of the effective segmental interaction parameter χAB. Numerous recent reports have focused on developing ``high χAB'' AB diblocks that self-assemble at low values of N. In this talk we explore the ability of non-linear polymer architectures to induce block copolymer ordering at reduced length scales. Thus, we describe the melt and thin-film self-assembly behavior of block copolymer bottlebrushes derived from linking the block junctions of low molecular weight AB diblocks. We quantitatively demonstrate that increasing the bottlebrush backbone degree of polymerization (Nbackbone) results in a larger reduction in the critical copolymer arm degree of polymerization (Narm) required for self-assembly, thus reducing the length scales at which these materials self-assemble.

  8. Molecular microdomains in a sensory terminal, the vestibular calyx ending.

    PubMed

    Lysakowski, Anna; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chatlani, Shilpa; Price, Steven D; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-07-01

    Many primary vestibular afferents form large cup-shaped postsynaptic terminals (calyces) that envelope the basolateral surfaces of type I hair cells. The calyceal terminals both respond to glutamate released from ribbon synapses in the type I cells and initiate spikes that propagate to the afferent's central terminals in the brainstem. The combination of synaptic and spike initiation functions in these unique sensory endings distinguishes them from the axonal nodes of central neurons and peripheral nerves, such as the sciatic nerve, which have provided most of our information about nodal specializations. We show that rat vestibular calyces express an unusual mix of voltage-gated Na and K channels and scaffolding, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins, which may hold the ion channels in place. Protein expression patterns form several microdomains within the calyx membrane: a synaptic domain facing the hair cell, the heminode abutting the first myelinated internode, and one or two intermediate domains. Differences in the expression and localization of proteins between afferent types and zones may contribute to known variations in afferent physiology. PMID:21734302

  9. Theta Oscillation Reveals the Temporal Involvement of Different Attentional Networks in Contingent Reorienting

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Fu; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Hung, Daisy L.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    In the visual world, rapidly reorienting to relevant objects outside the focus of attention is vital for survival. This ability from the interaction between goal-directed and stimulus-driven attentional control is termed contingent reorienting. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations of the ventral and dorsal attentional networks (DANs) which exhibit right hemisphere dominance, but the temporal dynamics of the attentional networks still remain unclear. The present study used event-related potential (ERP) to index the locus of spatial attention and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to acquire the time-frequency information during contingent reorienting. The ERP results showed contingent reorienting induced significant N2pc on both hemispheres. In contrast, our time-frequency analysis found further that, unlike the N2pc, theta oscillation during contingent reorienting differed between hemispheres and experimental sessions. The inter-trial coherence (ITC) of the theta oscillation demonstrated that the two sides of the attentional networks became phase-locked to contingent reorienting at different stages. The left attentional networks were associated with contingent reorienting in the first experimental session whereas the bilateral attentional networks play a more important role in this process in the subsequent session. This phase-locked information suggests a dynamic temporal evolution of the involvement of different attentional networks in contingent reorienting and a potential role of the left ventral network in the first session. PMID:27375459

  10. Theta Oscillation Reveals the Temporal Involvement of Different Attentional Networks in Contingent Reorienting.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Fu; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Hung, Daisy L; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    In the visual world, rapidly reorienting to relevant objects outside the focus of attention is vital for survival. This ability from the interaction between goal-directed and stimulus-driven attentional control is termed contingent reorienting. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations of the ventral and dorsal attentional networks (DANs) which exhibit right hemisphere dominance, but the temporal dynamics of the attentional networks still remain unclear. The present study used event-related potential (ERP) to index the locus of spatial attention and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to acquire the time-frequency information during contingent reorienting. The ERP results showed contingent reorienting induced significant N2pc on both hemispheres. In contrast, our time-frequency analysis found further that, unlike the N2pc, theta oscillation during contingent reorienting differed between hemispheres and experimental sessions. The inter-trial coherence (ITC) of the theta oscillation demonstrated that the two sides of the attentional networks became phase-locked to contingent reorienting at different stages. The left attentional networks were associated with contingent reorienting in the first experimental session whereas the bilateral attentional networks play a more important role in this process in the subsequent session. This phase-locked information suggests a dynamic temporal evolution of the involvement of different attentional networks in contingent reorienting and a potential role of the left ventral network in the first session. PMID:27375459

  11. Theta Oscillation Reveals the Temporal Involvement of Different Attentional Networks in Contingent Reorienting.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Fu; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Hung, Daisy L; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    In the visual world, rapidly reorienting to relevant objects outside the focus of attention is vital for survival. This ability from the interaction between goal-directed and stimulus-driven attentional control is termed contingent reorienting. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations of the ventral and dorsal attentional networks (DANs) which exhibit right hemisphere dominance, but the temporal dynamics of the attentional networks still remain unclear. The present study used event-related potential (ERP) to index the locus of spatial attention and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to acquire the time-frequency information during contingent reorienting. The ERP results showed contingent reorienting induced significant N2pc on both hemispheres. In contrast, our time-frequency analysis found further that, unlike the N2pc, theta oscillation during contingent reorienting differed between hemispheres and experimental sessions. The inter-trial coherence (ITC) of the theta oscillation demonstrated that the two sides of the attentional networks became phase-locked to contingent reorienting at different stages. The left attentional networks were associated with contingent reorienting in the first experimental session whereas the bilateral attentional networks play a more important role in this process in the subsequent session. This phase-locked information suggests a dynamic temporal evolution of the involvement of different attentional networks in contingent reorienting and a potential role of the left ventral network in the first session.

  12. The platelet receptor for type III collagen (TIIICBP) is present in platelet membrane lipid microdomains (rafts).

    PubMed

    Maurice, Pascal; Waeckel, Ludovic; Pires, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Lemesle, Monique; Arbeille, Brigitte; Vassy, Jany; Rochette, Jacques; Legrand, Chantal; Fauvel-Lafève, Françoise

    2006-04-01

    Platelet interactions with collagen are orchestrated by the presence or the migration of platelet receptor(s) for collagen into lipid rafts, which are specialized lipid microdomains from the platelet plasma membrane enriched in signalling proteins. Electron microscopy shows that in resting platelets, TIIICBP, a receptor specific for type III collagen, is present on the platelet membrane and associated with the open canalicular system, and redistributes to the platelet membrane upon platelet activation. After platelet lysis by 1% Triton X-100 and the separation of lipid rafts on a discontinuous sucrose gradient, TIIICBP is recovered in lipid raft-containing fractions and Triton X-100 insoluble fractions enriched in cytoskeleton proteins. Platelet aggregation, induced by type III collagen, was inhibited after disruption of the lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion, whereas platelet adhesion under static conditions did not require lipid raft integrity. These results indicate that TIIICBP, a platelet receptor involved in platelet interaction with type III collagen, is localized within platelet lipid rafts where it could interact with other platelet receptors for collagen (GP VI and alpha2beta1 integrin) for efficient platelet activation. PMID:16205938

  13. Extracellular Vesicles from Caveolin-Enriched Microdomains Regulate Hyaluronan-Mediated Sustained Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Lennon, Frances E.; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Allen, Michael; Riehm, Jacob; Poroyko, Valeriy A.; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in vascular integrity are an initiating factor in several disease processes. We have previously reported that high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA), a major glycosaminoglycan in the body, promotes rapid signal transduction in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMVEC) leading to barrier enhancement. In contrast, low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA), produced in disease states by hyaluronidases and reactive oxygen species (ROS), induces HPMVEC barrier disruption. However, the mechanism(s) of sustained barrier regulation by HA are poorly defined. Our results indicate that long-term (6–24 hours) exposure of HMW-HA induced release of a novel type of extracellular vesicle from HLMVEC called enlargeosomes (characterized by AHNAK expression) while LMW-HA long-term exposure promoted release of exosomes (characterized by CD9, CD63, and CD81 expression). These effects were blocked by inhibiting caveolin-enriched microdomain (CEM) formation. Further, inhibiting enlargeosome release by annexin II siRNA attenuated the sustained barrier enhancing effects of HMW-HA. Finally, exposure of isolated enlargeosomes to HPMVEC monolayers generated barrier enhancement while exosomes led to barrier disruption. Taken together, these results suggest that differential release of extracellular vesicles from CEM modulate the sustained HPMVEC barrier regulation by HMW-HA and LMW-HA. HMW-HA-induced specialized enlargeosomes can be a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases involving impaired vascular integrity. PMID:26447809

  14. Cell Wall Polysaccharide Synthases Are Located in Detergent-Resistant Membrane Microdomains in Oomycetes ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Briolay, Anne; Bouzenzana, Jamel; Guichardant, Michel; Deshayes, Christian; Sindt, Nicolas; Bessueille, Laurence; Bulone, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The pathways responsible for cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis are vital in eukaryotic microorganisms. The corresponding synthases are potential targets of inhibitors such as fungicides. Despite their fundamental and economical importance, most polysaccharide synthases are not well characterized, and their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. With the example of Saprolegnia monoica as a model organism, we show that chitin and (1→3)-β-d-glucan synthases are located in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) in oomycetes, a phylum that comprises some of the most devastating microorganisms in the agriculture and aquaculture industries. Interestingly, no cellulose synthase activity was detected in the DRMs. The purified DRMs exhibited similar biochemical features as lipid rafts from animal, plant, and yeast cells, although they contained some species-specific lipids. This report sheds light on the lipid environment of the (1→3)-β-d-glucan and chitin synthases, as well as on the sterol biosynthetic pathways in oomycetes. The results presented here are consistent with a function of lipid rafts in cell polarization and as platforms for sorting specific sets of proteins targeted to the plasma membrane, such as carbohydrate synthases. The involvement of DRMs in the biosynthesis of major cell wall polysaccharides in eukaryotic microorganisms suggests a function of lipid rafts in hyphal morphogenesis and tip growth. PMID:19201970

  15. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-12-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis.

  16. The relationship between Clinical Trial Network protocol involvement and quality of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Amanda J.; Knudsen, Hannah K.; Roman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is a practice-based research network that partners academic researchers with community based substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs designed primarily to conduct effectiveness trials of promising interventions. A secondary goal of the CTN is to widely disseminate results of these trials and thus improve the quality of SUD treatment in the US. Drawing on data from 156 CTN programs, this study examines the association between involvement in CTN protocols and overall treatment quality measured by a comprehensive index of 35 treatment services. Negative binomial regression models show that treatment programs that participated in a greater number of CTN protocols had significantly higher levels of treatment quality, an association that held after controlling for key organizational characteristics. These findings contribute to the growing body of research on the role of practice-based research networks in promoting health care quality. PMID:24080073

  17. Low copy numbers of DC-SIGN in cell membrane microdomains: implications for structure and function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Itano, Michelle S; Neumann, Aaron K; de Silva, Aravinda M; Jacobson, Ken; Thompson, Nancy L

    2014-02-01

    Presently, there are few estimates of the number of molecules occupying membrane domains. Using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) imaging approach, based on comparing the intensities of fluorescently labeled microdomains with those of single fluorophores, we measured the occupancy of DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin, in membrane microdomains. DC-SIGN or its mutants were labeled with primary monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in either dendritic cells (DCs) or NIH3T3 cells, or expressed as GFP fusions in NIH3T3 cells. The number of DC-SIGN molecules per microdomain ranges from only a few to over 20, while microdomain dimensions range from the diffraction limit to > 1 µm. The largest fraction of microdomains, appearing at the diffraction limit, in either immature DCs or 3 T3 cells contains only 4-8 molecules of DC-SIGN, consistent with our preliminary super-resolution Blink microscopy estimates. We further show that these small assemblies are sufficient to bind and efficiently internalize a small (∼ 50 nm) pathogen, dengue virus, leading to infection of host cells. PMID:24313910

  18. Regulation of Cellular Communication by Signaling Microdomains in the Blood Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Biwer, Lauren A.; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  19. Involvement of the CREB5 regulatory network in colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2014-07-01

    The signal regulatory network involved in colorectal cancer metastasis is complicated and thus the search for key control steps in the network is of great significance for unraveling colorectal cancer metastasis mechanism and finding drug-target site. Previous studies suggested that CREB5 (cAMP responsive element binding protein 5) might play key role in the metastatic signal network of colorectal cancer. Through colorectal cancer expression profile and enriching analysis of the effect of CREB5 gene expression levels on colorectal cancer molecular events, we found that these molecular events are correlated with tumor metastasis. Based on the feature that CREB5 could combine with c-Jun to form heterodimer, together with enriched binding sites for transcription factor AP-1, we identified 16 genes which were up-regulated in the CREB5 high-expression group, contained AP-1 binding sites, and participated in cancer pathway. The molecular network involving these 16 genes, in particular, CSF1R, MMP9, PDGFRB, FIGF and IL6, regulates cell migration. Therefore, CREB5 might accelerate the metastasis of colorectal cancer by regulating these five key genes.

  20. An Examination of Two Policy Networks Involved in Advancing Smokefree Policy Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Carothers, Bobbi J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines smokefree policy networks in two cities—Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri—one that was successful in achieving widespread policy success, and one that was not. Descriptive social network analyses and visual network mapping were used to compare importance and contact relationships among actors involved in the smokefree policy initiatives. In Kansas City, where policy adoption was achieved, there was a higher level of connectivity among members, with network members being in contact with an average of more than five people, compared to just over two people for the St. Louis network. For both cities, despite being recognized as important, politicians were in contact with the fewest number of people. Results highlight the critical need to actively engage a variety of stakeholders when attempting city wide public health policy change. As evident by the success in smokefree policy adoption throughout Kansas City compared to St. Louis, closer linkages and continued communication among stakeholders including the media, coalitions, public health agencies, policymakers, and other partners are essential if we are to advance and broaden the impact of public health policy. Results indicate that the presence of champions, or those that play leadership roles in actively promoting policy by linking individuals and organizations, play an important role in advancing public health policy. Those working in public health should examine their level of engagement with the policy process and implement strategies for improving that engagement through relationship building and ongoing interactions with a variety of stakeholders, including policymakers. PMID:26371022

  1. An Examination of Two Policy Networks Involved in Advancing Smokefree Policy Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2015-09-01

    This study examines smokefree policy networks in two cities—Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri—one that was successful in achieving widespread policy success, and one that was not. Descriptive social network analyses and visual network mapping were used to compare importance and contact relationships among actors involved in the smokefree policy initiatives. In Kansas City, where policy adoption was achieved, there was a higher level of connectivity among members, with network members being in contact with an average of more than five people, compared to just over two people for the St. Louis network. For both cities, despite being recognized as important, politicians were in contact with the fewest number of people. Results highlight the critical need to actively engage a variety of stakeholders when attempting city wide public health policy change. As evident by the success in smokefree policy adoption throughout Kansas City compared to St. Louis, closer linkages and continued communication among stakeholders including the media, coalitions, public health agencies, policymakers, and other partners are essential if we are to advance and broaden the impact of public health policy. Results indicate that the presence of champions, or those that play leadership roles in actively promoting policy by linking individuals and organizations, play an important role in advancing public health policy. Those working in public health should examine their level of engagement with the policy process and implement strategies for improving that engagement through relationship building and ongoing interactions with a variety of stakeholders, including policymakers. PMID:26371022

  2. An Examination of Two Policy Networks Involved in Advancing Smokefree Policy Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2015-09-01

    This study examines smokefree policy networks in two cities—Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri—one that was successful in achieving widespread policy success, and one that was not. Descriptive social network analyses and visual network mapping were used to compare importance and contact relationships among actors involved in the smokefree policy initiatives. In Kansas City, where policy adoption was achieved, there was a higher level of connectivity among members, with network members being in contact with an average of more than five people, compared to just over two people for the St. Louis network. For both cities, despite being recognized as important, politicians were in contact with the fewest number of people. Results highlight the critical need to actively engage a variety of stakeholders when attempting city wide public health policy change. As evident by the success in smokefree policy adoption throughout Kansas City compared to St. Louis, closer linkages and continued communication among stakeholders including the media, coalitions, public health agencies, policymakers, and other partners are essential if we are to advance and broaden the impact of public health policy. Results indicate that the presence of champions, or those that play leadership roles in actively promoting policy by linking individuals and organizations, play an important role in advancing public health policy. Those working in public health should examine their level of engagement with the policy process and implement strategies for improving that engagement through relationship building and ongoing interactions with a variety of stakeholders, including policymakers.

  3. Detection of focal adhesion kinase activation at membrane microdomains by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jihye; Ouyang, Mingxing; Kim, Taejin; Sun, Jie; Wen, Po-Chao; Lu, Shaoying; Zhuo, Yue; Llewellyn, Nicholas M; Schlaepfer, David D; Guan, Jun-Lin; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-07-26

    Proper subcellular localization of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is crucial for many cellular processes. It remains, however, unclear how FAK activity is regulated at subcellular compartments. To visualize the FAK activity at different membrane microdomains, we develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based FAK biosensor, and target it into or outside of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) regions at the plasma membrane. Here we show that, on cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or stimulation by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), the FRET responses of DRM-targeting FAK biosensor are stronger than that at non-DRM regions, suggesting that FAK activation can occur at DRM microdomains. Further experiments reveal that the PDGF-induced FAK activation is mediated and maintained by Src activity, whereas FAK activation on cell adhesion is independent of, and in fact essential for the Src activation. Therefore, FAK is activated at membrane microdomains with distinct activation mechanisms in response to different physiological stimuli.

  4. Tetraspan microdomains distinct from lipid rafts enrich select peptide-MHC class II complexes.

    PubMed

    Kropshofer, H; Spindeldreher, S; Röhn, T A; Platania, N; Grygar, C; Daniel, N; Wölpl, A; Langen, H; Horejsi, V; Vogt, A B

    2002-01-01

    Complexes of peptide and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II are expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells but their molecular organization is unknown. Here we show that subsets of MHC class II molecules localize to membrane microdomains together with tetraspan proteins, the peptide editor HLA-DM and the costimulator CD86. Tetraspan microdomains differ from other membrane areas such as lipid rafts, as they enrich MHC class II molecules carrying a selected set of peptide antigens. Antigen-presenting cells deficient in tetraspan microdomains have a reduced capacity to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the organization of uniformly loaded peptide-MHC class II complexes in tetraspan domains may be a very early event that determines both the composition of the immunological synapse and the quality of the subsequent T helper cell response.

  5. Ultrathin shell double emulsion templated giant unilamellar lipid vesicles with controlled microdomain formation.

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Laura R; Datta, Sujit S; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Amstad, Esther; Kodger, Thomas E; Monroy, Francisco; Weitz, David A

    2014-03-12

    A microfluidic approach is reported for the high-throughput, continuous production of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) using water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion drops as templates. Importantly, these emulsion drops have ultrathin shells; this minimizes the amount of residual solvent that remains trapped within the GUV membrane, overcoming a major limitation of typical microfluidic approaches for GUV fabrication. This approach enables the formation of microdomains, characterized by different lipid compositions and structures within the GUV membranes. This work therefore demonstrates a straightforward and versatile approach to GUV fabrication with precise control over the GUV size, lipid composition and the formation of microdomains within the GUV membrane.

  6. Parents, friends, and romantic partners: enmeshment in deviant networks and adolescent delinquency involvement.

    PubMed

    Lonardo, Robert A; Giordano, Peggy C; Longmore, Monica A; Manning, Wendy D

    2009-03-01

    Adolescent networks include parents, friends, and romantic partners, but research on the social learning mechanisms related to delinquency has not typically examined the characteristics of all three domains simultaneously. Analyses draw on data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 957), and our analytic sample contains 51% male and 49% female as well as 69% white, 24% African-American, and 7% Latino respondents. Parents,' peers,' and partners' deviance are each related to respondents' delinquency, and affiliation with a greater number of deviant networks is associated with higher self-reported involvement. Analyses that consider enmeshment type indicate that those with both above average romantic partner and friend delinquency report especially high levels of self-reported involvement. In all comparisons, adolescents with deviant romantic partners are more delinquent than those youths with more prosocial partners, regardless of friends' and parents' behavior. Findings highlight the importance of capturing the adolescent's entire network of affiliations, rather than viewing these in isolation, and suggest the need for additional research on romantic partner influences on delinquent behavior and other adolescent outcomes.

  7. Differential involvement of oriens/pyramidale interneurones in hippocampal network oscillations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gloveli, Tengis; Dugladze, Tamar; Saha, Sikha; Monyer, Hannah; Heinemann, Uwe; Traub, Roger D; Whittington, Miles A; Buhl, Eberhard H

    2005-01-01

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in conjunction with post hoc anatomy we investigated the physiological properties of hippocampal stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale inhibitory interneurones, before and following the induction of pharmacologically evoked gamma frequency network oscillations. Prior to kainate-induced transient epochs of gamma activity, two distinct classes of oriens interneurones, oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) and trilaminar cells, showed prominent differences in their membrane and firing properties, as well as in the amplitude and kinetics of their excitatory postsynaptic events. In the active network both types of neurone received a phasic barrage of gamma frequency excitatory inputs but, due to their differential functional integration, showed clear differences in their output patterns. While O-LM cells fired intermittently at theta frequency, trilaminar interneurones discharged on every gamma cycle and showed a propensity to fire spike doublets. Two other classes of fast spiking interneurones, perisomatic targeting basket and bistratified cells, in the active network discharged predominantly single action potentials on every gamma cycle. Thus, within a locally excited network, O-LM cells are likely to provide a theta-frequency patterned output to distal dendritic segments, whereas basket and bistratified cells are involved in the generation of locally synchronous gamma band oscillations. The anatomy and output profile of trilaminar cells suggest they are involved in the projection of locally generated gamma rhythms to distal sites. Therefore a division of labour appears to exist whereby different frequencies and spatiotemporal properties of hippocampal rhythms are mediated by different interneurone subtypes. PMID:15486016

  8. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking.

  9. Cryptosporidium parvum infects human cholangiocytes via sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jeremy B.; O’Hara, Steven P.; Small, Aaron J.; Tietz, Pamela S.; Choudhury, Amit K.; Pagano, Richard E.; Chen, Xian-Ming; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cryptosporidium parvum attaches to intestinal and biliary epithelial cells via specific molecules on host-cell surface membranes including Gal/GalNAc-associated glycoproteins. Subsequent cellular entry of this parasite depends on host-cell membrane alterations to form a parasitophorous vacuole via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Cdc42-associated actin remodelling. How C. parvum hijacks these host-cell processes to facilitate its infection of target epithelia is unclear. Using specific probes to known components of sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (SEMs), we detected aggregation of host-cell SEM components at infection sites during C. parvum infection of cultured human biliary epithelial cells (i.e. cholangiocytes). Activation and membrane translocation of acid-sphingomyelinase (ASM), an enzyme involved in SEM membrane aggregation, were also observed in infected cells. Pharmacological disruption of SEMs and knockdown of ASM via a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreased C. parvum attachment (by ~ 84%) and cellular invasion (by ~ 88%). Importantly, knockdown of ASM and disruption of SEMs significantly blocked C. parvum-induced accumulation of Gal/GalNAc-associated glycoproteins at infection sites by ~ 90%. Disruption of SEMs and knockdown of ASM also significantly blocked C. parvum-induced activation of host-cell PI-3K and subsequent accumulation of Cdc42 and actin by up to 75%. Our results suggest an important role of SEMs for C. parvum attachment to and entry of host cells, likely via clustering of membrane-binding molecules and facilitating of C. parvum-induced actin remodelling at infection sites through activation of the PI-3K/Cdc42 signalling pathway. PMID:16848787

  10. Dystrophic skeletal muscle fibers display alterations at the level of calcium microdomains

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Woods, Christopher E.; Capote, Joana; Vergara, Julio L.

    2008-01-01

    The spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+-release process in skeletal muscle fibers from normal and mdx fibers were determined using the confocal-spot detection technique. The Ca2+ indicator OGB-5N was used to record action potential-evoked fluorescence signals at consecutive locations separated by 200 nm along multiple sarcomeres of FDB fibers loaded with 10- and 30-mM EGTA. Three-dimensional reconstructions of fluorescence transients demonstrated the existence of microdomains of increased fluorescence around the Ca2+-release sites in both mouse strains. The Ca2+ microdomains in mdx fibers were regularly spaced along the fiber axis, displaying a distribution similar to that seen in normal fibers. Nevertheless, both preparations differed in that in 10-mM EGTA Ca2+ microdomains had smaller amplitudes and were wider in mdx fibers than in controls. In addition, Ca2+-dependent fluorescence transients recorded at selected locations within the sarcomere of mdx muscle fibers were not only smaller, but also slower than their counterparts in normal fibers. Notably, differences in the spatial features of the Ca2+ microdomains recorded in mdx and normal fibers, but not in the amplitude and kinetics of the Ca2+ transients, were eliminated in 30-mM EGTA. Our results consistently demonstrate that Ca2+-release flux calculated from release sites in mdx fibers is uniformly impaired with respect to those normal fibers. The Ca2+-release reduction is consistent with that previously measured using global detection techniques. PMID:18787128

  11. A tunable and reversible platform for the intracellular formation of genetically engineered protein microdomains.

    PubMed

    Pastuszka, Martha K; Janib, Siti M; Weitzhandler, Isaac; Okamoto, Curtis T; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah; Mackay, J Andrew

    2012-11-12

    From mitochondria to the nuclear envelope, the controlled assembly of micro- and nanostructures is essential for life; however, the level at which we can deliberately engineer the assembly of microstructures within intracellular environments remains primitive. To overcome this obstacle, we present a platform to reversibly assemble genetically engineered protein microdomains (GEPMs) on the time scale of minutes within living cells. Biologically inspired from the human protein tropoelastin, these protein polymers form a secondary aqueous phase above a tunable transition temperature. This assembly process is easily manipulated to occur at or near physiological temperature by adjusting molecular weight and hydrophobicity. We fused protein polymers to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize their behavior within the cytoplasm. While soluble, these polymers have a similar intracellular diffusion constant as cytosolic proteins at 7.4 μm(2)/s; however, above their phase transition temperature, the proteins form distinct microdomains (0.1-2 μm) with a reduced diffusion coefficient of 1.1 μm(2)/s. Microdomain assembly and disassembly are both rapid processes with half-lives of 3.8 and 1.0 min, respectively. Via selection of the protein polymer, the assembly temperature is tunable between 20 and 40 °C. This approach may be useful to control intracellular formation of genetically engineered proteins and protein complexes into concentrated microdomains. PMID:23088632

  12. cAMP signaling microdomains and their observation by optical methods

    PubMed Central

    Calebiro, Davide; Maiellaro, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a major intracellular mediator of many hormones and neurotransmitters and regulates a myriad of cell functions, including synaptic plasticity in neurons. Whereas cAMP can freely diffuse in the cytosol, a growing body of evidence suggests the formation of cAMP gradients and microdomains near the sites of cAMP production, where cAMP signals remain apparently confined. The mechanisms responsible for the formation of such microdomains are subject of intensive investigation. The development of optical methods based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), which allow a direct observation of cAMP signaling with high temporal and spatial resolution, is playing a fundamental role in elucidating the nature of such microdomains. Here, we will review the optical methods used for monitoring cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in living cells, providing some examples of their application in neurons, and will discuss the major hypotheses on the formation of cAMP/PKA microdomains. PMID:25389388

  13. Occipital and occipital "plus" epilepsies: A study of involved epileptogenic networks through SEEG quantification.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Angela; Bonini, Francesca; Lagarde, Stanislas; McGonigal, Aileen; Gavaret, Martine; Scavarda, Didier; Carron, Romain; Aubert, Sandrine; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Médina Villalon, Samuel; Bénar, Christian; Trebuchon, Agnes; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Compared with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsies, the occipital lobe epilepsies (OLE) remain poorly characterized. In this study, we aimed at classifying the ictal networks involving OLE and investigated clinical features of the OLE network subtypes. We studied 194 seizures from 29 consecutive patients presenting with OLE and investigated by stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG). Epileptogenicity of occipital and extraoccipital regions was quantified according to the 'epileptogenicity index' (EI) method. We found that 79% of patients showed widespread epileptogenic zone organization, involving parietal or temporal regions in addition to the occipital lobe. Two main groups of epileptogenic zone organization within occipital lobe seizures were identified: a pure occipital group and an occipital "plus" group, the latter including two further subgroups, occipitotemporal and occipitoparietal. In 29% of patients, the epileptogenic zone was found to have a bilateral organization. The most epileptogenic structure was the fusiform gyrus (mean EI: 0.53). Surgery was proposed in 18/29 patients, leading to seizure freedom in 55% (Engel Class I). Results suggest that, in patient candidates for surgery, the majority of cases are characterized by complex organization of the EZ, corresponding to the occipital plus group. PMID:27454330

  14. Occipital and occipital "plus" epilepsies: A study of involved epileptogenic networks through SEEG quantification.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Angela; Bonini, Francesca; Lagarde, Stanislas; McGonigal, Aileen; Gavaret, Martine; Scavarda, Didier; Carron, Romain; Aubert, Sandrine; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Médina Villalon, Samuel; Bénar, Christian; Trebuchon, Agnes; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Compared with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsies, the occipital lobe epilepsies (OLE) remain poorly characterized. In this study, we aimed at classifying the ictal networks involving OLE and investigated clinical features of the OLE network subtypes. We studied 194 seizures from 29 consecutive patients presenting with OLE and investigated by stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG). Epileptogenicity of occipital and extraoccipital regions was quantified according to the 'epileptogenicity index' (EI) method. We found that 79% of patients showed widespread epileptogenic zone organization, involving parietal or temporal regions in addition to the occipital lobe. Two main groups of epileptogenic zone organization within occipital lobe seizures were identified: a pure occipital group and an occipital "plus" group, the latter including two further subgroups, occipitotemporal and occipitoparietal. In 29% of patients, the epileptogenic zone was found to have a bilateral organization. The most epileptogenic structure was the fusiform gyrus (mean EI: 0.53). Surgery was proposed in 18/29 patients, leading to seizure freedom in 55% (Engel Class I). Results suggest that, in patient candidates for surgery, the majority of cases are characterized by complex organization of the EZ, corresponding to the occipital plus group.

  15. Mechanisms and neuronal networks involved in reactive and proactive cognitive control of interference in working memory.

    PubMed

    Irlbacher, Kerstin; Kraft, Antje; Kehrer, Stefanie; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive control can be reactive or proactive in nature. Reactive control mechanisms, which support the resolution of interference, start after its onset. Conversely, proactive control involves the anticipation and prevention of interference prior to its occurrence. The interrelation of both types of cognitive control is currently under debate: Are they mediated by different neuronal networks? Or are there neuronal structures that have the potential to act in a proactive as well as in a reactive manner? This review illustrates the way in which integrating knowledge gathered from behavioral studies, functional imaging, and human electroencephalography proves useful in answering these questions. We focus on studies that investigate interference resolution at the level of working memory representations. In summary, different mechanisms are instrumental in supporting reactive and proactive control. Distinct neuronal networks are involved, though some brain regions, especially pre-SMA, possess functions that are relevant to both control modes. Therefore, activation of these brain areas could be observed in reactive, as well as proactive control, but at different times during information processing.

  16. Obesity is marked by distinct functional connectivity in brain networks involved in food reward and salience.

    PubMed

    Wijngaarden, M A; Veer, I M; Rombouts, S A R B; van Buchem, M A; Willems van Dijk, K; Pijl, H; van der Grond, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that brain circuits involved in reward and salience respond differently to fasting in obese versus lean individuals. We compared functional connectivity networks related to food reward and saliency after an overnight fast (baseline) and after a prolonged fast of 48 h in lean versus obese subjects. We included 13 obese (2 males, 11 females, BMI 35.4 ± 1.2 kg/m(2), age 31 ± 3 years) and 11 lean subjects (2 males, 9 females, BMI 23.2 ± 0.5 kg/m(2), age 28 ± 3 years). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were made after an overnight fast (baseline) and after a prolonged 48 h fast. Functional connectivity of the amygdala, hypothalamus and posterior cingulate cortex (default-mode) networks was assessed using seed-based correlations. At baseline, we found a stronger connectivity between hypothalamus and left insula in the obese subjects. This effect diminished upon the prolonged fast. After prolonged fasting, connectivity of the hypothalamus with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) increased in lean subjects and decreased in obese subjects. Amygdala connectivity with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was stronger in lean subjects at baseline, which did not change upon the prolonged fast. No differences in posterior cingulate cortex connectivity were observed. In conclusion, obesity is marked by alterations in functional connectivity networks involved in food reward and salience. Prolonged fasting differentially affected hypothalamic connections with the dACC and the insula between obese and lean subjects. Our data support the idea that food reward and nutrient deprivation are differently perceived and/or processed in obesity.

  17. Identification of microdomains involved in association of "Arabidopsis" Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In planta, high capacity tonoplast Ca2+/H+ antiport is mediated in part by a family of CAtion Exchangers (CAX). Each CAX can be divided into two weakly homologous halves (N- and C-) at the negatively charged loop between transmembrane (TM) 6 and TM7. Some CAX halves (N+C) co-expressed in yeast cells...

  18. [Networks involving quorum sensing, cyclic-di-GMP and nitric oxide on biofilm production in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mata, Alberto; Fernández-Domínguez, Ileana J; Nuñez-Reza, Karen J; Xiqui-Vázquez, María L; Baca, Beatriz E

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, and their flexibility is derived in part from a complex extracellular matrix that can be made-to-order to cope with environmental demand. Although common developmental stages leading to biofilm formation have been described, an in-depth knowledge of genetic and signaling is required to understand biofilm formation. Bacteria detect changes in population density by quorum sensing and particular environmental conditions, using signals such as cyclic di-GMP or nitric oxide. The significance of understanding these signaling pathways lies in that they control a broad variety of functions such as biofilm formation, and motility, providing benefits to bacteria as regards host colonization, defense against competitors, and adaptation to changing environments. Due to the importance of these features, we here review the signaling network and regulatory connections among quorum sensing, c-di-GMP and nitric oxide involving biofilm formation.

  19. A network of enzymes involved in repair of oxidative DNA damage in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanwen; Pelicic, Vladimir; Freemont, Paul S.; Baldwin, Geoff S.; Tang, Christoph M.

    2013-01-01

    Although oxidative stress is a key aspect of innate immunity, little is known about how host-restricted pathogens successfully repair DNA damage. Base excision repair (BER) is responsible for correcting nucleobases damaged by oxidative stress, and is essential for bloodstream infection caused by the human pathogen, Neisseria meningitidis. We have characterised meningococcal BER enzymes involved in the recognition and removal of damaged nucleobases, and incision of the DNA backbone. We demonstrate that the bi-functional glycosylase/lyases Nth and MutM share several overlapping activities and functional redundancy. However MutM and other members of the GO system, which deal with 8-oxoG, a common lesion of oxidative damage, are not required for survival of N. meningitidis under oxidative stress. Instead, the mismatch repair pathway provides back-up for the GO system, while the lyase activity of Nth can substitute for the meningococcal AP endonuclease, NApe. Our genetic and biochemical evidence show that DNA repair is achieved through a robust network of enzymes that provides a flexible system of DNA repair. This network is likely to reflect successful adaptation to the human nasopharynx, and might provide a paradigm for DNA repair in other prokaryotes. PMID:22296581

  20. A network of assembly factors is involved in remodeling rRNA elements during preribosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Baßler, Jochen; Paternoga, Helge; Holdermann, Iris; Thoms, Matthias; Granneman, Sander; Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Nyarko, Afua; Stier, Gunter; Clark, Sarah A.; Schraivogel, Daniel; Kallas, Martina; Beckmann, Roland; Tollervey, David

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves ∼200 assembly factors, but how these contribute to ribosome maturation is poorly understood. Here, we identify a network of factors on the nascent 60S subunit that actively remodels preribosome structure. At its hub is Rsa4, a direct substrate of the force-generating ATPase Rea1. We show that Rsa4 is connected to the central protuberance by binding to Rpl5 and to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) helix 89 of the nascent peptidyl transferase center (PTC) through Nsa2. Importantly, Nsa2 binds to helix 89 before relocation of helix 89 to the PTC. Structure-based mutations of these factors reveal the functional importance of their interactions for ribosome assembly. Thus, Rsa4 is held tightly in the preribosome and can serve as a “distribution box,” transmitting remodeling energy from Rea1 into the developing ribosome. We suggest that a relay-like factor network coupled to a mechano-enzyme is strategically positioned to relocate rRNA elements during ribosome maturation. PMID:25404745

  1. A network of assembly factors is involved in remodeling rRNA elements during preribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Baßler, Jochen; Paternoga, Helge; Holdermann, Iris; Thoms, Matthias; Granneman, Sander; Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Nyarko, Afua; Lee, Woonghee; Stier, Gunter; Clark, Sarah A; Schraivogel, Daniel; Kallas, Martina; Beckmann, Roland; Tollervey, David; Barbar, Elisar; Sinning, Irmi; Hurt, Ed

    2014-11-24

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves ∼200 assembly factors, but how these contribute to ribosome maturation is poorly understood. Here, we identify a network of factors on the nascent 60S subunit that actively remodels preribosome structure. At its hub is Rsa4, a direct substrate of the force-generating ATPase Rea1. We show that Rsa4 is connected to the central protuberance by binding to Rpl5 and to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) helix 89 of the nascent peptidyl transferase center (PTC) through Nsa2. Importantly, Nsa2 binds to helix 89 before relocation of helix 89 to the PTC. Structure-based mutations of these factors reveal the functional importance of their interactions for ribosome assembly. Thus, Rsa4 is held tightly in the preribosome and can serve as a "distribution box," transmitting remodeling energy from Rea1 into the developing ribosome. We suggest that a relay-like factor network coupled to a mechano-enzyme is strategically positioned to relocate rRNA elements during ribosome maturation.

  2. Adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) by amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven from aqueous solution: the study of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Wei, Junfu; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Kai; Wang, Han

    2014-05-30

    A kind of amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven with hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain was prepared through electron beam induced graft polymerization and subsequent ring opening reaction and then utilized in the adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs). To elucidate the superiority of such amphiphilic microdomain, a unique structure without hydrophilic part was constructed as comparison. In addition, the adsorption behaviors including adsorption kinetics, isotherms and pH effect were systematically investigated. The result indicated that the amphiphilic structure and the synergy between hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain could considerably improve the adsorption capacities, rate and affinity. Particularly the existence of hydrophilic microdomain could reduce the diffusion resistance and energy barrier in the adsorption process. These adsorption results showed that the amphiphilic PP nonwoven have the potential to be used in environmental application.

  3. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  4. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-02-11

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  5. Flotillin-1 is essential for PKC-triggered endocytosis and membrane microdomain localization of DAT.

    PubMed

    Cremona, M Laura; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Pau, Kelvin; Bowton, Erica; Speed, Nicole; Lute, Brandon J; Anderson, Monique; Sen, Namita; Robertson, Sabrina D; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Rothman, James E; Galli, Aurelio; Javitch, Jonathan A; Yamamoto, Ai

    2011-04-01

    Plasmalemmal neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) regulate the level of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine (DA) and glutamate, after their release at brain synapses. Stimuli including protein kinase C (PKC) activation can lead to the internalization of some NTTs and a reduction in neurotransmitter clearance capacity. We found that the protein Flotillin-1 (Flot1), also known as Reggie-2, was required for PKC-regulated internalization of members of two different NTT families, the DA transporter (DAT) and the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2, and we identified a conserved serine residue in Flot1 that is essential for transporter internalization. Further analysis revealed that Flot1 was also required to localize DAT within plasma membrane microdomains in stable cell lines, and was essential for amphetamine-induced reverse transport of DA in neurons but not for DA uptake. In sum, our findings provide evidence for a critical role of Flot1-enriched membrane microdomains in PKC-triggered DAT endocytosis and the actions of amphetamine.

  6. Lipid rafts in epithelial brush borders: atypical membrane microdomains with specialized functions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-10-31

    Epithelial cells that fulfil high-throughput digestive/absorptive functions, such as small intestinal enterocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells, are endowed with a dense apical brush border. It has long been recognized that the microvillar surface of the brush border is organized in cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains commonly known as lipid rafts. More recent studies indicate that microvillar rafts, in particular those of enterocytes, have some unusual properties in comparison with rafts present on the surface of other cell types. Thus, microvillar rafts are stable rather than transient/dynamic, and their core components include glycolipids and the divalent lectin galectin-4, which together can be isolated as "superrafts", i.e., membrane microdomains resisting solubilization with Triton X-100 at physiological temperature. These glycolipid/lectin-based rafts serve as platforms for recruitment of GPI-linked and transmembrane digestive enzymes, most likely as an economizing effort to secure and prolong their digestive capability at the microvillar surface. However, in addition to microvilli, the brush border surface also consists of membrane invaginations between adjacent microvilli, which are the only part of the apical surface sterically accessible for membrane fusion/budding events. Many of these invaginations appear as pleiomorphic, deep apical tubules that extend up to 0.5-1 microm into the underlying terminal web region. Their sensitivity to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin suggests them to contain cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts of a different type from the glycolipid-based rafts at the microvillar surface. The brush border is thus an example of a complex membrane system that harbours at least two different types of lipid raft microdomains, each suited to fulfil specialized functions. This conclusion is in line with an emerging, more varied view of lipid rafts being pluripotent microdomains capable of adapting in size, shape, and content to

  7. Detergent-resistant membrane microdomains facilitate Ib oligomer formation and biological activity of Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin.

    PubMed

    Hale, Martha L; Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Popoff, Michel R; Stiles, Bradley G

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin consists of two separate proteins identified as a cell binding protein, iota b (Ib), which forms high-molecular-weight complexes on cells generating Na(+)/K(+)-permeable pores through which iota a (Ia), an ADP-ribosyltransferase, presumably enters the cytosol. Identity of the cell receptor and membrane domains involved in Ib binding, oligomer formation, and internalization is currently unknown. In this study, Vero (toxin-sensitive) and MRC-5 (toxin-resistant) cells were incubated with Ib, after which detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) were extracted with cold Triton X-100. Western blotting revealed that Ib oligomers localized in DRMs extracted from Vero, but not MRC-5, cells while monomeric Ib was detected in the detergent-soluble fractions of both cell types. The Ib protoxin, previously shown to bind Vero cells but not form oligomers or induce cytotoxicity, was detected only in the soluble fractions. Vero cells pretreated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C before addition of Ib indicated that glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins were minimally involved in Ib binding or oligomer formation. While pretreatment of Vero cells with filipin (which sequesters cholesterol) had no effect, methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (which extracts cholesterol) reduced Ib binding and oligomer formation and delayed iota-toxin cytotoxicity. These studies showed that iota-toxin exploits DRMs for oligomer formation to intoxicate cells.

  8. Variations in the transcriptome of Alzheimer's disease reveal molecular networks involved in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Monika; Ruan, Jianhua; Zhang, Weixiong

    2008-01-01

    Background Because of its polygenic nature, Alzheimer's disease is believed to be caused not by defects in single genes, but rather by variations in a large number of genes and their complex interactions. A systems biology approach, such as the generation of a network of co-expressed genes and the identification of functional modules and cis-regulatory elements, to extract insights and knowledge from microarray data will lead to a better understanding of complex diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we perform a series of analyses using co-expression networks, cis-regulatory elements, and functions of co-expressed gene modules to analyze single-cell gene expression data from normal and Alzheimer's disease-affected subjects. Results We identified six co-expressed gene modules, each of which represented a biological process perturbed in Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease-related genes, such as APOE, A2M, PON2 and MAP4, and cardiovascular disease-associated genes, including COMT, CBS and WNK1, all congregated in a single module. Some of the disease-related genes were hub genes while many of them were directly connected to one or more hub genes. Further investigation of this disease-associated module revealed cis-regulatory elements that match to the binding sites of transcription factors involved in Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease. Conclusion Our results show the extensive links between Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease at the co-expression and co-regulation levels, providing further evidence for the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease are linked. Our results support the notion that diseases in which the same set of biochemical pathways are affected may tend to co-occur with each other. PMID:18842138

  9. Blast exposure causes dynamic microglial/macrophage responses and microdomains of brain microvessel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huber, B R; Meabon, J S; Hoffer, Z S; Zhang, J; Hoekstra, J G; Pagulayan, K F; McMillan, P J; Mayer, C L; Banks, W A; Kraemer, B C; Raskind, M A; McGavern, D B; Peskind, E R; Cook, D G

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to blast overpressure (BOP) is associated with behavioral, cognitive, and neuroimaging abnormalities. We investigated the dynamic responses of cortical vasculature and its relation to microglia/macrophage activation in mice using intravital two-photon microscopy following mild blast exposure. We found that blast caused vascular dysfunction evidenced by microdomains of aberrant vascular permeability. Microglial/macrophage activation was specifically associated with these restricted microdomains, as evidenced by rapid microglial process retraction, increased ameboid morphology, and escape of blood-borne Q-dot tracers that were internalized in microglial/macrophage cell bodies and phagosome-like compartments. Microdomains of cortical vascular disruption and microglial/macrophage activation were also associated with aberrant tight junction morphology that was more prominent after repetitive (3×) blast exposure. Repetitive, but not single, BOPs also caused TNFα elevation two weeks post-blast. In addition, following a single BOP we found that aberrantly phosphorylated tau rapidly accumulated in perivascular domains, but cleared within four hours, suggesting it was removed from the perivascular area, degraded, and/or dephosphorylated. Taken together these findings argue that mild blast exposure causes an evolving CNS insult that is initiated by discrete disturbances of vascular function, thereby setting the stage for more protracted and more widespread neuroinflammatory responses.

