Science.gov

Sample records for networks suppresses selection

  1. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elvis H W; Wang, Wei; Xu, C; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P M

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1-p, respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ(p) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p. For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ(p) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p≤pR, and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for ppR. A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  2. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  3. Suppression of phase synchronisation in network based on cat's brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Iarosz, Kelly C.; Caldas, Iberê L.; Batista, Antonio M.; Viana, Ricardo L.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the effects of perturbations on the cat's cerebral cortex. According to the literature, this cortex structure can be described by a clustered network. This way, we construct a clustered network with the same number of areas as in the cat matrix, where each area is described as a sub-network with a small-world property. We focus on the suppression of neuronal phase synchronisation considering different kinds of perturbations. Among the various controlling interventions, we choose three methods: delayed feedback control, external time-periodic driving, and activation of selected neurons. We simulate these interventions to provide a procedure to suppress undesired and pathological abnormal rhythms that can be associated with many forms of synchronisation. In our simulations, we have verified that the efficiency of synchronisation suppression by delayed feedback control is higher than external time-periodic driving and activation of selected neurons of the cat's cerebral cortex with the same coupling strengths.

  4. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  5. Broadband network selection issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Michael E.

    1996-01-01

    Selecting the best network for a given cable or telephone company provider is not as obvious as it appears. The cost and performance trades between Hybrid Fiber Coax (HFC), Fiber to the Curb (FTTC) and Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line networks lead to very different choices based on the existing plant and the expected interactive subscriber usage model. This paper presents some of the issues and trades that drive network selection. The majority of the Interactive Television trials currently underway or planned are based on HFC networks. As a throw away market trial or a short term strategic incursion into a cable market, HFC may make sense. In the long run, if interactive services see high demand, HFC costs per node and an ever shrinking neighborhood node size to service large numbers of subscribers make FTTC appear attractive. For example, thirty-three 64-QAM modulators are required to fill the 550 MHz to 750 MHz spectrum with compressed video streams in 6 MHz channels. This large amount of hardware at each node drives not only initial build-out costs, but operations and maintenance costs as well. FTTC, with its potential for digitally switching large amounts of bandwidth to an given home, offers the potential to grow with the interactive subscriber base with less downstream cost. Integrated telephony on these networks is an issue that appears to be an afterthought for most of the networks being selected at the present time. The major players seem to be videocentric and include telephony as a simple add-on later. This may be a reasonable view point for the telephone companies that plan to leave their existing phone networks untouched. However, a phone company planning a network upgrade or a cable company jumping into the telephony business needs to carefully weigh the cost and performance issues of the various network choices. Each network type provides varying capability in both upstream and downstream bandwidth for voice channels. The noise characteristics

  6. Proactive selective response suppression is implemented via the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Majid, D S Adnan; Cai, Weidong; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Aron, Adam R

    2013-08-14

    In the welter of everyday life, people can stop particular response tendencies without affecting others. A key requirement for such selective suppression is that subjects know in advance which responses need stopping. We hypothesized that proactively setting up and implementing selective suppression relies on the basal ganglia and, specifically, regions consistent with the inhibitory indirect pathway for which there is scant functional evidence in humans. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show, first, that the degree of proactive motor suppression when preparing to stop selectively (indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation) corresponds to striatal, pallidal, and frontal activation (indexed by functional MRI). Second, we demonstrate that greater striatal activation at the time of selective stopping correlates with greater behavioral selectivity. Third, we show that people with striatal and pallidal volume reductions (those with premanifest Huntington's disease) have both absent proactive motor suppression and impaired behavioral selectivity when stopping. Thus, stopping goals are used to proactively set up specific basal ganglia channels that may then be triggered to implement selective suppression. By linking this suppression to the striatum and pallidum, these results provide compelling functional evidence in humans of the basal ganglia's inhibitory indirect pathway.

  7. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on “here and now” experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one’s own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed. PMID:26083379

  8. Discrimination networks for maximum selection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Brijnesh J; Wysotzki, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    We construct a novel discrimination network using differentiating units for maximum selection. In contrast to traditional competitive architectures like MAXNET the discrimination network does not only signal the winning unit, but also provides information about its evidence. In particular, we show that a discrimination network converges to a stable state within finite time and derive three characteristics: intensity normalization (P1), contrast enhancement (P2), and evidential response (P3). In order to improve the accuracy of the evidential response we incorporate distributed redundancy into the network. This leads to a system which is not only robust against failure of single units and noisy data, but also enables us to sharpen the focus on the problem given in terms of a more accurate evidential response. The proposed discrimination network can be regarded as a connectionist model for competitive learning by evidence.

  9. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre. PMID:22274056

  10. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre.

  11. Transient amplification limits noise suppression in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, John; Lindemann, Anika; McCoy, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Cell physiology is orchestrated, on a molecular level, through complex networks of biochemical reactions. The propagation of random fluctuations through these networks can significantly impact cell behavior, raising challenging questions about how network design shapes the cell's ability to suppress or exploit these fluctuations. Here, drawing on insights from statistical physics, fluid dynamics, and systems biology, we explore how transient amplification phenomena arising from network connectivity naturally limit a biochemical system's ability to suppress small fluctuations around steady-state behaviors. We find that even a simple system consisting of two variables linked by a single interaction is capable of amplifying small fluctuations orders of magnitude beyond the levels predicted by linear stability theory. We also find that adding additional interactions can promote further amplification, even when these interactions implement classic design strategies known to suppress fluctuations. These results establish that transient amplification is an essential factor determining baseline noise levels in stable intracellular networks. Significantly, our analysis is not bound to specific systems or interaction mechanisms: we find that noise amplification is an emergent phenomenon found near steady states in any network containing sufficiently strong interactions, regardless of its form or function.

  12. Stimulus-dependent suppression of chaos in recurrent neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, Kanaka; Abbott, L. F.; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2010-07-15

    Neuronal activity arises from an interaction between ongoing firing generated spontaneously by neural circuits and responses driven by external stimuli. Using mean-field analysis, we ask how a neural network that intrinsically generates chaotic patterns of activity can remain sensitive to extrinsic input. We find that inputs not only drive network responses, but they also actively suppress ongoing activity, ultimately leading to a phase transition in which chaos is completely eliminated. The critical input intensity at the phase transition is a nonmonotonic function of stimulus frequency, revealing a 'resonant' frequency at which the input is most effective at suppressing chaos even though the power spectrum of the spontaneous activity peaks at zero and falls exponentially. A prediction of our analysis is that the variance of neural responses should be most strongly suppressed at frequencies matching the range over which many sensory systems operate.

  13. Transient and selective suppression of neural activity with infrared light

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Austin R.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and control of neural circuitry requires the ability to selectively activate or inhibit neurons. Previous work showed that infrared laser light selectively excited neural activity in endogenous unmyelinated and myelinated axons. However, inhibition of neuronal firing with infrared light was only observed in limited cases, is not well understood and was not precisely controlled. Using an experimentally tractable unmyelinated preparation for detailed investigation and a myelinated preparation for validation, we report that it is possible to selectively and transiently inhibit electrically-initiated axonal activation, as well as to both block or enhance the propagation of action potentials of specific motor neurons. Thus, in addition to previously shown excitation, we demonstrate an optical method of suppressing components of the nervous system with functional spatiotemporal precision. We believe this technique is well-suited for non-invasive investigations of diverse excitable tissues and may ultimately be applied for treating neurological disorders. PMID:24009039

  14. Targeting prion-like protein doppel selectively suppresses tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Choi, Jeong Uk; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Controlled and site-specific regulation of growth factor signaling remains a major challenge for current antiangiogenic therapies, as these antiangiogenic agents target normal vasculature as well tumor vasculature. In this article, we identified the prion-like protein doppel as a potential therapeutic target for tumor angiogenesis. We investigated the interactions between doppel and VEGFR2 and evaluated whether blocking the doppel/VEGFR2 axis suppresses the process of angiogenesis. We discovered that tumor endothelial cells (TECs), but not normal ECs, express doppel; tumors from patients and mouse xenografts expressed doppel in their vasculatures. Induced doppel overexpression in ECs enhanced vascularization, whereas doppel constitutively colocalized and complexed with VEGFR2 in TECs. Doppel inhibition depleted VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, subsequently inducing the internalization and degradation of VEGFR2 and thereby attenuating VEGFR2 signaling. We also synthesized an orally active glycosaminoglycan (LHbisD4) that specifically binds with doppel. We determined that LHbisD4 concentrates over the tumor site and that genetic loss of doppel in TECs decreases LHbisD4 binding and targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, LHbisD4 eliminated VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, prevented VEGF binding in TECs, and suppressed tumor growth. Together, our results demonstrate that blocking doppel can control VEGF signaling in TECs and selectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26950422

  15. Targeting prion-like protein doppel selectively suppresses tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Chung, Seung Woo; Choi, Jeong Uk; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Kim, In-San; Byun, Youngro

    2016-04-01

    Controlled and site-specific regulation of growth factor signaling remains a major challenge for current antiangiogenic therapies, as these antiangiogenic agents target normal vasculature as well tumor vasculature. In this article, we identified the prion-like protein doppel as a potential therapeutic target for tumor angiogenesis. We investigated the interactions between doppel and VEGFR2 and evaluated whether blocking the doppel/VEGFR2 axis suppresses the process of angiogenesis. We discovered that tumor endothelial cells (TECs), but not normal ECs, express doppel; tumors from patients and mouse xenografts expressed doppel in their vasculatures. Induced doppel overexpression in ECs enhanced vascularization, whereas doppel constitutively colocalized and complexed with VEGFR2 in TECs. Doppel inhibition depleted VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, subsequently inducing the internalization and degradation of VEGFR2 and thereby attenuating VEGFR2 signaling. We also synthesized an orally active glycosaminoglycan (LHbisD4) that specifically binds with doppel. We determined that LHbisD4 concentrates over the tumor site and that genetic loss of doppel in TECs decreases LHbisD4 binding and targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, LHbisD4 eliminated VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, prevented VEGF binding in TECs, and suppressed tumor growth. Together, our results demonstrate that blocking doppel can control VEGF signaling in TECs and selectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26950422

  16. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-07-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate.

  17. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate. PMID:27380881

  18. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate. PMID:27380881

  19. Suppressing disease spreading by using information diffusion on multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Quan-Hui; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Braunstein, Lidia A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Although there is always an interplay between the dynamics of information diffusion and disease spreading, the empirical research on the systemic coevolution mechanisms connecting these two spreading dynamics is still lacking. Here we investigate the coevolution mechanisms and dynamics between information and disease spreading by utilizing real data and a proposed spreading model on multiplex network. Our empirical analysis finds asymmetrical interactions between the information and disease spreading dynamics. Our results obtained from both the theoretical framework and extensive stochastic numerical simulations suggest that an information outbreak can be triggered in a communication network by its own spreading dynamics or by a disease outbreak on a contact network, but that the disease threshold is not affected by information spreading. Our key finding is that there is an optimal information transmission rate that markedly suppresses the disease spreading. We find that the time evolution of the dynamics in the proposed model qualitatively agrees with the real-world spreading processes at the optimal information transmission rate.

  20. Selective suppression of endothelial cytokine production by progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Lauren M; Ton, Amy N; Org, Tõnis; Mikkola, Hanna K A; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Steroid hormones are well-recognized suppressors of the inflammatory response, however, their cell- and tissue-specific effects in the regulation of inflammation are far less understood, particularly for the sex-related steroids. To determine the contribution of progesterone in the endothelium, we have characterized and validated an in vitro culture system in which human umbilical vein endothelial cells constitutively express human progesterone receptor (PR). Using next generation RNA-sequencing, we identified a selective group of cytokines that are suppressed by progesterone both under physiological conditions and during pathological activation by lipopolysaccharide. In particular, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2/3, and CXCL1 were found to be direct targets of PR, as determined by ChIP-sequencing. Regulation of these cytokines by progesterone was also confirmed by bead-based multiplex cytokine assays and quantitative PCR. These findings provide a novel role for PR in the direct regulation of cytokine levels secreted by the endothelium. They also suggest that progesterone-PR signaling in the endothelium directly impacts leukocyte trafficking in PR-expressing tissues. PMID:23747964

  1. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-07-19

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  2. The Suppression of Selected Acoustic Noise Frequencies in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Xingxian

    Problems due to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) acoustic noise have long been an important concern, both in research and clinical applications. A study is made of certain dominant frequencies in the acoustic noise spectrum of the MRI system. Motivated by both spring and string ideas, we investigate whether the contributions to the sound from certain frequencies can be cancelled by the appropriate the gradient pulse sequence design. Ideas for cancelling these frequencies are investigated by carrying out theoretical string calculations. The MRI gradient assembly is modeled as a string and the gradient pulse sequences as a driving force for that string. Analytical results are obtained with different input gradient pulses including boxcars, trapezoids, and multiple trapezoids, along with special "quadratic" pulses. Pulse trains composed of repetitions of these pulse structures are studied. For comparison and to test these ideas, both simulations and experiments are carried out to verify our analytical results for the cancellations of selected frequency peaks. The idea that vibrations resulting from an impulsive force associated with a ramping up of a gradient pulse are shown to be cancelled immediately upon the application of another impulsive force coming from the subsequent appropriately timed ramping down of that pulse is verified both by simulations and experiments. A general approach to suppression of multiple-frequency contributions involving a series of gradient pulses with variable timings is given for the cancellations between pairs of impulse forces. The various examples investigated with string analytics and simulations and the associated MRI experiments are a physical embodiments of general time-invariant linear response theory. The present study also provides a foundation to explain results in previous papers on this subject. The method suggests that a variety of pulse profiles and timing combinations can be used to attenuate important contributions to

  3. Pattern Selection in Network of Coupled Multi-Scroll Attractors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scroll chaotic attractor makes the oscillator become more complex in dynamic behaviors. The collective behaviors of coupled oscillators with multi-scroll attractors are investigated in the regular network in two-dimensional array, which the local kinetics is described by an improved Chua circuit. A feasible scheme of negative feedback with diversity is imposed on the network to stabilize the spatial patterns. Firstly, the Chua circuit is improved by replacing the nonlinear term with Sine function to generate infinite aquariums so that multi-scroll chaotic attractors could be generated under appropriate parameters, which could be detected by calculating the Lyapunov exponent in the parameter region. Furthermore, negative feedback with different gains (D1, D2) is imposed on the local square center area A2 and outer area A1 of the network, it is found that spiral wave, target wave could be developed in the network under appropriate feedback gain with diversity and size of controlled area. Particularly, homogeneous state could be reached after synchronization by selecting appropriate feedback gain and controlled size in the network. Finally, the distribution for statistical factors of synchronization is calculated in the two-parameter space to understand the transition of pattern region. It is found that developed spiral waves, target waves often are associated with smaller factor of synchronization. These results show that emergence of sustained spiral wave and continuous target wave could be effective for further suppression of spatiotemporal chaos in network by generating stable pacemaker completely. PMID:27119986

  4. Pattern Selection in Network of Coupled Multi-Scroll Attractors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scroll chaotic attractor makes the oscillator become more complex in dynamic behaviors. The collective behaviors of coupled oscillators with multi-scroll attractors are investigated in the regular network in two-dimensional array, which the local kinetics is described by an improved Chua circuit. A feasible scheme of negative feedback with diversity is imposed on the network to stabilize the spatial patterns. Firstly, the Chua circuit is improved by replacing the nonlinear term with Sine function to generate infinite aquariums so that multi-scroll chaotic attractors could be generated under appropriate parameters, which could be detected by calculating the Lyapunov exponent in the parameter region. Furthermore, negative feedback with different gains (D1, D2) is imposed on the local square center area A2 and outer area A1 of the network, it is found that spiral wave, target wave could be developed in the network under appropriate feedback gain with diversity and size of controlled area. Particularly, homogeneous state could be reached after synchronization by selecting appropriate feedback gain and controlled size in the network. Finally, the distribution for statistical factors of synchronization is calculated in the two-parameter space to understand the transition of pattern region. It is found that developed spiral waves, target waves often are associated with smaller factor of synchronization. These results show that emergence of sustained spiral wave and continuous target wave could be effective for further suppression of spatiotemporal chaos in network by generating stable pacemaker completely.

  5. Pattern Selection in Network of Coupled Multi-Scroll Attractors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scroll chaotic attractor makes the oscillator become more complex in dynamic behaviors. The collective behaviors of coupled oscillators with multi-scroll attractors are investigated in the regular network in two-dimensional array, which the local kinetics is described by an improved Chua circuit. A feasible scheme of negative feedback with diversity is imposed on the network to stabilize the spatial patterns. Firstly, the Chua circuit is improved by replacing the nonlinear term with Sine function to generate infinite aquariums so that multi-scroll chaotic attractors could be generated under appropriate parameters, which could be detected by calculating the Lyapunov exponent in the parameter region. Furthermore, negative feedback with different gains (D1, D2) is imposed on the local square center area A2 and outer area A1 of the network, it is found that spiral wave, target wave could be developed in the network under appropriate feedback gain with diversity and size of controlled area. Particularly, homogeneous state could be reached after synchronization by selecting appropriate feedback gain and controlled size in the network. Finally, the distribution for statistical factors of synchronization is calculated in the two-parameter space to understand the transition of pattern region. It is found that developed spiral waves, target waves often are associated with smaller factor of synchronization. These results show that emergence of sustained spiral wave and continuous target wave could be effective for further suppression of spatiotemporal chaos in network by generating stable pacemaker completely. PMID:27119986

  6. Network Selection: A Method for Ranked Lists Selection

    PubMed Central

    Figini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding the set of rankings that best represents a given group of orderings on the same collection of elements (preference lists). This problem arises from social choice and voting theory, in which each voter gives a preference on a set of alternatives, and a system outputs a single preference order based on the observed voters’ preferences. In this paper, we observe that, if the given set of preference lists is not homogeneous, a unique true underling ranking might not exist. Moreover only the lists that share the highest amount of information should be aggregated, and thus multiple rankings might provide a more feasible solution to the problem. In this light, we propose Network Selection, an algorithm that, given a heterogeneous group of rankings, first discovers the different communities of homogeneous rankings and then combines only the rank orderings belonging to the same community into a single final ordering. Our novel approach is inspired by graph theory; indeed our set of lists can be loosely read as the nodes of a network. As a consequence, only the lists populating the same community in the network would then be aggregated. In order to highlight the strength of our proposal, we show an application both on simulated and on two real datasets, namely a financial and a biological dataset. Experimental results on simulated data show that Network Selection can significantly outperform existing related methods. The other way around, the empirical evidence achieved on real financial data reveals that Network Selection is also able to select the most relevant variables in data mining predictive models, providing a clear superiority in terms of predictive power of the models built. Furthermore, we show the potentiality of our proposal in the bioinformatics field, providing an application to a biological microarray dataset. PMID:22937075

  7. Topological pattern selection in recurrent networks.

    PubMed

    Bahraini, Alireza; Abbassian, Abdolhossein

    2012-07-01

    The impact of adding correlation to a population of neurons on the information and the activity of the population is one of the fundamental questions in recent system neuroscience. In this paper, we would like to introduce topology-based correlation at the level of storing patterns in a recurrent network. We then study the effects of topological patterns on the activity and memory capacity of the network. The general aim of the present work is to show how the repertoire of possible stored patterns is determined by the underlying network topology. Two topological probability rules for pattern selection in recurrent network are introduced. The first one selects patterns according to a Gibbs-type distribution. We start with a Hopfield-type dynamics on a ring model and then a Langevin model on a general random graph is treated. The phenomenon of phase transition in pattern selection motivated us to introduce an alternative topological rule for pattern selection. In a network of N neurons on a random d-regular graph, two asymptotic cases, d/N→0 and d/N→1, have been discussed for the new rule, and it is shown that capacity of the network grows considerably as d/N→1. By introducing the notions of asymptotic eigenvector, we will be able to study the behaviour of the discrete model in the limit d/N→0. It will be proved that for degree d less than a critical value there is a positive role for noise, in which case increasing the number of patterns will improve the storage capacity.

  8. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  9. Orientation Selectivity in Inhibition-Dominated Networks of Spiking Neurons: Effect of Single Neuron Properties and Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  10. Modality-specificity of Selective Attention Networks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Hannah J.; Amitay, Sygal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish the modality specificity and generality of selective attention networks. Method: Forty-eight young adults completed a battery of four auditory and visual selective attention tests based upon the Attention Network framework: the visual and auditory Attention Network Tests (vANT, aANT), the Test of Everyday Attention (TEA), and the Test of Attention in Listening (TAiL). These provided independent measures for auditory and visual alerting, orienting, and conflict resolution networks. The measures were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis to assess underlying attention constructs. Results: The analysis yielded a four-component solution. The first component comprised of a range of measures from the TEA and was labeled “general attention.” The third component was labeled “auditory attention,” as it only contained measures from the TAiL using pitch as the attended stimulus feature. The second and fourth components were labeled as “spatial orienting” and “spatial conflict,” respectively—they were comprised of orienting and conflict resolution measures from the vANT, aANT, and TAiL attend-location task—all tasks based upon spatial judgments (e.g., the direction of a target arrow or sound location). Conclusions: These results do not support our a-priori hypothesis that attention networks are either modality specific or supramodal. Auditory attention separated into selectively attending to spatial and non-spatial features, with the auditory spatial attention loading onto the same factor as visual spatial attention, suggesting spatial attention is supramodal. However, since our study did not include a non-spatial measure of visual attention, further research will be required to ascertain whether non-spatial attention is modality-specific. PMID:26635709

  11. Suppressing epidemics on networks by exploiting observer nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Hasegawa, Takehisa; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    To control infection spreading on networks, we investigate the effect of observer nodes that recognize infection in a neighboring node and make the rest of the neighbor nodes immune. We numerically show that random placement of observer nodes works better on networks with clustering than on locally treelike networks, implying that our model is promising for realistic social networks. The efficiency of several heuristic schemes for observer placement is also examined for synthetic and empirical networks. In parallel with numerical simulations of epidemic dynamics, we also show that the effect of observer placement can be assessed by the size of the largest connected component of networks remaining after removing observer nodes and links between their neighboring nodes.

  12. Suppressed Conductance From Spin Selection Rules in F-CNT-F Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Nikolaus; Morgan-Wall, Tyler; Markovic, Nina

    Conductance through a quantum dot can be suppressed due to spin selection rules governing the hoping of an additional electron onto an already-occupied quantum dot. Measurements of this effect in a carbon nanotube quantum dot with ferromagnetic contacts will be presented. Suppressed conductance peaks are observed in the Coulomb diamond plots at zero field and explained using spin selection rules. The pattern of suppressed peaks is observed to change with applied magnetic field as the spin ground state of the occupied quantum dot changes. This work was supported by NSF DMR-1106167.

  13. Genetic Suppression of Transgenic APP Rescues Hypersynchronous Network Activity in a Mouse Model of Alzeimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Born, Heather A.; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R.; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A.; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology. PMID:24623762

  14. Riboflavin-binding protein exhibits selective sweet suppression toward protein sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, Kenji; Matano, Mami; Kondo, Azusa; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Udaka, Shigezo

    2007-02-01

    Riboflavin-binding protein (RBP) is well known as a riboflavin carrier protein in chicken egg and serum. A novel function of RBP was found as a sweet-suppressing protein. RBP, purified from hen egg white, suppressed the sweetness of protein sweeteners such as thaumatin, monellin, and lysozyme, whereas it did not suppress the sweetness of low molecular weight sweeteners such as sucrose, glycine, D-phenylalanine, saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame, and stevioside. Therefore, the sweet-suppressing activity of RBP was apparently selective to protein sweeteners. The sweet suppression by RBP was independent of binding of riboflavin with its molecule. Yolk RBP, with minor structural differences compared with egg white RBP, also elicited a weaker sweet suppression. However, other commercially available proteins including ovalbumin, ovomucoid, beta-lactogloblin, myoglobin, and albumin did not substantially alter the sweetness of protein sweeteners. Because a prerinse with RBP reduced the subsequent sweetness of protein sweeteners, whereas the enzymatic activity of lysozyme and the elution profile of lysozyme on gel permeation chromatography were not affected by RBP, it is suggested that the sweet suppression is caused by an interaction of RBP with a sweet taste receptor rather than with the protein sweeteners themselves. The selectivity in the sweet suppression by RBP is consistent with the existence of multiple interaction sites within a single sweet taste receptor.

  15. Pseudomonas fluorescens strains selectively suppress annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) is a cool-season annual grass that is a major weed species in turf, turfgrass-seed production, sod production, and golf courses of the western United States. There are few selective herbicides available for the management of annual bluegrass. While the life cycles o...

  16. Frequency selectivity of the human cochlea: Suppression tuning of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A; van Dijk, Pim

    2016-06-01

    Frequency selectivity is a key functional property of the inner ear and since hearing research began, the frequency resolution of the human ear has been a central question. In contrast to animal studies, which permit invasive recording of neural activity, human studies must rely on indirect methods to determine hearing selectivity. Psychophysical studies, which used masking of a tone by other sounds, indicate a modest frequency selectivity in humans. By contrast, estimates using the phase delays of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAE) predict a remarkably high selectivity, unique among mammals. An alternative measure of cochlear frequency selectivity are suppression tuning curves of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). Several animal studies show that these measures are in excellent agreement with neural frequency selectivity. Here we contribute a large data set from normal-hearing young humans on suppression tuning curves (STC) of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). The frequency selectivities of human STC measured near threshold levels agree with the earlier, much lower, psychophysical estimates. They differ, however, from the typical patterns seen in animal auditory nerve data in that the selectivity is remarkably independent of frequency. In addition, SOAE are suppressed by higher-level tones in narrow frequency bands clearly above the main suppression frequencies. These narrow suppression bands suggest interactions between the suppressor tone and a cochlear standing wave corresponding to the SOAE frequency being suppressed. The data show that the relationship between pre-neural mechanical processing in the cochlea and neural coding at the hair-cell/auditory nerve synapse needs to be reconsidered. PMID:27139323

  17. Frequency selectivity of the human cochlea: Suppression tuning of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A; van Dijk, Pim

    2016-06-01

    Frequency selectivity is a key functional property of the inner ear and since hearing research began, the frequency resolution of the human ear has been a central question. In contrast to animal studies, which permit invasive recording of neural activity, human studies must rely on indirect methods to determine hearing selectivity. Psychophysical studies, which used masking of a tone by other sounds, indicate a modest frequency selectivity in humans. By contrast, estimates using the phase delays of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAE) predict a remarkably high selectivity, unique among mammals. An alternative measure of cochlear frequency selectivity are suppression tuning curves of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). Several animal studies show that these measures are in excellent agreement with neural frequency selectivity. Here we contribute a large data set from normal-hearing young humans on suppression tuning curves (STC) of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). The frequency selectivities of human STC measured near threshold levels agree with the earlier, much lower, psychophysical estimates. They differ, however, from the typical patterns seen in animal auditory nerve data in that the selectivity is remarkably independent of frequency. In addition, SOAE are suppressed by higher-level tones in narrow frequency bands clearly above the main suppression frequencies. These narrow suppression bands suggest interactions between the suppressor tone and a cochlear standing wave corresponding to the SOAE frequency being suppressed. The data show that the relationship between pre-neural mechanical processing in the cochlea and neural coding at the hair-cell/auditory nerve synapse needs to be reconsidered.

  18. Inclusive fitness effects can select for cancer suppression into old age

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joel S.; Aktipis, C. Athena

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection can favour health at youth or middle age (high reproductive value) over health at old age (low reproductive value). This means, all else being equal, selection for cancer suppression should dramatically drop after reproductive age. However, in species with significant parental investment, the capacity to enhance inclusive fitness may increase the reproductive value of older individuals or even those past reproductive age. Variation in parental investment levels could therefore contribute to variation in cancer susceptibility across species. In this article, we describe a simple model and framework for the evolution of cancer suppression with varying levels of parental investment and use this model to make testable predictions about variation in cancer suppression across species. This model can be extended to show that selection for cancer suppression is stronger in species with cooperative breeding systems and intergenerational transfers. We consider three cases that can select for cancer suppression into old age: (i) extended parental care that increases the survivorship of their offspring, (ii) grandparents contributing to higher fecundity of their children and (iii) cooperative breeding where helpers forgo reproduction or even survivorship to assist parents in having higher fecundity. PMID:26056358

  19. On the properties of artificial neural network filters for bone-suppressed digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eunpyeong; Park, Junbeom; Kim, Daecheon; Youn, Hanbean; Jeon, Hosang; Kim, Jin Sung; Kang, Dong-Joong; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy imaging can enhance lesion conspicuity. However, the conventional (fast kilovoltage switching) dual-shot dual-energy imaging is vulnerable to patient motion. The single-shot method requires a special design of detector system. Alternatively, single-shot bone-suppressed imaging is possible using post-image processing combined with a filter obtained from training an artificial neural network. In this study, the authors investigate the general properties of artificial neural network filters for bone-suppressed digital radiography. The filter properties are characterized in terms of various parameters such as the size of input vector, the number of hidden units, the learning rate, and so on. The preliminary result shows that the bone-suppressed image obtained from the filter, which is designed with 5,000 teaching images from a single radiograph, results in about 95% similarity with a commercial bone-enhanced image.

  20. Delayed resonator concept for vibration suppression using piezoelectric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Ayhan S.; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-11-01

    Delayed resonators (DR) are a class of active vibration absorbers, where resonance in the absorber is achieved through a delayed feedback control. Studies on DR theory so far, have focused on traditional mechanical absorber structures with proof masses. Both in linear and rotational vibration applications, a mechanical substructure is brought to resonance; which, in turn, absorbs vibration from the primary structure. This study is a departure from the existing literature in the sense that the mechanical absorber structure is replaced by an electrical circuit that resonates. The tuning is achieved by the use of piezoelectric elements, which introduce a coupling between the mechanical and electrical components in the system. The resonance and desired vibration absorption are still the objectives but with a distinct feature, ‘without a proof mass’. This work unites the two fronts of research from this interesting angle, namely DR theory and piezoelectric networks, to benefit from their individual strengths.

  1. Formal Mate Selection Networks in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedlicka, Davor

    1980-01-01

    Mate selection barriers beyond individuals' control are presented as reasons for development of formal mate selection networks. Network processes are described and classified according to the degree of third-party involvement and the degree to which anonymity of participants is protected. (Author)

  2. Effective Suppression of Pathological Synchronization in Cortical Networks by Highly Heterogeneous Distribution of Inhibitory Connections

    PubMed Central

    Kada, Hisashi; Teramae, Jun-Nosuke; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2016-01-01

    Even without external random input, cortical networks in vivo sustain asynchronous irregular firing with low firing rate. In addition to detailed balance between excitatory and inhibitory activities, recent theoretical studies have revealed that another feature commonly observed in cortical networks, i.e., long-tailed distribution of excitatory synapses implying coexistence of many weak and a few extremely strong excitatory synapses, plays an essential role in realizing the self-sustained activity in recurrent networks of biologically plausible spiking neurons. The previous studies, however, have not considered highly non-random features of the synaptic connectivity, namely, bidirectional connections between cortical neurons are more common than expected by chance and strengths of synapses are positively correlated between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. The positive correlation of synaptic connections may destabilize asynchronous activity of networks with the long-tailed synaptic distribution and induce pathological synchronized firing among neurons. It remains unclear how the cortical network avoids such pathological synchronization. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of the correlated connections indeed gives rise to synchronized firings in a cortical network model with the long-tailed distribution. By using a simplified feed-forward network model of spiking neurons, we clarify the underlying mechanism of the synchronization. We then show that the synchronization can be efficiently suppressed by highly heterogeneous distribution, typically a lognormal distribution, of inhibitory-to-excitatory connection strengths in a recurrent network model of cortical neurons. PMID:27803659

  3. Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Pao, K. F.; Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chu, K. R.

    2007-09-15

    Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) is investigated in theory and in experiment. The gyro-BWO interaction is much more efficient in a down-tapered interaction structure, while it is also more susceptible to the problem of axial mode competition in such a structure. Because higher order axial modes (at a higher oscillation frequency) penetrate deeper into the interaction structure, application of distributed wall loss at the downstream end of the interaction structure is shown to be effective for selective suppression of these modes with minor effects on the efficiency of the desired fundamental axial mode. A stable gyro-BWO operating in a single mode throughout the entire beam pulse is demonstrated on the basis of this principle. Theoretical and experimental results are found to be in good agreement.

  4. Neural network optimization, components, and design selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Scott W.

    1990-07-01

    Neural Networks are part of a revived technology which has received a lot of hype in recent years. As is apt to happen in any hyped technology, jargon and predictions make its assimilation and application difficult. Nevertheless, Neural Networks have found use in a number of areas, working on non-trivial and noncontrived problems. For example, one net has been trained to "read", translating English text into phoneme sequences. Other applications of Neural Networks include data base manipulation and the solving of muting and classification types of optimization problems. Neural Networks are constructed from neurons, which in electronics or software attempt to model but are not constrained by the real thing, i.e., neurons in our gray matter. Neurons are simple processing units connected to many other neurons over pathways which modify the incoming signals. A single synthetic neuron typically sums its weighted inputs, runs this sum through a non-linear function, and produces an output. In the brain, neurons are connected in a complex topology: in hardware/software the topology is typically much simpler, with neurons lying side by side, forming layers of neurons which connect to the layer of neurons which receive their outputs. This simplistic model is much easier to construct than the real thing, and yet can solve real problems. The information in a network, or its "memory", is completely contained in the weights on the connections from one neuron to another. Establishing these weights is called "training" the network. Some networks are trained by design -- once constructed no further learning takes place. Other types of networks require iterative training once wired up, but are not trainable once taught Still other types of networks can continue to learn after initial construction. The main benefit to using Neural Networks is their ability to work with conflicting or incomplete ("fuzzy") data sets. This ability and its usefulness will become evident in the following

  5. Amplification or suppression: Social networks and the climate change—migration association in rural Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Riosmena, Fernando; Hunter, Lori M.; Runfola, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing rates of climate migration may be of economic and national concern to sending and destination countries. It has been argued that social networks – the ties connecting an origin and destination – may operate as “migration corridors” with the potential to strongly facilitate climate change-related migration. This study investigates whether social networks at the household and community levels amplify or suppress the impact of climate change on international migration from rural Mexico. A novel set of 15 climate change indices was generated based on daily temperature and precipitation data for 214 weather stations across Mexico. Employing geostatistical interpolation techniques, the climate change values were linked to 68 rural municipalities for which sociodemographic data and detailed migration histories were available from the Mexican Migration Project. Multi-level discrete-time event-history models were used to investigate the effect of climate change on international migration between 1986 and 1999. At the household level, the effect of social networks was approximated by comparing the first to the last move, assuming that through the first move a household establishes internal social capital. At the community level, the impact of social capital was explored through interactions with a measure of the proportion of adults with migration experience. The results show that rather than amplifying, social capital may suppress the sensitivity of migration to climate triggers, suggesting that social networks could facilitate climate change adaptation in place. PMID:26692656

  6. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-12-01

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

  7. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-12-19

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

  8. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks. PMID:25524835

  9. Network selection, Information filtering and Scalable computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changqing

    This dissertation explores two application scenarios of sparsity pursuit method on large scale data sets. The first scenario is classification and regression in analyzing high dimensional structured data, where predictors corresponds to nodes of a given directed graph. This arises in, for instance, identification of disease genes for the Parkinson's diseases from a network of candidate genes. In such a situation, directed graph describes dependencies among the genes, where direction of edges represent certain causal effects. Key to high-dimensional structured classification and regression is how to utilize dependencies among predictors as specified by directions of the graph. In this dissertation, we develop a novel method that fully takes into account such dependencies formulated through certain nonlinear constraints. We apply the proposed method to two applications, feature selection in large margin binary classification and in linear regression. We implement the proposed method through difference convex programming for the cost function and constraints. Finally, theoretical and numerical analyses suggest that the proposed method achieves the desired objectives. An application to disease gene identification is presented. The second application scenario is personalized information filtering which extracts the information specifically relevant to a user, predicting his/her preference over a large number of items, based on the opinions of users who think alike or its content. This problem is cast into the framework of regression and classification, where we introduce novel partial latent models to integrate additional user-specific and content-specific predictors, for higher predictive accuracy. In particular, we factorize a user-over-item preference matrix into a product of two matrices, each representing a user's preference and an item preference by users. Then we propose a likelihood method to seek a sparsest latent factorization, from a class of over

  10. Incorporating spatial criteria in optimum reserve network selection.

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Hayri; Briers, Robert A

    2002-01-01

    Considering the spatial location of sites that are to be selected for inclusion in a protected reserve network may be necessary to facilitate dispersal and long-term persistence of species in the selected sites. This paper presents an integer programming (IP) approach to the reserve network selection problem where spatial considerations based on intersite distances are taken into account when selecting reserve sites. The objective is to reduce the fragmentation of preserved sites and design a compact reserve network. Two IP formulations are developed which minimize the sum of pairwise distances and the maximum intersite distance between all sites in the reserve network, respectively, while representing all species under consideration. This approach is applied to a pond invertebrate dataset consisting of 131 sites containing 256 species in Oxfordshire, UK. The results show that significant reductions in reserve fragmentation can be achieved, compared with spatially unrestricted optimum reserve selection, at the expense of a small loss in reserve efficiency. PMID:12495486

  11. Selective Memories: Infants' Encoding Is Enhanced in Selection via Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markant, Julie; Amso, Dima

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the hypothesis that inhibitory visual selection mechanisms play a vital role in memory by limiting distractor interference during item encoding. In Experiment 1a we used a modified spatial cueing task in which 9-month-old infants encoded multiple category exemplars in the contexts of an attention orienting mechanism…

  12. [Lateralized brain language semantic network demonstrated by word repetition suppression effect in MEG].

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, A Yu; Butorina, A V; Prokofyev, A O; Stroganova, T A

    2015-01-01

    We studied auditory word repetition suppression effect using magnetoencephalography while subjects listened to "new" and "old" words whose familiarity they had to judge upon presentation. The lateralization of brain magnetic activity during processing of "new" and "old" words were estimated by computing RMS measure of whole-brain magnetic response within time window of semantic N400 (350-450 ms). A magnetic N400 was significantly stronger in the left than in the right hemisphere for the "new" words only. Repetition of "new" words led to sharp decrease of N400 response RMS in the left hemisphere but did not change right-hemispheric N400 RMS. The asymmetry index of this repetition suppression effect was lateralized to the left hemisphere for the majority of the participants and its magnitude was related to memory task performance. The findings point to a strong left-hemispheric dominance of word repetition suppression effect within the brain semantic networks at the level of whole-network response.

  13. Impaired language function in generalized epilepsy: inadequate suppression of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Gauffin, Helena; van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Ulrici, Daniel; McAllister, Anita; Karlsson, Thomas; Engström, Maria

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to study the effect of a potential default mode network (DMN) dysfunction on language performance in epilepsy. Language dysfunction in focal epilepsy has previously been connected to brain damage in language-associated cortical areas. In this work, we studied generalized epilepsy (GE) without focal brain damage to see if the language function was impaired. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if the DMN was involved. Eleven persons with GE and 28 healthy controls were examined with fMRI during a sentence-reading task. We demonstrated impaired language function, reduced suppression of DMN, and, specifically, an inadequate suppression of activation in the left anterior temporal lobe and the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as an aberrant activation in the right hippocampal formation. Our results highlight the presence of language decline in people with epilepsy of not only focal but also generalized origin. PMID:23648277

  14. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks: Selection and Influence Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to enhance their status through befriending higher…

  15. Networks in Education: An Analysis of Selected Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Sofia Branco; Doroftei, Alexandra Oliveira; Araújo, Helena Costa

    2013-01-01

    "Network" is a fashionable and current term in every field of contemporary society and education is no exception. In this paper, the concept of network (and other associated concepts, such as partnership and collaboration) is reviewed. Such revision regards selected theoretical contributions and is explored in terms of the use of the…

  16. Directionally selective retinal ganglion cells suppress luminance responses during natural viewing

    PubMed Central

    Im, Maesoon; Fried, Shelley I.

    2016-01-01

    The ON-OFF directionally selective cells of the retina respond preferentially to movement in a preferred direction, but under laboratory conditions they are also sensitive to changes in the luminance of the stationary stimulus. If the response of these neurons contains information about both direction and luminance downstream neurons are faced with the challenge of extracting the motion component, a computation that may be difficult under certain viewing conditions. Here, we show that during natural viewing the response to luminance is suppressed, leaving a relatively pure motion signal that gets transmitted to the brain. PMID:27759086

  17. Dioxonaphthoimidazoliums are Potent and Selective Rogue Stem Cell Clearing Agents with SOX2-Suppressing Properties.

    PubMed

    Ho, Si-Han Sherman; Ali, Azhar; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lam, Kuen-Kuen Millie; Wang, Shu; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Chin, Tan-Min; Go, Mei-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are uniquely positioned for regenerative medicine, but their clinical potential can only be realized if their tumorigenic tendencies are decoupled from their pluripotent properties. Deploying small molecules to remove remnant undifferentiated pluripotent cells, which would otherwise transform into teratomas and teratomacarcinomas, offers several advantages over non-pharmacological methods. Dioxonapthoimidazolium YM155, a survivin suppressant, induced selective and potent cell death of undifferentiated stem cells. Herein, the structural requirements for stemotoxicity were investigated and found to be closely aligned with those essential for cytotoxicity in malignant cells. There was a critical reliance on the quinone and imidazolium moieties but a lesser dependence on ring substituents, which served mainly to fine-tune activity. Several potent analogues were identified which, like YM155, suppressed survivin and decreased SOX2 in stem cells. The decrease in SOX2 would cause an imbalance in pluripotent factors that could potentially prompt cells to differentiate and hence decrease the risk of aberrant teratoma formation. As phosphorylation of the NF-κB p50 subunit was also suppressed, the crosstalk between phospho-p50, SOX2, and survivin could implicate a causal role for NF-κB signaling in mediating the stem cell clearing properties of dioxonaphthoimidazoliums.

  18. Intercellular redistribution of cAMP underlies selective suppression of cancer cell growth by connexin26.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Anjana; Kalmykov, Edward A; Polusani, Srikanth R; Mathis, Sandra A; Zucker, Shoshanna N; Nicholson, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  19. The evolution of network topology by selective removal.

    PubMed

    Salathé, Marcel; May, Robert M; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2005-12-22

    The topology of large social, technical and biological networks such as the World Wide Web or protein interaction networks has caught considerable attention in the past few years (reviewed in Newman 2003), and analysis of the structure of such networks revealed that many of them can be classified as broad-tailed, scale-free-like networks, since their vertex connectivities follow approximately a power-law. Preferential attachment of new vertices to highly connected vertices is commonly seen as the main mechanism that can generate scale-free connectivity in growing networks (Watts 2004). Here, we propose a new model that can generate broad-tailed networks even in the absence of network growth, by not only adding vertices, but also selectively eliminating vertices with a probability that is inversely related to the sum of their first- and second order connectivity.

  20. The mechanism of selective molecular capture in carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Guan, Jun; Yang, Xudong; Zheng, Quanshui; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-28

    Recently, air pollution issues have drawn significant attention to the development of efficient air filters, and one of the most promising materials for this purpose is nanofibers. We explore here the mechanism of selective molecular capture of volatile organic compounds in carbon nanotube networks by performing atomistic simulations. The results are discussed with respect to the two key parameters that define the performance of nanofiltration, i.e. the capture efficiency and flow resistance, which demonstrate the advantages of carbon nanotube networks with high surface-to-volume ratio and atomistically smooth surfaces. We also reveal the important roles of interfacial adhesion and diffusion that govern selective gas transport through the network.

  1. Selection Shapes Transcriptional Logic and Regulatory Specialization in Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, Karl; Peterson, Carsten; Troein, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background Living organisms need to regulate their gene expression in response to environmental signals and internal cues. This is a computational task where genes act as logic gates that connect to form transcriptional networks, which are shaped at all scales by evolution. Large-scale mutations such as gene duplications and deletions add and remove network components, whereas smaller mutations alter the connections between them. Selection determines what mutations are accepted, but its importance for shaping the resulting networks has been debated. Methodology To investigate the effects of selection in the shaping of transcriptional networks, we derive transcriptional logic from a combinatorially powerful yet tractable model of the binding between DNA and transcription factors. By evolving the resulting networks based on their ability to function as either a simple decision system or a circadian clock, we obtain information on the regulation and logic rules encoded in functional transcriptional networks. Comparisons are made between networks evolved for different functions, as well as with structurally equivalent but non-functional (neutrally evolved) networks, and predictions are validated against the transcriptional network of E. coli. Principal Findings We find that the logic rules governing gene expression depend on the function performed by the network. Unlike the decision systems, the circadian clocks show strong cooperative binding and negative regulation, which achieves tight temporal control of gene expression. Furthermore, we find that transcription factors act preferentially as either activators or repressors, both when binding multiple sites for a single target gene and globally in the transcriptional networks. This separation into positive and negative regulators requires gene duplications, which highlights the interplay between mutation and selection in shaping the transcriptional networks. PMID:26927540

  2. Suppression of Experimental Arthritis and Associated Bone Loss by a Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Annica; Bernardi, Angelina I; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Stubelius, Alexandra; Grahnemo, Louise; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the systemic inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), decreased estradiol levels in postmenopausal RA patients further accelerate bone loss in these patients. The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), an estrogen combined with a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a new hormone replacement therapy option. The first approved TSEC, containing conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (BZA), reduces menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis with an improved safety profile compared with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that estrogens strongly inhibit experimental arthritis whereas BZA is mildly suppressive. In this study the antiarthritic potential of combined BZA and estradiol is explored for the first time. Female ovariectomized DBA/1 mice were subjected to collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental postmenopausal RA model, and treated with BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2), combined BZA and E2 (BZA/E2), or vehicle. BZA/E2 suppressed arthritis severity and frequency, synovitis, and joint destruction, equally efficient as E2 alone. Unwanted estrogenic proliferative effects on the endometrium were blocked by the addition of BZA, determined by collecting uterine weights. Bone mineral density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and all treatments protected collagen-induced arthritis mice from both trabecular and cortical bone loss. Moreover, BZA/E2, but not E2 alone, inhibited preosteoclast formation and reduced serum anticollagen type II antibodies. In conclusion, a TSEC, herein combined BZA/E2, suppresses experimental arthritis and prevents associated bone loss as efficiently as E2 alone but with minimal uterine effects, highlighting the need for clinical trials that evaluate the addition of a TSEC to conventional postmenopausal RA treatment. PMID:26745543

  3. Identification of a novel GPR81-selective agonist that suppresses lipolysis in mice without cutaneous flushing.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Taku; Davenport, Richard; Stafford, Stuart; Grosse, Johannes; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Cameron, Jennifer; Parton, Laura; Sykes, Andy; Mack, Stephen; Bousba, Sarah; Parmar, Alka; Harrison, David; Dickson, Louise; Leveridge, Mathew; Matsui, Junji; Barnes, Matt

    2014-03-15

    GPR81, which exhibits a high degree of homology with GPR109a, has been recently identified as a lactate receptor. Similar to GPR109a, the activation of GPR81 by lactate suppresses lipolysis, suggesting that GPR81 may be a potential drug target for treating dyslipidemia. In addition, the fact that GPR81 is expressed only in adipocytes, whereas GPR109a is expressed in various tissues and cells, including Langerhans cells, which are considered responsible for flushing, indicates that targeting GPR81 could lead to the development of antidyslipidemia agents with a reduced risk of this side effect. However, the pharmacological role of GPR81 remains largely unclear, mainly because of the lack of potent and selective surrogate GPR81 agonists suitable for in vivo studies. In the present study, we showed that lactate-induced suppression of lipolysis in explants of white adipose tissue (WAT) depends on the presence of GPR81. We also performed high-throughput screening (HTS) and identified four novel chemical clusters as GPR81 agonists. Chemical optimization of aminothiazole derivatives led to the discovery of a lead compound with improved potency. The compound inhibited lipolysis in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Finally, intraperitoneal administration of this compound suppressed lipolysis in mice at doses that did not cause cutaneous flushing. This is the first description of a 50nM GPR81 selective agonist with in vivo efficacy, without the side effect, i.e., flushing. These results suggest that GPR81 is an attractive drug target for treating dyslipidemia without the risk of flushing.

  4. Selective suppression of the incorrect response implementation in choice behavior assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tandonnet, Christophe; Garry, Michael I; Summers, Jeffery J

    2011-04-01

    Selecting the adequate alternative in choice situations may involve an inhibition process. Here we assessed response implementation during the reaction time of a between-hand choice task with single- or paired-pulse (3 or 15 ms interstimulus intervals [ISIs]) transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex. The amplitude of the single-pulse motor evoked potential (MEP) initially increased for both hands. At around 130 ms, the single-pulse MEP kept increasing for the responding hand and decreased for the nonresponding hand. The paired-pulse MEP revealed a similar pattern for both ISIs with no effect on short intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation measures. The results suggest that the incorrect response implementation was selectively suppressed before execution of the correct response, preventing errors in choice context. The results favor models assuming that decision making involves an inhibition process.

  5. Suppressant effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on rapid eye movement sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Tortella, F C; Echevarria, E; Pastel, R H; Cox, B; Blackburn, T P

    1989-04-24

    The effects of the novel, highly selective serotonin-2 (5-HT2) antagonists, ICI 169,369 and ICI 170,809, on 24 h EEG sleep-wake activity were studied in the rat. Both compounds caused a dose-related increase in the latency to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and significantly suppressed cumulative REMS time up to 12 h postinjection. In contrast, neither drug disrupted slow-wave sleep continuity in as much as the latency to non-REMS (NREMS) and cumulative NREMS time were unchanged. However, at the highest dose tested (20 mg/kg) ICI 170,809 did produce a significant increase in total NREMS time during the second half of the sleep-awake cycle. These results demonstrate effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on sleep in rats which appear to be specific for REMS behavior, suggesting that the priming influence of serotonin on REMS may involve 5-HT2 receptor subtypes. The relationship between the REMS suppressant actions of these compounds and their consideration as therapeutic agents in depression is discussed.

  6. Reduced default mode network suppression during a working memory task in remitted major depression

    PubMed Central

    Bartova, Lucie; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Diers, Kersten; Rabl, Ulrich; Scharinger, Christian; Popovic, Ana; Pail, Gerald; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland N.; Huemer, Julia; Mandorfer, Dominik; Windischberger, Christian; Sitte, Harald H.; Kasper, Siegfried; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Moser, Ewald; Brocke, Burkhard; Pezawas, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient default mode network (DMN) suppression was linked to increased rumination in symptomatic Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Since rumination is known to predict relapse and a more severe course of MDD, we hypothesized that similar DMN alterations might also exist during full remission of MDD (rMDD), a condition known to be associated with increased relapse rates specifically in patients with adolescent onset. Within a cross-sectional functional magnetic resonance imaging study activation and functional connectivity (FC) were investigated in 120 adults comprising 78 drug-free rMDD patients with adolescent- (n = 42) and adult-onset (n = 36) as well as 42 healthy controls (HC), while performing the n-back task. Compared to HC, rMDD patients showed diminished DMN deactivation with strongest differences in the anterior-medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC), which was further linked to increased rumination response style. On a brain systems level, rMDD patients showed an increased FC between the amPFC and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which constitutes a key region of the antagonistic working-memory network. Both whole-brain analyses revealed significant differences between adolescent-onset rMDD patients and HC, while adult-onset rMDD patients showed no significant effects. Results of this study demonstrate that reduced DMN suppression exists even after full recovery of depressive symptoms, which appears to be specifically pronounced in adolescent-onset MDD patients. Our results encourage the investigation of DMN suppression as a putative predictor of relapse in clinical trials, which might eventually lead to important implications for antidepressant maintenance treatment. PMID:25801734

  7. Selection for increased mass-independent maximal metabolic rate suppresses innate but not adaptive immune function

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Cynthia J.; Brown, Jessi L.; Wone, Bernard; Donovan, Edward R.; Hunter, Kenneth; Hayes, Jack P.

    2013-01-01

    Both appropriate metabolic rates and sufficient immune function are essential for survival. Consequently, eco-immunologists have hypothesized that animals may experience trade-offs between metabolic rates and immune function. Previous work has focused on how basal metabolic rate (BMR) may trade-off with immune function, but maximal metabolic rate (MMR), the upper limit to aerobic activity, might also trade-off with immune function. We used mice artificially selected for high mass-independent MMR to test for trade-offs with immune function. We assessed (i) innate immune function by quantifying cytokine production in response to injection with lipopolysaccharide and (ii) adaptive immune function by measuring antibody production in response to injection with keyhole limpet haemocyanin. Selection for high mass-independent MMR suppressed innate immune function, but not adaptive immune function. However, analyses at the individual level also indicate a negative correlation between MMR and adaptive immune function. By contrast BMR did not affect immune function. Evolutionarily, natural selection may favour increasing MMR to enhance aerobic performance and endurance, but the benefits of high MMR may be offset by impaired immune function. This result could be important in understanding the selective factors acting on the evolution of metabolic rates. PMID:23303541

  8. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Grant C; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-03-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: 'local scale' competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies.

  9. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Grant C.; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: ‘local scale’ competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies. PMID:23339246

  10. Bayesian Nonlinear Model Selection for Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yang; Stingo, Francesco C.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gene regulatory networks represent the regulatory relationships between genes and their products and are important for exploring and defining the underlying biological processes of cellular systems. We develop a novel framework to recover the structure of nonlinear gene regulatory networks using semiparametric spline-based directed acyclic graphical models. Our use of splines allows the model to have both flexibility in capturing nonlinear dependencies as well as control of overfitting via shrinkage, using mixed model representations of penalized splines. We propose a novel discrete mixture prior on the smoothing parameter of the splines that allows for simultaneous selection of both linear and nonlinear functional relationships as well as inducing sparsity in the edge selection. Using simulation studies, we demonstrate the superior performance of our methods in comparison with several existing approaches in terms of network reconstruction and functional selection. We apply our methods to a gene expression dataset in glioblastoma multiforme, which reveals several interesting and biologically relevant nonlinear relationships. PMID:25854759

  11. Social networks predict selective observation and information spread in ravens.

    PubMed

    Kulahci, Ipek G; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Bugnyar, Thomas; Hoppitt, William; Mikus, Nace; Schwab, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation and learning, we investigated transmission of information in two raven (Corvus corax) groups. First, we quantified social connections in each group by constructing networks on affiliative interactions, aggressive interactions and proximity. We then seeded novel information by training one group member on a novel task and allowing others to observe. In each group, an observation network based on who observed whose task-solving behaviour was strongly correlated with networks based on affiliative interactions and proximity. Ravens with high social centrality (strength, eigenvector, information centrality) in the affiliative interaction network were also central in the observation network, possibly as a result of solving the task sooner. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that the order that ravens first solved the task was best predicted by connections in the affiliative interaction network in a group of subadult ravens, and by social rank and kinship (which influenced affiliative interactions) in a group of juvenile ravens. Our results demonstrate that not all social connections are equally effective at predicting the patterns of selective observation and information transmission.

  12. Social networks predict selective observation and information spread in ravens.

    PubMed

    Kulahci, Ipek G; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Bugnyar, Thomas; Hoppitt, William; Mikus, Nace; Schwab, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation and learning, we investigated transmission of information in two raven (Corvus corax) groups. First, we quantified social connections in each group by constructing networks on affiliative interactions, aggressive interactions and proximity. We then seeded novel information by training one group member on a novel task and allowing others to observe. In each group, an observation network based on who observed whose task-solving behaviour was strongly correlated with networks based on affiliative interactions and proximity. Ravens with high social centrality (strength, eigenvector, information centrality) in the affiliative interaction network were also central in the observation network, possibly as a result of solving the task sooner. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that the order that ravens first solved the task was best predicted by connections in the affiliative interaction network in a group of subadult ravens, and by social rank and kinship (which influenced affiliative interactions) in a group of juvenile ravens. Our results demonstrate that not all social connections are equally effective at predicting the patterns of selective observation and information transmission. PMID:27493780

  13. Social networks predict selective observation and information spread in ravens

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.; Bugnyar, Thomas; Hoppitt, William; Mikus, Nace; Schwab, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Animals are predicted to selectively observe and learn from the conspecifics with whom they share social connections. Yet, hardly anything is known about the role of different connections in observation and learning. To address the relationships between social connections, observation and learning, we investigated transmission of information in two raven (Corvus corax) groups. First, we quantified social connections in each group by constructing networks on affiliative interactions, aggressive interactions and proximity. We then seeded novel information by training one group member on a novel task and allowing others to observe. In each group, an observation network based on who observed whose task-solving behaviour was strongly correlated with networks based on affiliative interactions and proximity. Ravens with high social centrality (strength, eigenvector, information centrality) in the affiliative interaction network were also central in the observation network, possibly as a result of solving the task sooner. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that the order that ravens first solved the task was best predicted by connections in the affiliative interaction network in a group of subadult ravens, and by social rank and kinship (which influenced affiliative interactions) in a group of juvenile ravens. Our results demonstrate that not all social connections are equally effective at predicting the patterns of selective observation and information transmission. PMID:27493780

  14. TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1-type cytokine production and inhibits the progression of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Y; Yamane, M; Sohda, T; Makino, H

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that TAK-603, a new anti-rheumatic drug, is more effective in animal models in which cellular immunity plays a central role. Here, we studied the effect of the drug on Th1 cytokines, which are dominantly produced in this type of immune reaction, in an in vitro system and an in vivo model. We established Th1- and Th2-dominant T-cell lines, and studied the effect of TAK-603 on their cytokine production. Th1 cell lines were BALB/c mouse allo-reactive T cells and C57BL mouse mite antigen-reactive T cells, and the Th2 cell line was BALB/c mouse ovalbumin-reactive T cells. TAK-603 suppressed the production of Th1 cytokines [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and not that of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5) in these cell lines. Furthermore, selective suppression of Th1 cytokine production was also observed in the T-cell clones obtained from the ovalbumin-reactive T-cell line. To investigate the effect on cytokine production in animal models of arthritis, we analysed the expression of cytokine messenger RNA using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In adjuvant arthritis rats, Th1-dominant cytokine production was observed both in the arthritic joint and the spleen, and the time-course paralleled the progression of arthritis. On the other hand, in type-II collagen-induced arthritis, in which TAK-603 has little effect, Th1-dominant cytokine production was not observed and Th2 cytokines were shown to be more important. The adjuvant arthritis rats treated with TAK-603 (6.25 mg/kg/day, per os) showed significantly lower cytokine mRNA expression both locally and systemically. These data suggest that TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1 cytokine production, which is consistent with its effect on cellular immunity in animal models. Images Figure 4 PMID:9370927

  15. Selecting public relations personnel of hospitals by analytic network process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sen-Kuei; Chang, Kuei-Lun

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of analytic network process (ANP) in the Taiwanese hospital public relations personnel selection process. Starting with interviewing 48 practitioners and executives in north Taiwan, we collected selection criteria. Then, we retained the 12 critical criteria that were mentioned above 40 times by theses respondents, including: interpersonal skill, experience, negotiation, language, ability to follow orders, cognitive ability, adaptation to environment, adaptation to company, emotion, loyalty, attitude, and Response. Finally, we discussed with the 20 executives to take these important criteria into three perspectives to structure the hierarchy for hospital public relations personnel selection. After discussing with practitioners and executives, we find that selecting criteria are interrelated. The ANP, which incorporates interdependence relationships, is a new approach for multi-criteria decision-making. Thus, we apply ANP to select the most optimal public relations personnel of hospitals. An empirical study of public relations personnel selection problems in Taiwan hospitals is conducted to illustrate how the selection procedure works.

  16. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  17. Open Peer Review by a Selected-Papers Network

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A selected-papers (SP) network is a network in which researchers who read, write, and review articles subscribe to each other based on common interests. Instead of reviewing a manuscript in secret for the Editor of a journal, each reviewer simply publishes his review (typically of a paper he wishes to recommend) to his SP network subscribers. Once the SP network reviewers complete their review decisions, the authors can invite any journal editor they want to consider these reviews and initial audience size, and make a publication decision. Since all impact assessment, reviews, and revisions are complete, this decision process should be short. I show how the SP network can provide a new way of measuring impact, catalyze the emergence of new subfields, and accelerate discovery in existing fields, by providing each reader a fine-grained filter for high-impact. I present a three phase plan for building a basic SP network, and making it an effective peer review platform that can be used by journals, conferences, users of repositories such as arXiv, and users of search engines such as PubMed. I show how the SP network can greatly improve review and dissemination of research articles in areas that are not well-supported by existing journals. Finally, I illustrate how the SP network concept can work well with existing publication services such as journals, conferences, arXiv, PubMed, and online citation management sites. PMID:22291635

  18. Modulation of behavioral networks by selective interneuronal inactivation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M J; Horvath, S; Ebert, P; Norris, J L; Seeley, E H; Brown, J; Gellert, L; Everheart, M; Garbett, K A; Grice, T W; Caprioli, R M; Mirnics, K

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic disturbances are hallmark features of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders and encompass multiple interneuronal cell types. Using bacterial artificial chromosome-driven, miRNA silencing technology we generated transgenic mouse lines that suppress glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) in either cholecystokinin (CCK)- or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons. In situ lipidomic and proteomic analyses on brain tissue sections revealed distinct, brain region-specific profiles in each transgenic line. Behavioral analyses revealed that suppression of GAD1 in CCK+ interneurons resulted in locomotor and olfactory sensory changes, whereas suppression in NPY+ interneurons affected anxiety-related behaviors and social interaction. Both transgenic mouse lines had altered sensitivity to amphetamine albeit in opposite directions. Together, these data argue that reduced GAD1 expression leads to altered molecular and behavioral profiles in a cell type-dependent manner, and that these subpopulations of interneurons are strong and opposing modulators of dopamine system function. Furthermore, our findings also support the hypothesis that neuronal networks are differentially controlled by diverse inhibitory subnetworks.

  19. Distributed Relay Selection for MIMO-SDM Cooperative Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Xuan Nam; Nguyen, Vinh Hanh; Bui, Thanh Tam; Dinh, The Cuong; Karasawa, Yoshio

    In this paper, we consider an amplify-and-forward cooperative wireless network in which network nodes use multiple input multiple output (MIMO) spatial division multiplexing (SDM) to communicate with one another. We examine the problem of distributed cooperative relay selection and signal combining at the destination. First, we propose three distributed relay selection algorithms based on the maximum channel gains, the maximum harmonic mean of the channel gains, and the minimum mean squared error (MSE) of the signal estimation. Second, we propose a minimum mean square error (MMSE) signal combining scheme which jointly serves as the optimal signal combiner and interference canceler. It is shown that the MSE selection together with the MMSE combining achieves the maximal diversity gain. We also show that in MIMO-SDM cooperative networks increasing the number of candidate nodes does not help to improve the BER performance as opposed to the cooperative networks where each node is equipped with only single antenna. A practical approach to implementation of the combiner based on the current wireless access network protocols will also be presented.

  20. Selective suppression of plasticity in amygdala inputs from temporal association cortex by the external capsule.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexei; Sukato, Daniel; Ito, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    GABAergic neurons in the external capsule (EC) provide feedforward inhibition in the lateral amygdala (LA), but how EC affects synaptic transmission and plasticity in inputs from specific cortical areas remains unknown; this is because axonal fibers from different cortical areas are intermingled in the amygdala and cannot be activated selectively using conventional electrical stimulation. Here, we achieved selective activation of fibers from the temporal association cortex (TeA) or the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) by using channelrhodopsin-2. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the TeA-LA pathway, which runs through EC, was enabled by cutting connections between EC and LA or by blocking GABA(A) receptor-mediated transmission. In contrast, LTP in the ACC-LA pathway, which bypasses EC, was GABA(A) receptor independent. The EC transection shifted balance between inhibitory and excitatory responses in the TeA-LA pathway toward excitation, but had no effect on the ACC-LA pathway. Thus, EC provides pathway-specific suppression of amygdala plasticity. PMID:21209220

  1. Selective electrochemical reactivity of rutile VO2 towards the suppression of metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Horrocks, Gregory; Kilcoyne, Colin; Marley, Peter M.; Stabile, Adam A.; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Zhang, Peihong; Sambandamurthy, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate through electrolyte gating measurements of a single nanobeam that the rultile phase of VO2 is electrochemically more reactive than the monoclinic phase. Our results show that the complete suppression of the metal-insulator transition and stabilization of the metallic phase is possible when gate voltage is applied in the rutile metallic phase. The results are discussed based on the formation of oxygen vacancies wherein accommodation of a high concentration of vacancies in the rutile phase selectively stabilizes it by disrupting dimerization of adjacent V-V pairs required for a transition to the monoclinic phase. The creation of oxygen vacancies is proposed to proceed through the oxidation of the electrolyte. Raman spectroscopy data suggest surface metallization upon electrolyte gating with an initial coexistence of insulating monoclinic and metallic domains. The selective electrochemical reactivity of the rutile phase and the resulting defect-induced stabilization of this phase across a vastly expanded temperature window suggest a facile defect engineering route to tune electronic phase transitions.

  2. Database Software Selection for the Egyptian National STI Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slamecka, Vladimir

    The evaluation and selection of information/data management system software for the Egyptian National Scientific and Technical (STI) Network are described. An overview of the state-of-the-art of database technology elaborates on the differences between information retrieval and database management systems (DBMS). The desirable characteristics of…

  3. Selecting a Local Area Network for an Academic Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Mohammed M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes the process used to select a local area network (LAN) for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Library and Information Science. The use of computers at the library school by staff, faculty, and students is described, technical aspects of a LAN are explained, and the future of LANs is discussed. (LRW)

  4. Selective randomized load balancing and mesh networks with changing demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, F. B.; Winzer, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    We consider the problem of building cost-effective networks that are robust to dynamic changes in demand patterns. We compare several architectures using demand-oblivious routing strategies. Traditional approaches include single-hop architectures based on a (static or dynamic) circuit-switched core infrastructure and multihop (packet-switched) architectures based on point-to-point circuits in the core. To address demand uncertainty, we seek minimum cost networks that can carry the class of hose demand matrices. Apart from shortest-path routing, Valiant's randomized load balancing (RLB), and virtual private network (VPN) tree routing, we propose a third, highly attractive approach: selective randomized load balancing (SRLB). This is a blend of dual-hop hub routing and randomized load balancing that combines the advantages of both architectures in terms of network cost, delay, and delay jitter. In particular, we give empirical analyses for the cost (in terms of transport and switching equipment) for the discussed architectures, based on three representative carrier networks. Of these three networks, SRLB maintains the resilience properties of RLB while achieving significant cost reduction over all other architectures, including RLB and multihop Internet protocol/multiprotocol label switching (IP/MPLS) networks using VPN-tree routing.

  5. Micro-mechanical wavelength-selectable switches for photonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Masato; Katagiri, Yoshitada

    2005-12-01

    Reconfigurable wideband photonic networks based on dense wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) are promising for versatile ubiquitous services. In such networks, wavelength-selectable optical switches will be needed for WDM-based routing, which is a primary function of the networks. A critical requirement is a wavelength selection time of 20 ms or less; otherwise, data packets will be lost. Various filters, including acousto-optic filters or Fabry-Perot etalon filters, are candidates for such switches, but all are inadequate because of high driving power or low accuracy in selecting wavelengths. We propose and demonstrate a wavelength-selectable switch that consists of micromechanically movable in/out filters. A series of thirty-two in/out elements with highly wavelength-managed dielectric filter units, which have flat-top spectral responses according to ITU-T grids, are densely packaged into a small space of 45 x24 x11 mm using miniaturized voice-coil motors (VCMs). By accurately arranging the filter elements along a collimating optical beam between fibers, we achieve small total insertion losses of less than 2.5 dB for all elements. By optimizing the VCM torque, we also achieve a wavelength-selection time of 10 ms (The minimum is 5 ms). We also achieve good wavelength reproducibility with an error of less than 0.1 nm, which was confirmed by a repetition test. These results show that the proposed switches are suitable for practical use.

  6. Suppression of cancer-initiating cells and selection of adipose-derived stem cells cultured on biomaterials having specific nanosegments.

    PubMed

    Kao, Ta-Chun; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Higuchi, Akon; Ling, Qing-Dong; Yu, Wan-Chun; Chou, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Pin-Yu; Suresh Kumar, S; Chang, Yu; Hung Chen, Yung; Chang, Yung; Chen, Da-Chung; Hsu, Shih-Tien

    2014-04-01

    Cancer-initiating cells [cancer stem cells (CSCs)] in colon cancer cells can be selectively suppressed when they are cultured on Pluronic (nanosegment)-grafted dishes, whereas CSCs are maintained on conventional tissue culture dishes and extracellular matrix-coated dishes. CSCs persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumorigenic clones. The purification or depletion (suppression) of CSCs should be useful for analyzing CSC characteristics and for clinical application. CSCs can be selectively suppressed from colon cancer cells containing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on Pluronic-grafted dishes, while ADSCs remain on the dishes. ADSCs on Pluronic-grafted dishes after the suppression of the CSCs can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and neuronal cells. The CSCs and ADSCs exhibited different characteristics. The selection of ADSCs was possible on Pluronic-grafted dishes that suppressed the CSCs from the fat tissues of cancer patients (i.e., cell-sorting dishes), which was explained by specific biomedical characteristics of Pluronic. PMID:24039170

  7. Hadoop neural network for parallel and distributed feature selection.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Victoria J; O'Keefe, Simon; Austin, Jim

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a theoretical basis for a Hadoop-based neural network for parallel and distributed feature selection in Big Data sets. It is underpinned by an associative memory (binary) neural network which is highly amenable to parallel and distributed processing and fits with the Hadoop paradigm. There are many feature selectors described in the literature which all have various strengths and weaknesses. We present the implementation details of five feature selection algorithms constructed using our artificial neural network framework embedded in Hadoop YARN. Hadoop allows parallel and distributed processing. Each feature selector can be divided into subtasks and the subtasks can then be processed in parallel. Multiple feature selectors can also be processed simultaneously (in parallel) allowing multiple feature selectors to be compared. We identify commonalities among the five features selectors. All can be processed in the framework using a single representation and the overall processing can also be greatly reduced by only processing the common aspects of the feature selectors once and propagating these aspects across all five feature selectors as necessary. This allows the best feature selector and the actual features to select to be identified for large and high dimensional data sets through exploiting the efficiency and flexibility of embedding the binary associative-memory neural network in Hadoop. PMID:26403824

  8. Hadoop neural network for parallel and distributed feature selection.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Victoria J; O'Keefe, Simon; Austin, Jim

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a theoretical basis for a Hadoop-based neural network for parallel and distributed feature selection in Big Data sets. It is underpinned by an associative memory (binary) neural network which is highly amenable to parallel and distributed processing and fits with the Hadoop paradigm. There are many feature selectors described in the literature which all have various strengths and weaknesses. We present the implementation details of five feature selection algorithms constructed using our artificial neural network framework embedded in Hadoop YARN. Hadoop allows parallel and distributed processing. Each feature selector can be divided into subtasks and the subtasks can then be processed in parallel. Multiple feature selectors can also be processed simultaneously (in parallel) allowing multiple feature selectors to be compared. We identify commonalities among the five features selectors. All can be processed in the framework using a single representation and the overall processing can also be greatly reduced by only processing the common aspects of the feature selectors once and propagating these aspects across all five feature selectors as necessary. This allows the best feature selector and the actual features to select to be identified for large and high dimensional data sets through exploiting the efficiency and flexibility of embedding the binary associative-memory neural network in Hadoop.