  10. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  11. Ca2+ microdomains near plasma membrane Ca2+ channels: impact on cell function.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Anant B

    2008-07-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a rise in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) can activate a plethora of responses that operate on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Inherent to the use of a promiscuous signal like Ca(2+) is the problem of specificity: how can Ca(2+) activate some responses but not others? We now know that the spatial profile of the Ca(2+) signal is important Ca(2+) does not simply rise uniformly throughout the cytoplasm upon stimulation but can reach very high levels locally, creating spatial gradients. The most fundamental local Ca(2+) signal is the Ca(2+) microdomain that develops rapidly near open plasmalemmal Ca(2+) channels like voltage-gated L-type (Cav1.2) and store-operated CRAC channels. Recent work has revealed that Ca(2+) microdomains arising from these channels are remarkably versatile in triggering a range of responses that differ enormously in both temporal and spatial profile. Here, I delineate basic features of Ca(2+) microdomains and then describe how these highly local signals are used by Ca(2+)-permeable channels to drive cellular responses. PMID:18467365

  12. Orientational control of block copolymer microdomains by sub-tesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinadhan, Manesh; Choo, Youngwoo; Feng, Xunda; Kawabata, Kohsuke; di, Xiaojun; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic fields offer a versatile approach to controlling the orientation of block copolymer (BCP) microdomains during self-assembly. To date however, such control has required the imposition of large magnetic fields (>3T), necessitating the use of complex magnet systems - either superconducting or very large conventional resistive magnets. Here we demonstrate the ability to direct BCP self-assembly using considerably smaller fields (<1T) which are accessible using simple rare-earth permanent magnets. The low field alignment is enabled by the presence of small quantities of mesogenic species that are blended into, and co-assemble with the liquid crystalline (LC) mesophase of the side-chain LC BCP under study. In situ SAXS experiments reveal a pronounced dependence of the critical alignment field strength on the stoichiometry of the blend, and the ability to generate aligned microdomains with orientational distribution coefficients exceeding 0.95 at sub-1 T fields for appropriate stoichiometries. The alignment response overall can be rationalized in terms of increased mobility and grain size due to the presence of the mesogenic additive. We use a permanent magnet to fabricate films with aligned nanopores, and the utility of this approach to generate complex BCP microdomain patterns in thin films by local field screening are highlighted. NSF DMR-1410568 and DMR-0847534.

  13. Nuclear lipid microdomain as resting place of dexamethasone to impair cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Cascianelli, Giacomo; Tringali, Sabina; Tringali, Anna Rita; Lazzarini, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Bartoccini, Elisa; Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Lazzarini, Remo; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Curcio, Francesco; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    The action of dexamethasone is initiated by, and strictly dependent upon, the interaction of the drug with its receptor followed by its translocation into the nucleus where modulates gene expression. Where the drug localizes at the intranuclear level is not yet known. We aimed to study the localization of the drug in nuclear lipid microdomains rich in sphingomyelin content that anchor active chromatin and act as platform for transcription modulation. The study was performed in non-Hodgkin's T cell human lymphoblastic lymphoma (SUP-T1 cell line). We found that when dexamethasone enters into the nucleus it localizes in nuclear lipid microdomains where influences sphingomyelin metabolism. This is followed after 24 h by a cell cycle block accompanied by the up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B), growth arrest and DNA-damage 45A (GADD45A), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) genes and by the reduction of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phospho signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (phoshoSTAT3) proteins. After 48 h some cells show morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis while the number of the cells that undergo cell division and express B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) is very low. We suggest that the integrity of nuclear lipid microdomains is important for the response to glucocorticoids of cancer cells.

  14. The melanoma proteoglycan: restricted expression on microspikes, a specific microdomain of the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan associated with human melanomas and defined by mAb's F24.47 and 48.7 has been characterized biochemically and localized by indirect immunogold electron microscopy. These antibodies recognize distinct epitopes on the intact proteoglycan. In addition, mAb 48.7 also recognizes an epitope on a 250,000-D glycoprotein and is therefore similar to antibody 9.2.27 (described by Bumol, T.F., and R.A. Reisfeld, 1982, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 79:1245-1249). Furthermore, it was shown that the glycosaminoglycan chains released by alkaline borohydride treatment of the proteoglycan recognized by mAb 48.7 had a size of approximately 60,000 D. Since the intact proteoglycan was estimated to be 420,000 D, there are probably three chondroitin sulfate chains attached to the 250,000-D core glycoprotein. Furthermore, an oligosaccharide fraction containing 42% of the 3H activity (glucosamine as precursor) was isolated. Immunolocalization studies using whole-mount electron microscopy revealed that the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan was present almost exclusively on microspikes, a microdomain of the melanoma cell surface. These processes were present as 1-2-micron structures on the upper cell surface and as longer (up to 20 micron) structures at the cell periphery. Peripheral microspikes were involved in the initial interactions between adjacent cells and formed complex footpads that made contact with the substratum. Immunogold-labeled cells were also thin sectioned and the specific localization of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan antigen was quantitated. The data confirmed the results of whole-mount microscopy and demonstrated a statistically significant association of the antigen with the microspike processes as compared with other areas of the cell surface. By using two different mAb's (48.7 and F24.47) that recognize epitopes on either the core glycoprotein or the intact proteoglycan, respectively, we have demonstrated that both

  15. Alcohol-Induced Histone Acetylation Reveals a Gene Network Involved in Alcohol Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R.; Lew, Linda; Prado, Francisco J.; Ong, Darryl S.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol. PMID:24348266

  16. Cytosolic H+ microdomain developed around AE1 during AE1-mediated Cl-/HCO3- exchange.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Danielle E; Casey, Joseph R

    2011-04-01

    Microdomains, regions of discontinuous cytosolic solute concentration enhanced by rapid solute transport and slow diffusion rates, have many cellular roles. pH-regulatory membrane transporters, like the Cl−/HCO3− exchanger AE1, could develop H+ microdomains since AE1 has a rapid transport rate and cytosolic H+ diffusion is slow. We examined whether the pH environment surrounding AE1 differs from other cellular locations. As AE1 drives Cl−/HCO3− exchange, differences in pH, near and remote from AE1, were monitored by confocal microscopy using two pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins: deGFP4 (GFP) and mNectarine (mNect). Plasma membrane (PM) pH (defined as ∼1 μm region around the cell periphery) was monitored by GFP fused to AE1 (GFP.AE1), and mNect fused to an inactive mutant of the Na+-coupled nucleoside co-transporter, hCNT3 (mNect.hCNT3). GFP.AE1 to mNect.hCNT3 distance was varied by co-expression of different amounts of the two proteins in HEK293 cells. As the GFP.AE1–mNect.hCNT3 distance increased, mNect.hCNT3 detected the Cl−/HCO3− exchange-associated cytosolic pH change with a time delay and reduced rate of pH change compared to GFP.AE1. We found that a H+ microdomain 0.3 μm in diameter forms around GFP.AE1 during physiological HCO3− transport. Carbonic anhydrase isoform II inhibition prevented H+ microdomain formation. We also measured the rate of H+ movement from PM GFP.AE1 to endoplasmic reticulum (ER), using mNect fused to the cytosolic face of ER-resident calnexin (CNX.mNect). The rate of H+ diffusion through cytosol was 60-fold faster than along the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane. The pH environment surrounding pH regulatory transport proteins may differ as a result of H+ microdomain formation, which will affect nearby pH-sensitive processes.

  17. Identification, Localization, and Functional Implications of the Microdomain-Forming Stomatin Family in the Ciliated Protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Plattner, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The SPFH protein superfamily is assumed to occur universally in eukaryotes, but information from protozoa is scarce. In the Paramecium genome, we found only Stomatins, 20 paralogs grouped in 8 families, STO1 to STO8. According to cDNA analysis, all are expressed, and molecular modeling shows the typical SPFH domain structure for all subgroups. For further analysis we used family-specific sequences for fluorescence and immunogold labeling, gene silencing, and functional tests. With all family members tested, we found a patchy localization at/near the cell surface and on vesicles. The Sto1p and Sto4p families are also associated with the contractile vacuole complex. Sto4p also makes puncta on some food vacuoles and is abundant on vesicles recycling from the release site of spent food vacuoles to the site of nascent food vacuole formation. Silencing of the STO1 family reduces mechanosensitivity (ciliary reversal upon touching an obstacle), thus suggesting relevance for positioning of mechanosensitive channels in the plasmalemma. Silencing of STO4 members increases pulsation frequency of the contractile vacuole complex and reduces phagocytotic activity of Paramecium cells. In summary, Sto1p and Sto4p members seem to be involved in positioning specific superficial and intracellular microdomain-based membrane components whose functions may depend on mechanosensation (extracellular stimuli and internal osmotic pressure). PMID:23376944

  18. A plasma membrane microdomain compartmentalizes ephrin-generated cAMP signals to prune developing retinal axon arbors

    PubMed Central

    Averaimo, Stefania; Assali, Ahlem; Ros, Oriol; Couvet, Sandrine; Zagar, Yvrick; Genescu, Ioana; Rebsam, Alexandra; Nicol, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The development of neuronal circuits is controlled by guidance molecules that are hypothesized to interact with the cholesterol-enriched domains of the plasma membrane termed lipid rafts. Whether such domains enable local intracellular signalling at the submicrometre scale in developing neurons and are required for shaping the nervous system connectivity in vivo remains controversial. Here, we report a role for lipid rafts in generating domains of local cAMP signalling in axonal growth cones downstream of ephrin-A repulsive guidance cues. Ephrin-A-dependent retraction of retinal ganglion cell axons involves cAMP signalling restricted to the vicinity of lipid rafts and is independent of cAMP modulation outside of this microdomain. cAMP modulation near lipid rafts controls the pruning of ectopic axonal branches of retinal ganglion cells in vivo, a process requiring intact ephrin-A signalling. Together, our findings indicate that lipid rafts structure the subcellular organization of intracellular cAMP signalling shaping axonal arbors during the nervous system development. PMID:27694812

  19. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. PMID:22988039

  20. Using Long-Distance Scientist Involvement to Enhance NASA Volunteer Network Educational Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since 1999, the NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassadors (SSA) and Solar System Educators (SSEP) programs have used specially-trained volunteers to expand education and public outreach beyond the immediate NASA center regions. Integrating nationwide volunteers in these highly effective programs has helped optimize agency funding set aside for education. Since these volunteers were trained by NASA scientists and engineers, they acted as "stand-ins" for the mission team members in communities across the country. Through the efforts of these enthusiastic volunteers, students gained an increased awareness of NASA's space exploration missions through Solar System Ambassador classroom visits, and teachers across the country became familiarized with NASA's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) educational materials through Solar System Educator workshops; however the scientist was still distant. In 2003, NASA started the Digital Learning Network (DLN) to bring scientists into the classroom via videoconferencing. The first equipment was expensive and only schools that could afford the expenditure were able to benefit; however, recent advancements in software allow classrooms to connect to the DLN via personal computers and an internet connection. Through collaboration with the DLN at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Goddard Spaceflight Center, Solar System Ambassadors and Solar System Educators in remote parts of the country are able to bring scientists into their classroom visits or workshops as guest speakers. The goals of this collaboration are to provide special elements to the volunteers' event, allow scientists opportunities for education involvement with minimal effort, acquaint teachers with DLN services and enrich student's classroom learning experience.;

  1. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. PMID:27375200

  2. Dynamical properties of gene regulatory networks involved in long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nido, Gonzalo S.; Ryan, Margaret M.; Benuskova, Lubica; Williams, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    The long-lasting enhancement of synaptic effectiveness known as long-term potentiation (LTP) is considered to be the cellular basis of long-term memory. LTP elicits changes at the cellular and molecular level, including temporally specific alterations in gene networks. LTP can be seen as a biological process in which a transient signal sets a new homeostatic state that is “remembered” by cellular regulatory systems. Previously, we have shown that early growth response (Egr) transcription factors are of fundamental importance to gene networks recruited early after LTP induction. From a systems perspective, we hypothesized that these networks will show less stable architecture, while networks recruited later will exhibit increased stability, being more directly related to LTP consolidation. Using random Boolean network (RBN) simulations we found that the network derived at 24 h was markedly more stable than those derived at 20 min or 5 h post-LTP. This temporal effect on the vulnerability of the networks is mirrored by what is known about the vulnerability of LTP and memory itself. Differential gene co-expression analysis further highlighted the importance of the Egr family and found a rapid enrichment in connectivity at 20 min, followed by a systematic decrease, providing a potential explanation for the down-regulation of gene expression at 24 h documented in our preceding studies. We also found that the architecture exhibited by a control and the 24 h LTP co-expression networks fit well to a scale-free distribution, known to be robust against perturbations. By contrast the 20 min and 5 h networks showed more truncated distributions. These results suggest that a new homeostatic state is achieved 24 h post-LTP. Together, these data present an integrated view of the genomic response following LTP induction by which the stability of the networks regulated at different times parallel the properties observed at the synapse. PMID:26300724

  3. Construction of protein interaction network involved in lung adenocarcinomas using a novel algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhu; Xu, Ning; Yu, Bo; Xu, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Pei-Ge; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Studies that only assess differentially-expressed (DE) genes do not contain the information required to investigate the mechanisms of diseases. A complete knowledge of all the direct and indirect interactions between proteins may act as a significant benchmark in the process of forming a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. The results of protein interaction network studies are often inconsistent and are based on various methods. In the present study, a combined network was constructed using selected gene pairs, following the conversion and combination of the scores of gene pairs that were obtained across multiple approaches by a novel algorithm. Samples from patients with and without lung adenocarcinoma were compared, and the RankProd package was used to identify DE genes. The empirical Bayesian (EB) meta-analysis approach, the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins database (STRING), the weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) package and the differentially-coexpressed genes and links package (DCGL) were used for network construction. A combined network was also constructed with a novel rank-based algorithm using a combined score. The topological features of the 5 networks were analyzed and compared. A total of 941 DE genes were screened. The topological analysis indicated that the gene interaction network constructed using the WGCNA method was more likely to produce a small-world property, which has a small average shortest path length and a large clustering coefficient, whereas the combined network was confirmed to be a scale-free network. Gene pairs that were identified using the novel combined method were mostly enriched in the cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. The present study provided a novel perspective to the network-based analysis. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Compared with single methods, the combined algorithm used in the present study may provide a novel method to

  4. Microdomain patterns from directional eutectic solidification and epitaxy

    PubMed

    De Rosa C; Park; Thomas; Lotz

    2000-05-25

    Creating a regular surface pattern on the nanometre scale is important for many technological applications, such as the periodic arrays constructed by optical microlithography that are used as separation media in electrophoresis, and island structures used for high-density magnetic recording devices. Block copolymer patterns can also be used for lithography on length scales below 30 nanometres (refs 3-5). But for such polymers to prove useful for thin-film technologies, chemically patterned surfaces need to be made substantially defect-free over large areas, and with tailored domain orientation and periodicity. So far, control over domain orientation has been achieved by several routes, using electric fields, temperature gradients, patterned substrates and neutral confining surfaces. Here we describe an extremely fast process that leads the formation of two-dimensional periodic thin films having large area and uniform thickness, and which possess vertically aligned cylindrical domains each containing precisely one crystalline lamella. The process involves rapid solidification of a semicrystalline block copolymer from a crystallizable solvent between glass substrates using directional solidification and epitaxy. The film is both chemically and structurally periodic, thereby providing new opportunities for more selective and versatile nanopatterned surfaces.

  5. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo; Komiya, Eriko; Dang, Nam H; Iwao, Noriaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2016-05-20

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulating the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis.

  6. Inference of a Transcriptional Network Involved in Chemical Inhibition of Estrogen Synthesis in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  7. Coupling acidic organelles with the ER through Ca²⁺ microdomains at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Penny, Christopher J; Kilpatrick, Bethan S; Eden, Emily R; Patel, Sandip

    2015-10-01

    Acidic organelles such as lysosomes serve as non-canonical Ca(2+) stores. The Ca(2+) mobilising messenger NAADP is thought to trigger local Ca(2+) release from such stores. These events are then amplified by Ca(2+) channels on canonical ER Ca(2+) stores to generate physiologically relevant global Ca(2+) signals. Coupling likely occurs at microdomains formed at membrane contact sites between acidic organelles and the ER. Molecular analyses and computational modelling suggest heterogeneity in the composition of these contacts and predicted Ca(2+) microdomain behaviour. Conversely, acidic organelles might also locally amplify and temper ER-evoked Ca(2+) signals. Ca(2+) microdomains between distinct Ca(2+) stores are thus likely to be integral to the genesis of complex Ca(2+) signals. PMID:25866010

  8. Composition of MHC class II-enriched lipid microdomains is modified during maturation of primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Setterblad, Niclas; Roucard, Corinne; Bocaccio, Claire; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Charron, Dominique; Mooney, Nuala

    2003-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule expression changes with maturation; immature DCs concentrate MHC class II molecules intracellularly, whereas maturation increases surface expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules to optimize antigen presentation. Signal transduction via MHC class II molecules localized in lipid microdomains has been described in B lymphocytes and in the THP-1 monocyte cell line. We have characterized MHC class II molecules throughout human DC maturation with particular attention to their localization in lipid-rich microdomains. Only immature DCs expressed empty MHC class II molecules, and maturation increased the level of peptide-bound heterodimers. Ligand binding to surface human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR induced rapid internalization in immature DCs. The proportion of cell-surface detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain-clustered HLA-DR was higher in immature DCs despite the higher surface expression of HLA-DR in mature DCs. Constituents of HLA-DR containing microdomains included the src kinase Lyn and the cytoskeletal protein tubulin in immature DCs. Maturation modified the composition of the HLA-DR-containing microdomains to include protein kinase C (PKC)-delta, Lyn, and the cytoskeletal protein actin, accompanied by the loss of tubulin. Signaling via HLA-DR redistributed HLA-DR and -DM and PKC-delta as well as enriching the actin content of mature DC microdomains. The increased expression of HLA-DR as a result of DC maturation was therefore accompanied by modification of the spatial organization of HLA-DR. Such regulation could contribute to the distinct responses induced by ligand binding to MHC class II molecules in immature versus mature DCs.

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Britta; Krautkrämer, Ellen; Tibroni, Nadine; Munte, Claudia E; Rauch, Susanne; Leibrecht, Iris; Glass, Bärbel; Breuer, Sebastian; Geyer, Matthias; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Wieland, Felix T; Fackler, Oliver T

    2007-01-01

    Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo. PMID:17908312

  10. Extrapolating microdomain Ca2+ dynamics using BK channels as a Ca2+ sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Panpan; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Haowen; Yuchi, Ming; Zhang, Guohui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenping; Ding, Mingyue; Cui, Jianming; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiuping

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ ions play crucial roles in mediating physiological and pathophysiological processes, yet Ca2+ dynamics local to the Ca2+ source, either from influx via calcium permeable ion channels on plasmic membrane or release from internal Ca2+ stores, is difficult to delineate. Large-conductance calcium-activated K+ (BK-type) channels, abundantly distribute in excitable cells and often localize to the proximity of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), spatially enabling the coupling of the intracellular Ca2+ signal to the channel gating to regulate membrane excitability and spike firing patterns. Here we utilized the sensitivity and dynamic range of BK to explore non-uniform Ca2+ local transients in the microdomain of VGCCs. Accordingly, we applied flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ to activate BK channels and determine their intrinsic sensitivity to Ca2+. We found that uncaging Ca2+ activated biphasic BK currents with fast and slow components (time constants being τf ≈ 0.2 ms and τs ≈ 10 ms), which can be accounted for by biphasic Ca2+ transients following light photolysis. We estimated the Ca2+-binding rate constant kb (≈1.8 × 108 M−1s−1) for mSlo1 and further developed a model in which BK channels act as a calcium sensor capable of quantitatively predicting local microdomain Ca2+ transients in the vicinity of VGCCs during action potentials. PMID:26776352

  11. Microdomains shift and rotate in the lateral wall of cochlear outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Rei; Park, Channy; Kalinec, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility, a response consisting of reversible changes in cell length and diameter induced by electrical stimulation, confers remarkable sensitivity and frequency resolution to the mammalian inner ear. Looking for a better understanding of this mechanism, we labeled isolated guinea pig OHCs with microspheres and, using high-speed video recording, investigated their movements at the apical, mid, and basal regions of osmotically and electrically stimulated cells. After hypoosmotic challenge, OHCs shortened and their diameter increased, with microspheres moving always toward the central plane; iso-osmolarity returned OHCs to their original shape and microspheres to their original positions. Under electrical stimulation, microspheres exhibited robust movements, with their displacement vectors changing in direction from random to parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cells with peak reorientation speeds of up to 6 rad/s and returning to random after 5 min without stimulation. Alterations in plasma-membrane cholesterol levels as well as cytoskeleton integrity affected microsphere responses. We concluded that microspheres attach to different molecular microdomains, and these microdomains are able to shift and rotate in the plane of the OHC lateral wall with a dynamics tightly regulated by membrane lipid composition and the cortical cytoskeleton.

  12. Microdomains of endoplasmic reticulum within the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal myofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaakinen, Mika; Papponen, Hinni; Metsikkoe, Kalervo

    2008-01-15

    The relationship between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle cells has remained obscure. In this study, we found that ER- and SR-specific membrane proteins exhibited diverse solubility properties when extracted with mild detergents. Accordingly, the major SR-specific protein Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA) remained insoluble in Brij 58 and floated in sucrose gradients while typical ER proteins were partially or fully soluble. Sphingomyelinase treatment rendered SERCA soluble in Brij 58. Immunofluorescence staining for resident ER proteins revealed dispersed dots over I bands contrasting the continuous staining pattern of SERCA. Infection of isolated myofibers with enveloped viruses indicated that interfibrillar protein synthesis occurred. Furthermore, we found that GFP-tagged Dad1, able to incorporate into the oligosaccharyltransferase complex, showed the dot-like structures but the fusion protein was also present in membranes over the Z lines. This behaviour mimics that of cargo proteins that accumulated over the Z lines when blocked in the ER. Taken together, the results suggest that resident ER proteins comprised Brij 58-soluble microdomains within the insoluble SR membrane. After synthesis and folding in the ER-microdomains, cargo proteins and non-incorporated GFP-Dad1 diffused into the Z line-flanking compartment which likely represents the ER exit sites.

  13. Lipid microdomain modification sustains neuronal viability in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herzer, Silke; Meldner, Sascha; Rehder, Klara; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Nordström, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Decreased neuronal insulin receptor (IR) signaling in Alzheimer's disease is suggested to contribute to synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. This work shows that alteration of membrane microdomains increases IR levels and signaling, as well as neuronal viability in AD models in vitro and in vivo. Neuronal membrane microdomains are highly enriched in gangliosides. We found that inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), the key enzyme of ganglioside biosynthesis, increases viability of cortical neurons in 5xFAD mice, as well as in cultured neurons exposed to oligomeric amyloid-β-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs). We furthermore demonstrate a molecular mechanism explaining how gangliosides mediate ADDL-related toxic effects on IR of murine neurons. GCS inhibition increases the levels of functional dendritic IR on the neuronal surface by decreasing caveolin-1-mediated IR internalization. Consequently, IR signaling is increased in neurons exposed to ADDL stress. Thus, we propose that GCS inhibition constitutes a potential target for protecting neurons from ADDL-mediated neurotoxicity and insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27639375

  14. Networks involved in olfaction and their dynamics using independent component analysis and unified structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Karunanayaka, Prasanna; Eslinger, Paul J; Wang, Jian-Li; Weitekamp, Christopher W; Molitoris, Sarah; Gates, Kathleen M; Molenaar, Peter C M; Yang, Qing X

    2014-05-01

    The study of human olfaction is complicated by the myriad of processing demands in conscious perceptual and emotional experiences of odors. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging with convergent multivariate network analyses, we examined the spatiotemporal behavior of olfactory-generated blood-oxygenated-level-dependent signal in healthy adults. The experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm was found to offset the limitations of olfactory habituation effects and permitted the identification of five functional networks. Analysis delineated separable neuronal circuits that were spatially centered in the primary olfactory cortex, striatum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, rostral prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate, and parietal-occipital junction. We hypothesize that these functional networks subserve primary perceptual, affective/motivational, and higher order olfactory-related cognitive processes. Results provided direct evidence for the existence of parallel networks with top-down modulation for olfactory processing and clearly distinguished brain activations that were sniffing-related versus odor-related. A comprehensive neurocognitive model for olfaction is presented that may be applied to broader translational studies of olfactory function, aging, and neurological disease.

  15. KEGG for representation and analysis of molecular networks involving diseases and drugs.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu; Furumichi, Miho; Tanabe, Mao; Hirakawa, Mika

    2010-01-01

    Most human diseases are complex multi-factorial diseases resulting from the combination of various genetic and environmental factors. In the KEGG database resource (http://www.genome.jp/kegg/), diseases are viewed as perturbed states of the molecular system, and drugs as perturbants to the molecular system. Disease information is computerized in two forms: pathway maps and gene/molecule lists. The KEGG PATHWAY database contains pathway maps for the molecular systems in both normal and perturbed states. In the KEGG DISEASE database, each disease is represented by a list of known disease genes, any known environmental factors at the molecular level, diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs, which may reflect the underlying molecular system. The KEGG DRUG database contains chemical structures and/or chemical components of all drugs in Japan, including crude drugs and TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) formulas, and drugs in the USA and Europe. This database also captures knowledge about two types of molecular networks: the interaction network with target molecules, metabolizing enzymes, other drugs, etc. and the chemical structure transformation network in the history of drug development. The new disease/drug information resource named KEGG MEDICUS can be used as a reference knowledge base for computational analysis of molecular networks, especially, by integrating large-scale experimental datasets.

  16. Tinnitus and hyperacusis involve hyperactivity and enhanced connectivity in auditory-limbic-arousal-cerebellar network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Lijie; Wang, Jian; Lu, Chun-Qiang; Yang, Ming; Jiao, Yun; Zang, Feng-Chao; Radziwon, Kelly; Chen, Guang-Di; Sun, Wei; Krishnan Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash; Salvi, Richard; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss often triggers an inescapable buzz (tinnitus) and causes everyday sounds to become intolerably loud (hyperacusis), but exactly where and how this occurs in the brain is unknown. To identify the neural substrate for these debilitating disorders, we induced both tinnitus and hyperacusis with an ototoxic drug (salicylate) and used behavioral, electrophysiological, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques to identify the tinnitus–hyperacusis network. Salicylate depressed the neural output of the cochlea, but vigorously amplified sound-evoked neural responses in the amygdala, medial geniculate, and auditory cortex. Resting-state fMRI revealed hyperactivity in an auditory network composed of inferior colliculus, medial geniculate, and auditory cortex with side branches to cerebellum, amygdala, and reticular formation. Functional connectivity revealed enhanced coupling within the auditory network and segments of the auditory network and cerebellum, reticular formation, amygdala, and hippocampus. A testable model accounting for distress, arousal, and gating of tinnitus and hyperacusis is proposed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06576.001 PMID:25962854

  17. Regional contraction of brain surface area involves three large-scale networks in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Lena; Mallikarjun, Pavan; Joseph, Verghese; White, Thomas P; Liddle, Peter F

    2011-07-01

    In schizophrenia, morphological changes in the cerebral cortex have been primarily investigated using volumetric or cortical thickness measurements. In healthy subjects, as the brain size increases, the surface area expands disproportionately when compared to the scaling of cortical thickness. In this structural MRI study, we investigated the changes in brain surface area in schizophrenia by constructing relative areal contraction/expansion maps showing group differences in surface area using Freesurfer software in 57 patients and 41 controls. We observed relative areal contraction affecting Default Mode Network, Central Executive Network and Salience Network, in addition to other regions in schizophrenia. We confirmed the surface area reduction across these three large-scale brain networks by undertaking further region-of-interest analysis of surface area. We also observed a significant hemispheric asymmetry in the surface area changes, with the left hemisphere showing a greater reduction in the areal contraction maps. Our findings suggest that a fundamental disturbance in cortical expansion is likely in individuals who develop schizophrenia. PMID:21497489

  18. A new type of entangled coordination network: coexistence of polythreading and polyknotting involved molecular braids.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Xin-Xin; Zhou, Wen; Pang, Chun-Yan; Bao, Fei-Fei; Li, Zaijun

    2012-03-28

    A fascinating polythreaded coordination network formed by 1D crankshaft shaped chains threading into a 2D undulated sheet in a one-over/one-under interweaving fashion was reported, in which the 2D layer exhibits an unusual polyknotted entanglement containing triple-stranded molecular braids. PMID:22331293

  19. Altered brain rhythms and functional network disruptions involved in patients with generalized fixation-off epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Solana, Ana Beatriz; Martínez, Kenia; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; San Antonio-Arce, Victoria; Toledano, Rafael; García-Morales, Irene; Alvárez-Linera, Juan; Gil-Nágel, Antonio; Del Pozo, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    Generalized Fixation-off Sensitivity (CGE-FoS) patients present abnormal EEG patterns when losing fixation. In the present work, we studied two CGE-FoS epileptic patients with simultaneous EEG-fMRI. We aim to identify brain areas that are specifically related to the pathology by identifying the brain networks that are related to the EEG brain altered rhythms. Three main analyses were performed: EEG standalone, where the voltage fluctuations in delta, alpha, and beta EEG bands were obtained; fMRI standalone, where resting-state fMRI ICA analyses for opened and closed eyes conditions were computed per subject; and, EEG-informed fMRI, where EEG delta, alpha and beta oscillations were used to analyze fMRI. Patient 1 showed EEG abnormalities for lower beta band EEG brain rhythm. Fluctuations of this rhythm were correlated with a brain network mainly composed by temporo-frontal areas only found in the closed eyes condition. Patient 2 presented alterations in all the EEG brain rhythms (delta, alpha, beta) under study when closing eyes. Several biologically relevant brain networks highly correlated (r > 0.7) to each other in the closed eyes condition were found. EEG-informed fMRI results in patient 2 showed hypersynchronized patterns in the fMRI correlation spatial maps. The obtained findings allow a differential diagnosis for each patient and different profiles with respect to healthy volunteers. The results suggest a different disruption in the functional brain networks of these patients that depends on their altered brain rhythms. This knowledge could be used to treat these patients by novel brain stimulation approaches targeting specific altered brain networks in each patient.

  20. Neuroblastoma Tyrosine Kinase Signaling Networks Involve FYN and LYN in Endosomes and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ailan; Stokes, Matthew P.; Kuehn, Emily D.; George, Lynn; Comb, Michael; Grimes, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a central role in creating a highly dynamic network of interacting proteins that reads and responds to signals from growth factors in the cellular microenvironment. Cells of the neural crest employ multiple signaling mechanisms to control migration and differentiation during development. It is known that defects in these mechanisms cause neuroblastoma, but how multiple signaling pathways interact to govern cell behavior is unknown. In a phosphoproteomic study of neuroblastoma cell lines and cell fractions, including endosomes and detergent-resistant membranes, 1622 phosphorylated proteins were detected, including more than half of the receptor tyrosine kinases in the human genome. Data were analyzed using a combination of graph theory and pattern recognition techniques that resolve data structure into networks that incorporate statistical relationships and protein-protein interaction data. Clusters of proteins in these networks are indicative of functional signaling pathways. The analysis indicates that receptor tyrosine kinases are functionally compartmentalized into distinct collaborative groups distinguished by activation and intracellular localization of SRC-family kinases, especially FYN and LYN. Changes in intracellular localization of activated FYN and LYN were observed in response to stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinases, ALK and KIT. The results suggest a mechanism to distinguish signaling responses to activation of different receptors, or combinations of receptors, that govern the behavior of the neural crest, which gives rise to neuroblastoma. PMID:25884760

  1. Identifying a Network of Brain Regions Involved in Aversion-Related Processing: A Cross-Species Translational Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Dave J.; Northoff, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ability to detect and respond appropriately to aversive stimuli is essential for all organisms, from fruit flies to humans. This suggests the existence of a core neural network which mediates aversion-related processing. Human imaging studies on aversion have highlighted the involvement of various cortical regions, such as the prefrontal cortex, while animal studies have focused largely on subcortical regions like the periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. However, whether and how these regions form a core neural network of aversion remains unclear. To help determine this, a translational cross-species investigation in humans (i.e., meta-analysis) and other animals (i.e., systematic review of functional neuroanatomy) was performed. Our results highlighted the recruitment of the anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula, and the amygdala as well as other subcortical (e.g., thalamus, midbrain) and cortical (e.g., orbitofrontal) regions in both animals and humans. Importantly, involvement of these regions remained independent of sensory modality. This study provides evidence for a core neural network mediating aversion in both animals and humans. This not only contributes to our understanding of the trans-species neural correlates of aversion but may also carry important implications for psychiatric disorders where abnormal aversive behavior can often be observed. PMID:22102836

  2. SMALL DEDIFFERENTIATED CARDIOMYOCYTES BORDERING ON MICRODOMAINS OF FIBROSIS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERSE REMODELING WITH ASSISTED RECOVERY

    PubMed Central

    Al Darazi, Fahed; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Marion, Tony N.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Weber, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    With the perspective of functional myocardial regeneration, we investigated small cardiomyocytes bordering on microdomains of fibrosis, where they are dedifferentiated re-expressing fetal genes, and determined: i) whether they are atrophied segments of the myofiber syncytium; ii) their redox state; iii) their anatomic relationship to activated myofibroblasts (myoFb), given their putative regulatory role in myocyte dedifferentiation and re-differentiation; iv) the relevance of proteolytic ligases of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) as a mechanistic link to their size; and v) whether they could be rescued from their dedifferentiated phenotype. Chronic aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) was invoked, where hypertensive heart disease with attendant myocardial fibrosis creates the fibrillar collagen substrate for myocyte sequestration with propensity for disuse atrophy, activated myoFb and oxidative stress. To address phenotype rescue, 4 wks ALDOST was terminated followed by 4 wks neurohormonal withdrawal combined with a regimen of exogenous antioxidants, ZnSO4 and nebivolol (assisted recovery). Compared to controls, at 4 wks ALDOST we found small myocytes to be: 1) sequestered by collagen fibrils emanating from microdomains of fibrosis and representing atrophic segments of the myofiber syncytia; 2) dedifferentiated re-expressing fetal genes (β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic peptide); 3) proximal to activated myoFb expressing α-smooth muscle actin microfilaments and angiotensin-converting enzyme; 4) expressing reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO) with increased tissue 8-isoprostane, coupled to ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction; and 5) associated with upregulated redox-sensitive, proteolytic ligases MuRF1 and atrogin-1. In a separate study, we did not find evidence of myocyte replication (BrdU labeling) or expression of stem cell antigen (c-Kit) at wks 1-4 ALDOST. Assisted recovery caused: complete disappearance of myoFb from sites

  3. Dynamic Partitioning of a GPI-Anchored Protein in Glycosphingolipid-Rich Microdomains Imaged by Single-Quantum Dot Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Pinaud, Fabien; Michalet, Xavier; Iyer, Gopal; Margeat, Emmanuel; Moore, Hsiao-Ping; Weiss, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental developments have led to a revision of the classical fluid mosaic model proposed by Singer and Nicholson 35 years ago. In particular, it is now well established that lipids and proteins diffuse heterogeneously in cell plasma membranes. Their complex motion patterns reflect the dynamic structure and composition of the membrane itself, as well as the presence of the underlying cytoskeleton scaffold and that of the extracellular matrix. How the structural organization of plasma membranes influences the diffusion of individual proteins remains a challenging, yet central question for cell signaling and its regulation. Here we have developed a raft-associated glycosylphosphatidyl Inositol-anchored avidin test probe (Av-GPI), whose diffusion patterns indirectly reports on the structure and dynamics of putative raft microdomains in the membrane of HeLa cells. Labeling with quantum dots (qdots) allowed high-resolution and long-term tracking of individual Av-GPI and the classification of their various diffusive behaviors. Using dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we studied the correlation between the diffusion of individual Av-GPI and the location of glycosphingolipid GM1-rich microdomains and caveolae. We show that Av-GPI exhibit a fast and a slow diffusion regime in different membrane regions, and that slowing down of their diffusion is correlated with entry in GM1-rich microdomains located in close proximity to, but distinct, from caveolae. We further show that Av-GPI dynamically partition in and out of these microdomains in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Our results provide direct evidence that cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich microdomains can compartmentalize the diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins in living cells and that the dynamic partitioning raft model appropriately describes the diffusive behavior of some raft-associated proteins across the plasma membrane. PMID:19416475

  4. Neonatal Odor-Shock Conditioning Alters the Neural Network Involved in Odor Fear Learning at Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevelinges, Yannick; Sullivan, Regina M.; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Adult learning and memory functions are strongly dependent on neonatal experiences. We recently showed that neonatal odor-shock learning attenuates later life odor fear conditioning and amygdala activity. In the present work we investigated whether changes observed in adults can also be observed in other structures normally involved, namely…

  5. Social Disparity of Family Involvement in Hong Kong: Effect of Family Resources and Family Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Esther Sui-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Using data from Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study examines the social disparity of family involvement. A total of 4,405 students from 140 Hong Kong secondary schools participated in the first cycle of PISA study identifying four types of…

  6. Involvement of the mentalizing network in social and non-social high construal

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Steen, Johan; Van Overwalle, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) is consistently involved in tasks requiring the processing of mental states, and much rarer so by tasks that do not involve mental state inferences. We hypothesized that the dmPFC might be more generally involved in high construal of stimuli, defined as the formation of concepts or ideas by omitting non-essential features of stimuli, irrespective of their social or non-social nature. In an fMRI study, we presented pictures of a person engaged in everyday activities (social stimuli) or of objects (non-social stimuli) and induced a higher level of construal by instructing participants to generate personality traits of the person or categories to which the objects belonged. This was contrasted against a lower level task where participants had to describe these same pictures visually. As predicted, we found strong involvement of the dmPFC in high construal, with substantial overlap across social and non-social stimuli, including shared activation in the vmPFC/OFC, parahippocampal, fusiform and angular gyrus, precuneus, posterior cingulate and right cerebellum. PMID:23552077

  7. Neural networks involved in learning lexical-semantic and syntactic information in a second language.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jutta L; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Ono, Kentaro; Sugiura, Motoaki; Sadato, Norihiro; Nakamura, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of language acquisition in a realistic learning environment. Japanese native speakers were trained in a miniature version of German prior to fMRI scanning. During scanning they listened to (1) familiar sentences, (2) sentences including a novel sentence structure, and (3) sentences containing a novel word while visual context provided referential information. Learning-related decreases of brain activation over time were found in a mainly left-hemispheric network comprising classical frontal and temporal language areas as well as parietal and subcortical regions and were largely overlapping for novel words and the novel sentence structure in initial stages of learning. Differences occurred at later stages of learning during which content-specific activation patterns in prefrontal, parietal and temporal cortices emerged. The results are taken as evidence for a domain-general network supporting the initial stages of language learning which dynamically adapts as learners become proficient.

  8. Neural networks involved in learning lexical-semantic and syntactic information in a second language

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jutta L.; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Ono, Kentaro; Sugiura, Motoaki; Sadato, Norihiro; Nakamura, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of language acquisition in a realistic learning environment. Japanese native speakers were trained in a miniature version of German prior to fMRI scanning. During scanning they listened to (1) familiar sentences, (2) sentences including a novel sentence structure, and (3) sentences containing a novel word while visual context provided referential information. Learning-related decreases of brain activation over time were found in a mainly left-hemispheric network comprising classical frontal and temporal language areas as well as parietal and subcortical regions and were largely overlapping for novel words and the novel sentence structure in initial stages of learning. Differences occurred at later stages of learning during which content-specific activation patterns in prefrontal, parietal and temporal cortices emerged. The results are taken as evidence for a domain-general network supporting the initial stages of language learning which dynamically adapts as learners become proficient. PMID:25400602

  9. A conserved protein interaction network involving the yeast MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1.

    PubMed

    Kusari, Anasua B; Molina, Douglas M; Sabbagh, Walid; Lau, Chang S; Bardwell, Lee

    2004-01-19

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 bind to multiple regulators and substrates. We show that mutations in a conserved docking site in these MAPKs (the CD/7m region) disrupt binding to an important subset of their binding partners, including the Ste7 MAPK kinase, the Ste5 adaptor/scaffold protein, and the Dig1 and Dig2 transcriptional repressors. Supporting the possibility that Ste5 and Ste7 bind to the same region of the MAPKs, they partially competed for Fus3 binding. In vivo, some of the MAPK mutants displayed reduced Ste7-dependent phosphorylation, and all of them exhibited multiple defects in mating and pheromone response. The Kss1 mutants were also defective in Kss1-imposed repression of Ste12. We conclude that MAPKs contain a structurally and functionally conserved docking site that mediates an overall positively acting network of interactions with cognate docking sites on their regulators and substrates. Key features of this interaction network appear to have been conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:14734536

  10. Structural evidence for involvement of a left amygdala-orbitofrontal network in subclinical anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Karen; Barr, William B.; Carlson, Chad; Devinsky, Orrin; DuBois, Jonathan; Pogash, Daniel; Quinn, Brian T.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Halgren, Eric; Thesen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging implicates hyperactivity of amygdala-orbitofrontal circuitry as a common neurobiological mechanism underlying the development of anxiety. Less is known about anxiety-related structural differences in this network. In this study, a sample of healthy adults with no history of anxiety disorders completed a 3T MRI scan and self-report mood inventories. Post-processing quantitative MRI image analysis included segmentation and volume estimation of subcortical structures, which were regressed on anxiety inventory scores, with depression scores used to establish discrimant validity. We then used a quantitative vertex-based post-processing method to correlate (1) anxiety scores and (2) left amygdala volumes with cortical thickness across the whole cortical mantle. Left amygdala volumes predicted anxiety, with decreased amygdala volume associated with higher anxiety on both state and trait anxiety measures. A negative correlation between left amygdala volume and cortical thickness overlapped with a positive correlation between anxiety and cortical thickness in left lateral orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest a structural anxiety network that corresponds with a large body of evidence from functional neuroimaging. Such findings raise the possibility that structural abnormalities may result in a greater vulnerability to anxiety or conversely that elevated anxiety symptoms may result in focal structural changes. PMID:21803551

  11. Intracellular lipid flux and membrane microdomains as organizing principles in inflammatory cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Michael B; Parks, John S

    2011-08-15

    Lipid rafts and caveolae play a pivotal role in organization of signaling by TLR4 and several other immune receptors. Beyond the simple cataloguing of signaling events compartmentalized by these membrane microdomains, recent studies have revealed the surprisingly central importance of dynamic remodeling of membrane lipid domains to immune signaling. Simple interventions upon membrane lipid, such as changes in cholesterol loading or crosslinking of raft lipids, are sufficient to induce micrometer-scale reordering of membranes and their protein cargo with consequent signal transduction. In this review, using TLR signaling in the macrophage as a central focus, we discuss emerging evidence that environmental and genetic perturbations of membrane lipid regulate protein signaling, illustrate how homeostatic flow of cholesterol and other lipids through rafts regulates the innate immune response, and highlight recent attempts to harness these insights toward therapeutic development.

  12. Convenient and rapid removal of detergent from glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Kabayama, Kazuya

    2012-03-01

    Although detergents are often essential in protocols, they are usually incompatible with further biochemical analysis. There are several methods for detergent removal, but the procedures are complicated or suffer from sample loss. Here, we describe a convenient and rapid method for detergent removal from sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids (gangliosides) and neutral glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) microdomain. It is based on selective detergent extraction, in which the sample is dried on a glass tube, followed by washing with organic solvent. We investigated 18 organic solvents and used high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-QIT-TOF MS) to confirm that dichloroethane (DCE) was the most suitable solvent and completely removed the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. Furthermore, DCE extraction effectively removed interference caused by other nonionic, zwitterionic, or ionic detergents in MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis.