  9. Efficient server selection system for widely distributed multiserver networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-pyo; Park, Sung-sik; Lee, Kyoon-Ha

    2001-07-01

    In order to providing more improved quality of Internet service, the access speed to a subscriber's network and a server which is the Internet access device was rapidly enhanced by traffic distribution and installation of high-performance server. But the Internet access quality and the content for a speed were remained out of satisfaction. With such a hazard, an extended node at Internet access device has a limitation for coping with growing network traffic, and the root cause is located in the Middle-mile node between a CP (Content Provider) server and a user node. For such a problem, this paper proposes a new method to select a effective server to a client as minimizing the number of node between the server and the client while keeping the load balance among servers which is clustered by the client's location on the physically distributed multi-site environments. The proposed method use a NSP (Network Status Prober) and a contents server manager so as to get a status of each servers and distributed network, a new architecture will be shown for the server selecting algorithm and the implementation for the algorithm. And also, this paper shows the parameters selecting a best service providing server for client and that the grantor will be confirmed by the experiment over the proposed architectures.

  10. An exotic invasive plant selects for increased competitive tolerance, but not competitive suppression, in a native grass.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Rebecca A; Callaway, Ragan M; Atwater, Daniel Z

    2016-06-01

    Exotic invasive plants can exert strong selective pressure for increased competitive ability in native plants. There are two fundamental components of competitive ability: suppression and tolerance, and the current paradigm that these components have equal influences on a species' overall competitive ability has been recently questioned. If these components do not have equal influences on overall ability, then selection on competitive tolerance and suppression may be disproportionate. We used naturally invaded communities to study the effects of selection caused by an invasive forb, Centaurea stoebe, on a native grass, Pseudoroegneria spicata. P. spicata plants were harvested from within dense C. stoebe patches and from nearby uninvaded areas, divided clonally into replicates, then transplanted into a common garden where they grew alone or competed with C. stoebe. We found that P. spicata plants collected from within C. stoebe patches were significantly more tolerant of competition with C. stoebe than P. spicata plants collected from uninvaded areas, but plants from inside invaded patches were not superior at suppressing C. stoebe. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that strong competitors may select for tolerance to competition more than for the ability to suppress neighbors. This has important implications for how native plant communities may respond to invasion over time, and how invasive and native species may ultimately coexist. PMID:26897605

  11. Selective suppression of cytokine secretion in whole blood cell cultures of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, H.; Schindel, M.; Frikart, L.; Cerottini, J. P.; Yilmaz, A.; Givel, J. C.; Fischer, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-gamma, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-2 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in whole blood cell cultures (WBCCs) of colorectal cancer patients upon mitogen stimulation. Whereas the values for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha remained virtually unchanged in comparison with healthy control subjects, WBCCs of colorectal cancer patients secreted significantly lower amounts of IFN-alpha (P < 0.005), IFN-gamma (P < 0.0001), IL-1alpha (P < 0.0001) and IL-2 (P < 0.05). This reduction correlated with the progression of the disease. The total leucocyte and monocyte population were almost identical in both groups. In contrast, a dramatic depletion of lymphocytes was observed in colorectal cancer patients, which affected both lymphocyte counts (P < 0.0005) and their distribution (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest a selective suppression of cytokines in colorectal cancer patients that is related to tumour burden. Several mechanisms might account for this phenomenon, one of which might be lymphocyte depletion. PMID:9792144

  12. Selective suppression of harmful cyanobacteria in an entire lake with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Hans C P; Visser, Petra M; Reeze, Bart; Meeuse, Jeroen; Slot, Pieter C; Wijn, Geert; Talens, Renée; Huisman, Jef

    2012-04-01

    Although harmful cyanobacteria form a major threat to water quality, few methods exist for the rapid suppression of cyanobacterial blooms. Since laboratory studies indicated that cyanobacteria are more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than eukaryotic phytoplankton, we tested the application of H(2)O(2) in natural waters. First, we exposed water samples from a recreational lake dominated by the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii to dilute H(2)O(2). This reduced the photosynthetic vitality by more than 70% within a few hours. Next, we installed experimental enclosures in the lake, which revealed that H(2)O(2) selectively killed the cyanobacteria without major impacts on eukaryotic phytoplankton, zooplankton, or macrofauna. Based on these tests, we introduced 2 mg L(-1) (60 μM) of H(2)O(2) homogeneously into the entire water volume of the lake with a special dispersal device, called the water harrow. The cyanobacterial population as well as the microcystin concentration collapsed by 99% within a few days. Eukaryotic phytoplankton (including green algae, cryptophytes, chrysophytes and diatoms), zooplankton and macrofauna remained largely unaffected. Following the treatment, cyanobacterial abundances remained low for 7 weeks. Based on these results, we propose the use of dilute H(2)O(2) for the selective elimination of harmful cyanobacteria from recreational lakes and drinking water reservoirs, especially when immediate action is urgent and/or cyanobacterial control by reduction of eutrophication is currently not feasible. A key advantage of this method is that the added H(2)O(2) degrades to water and oxygen within a few days, and thus leaves no long-term chemical traces in the environment.

  13. Selective suppression of harmful cyanobacteria in an entire lake with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Hans C P; Visser, Petra M; Reeze, Bart; Meeuse, Jeroen; Slot, Pieter C; Wijn, Geert; Talens, Renée; Huisman, Jef

    2012-04-01

    Although harmful cyanobacteria form a major threat to water quality, few methods exist for the rapid suppression of cyanobacterial blooms. Since laboratory studies indicated that cyanobacteria are more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than eukaryotic phytoplankton, we tested the application of H(2)O(2) in natural waters. First, we exposed water samples from a recreational lake dominated by the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii to dilute H(2)O(2). This reduced the photosynthetic vitality by more than 70% within a few hours. Next, we installed experimental enclosures in the lake, which revealed that H(2)O(2) selectively killed the cyanobacteria without major impacts on eukaryotic phytoplankton, zooplankton, or macrofauna. Based on these tests, we introduced 2 mg L(-1) (60 μM) of H(2)O(2) homogeneously into the entire water volume of the lake with a special dispersal device, called the water harrow. The cyanobacterial population as well as the microcystin concentration collapsed by 99% within a few days. Eukaryotic phytoplankton (including green algae, cryptophytes, chrysophytes and diatoms), zooplankton and macrofauna remained largely unaffected. Following the treatment, cyanobacterial abundances remained low for 7 weeks. Based on these results, we propose the use of dilute H(2)O(2) for the selective elimination of harmful cyanobacteria from recreational lakes and drinking water reservoirs, especially when immediate action is urgent and/or cyanobacterial control by reduction of eutrophication is currently not feasible. A key advantage of this method is that the added H(2)O(2) degrades to water and oxygen within a few days, and thus leaves no long-term chemical traces in the environment. PMID:22112924

  14. A Cytosolic Network Suppressing Mitochondria-Mediated Proteostatic Stress and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Chen, Xin Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles whose dysfunction leads to neuromuscular degeneration and ageing. The multi-functionality poses a great challenge for understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction causes specific pathologies. Among the leading mitochondrial mediators of cell death are energy depletion, free radical production, defect in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, the release of pro-apoptotic and non-cell-autonomous signaling molecules, and altered stress signaling 1–5. Here, we identified a novel pathway of mitochondria-mediated cell death. This pathway was named mitochondrial Precursor Over-accumulation Stress (mPOS), characterized by aberrant accumulation of mitochondrial precursors in the cytosol. mPOS can be triggered by clinically relevant mitochondrial damage which is not limited to the core machineries of protein import. We also identified a large network of genes that suppress mPOS, by modulating ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA decapping, transcript-specific translation, protein chaperoning and turnover. In response to mPOS, several ribosome-associated proteins were up-regulated including Gis2 and Nog2, which promote cap-independent translation and inhibit the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit respectively 6, 7. Gis2 and Nog2 up-regulation promotes cell survival, which may be part of a feedback loop that attenuates mPOS. Our data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes directly to cytosolic proteostatic stress, and provide an explanation for the enigmatic association between these two hallmarks of degenerative diseases and ageing. The results are relevant to understanding diseases (e.g., spinocerebellar ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myotonic dystrophy) that involve mutations within the anti-degenerative network. PMID:26192197

  15. Selection of genetically diverse Trichoderma spp. isolates for suppression of Phytophthora capsici on bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Daniel P; Maul, Jude E; McKenna, Laurie F; Emche, Sarah E; Meyer, Susan L F; Collins, Ronald T; Bowers, John H

    2010-10-01

    Environmentally compatible control measures are needed for suppression of Phytophthora capsici on pepper. Twenty-three isolates of Trichoderma were screened for suppression of a mixture of 4 genetically distinct isolates of this pathogen on bell pepper (Capsicum anuum) in greenhouse pot assays. Of these 23 isolates, GL12, GL13, and Th23 provided significant suppression of P. capsici in at least 2 assays. These isolates were then compared with Trichoderma virens isolates GL3 and GL21 for suppression of this disease in the presence and absence of the harpin-based natural product Messenger. Isolates GL3 and Th23 provided significant disease suppression (P ≤ 0.05) in 3 of 4 assays, while GL12, GL13, and GL21 provided significant suppression in 2 of 4 assays. There was no apparent benefit from the application of Messenger. Phylogenetic analysis of these 5 isolates (based on the ITS1 region of the nuclear rDNA cluster and tef1), and an additional 9 isolates that suppressed P. capsici in at least 1 assay, separated isolates into 2 clades, with 1 clade containing GL3, GL12, GL13, and GL21. There were also 2 more distantly related isolates, one of which was Th23. We report here the identification of genetically distinct Trichoderma isolates for potential use in disease management strategies employing isolate combinations directed at suppression of P. capsici on pepper.

  16. Targeting tumor-associated immune suppression with selective protein kinase A type I (PKAI) inhibitors may enhance cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Muzammal; Shah, Zahir; Abbas, Nasir; Javeed, Aqeel; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood; Zhang, Jiancun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress in last few years, the cancer immunotherapy has not yet improved disease-free because of the tumor-associated immune suppression being a major barrier. Novel trends to enhance cancer immunotherapy aims at harnessing the therapeutic manipulation of signaling pathways mediating the tumor-associated immune suppression, with the general aims of: (a) reversing the tumor immune suppression; (b) enhancing the innate and adaptive components of anti-tumor immunosurveillance, and (c) protecting immune cells from the suppressive effects of T regulatory cells (Tregs) and the tumor-derived immunoinhibitory mediators. A particular striking example in this context is the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A type I (PKAI) pathway. Oncogenic cAMP/PKAI signaling has long been implicated in the initiation and progression of several human cancers. Emerging data indicate that cAMP/PKAI signaling also contributes to tumor- and Tregs-derived suppression of innate and adaptive arms of anti-tumor immunosurveillance. Therapeutically, selective PKAI inhibitors have been developed which have shown promising anti-cancer activity in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Rp-8-Br-cAMPS is a selective PKAI antagonist that is widely used as a biochemical tool in signal transduction research. Collateral data indicate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS has shown immune-rescuing potential in terms of enhancing the innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity, as well as protecting adaptive T cells from the suppressive effects of Tregs. Therefore, this proposal specifically implicates that combining selective PKAI antagonists/inhibitors with cancer immunotherapy may have multifaceted benefits, such as rescuing the endogenous anti-tumor immunity, enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, and direct anti-cancer effects.

  17. Suppression of PKR Promotes Network Excitability and Enhanced Cognition by Interferon-γ-Mediated Disinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping Jun; Huang, Wei; Kalikulov, Djanenkhodja; Yoo, Jong W.; Placzek, Andon N.; Stoica, Loredana; Zhou, Hongyi; Bell, John C.; Friedlander, Michael J.; Krnjević, Krešimir; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) was originally identified as a sensor of virus infection, but its function in the brain remains unknown. Here, we report that the lack of PKR enhances learning and memory in several behavioral tasks while increasing network excitability. In addition, loss of PKR increases the late phase of long-lasting synaptic potentiation (L-LTP) in hippocampal slices. These effects are caused by an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-mediated selective reduction in GABAergic synaptic action. Together, our results reveal that PKR finely tunes the network activity that must be maintained while storing a given episode during learning. Because PKR activity is altered in several neurological disorders, this kinase presents a promising new target for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction. As a first step in this direction, we show that a selective PKR inhibitor replicates the Pkr−/− phenotype in WT mice, enhancing long-term memory storage and L-LTP. PMID:22153080

  18. Selecting public relations personnel of hospitals by analytic network process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sen-Kuei; Chang, Kuei-Lun

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of analytic network process (ANP) in the Taiwanese hospital public relations personnel selection process. Starting with interviewing 48 practitioners and executives in north Taiwan, we collected selection criteria. Then, we retained the 12 critical criteria that were mentioned above 40 times by theses respondents, including: interpersonal skill, experience, negotiation, language, ability to follow orders, cognitive ability, adaptation to environment, adaptation to company, emotion, loyalty, attitude, and Response. Finally, we discussed with the 20 executives to take these important criteria into three perspectives to structure the hierarchy for hospital public relations personnel selection. After discussing with practitioners and executives, we find that selecting criteria are interrelated. The ANP, which incorporates interdependence relationships, is a new approach for multi-criteria decision-making. Thus, we apply ANP to select the most optimal public relations personnel of hospitals. An empirical study of public relations personnel selection problems in Taiwan hospitals is conducted to illustrate how the selection procedure works. PMID:19197656

  19. It takes three: selection, influence, and de-selection processes of depression in adolescent friendship networks.

    PubMed

    Van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter; Kerr, Margaret; Branje, Susan J T; Stattin, Håkan; Meeus, Wim H J

    2010-07-01

    The authors of this study tested a selection-influence-de-selection model of depression. This model explains friendship influence processes (i.e., friends' depressive symptoms increase adolescents' depressive symptoms) while controlling for two processes: friendship selection (i.e., selection of friends with similar levels of depressive symptoms) and friendship de-selection (i.e., de-selection of friends with dissimilar levels of depressive symptoms). Further, this study is unique in that these processes were studied both inside and outside the school context. The authors used a social network approach to examine 5 annual measurements of data in a large (N =847) community-based network of adolescents and their friends (M = 14.3 years old at first measurement). Results supported the proposed model: adolescents tend to select friends with similar levels of depression, and friends may increase each other's depressive symptoms as relationships endure. These two processes were most salient outside the school context. At the same time, friendships seemed to be ended more frequently if adolescents' level of depressive symptoms was dissimilar to that of their friends.

  20. Distributed estimation for adaptive sensor selection in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Hassan Hamid, Matasm M.

    2014-05-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are usually deployed for monitoring systems with the distributed detection and estimation of sensors. Sensor selection in WSNs is considered for target tracking. A distributed estimation scenario is considered based on the extended information filter. A cost function using the geometrical dilution of precision measure is derived for active sensor selection. A consensus-based estimation method is proposed in this paper for heterogeneous WSNs with two types of sensors. The convergence properties of the proposed estimators are analyzed under time-varying inputs. Accordingly, a new adaptive sensor selection (ASS) algorithm is presented in which the number of active sensors is adaptively determined based on the absolute local innovations vector. Simulation results show that the tracking accuracy of the ASS is comparable to that of the other algorithms.

  1. Evolution and selection of river networks: Statics, dynamics, and complexity

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rigon, Riccardo; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Moving from the exact result that drainage network configurations minimizing total energy dissipation are stationary solutions of the general equation describing landscape evolution, we review the static properties and the dynamic origins of the scale-invariant structure of optimal river patterns. Optimal channel networks (OCNs) are feasible optimal configurations of a spanning network mimicking landscape evolution and network selection through imperfect searches for dynamically accessible states. OCNs are spanning loopless configurations, however, only under precise physical requirements that arise under the constraints imposed by river dynamics—every spanning tree is exactly a local minimum of total energy dissipation. It is remarkable that dynamically accessible configurations, the local optima, stabilize into diverse metastable forms that are nevertheless characterized by universal statistical features. Such universal features explain very well the statistics of, and the linkages among, the scaling features measured for fluvial landforms across a broad range of scales regardless of geology, exposed lithology, vegetation, or climate, and differ significantly from those of the ground state, known exactly. Results are provided on the emergence of criticality through adaptative evolution and on the yet-unexplored range of applications of the OCN concept. PMID:24550264

  2. Evolution and selection of river networks: statics, dynamics, and complexity.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rigon, Riccardo; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-02-18

    Moving from the exact result that drainage network configurations minimizing total energy dissipation are stationary solutions of the general equation describing landscape evolution, we review the static properties and the dynamic origins of the scale-invariant structure of optimal river patterns. Optimal channel networks (OCNs) are feasible optimal configurations of a spanning network mimicking landscape evolution and network selection through imperfect searches for dynamically accessible states. OCNs are spanning loopless configurations, however, only under precise physical requirements that arise under the constraints imposed by river dynamics--every spanning tree is exactly a local minimum of total energy dissipation. It is remarkable that dynamically accessible configurations, the local optima, stabilize into diverse metastable forms that are nevertheless characterized by universal statistical features. Such universal features explain very well the statistics of, and the linkages among, the scaling features measured for fluvial landforms across a broad range of scales regardless of geology, exposed lithology, vegetation, or climate, and differ significantly from those of the ground state, known exactly. Results are provided on the emergence of criticality through adaptative evolution and on the yet-unexplored range of applications of the OCN concept. PMID:24550264

  3. Long-range recruitment of Martinotti cells causes surround suppression and promotes saliency in an attractor network model

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Pradeep; Silberberg, Gilad; Lansner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of long-range connections for cortical information processing has been acknowledged for a long time, most studies focused on the long-range interactions between excitatory cortical neurons. Inhibitory interneurons play an important role in cortical computation and have thus far been studied mainly with respect to their local synaptic interactions within the cortical microcircuitry. A recent study showed that long-range excitatory connections onto Martinotti cells (MC) mediate surround suppression. Here we have extended our previously reported attractor network of pyramidal cells (PC) and MC by introducing long-range connections targeting MC. We have demonstrated how the network with Martinotti cell-mediated long-range inhibition gives rise to surround suppression and also promotes saliency of locations at which simple non-uniformities in the stimulus field are introduced. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the presynaptic dynamics of MC is only ancillary to its orientation tuning property in enabling the network with saliency detection. Lastly, we have also implemented a disinhibitory pathway mediated by another interneuron type (VIP interneurons), which inhibits MC and abolishes surround suppression. PMID:26528143

  4. Robust nonlinear variable selective control for networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Behrooz

    2016-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the networked control of a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. In this way, Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy modelling is used to extend the previously proposed variable selective control (VSC) methodology to nonlinear systems. This extension is based upon the decomposition of the nonlinear system to a set of fuzzy-blended locally linearised subsystems and further application of the VSC methodology to each subsystem. To increase the applicability of the T-S approach for uncertain nonlinear networked control systems, this study considers the asynchronous premise variables in the plant and the controller, and then introduces a robust stability analysis and control synthesis. The resulting optimal switching-fuzzy controller provides a minimum guaranteed cost on an H2 performance index. Simulation studies on three nonlinear benchmark problems demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. A general method for diagonal peak suppression in homonuclear correlated NMR spectra by spatially and frequency selective pulses☆

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Simon; Schrank, Evelyne; Zangger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Homonuclear two- and multidimensional NMR spectra are standard experiments for the structure determination of small to medium-sized molecules. In the large majority of homonuclear correlated spectra the diagonal contains the most intense peaks. Cross-peaks near the diagonal could overlap with huge tails of diagonal peaks and can therefore be easily overlooked. Here we present a general method for the suppression of peaks along the diagonal in homonuclear correlated spectra. It is based on a spatially selective excitation followed by the suppression of magnetization which has not changed the frequency during the mixing process. In addition to the auto correlation removal, these experiments are also less affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities due to the slice selective excitation, which on the other side leads to a reduced intensity compared to regular homonuclear correlated spectra. PMID:23665403

  6. A Predictive Based Regression Algorithm for Gene Network Selection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrier, Stéphane; Mili, Nabil; Molinari, Roberto; Orso, Samuel; Avella-Medina, Marco; Ma, Yanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Gene selection has become a common task in most gene expression studies. The objective of such research is often to identify the smallest possible set of genes that can still achieve good predictive performance. To do so, many of the recently proposed classification methods require some form of dimension-reduction of the problem which finally provide a single model as an output and, in most cases, rely on the likelihood function in order to achieve variable selection. We propose a new prediction-based objective function that can be tailored to the requirements of practitioners and can be used to assess and interpret a given problem. Based on cross-validation techniques and the idea of importance sampling, our proposal scans low-dimensional models under the assumption of sparsity and, for each of them, estimates their objective function to assess their predictive power in order to select. Two applications on cancer data sets and a simulation study show that the proposal compares favorably with competing alternatives such as, for example, Elastic Net and Support Vector Machine. Indeed, the proposed method not only selects smaller models for better, or at least comparable, classification errors but also provides a set of selected models instead of a single one, allowing to construct a network of possible models for a target prediction accuracy level. PMID:27379155

  7. A Predictive Based Regression Algorithm for Gene Network Selection.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, Stéphane; Mili, Nabil; Molinari, Roberto; Orso, Samuel; Avella-Medina, Marco; Ma, Yanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Gene selection has become a common task in most gene expression studies. The objective of such research is often to identify the smallest possible set of genes that can still achieve good predictive performance. To do so, many of the recently proposed classification methods require some form of dimension-reduction of the problem which finally provide a single model as an output and, in most cases, rely on the likelihood function in order to achieve variable selection. We propose a new prediction-based objective function that can be tailored to the requirements of practitioners and can be used to assess and interpret a given problem. Based on cross-validation techniques and the idea of importance sampling, our proposal scans low-dimensional models under the assumption of sparsity and, for each of them, estimates their objective function to assess their predictive power in order to select. Two applications on cancer data sets and a simulation study show that the proposal compares favorably with competing alternatives such as, for example, Elastic Net and Support Vector Machine. Indeed, the proposed method not only selects smaller models for better, or at least comparable, classification errors but also provides a set of selected models instead of a single one, allowing to construct a network of possible models for a target prediction accuracy level. PMID:27379155

  8. Network characteristics for server selection in online games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claypool, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Online gameplay is impacted by the network characteristics of players connected to the same server. Unfortunately, the network characteristics of online game servers are not well-understood, particularly for groups that wish to play together on the same server. As a step towards a remedy, this paper presents analysis of an extensive set of measurements of game servers on the Internet. Over the course of many months, actual Internet game servers were queried simultaneously by twenty-five emulated game clients, with both servers and clients spread out on the Internet. The data provides statistics on the uptime and populations of game servers over a month long period an an in-depth look at the suitability for game servers for multi-player server selection, concentrating on characteristics critical to playability--latency and fairness. Analysis finds most game servers have latencies suitable for third-person and omnipresent games, such as real-time strategy, sports and role-playing games, providing numerous server choices for game players. However, far fewer game servers have the low latencies required for first-person games, such as shooters or race games. In all cases, groups that wish to play together have a greatly reduced set of servers from which to choose because of inherent unfairness in server latencies and server selection is particularly limited as the group size increases. These results hold across different game types and even across different generations of games. The data should be useful for game developers and network researchers that seek to improve game server selection, whether for single or multiple players.

  9. Escherichia coli persister cells suppress translation by selectively disassembling and degrading their ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Junho; Rogers, Janet; Kearns, Mark; Leslie, Macall; Hartson, Steven D; Wilson, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are rare, phenotypically distinct cells that survive exposure to multiple antibiotics. Previous studies indicated that formation and maintenance of the persister phenotype are regulated by suppressing translation. To examine the mechanism of this translational suppression, we developed novel methodology to rapidly purify ribosome complexes from persister cells. We purified His-tagged ribosomes from Escherichia coli cells that over-expressed HipA protein, which induces persister formation, and were treated with ampicillin to remove antibiotic-sensitive cells. We profiled ribosome complexes and analyzed the ribosomal RNA and protein components from these persister cells. Our results show that (i) ribosomes in persisters exist largely as inactive ribosomal subunits, (ii) rRNAs and tRNAs are mostly degraded and (iii) a small fraction of the ribosomes remain mostly intact, except for reduced amounts of seven ribosomal proteins. Our findings explain the basis for translational suppression in persisters and suggest how persisters survive exposure to multiple antibiotics.

  10. The International Lunar Network: science goals and landing site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, M. A.; Crawford, I.; Iln Site Selection Working Group

    2010-12-01

    working groups were created with the purpose of defining a set of core scientific instruments, communications standards, and site selection criteria. The core instruments working group identified four instruments to be included on any future ILN node: a seismometer, heat flow probe, electromagnetic sounder, and laser retroreflector. The focus of this site selection working group is to identify classes of sites and network geometries that would best address lunar science goals. Though our work is preliminary, we have identified two science goals that place stringent constraints on the selection of the initial landing sites. One goal is to elucidate the asymmetric thermal evolution of the Moon, and three sites that are necessary for the heat flow experiment include the Procellarum KREEP terrain, the Feldspathic highlands terrane, and a region where the crust is thin or absent. A second goal is to determine the size of the lunar core, and the key seismic site selection criteria include the identification of reflected and refracted core phases. This paper will represent an update of the site selection working group activities, and our work to optimize a lunar network for all core scientific instruments.

  11. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging with highly effective outer volume suppression using combined presaturation and spatially selective echo dephasing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Archie; Alger, Jeffry R; Moore, Gregory J; Posse, Stefan

    2003-05-01

    A highly effective outer volume suppression (OVS) technique, termed spatially selective echo dephasing (SSED), which employs gradient dephasing of spatially selective spin echoes, is introduced. SSED, which is relatively insensitive to T(1) dispersion among lipid signals and B(1) inhomogeneity, was integrated with very high spatial resolution 2D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) to assess residual lipid bleeding into cortical regions in the human brain. The method was optimized to minimize signal refocusing of secondary spin-echoes in areas of overlapping suppression slices. A comparison of spatial presaturation with single or double SSED, and with combined presaturation and SSED shows that the latter method has superior performance with spatially uniform lipid suppression factors in excess of 70. Metabolite mapping (choline, creatine, and NAA) with a 64 x 64 spatial matrix and 0.3 cm(3) voxels in close proximity to peripheral lipid regions was demonstrated at 1.5 T with a scan time of 32 min using the standard head coil.

  12. Selective suppression of adipose tissue apoE expression impacts systemic metabolic phenotype and adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi H; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Maeda, Nobuyo; Mazzone, Theodore

    2015-02-01

    apoE is a multi-functional protein expressed in several cell types and in several organs. It is highly expressed in adipose tissue, where it is important for modulating adipocyte lipid flux and gene expression in isolated adipocytes. In order to investigate a potential systemic role for apoE that is produced in adipose tissue, mice were generated with selective suppression of adipose tissue apoE expression and normal circulating apoE levels. These mice had less adipose tissue with smaller adipocytes containing fewer lipids, but no change in adipocyte number compared with control mice. Adipocyte TG synthesis in the presence of apoE-containing VLDL was markedly impaired. Adipocyte caveolin and leptin gene expression were reduced, but adiponectin, PGC-1, and CPT-1 gene expression were increased. Mice with selective suppression of adipose tissue apoE had lower fasting lipid, insulin, and glucose levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were consistent with increased insulin sensitivity. Lipid storage in muscle, heart, and liver was significantly reduced. Adipose tissue macrophage inflammatory activation was markedly diminished with suppression of adipose tissue apoE expression. Our results establish a novel effect of adipose tissue apoE expression, distinct from circulating apoE, on systemic substrate metabolism and adipose tissue inflammatory state.

  13. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging with highly effective outer volume suppression using combined presaturation and spatially selective echo dephasing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Archie; Alger, Jeffry R; Moore, Gregory J; Posse, Stefan

    2003-05-01

    A highly effective outer volume suppression (OVS) technique, termed spatially selective echo dephasing (SSED), which employs gradient dephasing of spatially selective spin echoes, is introduced. SSED, which is relatively insensitive to T(1) dispersion among lipid signals and B(1) inhomogeneity, was integrated with very high spatial resolution 2D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) to assess residual lipid bleeding into cortical regions in the human brain. The method was optimized to minimize signal refocusing of secondary spin-echoes in areas of overlapping suppression slices. A comparison of spatial presaturation with single or double SSED, and with combined presaturation and SSED shows that the latter method has superior performance with spatially uniform lipid suppression factors in excess of 70. Metabolite mapping (choline, creatine, and NAA) with a 64 x 64 spatial matrix and 0.3 cm(3) voxels in close proximity to peripheral lipid regions was demonstrated at 1.5 T with a scan time of 32 min using the standard head coil. PMID:12704763

  14. Insect herbivores selectively suppress the HPL branch of the oxylipin pathway in host plants.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Pearse, Ian S; Ignatia, Laura; Karban, Richard; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2013-02-01

    Insect herbivores have developed a myriad of strategies to manipulate the defense responses of their host plants. Here we provide evidence that chewing insects differentially alter the oxylipin profiles produced by the two main and competing branches of the plant defensive response pathway, the allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) branches, which are responsible for wound-inducible production of jasmonates (JAs), and green leafy volatiles (GLVs) respectively. Specifically, we used three Arabidopsis genotypes that were damaged by mechanical wounding or by insects of various feeding guilds (piercing aphids, generalist chewing caterpillars and specialist chewing caterpillars). We established that emission of GLVs is stimulated by wounding incurred mechanically or by aphids, but release of these volatiles is constitutively impaired by both generalist and specialist chewing insects. Simultaneously, however, these chewing herbivores stimulated JA production, demonstrating targeted insect suppression of the HPL branch of the oxylipin pathway. Use of lines engineered to express HPL constitutively, in conjunction with quantitative RT-PCR-based expression analyses, established a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional reprogramming of the HPL pathway genes as the mechanistic basis of insect-mediated suppression of the corresponding metabolites. Feeding studies suggested a potential evolutionary advantage of suppressing GLV production, as caterpillars preferably consumed leaf tissue from plants that had not been primed by these volatile cues.

  15. Brain networks supporting perceptual grouping and contour selection.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The human visual system groups local elements into global objects seemingly without effort. Using a contour integration task and EEG source level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that perceptual grouping requires a top-down selection, rather than a passive pooling, of neural information that codes local elements in the visual image. The participants were presented visual displays with or without a hidden contour. Two tasks were performed: a central luminance-change detection task and a peripheral contour detection task. Only in the contour-detection task could we find differential brain activity between contour and non-contour conditions, within a distributed brain network including parietal, lateral occipital and primary visual areas. Contour processing was associated with an inflow of information from lateral occipital into primary visual regions, as revealed from the slope of phase differences between source level oscillations within these areas. The findings suggest that contour integration results from a selection of neural information from lower visual areas, and that this selection is driven by the lateral occipital cortex.

  16. Optimal experiment design for model selection in biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mathematical modeling is often used to formalize hypotheses on how a biochemical network operates by discriminating between competing models. Bayesian model selection offers a way to determine the amount of evidence that data provides to support one model over the other while favoring simple models. In practice, the amount of experimental data is often insufficient to make a clear distinction between competing models. Often one would like to perform a new experiment which would discriminate between competing hypotheses. Results We developed a novel method to perform Optimal Experiment Design to predict which experiments would most effectively allow model selection. A Bayesian approach is applied to infer model parameter distributions. These distributions are sampled and used to simulate from multivariate predictive densities. The method is based on a k-Nearest Neighbor estimate of the Jensen Shannon divergence between the multivariate predictive densities of competing models. Conclusions We show that the method successfully uses predictive differences to enable model selection by applying it to several test cases. Because the design criterion is based on predictive distributions, which can be computed for a wide range of model quantities, the approach is very flexible. The method reveals specific combinations of experiments which improve discriminability even in cases where data is scarce. The proposed approach can be used in conjunction with existing Bayesian methodologies where (approximate) posteriors have been determined, making use of relations that exist within the inferred posteriors. PMID:24555498

  17. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions.

  18. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions. PMID:26378793

  19. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions. PMID:26378793

  20. Narrow-band injection seeding of a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser: Selection and suppression of longitudinal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, Hanond Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan; Pal, Shovon; Mohandas, Reshma A.; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2014-09-15

    A periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal with multiple poling periods is used to generate tunable narrow-bandwidth THz pulses for injection seeding a quantum cascade laser (QCL). We demonstrate that longitudinal modes of the quantum cascade laser close to the gain maximum can be selected or suppressed according to the seed spectrum. The QCL emission spectra obtained by electro-optic sampling from the quantum cascade laser, in the most favorable case, shows high selectivity and amplification of the longitudinal modes that overlap the frequency of the narrow-band seed. Proper selection of the narrow-band THz seed from the PPLN crystal discretely tunes the longitudinal mode emission of the quantum cascade laser. Moreover, the THz wave build-up within the laser cavity is studied as a function of the round-trip time. When the seed frequency is outside the maximum of the gain spectrum the laser emission shifts to the preferential longitudinal mode.

  1. Social selection and peer influence in an online social network.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends-except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes.

  2. Social selection and peer influence in an online social network

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends—except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes. PMID:22184242

  3. A genetic network that suppresses genome rearrangements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and contains defects in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher D.; Srivatsan, Anjana; Nene, Rahul V.; Martinez, Sandra L.; Clotfelter, Sarah P.; Bell, Sara N.; Somach, Steven B.; E.S. de Souza, Jorge; Fonseca, André F.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) play an important role in human diseases, including cancer. The identity of all Genome Instability Suppressing (GIS) genes is not currently known. Here multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCR assays and query mutations were crossed into arrays of mutants to identify progeny with increased GCR rates. One hundred eighty two GIS genes were identified that suppressed GCR formation. Another 438 cooperatively acting GIS genes were identified that were not GIS genes, but suppressed the increased genome instability caused by individual query mutations. Analysis of TCGA data using the human genes predicted to act in GIS pathways revealed that a minimum of 93% of ovarian and 66% of colorectal cancer cases had defects affecting one or more predicted GIS gene. These defects included loss-of-function mutations, copy-number changes associated with reduced expression, and silencing. In contrast, acute myeloid leukaemia cases did not appear to have defects affecting the predicted GIS genes. PMID:27071721

  4. A genetic network that suppresses genome rearrangements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and contains defects in cancers.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Christopher D; Srivatsan, Anjana; Nene, Rahul V; Martinez, Sandra L; Clotfelter, Sarah P; Bell, Sara N; Somach, Steven B; de Souza, Jorge E S; Fonseca, André F; de Souza, Sandro J; Kolodner, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) play an important role in human diseases, including cancer. The identity of all Genome Instability Suppressing (GIS) genes is not currently known. Here multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCR assays and query mutations were crossed into arrays of mutants to identify progeny with increased GCR rates. One hundred eighty two GIS genes were identified that suppressed GCR formation. Another 438 cooperatively acting GIS genes were identified that were not GIS genes, but suppressed the increased genome instability caused by individual query mutations. Analysis of TCGA data using the human genes predicted to act in GIS pathways revealed that a minimum of 93% of ovarian and 66% of colorectal cancer cases had defects affecting one or more predicted GIS gene. These defects included loss-of-function mutations, copy-number changes associated with reduced expression, and silencing. In contrast, acute myeloid leukaemia cases did not appear to have defects affecting the predicted GIS genes. PMID:27071721

  5. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  6. Comparison of two channel selection criteria for noise suppression in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of current channel selection criteria used in cochlear implant (CI) devices (e.g., maximum selection criterion used in ACE) degrades significantly in the presence of noise. In noisy backgrounds, coding strategies that select the “right” channels for stimulation could potentially produce substantial improvements in intelligibility. In this study, the performance of two alternative channel selection criteria is assessed in terms of intelligibility and subjective quality with CI users in noise. The performance is compared against that of the maximum selection scheme employed in the ACE strategy (comparison is also made with the CIS strategy). Sentences were presented to seven CI users in speech weighted noise (−5, 0, and 5 dB SNR). Both channel selection criteria were implemented under ideal conditions where a priori knowledge of the target and masker was assumed. This was done to assess the full potential benefit of selecting the “right” channels for stimulation in noisy backgrounds. Substantial intelligibility improvement relative to the CI users' daily strategy (i.e., ACE or CIS) was achieved with the two different channel selection criteria under all noisy conditions considered. No significant difference in subjective quality of noisy speech processed by the two channel selection criteria was observed. PMID:23464031

  7. Age-related differences in enhancement and suppression of neural activity underlying selective attention in matched young and old adults.

    PubMed

    Haring, A E; Zhuravleva, T Y; Alperin, B R; Rentz, D M; Holcomb, P J; Daffner, K R

    2013-03-01

    Selective attention reflects the top-down control of sensory processing that is mediated by enhancement or inhibition of neural activity. ERPs were used to investigate age-related differences in neural activity in an experiment examining selective attention to color under Attend and Ignore conditions, as well as under a Neutral condition in which color was task-irrelevant. We sought to determine whether differences in neural activity between old and young adult subjects were due to differences in age rather than executive capacity. Old subjects were matched to two groups of young subjects on the basis of neuropsychological test performance: one using age-appropriate norms and the other using test scores not adjusted for age. We found that old and young subject groups did not differ in the overall modulation of selective attention between Attend and Ignore conditions, as indexed by the size of the anterior Selection Positivity. However, in contrast to either young adult group, old subjects did not exhibit reduced neural activity under the Ignore relative to Neutral condition, but showed enhanced activity under the Attend condition. The onset and peak of the Selection Positivity occurred later for old than young subjects. In summary, older adults execute selective attention less efficiently than matched younger subjects, with slowed processing and failed suppression under Ignore. Increased enhancement under Attend may serve as a compensatory mechanism.

  8. Centrally controlled self-healing wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network based on optical carrier suppression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jiao; Sun, Xiaohan

    2015-12-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a centrally controlled and self-healing wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network with colorless optical network units (ONUs) based on optical carrier suppression technique. By switching the affected data in the OCS signal sideband to an alternate protection path, only one optical switch is provisioned at the optical line terminal, which is controlled by a logic control circuit upon monitoring of power outage on the working path. The proposed scheme can reliably protect against both distribution and feeder fiber failures. Moreover, gain-saturated reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers are used as colorless transmitters in ONUs. The protection scheme feasibility and system performances are experimentally verified with 10 Gb/s downstream and 1.25 Gb/s upstream data in both working and protection modes. The protection switching time was measured to be around 1 ms.

  9. Anti-coreceptor therapy drives selective T cell egress by suppressing inflammation-dependent chemotactic cues

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron J.; Clark, Matthew; Gojanovich, Gregory; Manzoor, Fatima; Miller, Keith; Kline, Douglas E.; Morillon, Y. Maurice; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be a need for immunotherapies to treat type 1 diabetes in the clinic. We previously reported that nondepleting anti-CD4 and -CD8 Ab treatment effectively reverses diabetes in new-onset NOD mice. A key feature of the induction of remission is the egress of the majority of islet-resident T cells. How this occurs is undefined. Herein, the effects of coreceptor therapy on islet T cell retention were investigated. Bivalent Ab binding to CD4 and CD8 blocked TCR signaling and T cell cytokine production, while indirectly downregulating islet chemokine expression. These processes were required for T cell retention, as ectopic IFN-γ or CXCL10 inhibited Ab-mediated T cell purging. Importantly, treatment of humanized mice with nondepleting anti–human CD4 and CD8 Ab similarly reduced tissue-infiltrating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrate that Ab binding of CD4 and CD8 interrupts a feed-forward circuit by suppressing T cell–produced cytokines needed for expression of chemotactic cues, leading to rapid T cell egress from the islets. Coreceptor therapy therefore offers a robust approach to suppress T cell–mediated pathology by purging T cells in an inflammation-dependent manner. PMID:27777971

  10. Selective impact of CDK4/6 suppression on patient-derived models of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Borja, Nicholas A.; Franco, Jorge; Brody, Jonathan R.; Yeo, Charles J.; Mansour, John; Choti, Michael A.; McCue, Peter; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) harbors an exceedingly poor prognosis, and is generally considered a therapy-recalcitrant disease due to poor response to conventional chemotherapy coupled with non-actionable genetic drivers (e.g. KRAS mutations). However, PDA frequently loses p16ink4a, thereby leading to deregulation of CDK4/6. Surprisingly, in established cell models and xenografts, CDK4/6 inhibition has a modest effect on proliferation and resistance develops rapidly. To determine if such weak response was an intrinsic feature of PDA, we developed primary tumor explants that maintain the tumor environment and recapitulate feuture of primary PDA. The CDK4/6 inhibitor PD-0332991 was highly efficient at suppressing proliferation in 14 of the 15 explants. In the single resistant explant, we identified the rare loss of the RB tumor suppressor as the basis for resistance. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) were developed in parallel, and unlike the xenografts emerging from established cell lines, the PDXs maintained the histoarchitecture of the primary tumor. These PDXs were highly sensitive to CDK4/6 inhibition, yielding a complete suppression of PDA proliferation. Together, these data indicate that primary PDA is sensitive to CDK4/6 inhibition, that specific biomarkers can delineate intrinsic resistance, and that established cell line models may not represent an adequate means for evaluating therapeutic sensitivities. PMID:26158861

  11. Selective impact of CDK4/6 suppression on patient-derived models of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Borja, Nicholas A; Franco, Jorge; Brody, Jonathan R; Yeo, Charles J; Mansour, John; Choti, Michael A; McCue, Peter; Knudsen, Erik S

    2015-06-30

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) harbors an exceedingly poor prognosis, and is generally considered a therapy-recalcitrant disease due to poor response to conventional chemotherapy coupled with non-actionable genetic drivers (e.g. KRAS mutations). However, PDA frequently loses p16ink4a, thereby leading to deregulation of CDK4/6. Surprisingly, in established cell models and xenografts, CDK4/6 inhibition has a modest effect on proliferation and resistance develops rapidly. To determine if such weak response was an intrinsic feature of PDA, we developed primary tumor explants that maintain the tumor environment and recapitulate feuture of primary PDA. The CDK4/6 inhibitor PD-0332991 was highly efficient at suppressing proliferation in 14 of the 15 explants. In the single resistant explant, we identified the rare loss of the RB tumor suppressor as the basis for resistance. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) were developed in parallel, and unlike the xenografts emerging from established cell lines, the PDXs maintained the histoarchitecture of the primary tumor. These PDXs were highly sensitive to CDK4/6 inhibition, yielding a complete suppression of PDA proliferation. Together, these data indicate that primary PDA is sensitive to CDK4/6 inhibition, that specific biomarkers can delineate intrinsic resistance, and that established cell line models may not represent an adequate means for evaluating therapeutic sensitivities.

  12. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements.

  13. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  14. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy.

  15. Urinary bladder instability induced by selective suppression of the murine small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channel

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Gerald M; Pozo, Maria J; Zvara, Peter; Petkov, Georgi V; Bond, Chris T; Adelman, John P; Nelson, Mark T

    2003-01-01

    Small conductance, calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels have an important role in determining the excitability and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle. Here, the role of the SK isoform SK3 was examined by altering expression levels of the SK3 gene using a mouse model that conditionally overexpresses SK3 channels (SK3T/T). Prominent SK3 immunostaining was found in both the smooth muscle (detrusor) and urothelium layers of the urinary bladder. SK currents were elevated 2.4-fold in isolated myocytes from SK3T/T mice. Selective suppression of SK3 expression by dietary doxycycline (DOX) decreased SK current density in isolated myocytes, increased phasic contractions of isolated urinary bladder smooth muscle strips and exposed high affinity effects of the blocker apamin of the SK isoforms (SK1–3), suggesting an additional participation from SK2 channels. The role of SK3 channels in urinary bladder function was assessed using cystometry in conscious, freely moving mice. The urinary bladders of SK3T/T had significantly greater bladder capacity, and urine output exceeded the infused saline volume. Suppression of SK3 channel expression did not alter filling pressure, threshold pressure or bladder capacity, but micturition pressure was elevated compared to control mice. However, SK3 suppression did eliminate excess urine production and caused a marked increase in non-voiding contractions. The ability to examine bladder function in mice in which SK3 channel expression is selectively altered reveals that these channels have a significant role in the control of non-voiding contractions in vivo. Activation of these channels may be a therapeutic approach for management of non-voiding contractions, a condition which characterizes many types of urinary bladder dysfunctions including urinary incontinence. PMID:12813145

  16. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; and others

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys{sup 38} to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. - Highlights: • Current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. • Piperlongumine inhibits NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import via directly binding to p65. • Piperlongumine selectively inhibits proliferation of ABC-DLBCL cells. • This study provides a novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy.

  17. A Neuronal Network Model for Pitch Selectivity and Representation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengcheng; Rinzel, John

    2016-01-01

    Pitch is a perceptual correlate of periodicity. Sounds with distinct spectra can elicit the same pitch. Despite the importance of pitch perception, understanding the cellular mechanism of pitch perception is still a major challenge and a mechanistic model of pitch is lacking. A multi-stage neuronal network model is developed for pitch frequency estimation using biophysically-based, high-resolution coincidence detector neurons. The neuronal units respond only to highly coincident input among convergent auditory nerve fibers across frequency channels. Their selectivity for only very fast rising slopes of convergent input enables these slope-detectors to distinguish the most prominent coincidences in multi-peaked input time courses. Pitch can then be estimated from the first-order interspike intervals of the slope-detectors. The regular firing pattern of the slope-detector neurons are similar for sounds sharing the same pitch despite the distinct timbres. The decoded pitch strengths also correlate well with the salience of pitch perception as reported by human listeners. Therefore, our model can serve as a neural representation for pitch. Our model performs successfully in estimating the pitch of missing fundamental complexes and reproducing the pitch variation with respect to the frequency shift of inharmonic complexes. It also accounts for the phase sensitivity of pitch perception in the cases of Schroeder phase, alternating phase and random phase relationships. Moreover, our model can also be applied to stochastic sound stimuli, iterated-ripple-noise, and account for their multiple pitch perceptions. PMID:27378900

  18. A Neuronal Network Model for Pitch Selectivity and Representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengcheng; Rinzel, John

    2016-01-01

    Pitch is a perceptual correlate of periodicity. Sounds with distinct spectra can elicit the same pitch. Despite the importance of pitch perception, understanding the cellular mechanism of pitch perception is still a major challenge and a mechanistic model of pitch is lacking. A multi-stage neuronal network model is developed for pitch frequency estimation using biophysically-based, high-resolution coincidence detector neurons. The neuronal units respond only to highly coincident input among convergent auditory nerve fibers across frequency channels. Their selectivity for only very fast rising slopes of convergent input enables these slope-detectors to distinguish the most prominent coincidences in multi-peaked input time courses. Pitch can then be estimated from the first-order interspike intervals of the slope-detectors. The regular firing pattern of the slope-detector neurons are similar for sounds sharing the same pitch despite the distinct timbres. The decoded pitch strengths also correlate well with the salience of pitch perception as reported by human listeners. Therefore, our model can serve as a neural representation for pitch. Our model performs successfully in estimating the pitch of missing fundamental complexes and reproducing the pitch variation with respect to the frequency shift of inharmonic complexes. It also accounts for the phase sensitivity of pitch perception in the cases of Schroeder phase, alternating phase and random phase relationships. Moreover, our model can also be applied to stochastic sound stimuli, iterated-ripple-noise, and account for their multiple pitch perceptions. PMID:27378900

  19. Neural repetition suppression: evidence for perceptual expectation in object-selective regions

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhauser, Lisa; Bergmann, Jürgen; Crone, Julia; Kronbichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    It is an established finding that neuronal activity is decreased for repeated stimuli. Recent studies revealed that repetition suppression (RS) effects are altered by manipulating the probability with which stimuli are repeated. RS for faces is more pronounced when the probability of repetition is high than when it is low. This response pattern is interpreted with reference to the predictive coding (PC) account, which assumes that RS is influenced by top-down expectations. Recent findings challenge the generality of PC accounts of RS by showing repetition probability does not modulate RS for other visual stimuli than faces. However, a number of findings on visual processing are in line with PC. Thus, the influence of repetition probability on RS effects during object processing requires careful reinvestigations. In the present fMRI study, object pictures were presented in a high (75%) or low (25%) repetition probability context. We found increased RS in the high-probability context compared to the low-probability context in the left lateral occipital complex (LOC). The dorsal-caudal and the ventral-anterior subdivisions of the LOC revealed similar neuronal responses. These results indicate that repetition probability effects can be found for other visual objects than faces and provide evidence in favor of the PC account. PMID:24860461

  20. A scheme for noise suppression and spectral enhancement of speech to alleviate speech reception problems from loss of frequency selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyzenga, Johannes; Festen, Joost M.; Houtgast, Tammo

    2002-05-01

    Even after sufficient amplification, hearing-impaired listeners often experience problems in understanding speech under noisy conditions. This may be caused by suprathreshold deficits such as loss of compression and reduced frequency selectivity. In this project we investigate a scheme in which speech and noise are processed before presentation to try and alleviate intelligibility problems caused by reduced frequency selectivity. The scheme contains three strategies, one in which the peak-to-valley ratios of selected modulations in the speech spectrum are enlarged, a second in which the overall speech spectrum is modified, and a third in which noise is suppressed before the two enhancement steps. An overlap-and-add (OLA) algorithm is used in the implementation. The effect of the speech processing is evaluated by measuring speech-reception thresholds (SRT) for sentences in speech noise, estimating the signal-to-noise ratio at which listeners can correctly reproduce 50% of presented sentences. Hearing-impaired and normal-hearing listeners were used. To simulate the hearing impairment resulting from a loss of frequency selectivity, we spectrally smeared the stimuli presented to the normal-hearing listeners. We found that the preprocessing scheme achieved a modest improvement of nearly 2 dB in the SRT for normal-hearing listeners. Data for hearing-impaired listeners are presently being collected.

  1. P50 Suppression in Children with Selective Mutism: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Yael; Feinholz, Maya; Arie, Miri; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that children with selective mutism (SM) display significant aberrations in auditory efferent activity at the brainstem level that may underlie inefficient auditory processing during vocalization, and lead to speech avoidance. The objective of the present study was to explore auditory filtering processes at the cortical level in…

  2. Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

  3. On the selection of transmission range in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingsheng; Foh, Chuan Heng; Cai, Jianfei

    2012-01-01

    Transmission range plays an important role in the deployment of a practical underwater acoustic sensor network (UWSN), where sensor nodes equipping with only basic functions are deployed at random locations with no particular geometrical arrangements. The selection of the transmission range directly influences the energy efficiency and the network connectivity of such a random network. In this paper, we seek analytical modeling to investigate the tradeoff between the energy efficiency and the network connectivity through the selection of the transmission range. Our formulation offers a design guideline for energy-efficient packet transmission operation given a certain network connectivity requirement.

  4. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Motallebi, Sadegh Aliakbary, Sadegh Habibi, Jafar

    2013-12-15

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named “Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks,” outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  5. Social Capital for College: Network Composition and Access to Selective Institutions among Urban High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Lori Diane; Bregman, Allyson; Andrade, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between networks that provide high school students with "social capital for college" (SCFC) and their access to selective institutions. It also explores the link between racial disparities in access to selective colleges and the composition of students' SCFC networks. Findings indicate that while…

  6. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, "Chen Pi." Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4(H)/PDE4(L)) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation.

  7. Suppressed N2O formation during NH3 selective catalytic reduction using vanadium on zeolitic microporous TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Song, Inhak; Youn, Seunghee; Kim, Do Heui; Cho, Sung June

    2015-01-01

    Emission of N2O from mobile and off-road engine is now being currently regulated because of its high impact compared to that of CO2, thereby implying that N2O formation from the exhaust gas after-treatment system should be suppressed. Selective catalytic reduction using vanadium supported TiO2 catalyst in mobile and off-road engine has been considered to be major source for N2O emission in the system. Here we have demonstrated that vanadium catalyst supported on zeolitic microporous TiO2 obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of bulk TiO2 at 400 K in the presence of LiOH suppresses significantly the N2O emission compared to conventional VOx/TiO2 catalyst, while maintaining the excellent NOx reduction, which was ascribed to the location of VOx domain in the micropore of TiO2, resulting in the strong metal support interaction. The use of zeolitic microporous TiO2 provides a new way of preparing SCR catalyst with a high thermal stability and superior catalytic performance. It can be also extended further to the other catalytic system employing TiO2-based substrate. PMID:26235671

  8. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, "Chen Pi." Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4(H)/PDE4(L)) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation. PMID:22454667

  9. Suppressed N2O formation during NH3 selective catalytic reduction using vanadium on zeolitic microporous TiO2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Song, Inhak; Youn, Seunghee; Kim, Do Heui; Cho, Sung June

    2015-08-03

    Emission of N2O from mobile and off-road engine is now being currently regulated because of its high impact compared to that of CO2, thereby implying that N2O formation from the exhaust gas after-treatment system should be suppressed. Selective catalytic reduction using vanadium supported TiO2 catalyst in mobile and off-road engine has been considered to be major source for N2O emission in the system. Here we have demonstrated that vanadium catalyst supported on zeolitic microporous TiO2 obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of bulk TiO2 at 400 K in the presence of LiOH suppresses significantly the N2O emission compared to conventional VOx/TiO2 catalyst, while maintaining the excellent NOx reduction, which was ascribed to the location of VOx domain in the micropore of TiO2, resulting in the strong metal support interaction. The use of zeolitic microporous TiO2 provides a new way of preparing SCR catalyst with a high thermal stability and superior catalytic performance. It can be also extended further to the other catalytic system employing TiO2-based substrate.

  10. Suppressed N2O formation during NH3 selective catalytic reduction using vanadium on zeolitic microporous TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Song, Inhak; Youn, Seunghee; Kim, Do Heui; Cho, Sung June

    2015-08-01

    Emission of N2O from mobile and off-road engine is now being currently regulated because of its high impact compared to that of CO2, thereby implying that N2O formation from the exhaust gas after-treatment system should be suppressed. Selective catalytic reduction using vanadium supported TiO2 catalyst in mobile and off-road engine has been considered to be major source for N2O emission in the system. Here we have demonstrated that vanadium catalyst supported on zeolitic microporous TiO2 obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of bulk TiO2 at 400 K in the presence of LiOH suppresses significantly the N2O emission compared to conventional VOx/TiO2 catalyst, while maintaining the excellent NOx reduction, which was ascribed to the location of VOx domain in the micropore of TiO2, resulting in the strong metal support interaction. The use of zeolitic microporous TiO2 provides a new way of preparing SCR catalyst with a high thermal stability and superior catalytic performance. It can be also extended further to the other catalytic system employing TiO2-based substrate.

  11. Development of novel DIF-1 derivatives that selectively suppress innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Hai; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Takahashi, Katsunori; Katou, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-08-01

    The multiple pharmacological activities of differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum led us to examine the use of DIF-1 as a 'drug template' to develop promising seed compounds for drug discovery. DIF-1 and its derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their regulatory activities in innate immune responses. We found two new derivatives (4d and 5e) with highly selective inhibitory activities against production of the antimicrobial peptide attacin in Drosophila S2 cells and against production of interleukin-2 in Jurkat cells. PMID:26122773

  12. Bismuth as a modifier of Au Pd catalyst: Enhancing selectivity in alcohol oxidation by suppressing parallel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Bi has been widely employed as a modifier for Pd and Pt based catalyst mainly in order to improve selectivity. We found that when Bi was added to the bimetallic system AuPd, the effect on activity in alcohol oxidation mainly depends on the amount of Bi regardless its position, being negligible when Bi was 0.1 wt% and detectably negative when the amount was increased to 3 wt%. However, the selectivity of the reactions notably varied only when Bi was deposited on the surface of metal nanoparticles suppressing parallel reaction in both benzyl alcohol and glycerol oxidation. After a careful characterization of all the catalysts and additional catalytic tests, we concluded that the Bi influence on the activity of the catalysts could be ascribed to electronic effect whereas the one on selectivity mainly to a geometric modification. Moreover, the Bi-modified AuPd/AC catalyst showed possible application in the production of tartronic acid, a useful intermediate, from glycerol.

  13. Some scale-free networks could be robust under selective node attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bojin; Huang, Dan; Li, Deyi; Chen, Guisheng; Lan, Wenfei

    2011-04-01

    It is a mainstream idea that scale-free network would be fragile under the selective attacks. Internet is a typical scale-free network in the real world, but it never collapses under the selective attacks of computer viruses and hackers. This phenomenon is different from the deduction of the idea above because this idea assumes the same cost to delete an arbitrary node. Hence this paper discusses the behaviors of the scale-free network under the selective node attack with different cost. Through the experiments on five complex networks, we show that the scale-free network is possibly robust under the selective node attacks; furthermore, the more compact the network is, and the larger the average degree is, then the more robust the network is; with the same average degrees, the more compact the network is, the more robust the network is. This result would enrich the theory of the invulnerability of the network, and can be used to build robust social, technological and biological networks, and also has the potential to find the target of drugs.

  14. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Rebecca H.; Meissler, Joseph J.; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W.; Eisenstein, Toby K.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability. PMID:25980325

  15. Cellular Signaling Networks Function as Generalized Wiener-Kolmogorov Filters to Suppress Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-10-01

    Cellular signaling involves the transmission of environmental information through cascades of stochastic biochemical reactions, inevitably introducing noise that compromises signal fidelity. Each stage of the cascade often takes the form of a kinase-phosphatase push-pull network, a basic unit of signaling pathways whose malfunction is linked with a host of cancers. We show that this ubiquitous enzymatic network motif effectively behaves as a Wiener-Kolmogorov optimal noise filter. Using concepts from umbral calculus, we generalize the linear Wiener-Kolmogorov theory, originally introduced in the context of communication and control engineering, to take nonlinear signal transduction and discrete molecule populations into account. This allows us to derive rigorous constraints for efficient noise reduction in this biochemical system. Our mathematical formalism yields bounds on filter performance in cases important to cellular function—such as ultrasensitive response to stimuli. We highlight features of the system relevant for optimizing filter efficiency, encoded in a single, measurable, dimensionless parameter. Our theory, which describes noise control in a large class of signal transduction networks, is also useful both for the design of synthetic biochemical signaling pathways and the manipulation of pathways through experimental probes such as oscillatory input.

  16. Guidelines for Selection of Electronic Networking Software and Hardware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieck, Donald A.

    This article discusses the issues that confront network users and systems operators when they explore and adapt their professional communications activities to electronic communication. (Electronic networking here refers to the use of the telephone and the computer to facilitate communication between or among professional groups in a variety of…

  17. Network Analysis: A Selected Bibliography. Exchange Bibliography No. 165.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Budd H.; Murphy, Elaine

    This bibliography presents a series of studies that focus on the topic of networks and on the manner in which they have been considered in the literature. Each section of the bibliography provides a working set of references for one of the five major areas of research in which network analysis has been used. The first section deals primarily with…

  18. Comparative Analysis of Human Communication Networks in Selected Formal Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farace, Richard V.; Johnson, Jerome David

    This paper briefly describes the organization of a "data bank" containing research on communication networks, specifies the kinds of information compiled about various network properties, discusses some specific results of the work done to date, and presents some general conclusions about the overall project and its potential advantages to…

  19. Model selection for athermal cross-linked fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, A; Picu, R C

    2012-07-01

    Athermal random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a truss, a Euler-Bernoulli or a Timoshenko beam, and, in the case of cross-linked networks, each cross-link as a pinned, rotating, or welded joint. In this work we study the effect of these various modeling options on the dependence of the overall network stiffness on system parameters. We conclude that Timoshenko beams can be used for the entire range of density and beam stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low network densities. In the high density-high bending stiffness range, strain energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored in the bending mode. The effect of the model size on the network stiffness is also discussed. PMID:23005468

  20. Noise-tolerant model selection and parameter estimation for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbary, Sadegh; Motallebi, Sadegh; Rashidian, Sina; Habibi, Jafar; Movaghar, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Real networks often exhibit nontrivial topological features that do not occur in random graphs. The need for synthesizing realistic networks has resulted in development of various network models. In this paper, we address the problem of selecting and calibrating the model that best fits a given target network. The existing model fitting approaches mostly suffer from sensitivity to network perturbations, lack of the parameter estimation component, dependency on the size of the networks, and low accuracy. To overcome these limitations, we considered a broad range of network features and employed machine learning techniques such as genetic algorithms, distance metric learning, nearest neighbor classification, and artificial neural networks. Our proposed method, which is named ModelFit, outperforms the state-of-the-art baselines with respect to accuracy and noise tolerance in different network datasets.

  1. ICA model order selection of task co-activation networks

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kimberly L.; McKay, D. Reese; Fox, Peter M.; Riedel, Michael C.; Uecker, Angela M.; Beckmann, Christian F.; Smith, Stephen M.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.

    2013-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has become a widely used method for extracting functional networks in the brain during rest and task. Historically, preferred ICA dimensionality has widely varied within the neuroimaging community, but typically varies between 20 and 100 components. This can be problematic when comparing results across multiple studies because of the impact ICA dimensionality has on the topology of its resultant components. Recent studies have demonstrated that ICA can be applied to peak activation coordinates archived in a large neuroimaging database (i.e., BrainMap Database) to yield whole-brain task-based co-activation networks. A strength of applying ICA to BrainMap data is that the vast amount of metadata in BrainMap can be used to quantitatively assess tasks and cognitive processes contributing to each component. In this study, we investigated the effect of model order on the distribution of functional properties across networks as a method for identifying the most informative decompositions of BrainMap-based ICA components. Our findings suggest dimensionality of 20 for low model order ICA to examine large-scale brain networks, and dimensionality of 70 to provide insight into how large-scale networks fractionate into sub-networks. We also provide a functional and organizational assessment of visual, motor, emotion, and interoceptive task co-activation networks as they fractionate from low to high model-orders. PMID:24339802

  2. Selective suppression of the slow-inactivating potassium currents by nootropics in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Bukanova, Julia V; Solntseva, Elena I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2002-09-01

    The role of the voltage-gated K+ channels in the effect of some nootropics was investigated. Earlier, the multiple effect of high concentrations of two nootropics, piracetam and its peptide analogue GVS-111 [Seredenin et al. (1995), US Patent No. 5,439,930], on Ca2+ and K+ currents of molluscan neurons was shown [Solntseva et al. (1997), General Pharmacology 29, 85-89]. In the present work, we describe the selective effect of low concentrations of these nootropics as well as vinpocetine on certain types of K+ current. The experiments were performed on isolated neurons of the land snail Helix pomatia using a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method. The inward voltage-gated Ca2+ current (ICa) and three subtypes of the outward voltage-gated K+ current were recorded: Ca2+-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), delayed rectifying current (IKD), and fast-inactivating K+ current (IA). It has been found that I Ca was not changed in the presence of 30 microM vinpocetine, 100 microM piracetam or 10 nM GVS-111, while slow-inactivating, TEA-sensitive IK(Ca) and IKD were inhibited (IK(Ca) more strongly than IKD). In contrast, the fast-inactivating, 4-AP-sensitive K+ current (IA) was not diminished by low concentrations of piracetam and GVS-111, while vinpocetine even augmented it. A possible role of slow-inactivating subtypes of the K+ channels in the development of different forms of dementia is discussed.

  3. Selective suppression of the slow-inactivating potassium currents by nootropics in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Bukanova, Julia V; Solntseva, Elena I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2002-09-01

    The role of the voltage-gated K+ channels in the effect of some nootropics was investigated. Earlier, the multiple effect of high concentrations of two nootropics, piracetam and its peptide analogue GVS-111 [Seredenin et al. (1995), US Patent No. 5,439,930], on Ca2+ and K+ currents of molluscan neurons was shown [Solntseva et al. (1997), General Pharmacology 29, 85-89]. In the present work, we describe the selective effect of low concentrations of these nootropics as well as vinpocetine on certain types of K+ current. The experiments were performed on isolated neurons of the land snail Helix pomatia using a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method. The inward voltage-gated Ca2+ current (ICa) and three subtypes of the outward voltage-gated K+ current were recorded: Ca2+-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), delayed rectifying current (IKD), and fast-inactivating K+ current (IA). It has been found that I Ca was not changed in the presence of 30 microM vinpocetine, 100 microM piracetam or 10 nM GVS-111, while slow-inactivating, TEA-sensitive IK(Ca) and IKD were inhibited (IK(Ca) more strongly than IKD). In contrast, the fast-inactivating, 4-AP-sensitive K+ current (IA) was not diminished by low concentrations of piracetam and GVS-111, while vinpocetine even augmented it. A possible role of slow-inactivating subtypes of the K+ channels in the development of different forms of dementia is discussed. PMID:12366875

  4. miRNAs confer phenotypic robustness to gene networks by suppressing biological noise

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Velia; Garzilli, Immacolata; Fracassi, Chiara; Criscuolo, Stefania; Ventre, Simona; di Bernardo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs able to modulate target-gene expression. It has been postulated that miRNAs confer robustness to biological processes, but a clear experimental evidence is still missing. Using a synthetic biology approach, we demonstrate that microRNAs provide phenotypic robustness to transcriptional regulatory networks by buffering fluctuations in protein levels. Here we construct a network motif in mammalian cells exhibiting a “toggle - switch” phenotype in which two alternative protein expression levels define its ON and OFF states. The motif consists of an inducible transcription factor that self-regulates its own transcription and that of a miRNA against the transcription factor itself. We confirm, using mathematical modeling and experimental approaches, that the microRNA confers robustness to the toggle-switch by enabling the cell to maintain and transmit its state. When absent, a dramatic increase in protein noise level occurs, causing the cell to randomly switch between the two states. PMID:24077216

  5. High-dose corticosterone after fear conditioning selectively suppresses fear renewal by reducing anxiety-like response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Xing, Xiaoli; Liang, Jing; Bai, Yunjing; Lui, Zhengkui; Zheng, Xigeng

    2014-09-01

    Exposure therapy is widely used to treat anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, preventing the return of fear is still a major challenge after this behavioral treatment. An increasing number of studies suggest that high-dose glucocorticoid treatment immediately after trauma can alleviate the symptoms of PTSD in humans. Unknown is whether high-dose glucocorticoid treatment following fear conditioning suppresses the return of fear. In the present study, a typical fear renewal paradigm (AAB) was used, in which the fear response to an auditory cue can be restored in a novel context (context B) when both training and extinction occur in the same context (context A). We trained rats for auditory fear conditioning and administered corticosterone (CORT; 5 and 25mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle with different delays (1 and 24h). Forty-eight hours after drug injection, extinction was conducted with no drug in the training context, followed by a test of tone-induced freezing behavior in the same (AAA) or a shifted (AAB) context. Both immediate and delayed administration of high-dose CORT after fear conditioning reduced fear renewal. To examine the anxiolytic effect of CORT, independent rats were trained for cued or contextual fear conditioning, followed by an injection of CORT (5 and 25mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at a 1 or 24h delay. One week later, anxiety-like behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) before and after fear expression. We found that high-dose CORT decreased anxiety-like behavior without changing tone- or context-induced freezing. These findings indicate that a single high-dose CORT administration given after fear conditioning may selectively suppress fear renewal by reducing anxiety-like behavior and not by altering the consolidation, retrieval, or extinction of fear memory.

  6. Selection of genetic variants of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in spleens of persistently infected mice. Role in suppression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte response and viral persistence

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) persistence and the suppression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in BALB/c WEHI mice infected at birth with LCMV Armstrong strain. Using adoptive transfer experiments we found that spleen cells from persistently infected (carrier) mice actively suppressed the expected LCMV-specific CTL response of spleen cells from normal adult mice. The suppression was specific for the CTL response and LCMV - specific antibody responses were not affected. Associated with the specific CTL suppression was the establishment of persistent LCMV infection. The transfer of spleen or lymph node cells containing LCMV - specific CTL resulted in virus clearance and prevented establishment of the carrier state. The suppression of LCMV -specific CTL responses by carrier spleen cells is not mediated by a suppressor cell, but is due to the presence of genetic variants of LCMV in spleens of carrier mice. Such virus variants selectively suppress LCMV-specific CTL responses and cause persistent infections in immunocompetent mice. In striking contrast, wild-type LCMV Armstrong, from which these variants were generated, induces a potent CTL response in immunocompetent mice and the LCMV infection is rapidly cleared. Our results show that LCMV variants that emerge during infection in vivo play a crucial role in the suppression of virus-specific CTL responses and in the maintenance of virus persistence. PMID:6332167

  7. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage

  8. Selective pinning control of the average disease transmissibility in an HIV contact network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Toit, E. F.; Craig, I. K.

    2015-07-01

    Medication is applied to the HIV-infected nodes of high-risk contact networks with the aim of controlling the spread of disease to a predetermined maximum level. This intervention, known as pinning control, is performed both selectively and randomly in the network. These strategies are applied to 300 independent realizations per reference level of incidence on connected undirectional networks without isolated components and varying in size from 100 to 10 000 nodes per network. It is shown that a selective on-off pinning control strategy can control the networks studied with limited steady-state error and, comparing the medians of the doses from both strategies, uses 51.3% less medication than random pinning of all infected nodes. Selective pinning could possibly be used by public health specialists to identify the maximum level of HIV incidence in a population that can be achieved in a constrained funding environment.

  9. Correction: A Co(2+)-selective and chirality-sensitive supermolecular metallohydrogel with a nanofiber network skeleton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; He, Ting; Yang, Lan; Wu, Huiqiong; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenzhu; Shen, Rujuan; Xiang, Juan; Zhang, Yi; Wei, Chuanwan

    2016-04-21

    Correction for 'A Co(2+)-selective and chirality-sensitive supermolecular metallohydrogel with a nanofiber network skeleton' by Xiaojuan Wang et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00822d. PMID:27021200

  10. Wavelength selective polymer network formation of end-functional star polymers.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Michael; Hiltebrandt, Kai; Trouillet, Vanessa; Mueller, Patrick; Quick, Alexander S; Wegener, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-01-31

    A wavelength selective technique for light-induced network formation based on two photo-active moieties, namely ortho-methylbenzaldehyde and tetrazole is introduced. The network forming species are photo-reactive star polymers generated via reversible activation fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, allowing the network to be based on almost any vinylic monomer. Direct laser writing (DLW) allows to form any complex three-dimensional structure based on the photo-reactive star polymers.