  13. Determination of seizure propagation across microdomains using spectral measures of causality.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Anderson, William S

    2014-01-01

    The use of microelectrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure focus localization. In this work, we determine seizure propagation across microdomains sampled by such microelectrode arrays and compare the results using two widely used frequency domain measures of causality, namely the partial directed coherence and the directed direct transfer function. We show that these two measures produce very similar propagation patterns for simulated microelectrode activity over a relatively smaller number of channels. However as the number of channels increases, partial directed coherence produces better estimates of the actual propagation pattern. Additionally, we apply these two measures to determine seizure propagation over microelectrode arrays measured from a patient undergoing intracranial monitoring for seizure focus localization and find very similar patterns which also agree with a threshold based reconstruction during seizure onset. PMID:25571448

  14. Diffusing Polymers in Confined Microdomains and Estimation of Chromosomal Territory Sizes from Chromosome Capture Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, A.; Holcman, D.

    2013-06-01

    Is it possible to extract the size and structure of chromosomal territories (confined domain) from the encounter frequencies of chromosomal loci? To answer this question, we estimate the mean time for two monomers located on the same polymer to encounter, which we call the mean first encounter time in a confined microdomain (MFETC). We approximate the confined domain geometry by a harmonic potential well and obtain an asymptotic expression that agrees with Brownian simulations for the MFETC as a function of the polymer length, the radius of the confined domain, and the activation distance radius ɛ at which the two searching monomers meet. We illustrate the present approach using chromosome capture data for the encounter rate distribution of two loci depending on their distances along the DNA. We estimate the domain size that restricts the motion of one of these loci for chromosome II in yeast.

  15. Simulations Show that Virus Assembly and Budding Are Facilitated by Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    For many viruses, assembly and budding occur simultaneously during virion formation. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this process could promote biomedical efforts to block viral propagation and enable use of capsids in nanomaterials applications. To this end, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations on a coarse-grained model that describes virus assembly on a fluctuating lipid membrane. Our simulations show that the membrane can promote association of adsorbed subunits through dimensional reduction, but it also introduces thermodynamic and kinetic effects that can inhibit complete assembly. We find several mechanisms by which membrane microdomains, such as lipid rafts, reduce these effects, and thus, enhance assembly. We show how these predicted mechanisms can be experimentally tested. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that assembly and budding depend crucially on the system dynamics via multiple timescales related to membrane deformation, protein diffusion, association, and adsorption onto the membrane. PMID:25650926

  16. Nanofabrication of Block Copolymer Bulk and Thin Films: Microdomain Structures as Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takeji; Fukunaga, Kenji

    In this chapter we shall discuss applications of block copolymers (bcps) to nanotechnologies and nanosciences. Our objectives here are to explore the methods and principles concerning fabrications of ordered structures of bcps having various symmetries with nano-sized periodicity to create new materials with interesting structures and properties. We define this kind of fabrication as nano-fabrication. In other words we aim to control or manipulate self- organized microdomain structures of bcps, in both nonequilibrium and equi- librium states, and utilize them as templates for further nano-fabrication to- ward advanced devices and materials, such as tunable photonic crystals [1-4], quantum dots and nanowires [5-9], nanohybrids with inorganic materials and nanometal particles [10-12], photovoltaics and photoluminescence [13-16], etc. We shall present the bcp templates in both bulk (Sect. 2) and thin films (Sect. 3).

  17. Increased functional connectivity with puberty in the mentalising network involved in social emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Klapwijk, Eduard T.; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Bird, Geoffrey; Viner, Russell M.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that puberty plays an important role in the structural and functional brain development seen in adolescence, but little is known of the pubertal influence on changes in functional connectivity. We explored how pubertal indicators (salivary concentrations of testosterone, oestradiol and DHEA; pubertal stage; menarcheal status) relate to functional connectivity between components of a mentalising network identified to be engaged in social emotion processing by our prior work, using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis. Female adolescents aged 11 to 13 years were scanned whilst silently reading scenarios designed to evoke either social emotions (guilt and embarrassment) or basic emotions (disgust and fear), of which only social compared to basic emotions require the representation of another person’s mental states. Pubertal stage and menarcheal status were used to assign participants to pre/early or mid/late puberty groups. We found increased functional connectivity between the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during social relative to basic emotion processing. Moreover, increasing oestradiol concentrations were associated with increased functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the right TPJ during social relative to basic emotion processing, independent of age. Our analysis of the PPI data by phenotypic pubertal status showed that more advanced puberty stage was associated with enhanced functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the left anterior temporal cortex (ATC) during social relative to basic emotion processing, also independent of age. Our results suggest increased functional maturation of the social brain network with the advancement of puberty in girls. PMID:23998674

  18. Fins into limbs: Autopod acquisition and anterior elements reduction by modifying gene networks involving 5'Hox, Gli3, and Shh.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mikiko

    2016-05-01

    Two major morphological changes occurred during the fin-to-limb transition: the appearance of the autopod, and the reduction of anterior skeletal elements. In the past decades, numerous approaches to the study of genetic developmental systems involved in patterning of fins/limbs among different taxa have provided clues to better understand the mechanism of the fin-to-limb transition. In this article, I discuss recent progress toward elucidating the evolutionary origin of the autopod and the mechanism through which the multiple-basal bones of ancestral fins were reduced into a single bone (humerus/femur). A particular focus of this article is the patterning mechanism of the tetrapod limb and chondrichthyan fin controlled by gene networks involving the 5'Hox genes, Gli3 and Shh. These recent data provide possible scenarios that could have led to the transformation of fins into limbs. PMID:26992366

  19. Modifications of a conserved regulatory network involving INDEHISCENT controls multiple aspects of reproductive tissue development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kay, P; Groszmann, M; Ross, J J; Parish, R W; Swain, S M

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting pollen tube growth and fertilization in Arabidopsis plants leads to reduced seed set and silique size, providing a powerful genetic system with which to identify genes with important roles in plant fertility. A transgenic Arabidopsis line with reduced pollen tube growth, seed set and silique growth was used as the progenitor in a genetic screen to isolate suppressors with increased seed set and silique size. This screen generated a new allele of INDEHISCENT (IND), a gene originally identified by its role in valve margin development and silique dehiscence (pod shatter). IND forms part of a regulatory network that involves several other transcriptional regulators and involves the plant hormones GA and auxin. Using GA and auxin mutants that alter various aspects of reproductive development, we have identified novel roles for IND, its paralogue HECATE3, and the MADS box proteins SHATTERPROOF1/2 in flower and fruit development. These results suggest that modified forms of the regulatory network originally described for the Arabidopsis valve margin, which include these genes and/or their recently evolved paralogs, function in multiple components of GA/auxin-regulated reproductive development. PMID:23126654

  20. CBL controls a tyrosine kinase network involving AXL, SYK and LYN in nilotinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Romain; Trégoat, Claire; Dumas, Pierre-Yves; Lagarde, Valérie; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Desplat, Vanessa; Sirvent, Audrey; Praloran, Vincent; Lippert, Eric; Villacreces, Arnaud; Leconet, Wilhem; Robert, Bruno; Vigon, Isabelle; Roche, Serge; Mahon, François-Xavier; Pasquet, Jean-Max

    2015-09-01

    A tyrosine kinase network composed of the TAM receptor AXL and the cytoplasmic kinases LYN and SYK is involved in nilotinib-resistance of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells. Here, we show that the E3-ubiquitin ligase CBL down-regulation occurring during prolonged drug treatment plays a critical role in this process. Depletion of CBL in K562 cells increases AXL and LYN protein levels, promoting cell resistance to nilotinib. Conversely, forced expression of CBL in nilotinib-resistant K562 cells (K562-rn) dramatically reduces AXL and LYN expression and resensitizes K562-rn cells to nilotinib. A similar mechanism was found to operate in primary CML CD34(+) cells. Mechanistically, the E3-ligase CBL counteracts AXL/SYK signalling, promoting LYN transcription by controlling AXL protein stability. Surprisingly, the role of AXL in resistance was independent of its ligand GAS6 binding and its TK activity, in accordance with a scaffold activity for this receptor being involved in this cellular process. Collectively, our results demonstrate a pivotal role for CBL in the control of a tyrosine kinase network mediating resistance to nilotinib treatment in CML cells.

  1. JMY is involved in anterograde vesicle trafficking from the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Kai; Waschbüsch, Dieter; Anft, Moritz; Hügging, Debbie; Kind, Sabine; Hänisch, Jan; Lakisic, Goran; Gautreau, Alexis; Barnekow, Angelika; Stradal, Theresia E B

    2014-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) was originally identified as a transcriptional co-factor in the p53-response to DNA damage. Aside from this nuclear function, recent years have uncovered an additional function of JMY, namely in cytoskeleton remodelling and actin assembly. The C-terminus of JMY comprises a canonical VCA-module, the sequence signature of Arp2/3 complex activators. Furthermore, tandem repeats of 3 WH2 (V, or more recently also W) domains render JMY capable of Arp2/3 independent actin assembly. The motility promoting cytoplasmic function of JMY is abrogated upon DNA-damage and nuclear translocation of JMY. To address the precise cellular function of JMY in cellular actin rearrangements, we have searched for potential new interaction partners by mass spectrometry. We identified several candidates and correlated their localization with the subcellular dynamics of JMY. JMY is localized to dynamic vesiculo-tubular structures throughout the cytoplasm, which are decorated with actin and Arp2/3 complex. Moreover, JMY partially colocalizes and interacts with VAP-A, which is involved in vesicle-based transport processes. Finally, overexpression of JMY results in Golgi dispersal by loss from the trans-site and affects VSV-G transport. These analyses, together with biochemical experiments, indicate that JMY drives vesicular trafficking in the trans-Golgi region and at ER-membrane contact sites (MCS), distinct from other Arp2/3 activators involved in vesicle transport processes such as the related WHAMM or WASH.

  2. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Alan S. R.; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C.; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  3. Identification of Crowding Stress Tolerance Co-Expression Networks Involved in Sweet Corn Yield.

    PubMed

    Choe, Eunsoo; Drnevich, Jenny; Williams, Martin M

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance to crowding stress has played a crucial role in improving agronomic productivity in field corn; however, commercial sweet corn hybrids vary greatly in crowding stress tolerance. The objectives were to 1) explore transcriptional changes among sweet corn hybrids with differential yield under crowding stress, 2) identify relationships between phenotypic responses and gene expression patterns, and 3) identify groups of genes associated with yield and crowding stress tolerance. Under conditions of crowding stress, three high-yielding and three low-yielding sweet corn hybrids were grouped for transcriptional and phenotypic analyses. Transcriptional analyses identified from 372 to 859 common differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for each hybrid. Large gene expression pattern variation among hybrids and only 26 common DEGs across all hybrid comparisons were identified, suggesting each hybrid has a unique response to crowding stress. Over-represented biological functions of DEGs also differed among hybrids. Strong correlation was observed between: 1) modules with up-regulation in high-yielding hybrids and yield traits, and 2) modules with up-regulation in low-yielding hybrids and plant/ear traits. Modules linked with yield traits may be important crowding stress response mechanisms influencing crop yield. Functional analysis of the modules and common DEGs identified candidate crowding stress tolerant processes in photosynthesis, glycolysis, cell wall, carbohydrate/nitrogen metabolic process, chromatin, and transcription regulation. Moreover, these biological functions were greatly inter-connected, indicating the importance of improving the mechanisms as a network. PMID:26796516

  4. Identification of Crowding Stress Tolerance Co-Expression Networks Involved in Sweet Corn Yield

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Eunsoo; Drnevich, Jenny; Williams, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance to crowding stress has played a crucial role in improving agronomic productivity in field corn; however, commercial sweet corn hybrids vary greatly in crowding stress tolerance. The objectives were to 1) explore transcriptional changes among sweet corn hybrids with differential yield under crowding stress, 2) identify relationships between phenotypic responses and gene expression patterns, and 3) identify groups of genes associated with yield and crowding stress tolerance. Under conditions of crowding stress, three high-yielding and three low-yielding sweet corn hybrids were grouped for transcriptional and phenotypic analyses. Transcriptional analyses identified from 372 to 859 common differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for each hybrid. Large gene expression pattern variation among hybrids and only 26 common DEGs across all hybrid comparisons were identified, suggesting each hybrid has a unique response to crowding stress. Over-represented biological functions of DEGs also differed among hybrids. Strong correlation was observed between: 1) modules with up-regulation in high-yielding hybrids and yield traits, and 2) modules with up-regulation in low-yielding hybrids and plant/ear traits. Modules linked with yield traits may be important crowding stress response mechanisms influencing crop yield. Functional analysis of the modules and common DEGs identified candidate crowding stress tolerant processes in photosynthesis, glycolysis, cell wall, carbohydrate/nitrogen metabolic process, chromatin, and transcription regulation. Moreover, these biological functions were greatly inter-connected, indicating the importance of improving the mechanisms as a network. PMID:26796516

  5. Model-based action planning involves cortico-cerebellar and basal ganglia networks.

    PubMed

    Fermin, Alan S R; Yoshida, Takehiko; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Makoto; Tanaka, Saori C; Doya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Humans can select actions by learning, planning, or retrieving motor memories. Reinforcement Learning (RL) associates these processes with three major classes of strategies for action selection: exploratory RL learns state-action values by exploration, model-based RL uses internal models to simulate future states reached by hypothetical actions, and motor-memory RL selects past successful state-action mapping. In order to investigate the neural substrates that implement these strategies, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment while humans performed a sequential action selection task under conditions that promoted the use of a specific RL strategy. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum increased activity in the exploratory condition; the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial striatum, and lateral cerebellum in the model-based condition; and the supplementary motor area, putamen, and anterior cerebellum in the motor-memory condition. These findings suggest that a distinct prefrontal-basal ganglia and cerebellar network implements the model-based RL action selection strategy. PMID:27539554

  6. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  7. Plant pathogenic bacteria target the actin microfilament network involved in the trafficking of disease defense components.

    PubMed

    Jelenska, Joanna; Kang, Yongsung; Greenberg, Jean T

    2014-01-01

    Cells of infected organisms transport disease defense-related molecules along actin filaments to deliver them to their sites of action to combat the pathogen. To accommodate higher demand for intracellular traffic, plant F-actin density increases transiently during infection or treatment of Arabidopsis with pathogen-associated molecules. Many animal and plant pathogens interfere with actin polymerization and depolymerization to avoid immune responses. Pseudomonas syringae, a plant extracellular pathogen, injects HopW1 effector into host cells to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton and reduce vesicle movement in order to elude defense responses. In some Arabidopsis accessions, however, HopW1 is recognized and causes resistance via an actin-independent mechanism. HopW1 targets isoform 7 of vegetative actin (ACT7) that is regulated by phytohormones and environmental factors. We hypothesize that dynamic changes of ACT7 filaments are involved in plant immunity. PMID:25551177

  8. Two Scales, Hybrid Model for Soils, Involving Artificial Neural Network and Finite Element Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasiński, Marcin; Lefik, Marek

    2015-02-01

    A hybrid ANN-FE solution is presented as a result of two level analysis of soils: a level of a laboratory sample and a level of engineering geotechnical problem. Engineering properties of soils (sands) are represented directly in the form of ANN (this is in contrast with our former paper where ANN approximated constitutive relationships). Initially the ANN is trained with Duncan formula (Duncan and Chang [2]), then it is re-trained (calibrated) with some available experimental data, specific for the soil considered. The obtained approximation of the constitutive parameters is used directly in finite element method at the level of a single element at the scale of the laboratory sample to check the correct representation of the laboratory test. Then, the finite element that was successfully tested at the level of laboratory sample is used at the macro level to solve engineering problems involving the soil for which it was calibrated.

  9. JMY is involved in anterograde vesicle trafficking from the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Kai; Waschbüsch, Dieter; Anft, Moritz; Hügging, Debbie; Kind, Sabine; Hänisch, Jan; Lakisic, Goran; Gautreau, Alexis; Barnekow, Angelika; Stradal, Theresia E B

    2014-01-01

    Junction-mediating and regulatory protein (JMY) was originally identified as a transcriptional co-factor in the p53-response to DNA damage. Aside from this nuclear function, recent years have uncovered an additional function of JMY, namely in cytoskeleton remodelling and actin assembly. The C-terminus of JMY comprises a canonical VCA-module, the sequence signature of Arp2/3 complex activators. Furthermore, tandem repeats of 3 WH2 (V, or more recently also W) domains render JMY capable of Arp2/3 independent actin assembly. The motility promoting cytoplasmic function of JMY is abrogated upon DNA-damage and nuclear translocation of JMY. To address the precise cellular function of JMY in cellular actin rearrangements, we have searched for potential new interaction partners by mass spectrometry. We identified several candidates and correlated their localization with the subcellular dynamics of JMY. JMY is localized to dynamic vesiculo-tubular structures throughout the cytoplasm, which are decorated with actin and Arp2/3 complex. Moreover, JMY partially colocalizes and interacts with VAP-A, which is involved in vesicle-based transport processes. Finally, overexpression of JMY results in Golgi dispersal by loss from the trans-site and affects VSV-G transport. These analyses, together with biochemical experiments, indicate that JMY drives vesicular trafficking in the trans-Golgi region and at ER-membrane contact sites (MCS), distinct from other Arp2/3 activators involved in vesicle transport processes such as the related WHAMM or WASH. PMID:25015719

  10. FOXA2 regulates a network of genes involved in critical functions of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gosalia, Nehal; Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead box A (FOXA) family of pioneer transcription factors is critical for the development of many endoderm-derived tissues. Their importance in regulating biological processes in the lung and liver is extensively characterized, though much less is known about their role in intestine. Here we investigate the contribution of FOXA2 to coordinating intestinal epithelial cell function using postconfluent Caco2 cells, differentiated into an enterocyte-like model. FOXA2 binding sites genome-wide were determined by ChIP-seq and direct targets of the factor were validated by ChIP-qPCR and siRNA-mediated depletion of FOXA1/2 followed by RT-qPCR. Peaks of FOXA2 occupancy were frequent at loci contributing to gene ontology pathways of regulation of cell migration, cell motion, and plasma membrane function. Depletion of both FOXA1 and FOXA2 led to a significant reduction in the expression of multiple transmembrane proteins including ion channels and transporters, which form a network that is essential for maintaining normal ion and solute transport. One of the targets was the adenosine A2B receptor, and reduced receptor mRNA levels were associated with a functional decrease in intracellular cyclic AMP. We also observed that 30% of FOXA2 binding sites contained a GATA motif and that FOXA1/A2 depletion reduced GATA-4, but not GATA-6 protein levels. These data show that FOXA2 plays a pivotal role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell function. Moreover, that the FOXA and GATA families of transcription factors may work cooperatively to regulate gene expression genome-wide in the intestinal epithelium.

  11. Neural networks involved in adolescent reward processing: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Merav H; Jedd, Kelly; Luciana, Monica

    2015-11-15

    Behavioral responses to, and the neural processing of, rewards change dramatically during adolescence and may contribute to observed increases in risk-taking during this developmental period. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest differences between adolescents and adults in neural activation during reward processing, but findings are contradictory, and effects have been found in non-predicted directions. The current study uses an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach for quantitative meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies to: (1) confirm the network of brain regions involved in adolescents' reward processing, (2) identify regions involved in specific stages (anticipation, outcome) and valence (positive, negative) of reward processing, and (3) identify differences in activation likelihood between adolescent and adult reward-related brain activation. Results reveal a subcortical network of brain regions involved in adolescent reward processing similar to that found in adults with major hubs including the ventral and dorsal striatum, insula, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Contrast analyses find that adolescents exhibit greater likelihood of activation in the insula while processing anticipation relative to outcome and greater likelihood of activation in the putamen and amygdala during outcome relative to anticipation. While processing positive compared to negative valence, adolescents show increased likelihood for activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and ventral striatum. Contrasting adolescent reward processing with the existing ALE of adult reward processing reveals increased likelihood for activation in limbic, frontolimbic, and striatal regions in adolescents compared with adults. Unlike adolescents, adults also activate executive control regions of the frontal and parietal lobes. These findings support hypothesized elevations in motivated activity during adolescence. PMID:26254587

  12. An Arabidopsis WDR protein coordinates cellular networks involved in light, stress response and hormone signals.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huey-Wen; Feng, Ji-Huan; Feng, Yung-Lin; Wei, Miam-Ju

    2015-12-01

    The WD-40 repeat (WDR) protein acts as a scaffold for protein interactions in various cellular events. An Arabidopsis WDR protein exhibited sequence similarity with human WDR26, a scaffolding protein implicated in H2O2-induced cell death in neural cells. The AtWDR26 transcript was induced by auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ET), osmostic stress and salinity. The expression of AtWDR26 was regulated by light, and seed germination of the AtWDR26 overexpression (OE) and seedling growth of the T-DNA knock-out (KO) exhibited altered sensitivity to light. Root growth of the OE seedlings increased tolerance to ZnSO4 and NaCl stresses and were hypersensitive to inhibition of osmotic stress. Seedlings of OE and KO altered sensitivities to multiple hormones. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic plants overexpressing AtWDR26 showed that genes involved in the chloroplast-related metabolism constituted the largest group of the up-regulated genes. AtWDR26 overexpression up-regulated a large number of genes related to defense cellular events including biotic and abiotic stress response. Furthermore, several members of genes functioning in the regulation of Zn homeostasis, and hormone synthesis and perception of auxin and JA were strongly up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Our data provide physiological and transcriptional evidence for AtWDR26 role in hormone, light and abiotic stress cellular events.

  13. Chemical genetic screen for AMPKα2 substrates uncovers a network of proteins involved in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Banko, Max R.; Allen, Jasmina J.; Schaffer, Bethany E.; Wilker, Erik W.; Tsou, Peiling; White, Jamie L.; Villén, Judit; Wang, Beatrice; Kim, Sara R.; Sakamoto, Kei; Gygi, Steven P.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Brunet, Anne

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated by low nutrient levels. Functions of AMPK, other than its role in cellular metabolism, are just beginning to emerge. Here we use a chemical genetics screen to identify direct substrates of AMPK in human cells. We find that AMPK phosphorylates 28 previously unidentified substrates, several of which are involved in mitosis and cytokinesis. We identify the residues phosphorylated by AMPK in vivo in several substrates, including protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12C (PPP1R12C) and p21 -activated protein kinase (PAK2). AMPK-induced phosphorylation is necessary for PPP1R12C interaction with 14-3-3 and phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain. Both AMPK activity and PPP1R12C phosphorylation are increased in mitotic cells and are important for mitosis completion. These findings suggest that AMPK coordinates nutrient status with mitosis completion, which may be critical for the organism’s response to low nutrients during development, or in adult stem and cancer cells. PMID:22137581

  14. Plant signaling networks involving Ca2+ and Rboh/Nox-mediated ROS production under salinity stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Tada, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress, which induces both ionic and osmotic damage, impairs plant growth and causes severe reductions in crop yield. Plants are equipped with defense responses against salinity stress such as regulation of ion transport including Na+ and K+, accumulation of compatible solutes and stress-related gene expression. The initial Ca2+ influx mediated by plasma membrane ion channels has been suggested to be crucial for the adaptive signaling. NADPH oxidase (Nox)-mediated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has also been suggested to play crucial roles in regulating adaptation to salinity stress in several plant species including halophytes. Respiratory burst oxidase homolog (Rboh) proteins show the ROS-producing Nox activity, which are synergistically activated by the binding of Ca2+ to EF-hand motifs as well as Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation. We herein review molecular identity, structural features and roles of the Ca2+-permeable channels involved in early salinity and osmotic signaling, and comparatively discuss the interrelationships among spatiotemporal dynamic changes in cytosolic concentrations of free Ca2+, Rboh-mediated ROS production, and downstream signaling events during salinity adaptation in planta. PMID:26113854

  15. The ER/PM microdomain, PI(4,5)P2 and the regulation of STIM1-Orai1 channel function

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xu; Choi, Seok; Maléth, Jozsef J.; Park, Seonghee; Ahuja, Malini; Muallem, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    All forms of cell signaling occur in discreet cellular microdomains in which the ER is the main participant and include microdomains formed by the ER with lysosomes, endosomes, the nucleus, mitochondria and the plasma membrane. In the microdomains the two opposing organelles transfer and exchange constituents including lipids and ions. As is the case for other forms of signaling pathways, many components of the receptor-evoked Ca2+ signal are clustered at the ER/PM microdomain, including the Orai1-STIM1 complex. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the molecular components that tether the ER and plasma membrane to form the ER/PM microdomains in which PI(4,5)P2 is enriched, and how dynamic targeting of the Orai1-STIM1 complex to PI(4,5)P2-poor and PI(4,5)P2-rich microdomains controls the activity of Orai1 and its regulation by Ca2+ that is mediated by SARAF. PMID:25843208

  16. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  17. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN).

    PubMed

    Mattson, Margaret E; Albright, Victoria A; Yoon, Joanna; Council, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to have abuse potential, is now being subject to misuse and abuse (MUA; ie, taken when not prescribed for them or used in a way other than instructed by their health professional). Here we present systematic, nationally representative data from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for prevalence of emergency department (ED) visits among the U.S. general population involving quetiapine and related to MUA, suicide attempts, and adverse reactions. Nationally, quetiapine-related ED visits increased 90% between 2005 and 2011, from 35,581 ED visits to 67,497. DAWN data indicate that when used without medical supervision for recreational/self-medication purposes, quetiapine poses health risks for its users, especially among polydrug users and women. These findings suggest that the medical and public health communities should increase vigilance concerning this drug and its potential for MUA. PMID:26056465

  18. The involvement of the interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases (IRAKs) in cellular signaling networks controlling inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ringwood, Lorna; Li, Liwu

    2008-01-01

    Innate immunity and inflammation plays a key role in host defense and wound healing. However, Excessive or altered inflammatory processes can contribute to severe and diverse human diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. The interleukin-1 receptor associated kinases (IRAKs) are critically involved in the regulation of intra-cellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. Collective studies indicate that IRAKs are present in many cell types, and can mediate signals from various cell receptors including Toll-Like-Receptors (TLRs). Consequently, diverse downstream signaling processes can be elicited following the activation of various IRAKs. Given the critical and complex roles IRAK proteins play, it is not surprising that genetic variations in human IRAK genes have been found to be linked with various human inflammatory diseases. This review intends to summarize the recent advances regarding the regulations of various IRAK proteins and their cellular functions in mediating inflammatory signaling processes. PMID:18249132

  19. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN)

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Margaret E; Albright, Victoria A; Yoon, Joanna; Council, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to have abuse potential, is now being subject to misuse and abuse (MUA; ie, taken when not prescribed for them or used in a way other than instructed by their health professional). Here we present systematic, nationally representative data from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) for prevalence of emergency department (ED) visits among the U.S. general population involving quetiapine and related to MUA, suicide attempts, and adverse reactions. Nationally, quetiapine-related ED visits increased 90% between 2005 and 2011, from 35,581 ED visits to 67,497. DAWN data indicate that when used without medical supervision for recreational/self-medication purposes, quetiapine poses health risks for its users, especially among polydrug users and women. These findings suggest that the medical and public health communities should increase vigilance concerning this drug and its potential for MUA. PMID:26056465

  20. The expansion of body coloration involves coordinated evolution in cis and trans within the pigmentation regulatory network of Drosophila prostipennis.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Alison J; Hancuch, Kerry N; Johnson, Winslow; Wiliams, Thomas M; Rebeiz, Mark

    2014-08-15

    The generation of complex morphological features requires the precisely orchestrated expression of numerous genes during development. While several traits have been resolved to evolutionary changes within a single gene, the evolutionary path by which genes derive co-localized or mutually excluded expression patterns is currently a mystery. Here we investigate how the Drosophila pigmentation gene network was altered in Drosophila prostipennis, a species in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, that evolved expanded abdominal pigmentation. We show that this expansion involved broadened expression of the melanin-promoting enzyme genes tan and yellow, and a reciprocal withdrawn pattern of the melanin-suppressing enzyme gene ebony. To examine whether these coordinated changes to the network were generated through mutations in the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of these genes, we cloned and tested CREs of D. prostipennis tan, ebony, and yellow in transgenic reporter assays. Regulatory regions of both tan and ebony failed to recapitulate the derived D. prostipennis expression phenotype, implicating the modification of a factor or factors upstream of both genes. However, the D. prostipennis yellow cis-regulatory region recapitulated the expanded expression pattern observed in this species, implicating causative mutations in cis to yellow. Our results provide an example in which a coordinated expression program evolved through independent changes at multiple loci, rather than through changes to a single "master regulator" directing a suite of downstream target genes. This implies a complex network structure in which each gene may be subject to a unique set of inputs, and resultantly may require individualized evolutionary paths to yield correlated gene expression patterns.

  1. Involvement of Different networks in mammary gland involution after the pregnancy/lactation cycle: Implications in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Rosa; García-Trevijano, Elena R; Lluch, Ana; Ribas, Gloria; Viña, Juan R

    2015-04-01

    Early pregnancy is associated with a reduction in a woman's lifetime risk for breast cancer. However, different studies have demonstrated an increase in breast cancer risk in the years immediately following pregnancy. Early and long-term risk is even higher if the mother age is above 35 years at the time of first parity. The proinflammatory microenvironment within the mammary gland after pregnancy renders an "ideal niche" for oncogenic events. Signaling pathways involved in programmed cell death and tissue remodeling during involution are also activated in breast cancer. Herein, the major signaling pathways involved in mammary gland involution, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), and retinoid acid receptors (RARs)/retinoid X receptors (RXRs), are reviewed as part of the complex network of signaling pathways that crosstalk in a contextual-dependent manner. These factors, also involved in breast cancer development, are important regulatory nodes for signaling amplification after weaning. Indeed, during involution, p65/p300 target genes such as MMP9, Capn1, and Capn2 are upregulated. Elevated expression and activities of these proteases in breast cancer have been extensively documented. The role of these proteases during mammary gland involution is further discussed. MMPs, calpains, and cathepsins exert their effect by modification of the extracellular matrix and intracellular proteins. Calpains, activated in the mammary gland during involution, cleave several proteins located in cell membrane, lysosomes, mitochondria, and nuclei favoring cell death. Besides, during this period, Capn1 is most probably involved in the modulation of preadipocyte differentiation through chromatin remodeling. Calpains can be implicated in cell anchoring loss, providing a proper microenvironment for tumor growth. A better understanding of the role of any of these proteases in tumorigenesis may

  2. The Deceptively Simple N170 Reflects Network Information Processing Mechanisms Involving Visual Feature Coding and Transfer Across Hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Robin A. A.; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Gross, Joachim; Panzeri, Stefano; van Rijsbergen, Nicola J.; Rousselet, Guillaume A.; Schyns, Philippe G.

    2016-01-01

    A key to understanding visual cognition is to determine “where”, “when”, and “how” brain responses reflect the processing of the specific visual features that modulate categorization behavior—the “what”. The N170 is the earliest Event-Related Potential (ERP) that preferentially responds to faces. Here, we demonstrate that a paradigmatic shift is necessary to interpret the N170 as the product of an information processing network that dynamically codes and transfers face features across hemispheres, rather than as a local stimulus-driven event. Reverse-correlation methods coupled with information-theoretic analyses revealed that visibility of the eyes influences face detection behavior. The N170 initially reflects coding of the behaviorally relevant eye contralateral to the sensor, followed by a causal communication of the other eye from the other hemisphere. These findings demonstrate that the deceptively simple N170 ERP hides a complex network information processing mechanism involving initial coding and subsequent cross-hemispheric transfer of visual features. PMID:27550865

  3. Pathway Network Analyses for Autism Reveal Multisystem Involvement, Major Overlaps with Other Diseases and Convergence upon MAPK and Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya; Alshikho, Mohamad J; Herbert, Martha R

    2016-01-01

    We used established databases in standard ways to systematically characterize gene ontologies, pathways and functional linkages in the large set of genes now associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These conditions are particularly challenging--they lack clear pathognomonic biological markers, they involve great heterogeneity across multiple levels (genes, systemic biological and brain characteristics, and nuances of behavioral manifestations)-and yet everyone with this diagnosis meets the same defining behavioral criteria. Using the human gene list from Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway Database, and then derived a pathway network from pathway-pathway functional interactions again in reference to KEGG. Through identifying the GO (Gene Ontology) groups in which SFARI genes were enriched, mapping the coherence between pathways and GO groups, and ranking the relative strengths of representation of pathway network components, we 1) identified 10 disease-associated and 30 function-associated pathways 2) revealed calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction as the most enriched, statistically significant pathways from the enrichment analysis, 3) showed calcium signaling pathways and MAPK signaling pathway to be interactive hubs with other pathways and also to be involved with pervasively present biological processes, 4) found convergent indications that the process "calcium-PRC (protein kinase C)-Ras-Raf-MAPK/ERK" is likely a major contributor to ASD pathophysiology, and 5) noted that perturbations associated with KEGG's category of environmental information processing were common. These findings support the idea that ASD-associated genes may contribute not only to core features of ASD themselves but also to vulnerability to other chronic and systemic problems potentially including cancer, metabolic conditions

  4. Pathway Network Analyses for Autism Reveal Multisystem Involvement, Major Overlaps with Other Diseases and Convergence upon MAPK and Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya; Alshikho, Mohamad J; Herbert, Martha R

    2016-01-01

    We used established databases in standard ways to systematically characterize gene ontologies, pathways and functional linkages in the large set of genes now associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These conditions are particularly challenging--they lack clear pathognomonic biological markers, they involve great heterogeneity across multiple levels (genes, systemic biological and brain characteristics, and nuances of behavioral manifestations)-and yet everyone with this diagnosis meets the same defining behavioral criteria. Using the human gene list from Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway Database, and then derived a pathway network from pathway-pathway functional interactions again in reference to KEGG. Through identifying the GO (Gene Ontology) groups in which SFARI genes were enriched, mapping the coherence between pathways and GO groups, and ranking the relative strengths of representation of pathway network components, we 1) identified 10 disease-associated and 30 function-associated pathways 2) revealed calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction as the most enriched, statistically significant pathways from the enrichment analysis, 3) showed calcium signaling pathways and MAPK signaling pathway to be interactive hubs with other pathways and also to be involved with pervasively present biological processes, 4) found convergent indications that the process "calcium-PRC (protein kinase C)-Ras-Raf-MAPK/ERK" is likely a major contributor to ASD pathophysiology, and 5) noted that perturbations associated with KEGG's category of environmental information processing were common. These findings support the idea that ASD-associated genes may contribute not only to core features of ASD themselves but also to vulnerability to other chronic and systemic problems potentially including cancer, metabolic conditions

  5. Pathway Network Analyses for Autism Reveal Multisystem Involvement, Major Overlaps with Other Diseases and Convergence upon MAPK and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya; Alshikho, Mohamad J.; Herbert, Martha R.

    2016-01-01

    We used established databases in standard ways to systematically characterize gene ontologies, pathways and functional linkages in the large set of genes now associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These conditions are particularly challenging—they lack clear pathognomonic biological markers, they involve great heterogeneity across multiple levels (genes, systemic biological and brain characteristics, and nuances of behavioral manifestations)—and yet everyone with this diagnosis meets the same defining behavioral criteria. Using the human gene list from Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway Database, and then derived a pathway network from pathway-pathway functional interactions again in reference to KEGG. Through identifying the GO (Gene Ontology) groups in which SFARI genes were enriched, mapping the coherence between pathways and GO groups, and ranking the relative strengths of representation of pathway network components, we 1) identified 10 disease-associated and 30 function-associated pathways 2) revealed calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction as the most enriched, statistically significant pathways from the enrichment analysis, 3) showed calcium signaling pathways and MAPK signaling pathway to be interactive hubs with other pathways and also to be involved with pervasively present biological processes, 4) found convergent indications that the process “calcium-PRC (protein kinase C)-Ras-Raf-MAPK/ERK” is likely a major contributor to ASD pathophysiology, and 5) noted that perturbations associated with KEGG’s category of environmental information processing were common. These findings support the idea that ASD-associated genes may contribute not only to core features of ASD themselves but also to vulnerability to other chronic and systemic problems potentially including cancer, metabolic

  6. Identification of candidate network hubs involved in metabolic adjustments of rice under drought stress by integrating transcriptome data and genome-scale metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Kitazumi, Ai; Cheung, C Y Maurice; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Jang, In-Cheol; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have integrated a rice genome-scale metabolic network and the transcriptome of a drought-tolerant rice line, DK151, to identify the major transcriptional regulators involved in metabolic adjustments necessary for adaptation to drought. This was achieved by examining the differential expressions of transcription factors and metabolic genes in leaf, root and young panicle of rice plants subjected to drought stress during tillering, booting and panicle elongation stages. Critical transcription factors such as AP2/ERF, bZIP, MYB and NAC that control the important nodes in the gene regulatory pathway were identified through correlative analysis of the patterns of spatio-temporal expression and cis-element enrichment. We showed that many of the candidate transcription factors involved in metabolic adjustments were previously linked to phenotypic variation for drought tolerance. This approach represents the first attempt to integrate models of transcriptional regulation and metabolic pathways for the identification of candidate regulatory genes for targeted selection in rice breeding. PMID:26566840

  7. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  8. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    PubMed

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis.

  9. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca2+ and H+ Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I.; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca2+ and H+ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot®565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca2+ or H+ probes. These ‘Rubies’ are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid) for H+ or Ca2+ sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca2+ and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging. PMID:26404317

  10. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  11. Influence of Homopolymers on the Microdomain Behavior of Block Copolymers in 2D Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkeol; Hwang, Sungyoul; Yu, Guiduk; Char, Kookheon

    Constraints imposed by nanometer scale confinement lead to changes in bulk equilibrium behavior of block copolymers (BCPs). Cylindrical pores with diameters corresponding to the length equivalent of several copolymer chains have been employed to investigate the influence of two-dimensional confinement on the behavior of BCPs. In this study, we expand the scope to homopolymer-BCP binary blends. Given fraction of homopolymers, the phase behavior of blends is dependent on molecular weight (Mw) of homopolymers. Lamella- and cylinder-forming poly(styrene-b-butadiene) (PS-b-PBD) and PS homopolymers (hPS) were drawn into the pores of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes in the melt by capillary forces. Based on the detailed observation of the morphologies within porous columns, we analyzed the structural transition of BCPs induced by the presence of hPS and confinement. The effect of hPS on the micro-domain of BCPs is greatly accentuated in nanoscale confinement compared to the bulk state due to the entropic loss of polymer chains. Pore diameters of AAO and Mw of the PS-b-PBD are also controlled so as to examine the effects of confinement on the phase transition of PS-b-PBD/hPS blends.

  12. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  13. In situ evidence for metabolic and chemical microdomains in the structured polymer matrix of bacterial microcolonies.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G D W; Kuhlicke, U; Neu, T R

    2016-11-01

    CLSM and fluorescent probes were applied to assess the structure, composition, metabolic activity and gradients within naturally occurring β-proteobacteria microcolonies. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) as defined by lectin-binding analyses had three regions: (i) cell associated, (ii) intercellular and (iii) an outer layer covering the entire colony. We assessed structural, microenvironmental and metabolic implications of this complex EPS structure. Permeability studies indicated that the outer two layers were permeable to 20 nm beads, intercellular EPS to <40 nm beads and the outer layer was permeable to <100 nm beads. Phosphatase activity occurred at the cell surface and associated polymer. Glucose oxidase activity was only detected inside the cells and the cell-associated polymer. Rhodamine 123 suggested that activity was highest near the cell surface. The potential sensitive dye JC-1 concentrated within the outer EPS layer and the gradient was responsive to inhibition by KCN, dispersion using KCl and enhanced by addition of nutrients (nutrient broth). pH gradients occurred from the cell interior (pH 7) to the microcolony interior (pH 4+) with a gradient of increasing pH (pH 7+) to the colony exterior. The EPS provides a physical and chemical structuring mechanism forming microdomains that segregate extracellular activities at the microscale, possibly resulting in a microcolony with unitary structure and function. PMID:27562775

  14. Optimal microdomain crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria for Ca2+ oscillations.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hong; Li, Linxi; Shuai, Jianwei

    2015-01-23

    A Ca(2+) signaling model is proposed to consider the crosstalk of Ca(2+) ions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria within microdomains around inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Our model predicts that there is a critical IP3R-MCU distance at which 50% of the ER-released Ca(2+) is taken up by mitochondria and that mitochondria modulate Ca(2+) signals differently when outside of this critical distance. This study highlights the importance of the IP3R-MCU distance on Ca(2+) signaling dynamics. The model predicts that when MCU are too closely associated with IP3Rs, the enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake will produce an increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) spike amplitude. Notably, the model demonstrates the existence of an optimal IP3R-MCU distance (30-85 nm) for effective Ca(2+) transfer and the successful generation of Ca(2+) signals in healthy cells. We suggest that the space between the inner and outer mitochondria membranes provides a defense mechanism against occurrences of high [Ca(2+)]Cyt. Our results also hint at a possible pathological mechanism in which abnormally high [Ca(2+)]Cyt arises when the IP3R-MCU distance is in excess of the optimal range.

  15. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ren, T; Takahashi, Y; Liu, X; Loughran, T P; Sun, S-C; Wang, H-G; Cheng, H

    2015-01-15

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma, has a crucial role in initiating T-lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IKK complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells.

  16. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  17. Photophysical and electron-transfer properties of pseudoisocyanine in the hydrophobic microdomain of an aqueous polyelectrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Oh, C. )

    1994-03-03

    The binding of pseudoisocyanine (PIC[sup +]) to the polyelectrolyte poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) has profound effects on the photophysical and photochemical properties of this prototypical cyanine dye. The hydrophobic dye was bound in the microdomain of the compact conformation of the polymer in its (uncharged, [open quotes]hypercoiled[close quotes]) acid form at pH < 4.0 in water. Under these conditions, the fluorescence quantum yield for PIC[sup +] was increased 600-fold and its lifetime is extended to 2.7 ns. The dye triplet state observed by flash photolysis provided a very long-lived phototransient ([lambda][sub max] = 640 nm, 50-100-[mu]s decay time). Electron-transfer quenching was investigated using the oxidant tetranitromethane (TNM) which provided the semioxidized dye radical intermediate (440-nm transient) on cobinding within PMAA hypercoils. The dye was also bound to a covalently modified form of PMAA in which polymer chains were end-labeled with 9-methylanthracene moieties. Electron transfer between anthracene chromophores and PIC[sup +] within the polymer domain was observed. 71 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    Directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution of the BCP patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, forming a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ self-consistent field theory SCFT and single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in- and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface affinity. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) system within trenches made using interference lithography.

  19. Interplay of channels, pumps and organelle location in calcium microdomain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peglow, Martin; Niemeyer, Barbara A.; Hoth, Markus; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the influence of Ca2+ microdomains on the global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, we consider the polarization and activation of T-cells after the formation of an immunological synapse as a model system. For T-cell proliferation and activation, a high and robust Ca2+ signal lasting from minutes up to hours is needed. This raises the intriguing question of how T-cells overcome all those mechanisms which normally remove an increased Ca2+ level as fast as possible from the cytosol. With the help of theoretical models we predict that, after the formation of a local Ca2+ influx pathway via STIM1 and Orai1, mitochondria relocation toward and accumulation of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase and sarcoplasmic/ endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pumps at the immunological synapse are sufficient to achieve a long-lasting increased global Ca2+ concentration. In addition, we also uncover new mechanisms to generate Ca2+ oscillations, which are important for efficient T-cell activation. Experimental tests and the implications of our predictions are discussed.