  11. Universal Service in a Global Networked Environment: Selected Issues and Possible Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertot, John Carlo; McClure, Charles R.; Owens, Kimberly A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents selected issues related to the development of universal service to networked information resources and services in a global networked environment. Defines universal service as a set of telecommunications services to which users should have access, including appropriate funding and interconnected public telecommunications infrastructure…

  12. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WHEAT TAKE-ALL DISEASE: II – RAPID SELECTION OF BACTERIA SUPPRESSIVE TO GAEUMANNOMYCES GRAMINIS VAR. TRITICI IN LABORATORY WITH GREENHOUSE AND FIELD CONFIRMATION TRIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening large collections of bacteria for potential biological control activity on economically important diseases is often difficult. A quick test tube assay was developed to rapidly screen selected bacterial isolates for their ability to suppress take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyc...

  13. Selection of genes associated with variations in the Circle of Willis in gerbils using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenkun; Huo, Xueyun; Zhang, Shuangyue; Lu, Jing; Li, Changlong; Guo, Meng; Fu, Rui; He, Zhengming; Du, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zhenwen

    2015-01-01

    Deformities in the Circle of Willis (CoW) can significantly increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deformities have not been understood. Based on our previous studies, variations in the CoW of gerbils are hereditary. A normal CoW is observed in approximately 60% of gerbils, a percentage that also applies to humans. Thus, gerbil is an ideal experimental model for studying variations in the CoW. To study the mechanisms underlying these variations, we selected genes associated with different types of the CoW using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). After evaluating the efficiency of SSH using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on subtracted and unsubtracted cDNA and Southern blotting on SSH PCR products, 12 SSH libraries were established. We identified 4 genes (CST3, GNAS, GPx4 and PFN2) associated with variations in the CoW. These genes were identified with qPCR and Western blotting using 70 expressed sequence tags from the SSH libraries. Cloning and sequencing allowed us to demonstrate that the 4 genes were closely related to mouse genes. We may assume that these 4 genes play an important role in the development of variations in the CoW. This study provides a foundation for further research of genes related to development of variations in the CoW and the mechanisms of dysmorphosis of cerebral vessels.

  14. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  15. Tigecycline-Amikacin Combination Effectively Suppresses the Selection of Resistance in Clinical Isolates of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wentao; Wei, Chuanqi; Zhou, Chufei; Zhao, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    By far, only tigecycline, colistin, and some aminoglycosides still show favorable in vitro activities against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, rapid emergence of resistance often occurs during long-term treatment in clinic, challenging these last resort antimicrobials. In this study, we measured mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) of tigecycline, colistin and amikacin alone and in combination for clinical isolates of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, and characterized the resistant mutants recovered. The MPC90 of 30 tested isolates for tigecycline, colistin, and amikacin were 16, >128, and 128 mg/L, respectively. The average MSW of tigecycline-amikacin, tigecycline-colistin, and amikacin-colistin combinations for four representative strains were 11.99, 200.13, and 372.38, respectively. A strong correlation was found between the MSW combination and the product of MSW of each single drug. Combinations of 1 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) multiple tigecycline and 1 MIC multiple amikacin could result in 1000- to 10000-fold reduction in mutational frequency relative to their individual mutational frequencies, and combinations of 1 MIC multiple amikacin and 1.5-2 MIC multiple tigecycline could successfully restrict the recovery of resistant mutants on agar plates. However, 2 MIC multiple colistin in combination with 2 MIC multiple tigecycline or amikacin merely resulted in approximately 10-fold decrease in the mutational frequency. In conclusion, this study showed tigecycline-amikacin combination could effectively suppress the selection of resistance at low concentrations compared with the colistin-tigecycline and colistin-amikacin combinations, suggesting that this combination may be useful in clinical therapy. PMID:27594855

  16. Tigecycline-Amikacin Combination Effectively Suppresses the Selection of Resistance in Clinical Isolates of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wentao; Wei, Chuanqi; Zhou, Chufei; Zhao, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    By far, only tigecycline, colistin, and some aminoglycosides still show favorable in vitro activities against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, rapid emergence of resistance often occurs during long-term treatment in clinic, challenging these last resort antimicrobials. In this study, we measured mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) of tigecycline, colistin and amikacin alone and in combination for clinical isolates of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, and characterized the resistant mutants recovered. The MPC90 of 30 tested isolates for tigecycline, colistin, and amikacin were 16, >128, and 128 mg/L, respectively. The average MSW of tigecycline-amikacin, tigecycline-colistin, and amikacin-colistin combinations for four representative strains were 11.99, 200.13, and 372.38, respectively. A strong correlation was found between the MSWcombination and the product of MSW of each single drug. Combinations of 1 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) multiple tigecycline and 1 MIC multiple amikacin could result in 1000- to 10000-fold reduction in mutational frequency relative to their individual mutational frequencies, and combinations of 1 MIC multiple amikacin and 1.5–2 MIC multiple tigecycline could successfully restrict the recovery of resistant mutants on agar plates. However, 2 MIC multiple colistin in combination with 2 MIC multiple tigecycline or amikacin merely resulted in approximately 10-fold decrease in the mutational frequency. In conclusion, this study showed tigecycline-amikacin combination could effectively suppress the selection of resistance at low concentrations compared with the colistin-tigecycline and colistin-amikacin combinations, suggesting that this combination may be useful in clinical therapy. PMID:27594855

  17. Heat dissipation does not suppress an immune response in laboratory mice divergently selected for basal metabolic rate (BMR).

    PubMed

    Książek, Aneta; Konarzewski, Marek

    2016-05-15

    The capacity for heat dissipation is considered to be one of the most important constraints on rates of energy expenditure in mammals. To date, the significance of this constraint has been tested exclusively under peak metabolic demands, such as during lactation. Here, we used a different set of metabolic stressors, which do not induce maximum energy expenditures and yet are likely to expose the potential constraining effect of heat dissipation. We compared the physiological responses of mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low basal metabolic rate (L-BMR) to simultaneous exposure to the keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) antigen and high ambient temperature (Ta). At 34°C (and at 23°C, used as a control), KLH challenge resulted in a transient increase in core body temperature (Tb) in mice of both line types (by approximately 0.4°C). Warm exposure did not produce line-type-dependent differences in Tb (which was consistently higher by ca. 0.6°C in H-BMR mice across both Ta values), nor did it result in the suppression of antibody synthesis. These findings were also supported by the lack of between-line-type differences in the mass of the thymus, spleen or lymph nodes. Warm exposure induced the downsizing of heat-generating internal organs (small intestine, liver and kidneys) and an increase in intrascapular brown adipose tissue mass. However, these changes were similar in scope in both line types. Mounting a humoral immune response in selected mice was therefore not affected by ambient temperature. Thus, a combined metabolic challenge of high Ta and an immune response did not appreciably compromise the capacity to dissipate heat, even in the H-BMR mice. PMID:26944492

  18. Tigecycline-Amikacin Combination Effectively Suppresses the Selection of Resistance in Clinical Isolates of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wentao; Wei, Chuanqi; Zhou, Chufei; Zhao, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    By far, only tigecycline, colistin, and some aminoglycosides still show favorable in vitro activities against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, rapid emergence of resistance often occurs during long-term treatment in clinic, challenging these last resort antimicrobials. In this study, we measured mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) of tigecycline, colistin and amikacin alone and in combination for clinical isolates of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, and characterized the resistant mutants recovered. The MPC90 of 30 tested isolates for tigecycline, colistin, and amikacin were 16, >128, and 128 mg/L, respectively. The average MSW of tigecycline-amikacin, tigecycline-colistin, and amikacin-colistin combinations for four representative strains were 11.99, 200.13, and 372.38, respectively. A strong correlation was found between the MSWcombination and the product of MSW of each single drug. Combinations of 1 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) multiple tigecycline and 1 MIC multiple amikacin could result in 1000- to 10000-fold reduction in mutational frequency relative to their individual mutational frequencies, and combinations of 1 MIC multiple amikacin and 1.5–2 MIC multiple tigecycline could successfully restrict the recovery of resistant mutants on agar plates. However, 2 MIC multiple colistin in combination with 2 MIC multiple tigecycline or amikacin merely resulted in approximately 10-fold decrease in the mutational frequency. In conclusion, this study showed tigecycline-amikacin combination could effectively suppress the selection of resistance at low concentrations compared with the colistin-tigecycline and colistin-amikacin combinations, suggesting that this combination may be useful in clinical therapy.

  19. It Takes Three: Selection, Influence, and De-Selection Processes of Depression in Adolescent Friendship Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter; Kerr, Margaret; Branje, Susan J. T.; Stattin, Hakan; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this study tested a selection-influence-de-selection model of depression. This model explains friendship influence processes (i.e., friends' depressive symptoms increase adolescents' depressive symptoms) while controlling for two processes: friendship selection (i.e., selection of friends with similar levels of depressive symptoms)…

  20. Selection-for-action emerges in neural networks trained to learn spatial associations between stimuli and actions.

    PubMed

    Simione, Luca; Nolfi, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    The objects present in our environment evoke multiple conflicting actions at every moment. Thus, a mechanism that resolves this conflict is needed in order to avoid the production of chaotic ineffective behaviours. A plausible candidate for such role is the selective attention, capable of inhibiting the neural representations of the objects irrelevant in the ongoing context and as a consequence the actions they afford. In this paper, we investigated whether a selective attention mechanism emerges spontaneously during the learning of context-dependent behaviour, whereas most neurocomputational models of selective attention and action selection imply the presence of architectural constraints. To this aim, we trained a deep neural network to learn context-dependent visual-action associations. Our main result was the spontaneous emergence of an inhibitory mechanism aimed to solve conflicts between multiple afforded actions by directly suppressing the irrelevant visual stimuli eliciting the incorrect actions for the current context. This suggests that such an inhibitory mechanism emerged as a result of the incorporation of context-independent probabilistic regularities occurring between stimuli and afforded actions. PMID:26232191

  1. Potential unsatisfiability of cyclic constraints on stochastic biological networks biases selection towards hierarchical architectures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cameron; Pechuan, Ximo; Puzio, Raymond S.; Biro, Daniel; Bergman, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Constraints placed upon the phenotypes of organisms result from their interactions with the environment. Over evolutionary time scales, these constraints feed back onto smaller molecular subnetworks comprising the organism. The evolution of biological networks is studied by considering a network of a few nodes embedded in a larger context. Taking into account this fact that any network under study is actually embedded in a larger context, we define network architecture, not on the basis of physical interactions alone, but rather as a specification of the manner in which constraints are placed upon the states of its nodes. We show that such network architectures possessing cycles in their topology, in contrast to those that do not, may be subjected to unsatisfiable constraints. This may be a significant factor leading to selection biased against those network architectures where such inconsistent constraints are more likely to arise. We proceed to quantify the likelihood of inconsistency arising as a function of network architecture finding that, in the absence of sampling bias over the space of possible constraints and for a given network size, networks with a larger number of cycles are more likely to have unsatisfiable constraints placed upon them. Our results identify a constraint that, at least in isolation, would contribute to a bias in the evolutionary process towards more hierarchical -modular versus completely connected network architectures. Together, these results highlight the context dependence of the functionality of biological networks. PMID:26040595

  2. Scalable Video Broadcasting with Distributed Node Selection in Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghun; Lee, Kyujin; Lee, Kyesan; Suh, Doug Young

    We propose a distributed node selection (DNS) scheme that guarantees quality of service (QoS) of the scalable video broadcasting system over wireless channels. The proposed DNS scheme chooses the destination node based on the SVC layer information, and it selects the best relay from a set of competing candidate nodes by considering two factors: 1) wireless channel conditions between destination and relay candidates and 2) scalable video's layer information. In simulations, the performance of the proposed scheme in terms of quality gains, complexity (overhead) and applicability was examined.

  3. The Stochastic Evolutionary Game for a Population of Biological Networks Under Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Ho, Shih-Ju

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a population of evolutionary biological networks is described by a stochastic dynamic system with intrinsic random parameter fluctuations due to genetic variations and external disturbances caused by environmental changes in the evolutionary process. Since information on environmental changes is unavailable and their occurrence is unpredictable, they can be considered as a game player with the potential to destroy phenotypic stability. The biological network needs to develop an evolutionary strategy to improve phenotypic stability as much as possible, so it can be considered as another game player in the evolutionary process, ie, a stochastic Nash game of minimizing the maximum network evolution level caused by the worst environmental disturbances. Based on the nonlinear stochastic evolutionary game strategy, we find that some genetic variations can be used in natural selection to construct negative feedback loops, efficiently improving network robustness. This provides larger genetic robustness as a buffer against neutral genetic variations, as well as larger environmental robustness to resist environmental disturbances and maintain a network phenotypic traits in the evolutionary process. In this situation, the robust phenotypic traits of stochastic biological networks can be more frequently selected by natural selection in evolution. However, if the harbored neutral genetic variations are accumulated to a sufficiently large degree, and environmental disturbances are strong enough that the network robustness can no longer confer enough genetic robustness and environmental robustness, then the phenotype robustness might break down. In this case, a network phenotypic trait may be pushed from one equilibrium point to another, changing the phenotypic trait and starting a new phase of network evolution through the hidden neutral genetic variations harbored in network robustness by adaptive evolution. Further, the proposed evolutionary game is extended to

  4. Selective intracellular drug delivery from pH-responsive polyion complex micelle for enhanced malignancy suppression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jixue; Xu, Weiguo; Guo, Hui; Ding, Jianxun; Chen, Jinjin; Guan, Jingjing; Wang, Chunxi

    2015-11-01

    The pH-triggered intracellular drug delivery platforms have attracted great interest in malignancy therapy. Herein, a pH-responsive polyion complex (PIC) micelle from anionic acid-sensitive methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(N(ϵ)-((1-carboxy-cis-cyclohexene)-2-carbonyl)-L-lysine) (mPEG-b-PCLL) and cationic doxorubicin (DOX), a model anthracycline antitumor drug, was constructed by electrostatic interaction for directional intracellular drug delivery in malignancy chemotherapy. The PIC micelle kept constant diameter at physiological condition (i.e., pH 7.4), while gradually swelled and finally disassembled at mimicking intratumoral pH (i.e., 6.8) and especially intracellular endo/lysosomal pH (i.e., 5.5). The DOX release from the PIC micelle at pH 7.4 was slow, whereas obviously accelerated at the intracellular acidic condition of pH 5.5. These results should be related to the rapid cleavage of the side amide bond of mPEG-b-PCLL in an acidic environment. The PIC micelle exhibited satisfactory tumor suppression toward the H22 hepatoma-bearing BALB/c mouse model compared with free DOX, which was demonstrated by the upregulated tumor inhibition rate, and the increased necrotic and apoptosis areas in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the enhanced security was also observed in the PIC micelle group in relation to that of free DOX. The above results strongly supported that the acid-sensitive PIC micelle was promising for selective intracellular drug delivery along with upregulated malignancy inhibition.

  5. Selective inhibition of EZH2 and EZH1 enzymatic activity by a small molecule suppresses MLL-rearranged leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bowen; On, Doan M; Ma, Anqi; Parton, Trevor; Konze, Kyle D; Pattenden, Samantha G; Allison, David F; Cai, Ling; Rockowitz, Shira; Liu, Shichong; Liu, Ying; Li, Fengling; Vedadi, Masoud; Frye, Stephen V; Garcia, Benjamin A; Zheng, Deyou; Jin, Jian; Wang, Gang Greg

    2015-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and related EZH1 control gene expression and promote tumorigenesis via methylating histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27). These methyltransferases are ideal therapeutic targets due to their frequent hyperactive mutations and overexpression found in cancer, including hematopoietic malignancies. Here, we characterized a set of small molecules that allow pharmacologic manipulation of EZH2 and EZH1, which include UNC1999, a selective inhibitor of both enzymes, and UNC2400, an inactive analog compound useful for assessment of off-target effect. UNC1999 suppresses global H3K27 trimethylation/dimethylation (H3K27me3/2) and inhibits growth of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemia cells. UNC1999-induced transcriptome alterations overlap those following knockdown of embryonic ectoderm development, a common cofactor of EZH2 and EZH1, demonstrating UNC1999's on-target inhibition. Mechanistically, UNC1999 preferentially affects distal regulatory elements such as enhancers, leading to derepression of polycomb targets including Cdkn2a. Gene derepression correlates with a decrease in H3K27me3 and concurrent gain in H3K27 acetylation. UNC2400 does not induce such effects. Oral administration of UNC1999 prolongs survival of a well-defined murine leukemia model bearing MLL-AF9. Collectively, our study provides the detailed profiling for a set of chemicals to manipulate EZH2 and EZH1 and establishes specific enzymatic inhibition of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-EZH2 and PRC2-EZH1 by small-molecule compounds as a novel therapeutics for MLL-rearranged leukemia.

  6. Simultaneous interpretation selectively influences working memory and attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julia; Padilla, Francisca; Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J; Bajo, M Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has shown that becoming an expert in a certain domain may lead to a transfer of the acquired skills to other domains requiring similar abilities. Thus, the cognitive skills acquired by professional interpreters after intensive training may also transfer to other domains. Simultaneous interpreters are known to develop high working memory capacity (e.g., Christoffels, de Groot, & Kroll, 2006; Signorelli, Haarmann, & Obler, 2012). However, little is known about transfer of other processes such us updating and some aspects of attention also involved in interpretation. In Experiment 1, we found that interpreters outperformed a control group in updating skills, as measured through a dual version of the n-back task (Jaeggi et al., 2007). In Experiment 2, use of the ANTI-V allowed us to reveal that interpreting differentially modulates the interactions between attentional networks. Thus, we found no group differences in conflict resolution, but the interaction between the alertness and orienting networks differed between interpreters and non-interpreters. Taken together, these results suggest that experience in simultaneous interpreting transfers to other domains, but this transfer seems specific to the cognitive processes more closely involved in the interpreting tasks.

  7. Selection of a minimum-boundary reserve network using integer programming.

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Hayri; Briers, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    In the conservation literature, heuristic procedures have been employed to incorporate spatial considerations in reserve network selection with the presumption that computationally convenient optimization models would be too difficult or impossible to formulate. This paper extends the standard set-covering formulation to incorporate a particular spatial selection criterion, namely reducing the reserve boundary to the extent possible, when selecting a reserve network that represents a set of target species at least once. Applying the model to a dataset on the occurrence of breeding birds in Berkshire, UK, demonstrated that the technique resulted in significant reductions in reserve boundary length relative to solutions produced by the standard set-covering formulation. Computational results showed that moderately large reserve network selection problems could be solved without issue. Alternative solutions may be produced to explore trade-offs between boundary length, number of sites required or alternative criteria. PMID:12965014

  8. Sensor Selection for Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks With Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nianxia; Choi, Sora; Masazade, Engin; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a multiobjective optimization framework for the sensor selection problem in uncertain Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). The uncertainties of the WSNs result in a set of sensor observations with insufficient information about the target. We propose a novel mutual information upper bound (MIUB) based sensor selection scheme, which has low computational complexity, same as the Fisher information (FI) based sensor selection scheme, and gives estimation performance similar to the mutual information (MI) based sensor selection scheme. Without knowing the number of sensors to be selected a priori, the multiobjective optimization problem (MOP) gives a set of sensor selection strategies that reveal different trade-offs between two conflicting objectives: minimization of the number of selected sensors and minimization of the gap between the performance metric (MIUB and FI) when all the sensors transmit measurements and when only the selected sensors transmit their measurements based on the sensor selection strategy. Illustrative numerical results that provide valuable insights are presented.

  9. Manganese suppresses ATP-dependent intercellular calcium waves in astrocyte networks through alteration of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tjalkens, Ronald B; Zoran, Mark J; Mohl, Brianne; Barhoumi, Roula

    2006-10-01

    The neurotoxicity of manganese [Mn] is due in part to glutamate excitotoxicity. Release of ATP by astrocytes is a critical modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is regulated by calcium (Ca(2+)) waves that propagate through astrocytic networks in response to synaptic activity. It was postulated that Mn alters ATP-dependent intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in astrocytes, thereby suppressing Ca(2+) wave activity. Confluent primary cultures of cortical astrocytes were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fluo-4 and examined by fluorescence microscopy for Ca(2+) wave activity following micropipet mechanical stimulation of a single cell. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy following addition of ATP using the mitochondrial-specific Ca(2+) dye rhod-2-AM. Imaging studies revealed that pretreatment of astrocytes with 1-10 microM Mn significantly reduced the rate, area, and amplitude of mechanically induced Ca(2+) waves. This attenuation was not a result of inhibited mitochondrial calcium uptake because robust calcium waves were still observed following pretreatment of astrocytes with Ru360, an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, either in coupling or uncoupling conditions. However, determination of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) levels in cells using the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin indicated that Mn reduced the available pool of releasable ER Ca(2+) at concentrations as low as 1 muM. Examination of ATP-stimulated changes in mitochondrial Ca(2+) indicated that, in cells pretreated with Mn, mitochondria retained high levels of Ca(2+). It is concluded that exposure of astrocytes to low concentrations of Mn(2+) results in sequestration of Ca(2+) within the mitochondria that reduces the available pool of releasable Ca(2+) within the ER, thereby inhibiting calcium wave activity. PMID:16934782

  10. Suppression of vascular network formation by chronic hypoxia and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 (phd2) deficiency during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Metikala, Sanjeeva; Neuhaus, Herbert; Hollemann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In the adult, new vessels and red blood cells form in response to hypoxia. Here, the oxygen-sensing system (PHD-HIF) has recently been put into focus, since the prolyl-hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) are considered as potential therapeutic targets to treat ischemia, cancers or age-related macula degeneration. While the oxygen-sensing system (PHD-HIF) has been studied intensively in this respect, only little is known from developing vertebrate embryos since mutations within this pathway led to an early decease of embryos due to placental defects. During vertebrate embryogenesis, a progenitor cell called hemangioblast is assumed to give rise to blood cells and blood vessels in a process called hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis, respectively. Xenopus provides an ideal experimental system to address these processes in vivo, as its development does not depend on a functional placenta and thus allows analyzing the role of oxygen directly. To this end, we adopted a computer-controlled four-channel system, which allowed us to culture Xenopus embryos under defined oxygen concentrations. Our data show that the development of vascular structures and blood cells is strongly impaired under hypoxia, while general development is less compromised. Interestingly, suppression of Phd2 function using specific antisense morpholinos or a chemical inhibitor resulted in mostly overlapping vascular defects; nevertheless, blood cell was formed almost normally. Our results provide the first evidence that oxygen via Phd2 has a decisive influence on the formation of the vascular network during vertebrate embryogenesis. These findings may be considered in certain potential treatment concepts. PMID:26678600

  11. Dehydroeffusol inhibits gastric cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity by selectively inducing tumor-suppressive endoplasmic reticulum stress and a moderate apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Han, Hongyan; Fu, Shilong; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2016-03-15

    Gastric cancer is ranked as the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Although extensive efforts have been made in recent decades to treat gastric cancer with various anticancer drugs, effective anti-gastric cancer therapeutics to cure the disease are still lacking in the clinics. Therefore, potent novel anti-gastric cancer drugs are greatly needed. In this study, we explored a novel anti-gastric cancer agent from a medicinal herb named Juncus effusus and found that the active component dehydroeffusol (DHE), a small molecular phenanthrene, effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by inducing tumor suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and by triggering moderate apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that DHE selectively activated the intracellular tumor suppressive stress response by promoting the overexpression of the key ER stress marker DNA damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3), through upregulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Concurrently, DHE suppressed the expression of the cell survival and ER stress marker glucose regulated protein of molecular mass 78 (GRP78) via downregulation of the transcription factor ATF6. In addition, DHE markedly activated the stress response signaling pathway MEKK4-MKK3/6-p38-DDIT3, but significantly inhibited ERK signaling. Our data suggest that DHE inhibits gastric cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity through selectively inducing a robust tumor suppressive ER stress response and a moderate apoptosis response. Therefore, DHE may provide a novel drug candidate for further development of potential anti-gastric cancer therapeutics. PMID:26774454

  12. A load-balance path selection algorithm in automatically swiched optical network (ASON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Lu, Yueming; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a novel load-balance algorithm is proposed to provide an approach to optimized path selection in automatically swiched optical network (ASON). By using this algorithm, improved survivability and low congestion can be achieved. The static nature of current routing algorithms, such as OSPF or IS-IS, has made the situation worse since the traffic is concentrated on the "least-cost" paths which causes the congestion for some links while leaving other links lightly loaded. So, the key is to select suitable paths to balance the network load to optimize network resource utilization and traffic performance. We present a method to provide the capability to control traffic engineering so that the carriers can define their own strategies for optimizations and apply them to path selection for dynamic load balancing. With considering load distribution and topology information, capacity utilization factor is introduced into Dijkstra (shortest path selection) for path selection to achieve balancing traffic over network. Routing simulations have been done over mesh networks to compare the two different algorithms. With the simulation results, a conclusion can be made on the performance of different algorithms.

  13. Selection for territory acquisition is modulated by social network structure in a wild songbird.

    PubMed

    Farine, D R; Sheldon, B C

    2015-03-01

    The social environment may be a key mediator of selection that operates on animals. In many cases, individuals may experience selection not only as a function of their phenotype, but also as a function of the interaction between their phenotype and the phenotypes of the conspecifics they associate with. For example, when animals settle after dispersal, individuals may benefit from arriving early, but, in many cases, these benefits will be affected by the arrival times of other individuals in their local environment. We integrated a recently described method for calculating assortativity on weighted networks, which is the correlation between an individual's phenotype and that of its associates, into an existing framework for measuring the magnitude of social selection operating on phenotypes. We applied this approach to large-scale data on social network structure and the timing of arrival into the breeding area over three years. We found that late-arriving individuals had a reduced probability of breeding. However, the probability of breeding was also influenced by individuals' social networks. Associating with late-arriving conspecifics increased the probability of successfully acquiring a breeding territory. Hence, social selection could offset the effects of nonsocial selection. Given parallel theoretical developments of the importance of local network structure on population processes, and increasing data being collected on social networks in free-living populations, the integration of these concepts could yield significant insights into social evolution.

  14. Patterns of Population Differentiation and Natural Selection on the Celiac Disease Background Risk Network

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Aaron; Hawks, John

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common small intestinal inflammatory condition induced by wheat gluten and related proteins from rye and barley. Left untreated, the clinical presentation of CD can include failure to thrive, malnutrition, and distension in juveniles. The disease can additionally lead to vitamin deficiencies, anemia, and osteoporosis. Therefore, CD potentially negatively affected fitness in past populations utilizing wheat, barley, and rye. Previous analyses of CD risk variants have uncovered evidence for positive selection on some of these loci. These studies also suggest the possibility that risk for common autoimmune conditions such as CD may be the result of positive selection on immune related loci in the genome to fight infection. Under this evolutionary scenario, disease phenotypes may be a trade-off from positive selection on immunity. If this hypothesis is generally true, we can expect to find a signal of natural selection when we survey across the network of loci known to influence CD risk. This study examines the non-HLA autosomal network of gene loci associated with CD risk in Europe. We reject the null hypothesis of neutrality on this network of CD risk loci. Additionally, we can localize evidence of selection in time and space by adding information from the genome of the Tyrolean Iceman. While we can show significant differentiation between continental regions across the CD network, the pattern of evidence is not consistent with primarily recent (Holocene) selection across this network in Europe. Further localization of ancient selection on this network may illuminate the ecological pressures acting on the immune system during this critically interesting phase of our evolution. PMID:23936230

  15. Patterns of population differentiation and natural selection on the celiac disease background risk network.

    PubMed

    Sams, Aaron; Hawks, John

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common small intestinal inflammatory condition induced by wheat gluten and related proteins from rye and barley. Left untreated, the clinical presentation of CD can include failure to thrive, malnutrition, and distension in juveniles. The disease can additionally lead to vitamin deficiencies, anemia, and osteoporosis. Therefore, CD potentially negatively affected fitness in past populations utilizing wheat, barley, and rye. Previous analyses of CD risk variants have uncovered evidence for positive selection on some of these loci. These studies also suggest the possibility that risk for common autoimmune conditions such as CD may be the result of positive selection on immune related loci in the genome to fight infection. Under this evolutionary scenario, disease phenotypes may be a trade-off from positive selection on immunity. If this hypothesis is generally true, we can expect to find a signal of natural selection when we survey across the network of loci known to influence CD risk. This study examines the non-HLA autosomal network of gene loci associated with CD risk in Europe. We reject the null hypothesis of neutrality on this network of CD risk loci. Additionally, we can localize evidence of selection in time and space by adding information from the genome of the Tyrolean Iceman. While we can show significant differentiation between continental regions across the CD network, the pattern of evidence is not consistent with primarily recent (Holocene) selection across this network in Europe. Further localization of ancient selection on this network may illuminate the ecological pressures acting on the immune system during this critically interesting phase of our evolution.

  16. A neural network based reputation bootstrapping approach for service selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Quanwang; Zhu, Qingsheng; Li, Peng

    2015-10-01

    With the concept of service-oriented computing becoming widely accepted in enterprise application integration, more and more computing resources are encapsulated as services and published online. Reputation mechanism has been studied to establish trust on prior unknown services. One of the limitations of current reputation mechanisms is that they cannot assess the reputation of newly deployed services as no record of their previous behaviours exists. Most of the current bootstrapping approaches merely assign default reputation values to newcomers. However, by this kind of methods, either newcomers or existing services will be favoured. In this paper, we present a novel reputation bootstrapping approach, where correlations between features and performance of existing services are learned through an artificial neural network (ANN) and they are then generalised to establish a tentative reputation when evaluating new and unknown services. Reputations of services published previously by the same provider are also incorporated for reputation bootstrapping if available. The proposed reputation bootstrapping approach is seamlessly embedded into an existing reputation model and implemented in the extended service-oriented architecture. Empirical studies of the proposed approach are shown at last.

  17. Performance analysis of relay subset selection for amplify-and-forward cognitive relay networks.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Kiran; Qureshi, Ijaz Mansoor; Malik, Aqdas Naveed; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative communication is regarded as a key technology in wireless networks, including cognitive radio networks (CRNs), which increases the diversity order of the signal to combat the unfavorable effects of the fading channels, by allowing distributed terminals to collaborate through sophisticated signal processing. Underlay CRNs have strict interference constraints towards the secondary users (SUs) active in the frequency band of the primary users (PUs), which limits their transmit power and their coverage area. Relay selection offers a potential solution to the challenges faced by underlay networks, by selecting either single best relay or a subset of potential relay set under different design requirements and assumptions. The best relay selection schemes proposed in the literature for amplify-and-forward (AF) based underlay cognitive relay networks have been very well studied in terms of outage probability (OP) and bit error rate (BER), which is deficient in multiple relay selection schemes. The novelty of this work is to study the outage behavior of multiple relay selection in the underlay CRN and derive the closed-form expressions for the OP and BER through cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the SNR received at the destination. The effectiveness of relay subset selection is shown through simulation results. PMID:24737980

  18. New Therapeutic Approach to Suppress Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Using ASC-J9 via Targeting Androgen Receptor in Selective Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Chang, Yu-Jia; Chung, Chin-Ying; Yamashita, Shinichi; Li, Lei; Lee, Soo Ok; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Using androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice to determine AR functions in selective prostate cancer (PCa) cells, we determined that AR might play differential roles in various cell types, either to promote or suppress PCa development/progression. These observations partially explain the failure of current androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to reduce/prevent androgen binding to AR in every cell. Herein, we identified the AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9, which selectively degrades AR protein via interruption of the AR-AR selective coregulator interaction. Such selective interruption could, therefore, suppress AR-mediated PCa growth in the androgen-sensitive stage before ADT and in the castration-resistant stage after ADT. Mechanistic dissection suggested that ASC-J9 could activate the proteasome-dependent pathway to promote AR degradation through the enhanced association of AR-Mdm2 complex. The consequences of ASC-J9-promoted AR degradation included reduced androgen binding to AR, AR N-C terminal interaction, and AR nuclear translocation. Such inhibitory regulation could then result in suppression of AR transactivation and AR-mediated cell growth in eight different mouse models, including intact or castrated nude mice xenografted with androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells or androgen-insensitive C81 cells and castrated nude mice xenografted with castration-resistant C4-2 and CWR22Rv1 cells, and TRAMP and Pten+/− mice. These results demonstrate that ASC-J9 could serve as an AR degradation enhancer that effectively suppresses PCa development/progression in the androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant stages. PMID:23219429

  19. Traffic of packets with non-homogeneously selected destinations in scale-free network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Xiong; Hu, Mao-Bin; Wu, Qing-Song

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we study the information traffic flow in communication networks with scale-free topology. We consider the situation arising when packets are delivered to non-homogeneously selected destinations. It is found that the network capacity Rc increases with the increase of (average degree of destination nodes) under local routing strategy. In contrast, Rc is essentially independent of under shortest path strategy. Based on this finding, an integrated routing strategy that can enhance network capacity is proposed by combining the two strategies.

  20. Seed selection strategy in global network alignment without destroying the entire structures of functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Network alignment is one of the most common biological network comparison methods. Aligning protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of different species is of great important to detect evolutionary conserved pathways or protein complexes across species through the identification of conserved interactions, and to improve our insight into biological systems. Global network alignment (GNA) problem is NP-complete, for which only heuristic methods have been proposed so far. Generally, the current GNA methods fall into global heuristic seed-and-extend approaches. These methods can not get the best overall consistent alignment between networks for the opinionated local seed. Furthermore These methods are lost in maximizing the number of aligned edges between two networks without considering the original structures of functional modules. Methods We present a novel seed selection strategy for global network alignment by constructing the pairs of hub nodes of networks to be aligned into multiple seeds. Beginning from every hub seed and using the membership similarity of nodes to quantify to what extent the nodes can participate in functional modules associated with current seed topologically we align the networks by modules. By this way we can maintain the functional modules are not damaged during the heuristic alignment process. And our method is efficient in resolving the fatal problem of most conventional algorithms that the initialization selected seeds have a direct influence on the alignment result. The similarity measures between network nodes (e.g., proteins) include sequence similarity, centrality similarity, and dynamic membership similarity and our algorithm can be called Multiple Hubs-based Alignment (MHA). Results When applying our seed selection strategy to several pairs of real PPI networks, it is observed that our method is working to strike a balance, extending the conserved interactions while maintaining the functional modules unchanged. In

  1. A Reinforcement Routing Algorithm with Access Selection in the Multi-Hop Multi-Interface Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Amir Hosein; Shahhoseini, Hadi Shahriar

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a routing algorithm is proposed for access selection in a network to find the optimal paths among intermediate nodes with multiple interfaces. Markov Decision Process is applied in each node to find optimal policy and select proper paths to the best access point in a dynamic environment. A reward function is defined as environment feedback to optimize and adapt routing behavior of nodes based on the local information. Selection metrics in each node are interface load, link quality and destination condition. It is shown, by using the proposed algorithm, there are better management in the node which decreases interference and collision and selects links with better quality toward the best possible destination. The performance of the method is exemplified and it is shown how the throughput and average delay of the network with more interface in its nodes, improved while packet loss degrades. As an example a two-interface and a one-interface network are studied. It is shown when network load is increased, interface management will improve the throughput, in the network with two-interface nodes. Also, by considering the link quality factor in the reward function, packet dropping becomes less but average delay increases.