  20. Dissociable Frontal–Striatal and Frontal–Parietal Networks Involved in Updating Hierarchical Contexts in Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Nee, Derek Evan; Brown, Joshua W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent theories propose that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is organized in a hierarchical fashion with more abstract, higher level information represented in anterior regions and more concrete, lower level information represented in posterior regions. This hierarchical organization affords flexible adjustments of action plans based on the context. Computational models suggest that such hierarchical organization in the PFC is achieved through interactions with the basal ganglia (BG) wherein the BG gate relevant contexts into the PFC. Here, we tested this proposal using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were scanned while updating working memory (WM) with 2 levels of hierarchical contexts. Consistent with PFC abstraction proposals, higher level context updates involved anterior portions of the PFC (BA 46), whereas lower level context updates involved posterior portions of the PFC (BA 6). Computational models were only partially supported as the BG were sensitive to higher, but not lower level context updates. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) showed the opposite pattern. Analyses examining changes in functional connectivity confirmed dissociable roles of the anterior PFC–BG during higher level context updates and posterior PFC–PPC during lower level context updates. These results suggest that hierarchical contexts are organized by distinct frontal–striatal and frontal–parietal networks. PMID:22798339

  1. Exogenous heat shock protein 70 binds macrophage lipid raft microdomain and stimulates phagocytosis, processing, and MHC-II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibo; Kovalchin, Joseph T; Muhlenkamp, Peggy; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2006-02-15

    The extracellular presence of endotoxin-free heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) enhances the rate and capacity of macrophage-mediated phagocytosis at 6 times the basal rate. It is protein-specific, dose- and time-dependent and involves the internalization of inert microspheres, Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and fungi. Structurally, exogenous HSP70 binds the macrophage plasma membrane, specifically on its lipid raft-microdomain. Disruption of lipid rafts, HSP70-LR interaction, or denaturing HSP70 abrogates the HSP-mediated increase in phagocytosis. Further, HSP70-mediated phagocytosis directly enhances the processing and presentation of internalized antigens via the endocytic MHC class-II pathway to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Modulating the HSP70-LR interaction presents an opportunity to intervene at the level of host-pathogen interface: a therapeutic tool for emerging infections, especially when conventional treatment with antibiotics is ineffective (antibiotic resistance) or unavailable (rapidly spreading, endemic). These results identify a new role for HSP70, a highly conserved molecule in stimulating phagocytosis: a primordial macrophage function, thereby influencing both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. A Shotgun Proteomic Approach Reveals That Fe Deficiency Causes Marked Changes in the Protein Profiles of Plasma Membrane and Detergent-Resistant Microdomain Preparations from Beta vulgaris Roots.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Takahashi, Daisuke; Lüthje, Sabine; González-Reyes, José Antonio; Mongrand, Sébastien; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Abadía, Anunciación; Uemura, Matsuo; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana Flor

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we have used label-free shotgun proteomic analysis to examine the effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profiles of highly pure sugar beet root plasma membrane (PM) preparations and detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), the latter as an approach to study microdomains. Altogether, 545 proteins were detected, with 52 and 68 of them changing significantly with Fe deficiency in PM and DRM, respectively. Functional categorization of these proteins showed that signaling and general and vesicle-related transport accounted for approximately 50% of the differences in both PM and DRM, indicating that from a qualitative point of view changes induced by Fe deficiency are similar in both preparations. Results indicate that Fe deficiency has an impact in phosphorylation processes at the PM level and highlight the involvement of signaling proteins, especially those from the 14-3-3 family. Lipid profiling revealed Fe-deficiency-induced decreases in phosphatidic acid derivatives, which may impair vesicle formation, in agreement with the decreases measured in proteins related to intracellular trafficking and secretion. The modifications induced by Fe deficiency in the relative enrichment of proteins in DRMs revealed the existence of a group of cytoplasmic proteins that appears to be more attached to the PM in conditions of Fe deficiency. PMID:27321140

  3. A Shotgun Proteomic Approach Reveals That Fe Deficiency Causes Marked Changes in the Protein Profiles of Plasma Membrane and Detergent-Resistant Microdomain Preparations from Beta vulgaris Roots.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Takahashi, Daisuke; Lüthje, Sabine; González-Reyes, José Antonio; Mongrand, Sébastien; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Abadía, Anunciación; Uemura, Matsuo; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana Flor

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we have used label-free shotgun proteomic analysis to examine the effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profiles of highly pure sugar beet root plasma membrane (PM) preparations and detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), the latter as an approach to study microdomains. Altogether, 545 proteins were detected, with 52 and 68 of them changing significantly with Fe deficiency in PM and DRM, respectively. Functional categorization of these proteins showed that signaling and general and vesicle-related transport accounted for approximately 50% of the differences in both PM and DRM, indicating that from a qualitative point of view changes induced by Fe deficiency are similar in both preparations. Results indicate that Fe deficiency has an impact in phosphorylation processes at the PM level and highlight the involvement of signaling proteins, especially those from the 14-3-3 family. Lipid profiling revealed Fe-deficiency-induced decreases in phosphatidic acid derivatives, which may impair vesicle formation, in agreement with the decreases measured in proteins related to intracellular trafficking and secretion. The modifications induced by Fe deficiency in the relative enrichment of proteins in DRMs revealed the existence of a group of cytoplasmic proteins that appears to be more attached to the PM in conditions of Fe deficiency.

  4. Microbial products activate monocytic cells through detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Berenger, Byron; Stack, Danuta; Neely, Graham G; Ma, Ling Ling; Mody, Christopher H

    2008-12-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis suffer recurrent pulmonary infections that are characterized by an overactive yet ineffective and destructive inflammatory response that is associated with respiratory infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that produces a number of phlogistic molecules. To better understand this process, we used exoenzyme S (ExoS), one of the key P. aeruginosa-secreted exoproducts, which is known to stimulate cells via the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway. We found that ExoS induced proinflammatory cytokine production via the NF-kappaB, Erk1/2, and Src kinase pathways. Because Src kinases are concentrated within cholesterol-containing, detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRM) (also called lipid rafts) and DRM act as signaling platforms and amplifiers on the surface of cells, we addressed the role of DRM in ExoS signaling. ExoS bound directly to a subset of DRM and induced the phosphorylation of multiple proteins within DRM, including Src kinases. Disruption of DRM by cholesterol extraction prevented NF-kappaB and Erk 1/2 activation and TNF-alpha production in response to ExoS. Activation of monocytic cells by other TLR and Nod-like receptor agonists, such as lipoteichoic acid, lipopolysaccharide, and peptidoglycan, were also dependent on DRM, and disruption prevented TNF-alpha production. Disruption of DRM did not prevent ExoS binding but did release the Src kinase, Lyn, from the DRM fraction into the detergent-soluble fraction, a site in which Src kinases are not active. These studies show that ExoS, a TLR agonist, requires direct binding to DRM for optimal signaling, which suggests that DRM are possible therapeutic targets in cystic fibrosis.

  5. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    The use of directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. It combines the ability of BCPs to self-assemble into nanoscale features with the use of lithographic tools to create controlled long range order. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution, and line edge fluctuations of the self-assembled patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, leading to the formation of a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using functionalized high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ the free energy analysis of self-consistent field theory SCFT to identify whether an in-plane or out-of-plane structure is stable for a particular trench width. In addition, we employ the single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in-plane and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface attraction strength. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a lamellar forming polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) within trenches made using interference lithography.

  6. Annexin XIIIb Associates with Lipid Microdomains to Function in Apical Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, Frank; Lecat, Sandra; Verkade, Paul; Simons, Kai

    1998-01-01

    A member of the annexin XIII sub-family, annexin XIIIb, has been implicated in the apical exocytosis of epithelial kidney cells. Annexins are phospholipid-binding proteins that have been suggested to be involved in membrane trafficking events although their actual physiological function remains open. Unlike the other annexins, annexin XIIIs are myristoylated. Here, we show by immunoelectron microscopy that annexin XIIIb is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), vesicular carriers and the apical cell surface. Polarized apical sorting involves clustering of apical proteins into dynamic sphingolipid-cholesterol rafts. We now provide evidence for the raft association of annexin XIIIb. Using in vitro assays and either myristoylated or unmyristoylated recombinant annexin XIIIb, we demonstrate that annexin XIIIb in its native myristoylated form stimulates specifically apical transport whereas the unmyristoylated form inhibits this route. Moreover, we show that formation of apical carriers from the TGN is inhibited by an anti-annexin XIIIb antibody whereas it is stimulated by myristoylated recombinant annexin XIIIb. These results suggest that annexin XIIIb directly participates in apical delivery. PMID:9744874

  7. Crystallization around solid-like nanosized docks can explain the specificity, diversity, and stability of membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Joly, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    To date, it is widely accepted that microdomains do form in the biological membranes of all eukaryotic cells, and quite possibly also in prokaryotes. Those sub-micrometric domains play crucial roles in signaling, in intracellular transport, and even in inter-cellular communications. Despite their ubiquitous distribution, and the broad and lasting interest invested in those microdomains, their actual nature and composition, and even the physical rules that regiment their assembly still remain elusive and hotly debated. One of the most often considered models is the raft hypothesis, i.e., the partition of lipids between liquid disordered and ordered phases (Ld and Lo, respectively), the latter being enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. Although it is experimentally possible to obtain the formation of microdomains in synthetic membranes through Ld/Lo phase separation, there is an ever increasing amount of evidence, obtained with a wide array of experimental approaches, that a partition between domains in Ld and Lo phases cannot account for many of the observations collected in real cells. In particular, it is now commonly perceived that the plasma membrane of cells is mostly in Lo phase and recent data support the existence of gel or solid ordered domains in a whole variety of live cells under physiological conditions. Here, we present a model whereby seeds comprised of oligomerised proteins and/or lipids would serve as crystal nucleation centers for the formation of diverse gel/crystalline nanodomains. This could confer the selectivity necessary for the formation of multiple types of membrane domains, as well as the stability required to match the time frames of cellular events, such as intra- or inter-cellular transport or assembly of signaling platforms. Testing of this model will, however, require the development of new methods allowing the clear-cut discrimination between Lo and solid nanoscopic phases in live cells. PMID:24634670

  8. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH) approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown novel proteins serve as

  9. Gag Induces the Coalescence of Clustered Lipid Rafts and Tetraspanin-Enriched Microdomains at HIV-1 Assembly Sites on the Plasma Membrane ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Grover, Jonathan R.; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Ono, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 structural protein Gag associates with two types of plasma membrane microdomains, lipid rafts and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs), both of which have been proposed to be platforms for HIV-1 assembly. However, a variety of studies have demonstrated that lipid rafts and TEMs are distinct microdomains in the absence of HIV-1 infection. To measure the impact of Gag on microdomain behaviors, we took advantage of two assays: an antibody-mediated copatching assay and a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that measures the clustering of microdomain markers in live cells without antibody-mediated patching. We found that lipid rafts and TEMs copatched and clustered to a greater extent in the presence of membrane-bound Gag in both assays, suggesting that Gag induces the coalescence of lipid rafts and TEMs. Substitutions in membrane binding motifs of Gag revealed that, while Gag membrane binding is necessary to induce coalescence of lipid rafts and TEMs, either acylation of Gag or binding of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate is sufficient. Finally, a Gag derivative that is defective in inducing membrane curvature appeared less able to induce lipid raft and TEM coalescence. A higher-resolution analysis of assembly sites by correlative fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy showed that coalescence of clustered lipid rafts and TEMs occurs predominately at completed cell surface virus-like particles, whereas a transmembrane raft marker protein appeared to associate with punctate Gag fluorescence even in the absence of cell surface particles. Together, these results suggest that different membrane microdomain components are recruited in a stepwise manner during assembly. PMID:21813604

  10. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Zhu, Minghui; Li, Yang

    2014-04-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy.

  11. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  12. GSK3β regulates oligodendrogenesis in the dorsal microdomain of the subventricular zone via Wnt-β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Azim, Kasum; Rivera, Andrea; Raineteau, Olivier; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are derived postnatally from oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) of the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, the mechanisms that regulate their generation from SVZ neural stem cells (NSC) are poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), an effector of multiple converging signaling pathways in postnatal mice. The expression of GSK3β by rt-qPCR was most prominent in the SVZ and in the developing white matter, around the first 1–2 weeks of postnatal life, coinciding with the peak periods of OP differentiation. Intraventricular infusion of the GSK3β inhibitor ARA-014418 in mice aged postnatal day (P) 8–11 significantly increased generation of OPs in the dorsal microdomain of the SVZ, as shown by expression of cell specific markers using rt-qPCR and immunolabelling. Analysis of stage specific markers revealed that the augmentation of OPs occurred via increased specification from earlier SVZ cell types. These effects of GSK3β inhibition on the dorsal SVZ were largely attributable to stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway over other pathways. The results indicate GSK3β is a key endogenous factor for specifically regulating oligodendrogenesis from the dorsal SVZ microdomain under the control of Wnt-signaling.

  13. Rafts and the battleships of defense: the multifaceted microdomains for positive and negative signals in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Szöor, Arpád; Szöllosi, János; Vereb, György

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of the heterogeneity of the cell membrane was one of the most important scientific achievements in the last decades. Since coining the term "lipid rafts", continuous development of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques has vastly expanded our view on these cell membrane microdomains that appear to have almost as many faces as researchers that look at them; they are variable in stability, size and composition that can change in a highly dynamic manner both by recruiting and expelling components as well as by coalescing and breaking up into smaller units. They have, however, one common feature: all eukaryotic cells present some variation of lipid rafts. Cells of the immune system are not exception to this, regardless of their lymphoid or myeloid origin their membranes show a domain structure and these domains serve to condense or reject particular transmembrane, GPI-linked and intracellularly membrane-anchored proteins as function requires. Here we provide a concise overview about the various weapons and shields that immune cells concentrate into their rafts, which have come into sight during the past years. The positive and negative regulatory roles of these microdomains are essential both in the functions of innate immunity and processes concatenated in the adaptive immune response. PMID:20026358

  14. Increased Gsα within Blood Cell Membrane Lipid Microdomains in Some Depressive Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, John J.; Samson, Jacqueline A.; McHale, Nancy L.; Pappalarado, Kathleen M.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Schildkraut, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein Gs couples many cellular receptors to adenylate cyclase, and the Gsα subunit activates all 9 isoforms of the adenylate cyclase catalytic unit to produce the enzyme product cyclicAMP or cAMP. In prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of unipolar depressive suicides, Rasenick and colleagues have found increased concentrations of Gsα in membrane lipid microdomains (Donati et al, 2008), where the ensconced Gsα is less likely to activate adenylate cyclase by receptor and postreceptor pathways (Allen et al, 2005 & 2009). We report that a group of 7 depressed patients (DP-1) had (1) reduced activation of platelet receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase by both prostaglandins E2 and D2 compared to controls, and (2) reduced postreceptor stimulation of adenylate cyclase by aluminum fluoride ion in both platelets and mononuclear leukocytes when compared to both another group of depressed patients (DP-2, n=17) and to controls (n=21). Our observations in the blood cells of the group DP-1 support the findings of Donati et al (2008), and they reflect the importance of this interaction between the activated Gsα subunit and membrane lipid microdomains in the pathophysiology and treatment of some major depressive disorders. PMID:23490066

  15. Characterization of Transcription Factor Networks Involved in Umbilical Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells-Derived Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Biaoru; Ding, Lianghao; Yang, Chinrang; Kang, Baolin; Liu, Li; Story, Michael D.; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) possess a great capacity for proliferation and differentiation and serve as a valuable model system to study gene regulation. Expanded knowledge of the molecular control of hemoglobin synthesis will provide a basis for rational design of therapies for β-hemoglobinopathies. Transcriptome data are available for erythroid progenitors derived from adult stem cells, however studies to define molecular mechanisms controlling globin gene regulation during fetal erythropoiesis are limited. Here, we utilize UCB-CD34+ stem cells induced to undergo erythroid differentiation to characterize the transcriptome and transcription factor networks (TFNs) associated with the γ/β-globin switch during fetal erythropoiesis. UCB-CD34+ stem cells grown in the one-phase liquid culture system displayed a higher proliferative capacity than adult CD34+ stem cells. The γ/β-globin switch was observed after day 42 during fetal erythropoiesis in contrast to adult progenitors where the switch occurred around day 21. To gain insights into transcription factors involved in globin gene regulation, microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from UCB-CD34+ cell-derived erythroid progenitors harvested on day 21, 42, 49 and 56 using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. After data normalization, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified transcription factors (TFs) with significant changes in expression during the γ/β-globin switch. Forty-five TFs were silenced by day 56 (Profile-1) and 30 TFs were activated by day 56 (Profile-2). Both GSEA datasets were analyzed using the MIMI Cytoscape platform, which discovered TFNs centered on KLF4 and GATA2 (Profile-1) and KLF1 and GATA1 for Profile-2 genes. Subsequent shRNA studies in KU812 leukemia cells and human erythroid progenitors generated from UCB-CD34+ cells supported a negative role of MAFB in γ-globin regulation. The characteristics of erythroblasts derived from UCB-CD34+ stem cells

  16. Searching for causal networks involving latent variables in complex traits: Application to growth, carcass, and meat quality traits in pigs.

    PubMed

    Peñagaricano, F; Valente, B D; Steibel, J P; Bates, R O; Ernst, C W; Khatib, H; Rosa, G J M

    2015-10-01

    Structural equation models (SEQM) can be used to model causal relationships between multiple variables in multivariate systems. Among the strengths of SEQM is its ability to consider causal links between latent variables. The use of latent variables allows modeling complex phenomena while reducing at the same time the dimensionality of the data. One relevant aspect in the quantitative genetics context is the possibility of correlated genetic effects influencing sets of variables under study. Under this scenario, if one aims at inferring causality among latent variables, genetic covariances act as confounders if ignored. Here we describe a methodology for assessing causal networks involving latent variables underlying complex phenotypic traits. The first step of the method consists of the construction of latent variables defined on the basis of prior knowledge and biological interest. These latent variables are jointly evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. The estimated factor scores are then used as phenotypes for fitting a multivariate mixed model to obtain the covariance matrix of latent variables conditional on the genetic effects. Finally, causal relationships between the adjusted latent variables are evaluated using different SEQM with alternative causal specifications. We have applied this method to a data set with pigs for which several phenotypes were recorded over time. Five different latent variables were evaluated to explore causal links between growth, carcass, and meat quality traits. The measurement model, which included 5 latent variables capturing the information conveyed by 19 different phenotypic traits, showed an acceptable fit to data (e.g., χ/df = 1.3, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.028, standardized root-mean-square residual = 0.041). Causal links between latent variables were explored after removing genetic confounders. Interestingly, we found that both growth (-0.160) and carcass traits (-0.500) have a significant

  17. "Apraxic dysgraphia" in a 15-year-old left-handed patient: disruption of the cerebello-cerebral network involved in the planning and execution of graphomotor movements.

    PubMed

    Mariën, Peter; de Smet, Eric; de Smet, Hyo Jung; Wackenier, Peggy; Dobbeleir, Andre; Verhoeven, Jo

    2013-02-01

    Apraxic agraphia is a peripheral writing disorder caused by neurological damage. It induces a lack or loss of access to the motor engrams that plan and programme the graphomotor movements necessary to produce written output. The neural network subserving handwriting includes the superior parietal region, the dorsolateral and medial premotor cortex and the thalamus of the dominant hemisphere. Recent studies indicate that the cerebellum may be involved as well. To the best of our knowledge, apraxic agraphia has not been described on a developmental basis. This paper reports the clinical, neurocognitive and (functional) neuroimaging findings of a 15-year-old left-handed patient with an isolated, non-progressive developmental handwriting disorder consistent with a diagnosis of "apraxic dysgraphia". Gross motor coordination problems were objectified as well but no signs of cerebellar, sensorimotor or extrapyramidal dysfunction of the writing limb were found to explain the apraxic phenomena. Brain MRI revealed no supra- and infratentorial damage but quantified Tc-99m-ECD SPECT disclosed decreased perfusion in the anatomoclinically suspected prefrontal and cerebellar brain regions crucially involved in the planning and execution of skilled motor actions. This pattern of functional depression seems to support the hypothesis that "apraxic dysgraphia" might reflect incomplete maturation of the cerebello-cerebral network involved in handwriting. In addition, it is hypothesized that "apraxic dysgraphia" may have to be considered to represent a distinct nosological category within the group of the developmental dyspraxias following dysfunction of the cerebello-cerebral network involved in planned actions.

  18. Combining self-organizing mapping and supervised affinity propagation clustering approach to investigate functional brain networks involved in motor imagery and execution with fMRI measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiang; Liu, Qi; Chen, Huafu; Yuan, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Deng, Lihua; Lu, Fengmei; Zhang, Junpeng; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Mingwen; Chen, Liangyin

    2015-01-01

    Clustering analysis methods have been widely applied to identifying the functional brain networks of a multitask paradigm. However, the previously used clustering analysis techniques are computationally expensive and thus impractical for clinical applications. In this study a novel method, called SOM-SAPC that combines self-organizing mapping (SOM) and supervised affinity propagation clustering (SAPC), is proposed and implemented to identify the motor execution (ME) and motor imagery (MI) networks. In SOM-SAPC, SOM was first performed to process fMRI data and SAPC is further utilized for clustering the patterns of functional networks. As a result, SOM-SAPC is able to significantly reduce the computational cost for brain network analysis. Simulation and clinical tests involving ME and MI were conducted based on SOM-SAPC, and the analysis results indicated that functional brain networks were clearly identified with different response patterns and reduced computational cost. In particular, three activation clusters were clearly revealed, which include parts of the visual, ME and MI functional networks. These findings validated that SOM-SAPC is an effective and robust method to analyze the fMRI data with multitasks. PMID:26236217

  19. An integrated approach to characterize transcription factor and microRNA regulatory networks involved in Schwann cell response to peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The regenerative response of Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury is a critical process directly related to the pathophysiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. This SC injury response is dependent on an intricate gene regulatory program coordinated by a number of transcription factors and microRNAs, but the interactions among them remain largely unknown. Uncovering the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory networks governing the Schwann cell injury response is a key step towards a better understanding of Schwann cell biology and may help develop novel therapies for related diseases. Performing such comprehensive network analysis requires systematic bioinformatics methods to integrate multiple genomic datasets. Results In this study we present a computational pipeline to infer transcription factor and microRNA regulatory networks. Our approach combined mRNA and microRNA expression profiling data, ChIP-Seq data of transcription factors, and computational transcription factor and microRNA target prediction. Using mRNA and microRNA expression data collected in a Schwann cell injury model, we constructed a regulatory network and studied regulatory pathways involved in Schwann cell response to injury. Furthermore, we analyzed network motifs and obtained insights on cooperative regulation of transcription factors and microRNAs in Schwann cell injury recovery. Conclusions This work demonstrates a systematic method for gene regulatory network inference that may be used to gain new information on gene regulation by transcription factors and microRNAs. PMID:23387820

  20. Combining self-organizing mapping and supervised affinity propagation clustering approach to investigate functional brain networks involved in motor imagery and execution with fMRI measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiang; Liu, Qi; Chen, Huafu; Yuan, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Deng, Lihua; Lu, Fengmei; Zhang, Junpeng; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Mingwen; Chen, Liangyin

    2015-01-01

    Clustering analysis methods have been widely applied to identifying the functional brain networks of a multitask paradigm. However, the previously used clustering analysis techniques are computationally expensive and thus impractical for clinical applications. In this study a novel method, called SOM-SAPC that combines self-organizing mapping (SOM) and supervised affinity propagation clustering (SAPC), is proposed and implemented to identify the motor execution (ME) and motor imagery (MI) networks. In SOM-SAPC, SOM was first performed to process fMRI data and SAPC is further utilized for clustering the patterns of functional networks. As a result, SOM-SAPC is able to significantly reduce the computational cost for brain network analysis. Simulation and clinical tests involving ME and MI were conducted based on SOM-SAPC, and the analysis results indicated that functional brain networks were clearly identified with different response patterns and reduced computational cost. In particular, three activation clusters were clearly revealed, which include parts of the visual, ME and MI functional networks. These findings validated that SOM-SAPC is an effective and robust method to analyze the fMRI data with multitasks. PMID:26236217

  1. When Sharing Is a Bad Idea: The Effects of Online Social Network Engagement and Sharing Passwords with Friends on Cyberbullying Involvement.

    PubMed

    Meter, Diana J; Bauman, Sheri

    2015-08-01

    Every day, children and adolescents communicate online via social networking sites (SNSs). They also report sharing passwords with peers and friends, a potentially risky behavior in regard to cyber safety. This longitudinal study tested the hypotheses that social network engagement in multiple settings would predict more cyberbullying involvement over time, and that youth who reported sharing passwords would also experience an increase in cyberbullying involvement. Data were collected at two time points one year apart from 1,272 third through eighth grade students. In line with the first study hypothesis, participating in more online SNSs was associated with increased cyberbullying involvement over time, as well as sharing passwords over time. Cyberbullying involvement at T1 predicted decreases in sharing passwords over time, suggesting that youth become aware of the dangers of sharing passwords as a result of their experience. Sharing passwords at T1 was unrelated to cyberbullying involvement at T2. Although it seems that youth may be learning from their previous mistakes, due to the widespread use of social media and normality of sharing passwords among young people, it is important to continue to educate youth about cyber safety and risky online behavior.

  2. When Sharing Is a Bad Idea: The Effects of Online Social Network Engagement and Sharing Passwords with Friends on Cyberbullying Involvement.

    PubMed

    Meter, Diana J; Bauman, Sheri

    2015-08-01

    Every day, children and adolescents communicate online via social networking sites (SNSs). They also report sharing passwords with peers and friends, a potentially risky behavior in regard to cyber safety. This longitudinal study tested the hypotheses that social network engagement in multiple settings would predict more cyberbullying involvement over time, and that youth who reported sharing passwords would also experience an increase in cyberbullying involvement. Data were collected at two time points one year apart from 1,272 third through eighth grade students. In line with the first study hypothesis, participating in more online SNSs was associated with increased cyberbullying involvement over time, as well as sharing passwords over time. Cyberbullying involvement at T1 predicted decreases in sharing passwords over time, suggesting that youth become aware of the dangers of sharing passwords as a result of their experience. Sharing passwords at T1 was unrelated to cyberbullying involvement at T2. Although it seems that youth may be learning from their previous mistakes, due to the widespread use of social media and normality of sharing passwords among young people, it is important to continue to educate youth about cyber safety and risky online behavior. PMID:26252928

  3. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  4. High proficiency in a second language is characterized by greater involvement of the first language network: evidence from Chinese learners of English.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fan; Tao, Ran; Liu, Li; Perfetti, Charles A; Booth, James R

    2013-10-01

    The assimilation hypothesis argues that second language learning recruits the brain network for processing the native language, whereas the accommodation hypothesis argues that learning a second language recruits brain structures not involved in native language processing. This study tested these hypotheses by examining brain activation of a group of native Chinese speakers, who were late bilinguals with varying levels of proficiency in English, when they performed a rhyming judgment to visually presented English word pairs (CE group) during fMRI. Assimilation was examined by comparing the CE group to native Chinese speakers performing the rhyming task in Chinese (CC group), and accommodation was examined by comparing the CE group to native English speakers performing the rhyming task in English (EE group). The CE group was very similar in activation to the CC group, supporting the assimilation hypothesis. Additional support for the assimilation hypothesis was the finding that higher proficiency in the CE group was related to increased activation in the Chinese network (as defined by the CC > EE), including the left middle frontal gyrus, the right inferior parietal lobule, and the right precuneus, and decreased activation in the English network (as defined by the EE > CC), including the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left inferior temporal gyrus. Although most of the results support assimilation, there was some evidence for accommodation as the CE group showed less activation in the Chinese network including the right middle occipital gyrus, which has been argued to be involved in holistic visuospatial processing of Chinese characters.

  5. The detection limit of a Gd3+-based T1 agent is substantially reduced when targeted to a protein microdomain

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Lubag, Angelo Josue M.; Castillo-Muzquiz, Aminta; Kodadek, Thomas; Sherry, A. Dean

    2008-01-01

    Simple low MW chelates of Gd3+ such as those currently used in clinical MR imaging are considered too insensitive for most molecular imaging applications. Here, we evaluated the detection limit of a molecularly targeted, low MW Gd3+-based, T1 agent in a model where the receptor concentration was precisely known. The data demonstrate that receptors clustered together to form a microdomain of high local concentration can be imaged successfully even when the bulk concentration of the receptor is quite low. A GdDO3A-peptide identified by phage display to target the anti-FLAG antibody was synthesized, purified and characterized. T1 weighted MR images were compared with the agent bound to antibody in bulk solution and with the agent bound to the antibody localized on agarose beads. Fluorescence competition binding assays show that the agent has a high binding affinity (KD = 150 nM) for the antibody while the fully bound relaxivity of the GdDO3A-peptide:anti-FLAG antibody in solution was a relatively modest 17 mM−1s−1. The agent:antibody complex was MR silent at concentrations below ~9 µM but was detectable down to 4 µM bulk concentrations when presented to antibody clustered together on the surface of agarose beads. These results provided an estimate of the detection limits for other T1-based agents with higher fully bound relaxivities or multimeric structures bound to clustered receptor molecules. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity of molecularly-targeted contrast agents depends on the local microdomain concentration of the target protein and the molecular relaxivity of the bound complex. A model is presented which predicts that for a molecularly targeted agent consisting of a single Gd3+ complex with bound relaxivity of 100 mM−1s−1 or, more reasonably, four tethered Gd3+ complexes each having a bound relaxivity of 25 mM−1s−1, the detection limit of a protein microdomain is ~690 nM at 9.4T. These experimental and extrapolated detection limits are

  6. The Development of National and International Information Systems and Networks Involving Combinations of Print and Non-Print Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, H. J. A.

    This discussion of the design, development, and operation of information systems functioning at the national or international level focuses on some of the current interests and concerns of those networks designed to facilitate the sharing or exchange of particular types of nonprint media (NPM) materials. Three categories of NPM materials/resources…

  7. Formation and preservation of biotite-rich microdomains in high-temperature rocks from the Antananarivo Block, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Berger, Alfons; Gueydan, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Highly restitic rocks from the Antananarivo Block in northern Madagascar are investigated in this study in order to unravel processes of H2O-rich biotite formation in HT rocks. Polyphase metamorphism and melt migration occurred at 0.6 GPa and 850 °C. Biotite remains stable together with orthopyroxene and makes up to 45 vol% of the rock. In addition, three well-characterised and delimited microdomains having different textural, chemical and petrological characteristics are preserved. Thermodynamic models using the specific bulk compositions of the domains are in agreement with petrological observations. These rocks provide evidence that the lower crust may be strongly heterogeneous, locally associated to the formation of hydrous restites controlled by episodes of melt production and melt escape. This has significant consequences for understanding of the lower crust.

  8. Detergent-resistant microdomains determine the localization of sigma-1 receptors to the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria junction.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Fujimoto, Michiko

    2010-04-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) that bind diverse synthetic and endogenous compounds have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several human diseases such as drug addiction, depression, neurodegenerative disorders, pain-related disorders, and cancer. Sig-1Rs were identified recently as novel ligand-operated molecular chaperones. Although Sig-1Rs are predominantly expressed at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomains apposing mitochondria [i.e., the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM)], they dynamically change the cellular distribution, thus regulating both MAM-specific and plasma membrane proteins. However, what determines the location of Sig-1R at the MAM and how the receptor translocation is initiated is unknown. Here we report that the detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) play an important role in anchoring Sig-1Rs to the MAM. The MAM, which is highly capable of accumulating ceramides, is enriched with both cholesterol and simple sphingolipids, thus forming Triton X-114-resistant DRMs. Sig-1Rs associate with MAM-derived DRMs but not with those from microsomes. A lipid overlay assay found that solubilized Sig-1Rs preferentially associate with simple sphingolipids such as ceramides. Disrupting DRMs by lowering cholesterol or inhibiting de novo synthesis of ceramides at the ER largely decreases Sig-1R at DRMs and causes translocation of Sig-1R from the MAM to ER cisternae. These findings suggest that the MAM, bearing cholesterol and ceramide-enriched microdomains at the ER, may use the microdomains to anchor Sig-1Rs to the location; thus, it serves to stage Sig-1R at ER-mitochondria junctions.

  9. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD−/− colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  10. Hypertrophy, gene expression, and beating of neonatal cardiac myocytes are affected by microdomain heterogeneity in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Matthew W.; Sharma, Sadhana; Desai, Tejal A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes are known to be influenced by the rigidity and topography of their physical microenvironment. It was hypothesized that 3D heterogeneity introduced by purely physical microdomains regulates cardiac myocyte size and contraction. This was tested in vitro using polymeric microstructures (G′=1.66 GPa) suspended with random orientation in 3D by a soft Matrigel matrix (G′=22.9 Pa). After 10 days of culture, the presence of 100 μm-long microstructures in 3D gels induced fold increases in neonatal rat ventricular myocyte size (1.61±0.06, p<0.01) and total protein/cell ratios (1.43± 0.08, p<0.05) that were comparable to those induced chemically by 50 μM phenylephrine treatment. Upon attachment to microstructures, individual myocytes also had larger cross-sectional areas (1.57±0.05, p<0.01) and higher average rates of spontaneous contraction (2.01±0.08, p<0.01) than unattached myocytes. Furthermore, the inclusion of microstructures in myocyte-seeded gels caused significant increases in the expression of beta-1 adrenergic receptor (β1-AR, 1.19±0.01), cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP, 1.26±0.02), and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA2, 1.59±0.12, p<0.05), genes implicated in hypertrophy and contractile activity. Together, the results demonstrate that cardiac myocyte behavior can be controlled through local 3D microdomains alone. This approach of defining physical cues as independent features may help to advance the elemental design considerations for scaffolds in cardiac tissue engineering and therapeutic microdevices. PMID:20668947

  11. Heterogeneous distribution of exocytotic microdomains in adrenal chromaffin cells resolved by high-density diamond ultra-microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gosso, Sara; Turturici, Marco; Franchino, Claudio; Colombo, Elisabetta; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the ability of a high-density diamond microelectrode array targeted to resolve multi-site detection of fast exocytotic events from single cells. The array consists of nine boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond ultra-microelectrodes (9-Ch NCD-UMEA) radially distributed within a circular area of the dimensions of a single cell. The device can be operated in voltammetric or chronoamperometric configuration. Sensitivity to catecholamines, tested by dose–response calibrations, set the lowest detectable concentration of adrenaline to ∼5 μm. Catecholamine release from bovine or mouse chromaffin cells could be triggered by electrical stimulation or external KCl-enriched solutions. Spikes detected from the cell apex using carbon fibre microelectrodes showed an excellent correspondence with events measured at the bottom of the cell by the 9-Ch NCD-UMEA, confirming the ability of the array to resolve single quantal secretory events. Subcellular localization of exocytosis was provided by assigning each quantal event to one of the nine channels based on its location. The resulting mapping highlights the heterogeneous distribution of secretory activity in cell microdomains of 12–27 μm2. In bovine chromaffin cells, secretion was highly heterogeneous with zones of high and medium activity in 54% of the cell surface and zones of low or no activity in the remainder. The ‘non-active’ (‘silent’) zones covered 24% of the total and persisted for 6–8 min, indicating stable location. The 9-Ch NCD-UMEA therefore appears suitable for investigating the microdomain organization of neurosecretion with high spatial resolution. PMID:24879870

  12. Prediction of the main cortical areas and connections involved in the tactile function of the visual cortex by network analysis.

    PubMed

    Négyessy, László; Nepusz, Tamás; Kocsis, László; Bazsó, Fülöp

    2006-04-01

    We explored the cortical pathways from the primary somatosensory cortex to the primary visual cortex (V1) by analysing connectional data in the macaque monkey using graph-theoretical tools. Cluster analysis revealed the close relationship of the dorsal visual stream and the sensorimotor cortex. It was shown that prefrontal area 46 and parietal areas VIP and 7a occupy a central position between the different clusters in the visuo-tactile network. Among these structures all the shortest paths from primary somatosensory cortex (3a, 1 and 2) to V1 pass through VIP and then reach V1 via MT, V3 and PO. Comparison of the input and output fields suggested a larger specificity for the 3a/1-VIP-MT/V3-V1 pathways among the alternative routes. A reinforcement learning algorithm was used to evaluate the importance of the aforementioned pathways. The results suggest a higher role for V3 in relaying more direct sensorimotor information to V1. Analysing cliques, which identify areas with the strongest coupling in the network, supported the role of VIP, MT and V3 in visuo-tactile integration. These findings indicate that areas 3a, 1, VIP, MT and V3 play a major role in shaping the tactile information reaching V1 in both sighted and blind subjects. Our observations greatly support the findings of the experimental studies and provide a deeper insight into the network architecture underlying visuo-tactile integration in the primate cerebral cortex.

  13. A bioinformatics analysis of Lamin-A regulatory network: a perspective on epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to premature aging. HGPS is caused by mutation in the Lamin-A (LMNA) gene that leads, in affected young individuals, to the accumulation of the progerin protein, usually present only in aging differentiated cells. Bioinformatics analyses of the network of interactions of the LMNA gene and transcripts are presented. The LMNA gene network has been analyzed using the BioGRID database (http://thebiogrid.org/) and related analysis tools such as Osprey (http://biodata.mshri.on.ca/osprey/servlet/Index) and GeneMANIA ( http://genemania.org/). The network of interaction of LMNA transcripts has been further analyzed following the competing endogenous (ceRNA) hypotheses (RNA cross-talk via microRNAs [miRNAs]) and using the miRWalk database and tools (www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/apps/zmf/mirwalk/). These analyses suggest particular relevance of epigenetic modifiers (via acetylase complexes and specifically HTATIP histone acetylase) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodelers (via pBAF, BAF, and SWI/SNF complexes).

  14. Genes and Gene Networks Involved in Sodium Fluoride-Elicited Cell Death Accompanying Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Oral Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Yunoki, Tatsuya; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Nobuo; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Here, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death induced by sodium fluoride (NaF), we analyzed gene expression patterns in rat oral epithelial ROE2 cells exposed to NaF using global-scale microarrays and bioinformatics tools. A relatively high concentration of NaF (2 mM) induced cell death concomitant with decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation. Using 980 probe sets, we identified 432 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated genes, that were differentially expressed by >2.5-fold in the cells treated with 2 mM of NaF and categorized them into 4 groups by K-means clustering. Ingenuity® pathway analysis revealed several gene networks from gene clusters. The gene networks Up-I and Up-II included many up-regulated genes that were mainly associated with the biological function of induction or prevention of cell death, respectively, such as Atf3, Ddit3 and Fos (for Up-I) and Atf4 and Hspa5 (for Up-II). Interestingly, knockdown of Ddit3 and Hspa5 significantly increased and decreased the number of viable cells, respectively. Moreover, several endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes including, Ddit3, Atf4 and Hapa5, were observed in these gene networks. These findings will provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of NaF-induced cell death accompanying ER stress in oral epithelial cells. PMID:24853129

  15. Results of the 1989-90 NETWORK Survey of Two-Year College Involvement in Employment, Training, and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NETWORK: America's Two-Year Coll. Employment, Training, and Literacy Consortium, Cleveland, OH.

    In 1989-90, a survey was conducted of two-year colleges nationwide to determine their level of involvement in the delivery of employment, training, and literacy services to public sector agencies and business and industry. The study focused particularly on those services funded under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), the Job Opportunities…

  16. Passive somatosensory discrimination tasks in healthy volunteers: differential networks involved in familiar versus unfamiliar shape and length discrimination.

    PubMed

    Van de Winckel, Ann; Sunaert, Stefan; Wenderoth, Nicole; Peeters, Ron; Van Hecke, Paul; Feys, Hilde; Horemans, Els; Marchal, Guy; Swinnen, Stephan P; Perfetti, Carlo; De Weerdt, Willy

    2005-06-01

    Somatosensory discrimination of unseen objects relies on processing of proprioceptive and tactile information to detect spatial features, such as shape or length, as acquired by exploratory finger movements. This ability can be impaired after stroke, because of somatosensory-motor deficits. Passive somatosensory discrimination tasks are therefore used in therapy to improve motor function. Whereas the neural correlates of active discrimination have been addressed repeatedly, little is known about the neural networks activated during passive discrimination of somatosensory information. In the present study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while the right index finger of ten healthy subjects was passively moved along various shapes and lengths by an fMRI compatible robot. Comparing discriminating versus non-discriminating passive movements, we identified a bilateral parieto-frontal network, including the precuneus, superior parietal gyrus, rostral intraparietal sulcus, and supramarginal gyrus as well as the supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsal premotor (PMd), and ventral premotor (PMv) areas. Additionally, we compared the discrimination of different spatial features, i.e., discrimination of length versus familiar (rectangles or triangles) and unfamiliar geometric shapes (arbitrary quadrilaterals). Length discrimination activated mainly medially located superior parietal and PMd circuits whereas discrimination of familiar geometric shapes activated more laterally located inferior parietal and PMv regions. These differential parieto-frontal circuits provide new insights into the neural basis of extracting spatial features from somatosensory input and suggest that different passive discrimination tasks could be used for lesion-specific training following stroke.

  17. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-11-09

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants.

  18. The genetic regulatory network centered on Pto-Wuschela and its targets involved in wood formation revealed by association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Zunzheng; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Wang, Qingshi; Quan, Mingyang; Song, Yuepeng; Xie, Jianbo; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression and can strongly affect phenotypes. However, few studies have examined TF variants and TF interactions with their targets in plants. Here, we used genetic association in 435 unrelated individuals of Populus tomentosa to explore the variants in Pto-Wuschela and its targets to decipher the genetic regulatory network of Pto-Wuschela. Our bioinformatics and co-expression analysis identified 53 genes with the motif TCACGTGA as putative targets of Pto-Wuschela. Single-marker association analysis showed that Pto-Wuschela was associated with wood properties, which is in agreement with the observation that it has higher expression in stem vascular tissues in Populus. Also, SNPs in the 53 targets were associated with growth or wood properties under additive or dominance effects, suggesting these genes and Pto-Wuschela may act in the same genetic pathways that affect variation in these quantitative traits. Epistasis analysis indicated that 75.5% of these genes directly or indirectly interacted Pto-Wuschela, revealing the coordinated genetic regulatory network formed by Pto-Wuschela and its targets. Thus, our study provides an alternative method for dissection of the interactions between a TF and its targets, which will strength our understanding of the regulatory roles of TFs in complex traits in plants. PMID:26549216

  19. A Permanent Change In Protein Mechanical Responses Can Be Produced By Thermally Induced Microdomain Mixing

    PubMed Central

    Sallach, Rory E.; Leisen, Johannes; Caves, Jeffrey M.; Fotovich, Emily; Apkarian, Robert P.; Conticello, Vincent P.; Chaikof`, Elliot L.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning was employed to fabricate three dimensional fiber networks from a recombinant amphiphilic elastin-mimetic triblock protein polymer and the effects of moderate thermal conditioning (60°C, 4h) on network mechanical responses investigated. Significantly, while cryo-high resolution scanning electron microscopy (cryo-HRSEM) revealed that macroscopic and microscopic morphology of the network structure was unchanged, solid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy demonstrated enhanced interphase mixing of hydrophobic and hydrophilic blocks. Significantly, thermal annealing triggered permanent changes in network swelling behavior (28.75 ± 2.80 non-annealed vs. 13.55 ± 1.39 annealed; p < 0.05) and uniaxial mechanical responses, including Young’s modulus (0.170 ± 0.010 MPa non-annealed vs. 0.366 ± 0.05 MPa annealed; p < 0.05) and ultimate tensile strength (0.079 ± 0.008 MPa vs 0.119 ± 0.015 MPa; p < 0.05). To our knowledge, these investigations are the first to note that mechanical responses of protein polymers can be permanently altered through a temperature-induced change in microphase mixing. PMID:19619402

  20. Reconstruction of the gene regulatory network involved in the sonic hedgehog pathway with a potential role in early development of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Xuelong; Li, Juan; Wang, Haifang; Wei, Gang; Yan, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is crucial for pattern formation in early central nervous system development. By systematically analyzing high-throughput in situ hybridization data of E11.5 mouse brain, we found that Shh and its receptor Ptch1 define two adjacent mutually exclusive gene expression domains: Shh+Ptch1- and Shh-Ptch1+. These two domains are associated respectively with Foxa2 and Gata3, two transcription factors that play key roles in specifying them. Gata3 ChIP-seq experiments and RNA-seq assays on Gata3-knockdown cells revealed that Gata3 up-regulates the genes that are enriched in the Shh-Ptch1+ domain. Important Gata3 targets include Slit2 and Slit3, which are involved in the process of axon guidance, as well as Slc18a1, Th and Qdpr, which are associated with neurotransmitter synthesis and release. By contrast, Foxa2 both up-regulates the genes expressed in the Shh+Ptch1- domain and down-regulates the genes characteristic of the Shh-Ptch1+ domain. From these and other data, we were able to reconstruct a gene regulatory network governing both domains. Our work provides the first genome-wide characterization of the gene regulatory network involved in the Shh pathway that underlies pattern formation in the early mouse brain. PMID:25299227

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals that Plasma Membrane Microdomains From Poplar Cell Suspension Cultures Are Enriched in Markers of Signal Transduction, Molecular Transport, and Callose Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vaibhav; Malm, Erik; Sundqvist, Gustav; Bulone, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) is a highly dynamic interface that contains detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). The aim of this work was to determine the main functions of such microdomains in poplar through a proteomic analysis using gel-based and solution (iTRAQ) approaches. A total of 80 proteins from a limited number of functional classes were found to be significantly enriched in DRM relative to PM. The enriched proteins are markers of signal transduction, molecular transport at the PM, or cell wall biosynthesis. Their intrinsic properties are presented and discussed together with the biological significance of their enrichment in DRM. Of particular importance is the significant and specific enrichment of several callose [(1→3)-β-glucan] synthase isoforms, whose catalytic activity represents a final response to stress, leading to the deposition of callose plugs at the surface of the PM. An integrated functional model that connects all DRM-enriched proteins identified is proposed. This report is the only quantitative analysis available to date of the protein composition of membrane microdomains from a tree species. PMID:24051156

  2. Better you lose than I do: neural networks involved in winning and losing in a real time strictly competitive game.

    PubMed

    Votinov, Mikhail; Pripfl, Juergen; Windischberger, Christian; Sailer, Uta; Lamm, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Many situations in daily life require competing with others for the same goal. In this case, the joy of winning is tied to the fact that the rival suffers. In this fMRI study participants played a competitive game against another player, in which every trial had opposite consequences for the two players (i.e., if one player won, the other lost, or vice versa). Our main aim was to disentangle brain activation for two different types of winning. Participants could either win a trial in a way that it increased their payoff; or they could win a trial in a way that it incurred a monetary loss to their opponent. Two distinct brain networks were engaged in these two types of winning. Wins with a monetary gain activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area associated with the processing of rewards. In contrast, avoidance of loss/other-related monetary loss evoked activation in areas related to mentalizing, such as the temporo-parietal junction and precuneus. However, both types of winnings shared activation in the striatum. Our findings extend recent evidence from neuroeconomics by suggesting that we consider our conspecifics' payoff even when we directly compete with them. PMID:26047332

  3. Better you lose than I do: neural networks involved in winning and losing in a real time strictly competitive game

    PubMed Central

    Votinov, Mikhail; Pripfl, Juergen; Windischberger, Christian; Sailer, Uta; Lamm, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Many situations in daily life require competing with others for the same goal. In this case, the joy of winning is tied to the fact that the rival suffers. In this fMRI study participants played a competitive game against another player, in which every trial had opposite consequences for the two players (i.e., if one player won, the other lost, or vice versa). Our main aim was to disentangle brain activation for two different types of winning. Participants could either win a trial in a way that it increased their payoff; or they could win a trial in a way that it incurred a monetary loss to their opponent. Two distinct brain networks were engaged in these two types of winning. Wins with a monetary gain activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, an area associated with the processing of rewards. In contrast, avoidance of loss/other-related monetary loss evoked activation in areas related to mentalizing, such as the temporo-parietal junction and precuneus. However, both types of winnings shared activation in the striatum. Our findings extend recent evidence from neuroeconomics by suggesting that we consider our conspecifics’ payoff even when we directly compete with them. PMID:26047332

  4. Identification of a large protein network involved in epigenetic transmission in replicating DNA of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Ernfors, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is maintained by transcriptional activities and chromatin modifying complexes highly organized within the chromatin. Although much effort has been focused on identifying genome-binding sites, little is known on their dynamic association with chromatin across cell divisions. Here, we used a modified version of the iPOND (isolation of proteins at nascent DNA) technology to identify a large protein network enriched at nascent DNA in ESCs. This comprehensive and unbiased proteomic characterization in ESCs reveals that, in addition to the core replication machinery, proteins relevant for pluripotency of ESCs are present at DNA replication sites. In particular, we show that the chromatin remodeller HDAC1–NuRD complex is enriched at nascent DNA. Interestingly, an acute block of HDAC1 in ESCs leads to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 at nascent DNA together with a concomitant loss of methylation. Consistently, in contrast to what has been described in tumour cell lines, these chromatin marks were found to be stable during cell cycle progression of ESCs. Our results are therefore compatible with a rapid deacetylation-coupled methylation mechanism during the replication of DNA in ESCs that may participate in the preservation of pluripotency of ESCs during replication. PMID:24852249

  5. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods. PMID:23880430

  6. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods.