  2. Teen Alcohol Use and Social Networks: The Contributions of Friend Influence and Friendship Selection

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Jacob E; Walsemann, Katrina M; Goosby, Bridget J

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the contributions of teen alcohol use to the formation and continuation of new and existing friendships while in turn estimating the influence of friend drinking on individuals’ regular use and heavy drinking. Method Longitudinal network analysis was used to assess the mutual influences between teen drinking and social networks among adolescents in two large Add Health schools where full network data was collected three times. Friendship processes were disaggregated into the formation of new friendships and the continuation of existing friendships in a joint model isolating friendship selection and friend influences. Results Friends have a modest influence on one another when selection is controlled. Selection is more complicated than prior studies suggest, and is only related to new friendships and not their duration in the largest school. Alcohol use predicts decreasing popularity in some cases, and popularity does not predict alcohol consumption. Conclusion Intervention efforts should continue pursuing strategies that mitigate negative peer influences. The development of socializing opportunities that facilitate relationship opportunities to select on healthy behaviors also appears promising. Future work preventing teen substance use should incorporate longitudinal network assessments to determine whether programs promote protective peer relationships in addition to how treatment effects diffuse through social networks. PMID:26692436

  3. Distribution of orientation selectivity in recurrent networks of spiking neurons with different random topologies.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex are more or less selective for the orientation of a light bar used for stimulation. A broad distribution of individual grades of orientation selectivity has in fact been reported in all species. A possible reason for emergence of broad distributions is the recurrent network within which the stimulus is being processed. Here we compute the distribution of orientation selectivity in randomly connected model networks that are equipped with different spatial patterns of connectivity. We show that, for a wide variety of connectivity patterns, a linear theory based on firing rates accurately approximates the outcome of direct numerical simulations of networks of spiking neurons. Distance dependent connectivity in networks with a more biologically realistic structure does not compromise our linear analysis, as long as the linearized dynamics, and hence the uniform asynchronous irregular activity state, remain stable. We conclude that linear mechanisms of stimulus processing are indeed responsible for the emergence of orientation selectivity and its distribution in recurrent networks with functionally heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

  4. Distribution of Orientation Selectivity in Recurrent Networks of Spiking Neurons with Different Random Topologies

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex are more or less selective for the orientation of a light bar used for stimulation. A broad distribution of individual grades of orientation selectivity has in fact been reported in all species. A possible reason for emergence of broad distributions is the recurrent network within which the stimulus is being processed. Here we compute the distribution of orientation selectivity in randomly connected model networks that are equipped with different spatial patterns of connectivity. We show that, for a wide variety of connectivity patterns, a linear theory based on firing rates accurately approximates the outcome of direct numerical simulations of networks of spiking neurons. Distance dependent connectivity in networks with a more biologically realistic structure does not compromise our linear analysis, as long as the linearized dynamics, and hence the uniform asynchronous irregular activity state, remain stable. We conclude that linear mechanisms of stimulus processing are indeed responsible for the emergence of orientation selectivity and its distribution in recurrent networks with functionally heterogeneous synaptic connectivity. PMID:25469704

  5. Selective Laser Direct Patterning of Silver Nanowire Percolation Network Transparent Conductor for Capacitive Touch Panel.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sukjoon; Yeo, Junyeob; Lee, Jinhwan; Lee, Habeom; Lee, Phillip; Lee, Seung S; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a facile method to enhance the functionality of a patterned metallic transparent conductor through selective laser ablation of metal nanowire percolation network. By scanning focused nanosecond pulsed laser on silver nanowire percolation network, silver nanowires are selectively ablated and patterned without using any conventional chemical etching or photolithography steps. Various arbitrary patterns of silver nanowire transparent conductors are readily created on the percolation network by changing various laser parameters such as repetition rate and power. The macroscopic optical and electrical properties of the percolation network transparent conductor can be easily tuned by changing the conductor pattern design via digital selective laser ablation. Further investigation on the silver nanowire based electrode line prepared by the ablation process substantiates that the general relation for a conducting thin film fails at a narrow width, which should be considered for the applications that requires a high resolution patterns. Finally, as a proof of concept, a capacitive touch sensor with diamond patterns has been demonstrated by selective laser ablation of metal nanowire percolation network.

  6. Forward selection radial basis function networks applied to bacterial classification based on MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuoyong; Wang, Dan; Harrington, Peter de B; Voorhees, Kent J; Rees, Jon

    2004-06-17

    Forward selection improved radial basis function (RBF) network was applied to bacterial classification based on the data obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The classification of each bacterium cultured at different time was discussed and the effect of parameters of the RBF network was investigated. The new method involves forward selection to prevent overfitting and generalized cross-validation (GCV) was used as model selection criterion (MSC). The original data was compressed by using wavelet transformation to speed up the network training and reduce the number of variables of the original MS data. The data was normalized prior training and testing a network to define the area the neural network to be trained in, accelerate the training rate, and reduce the range the parameters to be selected in. The one-out-of-n method was used to split the data set of p samples into a training set of size p-1 and a test set of size 1. With the improved method, the classification correctness for the five bacteria discussed in the present paper are 87.5, 69.2, 80, 92.3, and 92.8%, respectively.

  7. Channel selection based on trust and multiarmed bandit in multiuser, multichannel cognitive radio networks.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanzi; Shen, Xinwang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a channel selection scheme for the multiuser, multichannel cognitive radio networks. This scheme formulates the channel selection as the multiarmed bandit problem, where cognitive radio users are compared to the players and channels to the arms. By simulation negotiation we can achieve the potential reward on each channel after it is selected for transmission; then the channel with the maximum accumulated rewards is formally chosen. To further improve the performance, the trust model is proposed and combined with multi-armed bandit to address the channel selection problem. Simulation results validate the proposed scheme.

  8. Determine the optimal carrier selection for a logistics network based on multi-commodity reliability criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Yeh, Cheng-Ta

    2013-05-01

    From the perspective of supply chain management, the selected carrier plays an important role in freight delivery. This article proposes a new criterion of multi-commodity reliability and optimises the carrier selection based on such a criterion for logistics networks with routes and nodes, over which multiple commodities are delivered. Carrier selection concerns the selection of exactly one carrier to deliver freight on each route. The capacity of each carrier has several available values associated with a probability distribution, since some of a carrier's capacity may be reserved for various orders. Therefore, the logistics network, given any carrier selection, is a multi-commodity multi-state logistics network. Multi-commodity reliability is defined as a probability that the logistics network can satisfy a customer's demand for various commodities, and is a performance indicator for freight delivery. To solve this problem, this study proposes an optimisation algorithm that integrates genetic algorithm, minimal paths and Recursive Sum of Disjoint Products. A practical example in which multi-sized LCD monitors are delivered from China to Germany is considered to illustrate the solution procedure.

  9. Rational design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms for potent and allele selective suppression of mutant Huntingtin in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Michael E.; Southwell, Amber L.; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Skotte, Niels H.; Doty, Crystal N.; Vaid, Kuljeet; Villanueva, Erika B.; Swayze, Eric E.; Frank Bennett, C.; Hayden, Michael R.; Seth, Punit P.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD) are caused by a gain of function mutant protein and/or RNA. An ideal treatment for these diseases is to selectively suppress expression of the mutant allele while preserving expression of the wild-type variant. RNase H active antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) or small interfering RNAs can achieve allele selective suppression of gene expression by targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the repeat expansion. ASOs have been previously shown to discriminate single nucleotide changes in targeted RNAs with ∼5-fold selectivity. Based on RNase H enzymology, we enhanced single nucleotide discrimination by positional incorporation of chemical modifications within the oligonucleotide to limit RNase H cleavage of the non-targeted transcript. The resulting oligonucleotides demonstrate >100-fold discrimination for a single nucleotide change at an SNP site in the disease causing huntingtin mRNA, in patient cells and in a completely humanized mouse model of HD. The modified ASOs were also well tolerated after injection into the central nervous system of wild-type animals, suggesting that their tolerability profile is suitable for advancement as potential allele-selective HD therapeutics. Our findings lay the foundation for efficient allele-selective downregulation of gene expression using ASOs—an outcome with broad application to HD and other dominant genetic disorders. PMID:23963702

  10. Sexual reproduction selects for robustness and negative epistasis in artificial gene networks.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Lohaus, Rolf; Srinivasan, Suraj; Dang, Kristen K; Burch, Christina L

    2006-03-01

    The mutational deterministic hypothesis for the origin and maintenance of sexual reproduction posits that sex enhances the ability of natural selection to purge deleterious mutations after recombination brings them together into single genomes. This explanation requires negative epistasis, a type of genetic interaction where mutations are more harmful in combination than expected from their separate effects. The conceptual appeal of the mutational deterministic hypothesis has been offset by our inability to identify the mechanistic and evolutionary bases of negative epistasis. Here we show that negative epistasis can evolve as a consequence of sexual reproduction itself. Using an artificial gene network model, we find that recombination between gene networks imposes selection for genetic robustness, and that negative epistasis evolves as a by-product of this selection. Our results suggest that sexual reproduction selects for conditions that favour its own maintenance, a case of evolution forging its own path.

  11. Secure relay selection based on learning with negative externality in wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Caidan; Xiao, Liang; Kang, Shan; Chen, Guiquan; Li, Yunzhou; Huang, Lianfen

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we formulate relay selection into a Chinese restaurant game. A secure relay selection strategy is proposed for a wireless network, where multiple source nodes send messages to their destination nodes via several relay nodes, which have different processing and transmission capabilities as well as security properties. The relay selection utilizes a learning-based algorithm for the source nodes to reach their best responses in the Chinese restaurant game. In particular, the relay selection takes into account the negative externality of relay sharing among the source nodes, which learn the capabilities and security properties of relay nodes according to the current signals and the signal history. Simulation results show that this strategy improves the user utility and the overall security performance in wireless networks. In addition, the relay strategy is robust against the signal errors and deviations of some user from the desired actions.

  12. Bully Victimization: Selection and Influence Within Adolescent Friendship Networks and Cliques.

    PubMed

    Lodder, Gerine M A; Scholte, Ron H J; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Giletta, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents tend to form friendships with similar peers and, in turn, their friends further influence adolescents' behaviors and attitudes. Emerging work has shown that these selection and influence processes also might extend to bully victimization. However, no prior work has examined selection and influence effects involved in bully victimization within cliques, despite theoretical account emphasizing the importance of cliques in this regard. This study examined selection and influence processes in adolescence regarding bully victimization both at the level of the entire friendship network and the level of cliques. We used a two-wave design (5-month interval). Participants were 543 adolescents (50.1% male, Mage = 15.8) in secondary education. Stochastic actor-based models indicated that at the level of the larger friendship network, adolescents tended to select friends with similar levels of bully victimization as they themselves. In addition, adolescent friends influenced each other in terms of bully victimization over time. Actor Parter Interdependence models showed that similarities in bully victimization between clique members were not due to selection of clique members. For boys, average clique bully victimization predicted individual bully victimization over time (influence), but not vice versa. No influence was found for girls, indicating that different mechanisms may underlie friend influence on bully victimization for girls and boys. The differences in results at the level of the larger friendship network versus the clique emphasize the importance of taking the type of friendship ties into account in research on selection and influence processes involved in bully victimization.

  13. Selective pumping in a network: insect-style microscale flow transport.

    PubMed

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Staples, Anne E

    2013-06-01

    A new paradigm for selective pumping of fluids in a complex network of channels in the microscale flow regime is presented. The model is inspired by internal flow distributions produced by the rhythmic wall contractions observed in many insect tracheal networks. The approach presented here is a natural extension of previous two-dimensional modeling of insect-inspired microscale flow transport in a single channel, and aims to manipulate fluids efficiently in microscale networks without the use of any mechanical valves. This selective pumping approach enables fluids to be transported, controlled and precisely directed into a specific branch in a network while avoiding other possible routes. In order to present a quantitative analysis of the selective pumping approach presented here, the velocity and pressure fields and the time-averaged net flow that are induced by prescribed wall contractions are calculated numerically using the method of fundamental solutions. More specifically, the Stokeslets-meshfree method is used in this study to solve the Stokes equations that govern the flow motions in a network with moving wall contractions. The results presented here might help in understanding some features of the insect respiratory system function and guide efforts to fabricate novel microfluidic devices for flow transport and mixing, and targeted drug delivery applications.

  14. Selective pumping in a network: insect-style microscale flow transport.

    PubMed

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Staples, Anne E

    2013-06-01

    A new paradigm for selective pumping of fluids in a complex network of channels in the microscale flow regime is presented. The model is inspired by internal flow distributions produced by the rhythmic wall contractions observed in many insect tracheal networks. The approach presented here is a natural extension of previous two-dimensional modeling of insect-inspired microscale flow transport in a single channel, and aims to manipulate fluids efficiently in microscale networks without the use of any mechanical valves. This selective pumping approach enables fluids to be transported, controlled and precisely directed into a specific branch in a network while avoiding other possible routes. In order to present a quantitative analysis of the selective pumping approach presented here, the velocity and pressure fields and the time-averaged net flow that are induced by prescribed wall contractions are calculated numerically using the method of fundamental solutions. More specifically, the Stokeslets-meshfree method is used in this study to solve the Stokes equations that govern the flow motions in a network with moving wall contractions. The results presented here might help in understanding some features of the insect respiratory system function and guide efforts to fabricate novel microfluidic devices for flow transport and mixing, and targeted drug delivery applications. PMID:23538838

  15. Secure and Fair Cluster Head Selection Protocol for Enhancing Security in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Paramasivan, B.; Kaliappan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are wireless networks consisting of number of autonomous mobile devices temporarily interconnected into a network by wireless media. MANETs become one of the most prevalent areas of research in the recent years. Resource limitations, energy efficiency, scalability, and security are the great challenging issues in MANETs. Due to its deployment nature, MANETs are more vulnerable to malicious attack. The secure routing protocols perform very basic security related functions which are not sufficient to protect the network. In this paper, a secure and fair cluster head selection protocol (SFCP) is proposed which integrates security factors into the clustering approach for achieving attacker identification and classification. Byzantine agreement based cooperative technique is used for attacker identification and classification to make the network more attack resistant. SFCP used to solve this issue by making the nodes that are totally surrounded by malicious neighbors adjust dynamically their belief and disbelief thresholds. The proposed protocol selects the secure and energy efficient cluster head which acts as a local detector without imposing overhead to the clustering performance. SFCP is simulated in network simulator 2 and compared with two protocols including AODV and CBRP. PMID:25143986

  16. Using a two-phase evolutionary framework to select multiple network spreaders based on community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Chung-Yuan; Sun, Chuen-Tsai

    2016-11-01

    Using network community structures to identify multiple influential spreaders is an appropriate method for analyzing the dissemination of information, ideas and infectious diseases. For example, data on spreaders selected from groups of customers who make similar purchases may be used to advertise products and to optimize limited resource allocation. Other examples include community detection approaches aimed at identifying structures and groups in social or complex networks. However, determining the number of communities in a network remains a challenge. In this paper we describe our proposal for a two-phase evolutionary framework (TPEF) for determining community numbers and maximizing community modularity. Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi benchmark networks were used to test our proposed method and to analyze execution time, community structure quality, convergence, and the network spreading effect. Results indicate that our proposed TPEF generates satisfactory levels of community quality and convergence. They also suggest a need for an index, mechanism or sampling technique to determine whether a community detection approach should be used for selecting multiple network spreaders.

  17. Exact probability distributions of selected species in stochastic chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2014-09-01

    Chemical reactions are discrete, stochastic events. As such, the species' molecular numbers can be described by an associated master equation. However, handling such an equation may become difficult due to the large size of reaction networks. A commonly used approach to forecast the behaviour of reaction networks is to perform computational simulations of such systems and analyse their outcome statistically. This approach, however, might require high computational costs to provide accurate results. In this paper we opt for an analytical approach to obtain the time-dependent solution of the Chemical Master Equation for selected species in a general reaction network. When the reaction networks are composed exclusively of zeroth and first-order reactions, this analytical approach significantly alleviates the computational burden required by simulation-based methods. By building upon these analytical solutions, we analyse a general monomolecular reaction network with an arbitrary number of species to obtain the exact marginal probability distribution for selected species. Additionally, we study two particular topologies of monomolecular reaction networks, namely (i) an unbranched chain of monomolecular reactions with and without synthesis and degradation reactions and (ii) a circular chain of monomolecular reactions. We illustrate our methodology and alternative ways to use it for non-linear systems by analysing a protein autoactivation mechanism. Later, we compare the computational load required for the implementation of our results and a pure computational approach to analyse an unbranched chain of monomolecular reactions. Finally, we study calcium ions gates in the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum mediated by ryanodine receptors.

  18. Secure and fair cluster head selection protocol for enhancing security in mobile ad hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Paramasivan, B; Kaliappan, M

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are wireless networks consisting of number of autonomous mobile devices temporarily interconnected into a network by wireless media. MANETs become one of the most prevalent areas of research in the recent years. Resource limitations, energy efficiency, scalability, and security are the great challenging issues in MANETs. Due to its deployment nature, MANETs are more vulnerable to malicious attack. The secure routing protocols perform very basic security related functions which are not sufficient to protect the network. In this paper, a secure and fair cluster head selection protocol (SFCP) is proposed which integrates security factors into the clustering approach for achieving attacker identification and classification. Byzantine agreement based cooperative technique is used for attacker identification and classification to make the network more attack resistant. SFCP used to solve this issue by making the nodes that are totally surrounded by malicious neighbors adjust dynamically their belief and disbelief thresholds. The proposed protocol selects the secure and energy efficient cluster head which acts as a local detector without imposing overhead to the clustering performance. SFCP is simulated in network simulator 2 and compared with two protocols including AODV and CBRP.

  19. The use of a selective saturation pulse to suppress t1 noise in two-dimensional (1)H fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aiden J; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Marsh, Andrew; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Brown, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    A selective saturation pulse at fast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies (60+kHz) suppresses t1 noise in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional (1)H MAS NMR spectra. The method is applied to a synthetic nucleoside with an intense methyl (1)H signal due to triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting groups. Enhanced performance in terms of suppressing the methyl signal while minimising the loss of signal intensity of nearby resonances of interest relies on reducing spin diffusion--this is quantified by comparing two-dimensional (1)H NOESY-like spin diffusion spectra recorded at 30-70 kHz MAS. For a saturation pulse centred at the methyl resonance, the effect of changing the nutation frequency at different MAS frequencies as well as the effect of changing the pulse duration is investigated. By applying a pulse of duration 30 ms and nutation frequency 725 Hz at 70 kHz MAS, a good compromise of significant suppression of the methyl resonance combined with the signal intensity of resonances greater than 5 ppm away from the methyl resonance being largely unaffected is achieved. The effectiveness of using a selective saturation pulse is demonstrated for both homonuclear (1)H-(1)H double quantum (DQ)/single quantum (SQ) MAS and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

  20. Adaptive Path Selection for Link Loss Inference in Network Tomography Applications

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yan; Jiao, Jun; Rao, Yuan; Ma, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of selecting the optimal end-to-end paths for link loss inference in order to improve the performance of network tomography applications, which infer the link loss rates from the path loss rates. Measuring the path loss rates using end-to-end probing packets may incur additional traffic overheads for networks, so it is important to select the minimum path set carefully while maximizing their performance. The usual approach is to select the maximum independent paths from the candidates simultaneously, while the other paths can be replaced by linear combinations of them. However, this approach ignores the fact that many paths always exist that do not lose any packets, and thus it is easy to determine that all of the links of these paths also have 0 loss rates. Not considering these good paths will inevitably lead to inefficiency and high probing costs. Thus, we propose an adaptive path selection method that selects paths sequentially based on the loss rates of previously selected paths. We also propose a theorem as well as a graph construction and decomposition approach to efficiently find the most valuable path during each round of selection. Our new method significantly outperforms the classical path selection method based on simulations in terms of the probing cost, number of accurate links determined, and the running speed. PMID:27701447

  1. An Examination of Native and Immigrant Students' Social Networking Using the College Search and Selection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neimeyer, Bruce Carlton

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of formal and informal networks through cyber- and traditional communication methods in the college search and selection process by native and immigrant students to examine various postulates and propositions of social capital theory. In addition, the analysis of cybernetworks used by disadvantaged, college bound…

  2. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  3. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  4. Cancer Markers Selection Using Network-Based Cox Regression: A Methodological and Computational Practice

    PubMed Central

    Iuliano, Antonella; Occhipinti, Annalisa; Angelini, Claudia; De Feis, Italia; Lió, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    International initiatives such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) are collecting multiple datasets at different genome-scales with the aim of identifying novel cancer biomarkers and predicting survival of patients. To analyze such data, several statistical methods have been applied, among them Cox regression models. Although these models provide a good statistical framework to analyze omic data, there is still a lack of studies that illustrate advantages and drawbacks in integrating biological information and selecting groups of biomarkers. In fact, classical Cox regression algorithms focus on the selection of a single biomarker, without taking into account the strong correlation between genes. Even though network-based Cox regression algorithms overcome such drawbacks, such network-based approaches are less widely used within the life science community. In this article, we aim to provide a clear methodological framework on the use of such approaches in order to turn cancer research results into clinical applications. Therefore, we first discuss the rationale and the practical usage of three recently proposed network-based Cox regression algorithms (i.e., Net-Cox, AdaLnet, and fastcox). Then, we show how to combine existing biological knowledge and available data with such algorithms to identify networks of cancer biomarkers and to estimate survival of patients. Finally, we describe in detail a new permutation-based approach to better validate the significance of the selection in terms of cancer gene signatures and pathway/networks identification. We illustrate the proposed methodology by means of both simulations and real case studies. Overall, the aim of our work is two-fold. Firstly, to show how network-based Cox regression models can be used to integrate biological knowledge (e.g., multi-omics data) for the analysis of survival data. Secondly, to provide a clear methodological and computational approach for

  5. Applications of self-organizing neural networks in virtual screening and diversity selection.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Paul; Ertl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Artificial neural networks provide a powerful technique for the analysis and modeling of nonlinear relationships between molecular structures and pharmacological activity. Many network types, including Kohonen and counterpropagation, also provide an intuitive method for the visual assessment of correspondence between the input and output data. This work shows how a combination of neural networks and radial distribution function molecular descriptors can be applied in various areas of industrial pharmaceutical research. These applications include the prediction of biological activity, the selection of screening candidates (cherry picking), and the extraction of representative subsets from large compound collections such as combinatorial libraries. The methods described have also been implemented as an easy-to-use Web tool, allowing chemists to perform interactive neural network experiments on the Novartis intranet.

  6. Selective Disclosure of HIV Status in Egocentric Support Networks of People Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Chunpeng; He, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate HIV disclosure activities in social support networks of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). An egocentric network study was conducted in Nanning, China. A sample of 147 PLWHAs (egos) nominated 922 network members (alters) who would provide egos with social support. All egos disclosed their HIV status to at least one alter in their support networks and 26.5 % disclosed to all alters. Among network alters, 95.7 % of spouse alters, 59.9 % of other family member alters, and 29.7 % of friend alters were aware of egos’ HIV status. PLWHA egos were more likely to disclose their HIV status to their spouse and other family members, frequently-contacted alters, and alters who provided more social support. In addition, older egos and unmarried egos were more likely to disclose their HIV status. The findings indicate that network-based HIV intervention programs should take into consideration selective disclosure in social networks. PMID:24996393

  7. A New HIV Prevention Network Approach: Sociometric Peer Change Agent Selection

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, John A.; Zhou, A. Ning; Laumann, Edward O.

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, the Peer Change Agent (PCA) model is the most frequently used conceptual framework for HIV prevention. Change agents themselves can be more important than the messages they convey. PCA selection is operationalized via heterogeneous methods based upon individual-level attributes. A sociometric position selection strategy, however, could increase peer influence potency and halt transmission at key network locations. In this study, we selected candidate PCAs based upon relative sociometric bridging and centrality scores and assessed their attributes in comparison to one another and to existing peer educators. We focused upon an emerging HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men in Southern India in 2011. PCAs selected based on their bridging score were more likely to be innovators when compared to other centrally-located PCAs, to PCAs located on the periphery, and to existing peer educators. We also found that sociodemographic attributes and risk behaviors were similar across all candidate PCAs, but risk behaviors of existing peer educators differed. Existing peer educators were more likely to engage in higher risk behavior such as receiving money for sex when compared to sociometrically selected peer changes agents. These existing peer educators were also more likely to exhibit leadership qualities within the overall network; they were, however, just as likely as other non-trained candidate peer change agents to report important HIV intravention behavior (encouraging condoms within their network). The importance of identifying bridges who may be able to diffuse innovation more effectively within high risk HIV networks is especially critical given recent efficacy data from novel HIV prevention interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis. Moreover, while existing peer educators were more likely to be leaders in our analysis, using peer educators with high risk behavior may have limited utility in enacting behavior change among sex worker peers or

  8. Adolescent Friendships, BMI, and Physical Activity: Untangling Selection and Influence Through Longitudinal Social Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Sandra D; Schaefer, David R; Price, Chara D; Vest, Andrea E

    2013-09-01

    Bioecological theory suggests that adolescents' health is a result of selection and socialization processes occurring between adolescents and their microsettings. This study examines the association between adolescents' friends and health using a social network model and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,896, mean age = 15.97 years). Results indicated evidence of friend influence on BMI and physical activity. Friendships were more likely among adolescents who engaged in greater physical activity and who were similar to one another in BMI and physical activity. These effects emerged after controlling for alternative friend selection factors, such as endogenous social network processes and propinquity through courses and activities. Some selection effects were moderated by gender, popularity, and reciprocity.

  9. Adolescent Friendships, BMI, and Physical Activity: Untangling Selection and Influence Through Longitudinal Social Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; Schaefer, David R.; Price, Chara D.; Vest, Andrea E.

    2012-01-01

    Bioecological theory suggests that adolescents’ health is a result of selection and socialization processes occurring between adolescents and their microsettings. This study examines the association between adolescents’ friends and health using a social network model and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,896, mean age = 15.97 years). Results indicated evidence of friend influence on BMI and physical activity. Friendships were more likely among adolescents who engaged in greater physical activity and who were similar to one another in BMI and physical activity. These effects emerged after controlling for alternative friend selection factors, such as endogenous social network processes and propinquity through courses and activities. Some selection effects were moderated by gender, popularity, and reciprocity. PMID:24222971

  10. High performances CNTFETs achieved using CNT networks for selective gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorintin, Louis; Bondavalli, Paolo; Legagneux, Pierre; Pribat, Didier

    2009-08-01

    Our study deals with the utilization of carbon nanotubes networks based transistors with different metal electrodes for highly selective gas sensing. Indeed, carbon nanotubes networks can be used as semi conducting materials to achieve good performances transistors. These devices are extremely sensitive to the change of the Schottky barrier heights between Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) and drain/source metal electrodes: the gas adsorption creates an interfacial dipole that modifies the metal work function and so the bending and the height of the Schottky barrier at the contacts. Moreover each gas interacts specifically with each metal identifying a sort of electronic fingerprinting. Using airbrush technique for deposition, we have been able to achieve uniform random networks of carbon nanotubes suitable for large area applications and mass production such as fabrication of CNT based gas sensors. These networks enable us to achieve transistors with on/off ratio of more than 5 orders of magnitude. To reach these characteristics, the density of the CNT network has been adjusted in order to reach the percolation threshold only for semi-conducting nanotubes. These optimized devices have allowed us to tune the sensitivity (improving it) of our sensors for highly selective detection of DiMethyl-Methyl-Phosphonate (DMMP, a sarin stimulant), and even volatile drug precursors using Pd, Au and Mo electrodes.

  11. Selectivity of stimulus induced responses in cultured hippocampal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Pimashkin, Alexey; Gladkov, Arseniy; Agrba, Ekaterina; Mukhina, Irina; Kazantsev, Victor

    2016-08-01

    Sensory information can be encoded using the average firing rate and spike occurrence times in neuronal network responses to external stimuli. Decoding or retrieving stimulus characteristics from the response pattern generally implies that the corresponding neural network has a selective response to various input signals. The role of various spiking activity characteristics (e.g., spike rate and precise spike timing) for basic information processing was widely investigated on the level of neural populations but gave inconsistent evidence for particular mechanisms. Multisite electrophysiology of cultured neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays is a recently developed tool and currently an active research area. In this study, we analyzed the stimulus responses represented by network-wide bursts evoked from various spatial locations (electrodes). We found that the response characteristics, such as the burst initiation time and the spike rate, can be used to retrieve information about the stimulus location. The best selectivity in the response spiking pattern could be found for a small subpopulation of neurones (electrodes) at relatively short post-stimulus intervals. Such intervals were unique for each culture due to the non-uniform organization of the functional connectivity in the network during spontaneous development. PMID:27468317

  12. Selectivity of stimulus induced responses in cultured hippocampal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Pimashkin, Alexey; Gladkov, Arseniy; Agrba, Ekaterina; Mukhina, Irina; Kazantsev, Victor

    2016-08-01

    Sensory information can be encoded using the average firing rate and spike occurrence times in neuronal network responses to external stimuli. Decoding or retrieving stimulus characteristics from the response pattern generally implies that the corresponding neural network has a selective response to various input signals. The role of various spiking activity characteristics (e.g., spike rate and precise spike timing) for basic information processing was widely investigated on the level of neural populations but gave inconsistent evidence for particular mechanisms. Multisite electrophysiology of cultured neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays is a recently developed tool and currently an active research area. In this study, we analyzed the stimulus responses represented by network-wide bursts evoked from various spatial locations (electrodes). We found that the response characteristics, such as the burst initiation time and the spike rate, can be used to retrieve information about the stimulus location. The best selectivity in the response spiking pattern could be found for a small subpopulation of neurones (electrodes) at relatively short post-stimulus intervals. Such intervals were unique for each culture due to the non-uniform organization of the functional connectivity in the network during spontaneous development.

  13. Default network activation during episodic and semantic memory retrieval: A selective meta-analytic comparison.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongkeun

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear whether and to what extent the default network subregions involved in episodic memory (EM) and semantic memory (SM) processes overlap or are separated from one another. This study addresses this issue through a controlled meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies involving healthy participants. Various EM and SM task paradigms differ widely in the extent of default network involvement. Therefore, the issue at hand cannot be properly addressed without some control for this factor. In this regard, this study employs a two-stage analysis: a preliminary meta-analysis to select EM and SM task paradigms that recruit relatively extensive default network regions and a main analysis to compare the selected task paradigms. Based on a within-EM comparison, the default network contributed more to recollection/familiarity effects than to old/new effects, and based on a within-SM comparison, it contributed more to word/pseudoword effects than to semantic/phonological effects. According to a direct comparison of recollection/familiarity and word/pseudoword effects, each involving a range of default network regions, there were more overlaps than separations in default network subregions involved in these two effects. More specifically, overlaps included the bilateral posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex, left inferior parietal lobule, and left anteromedial prefrontal regions, whereas separations included only the hippocampal formation and the parahippocampal cortex region, which was unique to recollection/familiarity effects. These results indicate that EM and SM retrieval processes involving strong memory signals recruit extensive and largely overlapping default network regions and differ mainly in distinct contributions of hippocampus and parahippocampal regions to EM retrieval. PMID:26562053

  14. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  15. Orbital-selective singlet dimer formation and suppression of double exchange in 4d and 5d systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Sergey; Cao, Gang; Khomskii, Daniel

    One of the main mechanisms of ferromagnetic ordering in conducting materials is the double exchange (DE). It is usually supposed in DE model that the Hund's coupling JH is much larger than electron hopping t; in this case one stabilizes the state with maximum spin per pair of ions, which finally leads to ferromagnetism in bulk systems. We show that in the dimerized 4 d / 5 d transition metal oxides for which JH is reduced and t is in contrast enhanced, another situation is possible, when formation of the spin-singlets on delocalized orbitals is more favorable. This leads to suppression of the DE and to a strong decrease of the total spin. The model calculations using the dynamical mean-field theory show that this effect survives even in the extended systems, not only for dimers. Such a situation is realized, e.g., in Y5Mo2O12, CrO2 under pressure and in many other 4 d / 5 d based materials. Another mechanism, which may suppress DE and which is also typical for 4 d / 5 d compounds is the spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We show on the example of Ba5AlIr2O11, that in this system it is the combination of molecular-orbital formation and SOC that strongly decreases magnetic moment on Ir. Civil Research and Development Foundation via FSCX-14-61025-0.

  16. Suppressive Effects of Selected Food Phytochemicals on CD74 Expression in NCI-N87 Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Hirotaka; Washida, Kazuto; Murakami, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread human pathogens, and plays major roles in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. CD74 of gastric epithelial cells has recently been identified as an adhesion molecule to urease in H. pylori. In this study, we found that CD74 is highly expressed in a constitutive manner in NCI-N87 human gastric carcinoma cells at both the protein and mRNA levels as compared with Hs738St./Int fetal gastric cells. Subsequently, a novel cell-based ELISA able to rapidly screen the suppressive agents of CD74 expression was established. NCI-N87 cells were treated separately with 25 different food phytochemicals (4–100 µM) for 48 h and subjected to our novel assay. From those results, a citrus coumarin, bergamottin, was indicated to be the most promising compound with an LC50/IC50 value greater than 7.1, followed by luteolin (>5.4), nobiletin (>5.3), and quercetin (>5.1). Our findings suggest that these CD74 suppressants are unique candidates for preventing H. pylori adhesion and subsequent infection with reasonable action mechanisms. PMID:18818744

  17. Emergence of multilevel selection in the prisoner's dilemma game on coevolving random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2009-09-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game, whereby a coevolutionary rule is introduced that molds the random topology of the interaction network in two ways. First, existing links are deleted whenever a player adopts a new strategy or its degree exceeds a threshold value; second, new links are added randomly after a given number of game iterations. These coevolutionary processes correspond to the generic formation of new links and deletion of existing links that, especially in human societies, appear frequently as a consequence of ongoing socialization, change of lifestyle or death. Due to the counteraction of deletions and additions of links the initial heterogeneity of the interaction network is qualitatively preserved, and thus cannot be held responsible for the observed promotion of cooperation. Indeed, the coevolutionary rule evokes the spontaneous emergence of a powerful multilevel selection mechanism, which despite the sustained random topology of the evolving network, maintains cooperation across the whole span of defection temptation values.

  18. Biohybrid networks of selectively desulfated glycosaminoglycans for tunable growth factor delivery.

    PubMed

    Zieris, Andrea; Dockhorn, Ron; Röhrich, Anika; Zimmermann, Ralf; Müller, Martin; Welzel, Petra B; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Sommer, Jens-Uwe; Freudenberg, Uwe; Werner, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Sulfation patterns of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) govern the electrostatic complexation of biomolecules and thus allow for modulating the release profiles of growth factors from GAG-based hydrogels. To explore options related to this, selectively desulfated heparin derivatives were prepared, thoroughly characterized, and covalently converted with star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) into binary polymer networks. The impact of the GAG sulfation pattern on the network characteristics of the obtained hydrogels was theoretically evaluated by mean field methods and experimentally analyzed by rheometry and swelling measurements. Sulfation-dependent differences of reactivity and miscibility of the heparin derivatives were shown to determine network formation. A theory-based design concept for customizing growth factor affinity and physical characteristics was introduced and validated by quantifying the release of fibroblast growth factor 2 from a set of biohybrid gels. The resulting new class of cell-instructive polymer matrices with tunable GAG sulfation will be instrumental for multiple applications in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:25329425

  19. Techniques for selecting topology and implementing the distributed control system network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyi, S.