  7. A Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System (PhyNNeSS) for multimodal interactive virtual environments involving nonlinear deformable objects

    PubMed Central

    De, Suvranu; Deo, Dhannanjay; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata S.

    2012-01-01

    Background While an update rate of 30 Hz is considered adequate for real time graphics, a much higher update rate of about 1 kHz is necessary for haptics. Physics-based modeling of deformable objects, especially when large nonlinear deformations and complex nonlinear material properties are involved, at these very high rates is one of the most challenging tasks in the development of real time simulation systems. While some specialized solutions exist, there is no general solution for arbitrary nonlinearities. Methods In this work we present PhyNNeSS - a Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System - to address this long-standing technical challenge. The first step is an off-line pre-computation step in which a database is generated by applying carefully prescribed displacements to each node of the finite element models of the deformable objects. In the next step, the data is condensed into a set of coefficients describing neurons of a Radial Basis Function network (RBFN). During real-time computation, these neural networks are used to reconstruct the deformation fields as well as the interaction forces. Results We present realistic simulation examples from interactive surgical simulation with real time force feedback. As an example, we have developed a deformable human stomach model and a Penrose-drain model used in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training tool box. Conclusions A unique computational modeling system has been developed that is capable of simulating the response of nonlinear deformable objects in real time. The method distinguishes itself from previous efforts in that a systematic physics-based pre-computational step allows training of neural networks which may be used in real time simulations. We show, through careful error analysis, that the scheme is scalable, with the accuracy being controlled by the number of neurons used in the simulation. PhyNNeSS has been integrated into SoFMIS (Software Framework for Multimodal

  8. A Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System (PhyNNeSS) for multimodal interactive virtual environments involving nonlinear deformable objects.

    PubMed

    De, Suvranu; Deo, Dhannanjay; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata S

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND: While an update rate of 30 Hz is considered adequate for real time graphics, a much higher update rate of about 1 kHz is necessary for haptics. Physics-based modeling of deformable objects, especially when large nonlinear deformations and complex nonlinear material properties are involved, at these very high rates is one of the most challenging tasks in the development of real time simulation systems. While some specialized solutions exist, there is no general solution for arbitrary nonlinearities. METHODS: In this work we present PhyNNeSS - a Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System - to address this long-standing technical challenge. The first step is an off-line pre-computation step in which a database is generated by applying carefully prescribed displacements to each node of the finite element models of the deformable objects. In the next step, the data is condensed into a set of coefficients describing neurons of a Radial Basis Function network (RBFN). During real-time computation, these neural networks are used to reconstruct the deformation fields as well as the interaction forces. RESULTS: We present realistic simulation examples from interactive surgical simulation with real time force feedback. As an example, we have developed a deformable human stomach model and a Penrose-drain model used in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training tool box. CONCLUSIONS: A unique computational modeling system has been developed that is capable of simulating the response of nonlinear deformable objects in real time. The method distinguishes itself from previous efforts in that a systematic physics-based pre-computational step allows training of neural networks which may be used in real time simulations. We show, through careful error analysis, that the scheme is scalable, with the accuracy being controlled by the number of neurons used in the simulation. PhyNNeSS has been integrated into SoFMIS (Software Framework for Multimodal

  9. High contaminant loads in Lake Apopka's riparian wetland disrupt gene networks involved in reproduction and immune function in largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Doperalski, Nicholas J; Prucha, Melinda S; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Kroll, Kevin J; Conrow, Roxanne; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2016-09-01

    Lake Apopka (FL, USA) has elevated levels of some organochlorine pesticides in its sediments and a portion of its watershed has been designated a US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site. This study assessed reproductive endpoints in Florida largemouth bass (LMB) (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) after placement into experimental ponds adjacent to Lake Apopka. LMB collected from a clean reference site (DeLeon Springs) were stocked at two periods of time into ponds constructed in former farm fields on the north shore of the lake. LMB were stocked during early and late oogenesis to determine if there were different effects of contamination on LMB that may be attributed to their reproductive stage. LMB inhabiting the ponds for ~4months had anywhere from 2 to 800 times higher contaminant load for a number of organochlorine pesticides (e.g. p, p'-DDE, methoxychlor) compared to control animals. Gonadosomatic index and plasma vitellogenin were not different between reproductively-stage matched LMB collected at reference sites compared to those inhabiting the ponds. However, plasma 17β-estradiol was lower in LMB inhabiting the Apopka ponds compared to ovary stage-matched LMB from the St. Johns River, a site used as a reference site. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that genes related to reproduction (granulosa function, oocyte development), endocrine function (steroid metabolism, hormone biosynthesis), and immune function (T cell suppression, leukocyte accumulation) were differentially expressed in the ovaries of LMB placed into the ponds. These data suggest that (1) LMB inhabiting the Apopka ponds showed disrupted reproduction and immune responses and that (2) gene expression profiles provided site-specific information by discriminating LMB from different macro-habitats. PMID:27397556

  10. High contaminant loads in Lake Apopka's riparian wetland disrupt gene networks involved in reproduction and immune function in largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Doperalski, Nicholas J; Prucha, Melinda S; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Kroll, Kevin J; Conrow, Roxanne; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2016-09-01

    Lake Apopka (FL, USA) has elevated levels of some organochlorine pesticides in its sediments and a portion of its watershed has been designated a US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site. This study assessed reproductive endpoints in Florida largemouth bass (LMB) (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) after placement into experimental ponds adjacent to Lake Apopka. LMB collected from a clean reference site (DeLeon Springs) were stocked at two periods of time into ponds constructed in former farm fields on the north shore of the lake. LMB were stocked during early and late oogenesis to determine if there were different effects of contamination on LMB that may be attributed to their reproductive stage. LMB inhabiting the ponds for ~4months had anywhere from 2 to 800 times higher contaminant load for a number of organochlorine pesticides (e.g. p, p'-DDE, methoxychlor) compared to control animals. Gonadosomatic index and plasma vitellogenin were not different between reproductively-stage matched LMB collected at reference sites compared to those inhabiting the ponds. However, plasma 17β-estradiol was lower in LMB inhabiting the Apopka ponds compared to ovary stage-matched LMB from the St. Johns River, a site used as a reference site. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that genes related to reproduction (granulosa function, oocyte development), endocrine function (steroid metabolism, hormone biosynthesis), and immune function (T cell suppression, leukocyte accumulation) were differentially expressed in the ovaries of LMB placed into the ponds. These data suggest that (1) LMB inhabiting the Apopka ponds showed disrupted reproduction and immune responses and that (2) gene expression profiles provided site-specific information by discriminating LMB from different macro-habitats.

  11. Plasma-activated medium induces A549 cell injury via a spiral apoptotic cascade involving the mitochondrial-nuclear network.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nonomura, Saho; Hara, Hirokazu; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Hori, Masaru

    2015-02-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly expanding new field of interdisciplinary research that combines physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma can be applied to living cells and tissues and has emerged as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Plasma has recently been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). The objective of this study was to demonstrate the inhibitory effects of PAM on A549 cell survival and elucidate the signaling mechanisms responsible for cell death. PAM maintained its ability to suppress cell viability for at least 1 week when stored at -80°C. The severity of PAM-triggered cell injury depended on the kind of culture medium used to prepare the PAM, especially that with or without pyruvate. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and/or its derived or cooperating reactive oxygen species reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl2, activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, and released apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria with endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, the activation of caspase 3/7 and attenuation of cell viability by the addition of caspase inhibitor were not observed. The accumulation of adenine 5'-diphosphoribose as a product of the above reactions activated transient receptor potential melastatin 2, which elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels and subsequently led to cell death. These results demonstrated that H2O2 and/or other reactive species in PAM disturbed the mitochondrial-nuclear network in cancer cells through a caspase-independent apoptotic pathway. Moreover, damage to the plasma membrane by H2O2-cooperating charged species not only induced apoptosis, but also increased its permeability to extracellular reactive species. These phenomena were also detected in PAM-treated HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. PMID:25433364

  12. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca²⁺ and H⁺ Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-09-23

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and H⁺ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot(®)565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca(2+) or H⁺ probes. These 'Rubies' are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid) for H⁺ or Ca(2+) sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging.

  13. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca²⁺ and H⁺ Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and H⁺ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot(®)565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca(2+) or H⁺ probes. These 'Rubies' are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid) for H⁺ or Ca(2+) sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging. PMID:26404317

  14. Generation of Stable Lipid Raft Microdomains in the Enterocyte Brush Border by Selective Endocytic Removal of Non-Raft Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, E. Michael; Hansen, Gert H.

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination. PMID:24124585

  15. Lifeguard/neuronal membrane protein 35 regulates Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis in neurons via microdomain recruitment.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Miriam; Segura, Miguel F; Solé, Carme; Colino, Alicia; Comella, Joan X; Ceña, Valentín

    2007-10-01

    Fas ligand (FasL)-receptor system plays an essential role in regulating cell death in the developing nervous system, and it has been implicated in neurodegenerative and inflammatory responses in the CNS. Lifeguard (LFG) is a protein highly expressed in the hippocampus and the cerebellum, and it shows a particularly interesting regulation by being up-regulated during postnatal development and in the adult. We show that over-expression of LFG protected cortical neurons from FasL-induced apoptosis and decreased caspase-activation. Reduction of endogenous LFG expression by small interfering RNA sensitized cerebellar granular neurons to FasL-induced cell death and caspase-8 activation, and also increased sensitivity of cortical neurons. In differentiated cerebellar granular neurons, protection from FasL-induced cell death could be attributed exclusively to LFG and appears to be independent of FLICE inhibitor protein. Thus, LFG is an endogenous inhibitor of FasL-mediated neuronal death and it mediates the FasL resistance of CNS differentiated neurons. Finally, we also demonstrate that LFG is detected in lipid rafts microdomains, where it may interact with Fas receptor and regulate FasL-activated signaling pathways.

  16. Pre-embedding immunogold labeling to optimize protein localization at subcellular compartments and membrane microdomains of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N; Morgan, Ellen; Monahan-Earley, Rita; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    Precise immunolocalization of proteins within a cell is central to understanding cell processes and functions such as intracellular trafficking and secretion of molecules during immune responses. Here we describe a protocol for ultrastructural detection of proteins in leukocytes. The method uses a pre-embedding approach (immunolabeling before standard processing for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)). This protocol combines several strategies for ultrastructure and antigen preservation, robust blocking of nonspecific binding sites, as well as superior antibody penetration for detecting molecules at subcellular compartments and membrane microdomains. A further advantage of this technique is that electron microscopy (EM) processing is quick. This method has been used to study leukocyte biology, and it has helped demonstrate how activated leukocytes deliver specific cargos. It may also potentially be applied to a variety of different cell types. Excluding the initial time required for sample preparation (15 h) and the final resin polymerization step (16 h), the protocol (immunolabeling and EM procedures) can be completed in 8 h. PMID:25211515

  17. The effect of natural and synthetic fatty acids on membrane structure, microdomain organization, cellular functions and human health.

    PubMed

    Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2014-06-01

    This review deals with the effects of synthetic and natural fatty acids on the biophysical properties of membranes, and on their implication on cell function. Natural fatty acids are constituents of more complex lipids, like triacylglycerides or phospholipids, which are used by cells to store and obtain energy, as well as for structural purposes. Accordingly, natural and synthetic fatty acids may modify the structure of the lipid membrane, altering its microdomain organization and other physical properties, and provoking changes in cell signaling. Therefore, by modulating fatty acids it is possible to regulate the structure of the membrane, influencing the cell processes that are reliant on this structure and potentially reverting pathological cell dysfunctions that may provoke cancer, diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The so-called Membrane Lipid Therapy offers a strategy to regulate the membrane composition through drug administration, potentially reverting pathological processes by re-adapting cell membrane structure. Certain fatty acids and their synthetic derivatives are described here that may potentially be used in such therapies, where the cell membrane itself can be considered as a target to combat disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  18. PI(4,5)P2-dependent microdomain assemblies capture microtubules to promote and control leading edge motility.

    PubMed

    Golub, Tamara; Caroni, Pico

    2005-04-11

    The lipid second messenger PI(4,5)P(2) modulates actin dynamics, and its local accumulation at plasmalemmal microdomains (rafts) might mediate regulation of protrusive motility. However, how PI(4,5)P(2)-rich rafts regulate surface motility is not well understood. Here, we show that upon signals promoting cell surface motility, PI(4,5)P(2) directs the assembly of dynamic raft-rich plasmalemmal patches, which promote and sustain protrusive motility. The accumulation of PI(4,5)P(2) at rafts, together with Cdc42, promotes patch assembly through N-WASP. The patches exhibit locally regulated PI(4,5)P(2) turnover and reduced diffusion-mediated exchange with their environment. Patches capture microtubules (MTs) through patch IQGAP1, to stabilize MTs at the leading edge. Captured MTs in turn deliver PKA to patches to promote patch clustering through further PI(4,5)P(2) accumulation in response to cAMP. Patch clustering restricts, spatially confines, and polarizes protrusive motility. Thus, PI(4,5)P(2)-dependent raft-rich patches enhance local signaling for motility, and their assembly into clusters is regulated through captured MTs and PKA, coupling local regulation of motility to cell polarity, and organization.

  19. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  20. Super-resolution imaging of ciliary microdomains in isolated olfactory sensory neurons using a custom STED microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephanie A.; Ozbay, Baris; Restrepo, Diego; Gibson, Emily A.

    2014-03-01

    We performed super-resolution imaging of isolated olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) using a custom-built Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope. The design for the STED microscope is based on the system developed in the laboratory of Dr. Stefan Hell1. Our system is capable of imaging with sub-diffraction limited resolution simultaneously in two color channels (at Atto 590/Atto 647N wavelengths). A single, pulsed laser source (ALP; Fianium, Inc.) generates all four laser beams, two excitation and two STED. The two STED beams are coupled into one polarization maintaining (PM) fiber and the two excitation beams into another. They are then collimated and both STED beams pass through a vortex phase plate (RPC Photonics) to allow shaping into a donut at the focus of the objective lens. The beams are then combined and sent into an inverted research microscope (IX-71; Olympus Inc.) allowing widefield epifluorescence, brightfield and DIC imaging on the same field of view as STED imaging. A fast piezo stage scans the sample during STED and confocal imaging. The fluorescent signals from the two color channels are detected with two avalanche photodiodes (APD) after appropriate spectral filtering. The resolution of the system was characterized by imaging 40 nm fluorescent beads as ~60 nm (Atto 590) and ~50 nm (Atto 647N). We performed STED imaging on immunolabeled isolated OSNs tagged at the CNGA2 and ANO2 proteins. The STED microscope allows us to resolve ciliary CNGA2 microdomains of ~54 nm that were blurred in confocal.

  1. Modulation of the neuronal network activity by P2X receptors and their involvement in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Orellana, F; Godoy, P A; Silva-Grecchi, T; Barra, K M; Fuentealba, J

    2015-11-01

    ATP is a key energetic molecule, fundamental to cell function, which also has an important role in the extracellular milieu as a signaling molecule, acting as a chemoattractant for immune cells and as a neuro- and gliotransmitter. The ionotropic P2X receptors are members of an ATP-gated ion channels family. These ionotropic receptors are widely expressed through the body, with 7 subunits described in mammals, which are arranged in a trimeric configuration with a central pore permeable mainly to Ca(2+) and Na(+). All 7 subunits are expressed in different brain areas, being present in neurons and glia. ATP, through these ionotropic receptors, can act as a neuromodulator, facilitating the Ca(2+)-dependent release of neurotransmitters, inducing the cross-inhibition between P2XR and GABA receptors, and exercising by this way a modulation of synaptic plasticity. Growing evidence shows that P2XR play an important role in neuronal disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease; this role involves changes on P2XR expression levels, activation of key pathways like GSK3β, APP processing, oxidative stress and inflammatory response. This review is focused on the neuromodulatory function of P2XR on pathophysiological conditions of the brain; the recent evidence could open a window to a new therapeutic target. PMID:26122853

  2. Clathrin-dependent pathways and the cytoskeleton network are involved in ceramide endocytosis by a parasitic protozoan, Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Yunuen; Castillo, Cynthia; Roychowdhury, Sukla; Hehl, Adrian; Aley, Stephen B; Das, Siddhartha

    2007-01-01

    Although identified as an early-diverged protozoan, Giardia lamblia shares many similarities with higher eukaryotic cells, including an internal membrane system and cytoskeleton, as well as secretory pathways. However, unlike many other eukaryotes, Giardia does not synthesize lipids de novo, but rather depends on exogenous sources for both energy production and organelle or membrane biogenesis. It is not known how lipid molecules are taken up by this parasite and if endocytic pathways are involved in this process. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that highly regulated and selective lipid transport machinery is present in Giardia and necessary for the efficient internalization and intracellular targeting of ceramide molecules, the major sphingolipid precursor. Using metabolic and pathway inhibitors, we demonstrate that ceramide is internalized through endocytic pathways and is primarily targeted into perinuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Further investigations suggested that Giardia uses both clathrin-dependent pathways and the actin cytoskeleton for ceramide uptake, as well as microtubule filaments for intracellular localization and targeting. We speculate that this parasitic protozoan has evolved cytoskeletal and clathrin-dependent endocytic mechanisms for importing ceramide molecules from the cell exterior for the synthesis of membranes and vesicles during growth and differentiation. PMID:17087963

  3. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Vinton G.

    1991-01-01

    The demands placed on the networks transporting the information and knowledge generated by the increased diversity and sophistication of computational machinery are described. What is needed to support this increased flow, the structures already in place, and what must be built are topics of discussion. (KR)

  4. Pax9 regulates a molecular network involving Bmp4, Fgf10, Shh signaling and the Osr2 transcription factor to control palate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Gao, Yang; Lan, Yu; Jia, Shihai; Jiang, Rulang

    2013-12-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common birth defects in humans. Whereas gene knockout studies in mice have shown that both the Osr2 and Pax9 transcription factors are essential regulators of palatogenesis, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involving these transcription factors in palate development. We report here that Pax9 plays a crucial role in patterning the anterior-posterior axis and outgrowth of the developing palatal shelves. We found that tissue-specific deletion of Pax9 in the palatal mesenchyme affected Shh expression in palatal epithelial cells, indicating that Pax9 plays a crucial role in the mesenchyme-epithelium interactions during palate development. We found that expression of the Bmp4, Fgf10, Msx1 and Osr2 genes is significantly downregulated in the developing palatal mesenchyme in Pax9 mutant embryos. Remarkably, restoration of Osr2 expression in the early palatal mesenchyme through a Pax9(Osr2KI) allele rescued posterior palate morphogenesis in the absence of Pax9 protein function. Our data indicate that Pax9 regulates a molecular network involving the Bmp4, Fgf10, Shh and Osr2 pathways to control palatal shelf patterning and morphogenesis.

  5. Identification of AMPK Phosphorylation Sites Reveals a Network of Proteins Involved in Cell Invasion and Facilitates Large-Scale Substrate Prediction.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Bethany E; Levin, Rebecca S; Hertz, Nicholas T; Maures, Travis J; Schoof, Michael L; Hollstein, Pablo E; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Banko, Max R; Shaw, Reuben J; Shokat, Kevan M; Brunet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central energy gauge that regulates metabolism and has been increasingly involved in non-metabolic processes and diseases. However, AMPK's direct substrates in non-metabolic contexts are largely unknown. To better understand the AMPK network, we use a chemical genetics screen coupled to a peptide capture approach in whole cells, resulting in identification of direct AMPK phosphorylation sites. Interestingly, the high-confidence AMPK substrates contain many proteins involved in cell motility, adhesion, and invasion. AMPK phosphorylation of the RHOA guanine nucleotide exchange factor NET1A inhibits extracellular matrix degradation, an early step in cell invasion. The identification of direct AMPK phosphorylation sites also facilitates large-scale prediction of AMPK substrates. We provide an AMPK motif matrix and a pipeline to predict additional AMPK substrates from quantitative phosphoproteomics datasets. As AMPK is emerging as a critical node in aging and pathological processes, our study identifies potential targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26456332

  6. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. D1-like receptors regulate NADPH oxidase activity and subunit expression in lipid raft microdomains of renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hewang; Han, Weixing; Villar, Van Anthony M; Keever, Lindsay B; Lu, Quansheng; Hopfer, Ulrich; Quinn, Mark T; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A; Yu, Peiying

    2009-06-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox)-dependent reactive oxygen species production is implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that oxidase subunits are differentially regulated in renal proximal tubules from normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Basal Nox2 and Nox4, but not Rac1, in immortalized renal proximal tubule cells and brush border membranes were greater in hypertensive than in normotensive rats. However, more Rac1 was expressed in lipid rafts in cells from hypertensive rats than in cells from normotensive rats; the converse was observed with Nox4, whereas Nox2 expression was similar. The D(1)-like receptor agonist fenoldopam decreased Nox2 and Rac1 protein in lipid rafts to a greater extent in hypertensive than in normotensive rats. Basal oxidase activity was 3-fold higher in hypertensive than in normotensive rats but was inhibited to a greater extent by fenoldopam in normotensive (58+/-3.3%) than in hypertensive rats (31+/-5.2%; P<0.05; n=6 per group). Fenoldopam decreased the amount of Nox2 that coimmunoprecipitated with p67(phox) in cells from normotensive rats. D(1)-like receptors may decrease oxidase activity by disrupting the distribution and assembly of oxidase subunits in cell membrane microdomains. The cholesterol-depleting reagent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin decreased oxidase activity and cholesterol content to a greater extent in hypertensive than in normotensive rats. The greater basal levels of Nox2 and Nox4 in cell membranes and Nox2 and Rac1 in lipid rafts in hypertensive rats than in normotensive rats may explain the increased basal oxidase activity in hypertensive rats. PMID:19380616

  8. In vitro assessment of the biological response of Ti6Al4V implants coated with hydroxyapatite microdomains.

    PubMed

    Clavell, R Salvador; de Llano, J J Martín; Carda, C; Ribelles, J L Gómez; Vallés-Lluch, A

    2016-11-01

    Dental implantology is still an expanding field of scientific study because of the number of people that receive dental therapies throughout their lives worldwide. Recovery times associated to dental surgery are still long and demand strategies to improve integration of metallic devices with hard tissues. In this work, an in vitro ceramic coating is proposed to improve and accelerate osseointegration of titanium surfaces conceived to be used as dental implants or hip or knee prosthesis, shaped either as dishes or screws. Such coating consists of hydroxyapatite microdomains on the implant surfaces obtained in vitro by immersion of titanium alloy samples (Ti6Al4V) in a simulated body fluid. This titanium alloy is highly used in implant dentistry and trauma surgery, among other fields. Once the immersion times under physiological conditions yielding to different ceramic topographies on this alloy were set, the acellular coating time of major interest so as to optimize its biological development was determined. For this purpose, dental pulp mesenchymal cells were cultured on titanium coated surfaces with different hydroxyapatite outline, and cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology were followed through histological techniques and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that 4 days of acellular hydroxyapatite coating led to a significant cell adhesion on the titanium alloys at an early stage (6 h). Cells tended although to detach from the surface of the coating over time, but those adhered on domains of intricated topography or hydroxyapatite cauliflowers proliferated on them, leading to isolated large cell clusters. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2723-2729, 2016.

  9. Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy and Tracking of Bacterial Flotillin (Reggie) Paralogs Provide Evidence for Defined-Sized Protein Microdomains within the Bacterial Membrane but Absence of Clusters Containing Detergent-Resistant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dempwolff, Felix; Schmidt, Felix K.; Hervás, Ana B.; Stroh, Alex; Rösch, Thomas C.; Riese, Cornelius N.; Dersch, Simon; Heimerl, Thomas; Lucena, Daniella; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Takeshita, Norio; Fischer, Reinhard; Graumann, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes have been proposed to contain microdomains of a specific lipid composition, in which distinct groups of proteins are clustered. Flotillin-like proteins are conserved between pro—and eukaryotes, play an important function in several eukaryotic and bacterial cells, and define in vertebrates a type of so-called detergent-resistant microdomains. Using STED microscopy, we show that two bacterial flotillins, FloA and FloT, form defined assemblies with an average diameter of 85 to 110 nm in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, flotillin microdomains are of similar size in eukaryotic cells. The soluble domains of FloA form higher order oligomers of up to several hundred kDa in vitro, showing that like eukaryotic flotillins, bacterial assemblies are based in part on their ability to self-oligomerize. However, B. subtilis paralogs show significantly different diffusion rates, and consequently do not colocalize into a common microdomain. Dual colour time lapse experiments of flotillins together with other detergent-resistant proteins in bacteria show that proteins colocalize for no longer than a few hundred milliseconds, and do not move together. Our data reveal that the bacterial membrane contains defined-sized protein domains rather than functional microdomains dependent on flotillins. Based on their distinct dynamics, FloA and FloT confer spatially distinguishable activities, but do not serve as molecular scaffolds. PMID:27362352

  10. Microdomain dynamics in single-crystal BaTi O3 during paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition measured with time-of-flight neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanick, A.; Wang, X. P.; Hoffmann, C.; Diallo, S. O.; Jørgensen, M. R. V.; Wang, X.-L.

    2015-11-01

    Microscopic polar clusters can play an important role in the phase transition of ferroelectric perovskite oxides such as BaTi O3 , which have shown coexistence of both displacive and order-disorder dynamics, although their topological and dynamical characteristics are yet to be clarified. Here, we report sharp increases in the widths and intensities of Bragg peaks from a BaTi O3 single crystal, which are measured in situ during heating and cooling within a few degrees of its phase transition temperature TC, using the neutron time-of-flight Laue technique. Most significantly sharper and stronger increases in peak widths and peak intensities were found to occur during cooling compared to that during heating through TC. A closer examination of the Bragg peaks revealed their elongated shapes in both the paraelectric and ferroelectric phases, the analysis of which indicated the presence of microdomains that have correlated <111 > -type polarization vectors within the {110}-type crystallographic planes. No significant increase in the average size of the microdomains (˜10 nm ) near TC could be observed from diffraction measurements, which is also consistent with small changes in the relaxation times for motion of Ti ions measured with quasielastic neutron scattering. The current observations do not indicate that the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition in BaTi O3 is primarily caused by an increase in the size of the microscopic polar clusters or critical slowing down of Ti ionic motion. The sharp and strong increases in peak widths and peak intensities during cooling through TC are explained as a result of microstrains that are developed at microdomain interfaces during paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition.

  11. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  12. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Aaron W; Lee, Kyubin; Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  13. Calcium signalling microdomains and the t-tubular system in atrial mycoytes: potential roles in cardiac disease and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Trafford, Andrew W; Clarke, Jessica D; Richards, Mark A; Eisner, David A; Dibb, Katharine M

    2013-05-01

    The atria contribute 25% to ventricular stroke volume and are the site of the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF). The initiation of contraction in the atria is similar to that in the ventricle involving a systolic rise of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). There are, however, substantial inter-species differences in the way systolic Ca(2+) is regulated in atrial cells. These differences are a consequence of a well-developed and functionally relevant transverse (t)-tubule network in the atria of large mammals, including humans, and its virtual absence in smaller laboratory species such as the rat. Where T-tubules are absent, the systolic Ca(2+) transient results from a 'fire-diffuse-fire' sequential recruitment of Ca(2+) release sites from the cell edge to the centre and hence marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity of systolic Ca(2+). Conversely, the well-developed T-tubule network in large mammals ensures a near synchronous rise of [Ca(2+)](i). In addition to synchronizing the systolic rise of [Ca(2+)](i), the presence of T-tubules in the atria of large mammals, by virtue of localization of the L-type Ca(2+) channels and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger antiporters on the T-tubules, may serve to, respectively, accelerate changes in the amplitude of the systolic Ca(2+) transient during inotropic manoeuvres and lower diastolic [Ca(2+)](i). On the other hand, the presence of T-tubules and hence wider cellular distribution of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger may predispose the atria of large mammals to Ca(2+)-dependent delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs); this may be a determining factor in why the atria of large mammals spontaneously develop and maintain AF. PMID:23386275

  14. Discriminative gene co-expression network analysis uncovers novel modules involved in the formation of phosphate deficiency-induced root hairs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Henao, Jorge E.; Lin, Wen-Dar; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate and differentiation in the Arabidopsis root epidermis are genetically defined but remain plastic to environmental signals such as limited availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Root hairs of Pi-deficient plants are more frequent and longer than those of plants grown under Pi-replete conditions. To dissect genes involved in Pi deficiency-induced root hair morphogenesis, we constructed a co-expression network of Pi-responsive genes against a customized database that was assembled from experiments in which differentially expressed genes that encode proteins with validated functions in root hair development were over-represented. To further filter out less relevant genes, we combined this procedure with a search for common cis-regulatory elements in the promoters of the selected genes. In addition to well-described players and processes such as auxin signalling and modifications of primary cell walls, we discovered several novel aspects in the biology of root hairs induced by Pi deficiency, including cell cycle control, putative plastid-to-nucleus signalling, pathogen defence, reprogramming of cell wall-related carbohydrate metabolism, and chromatin remodelling. This approach allows the discovery of novel of aspects of a biological process from transcriptional profiles with high sensitivity and accuracy. PMID:27220366

  15. How the human brain goes virtual: distinct cortical regions of the person-processing network are involved in self-identification with virtual agents.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Shanti; van Schie, Hein T; de Lange, Floris P; Thompson, Evan; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2012-07-01

    Millions of people worldwide engage in online role-playing with their avatar, a virtual agent that represents the self. Previous behavioral studies have indicated that many gamers identify more strongly with their avatar than with their biological self. Through their avatar, gamers develop social networks and learn new social-cognitive skills. The cognitive neurosciences have yet to identify the neural processes that underlie self-identification with these virtual agents. We applied functional neuroimaging to 22 long-term online gamers and 21 nongaming controls, while they rated personality traits of self, avatar, and familiar others. Strikingly, neuroimaging data revealed greater avatar-referential cortical activity in the left inferior parietal lobe, a region associated with self-identification from a third-person perspective. The magnitude of this brain activity correlated positively with the propensity to incorporate external body enhancements into one's bodily identity. Avatar-referencing furthermore recruited greater activity in the rostral anterior cingulate gyrus, suggesting relatively greater emotional self-involvement with one's avatar. Post-scanning behavioral data revealed superior recognition memory for avatar relative to others. Interestingly, memory for avatar positively covaried with play duration. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the brain's plasticity to self-identify with virtual agents and the human cognitive-affective potential to live and learn in virtual worlds.

  16. The Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin Pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae Binds to Lipid Raft Microdomains in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sidney D.; Sanders, Melissa E.; Tullos, Nathan A.; Stray, Stephen J.; Norcross, Erin W.; McDaniel, Larry S.; Marquart, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for causing several human diseases including pneumonia, meningitis, and otitis media. Pneumococcus is also a major cause of human ocular infections and is commonly isolated in cases of bacterial keratitis, an infection of the cornea. The ocular pathology that occurs during pneumococcal keratitis is partly due to the actions of pneumolysin (Ply), a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin produced by pneumococcus. The lytic mechanism of Ply is a three step process beginning with surface binding to cholesterol. Multiple Ply monomers then oligomerize to form a prepore. The prepore then undergoes a conformational change that creates a large pore in the host cell membrane, resulting in cell lysis. We engineered a collection of single amino acid substitution mutants at residues (A370, A406, W433, and L460) that are crucial to the progression of the lytic mechanism and determined the effects that these mutations had on lytic function. Both PlyWT and the mutant Ply molecules (PlyA370G, PlyA370E, PlyA406G, PlyA406E, PlyW433G, PlyW433E, PlyW433F, PlyL460G, and PlyL460E) were able to bind to the surface of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) with similar efficiency. Additionally, PlyWT localized to cholesterol-rich microdomains on the HCEC surface, however, only one mutant (PlyA370G) was able to duplicate this behavior. Four of the 9 mutant Ply molecules (PlyA370E, PlyW433G, PlyW433E, and PlyL460E) were deficient in oligomer formation. Lastly, all of the mutant Ply molecules, except PlyA370G, exhibited significantly impaired lytic activity on HCECs. The other 8 mutants all experienced a reduction in lytic activity, but 4 of the 8 retained the ability to oligomerize. A thorough understanding of the molecular interactions that occur between Ply and the target cell, could lead to targeted treatments aimed to reduce the pathology observed during pneumococcal keratitis. PMID:23577214

  17. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  18. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σ(E)-regulated SPI-2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Kidwai, Afshan S; Jones, Marcus B; Johnson, Rudd C; Nguyen, Nhu T; McDermott, Jason E; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric D; Adkins, Joshua N

    2015-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σ(E) is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well-characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σ(E) in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σ(E) regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σ(E) in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σ(E) up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σ(E) is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σ(E) and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σ(E), may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.

  19. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Johnson, Rudd; Nguyen, Nhu T.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; et al

    2015-02-10

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved inmore » Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.« less

  20. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Johnson, Rudd; Nguyen, Nhu T.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2015-02-10

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.

  1. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Johnson, Rudd C.; Nguyen, Nhu T.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2015-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well-characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection. PMID:25713562

  2. Polycystin-2 activation by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release requires its direct association with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in a signaling microdomain.

    PubMed

    Sammels, Eva; Devogelaere, Benoit; Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Missiaen, Ludwig; Parys, Jan B; Cai, Yiqiang; Somlo, Stefan; De Smedt, Humbert

    2010-06-11

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the loss-of-function of a signaling complex involving polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 (TRPP2, an ion channel of the TRP superfamily), resulting in a disturbance in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Here, we identified the molecular determinants of the interaction between TRPP2 and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R), an intracellular Ca(2+) channel in the endoplasmic reticulum. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown experiments combined with mutational analysis led to the identification of an acidic cluster in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of TRPP2 and a cluster of positively charged residues in the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of the IP(3)R as directly responsible for the interaction. To investigate the functional relevance of TRPP2 in the endoplasmic reticulum, we re-introduced the protein in TRPP2(-/-) mouse renal epithelial cells using an adenoviral expression system. The presence of TRPP2 resulted in an increased agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) release in intact cells and IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release in permeabilized cells. Using pathological mutants of TRPP2, R740X and D509V, and competing peptides, we demonstrated that TRPP2 amplified the Ca(2+) signal by a local Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism, which only occurred in the presence of the TRPP2-IP(3)R interaction, and not via altered IP(3)R channel activity. Moreover, our results indicate that this interaction was instrumental in the formation of Ca(2+) microdomains necessary for initiating Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. The data strongly suggest that defects in this mechanism may account for the altered Ca(2+) signaling associated with pathological TRPP2 mutations and therefore contribute to the development of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  3. Polycystin-2 Activation by Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ Release Requires Its Direct Association with the Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor in a Signaling Microdomain*

    PubMed Central

    Sammels, Eva; Devogelaere, Benoit; Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Missiaen, Ludwig; Parys, Jan B.; Cai, Yiqiang; Somlo, Stefan; De Smedt, Humbert

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is characterized by the loss-of-function of a signaling complex involving polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 (TRPP2, an ion channel of the TRP superfamily), resulting in a disturbance in intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Here, we identified the molecular determinants of the interaction between TRPP2 and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), an intracellular Ca2+ channel in the endoplasmic reticulum. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown experiments combined with mutational analysis led to the identification of an acidic cluster in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of TRPP2 and a cluster of positively charged residues in the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of the IP3R as directly responsible for the interaction. To investigate the functional relevance of TRPP2 in the endoplasmic reticulum, we re-introduced the protein in TRPP2−/− mouse renal epithelial cells using an adenoviral expression system. The presence of TRPP2 resulted in an increased agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ release in intact cells and IP3-induced Ca2+ release in permeabilized cells. Using pathological mutants of TRPP2, R740X and D509V, and competing peptides, we demonstrated that TRPP2 amplified the Ca2+ signal by a local Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release mechanism, which only occurred in the presence of the TRPP2-IP3R interaction, and not via altered IP3R channel activity. Moreover, our results indicate that this interaction was instrumental in the formation of Ca2+ microdomains necessary for initiating Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The data strongly suggest that defects in this mechanism may account for the altered Ca2+ signaling associated with pathological TRPP2 mutations and therefore contribute to the development of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:20375013

  4. Involving the Students: Outcomes and Experiences from the Participation of the Board of European Students of Technology in the Thematic Network E4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniavitis, E.; Jarnefelt, C.; Wojewoda, N.

    2005-01-01

    In order to keep on developing the European dimension of engineering education, the European Commission decided to launch the thematic network Enhancing Engineering Education in Europe (E4) to continue the work done in the previous thematic network, Higher European Engineering Education (H3E). As in H3E, the input of students was considered to be…

  5. Regulation of H-Ras-driven MAPK signaling, transformation and tumorigenesis, but not PI3K signaling and tumor progression, by plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Michael, J V; Wurtzel, J G T; Goldfinger, L E

    2016-05-30

    In this study, we assessed the contributions of plasma membrane (PM) microdomain targeting to the functions of H-Ras and R-Ras. These paralogs have identical effector-binding regions, but variant C-terminal targeting domains (tDs) which are responsible for lateral microdomain distribution: activated H-Ras targets to lipid ordered/disordered (Lo/Ld) domain borders, and R-Ras to Lo domains (rafts). We hypothesized that PM distribution regulates Ras-effector interactions and downstream signaling. We used tD swap mutants, and assessed effects on signal transduction, cell proliferation, transformation and tumorigenesis. R-Ras harboring the H-Ras tD (R-Ras-tH) interacted with Raf, and induced Raf and ERK phosphorylation similar to H-Ras. R-Ras-tH stimulated proliferation and transformation in vitro, and these effects were blocked by both MEK and PI3K inhibition. Conversely, the R-Ras tD suppressed H-Ras-mediated Raf activation and ERK phosphorylation, proliferation and transformation. Thus, Ras access to Raf at the PM is sufficient for MAPK activation and is a principal component of Ras mitogenesis and transformation. Fusion of the R-Ras extended N-terminal domain to H-Ras had no effect on proliferation, but inhibited transformation and tumor progression, indicating that the R-Ras N-terminus also contributes negative regulation to these Ras functions. PI3K activation was tD independent; however, H-Ras was a stronger activator of PI3K than R-Ras, with either tD. PI3K inhibition nearly ablated transformation by R-Ras-tH, H-Ras and H-Ras-tR, whereas MEK inhibition had a modest effect on Ras-tH-driven transformation but no effect on H-Ras-tR transformation. R-Ras-tH supported tumor initiation, but not tumor progression. While H-Ras-tR-induced transformation was reduced relative to H-Ras, tumor progression was robust and similar to H-Ras. H-Ras tumor growth was moderately suppressed by MEK inhibition, which had no effect on H-Ras-tR tumor growth. In contrast, PI3K inhibition

  6. Liposome-based assays to study membrane-associated protein networks.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Stange, Christoph; Anitei, Mihaela; Hoflack, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Transport carriers regulate the bidirectional flow of membrane between the compartments of the secretory and endocytic pathways. Their biogenesis relies on the recruitment of a number of cytosolic proteins and protein complexes on specific membrane microdomains with defined protein and lipid compositions. The timely assembly of these cellular machines onto membranes involves multiple protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions and is necessary to select membrane proteins and lipids into nascent carriers, to bend the flat membrane of the donor compartment, to change the shape of this nascent carrier into a tubular-vesicular structure, and to operate its scission from the donor compartment. A challenge in this field of membrane cell biology has been to identify these machineries and to understand their precise function, in particular by studying their spatial and temporal dynamics during carrier biogenesis. During the past years, liposome-based synthetic biology fully recapitulating the fidelity of carrier biogenesis as seen in vivo has proved to be instrumental to identify these key cytosolic components using mass spectrometry and their dynamics using fluorescence microscopy. We describe here the methods to isolate on synthetic membranes the protein networks needed for carrier biogenesis, to identify them using label-free quantitative proteomics, and to visualize their dynamics on giant unilamellar vesicles. PMID:24359957

  7. Kinetic analysis of antagonist-occupied adenosine-A3 receptors within membrane microdomains of individual cells provides evidence of receptor dimerization and allosterism

    PubMed Central

    Corriden, Ross; Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Kellam, Barrie; Briddon, Stephen J.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, using a fluorescent adenosine-A3 receptor (A3AR) agonist and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), we demonstrated high-affinity labeling of the active receptor (R*) conformation. In the current study, we used a fluorescent A3AR antagonist (CA200645) to study the binding characteristics of antagonist-occupied inactive receptor (R) conformations in membrane microdomains of individual cells. FCS analysis of CA200645-occupied A3ARs revealed 2 species, τD2 and τD3, that diffused at 2.29 ± 0.35 and 0.09 ± 0.03 μm2/s, respectively. FCS analysis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged A3AR exhibited a single diffusing species (0.105 μm2/s). The binding of CA200645 to τD3 was antagonized by nanomolar concentrations of the A3 antagonist MRS 1220, but not by the agonist NECA (up to 300 nM), consistent with labeling of R. CA200645 normally dissociated slowly from the A3AR, but inclusion of xanthine amine congener (XAC) or VUF 5455 during washout markedly accelerated the reduction in the number of particles exhibiting τD3 characteristics. It is notable that this effect was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of particles with τD2 diffusion. These data show that FCS analysis of ligand-occupied receptors provides a unique means of monitoring ligand A3AR residence times that are significantly reduced as a consequence of allosteric interaction across the dimer interface.—Corriden, R., Kilpatrick, L. E., Kellam, B., Briddon, S. J., Hill, S. J. Kinetic analysis of antagonist-occupied adenosine-A3 receptors within membrane microdomains of individual cells provides evidence for receptor dimerization and allosterism. PMID:24970394

  8. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues.