    2016-04-01

    On grounds of reviews devoted to flows analysis methods in the data processing networks within the automated control systems for the technological process and assessment of these methods by the selected set of requirements, one may make conclusion about expediency of using the combination of graph flow algorithms and the queuing theory. The outputs of the research concerning the impact of network dynamics on the drilling platform distributed system control quality prove the fact that the quality of the transient depends upon the frequency of discretization and intensity of flows. With increasing the intensity of flows, the static error of the control enlarges. It was concluded that in order to control the automation objects in the real-time mode it is required to minimize the delays in transmitting packets in the network.

  20. Biohybrid networks of selectively desulfated glycosaminoglycans for tunable growth factor delivery.

    PubMed

    Zieris, Andrea; Dockhorn, Ron; Röhrich, Anika; Zimmermann, Ralf; Müller, Martin; Welzel, Petra B; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Sommer, Jens-Uwe; Freudenberg, Uwe; Werner, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Sulfation patterns of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) govern the electrostatic complexation of biomolecules and thus allow for modulating the release profiles of growth factors from GAG-based hydrogels. To explore options related to this, selectively desulfated heparin derivatives were prepared, thoroughly characterized, and covalently converted with star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) into binary polymer networks. The impact of the GAG sulfation pattern on the network characteristics of the obtained hydrogels was theoretically evaluated by mean field methods and experimentally analyzed by rheometry and swelling measurements. Sulfation-dependent differences of reactivity and miscibility of the heparin derivatives were shown to determine network formation. A theory-based design concept for customizing growth factor affinity and physical characteristics was introduced and validated by quantifying the release of fibroblast growth factor 2 from a set of biohybrid gels. The resulting new class of cell-instructive polymer matrices with tunable GAG sulfation will be instrumental for multiple applications in biotechnology and medicine.

  1. Construction of tunable radial basis function networks using orthogonal forward selection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Hong, Xia; Luk, Bing L; Harris, Chris J

    2009-04-01

    An orthogonal forward selection (OFS) algorithm based on leave-one-out (LOO) criteria is proposed for the construction of radial basis function (RBF) networks with tunable nodes. Each stage of the construction process determines an RBF node, namely, its center vector and diagonal covariance matrix, by minimizing the LOO statistics. For regression application, the LOO criterion is chosen to be the LOO mean-square error, while the LOO misclassification rate is adopted in two-class classification application. This OFS-LOO algorithm is computationally efficient, and it is capable of constructing parsimonious RBF networks that generalize well. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is fully automatic, and the user does not need to specify a termination criterion for the construction process. The effectiveness of the proposed RBF network construction procedure is demonstrated using examples taken from both regression and classification applications.

  2. Formation of nanoscale networks: selectively swelling amphiphilic block copolymers with CO2-expanded liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianliang; Zhang, Aijuan; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Qingkun; Du, Can; Li, Lei; Hong, Yanzhen; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric films with nanoscale networks were prepared by selectively swelling an amphiphilic diblock copolymer, polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP), with the CO2-expanded liquid (CXL), CO2-methanol. The phase behavior of the CO2-methanol system was investigated by both theoretical calculation and experiments, revealing that methanol can be expanded by CO2, forming homogeneous CXL under the experimental conditions. When treated with the CO2-methanol system, the spin cast compact PS-b-P4VP film was transformed into a network with interconnected pores, in a pressure range of 12-20 MPa and a temperature range of 45-60 °C. The formation mechanism of the network, involving plasticization of PS and selective swelling of P4VP, was proposed. Because the diblock copolymer diffusion process is controlled by the activated hopping of individual block copolymer chains with the thermodynamic barrier for moving PVP segments from one to another, the formation of the network structures is achieved in a short time scale and shows ``thermodynamically restricted'' character. Furthermore, the resulting polymer networks were employed as templates, for the preparation of polypyrrole networks, by an electrochemical polymerization process. The prepared porous polypyrrole film was used to fabricate a chemoresistor-type gas sensor which showed high sensitivity towards ammonia.Polymeric films with nanoscale networks were prepared by selectively swelling an amphiphilic diblock copolymer, polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP), with the CO2-expanded liquid (CXL), CO2-methanol. The phase behavior of the CO2-methanol system was investigated by both theoretical calculation and experiments, revealing that methanol can be expanded by CO2, forming homogeneous CXL under the experimental conditions. When treated with the CO2-methanol system, the spin cast compact PS-b-P4VP film was transformed into a network with interconnected pores, in a pressure range of 12-20 MPa and a

  3. Integrated network-diversity analyses suggest suppressive effect of Hodgkin’s lymphoma and slightly relieving effect of chemotherapy on human milk microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam); Li, Lianwei; Li, Wendy; Li, Jie; Chen, Hongju

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effects of Hodgkin’s lymphoma and the chemotherapy for treating the disease on the human milk microbiome through integrated network and community diversity analyses. Our analyses suggest that Hodgkin’s lymphoma seems to have a suppressing effect on the milk microbiome by lowering the milk microbial community diversity, as measured by the Hill numbers profiles. Although the diversity analysis did not reveal an effect of chemotherapy on community diversity, bacterial species interaction network analysis shows that chemotherapy may help to slightly restore the milk microbiome impacted by Hodgkin’s lymphoma through its influence on the interactions among species (or OTUs). We further constructed diversity-metabolites network, which suggests that the milk microbial diversity is positively correlated with some beneficial milk metabolites such as DHA (DocosaHexaenoic Acid), and that the diversity is negatively correlated with some potentially harmful metabolites such as Butanal. We hence postulate that higher milk microbial diversity should be a signature of healthy mothers and beneficial to infants. Finally, we constructed metabolites OTU correlation networks, from which we identified some special OTUs. These OTUs deserve further investigations given their apparent involvements in regulating the levels of critical milk metabolites such as DHA, Inositol and Butanal. PMID:27386954

  4. Breeding and Genetics Symposium: networks and pathways to guide genomic selection.

    PubMed

    Snelling, W M; Cushman, R A; Keele, J W; Maltecca, C; Thomas, M G; Fortes, M R S; Reverter, A

    2013-02-01

    Many traits affecting profitability and sustainability of meat, milk, and fiber production are polygenic, with no single gene having an overwhelming influence on observed variation. No knowledge of the specific genes controlling these traits has been needed to make substantial improvement through selection. Significant gains have been made through phenotypic selection enhanced by pedigree relationships and continually improving statistical methodology. Genomic selection, recently enabled by assays for dense SNP located throughout the genome, promises to increase selection accuracy and accelerate genetic improvement by emphasizing the SNP most strongly correlated to phenotype although the genes and sequence variants affecting phenotype remain largely unknown. These genomic predictions theoretically rely on linkage disequilibrium (LD) between genotyped SNP and unknown functional variants, but familial linkage may increase effectiveness when predicting individuals related to those in the training data. Genomic selection with functional SNP genotypes should be less reliant on LD patterns shared by training and target populations, possibly allowing robust prediction across unrelated populations. Although the specific variants causing polygenic variation may never be known with certainty, a number of tools and resources can be used to identify those most likely to affect phenotype. Associations of dense SNP genotypes with phenotype provide a 1-dimensional approach for identifying genes affecting specific traits; in contrast, associations with multiple traits allow defining networks of genes interacting to affect correlated traits. Such networks are especially compelling when corroborated by existing functional annotation and established molecular pathways. The SNP occurring within network genes, obtained from public databases or derived from genome and transcriptome sequences, may be classified according to expected effects on gene products. As illustrated by

  5. Corticostriatal response selection in sentence production: Insights from neural network simulation with reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Hinaut, Xavier; Lance, Florian; Droin, Colas; Petit, Maxime; Pointeau, Gregoire; Dominey, Peter Ford

    2015-11-01

    Language production requires selection of the appropriate sentence structure to accommodate the communication goal of the speaker - the transmission of a particular meaning. Here we consider event meanings, in terms of predicates and thematic roles, and we address the problem that a given event can be described from multiple perspectives, which poses a problem of response selection. We present a model of response selection in sentence production that is inspired by the primate corticostriatal system. The model is implemented in the context of reservoir computing where the reservoir - a recurrent neural network with fixed connections - corresponds to cortex, and the readout corresponds to the striatum. We demonstrate robust learning, and generalization properties of the model, and demonstrate its cross linguistic capabilities in English and Japanese. The results contribute to the argument that the corticostriatal system plays a role in response selection in language production, and to the stance that reservoir computing is a valid potential model of corticostriatal processing.

  6. Reversible Assembly of Graphitic Carbon Nitride 3D Network for Highly Selective Dyes Absorption and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuye; Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Jianhai; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-09-27

    Responsive assembly of 2D materials is of great interest for a range of applications. In this work, interfacial functionalized carbon nitride (CN) nanofibers were synthesized by hydrolyzing bulk CN in sodium hydroxide solution. The reversible assemble and disassemble behavior of the as-prepared CN nanofibers was investigated by using CO2 as a trigger to form a hydrogel network at first. Compared to the most widespread absorbent materials such as active carbon, graphene and previously reported supramolecular gel, the proposed CN hydrogel not only exhibited a competitive absorbing capacity (maximum absorbing capacity of methylene blue up to 402 mg/g) but also overcame the typical deficiencies such as poor selectivity and high energy-consuming regeneration. This work would provide a strategy to construct a 3D CN network and open an avenue for developing smart assembly for potential applications ranging from environment to selective extraction. PMID:27608277

  7. Descending control of neural bias and selectivity in a spatial attention network: rules and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mysore, Shreesh P; Knudsen, Eric I

    2014-10-01

    The brain integrates stimulus-driven (exogenous) activity with internally generated (endogenous) activity to compute the highest priority stimulus for gaze and attention. Little is known about how this computation is accomplished neurally. We explored the underlying functional logic in a critical component of the spatial attention network, the optic tectum (OT, superior colliculus in mammals), in awake barn owls. We found that space-specific endogenous influences, evoked by activating descending forebrain pathways, bias competition among exogenous influences, and substantially enhance the quality of the categorical neural pointer to the highest priority stimulus. These endogenous influences operate across sensory modalities. Biologically grounded modeling revealed that the observed effects on network bias and selectivity require a simple circuit mechanism: endogenously driven gain modulation of feedback inhibition among competing channels. Our findings reveal fundamental principles by which internal and external information combine to guide selection of the next target for gaze and attention.

  8. Descending control of neural bias and selectivity in a spatial attention network: rules and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mysore, Shreesh P.; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The brain integrates stimulus-driven (exogenous) activity with internally generated (endogenous) activity to compute the highest priority stimulus for gaze and attention. Little is known about how this computation is accomplished neurally. We explored the underlying functional logic in a critical component of the spatial attention network, the optic tectum (OT, superior colliculus in mammals), in awake barn owls. We found that space-specific endogenous influences, evoked by activating descending forebrain pathways, bias competition among exogenous influences, and substantially enhance the quality of the categorical neural pointer to the highest priority stimulus. These endogenous influences operate across sensory modalities. Biologically grounded modeling revealed that the observed effects on network bias and selectivity require a simple circuit mechanism: endogenously driven gain modulation of feedback inhibition among competing channels. Our findings reveal fundamental principles by which internal and external information combine to guide selection of the next target for gaze and attention. PMID:25220813

  9. Site selection for a countrywide temporary network in Austria: noise analysis and preliminary performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Kolínský, P.; Gröschl, G.; Apoloner, M.-T.; Qorbani, E.; Schneider, F.; Bokelmann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Site selection is a crucial part of the work flow for installing seismic stations. Here, we report the preparations for a countrywide temporary seismic network in Austria. We describe the specific requirements for a multi-purpose seismic array with 40 km station spacing that will be operative approximately three years. Reftek 151 60 s sensors and Reftek 130/130S digitizers form the core instrumentation of our seismic stations which are mostly installed inside abandoned or occasionally used basements or cellars. We present probabilistic power spectral density analysis to assess noise conditions at selected sites and show exemplary seismic events that were recorded by the preliminary network by the end of July 2015.

  10. Reversible Assembly of Graphitic Carbon Nitride 3D Network for Highly Selective Dyes Absorption and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuye; Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Jianhai; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-09-27

    Responsive assembly of 2D materials is of great interest for a range of applications. In this work, interfacial functionalized carbon nitride (CN) nanofibers were synthesized by hydrolyzing bulk CN in sodium hydroxide solution. The reversible assemble and disassemble behavior of the as-prepared CN nanofibers was investigated by using CO2 as a trigger to form a hydrogel network at first. Compared to the most widespread absorbent materials such as active carbon, graphene and previously reported supramolecular gel, the proposed CN hydrogel not only exhibited a competitive absorbing capacity (maximum absorbing capacity of methylene blue up to 402 mg/g) but also overcame the typical deficiencies such as poor selectivity and high energy-consuming regeneration. This work would provide a strategy to construct a 3D CN network and open an avenue for developing smart assembly for potential applications ranging from environment to selective extraction.

  11. Topology-selective jamming of fully-connected, code-division random-access networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polydoros, Andreas; Cheng, Unjeng

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce certain models of topology selective stochastic jamming and examine its impact on a class of fully-connected, spread-spectrum, slotted ALOHA-type random access networks. The theory covers dedicated as well as half-duplex units. The dominant role of the spatial duty factor is established, and connections with the dual concept of time selective jamming are discussed. The optimal choices of coding rate and link access parameters (from the users' side) and the jamming spatial fraction are numerically established for DS and FH spreading.

  12. Selection of opponents in the prisoner׳s dilemma in dynamic networks: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Yonenoh, Hiroto; Akiyama, Eizo

    2014-06-21

    To investigate how a human subject selects her neighbors (opponents) to play the Prisoner׳s Dilemma within a social network, we conducted a human-subject experiment. The results are as follows: (1) A subject is more likely to dismiss the links to her neighbors most frequently when the subject chooses C and when the neighbor chooses D; (2) a subject who has more neighbors is less likely to dismiss links than a subject who has fewer neighbors; and (3) a subject is more likely to create links to (=select) opponents who have more neighbors than to opponents who have fewer neighbors.

  13. Interference Mitigation Based on Intelligent Location Selection in a Canonical Communication Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Junyue; Cai, Yueming; Zheng, Jianchao; Yang, Wendong; Yang, Weiwei; Hu, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, the interference mitigation in a canonical communication network is discussed from the perspective of intelligent location selection. A potential game model is constructed and a location-selection algorithm is designed combining no-regret procedure. With the proposed algorithm, all nodes can update their strategies with limited information exchange. Specifically, our proposed algorithm can converge to a set of correlated equilibria which are the globally or locally optimal solution to the problem of interference minimization. Moreover, our proposed algorithm can achieve distributed implementation without a central node. Simulation results demonstrate that the total interference can be mitigated efficiently with our proposed algorithm. And the proposed algorithm can converge fast.

  14. Fuzzy C-Means Clustering and Energy Efficient Cluster Head Selection for Cooperative Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Dost Muhammad Saqib; Saeed, Nasir; Nam, Haewoon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel cluster based cooperative spectrum sensing algorithm to save the wastage of energy, in which clusters are formed using fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and a cluster head (CH) is selected based on a sensor’s location within each cluster, its location with respect to fusion center (FC), its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and its residual energy. The sensing information of a single sensor is not reliable enough due to shadowing and fading. To overcome these issues, cooperative spectrum sensing schemes were proposed to take advantage of spatial diversity. For cooperative spectrum sensing, all sensors sense the spectrum and report the sensed energy to FC for the final decision. However, it increases the energy consumption of the network when a large number of sensors need to cooperate; in addition to that, the efficiency of the network is also reduced. The proposed algorithm makes the cluster and selects the CHs such that very little amount of network energy is consumed and the highest efficiency of the network is achieved. Using the proposed algorithm maximum probability of detection under an imperfect channel is accomplished with minimum energy consumption as compared to conventional clustering schemes. PMID:27618061

  15. Fuzzy C-Means Clustering and Energy Efficient Cluster Head Selection for Cooperative Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Dost Muhammad Saqib; Saeed, Nasir; Nam, Haewoon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel cluster based cooperative spectrum sensing algorithm to save the wastage of energy, in which clusters are formed using fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and a cluster head (CH) is selected based on a sensor's location within each cluster, its location with respect to fusion center (FC), its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and its residual energy. The sensing information of a single sensor is not reliable enough due to shadowing and fading. To overcome these issues, cooperative spectrum sensing schemes were proposed to take advantage of spatial diversity. For cooperative spectrum sensing, all sensors sense the spectrum and report the sensed energy to FC for the final decision. However, it increases the energy consumption of the network when a large number of sensors need to cooperate; in addition to that, the efficiency of the network is also reduced. The proposed algorithm makes the cluster and selects the CHs such that very little amount of network energy is consumed and the highest efficiency of the network is achieved. Using the proposed algorithm maximum probability of detection under an imperfect channel is accomplished with minimum energy consumption as compared to conventional clustering schemes. PMID:27618061

  16. Characterization of computer network events through simultaneous feature selection and clustering of intrusion alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siyue; Leung, Henry; Dondo, Maxwell

    2014-05-01

    As computer network security threats increase, many organizations implement multiple Network Intrusion Detection Systems (NIDS) to maximize the likelihood of intrusion detection and provide a comprehensive understanding of intrusion activities. However, NIDS trigger a massive number of alerts on a daily basis. This can be overwhelming for computer network security analysts since it is a slow and tedious process to manually analyse each alert produced. Thus, automated and intelligent clustering of alerts is important to reveal the structural correlation of events by grouping alerts with common features. As the nature of computer network attacks, and therefore alerts, is not known in advance, unsupervised alert clustering is a promising approach to achieve this goal. We propose a joint optimization technique for feature selection and clustering to aggregate similar alerts and to reduce the number of alerts that analysts have to handle individually. More precisely, each identified feature is assigned a binary value, which reflects the feature's saliency. This value is treated as a hidden variable and incorporated into a likelihood function for clustering. Since computing the optimal solution of the likelihood function directly is analytically intractable, we use the Expectation-Maximisation (EM) algorithm to iteratively update the hidden variable and use it to maximize the expected likelihood. Our empirical results, using a labelled Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) 2000 reference dataset, show that the proposed method gives better results than the EM clustering without feature selection in terms of the clustering accuracy.

  17. Global transcription network incorporating distal regulator binding reveals selective cooperation of cancer drivers and risk genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwoneel; Yang, Woojin; Lee, Kang Seon; Bang, Hyoeun; Jang, Kiwon; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yang, Jin Ok; Park, Seongjin; Park, Kiejung; Choi, Jung Kyoon

    2015-01-01

    Global network modeling of distal regulatory interactions is essential in understanding the overall architecture of gene expression programs. Here, we developed a Bayesian probabilistic model and computational method for global causal network construction with breast cancer as a model. Whereas physical regulator binding was well supported by gene expression causality in general, distal elements in intragenic regions or loci distant from the target gene exhibited particularly strong functional effects. Modeling the action of long-range enhancers was critical in recovering true biological interactions with increased coverage and specificity overall and unraveling regulatory complexity underlying tumor subclasses and drug responses in particular. Transcriptional cancer drivers and risk genes were discovered based on the network analysis of somatic and genetic cancer-related DNA variants. Notably, we observed that the risk genes were functionally downstream of the cancer drivers and were selectively susceptible to network perturbation by tumorigenic changes in their upstream drivers. Furthermore, cancer risk alleles tended to increase the susceptibility of the transcription of their associated genes. These findings suggest that transcriptional cancer drivers selectively induce a combinatorial misregulation of downstream risk genes, and that genetic risk factors, mostly residing in distal regulatory regions, increase transcriptional susceptibility to upstream cancer-driving somatic changes. PMID:26001967

  18. Fuzzy C-Means Clustering and Energy Efficient Cluster Head Selection for Cooperative Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Dost Muhammad Saqib; Saeed, Nasir; Nam, Haewoon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel cluster based cooperative spectrum sensing algorithm to save the wastage of energy, in which clusters are formed using fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and a cluster head (CH) is selected based on a sensor's location within each cluster, its location with respect to fusion center (FC), its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and its residual energy. The sensing information of a single sensor is not reliable enough due to shadowing and fading. To overcome these issues, cooperative spectrum sensing schemes were proposed to take advantage of spatial diversity. For cooperative spectrum sensing, all sensors sense the spectrum and report the sensed energy to FC for the final decision. However, it increases the energy consumption of the network when a large number of sensors need to cooperate; in addition to that, the efficiency of the network is also reduced. The proposed algorithm makes the cluster and selects the CHs such that very little amount of network energy is consumed and the highest efficiency of the network is achieved. Using the proposed algorithm maximum probability of detection under an imperfect channel is accomplished with minimum energy consumption as compared to conventional clustering schemes.

  19. Selective β2-AR Blockage Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Growth Through Regulation of EGFR-Akt/ERK1/2 Signaling, G1-Phase Arrest, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chih-Chien; Li, Jhy-Ming; Lee, Kam-Fai; Huang, Yun-Ching; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Lai, Hsiao-Ching; Cheng, Chih-Chung; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The stress-upregulated catecholamines-activated β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors (β1/2-ARs) have been shown to accelerate the progression of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the underlying mechanism of the inhibition of β1/2-ARs signaling for the treatment of CRC and elucidated the significance of β2-AR expression in CRC in vitro and in clinical samples. The impacts of β1/2-AR antagonists in CRC in vitro and CRC-xenograft in vivo were examined. We found that repression of β2-AR but not β1-AR signaling selectively suppressed cell viability, induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest, caused both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways-mediated apoptosis of specific CRC cells and inhibited CRC-xenograft growth in vivo. Moreover, the expression of β2-AR was not consistent with the progression of CRC in vitro or in clinical samples. Our data evidence that the expression profiles, signaling, and blockage of β2-AR have a unique pattern in CRC comparing to other cancers. β2-AR antagonism selectively suppresses the growth of CRC accompanying active β2-AR signaling, which potentially carries wild-type KRAS, in vitro and in vivo via the inhibition of β2-AR transactivated EFGR-Akt/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Thus, β2-AR blockage might be a potential therapeutic strategy for combating the progressions of β2-AR-dependent CRC.

  20. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment.

  1. On Proper Selection of Multihop Relays for Future Enhancement of AeroMACS Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamali, Behnam; Kerczewski, Robert J.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2015-01-01

    As the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) has evolved from a technology concept to a deployed communications network over major US airports, it is now time to contemplate whether the existing capacity of AeroMACS is sufficient to meet the demands set forth by all fixed and mobile applications over the airport surface given the AeroMACS constraints regarding bandwidth and transmit power. The underlying idea in this article is to present IEEE 802.16j-based WiMAX as a technology that can address future capacity enhancements and therefore is most feasible for AeroMACS applications. The principal argument in favor IEEE 802.16j technology is the flexible and cost effective extension of radio coverage that is afforded by relay fortified networks, with virtually no increase in the power requirements and virtually no rise in interference levels to co-allocated applications. The IEEE 802.16j-based multihop relay systems are briefly described. The focus is on key features of this technology, frame structure, and its architecture. Next, AeroMACS is described as a WiMAX-based wireless network. The two major relay modes supported by IEEE 802.16j amendment, i.e., transparent and non-transparent are described. The benefits of employing multihop relays are listed. Some key challenges related to incorporating relays into AeroMACS networks are discussed. The selection of relay type in a broadband wireless network affects a number of network parameters such as latency, signal overhead, PHY (Scalable Physical Layer) and MAC (Media Access Layer) layer protocols, consequently it can alter key network quantities of throughput and QoS (Quality of Service).

  2. A selection model for accounting for publication bias in a full network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Dimitris; Welton, Nicky J; Sutton, Alex; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-12-30

    Copas and Shi suggested a selection model to explore the potential impact of publication bias via sensitivity analysis based on assumptions for the probability of publication of trials conditional on the precision of their results. Chootrakool et al. extended this model to three-arm trials but did not fully account for the implications of the consistency assumption, and their model is difficult to generalize for complex network structures with more than three treatments. Fitting these selection models within a frequentist setting requires maximization of a complex likelihood function, and identification problems are common. We have previously presented a Bayesian implementation of the selection model when multiple treatments are compared with a common reference treatment. We now present a general model suitable for complex, full network meta-analysis that accounts for consistency when adjusting results for publication bias. We developed a design-by-treatment selection model to describe the mechanism by which studies with different designs (sets of treatments compared in a trial) and precision may be selected for publication. We fit the model in a Bayesian setting because it avoids the numerical problems encountered in the frequentist setting, it is generalizable with respect to the number of treatments and study arms, and it provides a flexible framework for sensitivity analysis using external knowledge. Our model accounts for the additional uncertainty arising from publication bias more successfully compared to the standard Copas model or its previous extensions. We illustrate the methodology using a published triangular network for the failure of vascular graft or arterial patency.

  3. Frequency-selective control of cortical and subcortical networks by central thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Lee, Hyun Joo; Weitz, Andrew J; Fang, Zhongnan; Lin, Peter; Choy, ManKin; Fisher, Robert; Pinskiy, Vadim; Tolpygo, Alexander; Mitra, Partha; Schiff, Nicholas; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamus plays a critical role in forebrain arousal and organized behavior. However, network-level mechanisms that link its activity to brain state remain enigmatic. Here, we combined optogenetics, fMRI, electrophysiology, and video-EEG monitoring to characterize the central thalamus-driven global brain networks responsible for switching brain state. 40 and 100 Hz stimulations of central thalamus caused widespread activation of forebrain, including frontal cortex, sensorimotor cortex, and striatum, and transitioned the brain to a state of arousal in asleep rats. In contrast, 10 Hz stimulation evoked significantly less activation of forebrain, inhibition of sensory cortex, and behavioral arrest. To investigate possible mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent cortical inhibition, we performed recordings in zona incerta, where 10, but not 40, Hz stimulation evoked spindle-like oscillations. Importantly, suppressing incertal activity during 10 Hz central thalamus stimulation reduced the evoked cortical inhibition. These findings identify key brain-wide dynamics underlying central thalamus arousal regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09215.001 PMID:26652162

  4. Application of ecological criteria in selecting marine reserves and developing reserve networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Callum M.; Branch, George; Bustamante, Rodrigo H.; Castilla, Juan Carlos; Dugan, Jenifer; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Leslie, Heather; McArdle, Deborah; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Warner, Robert R.

    2003-01-01

    Marine reserves are being established worldwide in response to a growing recognition of the conservation crisis that is building in the oceans. However, designation of reserves has been largely opportunistic, or protective measures have been implemented (often overlapping and sometimes in conflict) by different entities seeking to achieve different ends. This has created confusion among both users and enforcers, and the proliferation of different measures provides a false sense of protection where little is offered. This paper sets out a procedure grounded in current understanding of ecological processes, that allows the evaluation and selection of reserve sites in order to develop functional, interconnected networks of fully protected reserves that will fulfill multiple objectives. By fully protected we mean permanently closed to fishing and other resource extraction. We provide a framework that unifies the central aims of conservation and fishery management, while also meeting other human needs such as the provision of ecosystem services (e.g., maintenance of coastal water quality, shoreline protection, and recreational opportunities). In our scheme, candidate sites for reserves are evaluated against 12 criteria focused toward sustaining the biological integrity and productivity of marine systems at both local and regional scales. While a limited number of sites will be indispensable in a network, many will be of similar value as reserves, allowing the design of numerous alternative, biologically adequate networks. Devising multiple network designs will help ensure that ecological functionality is preserved throughout the socioeconomic evaluation process. Too often, socioeconomic criteria have dominated the process of reserve selection, potentially undermining their efficacy. We argue that application of biological criteria must precede and inform socioeconomic evaluation, since maintenance of ecosystem functioning is essential for meeting all of the goals for

  5. Prefrontal Engagement and Reduced Default Network Suppression Co-occur and Are Dynamically Coupled in Older Adults: The Default-Executive Coupling Hypothesis of Aging.

    PubMed

    Turner, Gary R; Spreng, R Nathan

    2015-12-01

    Reduced executive control is a hallmark of neurocognitive aging. Poor modulation of lateral pFC activity in the context of increasing task challenge in old adults and a "failure to deactivate" the default network during cognitive control tasks have been observed. Whether these two patterns represent discrete mechanisms of neurocognitive aging or interact into older adulthood remains unknown. We examined whether altered pFC and default network dynamics co-occur during goal-directed planning over increasing levels of difficulty during performance on the Tower of London task. We used fMRI to investigate task- and age-related changes in brain activation and functional connectivity across four levels of task challenge. Frontoparietal executive control regions were activated and default network regions were suppressed during planning relative to counting performance in both groups. Older adults, unlike young, failed to modulate brain activity in executive control and default regions as planning demands increased. Critically, functional connectivity analyses revealed bilateral dorsolateral pFC coupling in young adults and dorsolateral pFC to default coupling in older adults with increased planning complexity. We propose a default-executive coupling hypothesis of aging. First, this hypothesis suggests that failure to modulate control and default network activity in response to increasing task challenge are linked in older adulthood. Second, functional brain changes involve greater coupling of lateral pFC and the default network as cognitive control demands increase in older adults. We speculate that these changes reflect an adaptive shift in cognitive approach as older adults come to rely more upon stored representations to support goal-directed task performance.

  6. Suppressed Microglial E Prostanoid Receptor 1 Signaling Selectively Reduces TNFα and IL-6 Secretion from Toll-like Receptor 3 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C. Dirk; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of innate immunity via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and some effectors, like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), directly contribute to neurodegeneration. We tested the hypothesis that prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor subtype 1 (EP1) was necessary for induction of microglial cytokines following activation of innate immunity. Primary murine microglia had cytokine secretion by activators of TLR3 > TLR9 >TLR4 > TLR2. TLR3 activation induced early expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and delayed expression of membranous PGE synthase and secretion of PGE2. Non-selective and COX2-selective inhibitors blocked TLR3 induction of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, of the eight out of twenty cytokines and chemokines induced by TLR3 activation, only TNFα and IL-6 were significantly dependent on EP1 signaling as determined using microglia from mice homozygous deficient for EP1 gene or wild type (WT) microglia co-incubated with an EP1 antagonist. These results were confirmed by blocking intracellular Ca2+ release with 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borate (2-APB) or Xestospongin C (XC), inhibitors of IP3 receptors. Our results show that suppression of microglial EP1 signaling achieves much of the desired effect of COX inhibitors by selectively blocking TLR3-induced microglial secretion of two major effectors of paracrine neuron damage. In combination with the ability of EP1 suppression to ameliorate excitotoxicity, these data point to blockade of EP1 as an attractive candidate therapeutic for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21319223

  7. Suppression of anodal break excitation by electrical stimulation with down-staircase waveform for distance-selective nerve recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ayako; Karashima, Akihiro; Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Katayama, Norihiro

    2012-01-01

    Electrical nerve stimulation using extracellular electrodes is widely performed in clinical medicine as well as basic medical science. It has been reported that selective recruitment of nerve fibers on the basis of the distance between the electrode and the axon is possible without moving the electrode and only by modifying the waveform of electrical stimulation. However, computer simulations have not reproduced the complete nature of the distance-selectivity of the stimulus owing to the difficulty in numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose a minor modification to the myelinated axon model to overcome this difficulty. We confirm that this modification improves the numerical stability of the simulation and enables us to obtain the spatio-temporal dynamics of axons, including the electrode-to-axon distance-dependency. In addition, we propose a novel stimulation method using a down-staircase waveform for distance-selective nerve recruitment. Simulations confirm that the method works well. We show the spatial distribution of axons activated by the down-staircase stimulation, which would be helpful to determine the stimulation parameters for distance-selective nerve recruitment. PMID:23365868

  8. Selection and Influence Mechanisms Associated With Marijuana Initiation and Use in Adolescent Friendship Networks.

    PubMed

    de la Haye, Kayla; Green, Harold D; Kennedy, David P; Pollard, Michael S; Tucker, Joan S

    2013-09-01

    Friends are thought to influence adolescent drug use. However, few studies have examined the role of drugs in friendship selection, which is necessary to draw sound conclusions about influence. This study applied statistical models for social networks to test the contribution of selection and influence to associations in marijuana use among friends in two large high schools (N = 1,612; M age = 16.4). There was evidence for friend selection based on similar lifetime and current marijuana use at both schools, but friends were found to influence the initiation and frequency of adolescent marijuana use in just one of these schools. There was minimal evidence that peer effects were moderated by personal, school, or family risk factors.

  9. Selection and Influence Mechanisms Associated With Marijuana Initiation and Use in Adolescent Friendship Networks

    PubMed Central

    de la Haye, Kayla; Green, Harold D.; Kennedy, David P.; Pollard, Michael S.; Tucker, Joan S.

    2013-01-01

    Friends are thought to influence adolescent drug use. However, few studies have examined the role of drugs in friendship selection, which is necessary to draw sound conclusions about influence. This study applied statistical models for social networks to test the contribution of selection and influence to associations in marijuana use among friends in two large high schools (N = 1,612; M age = 16.4). There was evidence for friend selection based on similar lifetime and current marijuana use at both schools, but friends were found to influence the initiation and frequency of adolescent marijuana use in just one of these schools. There was minimal evidence that peer effects were moderated by personal, school, or family risk factors. PMID:24187477

  10. Selective suppression of cocaine- versus food-maintained responding by monoamine releasers in rhesus monkeys: benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Baumann, M H; Rothman, R B; Mello, N K; Blough, B E

    2009-04-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of drugs currently under investigation as potential agonist medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The efficacy and safety of monoamine releasers as candidate medications may be influenced in part by their relative potency to release dopamine and serotonin, and we reported previously that releasers with approximately 30-fold selectivity for dopamine versus serotonin release may be especially promising. The present study examined the effects of the releasers benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine, which have 20- to 48-fold selectivity in vitro for releasing dopamine versus serotonin. In an assay of cocaine discrimination, rhesus monkeys were trained to discriminate 0.4 mg/kg i.m. cocaine from saline in a two-key, food-reinforced procedure. Each of the releasers produced a dose- and time-dependent substitution for cocaine. 4-Benzylpiperidine had the most rapid onset and shortest duration of action. Phenmetrazine and benzylpiperazine had slower onsets and longer durations of action. In an assay of cocaine self-administration, rhesus monkeys were trained to respond for cocaine injections and food pellets under a second order schedule. Treatment for 7 days with each of the releasers produced a dose-dependent and selective reduction in self-administration of cocaine (0.01 mg/kg/injection). The most selective effects were produced by phenmetrazine. Phenmetrazine also produced a downward shift in the cocaine self-administration dose effect curve, virtually eliminating responding maintained by a 30-fold range of cocaine doses (0.0032-0.1 mg/kg/injection) while having only small and transient effects on food-maintained responding. These findings support the potential utility of dopamine-selective releasers as candidate treatments for cocaine dependence. PMID:19151247

  11. Bayesian model selection applied to artificial neural networks used for water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, Greer B.; Maier, Holger R.; Lambert, Martin F.

    2008-04-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have proven to be extremely valuable tools in the field of water resources engineering. However, one of the most difficult tasks in developing an ANN is determining the optimum level of complexity required to model a given problem, as there is no formal systematic model selection method. This paper presents a Bayesian model selection (BMS) method for ANNs that provides an objective approach for comparing models of varying complexity in order to select the most appropriate ANN structure. The approach uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo posterior simulations to estimate the evidence in favor of competing models and, in this study, three known methods for doing this are compared in terms of their suitability for being incorporated into the proposed BMS framework for ANNs. However, it is acknowledged that it can be particularly difficult to accurately estimate the evidence of ANN models. Therefore, the proposed BMS approach for ANNs incorporates a further check of the evidence results by inspecting the marginal posterior distributions of the hidden-to-output layer weights, which unambiguously indicate any redundancies in the hidden layer nodes. The fact that this check is available is one of the greatest advantages of the proposed approach over conventional model selection methods, which do not provide such a test and instead rely on the modeler's subjective choice of selection criterion. The advantages of a total Bayesian approach to ANN development, including training and model selection, are demonstrated on two synthetic and one real world water resources case study.