  9. Investigating the specific core genetic-and-epigenetic networks of cellular mechanisms involved in human aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable part of life for humans, and slowing down the aging process has become a main focus of human endeavor. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to construct protein-protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic networks, i.e. genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs), of elderly individuals and young controls. We then compared these GENs to extract aging mechanisms using microarray data in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microRNA (miRNA) data, and database mining. The core GENs of elderly individuals and young controls were obtained by applying principal network projection to GENs based on Principal Component Analysis. By comparing the core networks, we identified that to overcome the accumulated mutation of genes in the aging process the transcription factor JUN can be activated by stress signals, including the MAPK signaling, T-cell receptor signaling, and neurotrophin signaling pathways through DNA methylation of BTG3, G0S2, and AP2B1 and the regulations of mir-223 let-7d, and mir-130a. We also address the aging mechanisms in old men and women. Furthermore, we proposed that drugs designed to target these DNA methylated genes or miRNAs may delay aging. A multiple drug combination comprising phenylalanine, cholesterol, and palbociclib was finally designed for delaying the aging process. PMID:26895224

  10. Layered Signaling Regulatory Networks Analysis of Gene Expression Involved in Malignant Tumorigenesis of Non-Resolving Ulcerative Colitis via Integration of Cross-Study Microarray Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengjun; Pan, Zhenyu; Geng, Qiang; Li, Xin; Wang, Yefan; An, Yu; Xu, Yan; Tie, Lu; Pan, Yan; Li, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) was the most frequently diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis. By far, the underlying mechanisms associated with the disease are still unclear. With the increasing accumulation of microarray gene expression profiles, it is profitable to gain a systematic perspective based on gene regulatory networks to better elucidate the roles of genes associated with disorders. However, a major challenge for microarray data analysis is the integration of multiple-studies generated by different groups. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, firstly, we modeled a signaling regulatory network associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) initiation via integration of cross-study microarray expression data sets using Empirical Bayes (EB) algorithm. Secondly, a manually curated human cancer signaling map was established via comprehensive retrieval of the publicly available repositories. Finally, the co-differently-expressed genes were manually curated to portray the layered signaling regulatory networks. Results Overall, the remodeled signaling regulatory networks were separated into four major layers including extracellular, membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, which led to the identification of five core biological processes and four signaling pathways associated with colorectal carcinogenesis. As a result, our biological interpretation highlighted the importance of EGF/EGFR signaling pathway, EPO signaling pathway, T cell signal transduction and members of the BCR signaling pathway, which were responsible for the malignant transition of CRC from the benign UC to the aggressive one. Conclusions The present study illustrated a standardized normalization approach for cross-study microarray expression data sets. Our model for signaling networks construction was based on the experimentally-supported interaction and microarray co-expression modeling. Pathway-based signaling regulatory networks analysis

  11. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  12. Measuring Second Language Proficiency with EEG Synchronization: How Functional Cortical Networks and Hemispheric Involvement Differ as a Function of Proficiency Level in Second Language Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiterer, Susanne; Pereda, Ernesto; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the question of whether university-based high-level foreign language and linguistic training can influence brain activation and whether different L2 proficiency groups have different brain activation in terms of lateralization and hemispheric involvement. The traditional and prevailing theory of hemispheric involvement in…

  13. Parent Involvement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    What are some ways in which to get parents meaningfully involved in their child's high school? According to the research, the most successful programs are those that provide a variety of ways in which parents can be actively engaged in their child's academic life. Joyce Epstein, Director of the National Network of Partnership Schools, out of Johns…

  14. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Stefanie; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Remans, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example. PMID:26287175

  15. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Stefanie; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Remans, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example. PMID:26287175

  16. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Stefanie; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Remans, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example.

  17. Identification of genetic networks involved in the cell injury accompanying endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by bisphenol A in testicular Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki . E-mail: ytabu@cts.u-toyama.ac.jp; Takasaki, Ichiro; Kondo, Takashi

    2006-07-07

    To identify detailed mechanisms by which bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, induces cell injury in mouse testicular Sertoli TTE3 cells, we performed genome-wide microarray and computational gene network analyses. BPA (200 {mu}M) significantly decreased cell viability and simultaneously induced an increase in mRNA levels of HSPA5 and DDIT3, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker genes. Of the 22,690 probe sets analyzed, BPA down-regulated 661 probe sets and up-regulated 604 probe sets by >2.0-fold. Hierarchical cluster analysis demonstrated nine gene clusters. In decreased gene clusters, two significant genetic networks were associated with cell growth and proliferation and the cell cycle. In increased gene clusters, two significant genetic networks including many basic-region leucine zipper transcription factors were associated with cell death and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The present results will provide additional novel insights into the detailed molecular mechanisms of cell injury accompanying ER stress induced by BPA in Sertoli cells.

  18. The orientation of microdomains and the progression of shear alignment in block copolymer films: The roles of key material, film, and process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Raleigh Lloyd

    Block copolymers provide attractive templates for nanopatterning at size scales inaccessible to conventional fabrication techniques. To serve effectively for most applications, however, the need to impart well-defined orientational and/or positional order to these microdomains is paramount. Shear alignment, has the powerful ability to macroscopically align microdomains in the direction of the applied shear simply by applying a stress at the film's surface. The primary goal of this dissertation is to investigate the influence of key material, film, and process parameters on the ease and quality of alignment in sheared block copolymer films. One important parameter which influences block copolymer thin film morphology is film thickness. To probe this effect rapidly and systematically, a film casting technique known as flowcoating was utilized. Previously, the quantitative relationship between the film thickness profile and the flowcoating process parameters was unclear. We illuminate this process by comparing experimental film thicknesses with a model based on a Landau-Levich treatment; the model thus provides a design approach which allows a user to produce polymer thin films of virtually any desired thickness profile. Via flowcoating, the influence of film thickness on block copolymer thin film morphology was then investigated using a series of polystyrene-poly(n-hexyl methacrylate) (PS-PHMA) diblocks varying in composition and molecular weight. The influence of additional material, film, and process parameters was then investigated using the same series of PS-PHMAs. To quantitatively compare the alignment process across the different block copolymer films, a melting-recrystallization model was fit to the data, which allowed for the determination of two key alignment parameters: the critical stress needed for alignment, and an orientation rate constant. Collectively, these results provide useful scaling rules which enable predictions of the level of alignment which

  19. Generation of micro-domains in AT-cut quartz by thermal processing and the effect on resonator modes

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenback, L.; Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.; Bohuszewicz, T.V.; Doughty, D.H.

    1994-08-01

    The fabrication of acoustic sensors with sol-gel selective coatings requires the deposition of thin films on quartz resonators using solution chemistry techniques. Oxide films are spin-cast, then heat treated. A variety of film compositions are deposited, requiring a variety of firing schedules. Network analysis of the untreated AT-cut quartz devices revealed a resonant frequency of 5.0 MHz, corresponding to a pure thickness-shear mode resonance. For devices that were rapidly fired to 400C and rapidly air cooled, network analysis showed the shear-mode response at 5.0 MHz disappeared, while a predominantly compressional mode response at 7.3 MHz emerged. Structural analysis explored the crystal structure changes induced by processing which resulted in this new mode.

  20. Network processes involved in the mediation of short-term habituation in Aplysia: contribution of intrinsic regulation of excitability and synaptic augmentation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Thomas M; Jacobson, Daniel A; Demorest-Hayes, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Short-term habituation (STH) is the decrease in behavioral responding observed during repeated stimulation at regular intervals. For siphon-elicited siphon withdrawal in Aplysia (S-SWR), we previously showed that the amplitude of responses measured in LFS-type siphon motor neurons (LFS MNs) during training is dependent on the stimulus interval used and is training-site specific. The major source of excitation from siphon stimulation onto the LFS MNs comes from the L29 interneurons. Here we examined the role of the L29s in STH by addressing two questions: (1) What are the relative contributions of intrinsic regulation of excitability and network inhibition on L29 activity during STH training? By activating L29s with intracellular current injection, we found that intrinsic changes in excitability occur, but only at short training intervals (1 s). We also demonstrated that network inhibition is not required for regulating L29 responses during training, indicating that any expression of inhibition is redundant to the excitability changes. (2) How does L29 synaptic plasticity contribute to the maintenance of training site-specificity exhibited in LFS MNs? When training stimuli are delivered 1 s apart [1 s, interstimulus interval (ISI)], L29 responses decrease in both stimulated (trained) and un-stimulated (untrained) pathways, yet site-specificity of training is maintained in the LFS MNs. Our results suggest that activity-dependent synaptic facilitation (augmentation; AUG) expressed by the L29s acts to compensate for the decreased activity in the untrained pathway. First, we demonstrated that the L29-LFS synapse exhibits significant AUG with L29 activation at a 1 s ISI. Second, we showed that the induction of AUG prevents the reduction in siphon-evoked LFS responses that is otherwise observed with decreased L29 activity. Collectively, our results support a role for the L29s in regulating network dynamics during STH training, but only at rapid (1 s ISI) training

  1. Using Social Networking Sites for Teaching and Learning: Students' Involvement in and Acceptance of Facebook® as a Course Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albayrak, Duygu; Yildirim, Zahide

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates students' involvement in Facebook® as a course management system (CMS), Facebook acceptance, and the relationships between the two. The study used Facebook as a CMS in two freshman courses and employed mixed method as part of an action-research approach. Forty-two students participated in the study, and 12 of those students…

  2. An Efficient Single-Molecule Resolution Method for Simulating Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Protein Interaction Networks that Involve the Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    A significant number of the cellular protein interaction networks, such as the receptor mediated signaling and vesicle trafficking pathways, includes membranes as a molecular assembly platform. Computer simulations can provide insight into the dynamics of complex formation and help identify the principles that govern recruitment and assembly on the membranes. Here, we introduce the Free-Propagator Re-weighting (FPR) algorithm, a recently developed method that efficiently simulates the spatio-temporal dynamics of multiprotein complex formation both in the solution and on the membranes. In the FPR, the position of each protein is propagated using the Brownian motion and the reactions between pairs of proteins can occur upon collisions. Depending on the dimensionality of the interaction, the association probabilities are determined by solving the Smoluchowski diffusion equations in 2D or 3D and trajectory reweighting allows us to obtain the exact association rates for all the reactive pairs. Using the FPR, in this presentation, we investigate the interaction dynamics of the receptor mediated endocytic network as a case study and discuss the possible effects of membrane binding and molecular crowding on the formation of complexes. Supported by the NIGMS/NIH under R00GM098371.

  3. Accumulation of staphylococcal Panton-Valentine leukocidin in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomains on the target cells is essential for its cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akihito; Isobe, Hirokazu; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Hung, Wei-Chun; Taneike, Ikue; Nakagawa, Saori; Dohmae, Soshi; Iwakura, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms for the cytotoxicity of staphylococcal Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a pore-forming toxin consisting of LukS-PV and LukF-PV, in human immune cells are still unclear. Because LukS-PV binds to ganglioside GM1, a constituent of detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) of the plasma membrane, the role of DRMs in PVL cytotoxicity was examined in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), monocytes, HL-60 cells, and THP-1 cells. PVL binding capacities in HL-60 and THP-1 cells were higher than those in PMNs and monocytes; however, the PVL concentration to obtain more than 80% cell lysis in HL-60 cells was 10 times higher than that in PMNs and PVL even at such concentration induced < 10% cell lysis in THP-1 cells. After incubation of PMNs with LukS-PV, more than 90% of LukS-PV bound to the detergent-soluble membranes. Subsequent incubation with LukF-PV at 4 °C induced the accumulation of more than 70% of PVL components and 170- to 220-kDa complex formation in DRMs in an actin-independent manner. However, only 30% of PVL was found, and complex formation was under detectable level in DRMs in HL-60 cells. PVL did not accumulate in DRMs in THP-1 cells. Our observations strongly indicate that PVL accumulation in DRMs is essential for PVL cytotoxicity.

  4. Broadband pH-Sensing Organic Transistors with Polymeric Sensing Layers Featuring Liquid Crystal Microdomains Encapsulated by Di-Block Copolymer Chains.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jooyeok; Song, Myeonghun; Jeong, Jaehoon; Nam, Sungho; Heo, Inseok; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-09-14

    We report broadband pH-sensing organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with the polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) sensing layers. The PDLC layers are prepared by spin-coating using ethanol solutions containing 4-cyano-4'-pentyl-biphenyl (5CB) and a diblock copolymer (PAA-b-PCBOA) that consists of LC-philic block [poly(4-cyano-biphenyl-4-oxyundecyl acrylate) (PCBOA)] and acrylic acid block [poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)]. The spin-coated sensing layers feature of 5CB microdomains (<5 μm) encapsulated by the PAA-b-PCBOA polymer chains. The resulting LC-integrated-OFETs (PDLC-i-OFETs) can detect precisely and reproducibly a wide range of pH with only small amounts (10-40 μL) of analyte solutions in both static and dynamic perfusion modes. The positive drain current change is measured for acidic solutions (pH < 7), whereas basic solutions (pH > 7) result in the negative change of drain current. The drain current trend in the present PDLC-i-OFET devices is explained by the shrinking-expanding mechanism of the PAA chains in the diblock copolymer layers. PMID:27557404

  5. Network Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Jocelyn A.; Batey, Anne

    This Network Directory is part of the effort by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) School Improvement Program to promote communication among educational professionals about school improvement. Specifically, the directory is designed to provide information for networking among schools involved in systematic, long-term…

  6. Arabidopsis RABA1 GTPases are involved in transport between the trans-Golgi network and the plasma membrane, and are required for salinity stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Rin; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ito, Jun; Fujimoto, Masaru; Ito, Emi; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    RAB GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic. Among them, RAB11, a widely conserved sub-group, has evolved in a unique way in plants; plant RAB11 members show notable diversity, whereas yeast and animals have only a few RAB11 members. Fifty-seven RAB GTPases are encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 26 of which are classified in the RAB11 group (further divided into RABA1-RABA6 sub-groups). Although several plant RAB11 members have been shown to play pivotal roles in plant-unique developmental processes, including cytokinesis and tip growth, molecular and physiological functions of the majority of RAB11 members remain unknown. To reveal precise functions of plant RAB11, we investigated the subcellular localization and dynamics of the largest sub-group of Arabidopsis RAB11, RABA1, which has nine members. RABA1 members reside on mobile punctate structures adjacent to the trans-Golgi network and co-localized with VAMP721/722, R-SNARE proteins that operate in the secretory pathway. In addition, the constitutive-active mutant of RABA1b, RABA1b(Q72L) , was present on the plasma membrane. The RABA1b -containing membrane structures showed actin-dependent dynamic motion . Vesicles labeled by GFP-RABA1b moved dynamically, forming queues along actin filaments. Interestingly, Arabidopsis plants whose four major RABA1 members were knocked out, and those expressing the dominant-negative mutant of RABA1B, exhibited hypersensitivity to salinity stress. Altogether, these results indicate that RABA1 members mediate transport between the trans-Golgi network and the plasma membrane, and are required for salinity stress tolerance.

  7. Detergent resistant membrane fractions are involved in calcium signaling in Müller glial cells of retina.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Gopinath; Chatterjee, Nivedita

    2013-08-01

    Compartmentalization of the plasma membrane into lipid microdomains promotes efficient cellular processes by increasing local molecular concentrations. Calcium signaling, either as transients or propagating waves require integration of complex macromolecular machinery. Calcium waves represent a form of intercellular signaling in the central nervous system and the retina. We hypothesized that the mechanism for calcium waves would require effector proteins to aggregate at the plasma membrane in lipid microdomains. The current study shows that in Müller glia of the retina, proteins involved in calcium signaling aggregate in detergent resistant membranes identifying rafts and respond by redistributing on stimulation. We have investigated Purinoreceptor-1 (P2Y1), Ryanodine receptor (RyR), and Phospholipase C (PLC-β1). P2Y1, RyR and PLC-β1, redistribute from caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 positive fractions on stimulation with the agonists, ATP, 2MeS-ATP and Thapsigargin, an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA). Redistribution is absent on treatment with cyclopiazonic acid, another SERCA inhibitor. Disruption of rafts by removing cholesterol cause proteins involved in this machinery to redistribute and change agonist-induced calcium signaling. Cholesterol depletion from raft lead to increase in time to peak of calcium levels in agonist-evoked calcium signals in all instances, as seen by live imaging. This study emphasizes the necessity of a sub-population of proteins to cluster in specialized lipid domains. The requirement for such an organization at the raft-like microdomains may have implications on intercellular communication in the retina. Such concerted interaction at the rafts can regulate calcium dynamics and could add another layer of complexity to calcium signaling in cells.

  8. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and…

  9. Response of candidate sex-determining genes to changes in temperature reveals their involvement in the molecular network underlying temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Christina M; Queen, Joanna; Crews, David

    2007-11-01

    Gonadogenesis, the process of forming an ovary or a testis from a bipotential gonad, is critical to the development of sexually reproducing adults. Although the molecular pathway underlying vertebrate gonadogenesis is well characterized in organisms exhibiting genotypic sex determination, it is less well understood in vertebrates whose sex is determined by environmental factors. We examine the response of six candidate sex-determining genes to sex-reversing temperature shifts in a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). For the first time, we report the regulation of FoxL2, Wnt4, Dmrt1, and Mis by temperature, confirming their involvement in the molecular pathway underlying TSD and placing them downstream of the action of temperature. We find evidence that FoxL2 plays an ovarian-specific role in development, whereas Wnt4 appears to be involved in both testis and ovary formation. Dmrt1 expression shows rapid activation in response to a shift to male-producing temperature, whereas Mis up-regulation is delayed. Furthermore, early repression of Mis appears critical to ovarian development. We also investigate Dax1 and Sox9 and reveal that at the level of gene expression, response to temperature is comparatively later in gonadogenesis. By examining the role of these genes in TSD, we can begin to elucidate elements of conservation and divergence between sex-determining mechanisms.

  10. Easy Identification of Residues Involved on Structural Differences Between Nonphosphorylated and Phosphorylated CDK2Cyclin A Complexes Using Two-Dimensional Networks.

    PubMed

    Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio

    2014-02-01

    The structures of proteins in Protein Data Bank (PDB) contain a lot of information that can be revealed through the use of tools to facilitate their organization and analysis. The increase in available structural data of nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated CDK2cyclin A (npCDK2cycA and pCDK2cycA) complexes has enabled a more realistic description of the fine structural details of the interface residues of these proteins. This work reports the application of two-dimensional network representations (TDNRs) to the structures deposited in PDB to distinguish the differences in the surface between both complexes due to phosphorylation. As a result, a detailed map of the hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions between the T-loop residues of CDK2 and the residues of cycA that are different among nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated complexes were described. In addition, we found some interesting subtle differences in the CDK2cycA interface between nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated complexes due to residues that are not located at the T-loop of CDK2. We noted that some HB interactions in CDK2cycA complex are reinforced when the CDK2 is phosphorylated. PMID:27485571

  11. Nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening: identification of a signaling molecule network involved in fulvestrant action and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, N; Wittner, B S; Shioda, K; Hitora, T; Ito, T; Ramaswamy, S; Isselbacher, K J; Sgroi, D C; Shioda, T

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screening of cancer cell cultures is an effective approach to predict drug targets or therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers, interactions among identified targets often remain obscure. Here, we introduce the nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening that generates a map of target interactions through systematic iterations of in silico prediction of targets and their experimental validation. An initial RNAi knockdown screening of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells targeting 6560 proteins identified four signaling molecules required for their fulvestrant-induced apoptosis. Signaling molecules physically or functionally interacting with these four primary node targets were computationally predicted and experimentally validated, resulting in identification of four second-generation nodes. Three rounds of further iterations of the prediction–validation cycle generated third, fourth and fifth generation of nodes, completing a 19-node interaction map that contained three predicted nodes but without experimental validation because of technical limitations. The interaction map involved all three members of the death-associated protein kinases (DAPKs) as well as their upstream and downstream signaling molecules (calmodulins and myosin light chain kinases), suggesting that DAPKs play critical roles in the cytocidal action of fulvestrant. The in silico Kaplan–Meier analysis of previously reported human breast cancer cohorts demonstrated significant prognostic predictive power for five of the experimentally validated nodes and for three of the prediction-only nodes. Immunohistochemical studies on the expression of 10 nodal proteins in human breast cancer tissues not only supported their prognostic prediction power but also provided statistically significant evidence of their synchronized expression, implying functional interactions among these nodal proteins. Thus, the Nodes-and-Connections approach to RNAi knockdown screening yields

  12. Networking computers.

    PubMed

    McBride, D C

    1997-03-01

    This decade the role of the personal computer has shifted dramatically from a desktop device designed to increase individual productivity and efficiency to an instrument of communication linking people and machines in different places with one another. A computer in one city can communicate with another that may be thousands of miles away. Networking is how this is accomplished. Just like the voice network used by the telephone, computer networks transmit data and other information via modems over these same telephone lines. A network can be created over both short and long distances. Networks can be established within a hospital or medical building or over many hospitals or buildings covering many geographic areas. Those confined to one location are called LANs, local area networks. Those that link computers in one building to those at other locations are known as WANs, or wide area networks. The ultimate wide area network is the one we've all been hearing so much about these days--the Internet, and its World Wide Web. Setting up a network is a process that requires careful planning and commitment. To avoid potential pitfalls and to make certain the network you establish meets your needs today and several years down the road, several steps need to be followed. This article reviews the initial steps involved in getting ready to network.

  13. Recruitment of Slp-76 to the Membrane and Glycolipid-Enriched Membrane Microdomains Replaces the Requirement for Linker for Activation of T Cells in T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boerth, Nancy J.; Sadler, Jeffrey J.; Bauer, Daniel E.; Clements, James L.; Gheith, Shereen M.; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Two hematopoietic-specific adapters, src homology 2 domain–containing leukocyte phosphoprotein of 76 kD (SLP-76) and linker for activation of T cells (LAT), are critical for T cell development and T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Several studies have suggested that SLP-76 and LAT function coordinately to promote downstream signaling. In support of this hypothesis, we find that a fraction of SLP-76 localizes to glycolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEMs) after TCR stimulation. This recruitment of SLP-76 requires amino acids 224–244. The functional consequences of targeting SLP-76 to GEMs for TCR signaling are demonstrated using a LAT/SLP-76 chimeric protein. Expression of this construct reconstitutes TCR-inducted phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation, extracellular signal–regulated kinase activation, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) promoter activity in LAT-deficient Jurkat T cells (J.CaM2). Mutation of the chimeric construct precluding its recruitment to GEMs diminishes but does not eliminate its ability to support TCR signaling. Expression of a chimera that lacks SLP-76 amino acids 224–244 restores NFAT promoter activity, suggesting that if localized, SLP-76 does not require an association with Gads to promote T cell activation. In contrast, mutation of the protein tyrosine kinase phosphorylation sites of SLP-76 in the context of the LAT/SLP-76 chimera abolishes reconstitution of TCR function. Collectively, these experiments show that optimal TCR signaling relies on the compartmentalization of SLP-76 and that one critical function of LAT is to bring SLP-76 and its associated proteins to the membrane. PMID:11015445

  14. The influence of Ca²⁺ buffers on free [Ca²⁺] fluctuations and the effective volume of Ca²⁺ microdomains.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2014-06-17

    Intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) plays a significant role in many cell signaling pathways, some of which are localized to spatially restricted microdomains. Ca(2+) binding proteins (Ca(2+) buffers) play an important role in regulating Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]). Buffers typically slow [Ca(2+)] temporal dynamics and increase the effective volume of Ca(2+) domains. Because fluctuations in [Ca(2+)] decrease in proportion to the square-root of a domain's physical volume, one might conjecture that buffers decrease [Ca(2+)] fluctuations and, consequently, mitigate the significance of small domain volume concerning Ca(2+) signaling. We test this hypothesis through mathematical and computational analysis of idealized buffer-containing domains and their stochastic dynamics during free Ca(2+) influx with passive exchange of both Ca(2+) and buffer with bulk concentrations. We derive Langevin equations for the fluctuating dynamics of Ca(2+) and buffer and use these stochastic differential equations to determine the magnitude of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations for different buffer parameters (e.g., dissociation constant and concentration). In marked contrast to expectations based on a naive application of the principle of effective volume as employed in deterministic models of Ca(2+) signaling, we find that mobile and rapid buffers typically increase the magnitude of domain [Ca(2+)] fluctuations during periods of Ca(2+) influx, whereas stationary (immobile) Ca(2+) buffers do not. Also contrary to expectations, we find that in the absence of Ca(2+) influx, buffers influence the temporal characteristics, but not the magnitude, of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations. We derive an analytical formula describing the influence of rapid Ca(2+) buffers on [Ca(2+)] fluctuations and, importantly, identify the stochastic analog of (deterministic) effective domain volume. Our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) buffers alter the dynamics of [Ca(2+)] fluctuations in a nonintuitive manner. The finding that Ca(2

  15. Proliferation of the surface-connected intracytoplasmic membranous network in skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, N. N.; Wilson, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    A surface-connected intracytoplasmic membranous (SCIM) network proliferates in skeletal muscle diseases and in myotubes grown in vitro. The authors observed frequent occurrence of "coated" microdomains in the form of budding vesicles in the proliferated components of this network and suspected a potential role the proliferated membranes might have in the endocytosis of molecules into myotubes undergoing repair or regeneration. Five-day-old myotubes in culture were incubated at 37 C and between 2 and 4 C with two tracers, Lucifer yellow and ferritin, both known to enter other types of cells via a fluid-phase endocytotic pathway. The differential penetration of Lucifer yellow at 37 C and below 2-4 C was examined by fluorescence microscopy and by electron microscopy. Lucifer yellow was rendered electron-opaque by photoreacting it with an intense light in the presence of DAB. Ferritin penetration at 37 C and between 2 and 4 C was compared and quantitated ultrastructurally. The authors found that endocytosis of the tracers into myotubes and eventually into lysosomes took place after the tracers had diffused into the lumen of the proliferated SCIM network. These processes were inhibited below 4 C. This finding, coupled with the presence of "coated" microdomains in the proliferated membranes, led us to suspect that the SCIM network may have a role in membrane turnover of metabolically active diseased muscle cells undergoing regeneration. Images Figure 5 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 p367-a PMID:3789091

  16. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Yee, Jason R; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  17. Novel effects of FTY720 on perinuclear reorganization of keratin network induced by sphingosylphosphorylcholine: Involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and G-protein-coupled receptor-12.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Soyeun; Kim, Hyun Ji; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, So Yeon; Kang, Gyeoung Jin; Byun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sang Hee; Lee, Ho; Lee, Chang Hoon

    2016-03-15

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) evokes perinuclear reorganization of keratin 8 (K8) filaments and regulates the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells leading to enhanced migration. Few studies have addressed the compounds modulating the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells. We studied the effects of sphingosine (SPH), sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), FTY720 and FTY720-phosphate (FTY720P) on SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and reorganization using Western blot and confocal microscopy, and also evaluated the elasticity of PANC-1 cells by atomic force microscopy. FTY720, FTY720P, SPH, and S1P concentration-dependently inhibited SPC-evoked phosphorylation and reorganization of K8, and migration of PANC-1 cells. SPC triggered reduction and narrow distribution of elastic constant K and conversely, FTY720 blocked them. A common upstream regulator of JNK and ERK, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression was reduced by SPC, but was restored by FTY720 and FTY72P. Butyryl forskolin, a PP2A activator, suppressed SPC-induced K8 phosphorylation and okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, induced K8 phosphorylation. Gene silencing of PP2A also led to K8 phosphorylation, reorganization and migration. We also investigated the involvement of GPR12, a high-affinity SPC receptor, in SPC-evoked keratin phosphorylation and reorganization. GPR12 siRNA suppressed the SPC-triggered phosphorylation and reorganization of K8. GPR12 overexpression stimulated keratin phosphorylation and reorganization even without SPC. FTY720 and FTY720P suppressed the GPR12-induced phosphorylation and reorganization of K8. The collective data indicates that FTY720 and FTY720P suppress SPC-induced phosphorylation and reorganization of K8 in PANC-1 cells by restoring the expression of PP2A via GPR12. These findings might be helpful in the development of compounds that modulate the viscoelasticity of metastatic cancer cells and various SPC actions. PMID:26872988

  18. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C.; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  19. Three different functional microdomains in the hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) mediate entry and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mo; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaoqing; Tong, Yimin; Liu, Yuan; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shiying; Dubuisson, Jean; Baumert, Thomas F; Zhu, Yongzhe; Peng, Haoran; Aurelian, Laure; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhongtian

    2012-10-12

    High genetic heterogeneity is an important characteristic of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that contributes to its ability to establish persistent infection. The hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) that includes the first 27 amino acid residues of the E2 envelope glycoprotein is the most variable region within the HCV polyprotein. HVR1 plays a major role in both HCV cell entry and immune evasion, but the respective contribution of specific amino acid residues is still unclear. Our mutagenesis analyses of HCV pseudoparticles and cell culture-derived HCV using the H77 isolate indicate that five residues at positions 14, 15, and 25-27 mediate binding of the E2 protein to the scavenger receptor class B, type I receptor, and any residue herein is indispensable for HCV cell entry. The region spanning positions 16-24 contains the sole neutralizing epitope and is dispensable for HCV entry, but it is involved in heparan binding. More importantly, this region is necessary for the enhancement of HCV entry by high density lipoprotein and interferes with virus neutralization by E2-neutralizing antibodies. Residues at positions 1-13 are also dispensable for HCV entry, but they can affect HCV infectivity by modulating binding of the envelope protein to scavenger receptor class B, type I. Mutations occurring at this site may confer resistance to HVR1 antibodies. These findings further our understanding about the mechanisms of HCV cell entry and the significance of HVR1 variation in HCV immune evasion. They have major implications for the development of HCV entry inhibitors and prophylactic vaccines.

  20. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-09-01

    An overview of applications of the deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method is presented together with recommendations for its optimal usage. Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  1. Insights into cell membrane microdomain organization from live cell single particle tracking of the IgE high affinity receptor FcϵRI of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Flor A; Wester, Michael J; Oliver, Janet M; Wilson, Bridget S; Andrews, Nicholas L; Lidke, Diane S; Steinberg, Stanly L

    2012-08-01

    Current models propose that the plasma membrane of animal cells is composed of heterogeneous and dynamic microdomains known variously as cytoskeletal corrals, lipid rafts and protein islands. Much of the experimental evidence for these membrane compartments is indirect. Recently, live cell single particle tracking studies using quantum dot-labeled IgE bound to its high affinity receptor FcϵRI, provided direct evidence for the confinement of receptors within micrometer-scale cytoskeletal corrals. In this study, we show that an innovative time-series analysis of single particle tracking data for the high affinity IgE receptor, FcϵRI, on mast cells provides substantial quantitative information about the submicrometer organization of the membrane. The analysis focuses on the probability distribution function of the lengths of the jumps in the positions of the quantum dots labeling individual IgE FcϵRI complexes between frames in movies of their motion. Our results demonstrate the presence, within the micrometer-scale cytoskeletal corrals, of smaller subdomains that provide an additional level of receptor confinement. There is no characteristic size for these subdomains; their size varies smoothly from a few tens of nanometers to a over a hundred nanometers. In QD-IGE labeled unstimulated cells, jumps of less than 70 nm predominate over longer jumps. Addition of multivalent antigen to crosslink the QD-IgE-FcϵRI complexes causes a rapid slowing of receptor motion followed by a long tail of mostly jumps less than 70 nm. The reduced receptor mobility likely reflects both the membrane heterogeneity revealed by the confined motion of the monomeric receptor complexes and the antigen-induced cross linking of these complexes into dimers and higher oligomers. In both cases, the probability distribution of the jump lengths is well fit, from 10 nm to over 100 nm, by a novel power law. The fit for short jumps suggests that the motion of the quantum dots can be modeled as

  2. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction and DNA repair network are involved in aluminum-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Brahma B.; Achary, V. Mohan M.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we studied the role of signal transduction in aluminum (Al3+)-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L. The root cells in planta were treated with Al3+ (800 μM) for 3 h without or with 2 h pre-treatment of inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein phosphatase. Also, root cells in planta were conditioned with Al3+ (10 μM) for 2 h and then subjected to genotoxic challenge of ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS; 5 mM) for 3 h without or with the pre-treatment of the aforementioned inhibitors as well as the inhibitors of translation, transcription, DNA replication and repair. At the end of treatments, roots cells were assayed for cell death and/or DNA damage. The results revealed that Al3+ (800 μM)-induced significant DNA damage and cell death. On the other hand, conditioning with low dose of Al3+ induced adaptive response conferring protection of root cells from genotoxic stress caused by EMS-challenge. Pre-treatment of roots cells with the chosen inhibitors prior to Al3+-conditioning prevented or reduced the adaptive response to EMS genotoxicity. The results of this study suggested the involvement of MAPK and DNA repair network underlying Al-induced DNA damage and adaptive response to genotoxic stress in root cells of A. cepa. PMID:24926302

  4. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Gunnar F; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T

    2014-09-01

    Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  5. Involvement of pre- and post-synaptic serotonergic receptors of dorsal raphe nucleus neural network in the control of the sweet-substance-induced analgesia in adult Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Miyase, Cátia Isumi; Kishi, Renato; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Paz, Denise Amorim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-05-13

    In order to investigate the effects of monoaminergic mechanisms of the dorsal raphe nucleus on the elaboration and control of sweet-substance-induced antinociception, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received sucrose solution (250 g/L) for 14 days as their only source of liquid. After the chronic consumption of sucrose solution, each animal was pretreated with unilateral microinjection of methiothepin mesylate (5.0 microg/0.2 microL), or methysergide maleate (5.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after the pharmacological treatment. The blockade of serotonergic receptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus with methysergide after the chronic intake of sucrose decreased the sweet-induced antinociception. However, microinjections of methiothepin in the dorsal raphe nucleus did not cause a similar effect on the tail-flick latencies after the chronic intake of sucrose solution, increasing the sweet-substance-induced analgesia. These results indicate the involvement of serotonin as a neurotransmitter in the sucrose-produced antinociception. Considering that the blockade of pre-synaptic serotonergic receptors of the neural networks of the dorsal raphe nucleus with methiothepin did not decrease the sweet-substance-induced antinociception, and the central blockade of post-synaptic serotonergic receptors decreased the sucrose-induced analgesia, the modulation of the release of serotonin in the neural substrate of the dorsal raphe nucleus seems to be crucial for the organization of this interesting antinociceptive process.

  6. Neural Network Development Tool (NETS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul T.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial neural networks formed from hundreds or thousands of simulated neurons, connected in manner similar to that in human brain. Such network models learning behavior. Using NETS involves translating problem to be solved into input/output pairs, designing network configuration, and training network. Written in C.

  7. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  8. Synthesis of polyaniline nanofibrous networks with the aid of an amphiphilic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhenjiang; Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhimin; Huang, Jun; Han, Buxing; Sun, Zhenyu; Du, Jimin

    2006-01-01

    In this work, polyaniline (PANI) nanofibrous networks were prepared using ionic liquid (IL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MIMCl), as a template through oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium persulfate. The resulting PANI was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis, and FTIR. It was indicated that the as-prepared PANI was in the emeraldine form and its morphology strongly depended on the molar ratio of aniline/C16MIMCI. A possible mechanism for the formation of PANI nanofibrous networks was that the ordered micro-domains of the IL acted as template to direct the growth of the nanostructures. PMID:16573100

  9. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  10. Neural-Network Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    F77NNS (FORTRAN 77 Neural Network Simulator) computer program simulates popular back-error-propagation neural network. Designed to take advantage of vectorization when used on computers having this capability, also used on any computer equipped with ANSI-77 FORTRAN Compiler. Problems involving matching of patterns or mathematical modeling of systems fit class of problems F77NNS designed to solve. Program has restart capability so neural network solved in stages suitable to user's resources and desires. Enables user to customize patterns of connections between layers of network. Size of neural network F77NNS applied to limited only by amount of random-access memory available to user.

  11. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  13. Dominating Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Milenković, Tijana; Memišević, Vesna; Bonato, Anthony; Pržulj, Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of “biologically central (BC)” genes (i.e., their protein products), such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network. To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC) role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs) in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its “spine” that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks. PMID:21887225

  14. Networked Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Chris, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This theme issue on networked teaching and learning contains 11 articles written by teachers of English and language arts in Bread Loaf's primarily rural, teacher networks. Most of these narratives describe how teachers have taught writing and literature using online exchanges or teleconferencing involving students in different locations and grade…

  15. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  16. Network Systems Administration Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lexington Community Coll., KY. Office of Institutional Research.

    In spring 1996, Lexington Community College (LCC) in Kentucky, conducted a survey to gather information on employment trends and educational needs in the field of network systems administration (NSA). NSA duties involve the installation and administration of network operating systems, applications software, and networking infrastructure;…

  17. Home Fires Involving Grills

    MedlinePlus

    ... fires were fueled by gas while 13% used charcoal or other solid fuel. Gas grills were involved ... structure fires and 4,300 outdoor fires annually. Charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were involved in ...

  18. Cognitive Control of Language Production in Bilinguals Involves a Partly Independent Process within the Domain-General Cognitive Control Network: Evidence from Task-switching and Electrical Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magezi, David A.; Khateb, Asaid; Mouthon, Michael; Spierer, Lucas; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    In highly proficient, early bilinguals, behavioural studies of the cost of switching language or task suggest qualitative differences between language control and domain-general cognitive control. By contrast, several neuroimaging studies have shown an overlap of the brain areas involved in language control and domain-general cognitive control.…

  19. Affective Involvement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1970-01-01

    The Affective Involvement Instrument (AII) describes and classifies affective involvement in the process of decision-making as it occurs during classroom activities such as role-playing or group discussions. The thirty-celled instrument behaviorizes the six processes involved in decision-making and combines them with the taxonomic levels of the…

  20. Gubernatorial Involvement in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Edward R.

    This research on 12 States' gubernatorial involvement in State educational policy formation investigates four functional stages of that involvement--issue definition, proposal formulation, support mobilization, and decision enactment. Drawing on the Educational Governance Project information and interviews, a gubernatorial involvement index was…

  1. The AAVSO High Energy Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2004-06-01

    The AAVSO is expanding its International Gamma-Ray Burst Network to incorporate other high energy objects such as blazars and magnetic cataclysmic variables (polars). The new AAVSO High Energy Network will be collaborating with the Global Telescope Network (GTN) to observe bright blazars in support of the upcoming GLAST mission. We also will be observing polars in support of the XMM mission. This new network will involve both visual and CCD obsrvers and is expected to last for many years.

  2. Online social networking for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Heller, Matthew T; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Sherry, Steven J; Tillack, Allison A

    2015-01-01

    Online social networking services have changed the way we interact as a society and offer many opportunities to improve the way we practice radiology and medicine in general. This article begins with an introduction to social networking. Next, the latest advances in online social networking are reviewed, and areas where radiologists and clinicians may benefit from these new tools are discussed. This article concludes with several steps that the interested reader can take to become more involved in online social networking.

  3. The Localization of Cytochrome P450s CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 into Different Lipid Microdomains Is Governed by Their N-terminal and Internal Protein Regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L

    2015-12-01

    In cellular membranes, different lipid species are heterogeneously distributed forming domains with different characteristics. Ordered domains are tightly packed with cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and saturated fatty acids, whereas disordered domains contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids. Our laboratory has shown that membrane heterogeneity affects the organization of cytochrome P450s and their cognate redox partner, the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, CYP1A1 was found to localize to disordered regions, whereas CYP1A2 resided in ordered domains. We hypothesized that regions of amino acid sequence variability may contain signal motifs that direct CYP1A proteins into ordered or disordered domains. Thus, chimeric constructs of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were created, and their localization was tested in HEK293T cells. CYP1A2, containing the N-terminal regions from CYP1A1, no longer localized in ordered domains, whereas the N terminus of CYP1A2 partially directed CYP1A1 into ordered regions. In addition, intact CYP1A2 containing a 206-302-residue peptide segment of CYP1A1 had less affinity to bind to ordered microdomains. After expression, the catalytic activity of CYP1A2 was higher than that of the CYP1A1-CYP1A2 chimera containing the N-terminal end of CYP1A1 with subsaturating CPR concentrations, but it was approximately equal with excess CPR suggesting that the localization of the CYP1A enzyme in ordered domains favored its interaction with CPR. These data demonstrate that both the N-terminal end and an internal region of CYP1A2 play roles in targeting CYP1A2 to ordered domains, and domain localization may influence P450 function under conditions that resemble those found in vivo. PMID:26468279

  4. The Localization of Cytochrome P450s CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 into Different Lipid Microdomains Is Governed by Their N-terminal and Internal Protein Regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L

    2015-12-01

    In cellular membranes, different lipid species are heterogeneously distributed forming domains with different characteristics. Ordered domains are tightly packed with cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and saturated fatty acids, whereas disordered domains contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids. Our laboratory has shown that membrane heterogeneity affects the organization of cytochrome P450s and their cognate redox partner, the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, CYP1A1 was found to localize to disordered regions, whereas CYP1A2 resided in ordered domains. We hypothesized that regions of amino acid sequence variability may contain signal motifs that direct CYP1A proteins into ordered or disordered domains. Thus, chimeric constructs of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were created, and their localization was tested in HEK293T cells. CYP1A2, containing the N-terminal regions from CYP1A1, no longer localized in ordered domains, whereas the N terminus of CYP1A2 partially directed CYP1A1 into ordered regions. In addition, intact CYP1A2 containing a 206-302-residue peptide segment of CYP1A1 had less affinity to bind to ordered microdomains. After expression, the catalytic activity of CYP1A2 was higher than that of the CYP1A1-CYP1A2 chimera containing the N-terminal end of CYP1A1 with subsaturating CPR concentrations, but it was approximately equal with excess CPR suggesting that the localization of the CYP1A enzyme in ordered domains favored its interaction with CPR. These data demonstrate that both the N-terminal end and an internal region of CYP1A2 play roles in targeting CYP1A2 to ordered domains, and domain localization may influence P450 function under conditions that resemble those found in vivo.

  5. Interictal networks in magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Urszula; Badier, Jean-Michel; Gavaret, Martine; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Chauvel, Patrick; Bénar, Christian-George

    2014-06-01

    Epileptic networks involve complex relationships across several brain areas. Such networks have been shown on intracerebral EEG (stereotaxic EEG, SEEG), an invasive technique. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive tool, which was recently proven to be efficient for localizing the generators of epileptiform discharges. However, despite the importance of characterizing non-invasively network aspects in partial epilepsies, only few studies have attempted to retrieve fine spatiotemporal dynamics of interictal discharges with MEG. Our goal was to assess the relevance of magnetoencephalography for detecting and characterizing the brain networks involved in interictal epileptic discharges. We propose here a semi-automatic method based on independent component analysis (ICA) and on co-occurrence of events across components. The method was evaluated in a series of seven patients by comparing its results with networks identified in SEEG. On both MEG and SEEG, we found that interictal discharges can involve remote regions which are acting in synchrony. More regions were identified in SEEG (38 in total) than in MEG (20). All MEG regions were confirmed by SEEG when an electrode was present in the vicinity. In all patients, at least one region could be identified as leading according to our criteria. A majority (71%) of MEG leaders were confirmed by SEEG. We have therefore shown that MEG measurements can extract a significant proportion of the networks visible in SEEG. This suggests that MEG can be a useful tool for defining noninvasively interictal epileptic networks, in terms of regions and patterns of connectivity, in search for a "primary irritative zone".

  6. Weighted multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, Giulia; Remondini, Daniel; Panzarasa, Pietro; Mondragón, Raúl J; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in network science is to quantify the information encoded in complex network structures. Disentangling randomness from organizational principles is even more demanding when networks have a multiplex nature. Multiplex networks are multilayer systems of [Formula: see text] nodes that can be linked in multiple interacting and co-evolving layers. In these networks, relevant information might not be captured if the single layers were analyzed separately. Here we demonstrate that such partial analysis of layers fails to capture significant correlations between weights and topology of complex multiplex networks. To this end, we study two weighted multiplex co-authorship and citation networks involving the authors included in the American Physical Society. We show that in these networks weights are strongly correlated with multiplex structure, and provide empirical evidence in favor of the advantage of studying weighted measures of multiplex networks, such as multistrength and the inverse multiparticipation ratio. Finally, we introduce a theoretical framework based on the entropy of multiplex ensembles to quantify the information stored in multiplex networks that would remain undetected if the single layers were analyzed in isolation.

  7. Super-resolution imaging of ciliary microdomains in isolated olfactory sensory neurons using a custom two-color stimulated emission depletion microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephanie A.; Ozbay, Baris N.; Potcoava, Mariana; Salcedo, Ernesto; Restrepo, Diego; Gibson, Emily A.

    2016-06-01

    We performed stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging of isolated olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) using a custom-built microscope. The STED microscope uses a single pulsed laser to excite two separate fluorophores, Atto 590 and Atto 647N. A gated timing circuit combined with temporal interleaving of the different color excitation/STED laser pulses filters the two channel detection and greatly minimizes crosstalk. We quantified the instrument resolution to be ˜81 and ˜44 nm, for the Atto 590 and Atto 647N channels. The spatial separation between the two channels was measured to be under 10 nm, well below the resolution limit. The custom-STED microscope is incorporated onto a commercial research microscope allowing brightfield, differential interference contrast, and epifluorescence imaging on the same field of view. We performed immunolabeling of OSNs in mice to image localization of ciliary membrane proteins involved in olfactory transduction. We imaged Ca2+-permeable cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel (Atto 594) and adenylyl cyclase type III (ACIII) (Atto 647N) in distinct cilia. STED imaging resolved well-separated subdiffraction limited clusters for each protein. We quantified the size of each cluster to have a mean value of 88±48 nm and 124±43 nm, for CNG and ACIII, respectively. STED imaging showed separated clusters that were not resolvable in confocal images.

  8. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein–protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Christian H.; Bromley, Jennifer R.; Stenbæk, Anne; Rasmussen, Randi E.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. Our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta. PMID:25326916

  9. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Wemore » tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.« less

  10. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.

  11. Nitrogen-source regulation of yeast gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase synthesis involves the regulatory network including the GATA zinc-finger factors Gln3, Nil1/Gat1 and Gzf3.

    PubMed Central

    Springael, Jean-Yves; Penninckx, Michel J

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the CIS2 gene encodes gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT; EC 2.3.2.2), the main GSH-degrading enzyme. The promoter region of CIS2 contains one stress-response element (CCCCT) and eight GAT(T/A)A core sequences, probably involved in nitrogen-regulated transcription. We show in the present study that expression of CIS2 is indeed regulated according to the nature of the nitrogen source. Expression is highest in cells growing on a poor nitrogen source such as urea. Under these conditions, the GATA zinc-finger transcription factors Nil1 and Gln3 are both required for CIS2 expression, Nil1 appearing as the more important factor. We further show that Gzf3, another GATA zinc-finger protein, acts as a negative regulator in nitrogen-source control of CIS2 expression. During growth on a preferred nitrogen source like NH(4)(+), CIS2 expression is repressed through a mechanism involving (at least) the Gln3-binding protein Ure2/GdhCR. Induction of CIS2 expression during nitrogen starvation is dependent on Gln3 and Nil1. Furthermore, rapamycin causes similar CIS2 activation, indicating that the target of rapamycin signalling pathway controls CIS2 expression via Gln3 and Nil1 in nitrogen-starved cells. Finally, our results show that CIS2 expression is induced mainly by nitrogen starvation but apparently not by other types of stress. PMID:12529169

  12. High Involvement Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on high-involvement work teams moderated by Michael Leimbach at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Beyond Training to the New Learning Environment: Workers on the High-Involvement Frontline" (Joseph Anthony Ilacqua, Carol Ann Zulauf) shows the link between an…

  13. Building Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Bloom, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Discussed is the rationale behind parent involvement in guidance and educational activities, together with specific suggestions for involving parents with other adults (parent advisory committees, informal coffees, Transactional analysis (groups etc.), with children (story hours, trips, demonstrations, counseling booths, testing, interviewing,…

  14. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  15. Categories of Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Jerold P.

    1994-01-01

    The growing interest in effective parent involvement has produced several ways to classify or describe ways parents are or should be involved. This article reviews and evaluates Ira Gordon's systems approach, the California-based System Development Corporation's categories, Eugenia H. Berger's parental role categories, Chavkin and Williams' parent…

  16. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  17. Gross anatomy of network security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Information security involves many branches of effort, including information assurance, host level security, physical security, and network security. Computer network security methods and implementations are given a top-down description to permit a medically focused audience to anchor this information to their daily practice. The depth of detail of network functionality and security measures, like that of the study of human anatomy, can be highly involved. Presented at the level of major gross anatomical systems, this paper will focus on network backbone implementation and perimeter defenses, then diagnostic tools, and finally the user practices (the human element). Physical security measures, though significant, have been defined as beyond the scope of this presentation.

  18. Network planning under uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kwok Shing; Cheung, Kwok Wai

    2008-11-01

    generic framework for solving the network planning problem under uncertainties. In addition to reviewing the various network planning problems involving uncertainties, we also propose that a unified framework based on robust optimization can be used to solve a rather large segment of network planning problem under uncertainties. Robust optimization is first introduced in the operations research literature and is a framework that incorporates information about the uncertainty sets for the parameters in the optimization model. Even though robust optimization is originated from tackling the uncertainty in the optimization process, it can serve as a comprehensive and suitable framework for tackling generic network planning problems under uncertainties. In this paper, we begin by explaining the main ideas behind the robust optimization approach. Then we demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed framework by giving out some examples of how the robust optimization framework can be applied to the current common network planning problems under uncertain environments. Next, we list some practical considerations for solving the network planning problem under uncertainties with the proposed framework. Finally, we conclude this article with some thoughts on the future directions for applying this framework to solve other network planning problems.

  19. Analysis of Chlamydia caviae entry sites and involvement of Cdc42 and Rac activity.

    PubMed

    Subtil, Agathe; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Balañá, María Eugenia; Dautry-Varsat, Alice

    2004-08-01

    In epithelial cells, endocytic activity is mostly dedicated to nutrient and macromolecule uptake. To invade these cells, Chlamydiaceae, like other pathogens, have evolved strategies that utilise the existing endocytic machineries and signalling pathways, but little is known about the host cell molecules involved. In this report, we show that within five minutes of infection of HeLa cells by Chlamydia caviae GPIC strain several events take place in the immediate vicinity of invasive bacteria: GM1-containing microdomains cluster, tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins accumulate, and intense actin polymerization occurs. We show that actin polymerization is controlled by the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac, which become activated upon infection. Expression of dominant negative forms of these GTPases inhibits C. caviae entry and leads to abnormal actin polymerization. In contrast, the small GTPase Rho does not seem essential for bacterial entry. Finally, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity is also required for internalization of C. caviae, probably downstream of the other molecular events reported here. We present the first scheme of the events occurring at the sites of invasion of epithelial cells by a member of the Chlamydiaceae family.

  20. Involve Your Total School Staff in Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Bonnie

    1985-01-01

    Effective school public relations programs begin with an employee relations network. Guides include a survey form as a follow-up to new teacher orientation sessions and 11 action suggestions to involve teachers in public relations. (MLF)

  1. A Regulatory Network Involving β-Catenin, e-Cadherin, PI3k/Akt, and Slug Balances Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells In Response to Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tyng-Shyan; Li, Li; Moalim-Nour, Lilian; Jia, Deyong; Bai, Jian; Yao, Zemin; Bennett, Steffany A L; Figeys, Daniel; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying disparate roles of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in maintaining self-renewal or inducing differentiation and lineage specification in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are not clear. In this study, we provide the first demonstration that self-renewal versus differentiation of human ESCs (hESCs) in response to Wnt signaling is predominantly determined by a two-layer regulatory circuit involving β-catenin, E-cadherin, PI3K/Akt, and Slug in a time-dependent manner. Short-term upregulation of β-catenin does not lead to the activation of T-cell factor (TCF)-eGFP Wnt reporter in hESCs. Instead, it enhances E-cadherin expression on the cell membrane, thereby enhancing hESC self-renewal through E-cadherin-associated PI3K/Akt signaling. Conversely, long-term Wnt activation or loss of E-cadherin intracellular β-catenin binding domain induces TCF-eGFP activity and promotes hESC differentiation through β-catenin-induced upregulation of Slug. Enhanced expression of Slug leads to a further reduction of E-cadherin that serves as a β-catenin "sink" sequestering free cytoplasmic β-catenin. The formation of such a framework reinforces hESCs to switch from a state of temporal self-renewal associated with short-term Wnt/β-catenin activation to definitive differentiation. Stem Cells 2015;33:1419-1433.

  2. Cognitive control of language production in bilinguals involves a partly independent process within the domain-general cognitive control network: evidence from task-switching and electrical brain activity.

    PubMed

    Magezi, David A; Khateb, Asaid; Mouthon, Michael; Spierer, Lucas; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2012-07-01

    In highly proficient, early bilinguals, behavioural studies of the cost of switching language or task suggest qualitative differences between language control and domain-general cognitive control. By contrast, several neuroimaging studies have shown an overlap of the brain areas involved in language control and domain-general cognitive control. The current study measured both behavioural responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) from bilinguals who performed picture naming in single- or mixed-language contexts, as well as an alphanumeric categorisation task in single- or mixed-task context. Analysis of switch costs during the mixed-context conditions showed qualitative differences between language control and domain-general cognitive control. A 2 × 2 ANOVA of the ERPs, with domain (linguistic, alphanumeric) and context (single, mixed) as within-participant factors, revealed a significant interaction, which also suggests a partly independent language-control mechanism. Source estimations revealed the neural basis of this mechanism to be in bilateral frontal-temporal areas.

  3. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  4. Network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  5. Eye Involvement in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... what we see to the brain via the optic nerve. Retinal and optic nerve involvement in TSC are well known today, ... hamartomas (non-cancerous tumors) of the retina or optic nerve. The most common type of retinal hamartoma ...

  6. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  7. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition.

    PubMed

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the "vestibular cortical projection areas", defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition.

  8. Rethinking Networks in Education: Case Studies of Organisational Development Networks in Neoliberal Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 the National College for School Leadership in England launched what they claimed to be the biggest school networking initiative of its kind. The networks which were members of this programme involved schools working together to achieve shared priorities and can be viewed as examples of organisational development networks. These networks,…

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Community-Based Dementia Care Networks: The Dementia Care Networks' Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemieux-Charles, Louis; Chambers, Larry W.; Cockerill, Rhonda; Jaglal, Susan; Brazil, Kevin; Cohen, Carole; LeClair, Ken; Dalziel, Bill; Schulman, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Dementia Care Networks' Study examined the effectiveness of four community-based, not-for-profit dementia networks. The study involved assessing the relationship between the types of administrative and service-delivery exchanges that occurred among the networked agencies and the network members' perception of the effectiveness of…

  10. Characterization of salA, syrF, and syrG Genes and Attendant Regulatory Networks Involved in Plant Pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Vanessa L.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of brown spot on bean, is an economically important plant pathogen that utilizes extracellular signaling to initiate a lifestyle change from an epiphyte to a pathogen. LuxR regulatory proteins play an important role in the transcriptional regulation of a variety of biological processes involving two-component signaling, quorum sensing, and secondary metabolism. Analysis of the B728a genome identified 24 LuxR-like proteins, three of which are encoded by salA, syrF, and syrG located adjacent to the syringomycin gene cluster. The LuxR-like proteins encoded by these three genes exhibit a domain architecture that places them in a subfamily of LuxR-like proteins associated with regulation of secondary metabolism in B728a. Deletion mutants of salA, syrF, and syrG failed to produce syringomycin and displayed reduction of virulence on bean. The transcriptional start sites of salA, syrG, and syrF were located 63, 235, and 498 bp upstream of the start codons, respectively, using primer extension analysis. The predicted -10/-35 promoter regions of syrF and syrG were confirmed using site-directed mutagenesis and GFP reporters that showed conserved promoter sequences around the -35 promoter region. Overexpression analysis and GFP reporters identified SyrG as an upstream transcriptional activator of syrF, where both SyrG and SyrF activate promoters of syringomycin biosynthesis genes. This study shows that syrG and syrF encode important transcriptional regulators of syringomycin biosynthesis genes. PMID:26954255

  11. A novel method combining cellular neural networks and the coupled nonlinear oscillators' paradigm involving a related bifurcation analysis for robust image contrast enhancement in dynamically changing difficult visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain Chedjou, Jean; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that a machine vision-based analysis of a dynamic scene, for example in the context of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), does require real-time processing capabilities. Therefore, the system used must be capable of performing both robust and ultrafast analyses. Machine vision in ADAS must fulfil the above requirements when dealing with a dynamically changing visual context (i.e. driving in darkness or in a foggy environment, etc). Among the various challenges related to the analysis of a dynamic scene, this paper focuses on contrast enhancement, which is a well-known basic operation to improve the visual quality of an image (dynamic or static) suffering from poor illumination. The key objective is to develop a systematic and fundamental concept for image contrast enhancement that should be robust despite a dynamic environment and that should fulfil the real-time constraints by ensuring an ultrafast analysis. It is demonstrated that the new approach developed in this paper is capable of fulfilling the expected requirements. The proposed approach combines the good features of the 'coupled oscillators'-based signal processing paradigm with the good features of the 'cellular neural network (CNN)'-based one. The first paradigm in this combination is the 'master system' and consists of a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that are (a) the so-called 'van der Pol oscillator' and (b) the so-called 'Duffing oscillator'. It is then implemented or realized on top of a 'slave system' platform consisting of a CNN-processors platform. An offline bifurcation analysis is used to find out, a priori, the windows of parameter settings in which the coupled oscillator system exhibits the best and most appropriate behaviours of interest for an optimal resulting image processing quality. In the frame of the extensive bifurcation analysis carried out, analytical formulae have been derived, which are capable of determining the various

  12. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  13. Network Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietzke, Robert; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This special section explains the latest developments in networking technologies, profiles school districts benefiting from successful implementations, and reviews new products for building networks. Highlights include ATM (asynchronous transfer mode), cable modems, networking switches, Internet screening software, file servers, network management…

  14. Optimal Phase Oscillatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follmann, Rosangela

    2013-03-01

    Important topics as preventive detection of epidemics, collective self-organization, information flow and systemic robustness in clusters are typical examples of processes that can be studied in the context of the theory of complex networks. It is an emerging theory in a field, which has recently attracted much interest, involving the synchronization of dynamical systems associated to nodes, or vertices, of the network. Studies have shown that synchronization in oscillatory networks depends not only on the individual dynamics of each element, but also on the combination of the topology of the connections as well as on the properties of the interactions of these elements. Moreover, the response of the network to small damages, caused at strategic points, can enhance the global performance of the whole network. In this presentation we explore an optimal phase oscillatory network altered by an additional term in the coupling function. The application to associative-memory network shows improvement on the correct information retrieval as well as increase of the storage capacity. The inclusion of some small deviations on the nodes, when solutions are attracted to a false state, results in additional enhancement of the performance of the associative-memory network. Supported by FAPESP - Sao Paulo Research Foundation, grant number 2012/12555-4

  15. A Balanced Memory Network

    PubMed Central

    Roudi, Yasser; Latham, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how working memory—the ability to store information at intermediate timescales, like tens of seconds—is implemented in realistic neuronal networks. The most likely candidate mechanism is the attractor network, and a great deal of effort has gone toward investigating it theoretically. Yet, despite almost a quarter century of intense work, attractor networks are not fully understood. In particular, there are still two unanswered questions. First, how is it that attractor networks exhibit irregular firing, as is observed experimentally during working memory tasks? And second, how many memories can be stored under biologically realistic conditions? Here we answer both questions by studying an attractor neural network in which inhibition and excitation balance each other. Using mean-field analysis, we derive a three-variable description of attractor networks. From this description it follows that irregular firing can exist only if the number of neurons involved in a memory is large. The same mean-field analysis also shows that the number of memories that can be stored in a network scales with the number of excitatory connections, a result that has been suggested for simple models but never shown for realistic ones. Both of these predictions are verified using simulations with large networks of spiking neurons. PMID:17845070

  16. [Pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, M; Hiraga, Y; Hirasawa, M

    1990-01-01

    We reported about intrathoracic changes and prognosis of 686 patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed in our hospital between 1963 and 1988. We evaluated CT findings in 135 patients with sarcoidosis and found pulmonary involvements in 81. We analyzed CT findings according to the classification by Tuengerthal which classified radiographic findings combining ILO classification of pneumoconiosis and characteristic findings of bronchovascular sheath with sarcoidosis. The CT findings were as follows: small opacities (44 out of 81 cases, 54.3%), large opacities (37 cases, 46.7%). Additional findings were as follows: peribronchial marking (42 cases, 51.9%), contraction (17 cases, 21.0%), pleural involvement (9 cases, 11.1%), bulla (5 cases, 6.2%). The characteristic CT findings of serious sarcoidosis were extasis of bronchus, thickening of the bronchial wall, unclearness of vascular shadow, atelectasis and thickening of pleura. Concerning the prognosis of pulmonary involvement, according to age, patients younger than 30 years old at initial diagnosis were better than those of 30 years and over in terms of disappearance of pulmonary involvements. According to stage, patients of stage I and stage II were better than those of stage III. Among the patients we were able to observe chest X-ray findings during five years according to the character of shadow, ill-defined shadow of small opacities and rounded shadows of large opacities had a higher disappearance rate of pulmonary involvements than irregular shadows of large opacities, atelectasis and contraction.

  17. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  18. Involve physicians in marketing.

    PubMed

    Randolph, G T; Baker, K M; Laubach, C A

    1984-01-01

    Many everyday problems in medical group practice can be attacked by a marketing approach. To be successful, however, this kind of approach must have the full support of those involved, especially the physicians, since they are the principal providers of healthcare services. When marketing is presented in a broad context, including elements such as patient mix, population distribution, and research, physicians are more likely to be interested and supportive. The members of Geisinger Medical Center's Department of Cardiovascular Medicine addressed their patient appointment backlog problem with a marketing approach. Their method is chronicled here and serves as a fine example of how physician involvement in marketing can lead to a positive outcome.

  19. Semantic Networks and Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

  20. A Network Primer for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Maria; Monahan, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Provides educators with a basic understanding of what networks are and how they can be used in educational settings. Topics include issues, policies, and equipment involved in setting up a network; software; telephone service; a computer facilitator; and the Internet and the World Wide Web for elementary and secondary education. (LRW)

  1. Rural Outreach: Connecting Distant Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenkel, Mary Beth

    Rural outreach in community mental health centers involves staff commuting from a central agency to surrounding rural towns to provide clinical and/or community service. The problem for outreach staff is how to best provide services to a rural network that is distant and different from the urban network. In general the greater the distance, the…

  2. Strengthening Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L., Jr.; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have verified Secretary of Education William Bennett's observation on the importance of home and family life. The most successful students are those whose parents become actively engaged in the educational process at home and at school. To capitalize on potential parent involvement, principals need to understand the kinds of…

  3. Structure and formation of ant transportation networks

    PubMed Central

    Latty, Tanya; Ramsch, Kai; Ito, Kentaro; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Sumpter, David J. T.; Middendorf, Martin; Beekman, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Many biological systems use extensive networks for the transport of resources and information. Ants are no exception. How do biological systems achieve efficient transportation networks in the absence of centralized control and without global knowledge of the environment? Here, we address this question by studying the formation and properties of inter-nest transportation networks in the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile). We find that the formation of inter-nest networks depends on the number of ants involved in the construction process. When the number of ants is sufficient and networks do form, they tend to have short total length but a low level of robustness. These networks are topologically similar to either minimum spanning trees or Steiner networks. The process of network formation involves an initial construction of multiple links followed by a pruning process that reduces the number of trails. Our study thus illuminates the conditions under and the process by which minimal biological transport networks can be constructed. PMID:21288958

  4. Fermionic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We study the structure of fermionic networks, i.e. a model of networks based on the behavior of fermionic gases, and we analyze dynamical processes over them. In this model, particle dynamics have been mapped to the domain of networks, hence a parameter representing the temperature controls the evolution of the system. In doing so, it is possible to generate adaptive networks, i.e. networks whose structure varies over time. As shown in previous works, networks generated by quantum statistics can undergo critical phenomena as phase transitions and, moreover, they can be considered as thermodynamic systems. In this study, we analyze fermionic networks and opinion dynamics processes over them, framing this network model as a computational model useful to represent complex and adaptive systems. Results highlight that a strong relation holds between the gas temperature and the structure of the achieved networks. Notably, both the degree distribution and the assortativity vary as the temperature varies, hence we can state that fermionic networks behave as adaptive networks. On the other hand, it is worth to highlight that we did not finding relation between outcomes of opinion dynamics processes and the gas temperature. Therefore, although the latter plays a fundamental role in gas dynamics, on the network domain, its importance is related only to structural properties of fermionic networks.

  5. Evolving Computer Networks in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCredie, John W.; Timlake, William P.

    1983-01-01

    Traditions and pressures in the academic environment accounting for early and continuing involvement of higher education with computer networking are described. Several established networks illustrating the wide range of academic applications currently available as well as policy issues of particular significance in academic networks are…

  6. Network Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    1992-01-01

    Explains how users can find and access information resources available on the Internet. Highlights include network information centers (NICs); lists, both formal and informal; computer networking protocols, including international standards; electronic mail; remote log-in; and file transfer. (LRW)

  7. Network science.

    PubMed

    Barabási, Albert-László

    2013-03-28

    Professor Barabási's talk described how the tools of network science can help understand the Web's structure, development and weaknesses. The Web is an information network, in which the nodes are documents (at the time of writing over one trillion of them), connected by links. Other well-known network structures include the Internet, a physical network where the nodes are routers and the links are physical connections, and organizations, where the nodes are people and the links represent communications.

  8. A random interacting network model for complex networks.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  9. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems.

  10. Networking as a Strategic Tool, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This conference focuses on the technological advances, pitfalls, requirements, and trends involved in planning and implementing an effective computer network system. The basic theme of the conference is networking as a strategic tool. Tutorials and conference presentations explore the technology and methods involved in this rapidly changing field. Future directions are explored from a global, as well as local, perspective.

  11. Accelerating Learning By Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to learn faster by use of terminal teacher forcing. Method of supervised learning involves addition of teacher forcing functions to excitations fed as inputs to output neurons. Initially, teacher forcing functions are strong enough to force outputs to desired values; subsequently, these functions decay with time. When learning successfully completed, terminal teacher forcing vanishes, and dynamics or neural network become equivalent to those of conventional neural network. Simulated neural network with terminal teacher forcing learned to produce close approximation of circular trajectory in 400 iterations.

  12. Training brain networks and states.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Posner, Michael I

    2014-07-01

    Brain training refers to practices that alter the brain in a way that improves cognition, and performance in domains beyond those involved in the training. We argue that brain training includes network training through repetitive practice that exercises specific brain networks and state training, which changes the brain state in a way that influences many networks. This opinion article considers two widely used methods - working memory training (WMT) and meditation training (MT) - to demonstrate the similarities and differences between network and state training. These two forms of training involve different areas of the brain and different forms of generalization. We propose a distinction between network and state training methods to improve understanding of the most effective brain training.

  13. Oscillatory Cortical Network Involved in Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    van Lutterveld, Remko; Hillebrand, Arjan; Diederen, Kelly M. J.; Daalman, Kirstin; Kahn, René S.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH), a prominent symptom of schizophrenia, are often highly distressing for patients. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of hallucinations could increase therapeutic options. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides direct measures of neuronal activity and has an excellent temporal resolution, offering a unique opportunity to study AVH pathophysiology. Methods Twelve patients (10 paranoid schizophrenia, 2 psychosis not otherwise specified) indicated the presence of AVH by button-press while lying in a MEG scanner. As a control condition, patients performed a self-paced button-press task. AVH-state and non-AVH state were contrasted in a region-of-interest (ROI) approach. In addition, the two seconds before AVH onset were contrasted with the two seconds after AVH onset to elucidate a possible triggering mechanism. Results AVH correlated with a decrease in beta-band power in the left temporal cortex. A decrease in alpha-band power was observed in the right inferior frontal gyrus. AVH onset was related to a decrease in theta-band power in the right hippocampus. Conclusions These results suggest that AVH are triggered by a short aberration in the theta band in a memory-related structure, followed by activity in language areas accompanying the experience of AVH itself. PMID:22844436

  14. Attractor Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Pelta, David A.; Veguillas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background The experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a Systemic Metabolic Structure in the cell, characterized by a set of different enzymatic reactions always locked into active states (metabolic core) while the rest of the catalytic processes are only intermittently active. This global metabolic structure was verified for Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it seems to be a common key feature to all cellular organisms. In concordance with these observations, the cell can be considered a complex metabolic network which mainly integrates a large ensemble of self-organized multienzymatic complexes interconnected by substrate fluxes and regulatory signals, where multiple autonomous oscillatory and quasi-stationary catalytic patterns simultaneously emerge. The network adjusts the internal metabolic activities to the external change by means of flux plasticity and structural plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to research the systemic mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cellular enzymatic activity we have studied different catalytic activities of a dissipative metabolic network under different external stimuli. The emergent biochemical data have been analysed using statistical mechanic tools, studying some macroscopic properties such as the global information and the energy of the system. We have also obtained an equivalent Hopfield network using a Boltzmann machine. Our main result shows that the dissipative metabolic network can behave as an attractor metabolic network. Conclusions/Significance We have found that the systemic enzymatic activities are governed by attractors with capacity to store functional metabolic patterns which can be correctly recovered from specific input stimuli. The network attractors regulate the catalytic patterns, modify the efficiency

  15. [Network structures in biological systems].

    PubMed

    Oleskin, A V

    2013-01-01

    Network structures (networks) that have been extensively studied in the humanities are characterized by cohesion, a lack of a central control unit, and predominantly fractal properties. They are contrasted with structures that contain a single centre (hierarchies) as well as with those whose elements predominantly compete with one another (market-type structures). As far as biological systems are concerned, their network structures can be subdivided into a number of types involving different organizational mechanisms. Network organization is characteristic of various structural levels of biological systems ranging from single cells to integrated societies. These networks can be classified into two main subgroups: (i) flat (leaderless) network structures typical of systems that are composed of uniform elements and represent modular organisms or at least possess manifest integral properties and (ii) three-dimensional, partly hierarchical structures characterized by significant individual and/or intergroup (intercaste) differences between their elements. All network structures include an element that performs structural, protective, and communication-promoting functions. By analogy to cell structures, this element is denoted as the matrix of a network structure. The matrix includes a material and an immaterial component. The material component comprises various structures that belong to the whole structure and not to any of its elements per se. The immaterial (ideal) component of the matrix includes social norms and rules regulating network elements' behavior. These behavioral rules can be described in terms of algorithms. Algorithmization enables modeling the behavior of various network structures, particularly of neuron networks and their artificial analogs.

  16. Superelastic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Obukhov, S.P.; Rubinstein, M.; Colby, R.H.

    1993-12-31

    This paper discusses the elastic modulus, swelling, and deswelling behavior of networks as a function of their concentration and the preparation state. Based on these results, the authors expect that networks prepared by crosslinking long chains at low concentration, followed by removal of solvent, will have superelastic properties - the deswollen networks will have low modulus and will be capable of stretching by enormous amounts without breaking. This is because deswelling introduces only temporary entanglements. These temporary entanglements change the static configuration of the network strands. The authors discuss the non-Gaussian nature of these strands and the linear viscoelastic response of the superelastic networks.

  17. Endocannabinoid involvement in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Natalia; Nagabukuro, Hiroshi; Resuehr, David; Zhang, Guohua; McAllister, Stacy L.; McGinty, Kristina A.; Mackie, Ken; Berkley, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Endometriosis is a disease common in women that is defined by abnormal extrauteral growths of uterine endometrial tissue and associated with severe pain. Partly because how the abnormal growths become associated with pain is poorly understood, the pain is difficult to alleviate without resorting to hormones or surgery, which often produce intolerable side effects or fail to help. Recent studies in a rat model and women showed that sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers sprout branches to innervate the abnormal growths. This situation, together with knowledge that the endocannabinoid system is involved in uterine function and dysfunction and that exogenous cannabinoids were once used to alleviate endometriosis-associated pain, suggests that the endocannabinoid system is involved in both endometriosis and its associated pain. Here, using a rat model, we found that CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on both the somata and fibers of both the sensory and sympathetic neurons that innervate endometriosis’s abnormal growths. We further found that CB1 receptor agonists decrease, whereas CB1 receptor antagonists increase, endometriosis-associated hyperalgesia. Together these findings suggest that the endocannabinoid system contributes to mechanisms underlying both the peripheral innervation of the abnormal growths and the pain associated with endometriosis, thereby providing a novel approach for the development of badly-needed new treatments. PMID:20833475

  18. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or are now underway this hot area. The purpose of this feature issue is to expose the networking community to the latest research breakthroughs and progresses in the area of optical access networks.

    Scope of Contributions

    This feature issue aims to present a collection of papers that focus on the state-of-the-art research in various networking aspects of optical access networks. Original papers are solicited from all researchers involved in area of optical access networks. Topics of interest include but not limited to:
    • Optical access network architectures and protocols
    • Passive optical networks (BPON, EPON, GPON, etc.)
    • Active optical networks
    • Multiple access control
    • Multiservices and QoS provisioning
    • Network survivability
    • Field trials and standards
    • Performance modeling and analysis

    Manuscript Submission

    To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating ``Optical Access Networks feature' in the ``Comments' field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this feature issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line ``Optical Access Networks' Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

  19. [Network analyses in neuroimaging studies].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeki; Yamada, Makiko

    2013-06-01

    Neurons are anatomically and physiologically connected to each other, and these connections are involved in various neuronal functions. Multiple important neural networks involved in neurodegenerative diseases can be detected using network analyses in functional neuroimaging. First, the basic methods and theories of voxel-based network analyses, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and seed-based analysis, are described. Disease- and symptom-specific brain networks have been identified using glucose metabolism images in patients with Parkinson's disease. These networks enable us to objectively evaluate individual patients and serve as diagnostic tools as well as biomarkers for therapeutic interventions. Many functional MRI studies have shown that "hub" brain regions, such as the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, are deactivated by externally driven cognitive tasks; such brain regions form the "default mode network." Recent studies have shown that this default mode network is disrupted from the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with amyloid deposition in the brain. Some recent studies have shown that the default mode network is also impaired in Parkinson's disease, whereas other studies have shown inconsistent results. These incongruent results could be due to the heterogeneous pharmacological status, differences in mesocortical dopaminergic impairment status, and concomitant amyloid deposition. Future neuroimaging network analysis studies will reveal novel and interesting findings that will uncover the pathomechanisms of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23735528

  20. Vulnerability of network of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Bashan, A.; Gao, J.; Stanley, H. E.

    2014-10-01

    Our dependence on networks - be they infrastructure, economic, social or others - leaves us prone to crises caused by the vulnerabilities of these networks. There is a great need to develop new methods to protect infrastructure networks and prevent cascade of failures (especially in cases of coupled networks). Terrorist attacks on transportation networks have traumatized modern societies. With a single blast, it has become possible to paralyze airline traffic, electric power supply, ground transportation or Internet communication. How, and at which cost can one restructure the network such that it will become more robust against malicious attacks? The gradual increase in attacks on the networks society depends on - Internet, mobile phone, transportation, air travel, banking, etc. - emphasize the need to develop new strategies to protect and defend these crucial networks of communication and infrastructure networks. One example is the threat of liquid explosives a few years ago, which completely shut down air travel for days, and has created extreme changes in regulations. Such threats and dangers warrant the need for new tools and strategies to defend critical infrastructure. In this paper we review recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the vulnerabilities of interdependent networks with and without spatial embedding, attack strategies and their affect on such networks of networks as well as recently developed strategies to optimize and repair failures caused by such attacks.

  1. Interactive protein network of FXIII-A1 in lipid rafts of activated and non-activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    Lipid-rafts are defined as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids within platelet plasma membrane. Lipid raft-mediated clot retraction requires factor XIII and other interacting proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteins that interact with factor XIII in raft and non-raft domains of activated and non-activated platelet plasma membrane. By lipidomics analysis, we identified cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched areas as lipid rafts. Platelets were activated by thrombin. Proteomics analysis provided an overview of the pathways in which proteins of rafts and non-rafts participated in the interaction network of FXIII-A1, a catalytic subunit of FXIII. "Platelet activation" was the principal pathway among KEGG pathways for proteins of rafts, both before and after activation. Network analysis showed four types of interactions (activation, binding, reaction, and catalysis) in raft and non-raft domains in interactive network of FXIII-A1. FXIII-A1 interactions with other proteins in raft domains and their role in homeostasis highlight the specialization of the raft domain in clot retraction via the Factor XIII protein network.

  2. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  3. Computer Networks As Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, Barry

    2001-09-01

    Computer networks are inherently social networks, linking people, organizations, and knowledge. They are social institutions that should not be studied in isolation but as integrated into everyday lives. The proliferation of computer networks has facilitated a deemphasis on group solidarities at work and in the community and afforded a turn to networked societies that are loosely bounded and sparsely knit. The Internet increases people's social capital, increasing contact with friends and relatives who live nearby and far away. New tools must be developed to help people navigate and find knowledge in complex, fragmented, networked societies.

  4. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population.

  5. Probing interfaces involving liquids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A L

    1987-04-10

    Last month in Washington, D.C., the National Academy of Sciences held the first of what it hopes will be a series of seminars in forefront fields of science, technology, and medicine. The idea is to bring the academy closer to the frontlines of research and to help spread the word to federal science policy-makers. The subject of the 23 and 24 March seminar was interfaces and thin films, and the talks, though tutorial in nature, contained a pleasantly large number of still unpublished results. Interfaces, such as the surface of a solid exposed to a liquid or gas, and thin films, whose properties are heavily influenced by interfaces, have long been of considerable technological importance and have always been so in biological processes, but researchers are now getting access to the experimental and theoretical tools needed to explore these complex physical systems that are neither ideally two-dimensional nor fully three-dimensional. The briefings that follow give a peek at three ways to probe interfaces involving liquids.

  6. A Guide to Networking for K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic networking information and planning assistance for technology coordinators and others involved in building networks for K-12 schools. The information in this guide focuses on the first few steps in the networking process. It reviews planning considerations and network design issues facing educators who…

  7. Innovation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, Andreas; Scharnhorst, Andrea

    The idea for this book started when we organized a topical workshop entitled "Innovation Networks - New Approaches in Modeling and Analyzing" (held in Augsburg, Germany in October 2005), under the auspices of Exystence, a network of excellence funded in the European Union's Fifth Framework Program. Unlike other conferences on innovation and networks, however, this workshop brought together scientists from economics, sociology, communication science, science and technology studies, and physics. With this book we aim to build further on a bridge connecting the bodies of knowledge on networks in economics, the social sciences and, more recently, statistical physics.

  8. Applying Employee Involvement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Susan Albers; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of employee-involvement approaches to the management of schools is explored, describing three approaches (parallel-suggestion involvement, job involvement, and high involvement). Design issues (technology; organizational structure; leadership; organizational boundaries, customer definition, and relation to stakeholder; measures;…

  9. Network Information Management Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatburn, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is implementing a distributed data base management system in which the data are shared among several applications and the host machines are not totally dedicated to a particular application. Since the data and resources are to be shared, the equipment must be operated carefully so that the resources are shared equitably. The current status of the project is discussed and policies, roles, and guidelines are recommended for the organizations involved in the project.

  10. Understanding deep convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Stéphane

    2016-04-13

    Deep convolutional networks provide state-of-the-art classifications and regressions results over many high-dimensional problems. We review their architecture, which scatters data with a cascade of linear filter weights and nonlinearities. A mathematical framework is introduced to analyse their properties. Computations of invariants involve multiscale contractions with wavelets, the linearization of hierarchical symmetries and sparse separations. Applications are discussed. PMID:26953183

  11. Diabetes network.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes UK has launched a network of information and support for commissioning and improvement in diabetes care. The network is free to join and offers monthly updates on good practice from around the UK, a forum for sharing ideas and learning, and access to Diabetes UK resources. PMID:27369708

  12. Network Security: What Non-Technical Administrators Must Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council, Chip

    2005-01-01

    Now it is increasingly critical that community college leaders become involved in network security and partner with their directors of information technology (IT). Network security involves more than just virus protection software and firewalls. It involves vigilance and requires top executive support. Leaders can help their IT directors to…

  13. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  14. GANG INVOLVEMENT AMONG STREET-INVOLVED YOUTH IN A CANADIAN SETTING: A GENDER-BASED ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Brandon DL; DeBeck, Kora; Simo, Annick; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Evidence suggests that gang involvement is associated with adverse health outcomes among high-risk youth. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence and correlates of gang affiliation among this population, particularly in Canada. We examined the relationship between self-reported gang involvement and early childhood traumatic experiences, social factors, and other behaviors in a study of drug-using, street-involved youth. Study Design Cross-Sectional Study Methods Data were derived from the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), a prospective study of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. Between June 2009 and May 2011, participants were asked questions ascertaining lifetime gang involvement and gang affiliation in one’s social network. We examined the gender-specific correlates of gang involvement using stratified log-binomial regression analyses. Results Among 435 eligible participants, 94 (21.6%) reported gang involvement and 206 (47.4%) reported having friends in a gang. In gender-stratified models, males involved in gangs were more likely to be of Aboriginal ancestry (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09 – 2.44), have grown up in government care (PR = 2.03, 95%CI: 1.32 – 3.12), dealt drugs (PR = 2.52, 95%CI: 1.66 – 3.85), and been incarcerated (PR = 1.40, 95%CI: 1.29 – 2.80). Women involved in gangs were more likely to have reported a history of childhood sexual abuse (PR = 3.08, 95%CI: 1.15 – 8.27). Conclusions These results suggest that a variety of adverse experiences in early life are associated with an increased risk of gang affiliation among street-involved youth. Primary prevention strategies aiming to avert gang initiation among high-risk youth should seek to address childhood abuse and other traumatic experiences commonly experienced by this population. PMID:25542743

  15. French fireball network FRIPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, F.; Zanda, B.; Vaubaillon, J.; Bouley, S.; Marmo, C.; Audureau, Y.; Kwon, M. K.; Rault, J.-L.; Caminade, S.; Vernazza, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Birlan, M.; Maquet, L.; Egal, A.; Rotaru, M.; Birnbaum, C.; Cochard, F.; Thizy, O.

    2015-01-01

    FRIPON (Fireball Recovery and Interplanetary Observation Network) was recently founded by ANR (Agence Nationale de la Recherche), its aim being to connect meteoritical science with asteroidal and cometary sciences, in order to better understand our solar system formation and evolution. The main idea is to cover all the French territory to collect a large number of meteorites (one or two per year) with an accurate orbit determination, allowing to pinpoint possible parent bodies. 100 all-sky cameras will be installed at the end of 2015, creating a dense network with an average distance of 100 km between the stations. To maximize the accuracy of the orbit determination, we will mix our optical data with radar data from the GRAVES transmitter received by 25 stations (Rault et al., 2015). As the network installation and the creation of research teams for meteorites involves many persons, at least many more than our small team of professionals, we will develop a participative science network for amateurs called Vigie-Ciel (Zanda et al., 2015). It will be possible to simply use our data, participate in research campaigns or even add cameras to the FRIPON network.

  16. The theory of macromolecular networks.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S F

    1986-01-01

    Network theory has evolved from the simplest rubber materials and is just entering the biological area. The existing theories are studied and the modifications required for biological applications are reviewed. The issues involved are: the balance between entropy and internal energy, the rigidity and flexibility of molecules, the stability of the networks, the origin of the intermolecular forces and the entanglement problems of swelling and precipitation.

  17. Policies for implementing network firewalls

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    Corporate networks are frequently protected by {open_quotes}firewalls{close_quotes} or gateway systems that control access to/from other networks, e.g., the Internet, in order to reduce the network`s vulnerability to hackers and other unauthorized access. Firewalls typically limit access to particular network nodes and application protocols, and they often perform special authentication and authorization functions. One of the difficult issues associated with network firewalls is determining which applications should be permitted through the firewall. For example, many networks permit the exchange of electronic mail with the outside but do not permit file access to be initiated by outside users, as this might allow outside users to access sensitive data or to surreptitiously modify data or programs (e.g., to intall Trojan Horse software). However, if access through firewalls is severely restricted, legitimate network users may find it difficult or impossible to collaborate with outside users and to share data. Some of the most serious issues regarding firewalls involve setting policies for firewalls with the goal of achieving an acceptable balance between the need for greater functionality and the associated risks. Two common firewall implementation techniques, screening routers and application gateways, are discussed below, followed by some common policies implemented by network firewalls.

  18. Technological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Bivas

    The study of networks in the form of mathematical graph theory is one of the fundamental pillars of discrete mathematics. However, recent years have witnessed a substantial new movement in network research. The focus of the research is shifting away from the analysis of small graphs and the properties of individual vertices or edges to consideration of statistical properties of large scale networks. This new approach has been driven largely by the availability of technological networks like the Internet [12], World Wide Web network [2], etc. that allow us to gather and analyze data on a scale far larger than previously possible. At the same time, technological networks have evolved as a socio-technological system, as the concepts of social systems that are based on self-organization theory have become unified in technological networks [13]. In today’s society, we have a simple and universal access to great amounts of information and services. These information services are based upon the infrastructure of the Internet and the World Wide Web. The Internet is the system composed of ‘computers’ connected by cables or some other form of physical connections. Over this physical network, it is possible to exchange e-mails, transfer files, etc. On the other hand, the World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet where nodes represent web pages and links represent hyperlinks between the pages. Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks [26] also have recently become a popular medium through which huge amounts of data can be shared. P2P file sharing systems, where files are searched and downloaded among peers without the help of central servers, have emerged as a major component of Internet traffic. An important advantage in P2P networks is that all clients provide resources, including bandwidth, storage space, and computing power. In this chapter, we discuss these technological networks in detail. The review

  19. Complex Networks in Psychological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, R. S.; Carvalho, L. S. A. V. D.; Donangelo, R.

    We develop schematic, self-organizing, neural-network models to describe mechanisms associated with mental processes, by a neurocomputational substrate. These models are examples of real world complex networks with interesting general topological structures. Considering dopaminergic signal-to-noise neuronal modulation in the central nervous system, we propose neural network models to explain development of cortical map structure and dynamics of memory access, and unify different mental processes into a single neurocomputational substrate. Based on our neural network models, neurotic behavior may be understood as an associative memory process in the brain, and the linguistic, symbolic associative process involved in psychoanalytic working-through can be mapped onto a corresponding process of reconfiguration of the neural network. The models are illustrated through computer simulations, where we varied dopaminergic modulation and observed the self-organizing emergent patterns at the resulting semantic map, interpreting them as different manifestations of mental functioning, from psychotic through to normal and neurotic behavior, and creativity.

  20. Innovation network

    PubMed Central

    Acemoglu, Daron; Akcigit, Ufuk; Kerr, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Technological progress builds upon itself, with the expansion of invention in one domain propelling future work in linked fields. Our analysis uses 1.8 million US patents and their citation properties to map the innovation network and its strength. Past innovation network structures are calculated using citation patterns across technology classes during 1975–1994. The interaction of this preexisting network structure with patent growth in upstream technology fields has strong predictive power on future innovation after 1995. This pattern is consistent with the idea that when there is more past upstream innovation for a particular technology class to build on, then that technology class innovates more. PMID:27681628

  1. L-plastin is involved in NKG2D recruitment into lipid rafts and NKG2D-mediated NK cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Brdička, Tomáš; Hoøejši, Václav; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Membrane rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane that have multiple biological functions. The involvement of these structures in the biology of T cells, namely in signal transduction by the TCR, has been widely studied. However, the role of membrane rafts in immunoreceptor signaling in NK cells is less well known. We studied the distribution of the activating NKG2D receptor in lipid rafts by isolating DRMs in a sucrose density gradient or by raft fractionation by β-OG-selective solubility in the NKL cell line. We found that the NKG2D-DAP10 complex and pVav are recruited into rafts upon receptor stimulation. Qualitative proteomic analysis of these fractions showed that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. In particular, we found that the actin-bundling protein L-plastin plays an important role in the clustering of NKG2D into lipid rafts. Moreover, coengagement of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A partially disrupted NKG2D recruitment into rafts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L-plastin participates in NKG2D-mediated inhibition of NK cell chemotaxis.

  2. Non-Repudiation in Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandel, Purvi; Valiveti, Sharada; Agrawal, K. P.; Kotecha, K.

    With the phenomenal growth of the Internet and open networks in general, security services, such as non-repudiation, become crucial to many applications. In conventional network non-repudiation is achieved using protocols involving TTP. Non-repudiation in conventional network is achieved using different protocols, but in ad hoc networks due to mobility problem we can't use trusted third party (TTP). There is a scope to implement a non-repudiation protocol, which satisfies non-repudiation requirements emerged by the application in a peer-to-peer network.

  3. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  4. Families Get Involved! Learning Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Media and Information Services.

    Noting that families who are involved in their children's education make a difference in their child's performance, this two-page information sheet encourages families to get involved by listing the benefits of family involvement on one side and the ways adult family members can help in the school on the other. As a result of family participation:…

  5. Parent Involvement: Barriers and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannan, Golam; Blackwell, Jacqueline

    1992-01-01

    Explores issues of parent involvement in light of current educational reform movements, asserts that parent involvement as a voluntary effort may not be effective, and argues that businesses and industries interested in reform are not focusing sufficiently on work-related variables that might encourage involvement of parents and other adults. (SLD)

  6. Measuring Involvement with Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Glen J.; Salmon, Charles T.

    A study applied research concepts from consumer product involvement to test a model for research on involvement with social issues. Issue involvement was defined as the state or level of perceived importance and/or interest evoked by a stimulus (issue) within a specific situation. Attitudes on four social issues--abortion, pornography, the…

  7. Youth Maltreatment and Gang Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kevin M.; Braaten-Antrim, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Examines whether physical and sexual maltreatment raises the risk of gang involvement among secondary school students. Findings show that maltreatment increases the probability of gang involvement, independent of demographic factors. When youth are physically and sexually abused their odds of gang involvement are four times higher than those who…

  8. Parental Involvement in High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Donna JG

    Although parental involvement is recommended at all levels of schooling, involvement of parents at the secondary level has not been well defined in the literature. This paper presents findings of a case study that examined three high schools with varying levels of parental involvement--the first, a large high school with a predominantly working…

  9. Sentinel Network

    Cancer.gov

    The Sentinel Network is an integrated, electronic, national medical product safety initiative that compiles information about the safe and effective use of medical products accessible to patients and healthcare practitioners.

  10. Whether information network supplements friendship network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Lili; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Nie, Da-Cheng; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-02-01

    Homophily is a significant mechanism for link prediction in complex network, of which principle describes that people with similar profiles or experiences tend to tie with each other. In a multi-relationship network, friendship among people has been utilized to reinforce similarity of taste for recommendation system whose basic idea is similar to homophily, yet how the taste inversely affects friendship prediction is little discussed. This paper contributes to address the issue by analyzing two benchmark data sets both including user's behavioral information of taste and friendship based on the principle of homophily. It can be found that the creation of friendship tightly associates with personal taste. Especially, the behavioral information of taste involving with popular objects is much more effective to improve the performance of friendship prediction. However, this result seems to be contradictory to the finding in Zhang et al. (2013) that the behavior information of taste involving with popular objects is redundant in recommendation system. We thus discuss this inconformity to comprehensively understand the correlation between them.

  11. Developer Network

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-21

    NREL's Developer Network, developer.nrel.gov, provides data that users can access to provide data to their own analyses, mobile and web applications. Developers can retrieve the data through a Web services API (application programming interface). The Developer Network handles overhead of serving up web services such as key management, authentication, analytics, reporting, documentation standards, and throttling in a common architecture, while allowing web services and APIs to be maintained and managed independently.

  12. Sentient networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1998-03-01

    The engineering problems of constructing autonomous networks of sensors and data processors that can provide alerts for dangerous situations provide a new context for debating the question whether man-made systems can emulate the cognitive capabilities of the mammalian brain. In this paper we consider the question whether a distributed network of sensors and data processors can form ``perceptions`` based on sensory data. Because sensory data can have exponentially many explanations, the use of a central data processor to analyze the outputs from a large ensemble of sensors will in general introduce unacceptable latencies for responding to dangerous situations. A better idea is to use a distributed ``Helmholtz machine`` architecture in which the sensors are connected to a network of simple processors, and the collective state of the network as a whole provides an explanation for the sensory data. In general communication within such a network will require time division multiplexing, which opens the door to the possibility that with certain refinements to the Helmholtz machine architecture it may be possible to build sensor networks that exhibit a form of artificial consciousness.

  13. On the Long-run Sensitivity of Probabilistic Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaoning; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Boolean networks and, more generally, probabilistic Boolean networks, as one class of gene regulatory networks, model biological processes with the network dynamics determined by the logic-rule regulatory functions in conjunction with probabilistic parameters involved in network transitions. While there has been significant research on applying different control policies to alter network dynamics as future gene therapeutic intervention, we have seen less work on understanding the sensitivity of network dynamics with respect to perturbations to networks, including regulatory rules and the involved parameters, which is particularly critical for the design of intervention strategies. This paper studies this less investigated issue of network sensitivity in the long run. As the underlying model of probabilistic Boolean networks is a finite Markov chain, we define the network sensitivity based on the steady-state distributions of probabilistic Boolean networks and call it long-run sensitivity. The steady-state distribution reflects the long-run behavior of the network and it can give insight into the dynamics or momentum existing in a system. The change of steady-state distribution caused by possible perturbations is the key measure for intervention. This newly defined long-run sensitivity can provide insight on both network inference and intervention. We show the results for probabilistic Boolean networks generated from random Boolean networks and the results from two real biological networks illustrate preliminary applications of sensitivity in intervention for practical problems. PMID:19168076

  14. Local structure of Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O by the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering - from average-structure to microdomain model

    SciTech Connect

    Komornicka, Dorota; Wolcyrz, Marek; Pietraszko, Adam

    2012-08-15

    Local structure of dirubidium tetralithium tris(selenate(VI)) dihydrate - Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O has been determined basing on the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering. The origin of observed structured diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching between two alternative positions in two quasi-planar layers existing in each unit cell and formation of domains with specific SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra configuration locally fulfilling condition for C-centering in the 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b Multiplication-Sign c superstructure cell. The local structure solution is characterized by a uniform distribution of rather large domains (ca. thousand of unit cells) in two layers, but also monodomains can be taken into account. Inside a single domain SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra are ordered along ab-diagonal forming two-string ribbons. Inside the ribbons SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} tetrahedra share the oxygen corners, whereas ribbons are bound to each other by a net of hydrogen bonds and fastened by corner sharing SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra of the neighboring layers. - Graphical abstract: Experimental sections of the reciprocal space showing diffraction effects observed for RLSO. Bragg spots are visible on sections with integer indices (1 kl section - on the left), streaks - on sections with fractional ones (1.5 kl section - on the right). At the center: resulting local structure of the A package modeled as a microdomain: two-string ribbons of ordered oxygen-corners-sharing SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} terahedra extended along ab-diagonal are seen; ribbons are bound by hydrogen bonds (shown in pink); the multiplied 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b unit cell is shown. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffuse scattering in RLSO was registered and modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The origin of diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching in two structure layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The local structure is characterized by a uniform

  15. Basketball teams as strategic networks.

    PubMed

    Fewell, Jennifer H; Armbruster, Dieter; Ingraham, John; Petersen, Alexander; Waters, James S

    2012-01-01

    We asked how team dynamics can be captured in relation to function by considering games in the first round of the NBA 2010 play-offs as networks. Defining players as nodes and ball movements as links, we analyzed the network properties of degree centrality, clustering, entropy and flow centrality across teams and positions, to characterize the game from a network perspective and to determine whether we can assess differences in team offensive strategy by their network properties. The compiled network structure across teams reflected a fundamental attribute of basketball strategy. They primarily showed a centralized ball distribution pattern with the point guard in a leadership role. However, individual play-off teams showed variation in their relative involvement of other players/positions in ball distribution, reflected quantitatively by differences in clustering and degree centrality. We also characterized two potential alternate offensive strategies by associated variation in network structure: (1) whether teams consistently moved the ball towards their shooting specialists, measured as "uphill/downhill" flux, and (2) whether they distributed the ball in a way that reduced predictability, measured as team entropy. These network metrics quantified different aspects of team strategy, with no single metric wholly predictive of success. However, in the context of the 2010 play-offs, the values of clustering (connectedness across players) and network entropy (unpredictability of ball movement) had the most consistent association with team advancement. Our analyses demonstrate the utility of network approaches in quantifying team strategy and show that testable hypotheses can be evaluated using this approach. These analyses also highlight the richness of basketball networks as a dataset for exploring the relationships between network structure and dynamics with team organization and effectiveness. PMID:23139744

  16. Basketball teams as strategic networks.

    PubMed

    Fewell, Jennifer H; Armbruster, Dieter; Ingraham, John; Petersen, Alexander; Waters, James S

    2012-01-01

    We asked how team dynamics can be captured in relation to function by considering games in the first round of the NBA 2010 play-offs as networks. Defining players as nodes and ball movements as links, we analyzed the network properties of degree centrality, clustering, entropy and flow centrality across teams and positions, to characterize the game from a network perspective and to determine whether we can assess differences in team offensive strategy by their network properties. The compiled network structure across teams reflected a fundamental attribute of basketball strategy. They primarily showed a centralized ball distribution pattern with the point guard in a leadership role. However, individual play-off teams showed variation in their relative involvement of other players/positions in ball distribution, reflected quantitatively by differences in clustering and degree centrality. We also characterized two potential alternate offensive strategies by associated variation in network structure: (1) whether teams consistently moved the ball towards their shooting specialists, measured as "uphill/downhill" flux, and (2) whether they distributed the ball in a way that reduced predictability, measured as team entropy. These network metrics quantified different aspects of team strategy, with no single metric wholly predictive of success. However, in the context of the 2010 play-offs, the values of clustering (connectedness across players) and network entropy (unpredictability of ball movement) had the most consistent association with team advancement. Our analyses demonstrate the utility of network approaches in quantifying team strategy and show that testable hypotheses can be evaluated using this approach. These analyses also highlight the richness of basketball networks as a dataset for exploring the relationships between network structure and dynamics with team organization and effectiveness.

  17. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  18. Communicability across evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark C.; Higham, Desmond J.; Estrada, Ernesto

    2011-04-01

    Many natural and technological applications generate time-ordered sequences of networks, defined over a fixed set of nodes; for example, time-stamped information about “who phoned who” or “who came into contact with who” arise naturally in studies of communication and the spread of disease. Concepts and algorithms for static networks do not immediately carry through to this dynamic setting. For example, suppose A and B interact in the morning, and then B and C interact in the afternoon. Information, or disease, may then pass from A to C, but not vice versa. This subtlety is lost if we simply summarize using the daily aggregate network given by the chain A-B-C. However, using a natural definition of a walk on an evolving network, we show that classic centrality measures from the static setting can be extended in a computationally convenient manner. In particular, communicability indices can be computed to summarize the ability of each node to broadcast and receive information. The computations involve basic operations in linear algebra, and the asymmetry caused by time’s arrow is captured naturally through the noncommutativity of matrix-matrix multiplication. Illustrative examples are given for both synthetic and real-world communication data sets. We also discuss the use of the new centrality measures for real-time monitoring and prediction.

  19. Musculoskeletal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Randone, Silvia Bellando; Guiducci, Serena; Cerinic, Marco Matucci

    2008-04-01

    Musculoskeletal involvement is more frequent than expected in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and is a major cause of disability, even if the prognosis of the disease largely depends on visceral involvement. The most common clinical feature of musculoskeletal involvement is arthralgia; less frequent features are arthritis, flexion contractures, stiffness (affecting predominantly fingers, wrists and ankles), proximal muscle weakness (mainly of the shoulder and hip) and tendon sheath involvement. Tendon friction rubs are predictive of poor prognosis. If musculoskeletal involvement is suspected, serum creatinine phosphokinase, aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies should be checked routinely. Treatment for muscle involvement has not yet been considered adequately and, in the future, it is to be hoped that clinical trials will identify new drugs to control this aspect of SSc, which seriously compromises patients' quality of life. PMID:18455689

  20. Thinking More Deeply about Networks in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lima, Jorge Avila

    2010-01-01

    In education, initiatives to restructure and reculture schools through their involvement in intra- and inter-institutional networks have grown in number in recent years. Networks of teachers and schools (often linked to institutions outside education) are becoming a key focus of change efforts promoted by professionals and policymakers. However,…

  1. Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes…

  2. Workshop on neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.; Emrich, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics covered in this report are: Learning, Memory, and Artificial Neural Systems; Emerging Neural Network Technology; Neural Networks; Digital Signal Processing and Neural Networks; Application of Neural Networks to In-Core Fuel Management; Neural Networks in Process Control; Neural Network Applications in Image Processing; Neural Networks for Multi-Sensor Information Fusion; Neural Network Research in Instruments Controls Division; Neural Networks Research in the ORNL Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division; Neural Network Applications for Linear Programming; Neural Network Applications to Signal Processing and Diagnostics; Neural Networks in Filtering and Control; Neural Network Research at Tennessee Technological University; and Global Minima within the Hopfield Hypercube.

  3. Antenna analysis using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William T.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional computing schemes have long been used to analyze problems in electromagnetics (EM). The vast majority of EM applications require computationally intensive algorithms involving numerical integration and solutions to large systems of equations. The feasibility of using neural network computing algorithms for antenna analysis is investigated. The ultimate goal is to use a trained neural network algorithm to reduce the computational demands of existing reflector surface error compensation techniques. Neural networks are computational algorithms based on neurobiological systems. Neural nets consist of massively parallel interconnected nonlinear computational elements. They are often employed in pattern recognition and image processing problems. Recently, neural network analysis has been applied in the electromagnetics area for the design of frequency selective surfaces and beam forming networks. The backpropagation training algorithm was employed to simulate classical antenna array synthesis techniques. The Woodward-Lawson (W-L) and Dolph-Chebyshev (D-C) array pattern synthesis techniques were used to train the neural network. The inputs to the network were samples of the desired synthesis pattern. The outputs are the array element excitations required to synthesize the desired pattern. Once trained, the network is used to simulate the W-L or D-C techniques. Various sector patterns and cosecant-type patterns (27 total) generated using W-L synthesis were used to train the network. Desired pattern samples were then fed to the neural network. The outputs of the network were the simulated W-L excitations. A 20 element linear array was used. There were 41 input pattern samples with 40 output excitations (20 real parts, 20 imaginary). A comparison between the simulated and actual W-L techniques is shown for a triangular-shaped pattern. Dolph-Chebyshev is a different class of synthesis technique in that D-C is used for side lobe control as opposed to pattern

  4. SATWG networked quality function deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Don

    1992-01-01

    The initiative of this work is to develop a cooperative process for continual evolution of an integrated, time phased avionics technology plan that involves customers, technologists, developers, and managers. This will be accomplished by demonstrating a computer network technology to augment the Quality Function Deployment (QFD). All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  5. School Improvement Network Directory, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipe, Linda, Comp.

    The 1995 "School Improvement Network Directory" is part of a series designed to facilitate information exchange and support among schools and districts involved in long-term school-improvement efforts. The directory provides information about 260 schools working with the school-based-management process, Onward to Excellence (OTE), to improve…

  6. Using Computer Networking for Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, John; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Two studies involving 27 learning-disabled middle-school students and 30 mildly handicapped junior high students investigated use of Teacher Net, a computer networking system that facilitates immediate feedback. Teacher Net reduced the teachers' administrative workload, effectively monitored student understanding, provided feedback to teachers,…

  7. Activity cliff networks for medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Network representations are widely used in bioinformatics but have only been little explored in chemistry. Thus far, only a few attempts have been made to generate and analyze compound networks. Among these are the first activity cliff networks. In medicinal chemistry, activity cliffs are focal points of structure-activity relationships (SAR) analysis. Activity cliffs have generally been defined as pairs of structurally similar or analogous active compounds that have a large difference in potency against their target. However, most activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple highly and weakly potent compounds. Recently, a comprehensive activity cliff network has been generated for current public domain bioactive compounds, hence providing a first global view of activity cliff formation. The design of activity cliff networks is discussed herein. From the global activity cliff network, local networks can be extracted for individual compound activity classes that provide graphical access to high-level SAR information for compound optimization efforts.

  8. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Novakova, Jana; Slaby, Ondrej; Vyzula, Rostislav; Michalek, Jaroslav

    2009-08-14

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  9. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  10. Parental Involvement in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machen, Sandra M.; Wilson, Janell D.; Notar, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Improving parental involvement with public schools can improve schools. Parental involvement is highly important for pushing the public school systems to higher standards. Also, research reports that engaging parents in an active role in the school curriculum can open alternative opportunities for children to succeed in academics. This report will…

  11. The Adolescent Drug Involvement Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, D. Paul; Hahn, Lori

    1991-01-01

    Developed Adolescent Drug Involvement Scale (ADIS) to measure level of drug involvement, considered as continuum ranging from no use to severe dependency, in adolescents. Administered ADIS to 453 adolescents referred for treatment. Results indicated acceptable internal consistency and provide preliminary evidence of validity. Scores correlated…

  12. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Daniel

    This paper examines the potential impact of parent involvement in the formal education of their children and suggests ways that teacher education can be restructured to prepare teachers to work with parents. This paper attempts to answer five questions: (1) Why should parents be involved in the formal education of their children? (2) Why should…

  13. New Directions in Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruchter, Norm; And Others

    This book presents findings of a study that identified and analyzed 18 recently developed programs or reform efforts in the United States that stress effective parental involvement. Chapter 1 provides a review of education literature and research on parent involvement from 1945 to 1985 and situates newly emerging efforts within the current climate…

  14. Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Four recent journal articles and one meeting paper on teacher involvement in curriculum development are summarized in this research bulletin. Contents include "Motivating Teacher Involvement in Professional Growth Activities," by Ruth Wright; "Teacher Participation in Curriculum Development: What Status Does It Have?" by Jean Young; "The Locus of…

  15. Employee involvement: motivation or manipulation?

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1998-03-01

    Employee involvement is subject to a great deal of verbal tribute; there is hardly a manager at work today who will not praise the value of employee input. However, many employee involvement efforts leave employees feeling more manipulated than motivated. This occurs because supervisors and managers, while expecting employees to change the way they work, are themselves either unwilling to change or remain unconscious of the need to change. The result is that, although employee input is regularly solicited in a number of forms, it is often discounted, ignored, or altered to fit the manager's preconceptions. Often the employee is left feeling manipulated. Since the opportunity for involvement can be a strong motivator, it becomes the manager's task to learn how to provide involvement opportunity in manipulative fashion. This can be accomplished by providing involvement opportunity accompanied by clear outcome expectations and allowing employees the freedom to pursue those outcomes in their own way.

  16. Distributed semantic networks and CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, James; Rodriguez, Tony

    1991-01-01

    Semantic networks of frames are commonly used as a method of reasoning in many problems. In most of these applications the semantic network exists as a single entity in a single process environment. Advances in workstation hardware provide support for more sophisticated applications involving multiple processes, interacting in a distributed environment. In these applications the semantic network may well be distributed over several concurrently executing tasks. This paper describes the design and implementation of a frame based, distributed semantic network in which frames are accessed both through C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) expert systems and procedural C++ language programs. The application area is a knowledge based, cooperative decision making model utilizing both rule based and procedural experts.

  17. Scaling in topological properties of brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Soibam Shyamchand; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Reid, Andrew T.; Lewis, John D.; Evans, Alan C.; Ishrat, Romana; Sharma, B. Indrajit; Singh, R. K. Brojen

    2016-01-01

    The organization in brain networks shows highly modular features with weak inter-modular interaction. The topology of the networks involves emergence of modules and sub-modules at different levels of constitution governed by fractal laws that are signatures of self-organization in complex networks. The modular organization, in terms of modular mass, inter-modular, and intra-modular interaction, also obeys fractal nature. The parameters which characterize topological properties of brain networks follow one parameter scaling theory in all levels of network structure, which reveals the self-similar rules governing the network structure. Further, the calculated fractal dimensions of brain networks of different species are found to decrease when one goes from lower to higher level species which implicates the more ordered and self-organized topography at higher level species. The sparsely distributed hubs in brain networks may be most influencing nodes but their absence may not cause network breakdown, and centrality parameters characterizing them also follow one parameter scaling law indicating self-similar roles of these hubs at different levels of organization in brain networks. The local-community-paradigm decomposition plot and calculated local-community-paradigm-correlation co-efficient of brain networks also shows the evidence for self-organization in these networks. PMID:27112129

  18. Scaling in topological properties of brain networks.

    PubMed

    Singh, Soibam Shyamchand; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Reid, Andrew T; Lewis, John D; Evans, Alan C; Ishrat, Romana; Sharma, B Indrajit; Singh, R K Brojen

    2016-01-01

    The organization in brain networks shows highly modular features with weak inter-modular interaction. The topology of the networks involves emergence of modules and sub-modules at different levels of constitution governed by fractal laws that are signatures of self-organization in complex networks. The modular organization, in terms of modular mass, inter-modular, and intra-modular interaction, also obeys fractal nature. The parameters which characterize topological properties of brain networks follow one parameter scaling theory in all levels of network structure, which reveals the self-similar rules governing the network structure. Further, the calculated fractal dimensions of brain networks of different species are found to decrease when one goes from lower to higher level species which implicates the more ordered and self-organized topography at higher level species. The sparsely distributed hubs in brain networks may be most influencing nodes but their absence may not cause network breakdown, and centrality parameters characterizing them also follow one parameter scaling law indicating self-similar roles of these hubs at different levels of organization in brain networks. The local-community-paradigm decomposition plot and calculated local-community-paradigm-correlation co-efficient of brain networks also shows the evidence for self-organization in these networks. PMID:27112129

  19. Consensus between Pipelines in Structural Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Christopher S.; Deligianni, Fani; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Daga, Pankaj; Modat, Marc; Dayan, Michael; Clark, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural brain networks may be reconstructed from diffusion MRI tractography data and have great potential to further our understanding of the topological organisation of brain structure in health and disease. Network reconstruction is complex and involves a series of processesing methods including anatomical parcellation, registration, fiber orientation estimation and whole-brain fiber tractography. Methodological choices at each stage can affect the anatomical accuracy and graph theoretical properties of the reconstructed networks, meaning applying different combinations in a network reconstruction pipeline may produce substantially different networks. Furthermore, the choice of which connections are considered important is unclear. In this study, we assessed the similarity between structural networks obtained using two independent state-of-the-art reconstruction pipelines. We aimed to quantify network similarity and identify the core connections emerging most robustly in both pipelines. Similarity of network connections was compared between pipelines employing different atlases by merging parcels to a common and equivalent node scale. We found a high agreement between the networks across a range of fiber density thresholds. In addition, we identified a robust core of highly connected regions coinciding with a peak in similarity across network density thresholds, and replicated these results with atlases at different node scales. The binary network properties of these core connections were similar between pipelines but showed some differences in atlases across node scales. This study demonstrates the utility of applying multiple structural network reconstrution pipelines to diffusion data in order to identify the most important connections for further study. PMID:25356977

  20. Scaling in topological properties of brain networks.

    PubMed

    Singh, Soibam Shyamchand; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Reid, Andrew T; Lewis, John D; Evans, Alan C; Ishrat, Romana; Sharma, B Indrajit; Singh, R K Brojen

    2016-04-26

    The organization in brain networks shows highly modular features with weak inter-modular interaction. The topology of the networks involves emergence of modules and sub-modules at different levels of constitution governed by fractal laws that are signatures of self-organization in complex networks. The modular organization, in terms of modular mass, inter-modular, and intra-modular interaction, also obeys fractal nature. The parameters which characterize topological properties of brain networks follow one parameter scaling theory in all levels of network structure, which reveals the self-similar rules governing the network structure. Further, the calculated fractal dimensions of brain networks of different species are found to decrease when one goes from lower to higher level species which implicates the more ordered and self-organized topography at higher level species. The sparsely distributed hubs in brain networks may be most influencing nodes but their absence may not cause network breakdown, and centrality parameters characterizing them also follow one parameter scaling law indicating self-similar roles of these hubs at different levels of organization in brain networks. The local-community-paradigm decomposition plot and calculated local-community-paradigm-correlation co-efficient of brain networks also shows the evidence for self-organization in these networks.

  1. Thermoreversible Morphology and Conductivity of a Conjugated Polymer Network Embedded in Block Copolymer Self-Assemblies

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Youngkyu; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Yunchao; Hong, Kunlun; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ohl, Michael; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Smith, Gregory S.; Do, Changwoo

    2016-07-19

    Self-assembly of block copolymers provides numerous opportunities to create functional materials, utilizing self-assembled microdomains with a variety of morphology and periodic architectures as templates for functional nanofillers. Here new progress is reported toward the fabrication of thermally responsive and electrically conductive polymeric self-assemblies made from a water-soluble poly(thiophene) derivative with short poly(ethylene oxide) side chains and Pluronic L62 block copolymer solution in water. The structural and electrical properties of conjugated polymer-embedded self-assembled architectures are investigated by combining small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and impedance spectroscopy. The L62 solution template organizes the conjugated polymers by stably incorporatingmore » them into the hydrophilic domains thus inhibiting aggregation. The changing morphology of L62 during the micellarto- lamellar phase transition defines the embedded conjugated polymer network. As a result, the conductivity is strongly coupled to the structural change of the templating L62 phase and exhibits thermally reversible behavior with no signs of quenching of the conductivity at high temperature. In conclusion, this study shows promise for enabling more flexibility in processing and utilizing water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solutions for self-assembly based fabrication of stimuli-responsive nanostructures and sensory materials.« less

  2. Network Modeling and Energy-Efficiency Optimization for Advanced Machine-to-Machine Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungmo; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Seoksoo

    2012-01-01

    Wireless machine-to-machine sensor networks with multiple radio interfaces are expected to have several advantages, including high spatial scalability, low event detection latency, and low energy consumption. Here, we propose a network model design method involving network approximation and an optimized multi-tiered clustering algorithm that maximizes node lifespan by minimizing energy consumption in a non-uniformly distributed network. Simulation results show that the cluster scales and network parameters determined with the proposed method facilitate a more efficient performance compared to existing methods. PMID:23202190

  3. Network Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Louis

    2010-01-01

    The world changed in 2008. The financial crisis brought with it a deepening sense of insecurity, and the desire to be connected to a network increased. Throughout the summer and fall of 2008, events were unfolding with alarming rapidity. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Alumni Association wanted to respond to this change in the…

  4. Network opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Michele; Buchanan, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Our developing scientific understanding of complex networks is being usefully applied in a wide set of financial systems. What we've learned from the 2008 crisis could be the basis of better management of the economy -- and a means to avert future disaster.

  5. Gradient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroczkai, Zoltán; Kozma, Balázs; Bassler, Kevin E.; Hengartner, N. W.; Korniss, G.

    2008-04-01

    Gradient networks are defined (Toroczkai and Bassler 2004 Nature 428 716) as directed graphs formed by local gradients of a scalar field distributed on the nodes of a substrate network G. We present the derivation for some of the general properties of gradient graphs and give an exact expression for the in-degree distribution R(l) of the gradient network when the substrate is a binomial (Erd{\\;\\kern -0.10em \\raise -0.35ex \\{{^{^{\\prime\\prime}}}}\\kern -0.57em \\o} s-Rényi) random graph, G_{N,p} , and the scalars are independent identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. We show that in the limit N \\to \\infty, p \\to 0, z = pN = \\mbox{const} \\gg 1, R(l)\\propto l^{-1} for l < l_c = z , i.e., gradient networks become scale-free graphs up to a cut-off degree. This paper presents the detailed derivation of the results announced in Toroczkai and Bassler (2004 Nature 428 716).

  6. Knowledge Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Scott

    2008-01-01

    The blogosphere and the Internet are both examples of complex, self-organizing networks. So too is the world of academic publishing. Some faculty members are prolific article and book writers. Their publications often are hubs, or even superhubs, in the scholarly literature, cited regularly by others. Some scholars might just be nodes, with…

  7. Beyond Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the new relationships between libraries and their users with reference to the worldwide medical information networks which have developed through the influence of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Consideration is given to the new roles librarians will have to assume. (Author/LLS)

  8. Social Network Methods for the Educational and Psychological Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Social networks are especially applicable in educational and psychological studies involving social interactions. A social network is defined as a specific relationship among a group of individuals. Social networks arise in a variety of situations such as friendships among children, collaboration and advice seeking among teachers, and coauthorship…

  9. CD-ROM Network Configurations: Good, Better, Best!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Gloria

    1996-01-01

    Rates three methods of arranging CD-ROM school networks: (1) peer-to-peer; (2) daisy chain configurations; and (3) dedicated CD-ROM file server. Describes the following network components: the file server, network adapters and wiring, the CD-ROM file server, and CD-ROM drives. Discusses issues involved in assembling these components into a working…

  10. The Characteristics of Religious Involvement (Churching) as Assessed by Young People of the Orthodox Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ufimtseva, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    A study of the process of religious socialization in Russia shows that it involves a wide network of people and organizational support, characterized by both passive and active phases of spiritual participation.

  11. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, Richard B.; Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process.

  12. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

    1998-04-28

    A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

  13. A building block for hardware belief networks

    PubMed Central

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Diep, Vinh; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    Belief networks represent a powerful approach to problems involving probabilistic inference, but much of the work in this area is software based utilizing standard deterministic hardware based on the transistor which provides the gain and directionality needed to interconnect billions of them into useful networks. This paper proposes a transistor like device that could provide an analogous building block for probabilistic networks. We present two proof-of-concept examples of belief networks, one reciprocal and one non-reciprocal, implemented using the proposed device which is simulated using experimentally benchmarked models. PMID:27443521

  14. A building block for hardware belief networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Diep, Vinh; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-07-01

    Belief networks represent a powerful approach to problems involving probabilistic inference, but much of the work in this area is software based utilizing standard deterministic hardware based on the transistor which provides the gain and directionality needed to interconnect billions of them into useful networks. This paper proposes a transistor like device that could provide an analogous building block for probabilistic networks. We present two proof-of-concept examples of belief networks, one reciprocal and one non-reciprocal, implemented using the proposed device which is simulated using experimentally benchmarked models.

  15. A building block for hardware belief networks.

    PubMed

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Diep, Vinh; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    Belief networks represent a powerful approach to problems involving probabilistic inference, but much of the work in this area is software based utilizing standard deterministic hardware based on the transistor which provides the gain and directionality needed to interconnect billions of them into useful networks. This paper proposes a transistor like device that could provide an analogous building block for probabilistic networks. We present two proof-of-concept examples of belief networks, one reciprocal and one non-reciprocal, implemented using the proposed device which is simulated using experimentally benchmarked models. PMID:27443521

  16. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bilgici, Ayhan; Ulusoy, H; Kuru, O; Celenk, C; Unsal, M; Danaci, M

    2005-08-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the relationships between clinical characteristics, lung involvement, and frequency of pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFT), we prospectively evaluated 52 patients with RA (eight males and 44 females, mean age 53.6 years). The HRCT was abnormal in 35 patients (67.3%), the most frequent abnormalities being reticulonodular patterns, which were found in 22 patients (62.9%), ground-glass attenuation (20%), and bronchiectasis (17%). In this group of patients, PFT results were normal in 13 patients (37%). Titers of rheumatoid factor and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were significantly higher in abnormal HRCT presence. Higher Larsen's score, advanced age, and severe disease were significant risk factors for lung involvement (p<0.001, p<0.01, and p<0.01, respectively) and are suggested by our data to be statistically significant predictors of lung involvement in RA.

  17. Chemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Wing-Fai

    2015-09-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One on-going research subject is finding new paths to synthesize species either in the gas-phase or on grain surfaces. Specific formation routes for water or carbon monoxide are discussed in more details. 13th Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  18. Modeling the citation network by network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan; Yi, Dongyun; Kong, Dexing

    2015-01-01

    Citation between papers can be treated as a causal relationship. In addition, some citation networks have a number of similarities to the causal networks in network cosmology, e.g., the similar in-and out-degree distributions. Hence, it is possible to model the citation network using network cosmology. The casual network models built on homogenous spacetimes have some restrictions when describing some phenomena in citation networks, e.g., the hot papers receive more citations than other simultaneously published papers. We propose an inhomogenous causal network model to model the citation network, the connection mechanism of which well expresses some features of citation. The node growth trend and degree distributions of the generated networks also fit those of some citation networks well.

  19. Artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance.

    PubMed

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function. PMID:21526157

  20. Artificial Astrocytes Improve Neural Network Performance

    PubMed Central

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B.; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function. PMID:21526157

  1. Network representations of immune system complexity.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Naeha; Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Gottschalk, Rachel A; Germain, Ronald N; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a dynamic multiscale system composed of a hierarchically organized set of molecular, cellular, and organismal networks that act in concert to promote effective host defense. These networks range from those involving gene regulatory and protein-protein interactions underlying intracellular signaling pathways and single-cell responses to increasingly complex networks of in vivo cellular interaction, positioning, and migration that determine the overall immune response of an organism. Immunity is thus not the product of simple signaling events but rather nonlinear behaviors arising from dynamic, feedback-regulated interactions among many components. One of the major goals of systems immunology is to quantitatively measure these complex multiscale spatial and temporal interactions, permitting development of computational models that can be used to predict responses to perturbation. Recent technological advances permit collection of comprehensive datasets at multiple molecular and cellular levels, while advances in network biology support representation of the relationships of components at each level as physical or functional interaction networks. The latter facilitate effective visualization of patterns and recognition of emergent properties arising from the many interactions of genes, molecules, and cells of the immune system. We illustrate the power of integrating 'omics' and network modeling approaches for unbiased reconstruction of signaling and transcriptional networks with a focus on applications involving the innate immune system. We further discuss future possibilities for reconstruction of increasingly complex cellular- and organism-level networks and development of sophisticated computational tools for prediction of emergent immune behavior arising from the concerted action of these networks.

  2. NASA Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Network includes nine NASA operated and partner operated stations covering North America, the west coast of South America, the Pacific, and Western Australia . A new station is presently being setup in South Africa and discussions are underway to add another station in Argentina. NASA SLR operations are supported by Honeywell Technical Solutions, Inc (HTSI), formally AlliedSignal Technical Services, The University of Texas, the University of Hawaii and Universidad Nacional de San Agustin.

  3. The Applicability of Social Network Analysis to the Study of Networked Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toikkanen, Tarmo; Lipponen, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    Studying networked learning (NL) by applying social network analysis (SNA) has gained popularity in recent years. However, it appears that in the context of NL the choice of SNA indices is very often dictated by using easily achievable SNA tools. Most studies in this field only involve a single group of students and utilise simple indices, such as…

  4. The Networked Principal: Examining Principals' Social Relationships and Transformational Leadership in School and District Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While in everyday practice, school leaders are often involved in social relationships with a variety of stakeholders both within and outside their own schools, studies on school leaders' networks often focus either on networks within or outside schools. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which principals occupy…

  5. A Bayesian network for mammography.

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, E.; Rubin, D.; Shachter, R.

    2000-01-01

    The interpretation of a mammogram and decisions based on it involve reasoning and management of uncertainty. The wide variation of training and practice among radiologists results in significant variability in screening performance with attendant cost and efficacy consequences. We have created a Bayesian belief network to integrate the findings on a mammogram, based on the standardized lexicon developed for mammography, the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS). Our goal in creating this network is to explore the probabilistic underpinnings of this lexicon as well as standardize mammographic decision-making to the level of expert knowledge. PMID:11079854

  6. Multiple myeloma involving the orbit.

    PubMed

    Fay, A M; Leib, M L; Fountain, K S

    1998-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy often associated with destructive skeletal lesions. Orbital involvement in multiple myeloma is rare. Risk factors for orbital involvement have not been established, although risk may vary with immunoglobulin subtype. Early detection of orbital plasmacytoma may affect treatment and clinical course. A case is reported of multiple myeloma without elevated serum immunoglobulins that involves the orbit, and the implications of early detection are discussed. The patient was first examined by an ophthalmologist 13 months after multiple myeloma was diagnosed and 5 months after the external appearance of an orbital tumor. Urine protein electrophoresis demonstrated kappa light chains. Hypergammaglobulinemia was not detected. Plain-film roentgenography showed orbital involvement at the time of initial diagnosis. An impressive clinical response to external beam radiation therapy was seen. Attention to immunoprotein characteristics in multiple myeloma may help to identify risk factors for orbital involvement. Early detection may permit safer and equally effective treatment. All patients with multiple myeloma should undergo thorough ophthalmic examination at the time of initial diagnosis.

  7. Default network activity, coupled with the frontoparietal control network, supports goal-directed cognition.

    PubMed

    Spreng, R Nathan; Stevens, W Dale; Chamberlain, Jon P; Gilmore, Adrian W; Schacter, Daniel L

    2010-10-15

    Tasks that demand externalized attention reliably suppress default network activity while activating the dorsal attention network. These networks have an intrinsic competitive relationship; activation of one suppresses activity of the other. Consequently, many assume that default network activity is suppressed during goal-directed cognition. We challenge this assumption in an fMRI study of planning. Recent studies link default network activity with internally focused cognition, such as imagining personal future events, suggesting a role in autobiographical planning. However, it is unclear how goal-directed cognition with an internal focus is mediated by these opposing networks. A third anatomically interposed 'frontoparietal control network' might mediate planning across domains, flexibly coupling with either the default or dorsal attention network in support of internally versus externally focused goal-directed cognition, respectively. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing brain activity during autobiographical versus visuospatial planning. Autobiographical planning engaged the default network, whereas visuospatial planning engaged the dorsal attention network, consistent with the anti-correlated domains of internalized and externalized cognition. Critically, both planning tasks engaged the frontoparietal control network. Task-related activation of these three networks was anatomically consistent with independently defined resting-state functional connectivity MRI maps. Task-related functional connectivity analyses demonstrate that the default network can be involved in goal-directed cognition when its activity is coupled with the frontoparietal control network. Additionally, the frontoparietal control network may flexibly couple with the default and dorsal attention networks according to task domain, serving as a cortical mediator linking the two networks in support of goal-directed cognitive processes.

  8. Consciousness, cognition and brain networks: New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aldana, E M; Valverde, J L; Fábregas, N

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the literature on consciousness and cognition mechanisms based on the neural networks theory is presented. The immune and inflammatory response to the anesthetic-surgical procedure induces modulation of neuronal plasticity by influencing higher cognitive functions. Anesthetic drugs can cause unconsciousness, producing a functional disruption of cortical and thalamic cortical integration complex. The external and internal perceptions are processed through an intricate network of neural connections, involving the higher nervous activity centers, especially the cerebral cortex. This requires an integrated model, formed by neural networks and their interactions with highly specialized regions, through large-scale networks, which are distributed throughout the brain collecting information flow of these perceptions. Functional and effective connectivity between large-scale networks, are essential for consciousness, unconsciousness and cognition. It is what is called the "human connectome" or map neural networks.

  9. Consciousness, cognition and brain networks: New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aldana, E M; Valverde, J L; Fábregas, N

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the literature on consciousness and cognition mechanisms based on the neural networks theory is presented. The immune and inflammatory response to the anesthetic-surgical procedure induces modulation of neuronal plasticity by influencing higher cognitive functions. Anesthetic drugs can cause unconsciousness, producing a functional disruption of cortical and thalamic cortical integration complex. The external and internal perceptions are processed through an intricate network of neural connections, involving the higher nervous activity centers, especially the cerebral cortex. This requires an integrated model, formed by neural networks and their interactions with highly specialized regions, through large-scale networks, which are distributed throughout the brain collecting information flow of these perceptions. Functional and effective connectivity between large-scale networks, are essential for consciousness, unconsciousness and cognition. It is what is called the "human connectome" or map neural networks. PMID:26143337

  10. The International Lunar Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    A new lunar science flight projects line has been introduced within NASA s Science Mission Directorate's (SMDs) proposed 2009 budget, including two new robotic missions designed to accomplish key scientific objectives and, when possible, provide results useful to the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Space Operations Mission Directorate (SOMD) as those organizations grapple with the challenges of returning humans to the Moon. The first mission in this line will be the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, an ESMD mission that will acquire key information for human return to the moon activities, which will transition after one year of operations to the SMD Lunar Science Program for a 2-year nominal science mission. The second mission, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) will be launch in 2011 along with the GRAIL Discovery mission to the moon. The third is delivery of two landed payloads as part of the International Lunar Network (ILN). This flight projects line provides a robust robotic lunar science program for the next 8 years and beyond, complements SMD s initiatives to build a robust lunar science community through R&A lines, and increases international participation in NASA s robotic exploration plans. The International Lunar Network is envisioned as a global lunar geophysical network, which fulfills many of the stated recommendations of the recent National Research Council report on The Scientific Context for Exploration of the Moon [2], but is difficult for any single space agency to accomplish on its own. The ILN would provide the necessary global coverage by involving US and international landed missions as individual nodes working together. Ultimately, this network could comprise 8-10 or more nodes operating simultaneously, while minimizing the required contribution from each space agency. Indian, Russian, Japanese, and British landed missions are currently being formulated and SMD is actively seeking partnership with

  11. Why Network? Theoretical Perspectives on Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muijs, Daniel; West, Mel; Ainscow, Mel

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, networking and collaboration have become increasingly popular in education. However, there is at present a lack of attention to the theoretical basis of networking, which could illuminate when and when not to network and under what conditions networks are likely to be successful. In this paper, we will attempt to sketch the…

  12. Lupus pernio without systemic involvement

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Vora, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that can affect the pulmonary, reticulo-endothelial, skin, gastrointestinal, cardiac, musculo – skeletal, endocrine or central nervous system. Exclusive cutaneous involvement is very rare in sarcoidosis. Lupus pernio is a variant of cutaneous sarcoidosis presenting with erythematous to violaceous nodules and plaques located symmetrically over the nose, cheeks, ears and digits. We present a case of lupus pernio which showed rapid improvement with topical steroids and has yet not developed any systemic involvement even after 6 years of regular follow up. PMID:24350015

  13. Multisystem involvement in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Megan M.; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of pediatric neuromyelitis optica (NMO) with muscle and lung involvement in addition to central nervous system disease. Our patient initially presented with features of area postrema syndrome, then subsequently with optic neuritis. The patient also had recurrent hyperCKemia that responded to corticosteroids. Finally, axillary and hilar adenopathy with pulmonary consolidation were noted as well and responded to immunomodulation. Our case highlights multisystem involvement in NMO including non-infectious pulmonary findings which have not been described in the pediatric population previously. PMID:26538850

  14. Breaking down Complex Saproxylic Communities: Understanding Sub-Networks Structure and Implications to Network Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Javier; Marcos-García, Ma. Ángeles; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Rico-Gray, Víctor; Brustel, Hervé; Galante, Eduardo; Micó, Estefanía

    2012-01-01

    Saproxylic insect communities inhabiting tree hollow microhabitats correspond with large food webs which simultaneously are constituted by multiple types of plant-animal and animal-animal interactions, according to the use of trophic resources (wood- and insect-dependent sub-networks), or to trophic habits or interaction types (xylophagous, saprophagous, xylomycetophagous, predators and commensals). We quantitatively assessed which properties of specialised networks were present in a complex networks involving different interacting types such as saproxylic community, and how they can be organised in trophic food webs. The architecture, interacting patterns and food web composition were evaluated along sub-networks, analysing their implications to network robustness from random and directed extinction simulations. A structure of large and cohesive modules with weakly connected nodes was observed throughout saproxylic sub-networks, composing the main food webs constituting this community. Insect-dependent sub-networks were more modular than wood-dependent sub-networks. Wood-dependent sub-networks presented higher species degree, connectance, links, linkage density, interaction strength, and were less specialised and more aggregated than insect-dependent sub-networks. These attributes defined high network robustness in wood-dependent sub-networks. Finally, our results emphasise the relevance of modularity, differences among interacting types and interrelations among them in modelling the structure of saproxylic communities and in determining their stability. PMID:23028763

  15. Scalable Approaches to Control Network Dynamics: Prospects for City Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2014-07-01

    A city is a complex, emergent system and as such can be conveniently represented as a network of interacting components. A fundamental aspect of networks is that the systemic properties can depend as much on the interactions as they depend on the properties of the individual components themselves. Another fundamental aspect is that changes to one component can affect other components, in a process that may cause the entire or a substantial part of the system to change behavior. Over the past 2 decades, much research has been done on the modeling of large and complex networks involved in communication and transportation, disease propagation, and supply chains, as well as emergent phenomena, robustness and optimization in such systems...

  16. Predictors of Residence Hall Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arboleda, Ana; Wang, Yongyi; Shelley, Mack C., II; Whalen, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    Residence hall students' (N = 1,186, 52% male, 90% White, 66% freshmen) involvement in their living community is influenced significantly by precollege student characteristics (gender, ethnicity), classification, attitudes (toward hall director, house cabinet, academic comfort, social environment, group study), and environmental variables (noise,…

  17. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  18. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  19. Parent Involvement as Ritualized Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucet, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    This article examines parent involvement (PI) as a ritual system using Turner's concept of root paradigms. Through a twofold analysis, I argue that the highly ritualized nature of PI practices creates a group identity among mainstream parents and schools that marginalizes diverse families. First, I point out three root paradigms in the ritual…

  20. Managing Parent Involvement during Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Lynette S.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the Virginia Tech shooting tragedy, it is no surprise that concern for students' safety is the primary reason attributed to parents' increased involvement. Parents and university administrators share in their commitment to student safety. However, college and university staff who assume responsibility…