  12. Using maximum entropy modeling for optimal selection of sampling sites for monitoring networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Kumar, Sunil; Barnett, David T.; Evangelista, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring programs must efficiently describe state shifts. We propose using maximum entropy modeling to select dissimilar sampling sites to capture environmental variability at low cost, and demonstrate a specific application: sample site selection for the Central Plains domain (453,490 km2) of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). We relied on four environmental factors: mean annual temperature and precipitation, elevation, and vegetation type. A “sample site” was defined as a 20 km × 20 km area (equal to NEON’s airborne observation platform [AOP] footprint), within which each 1 km2 cell was evaluated for each environmental factor. After each model run, the most environmentally dissimilar site was selected from all potential sample sites. The iterative selection of eight sites captured approximately 80% of the environmental envelope of the domain, an improvement over stratified random sampling and simple random designs for sample site selection. This approach can be widely used for cost-efficient selection of survey and monitoring sites.

  13. Water on Mars - Analyses on fluvial activity of selected valley networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Samir, M.; Tirsch, D.; Musiol, S.; Trauthan, F.; Jaumann, R.

    2010-05-01

    Water on Mars is a precondition for a possible habitability as a requirement for the evolution of life on planet Mars. Water is also responsible for erosion, transport and is a trigger for climate and climate changes in Martian history. Therefore, a possible habitability on Mars is one of the main objectives of the HGF Alliance Program "Planetary Evolution and Life". Valley networks and outflow channels in conjunction with local climate changes on Mars are not yet sufficiently explored. Mapping of selected valley networks as global representatives is necessary to correlate controls on habitability in their chronological relationship. Within this study we are focussing on dendritic and longitudinal valley networks over time and space by using the crater-size frequency distribution (CSFD) in order to date the planetary surfaces of the valley networks most accurately on high resolution imagery from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of the ESA Mars Express Orbiter. Morphometric parameters of the channels, as measured from digital terrain models (DTM), will be used to clarify the water and sediment discharge. The correlation of this information, combined with the results of the CSFD, allow us to interpret the development and the timing of the flooding events. The resulting data set might give us clues to ancient climatic conditions and its influence on the morphology and the discharge rates of the channel systems. The calculations of the bulk fluxes of water and sediment, based on the dimensions of channels and valleys, will be the topic of our future work.

  14. Elucidation of Genetic Interactions in the Yeast GATA-Factor Network Using Bayesian Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Gerosa, Luca; Falter, Laura; Sauer, Uwe; Lygeros, John

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of complex gene regulatory networks using classical genetic assays is an error-prone procedure that frequently generates ambiguous outcomes. Even some of the best-characterized gene networks contain interactions whose validity is not conclusively proven. Founded on dynamic experimental data, mechanistic mathematical models are able to offer detailed insights that would otherwise require prohibitively large numbers of genetic experiments. Here we attempt mechanistic modeling of the transcriptional network formed by the four GATA-factor proteins, a well-studied system of central importance for nitrogen-source regulation of transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To resolve ambiguities in the network organization, we encoded a set of five interactions hypothesized in the literature into a set of 32 mathematical models, and employed Bayesian model selection to identify the most plausible set of interactions based on dynamic gene expression data. The top-ranking model was validated on newly generated GFP reporter dynamic data and was subsequently used to gain a better understanding of how yeast cells organize their transcriptional response to dynamic changes of nitrogen sources. Our work constitutes a necessary and important step towards obtaining a holistic view of the yeast nitrogen regulation mechanisms; on the computational side, it provides a demonstration of how powerful Monte Carlo techniques can be creatively combined and used to address the great challenges of large-scale dynamical system inference. PMID:26967983

  15. Untangling Alzheimer's Disease Clinicoanatomical Heterogeneity Through Selective Network Vulnerability - An Effort to Understand a Complex Disease.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, David; Bensaïdane, Reda; Laforce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically, anatomically and biologically heterogeneous disorder encompassing a wide spectrum of cognitive profiles, ranging from the typical amnestic syndrome to visuospatial changes in posterior cortical atrophy, language deficits in primary progressive aphasia and behavioural/executive dysfunctions in anterior variants. With the emergence of functional imaging and neural network analysis using graph theory for instance, some authors have hypothesized that this phenotypic variability is produced by the differential involvement of large-scale neural networks - a model called 'molecular nexopathy'. At the moment, however, the hypothesized mechanisms underlying AD's divergent network degeneration remain speculative and mostly involve selective premorbid network vulnerability. Herein we present an overview of AD's clinicoanatomical variability, outline functional imaging and graph theory contributions to our understanding of the disease and discuss ongoing debates regarding the biological roots of its heterogeneity. We finally discuss the clinical promises of statistical signal processing disciplines (graph theory and information theory) in predicting the trajectory of AD variants. This paper aims to raise awareness about AD clinicoanatomical heterogeneity and outline how statistical signal processing methods could lead to a better understanding, diagnosis and treatment of AD variants in the future. PMID:26567745

  16. Selective class I histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress persistent spontaneous nociception and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of bee venom-induced inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Fei; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Li, Zhen; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-25

    To confirm whether class I histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are effective in relief of peripheral inflammatory pain, the effects of two selective inhibitors, MS-275 and MGCD0103, were studied in rats inflamed by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of bee venom (BV). The BV test is characterized by displaying both persistent spontaneous nociception (PSN) and primary hypersensitivity. Intrathecal (i.t.) pre-treatment of either MS-275 or MGCD0103 with a single dose of 60 nmol/20 μL resulted in profound suppression of both PSN and primary thermal hypersensitivity but without significant influence upon the primary mechanical hypersensitivity and mirror-image thermal hypersensitivity. Moreover, the up-regulation of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 induced by s.c. BV injection was completely suppressed by i.t. pre-treatment of MS-275. The present results provide with another new line of evidence showing involvement of epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure by HDAC1/2-mediated histone hypoacetylation in the BV-induced PSN and thermal hypersensitivity and demonstrate the beneficial effects of class I HDACIs in prevention of peripheral inflammatory pain from occurring. PMID:26490061

  17. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  18. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  19. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme.

  20. Selection of influential spreaders in complex networks using Pareto Shell decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeruva, Sujatha; Devi, T.; Reddy, Y. Samtha

    2016-06-01

    The selection of prominent nodes in order to maximize the ability of spreading is very crucial in complex networks. The well known K-Shell method, which comprises nodes located at the core of a network, is better than the degree centrality and betweenness centrality, in capturing the spreading ability for a single origin spreader. As per the multiple origin spreaders, the K-Shell method fails to yield similar results when compared to the degree centrality. Current research proposes a Pareto-Shell Decomposition. It employs Pareto front function. It's Pareto optimal set comprises non-dominated spreads, with the ratio of high out-degree to in-degree and high in-degree. Pareto-Shell decomposition outperforms the K-Shell and the degree centrality for multiple origin spreaders, with the simulation of epidemic spreading process.

  1. Select and Cluster: A Method for Finding Functional Networks of Clustered Voxels in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    DonGiovanni, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Extracting functional connectivity patterns among cortical regions in fMRI datasets is a challenge stimulating the development of effective data-driven or model based techniques. Here, we present a novel data-driven method for the extraction of significantly connected functional ROIs directly from the preprocessed fMRI data without relying on a priori knowledge of the expected activations. This method finds spatially compact groups of voxels which show a homogeneous pattern of significant connectivity with other regions in the brain. The method, called Select and Cluster (S&C), consists of two steps: first, a dimensionality reduction step based on a blind multiresolution pairwise correlation by which the subset of all cortical voxels with significant mutual correlation is selected and the second step in which the selected voxels are grouped into spatially compact and functionally homogeneous ROIs by means of a Support Vector Clustering (SVC) algorithm. The S&C method is described in detail. Its performance assessed on simulated and experimental fMRI data is compared to other methods commonly used in functional connectivity analyses, such as Independent Component Analysis (ICA) or clustering. S&C method simplifies the extraction of functional networks in fMRI by identifying automatically spatially compact groups of voxels (ROIs) involved in whole brain scale activation networks.

  2. Select and Cluster: A Method for Finding Functional Networks of Clustered Voxels in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    DonGiovanni, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Extracting functional connectivity patterns among cortical regions in fMRI datasets is a challenge stimulating the development of effective data-driven or model based techniques. Here, we present a novel data-driven method for the extraction of significantly connected functional ROIs directly from the preprocessed fMRI data without relying on a priori knowledge of the expected activations. This method finds spatially compact groups of voxels which show a homogeneous pattern of significant connectivity with other regions in the brain. The method, called Select and Cluster (S&C), consists of two steps: first, a dimensionality reduction step based on a blind multiresolution pairwise correlation by which the subset of all cortical voxels with significant mutual correlation is selected and the second step in which the selected voxels are grouped into spatially compact and functionally homogeneous ROIs by means of a Support Vector Clustering (SVC) algorithm. The S&C method is described in detail. Its performance assessed on simulated and experimental fMRI data is compared to other methods commonly used in functional connectivity analyses, such as Independent Component Analysis (ICA) or clustering. S&C method simplifies the extraction of functional networks in fMRI by identifying automatically spatially compact groups of voxels (ROIs) involved in whole brain scale activation networks. PMID:27656202

  3. Molecular template-directed synthesis of microporous polymer networks for highly selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yao-Qi; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Geng, Jian-Cheng; Sun, Lin-Bing

    2014-11-26

    Porous polymer networks have great potential in various applications including carbon capture. However, complex monomers and/or expensive catalysts are commonly used for their synthesis, which makes the process complicated, costly, and hard to scale up. Herein, we develop a molecular template strategy to fabricate new porous polymer networks by a simple nucleophilic substitution reaction of two low-cost monomers (i.e., chloromethylbenzene and ethylene diamine). The polymerization reactions can take place under mild conditions in the absence of any catalysts. The resultant materials are interconnected with secondary amines and show well-defined micropores due to the structure-directing role of solvent molecules. These properties make our materials highly efficient for selective CO2 capture, and unusually high CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivities are obtained. Furthermore, the adsorbents can be completely regenerated under mild conditions. Our materials may provide promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 from mixtures such as flue gas and natural gas.

  4. Effects of persistent selective suppression of ganglionic butyrylcholinesterase on steady state and regenerating levels of acetylcholinesterase: implications regarding function of butyrylcholinesterase and regulation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, W A; Koelle, G B; Smyrl, E G

    1976-01-01

    Persistent selective suppression of the butyrylcholinesterase (cholinesterase; acylcholine acyl-hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.8) activity of the superior cervical, stellate, and ciliary ganglia of cats by the daily administration of tetramonoisopropyl pyrophosphortetramide, 3.0 mumol/kg, intravenously, for 6 days produced a significant elevation in the levels of ganglionic acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7). When the same procedure was preceded by the inactivation of over 95% of the ganglionic acetylcholinesterase by sarin, 2.0 mumol/kg, intravenously, the rate of regeneration of acetylcholinesterase was decreased. Results are interpreted as evidence that ganglionic butyrylcholinesterase may serve as a precursor to acetylcholinesterase, and that the level of butyrylcholinesterase may regulate the rate of acetylcholinesterase synthesis. PMID:1066704

  5. Effects on Learners' Performance of Using Selected and Open Network Resources in a Problem-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chuang, Chien-Wen; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the popularity of computers and computer networks, fostering the web-based problem-solving ability of students has become an important educational objective in recent years. This study attempted to compare the effects of using selected and open network resources on students' intentions with regard to their information system usage by…

  6. Selecting Local Area Networks and CD-ROM/Computer Workstations for the High School Library: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behn, John; Kirsch, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selection of a local area network for a high school library and discusses network and equipment costs and computer requirements, including recommendations regarding monitors, printers, compact disk players, mouse devices, and computer architecture. A second article reviews new technology exhibited at a recent computer…

  7. Increased intracellular Ca2+ selectively suppresses IL-1-induced NO production by reducing iNOS mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    This study addresses the role of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) in the expression of iNOS, an IL-1 inducible gene in human articular chondrocytes. The calcium ionophore A23187 and ionomycin did not induce NO release or iNOS expression but inhibited dose dependently IL-1- induced NO release with IC50 of 200 nM and 100 nM, respectively. Increased intracellular Ca2+ induced by thapsigargin or cyclopiazonic acid, inhibitors of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, had similar inhibitory effects with IC50 of 1 nM and 3 microM, respectively. LPS and TNF alpha induced NO production were also suppressed by these Ca2+ elevating drugs. Levels of IL-1-induced iNOS protein were reduced by A23187, thapsigargin, and cyclopiazonic acid. These drugs as well as Bay K 8644 and KCl inhibited IL-1-induced iNOS mRNA expression. To analyze the role of Ca2+ in the expression of other IL-1 responsive genes in chondrocytes, these Ca2+ modulating drugs were tested for effects on COXII. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on iNOS mRNA, these drugs induced COXII mRNA expression and in combination with IL-1, enhanced COXII mRNA levels. Ca2+ mediated increases in COXII mRNA expression were associated with an increase in COXII protein. The kinetics of Ca2+ effects on IL-1-induced iNOS mRNA levels suggested a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of iNOS mRNA half life showed that it was 6-7 h in IL-1-stimulated cells and decreased by A23187 to 2- 3 h. In conclusion, these results show that Ca2+ inhibits IL-1-induced NO release, iNOS protein, and mRNA expression in human articular chondrocytes by reducing iNOS mRNA stability. Under identical conditions increased Ca2+ enhances IL-1-induced COXII gene and protein expression. PMID:7540612

  8. Suppressing the Skin-Core Structure of Injection-Molded Isotactic Polypropylene via Combination of an in situ Microfibrillar Network and an Interfacial Compatibilizer

    SciTech Connect

    X Yi; C Chen; G Zhong; L Xu; J Tang; X Ji; B Hsiao; Z Li

    2011-12-31

    Injection-molded semicrystalline polymer parts generally exhibited a so-called skin-core structure basically as a result of the large gradients of temperature, shear rate, stress, and pressure fields created by the boundary conditions of injection molding. Suppression of the skin-core structure is a long-term practical challenge. In the current work, the skin-core structure of the conventional injection-molded isotactic polypropylene (iPP) was largely relieved by the cooperative effects of an in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer. The in situ poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibrils of 1-8 {micro}m in diameter and large aspect ratios of above 40 tended to entangle with each other to generate a microfibrillar network in the iPP melt. During injection molding, the iPP molecules experienced confined flow in the microchannels or pores formed by the microfibrillar network, which could redistribute and homogenize the flow field of polymer melt. Addition of the compatibilizer, glycidyl methacrylate-grafted iPP, restrained the molecular orientation but facilitated preservation of oriented molecules due to the chemical bonds at the interface between PET microfibrils and iPP. The cooperative effects of in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer led to almost the same molecular orientation across the whole thickness of the injection-molded parts. Additionally, the content of {beta} crystals in different layers of injection-molded iPP parts depended on the combined effects of the molecular orientation, the amount of oriented crystals, and the crystallization time between 105 and 140 C. The presence of the interfacial compatibilizer facilitated formation of the {beta} crystals because of preservation of the oriented molecules.

  9. Suppressing the skin-core structure of injection-molded isotactic polypropylene via combination of an in situ microfibrillar network and an interfacial compatibilizer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Chen, Chen; Zhong, Gan-Ji; Xu, Ling; Tang, Jian-Hua; Ji, Xu; Hsiao, Benjamin S; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2011-06-16

    Injection-molded semicrystalline polymer parts generally exhibited a so-called skin-core structure basically as a result of the large gradients of temperature, shear rate, stress, and pressure fields created by the boundary conditions of injection molding. Suppression of the skin-core structure is a long-term practical challenge. In the current work, the skin-core structure of the conventional injection-molded isotactic polypropylene (iPP) was largely relieved by the cooperative effects of an in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer. The in situ poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibrils of 1-8 μm in diameter and large aspect ratios of above 40 tended to entangle with each other to generate a microfibrillar network in the iPP melt. During injection molding, the iPP molecules experienced confined flow in the microchannels or pores formed by the microfibrillar network, which could redistribute and homogenize the flow field of polymer melt. Addition of the compatibilizer, glycidyl methacrylate-grafted iPP, restrained the molecular orientation but facilitated preservation of oriented molecules due to the chemical bonds at the interface between PET microfibrils and iPP. The cooperative effects of in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer led to almost the same molecular orientation across the whole thickness of the injection-molded parts. Additionally, the content of β crystals in different layers of injection-molded iPP parts depended on the combined effects of the molecular orientation, the amount of oriented crystals, and the crystallization time between 105 and 140 °C. The presence of the interfacial compatibilizer facilitated formation of the β crystals because of preservation of the oriented molecules.

  10. Identification of a Selective G1-Phase Benzimidazolone Inhibitor by a Senescence-Targeted Virtual Screen Using Artificial Neural Networks12

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Alan E.; Pugliese, Angelo; Liu, Yu; Revie, John; Burns, Sharon; McCormick, Carol; Cairney, Claire J.; Bower, Justin; Drysdale, Martin; Narita, Masashi; Sadaie, Mahito; Keith, W. Nicol

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a barrier to tumorigenesis in normal cells, and tumor cells undergo senescence responses to genotoxic stimuli, which is a potential target phenotype for cancer therapy. However, in this setting, mixed-mode responses are common with apoptosis the dominant effect. Hence, more selective senescence inducers are required. Here we report a machine learning–based in silico screen to identify potential senescence agonists. We built profiles of differentially affected biological process networks from expression data obtained under induced telomere dysfunction conditions in colorectal cancer cells and matched these to a panel of 17 protein targets with confirmatory screening data in PubChem. We trained a neural network using 3517 compounds identified as active or inactive against these targets. The resulting classification model was used to screen a virtual library of ~ 2M lead-like compounds. One hundred and forty-seven virtual hits were acquired for validation in growth inhibition and senescence-associated β-galactosidase assays. Among the found hits, a benzimidazolone compound, CB-20903630, had low micromolar IC50 for growth inhibition of HCT116 cells and selectively induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in the entire treated cell population without cytotoxicity or apoptosis induction. Growth suppression was mediated by G1 blockade involving increased p21 expression and suppressed cyclin B1, CDK1, and CDC25C. In addition, the compound inhibited growth of multicellular spheroids and caused severe retardation of population kinetics in long-term treatments. Preliminary structure-activity and structure clustering analyses are reported, and expression analysis of CB-20903630 against other cell cycle suppressor compounds suggested a PI3K/AKT-inhibitor–like profile in normal cells, with different pathways affected in cancer cells. PMID:26476078

  11. Charge inversion, water splitting, and vortex suppression due to DNA sorption on ion-selective membranes and their ion-current signatures.

    PubMed

    Slouka, Zdenek; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Yan, Yu; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2013-07-01

    The physisorption of negatively charged single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of different lengths onto the surface of anion-exchange membranes is sensitively shown to alter the anion flux through the membrane. At low surface concentrations, the physisorbed DNAs act to suppress an electroconvection vortex instability that drives the anion flux into the membrane and hence reduce the overlimiting current through the membrane. Beyond a critical surface concentration, determined by the total number of phosphate charges on the DNA, the DNA layer becomes a cation-selective membrane, and the combined bipolar membrane has a lower net ion flux, at low voltages, than the original membrane as a result of ion depletion at the junction between the cation- (DNA) and anion-selective membranes. However, beyond a critical voltage that is dependent on the ssDNA coverage, water splitting occurs at the junction to produce a larger overlimiting current than that of the original membrane. These two large opposite effects of polyelectrolyte counterion sorption onto membrane surfaces may be used to eliminate limiting current constraints of ion-selective membranes for liquid fuel cells, dialysis, and desalination as well as to suggest a new low-cost membrane surface assay that can detect and quantify the number of large biomolecules captured by probes functionalized on the membrane surface.

  12. Novel retinoblastoma mutation abrogating the interaction to E2F2/3, but not E2F1, led to selective suppression of thyroid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Hideaki; Inoue, Maki; Minowa, Osamu; Motegi, Hiromi; Saiki, Yuriko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Masuya, Hiroshi; Gondo, Yoichi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Yao, Ryoji; Noda, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mouse models are indispensable tools for clarifying gene functions and elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. Here, we describe novel cancer models bearing point mutations in the retinoblastoma gene (Rb1) generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis. Two mutations in splice sites reduced Rb1 expression and led to a tumor spectrum and incidence similar to those observed in the conventional Rb1 knockout mice. The missense mutant, Rb1D326V/+, developed pituitary tumors, but thyroid tumors were completely suppressed. Immunohistochemical analyses of thyroid tissue revealed that E2F1, but not E2F2/3, was selectively inactivated, indicating that the mutant Rb protein (pRb) suppressed thyroid tumors by inactivating E2F1. Interestingly, Rb1D326V/+ mice developed pituitary tumors that originated from the intermediate lobe of the pituitary, despite selective inactivation of E2F1. Furthermore, in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, other E2F were also inactivated. These observations show that pRb mediates the inactivation of E2F function and its contribution to tumorigenesis is highly dependent on the cell type. Last, by using a reconstitution assay of synthesized proteins, we showed that the D326V missense pRb bound to E2F1 but failed to interact with E2F2/3. These results reveal the effect of the pRb N-terminal domain on E2F function and the impact of the protein on tumorigenesis. Thus, this mutant mouse model can be used to investigate human Rb family-bearing mutations at the N-terminal region. PMID:25088905

  13. Selective CDK7 inhibition with BS-181 suppresses cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo-Yong; Liu, Quan-Yan; Cao, Jun; Chen, Ji-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Su

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family members have been considered as attractive therapeutic targets for cancer. In this study, we aim to investigate the anticancer effects of a selective CDK7 inhibitor, BS-181, in gastric cancer (GC) cell line. Human GC cells (BGC823) were cultured with or without BS-181 at different concentrations for 24–72 hours. BS-181 significantly reduced the activity of CDK7 with downregulation of cyclin D1 and XIAP in GC cells. Treatment with BS-181 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The expression of Bax and caspase-3 was significantly increased, while Bcl-2 expression was decreased in cells treated with BS-181. In addition, the inhibition of CDK7 with BS-181 resulted in reduced rates of proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cells. Those results demonstrated the anticancer activities of selective CDK7 inhibitor BS-181 in BGC823 cells, suggesting that CDK7 may serve as a novel therapeutic target or the treatment of GC. PMID:27042010

  14. Neural Network Cascade Optimizes MicroRNA Biomarker Selection for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenliang; Kan, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be promising biomarkers in predicting cancer prognosis. However, inappropriate or poorly optimized processing and modeling of miRNA expression data can negatively affect prediction performance. Here, we propose a holistic solution for miRNA biomarker selection and prediction model building. This work introduces the use of a neural network cascade, a cascaded constitution of small artificial neural network units, for evaluating miRNA expression and patient outcome. A miRNA microarray dataset of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus to illustrate the methodology. Results indicated a nonlinear relationship between miRNA expression and patient death risk, implying that direct comparison of expression values is inappropriate. However, this method performs transformation of miRNA expression values into a miRNA score, which linearly measures death risk. Spearman correlation was calculated between miRNA scores and survival status for each miRNA. Finally, a nine-miRNA signature was optimized to predict death risk after nasopharyngeal carcinoma by establishing a neural network cascade consisting of 13 artificial neural network units. Area under the ROC was 0.951 for the internal validation set and had a prediction accuracy of 83% for the external validation set. In particular, the established neural network cascade was found to have strong immunity against noise interference that disturbs miRNA expression values. This study provides an efficient and easy-to-use method that aims to maximize clinical application of miRNAs in prognostic risk assessment of patients with cancer. PMID:25310846

  15. Neural network cascade optimizes microRNA biomarker selection for nasopharyngeal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenliang; Kan, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be promising biomarkers in predicting cancer prognosis. However, inappropriate or poorly optimized processing and modeling of miRNA expression data can negatively affect prediction performance. Here, we propose a holistic solution for miRNA biomarker selection and prediction model building. This work introduces the use of a neural network cascade, a cascaded constitution of small artificial neural network units, for evaluating miRNA expression and patient outcome. A miRNA microarray dataset of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus to illustrate the methodology. Results indicated a nonlinear relationship between miRNA expression and patient death risk, implying that direct comparison of expression values is inappropriate. However, this method performs transformation of miRNA expression values into a miRNA score, which linearly measures death risk. Spearman correlation was calculated between miRNA scores and survival status for each miRNA. Finally, a nine-miRNA signature was optimized to predict death risk after nasopharyngeal carcinoma by establishing a neural network cascade consisting of 13 artificial neural network units. Area under the ROC was 0.951 for the internal validation set and had a prediction accuracy of 83% for the external validation set. In particular, the established neural network cascade was found to have strong immunity against noise interference that disturbs miRNA expression values. This study provides an efficient and easy-to-use method that aims to maximize clinical application of miRNAs in prognostic risk assessment of patients with cancer. PMID:25310846

  16. Neural network models for spatial data mining, map production, and cortical direction selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Olga

    A family of ARTMAP neural networks for incremental supervised learning has been developed over the last decade. The Sensor Exploitation Group of MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) has incorporated an early version of this network as the recognition engine of a hierarchical system for fusion and data mining of multiple registered geospatial images. The LL system has been successfully fielded, but it is limited to target vs. non-target identifications and does not produce whole maps. This dissertation expands the capabilities of the LL system so that it learns to identify arbitrarily many target classes at once and can thus produce a whole map. This new spatial data mining system is designed particularly to cope with the highly skewed class distributions of typical mapping problems. Specification of a consistent procedure and a benchmark testbed has permitted the evaluation of candidate recognition networks as well as pre- and post-processing and feature extraction options. The resulting default ARTMAP network and mapping methodology set a standard for a variety of related mapping problems and application domains. The second part of the dissertation investigates the development of cortical direction selectivity. The possible role of visual experience and oculomotor behavior in the maturation of cells in the primary visual cortex is studied. The responses of neurons in the thalamus and cortex of the cat are modeled when natural scenes are scanned by several types of eye movements. Inspired by the Hebbian-like synaptic plasticity, which is based upon correlations between cell activations, the second-order statistical structure of thalamo-cortical activity is examined. In the simulations, patterns of neural activity that lead to a correct refinement of cell responses are observed during visual fixation, when small ocular movements occur, but are not observed in the presence of large saccades. Simulations also replicate experiments in which kittens are reared under stroboscopic

  17. A Theory of the Epigenesis of Neuronal Networks by Selective Stabilization of Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Courrége, Philippe; Danchin, Antoine

    1973-01-01

    A formalism is introduced to represent the connective organization of an evolving neuronal network and the effects of environment on this organization by stabilization or degeneration of labile synapses associated with functioning. Learning, or the acquisition of an associative property, is related to a characteristic variability of the connective organization: the interaction of the environment with the genetic program is printed as a particular pattern of such organization through neuronal functioning. An application of the theory to the development of the neuromuscular junction is proposed and the basic selective aspect of learning emphasized. PMID:4517949

  18. Your Health Buddies Matter: Preferential Selection and Social Influence on Weight Management in an Online Health Social Network.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingbo

    2016-12-01

    A growing number of online social networks are designed with the intention to promote health by providing virtual space wherein individuals can seek and share information and support with similar others. Research has shown that real-world social networks have a significant influence on one's health behavior and outcomes. However, there is a dearth of studies on how individuals form social networks in virtual space and whether such online social networks exert any impact on individuals' health outcomes. Built on the Multi-Theoretical Multilevel (MTML) framework and drawing from literature on social influence, this study examined the mechanisms underlying the formation of an online health social network and empirically tested social influence on individual health outcomes through the network. Situated in a weight management social networking site, the study tracked a health buddy network of 709 users and their weight management activities and outcomes for 4 months. Actor-based modeling was used to test the joint dynamics of preferential selection and social influence among health buddies. The results showed that baseline, inbreeding, and health status homophily significantly predicted preferential selection of health buddies in the weight management social networking site, whereas self-interest in seeking experiential health information did not. The study also found peer influence of online health buddy networks on individual weight outcomes, such that an individual's odds of losing weight increased if, on average, the individual's health buddies were losing weight. PMID:27055008

  19. Artificial neural network approach to assess selective flocculation on hematite and kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Lopamudra; Banerjee, P. K.; Biswal, Surendra Kumar; Venugopal, R.; Mandre, N. R.

    2014-07-01

    Because of the current depletion of high grade reserves, beneficiation of low grade ore, tailings produced and tailings stored in tailing ponds is needed to fulfill the market demand. Selective flocculation is one alternative process that could be used for the beneficiation of ultra-fine material. This process has not been extensively used commercially because of its complex dependency on process parameters. In this paper, a selective flocculation process, using synthetic mixtures of hematite and kaolinite in different ratios, was attempted, and the adsorption mechanism was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model (4-4-3) was used to predict the separation performance of the process in terms of grade, Fe recovery, and separation efficiency. The model values were in good agreement with experimental values.

  20. A Multi-Step Assessment Scheme for Seismic Network Site Selection in Densely Populated Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenkers, Katrin; Husen, Stephan; Kraft, Toni

    2015-10-01

    We developed a multi-step assessment scheme for improved site selection during seismic network installation in densely populated areas. Site selection is a complex process where different aspects (seismic background noise, geology, and financing) have to be taken into account. In order to improve this process, we developed a step-wise approach that allows quantifying the quality of a site by using, in addition to expert judgement and test measurements, two weighting functions as well as reference stations. Our approach ensures that the recording quality aimed for is reached and makes different sites quantitatively comparable to each other. Last but not least, it is an easy way to document the decision process, because all relevant parameters are listed, quantified, and weighted.

  1. Joint Transmit Antenna Selection and Power Allocation for ISDF Relaying Mobile-to-Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingwei; Zhang, Hao; Gulliver, T. Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The outage probability (OP) performance of multiple-relay incremental-selective decode-and-forward (ISDF) relaying mobile-to-mobile (M2M) sensor networks with transmit antenna selection (TAS) over N-Nakagami fading channels is investigated. Exact closed-form OP expressions for both optimal and suboptimal TAS schemes are derived. The power allocation problem is formulated to determine the optimal division of transmit power between the broadcast and relay phases. The OP performance under different conditions is evaluated via numerical simulation to verify the analysis. These results show that the optimal TAS scheme has better OP performance than the suboptimal scheme. Further, the power allocation parameter has a significant influence on the OP performance. PMID:26907282

  2. Joint Transmit Antenna Selection and Power Allocation for ISDF Relaying Mobile-to-Mobile Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingwei; Zhang, Hao; Gulliver, T Aaron

    2016-02-19

    The outage probability (OP) performance of multiple-relay incremental-selective decode-and-forward (ISDF) relaying mobile-to-mobile (M2M) sensor networks with transmit antenna selection (TAS) over N-Nakagami fading channels is investigated. Exact closed-form OP expressions for both optimal and suboptimal TAS schemes are derived. The power allocation problem is formulated to determine the optimal division of transmit power between the broadcast and relay phases. The OP performance under different conditions is evaluated via numerical simulation to verify the analysis. These results show that the optimal TAS scheme has better OP performance than the suboptimal scheme. Further, the power allocation parameter has a significant influence on the OP performance.

  3. Joint Transmit Antenna Selection and Power Allocation for ISDF Relaying Mobile-to-Mobile Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingwei; Zhang, Hao; Gulliver, T Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The outage probability (OP) performance of multiple-relay incremental-selective decode-and-forward (ISDF) relaying mobile-to-mobile (M2M) sensor networks with transmit antenna selection (TAS) over N-Nakagami fading channels is investigated. Exact closed-form OP expressions for both optimal and suboptimal TAS schemes are derived. The power allocation problem is formulated to determine the optimal division of transmit power between the broadcast and relay phases. The OP performance under different conditions is evaluated via numerical simulation to verify the analysis. These results show that the optimal TAS scheme has better OP performance than the suboptimal scheme. Further, the power allocation parameter has a significant influence on the OP performance. PMID:26907282

  4. Microglia protect against brain injury and their selective elimination dysregulates neuronal network activity after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Gergely; Martinecz, Bernadett; Lénárt, Nikolett; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Orsolits, Barbara; Judák, Linda; Császár, Eszter; Fekete, Rebeka; West, Brian L.; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Dénes, Ádám

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the main immune cells of the brain and contribute to common brain diseases. However, it is unclear how microglia influence neuronal activity and survival in the injured brain in vivo. Here we develop a precisely controlled model of brain injury induced by cerebral ischaemia combined with fast in vivo two-photon calcium imaging and selective microglial manipulation. We show that selective elimination of microglia leads to a striking, 60% increase in infarct size, which is reversed by microglial repopulation. Microglia-mediated protection includes reduction of excitotoxic injury, since an absence of microglia leads to dysregulated neuronal calcium responses, calcium overload and increased neuronal death. Furthermore, the incidence of spreading depolarization (SD) is markedly reduced in the absence of microglia. Thus, microglia are involved in changes in neuronal network activity and SD after brain injury in vivo that could have important implications for common brain diseases. PMID:27139776

  5. Delay selection by spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent networks of spiking neurons receiving oscillatory inputs.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert R; Burkitt, Anthony N; Thomas, Doreen A; Gilson, Matthieu; Grayden, David B

    2013-01-01

    Learning rules, such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), change the structure of networks of neurons based on the firing activity. A network level understanding of these mechanisms can help infer how the brain learns patterns and processes information. Previous studies have shown that STDP selectively potentiates feed-forward connections that have specific axonal delays, and that this underlies behavioral functions such as sound localization in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl. In this study, we investigate how STDP leads to the selective potentiation of recurrent connections with different axonal and dendritic delays during oscillatory activity. We develop analytical models of learning with additive STDP in recurrent networks driven by oscillatory inputs, and support the results using simulations with leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. Our results show selective potentiation of connections with specific axonal delays, which depended on the input frequency. In addition, we demonstrate how this can lead to a network becoming selective in the amplitude of its oscillatory response to this frequency. We extend this model of axonal delay selection within a single recurrent network in two ways. First, we show the selective potentiation of connections with a range of both axonal and dendritic delays. Second, we show axonal delay selection between multiple groups receiving out-of-phase, oscillatory inputs. We discuss the application of these models to the formation and activation of neuronal ensembles or cell assemblies in the cortex, and also to missing fundamental pitch perception in the auditory brainstem. PMID:23408878

  6. Energy-aware Gateway Selection for increasing the lifetime of Wireless Body Area Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bayilmis, Cuneyt; Younis, Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    A Wireless Body Area Sensor Network (WBASN) is composed of a set of sensor nodes, placed on, near or within a human body. WBASNs opt to continuously monitor the health conditions of individuals under medical risk, e.g., elders and chronically ill people, without keeping them in a hospital or restraining their motion. A WBASN needs to stay connected to local or wide area networks using wireless technologies in order to send sensor readings to a medical center. The WBASN nodes are implanted within the human body and would thus have limited energy supply. Since the mission of the WBASN is very critical, increasing the lifetime of nodes is essential in order to maintain both practicality and effectiveness. This paper presents a new Gateway Selection Algorithm (GSA) that factors in the use of energy harvesting technologies and dynamically picks the most suitable WBASN node that serves as a gateway to other wireless networks. The goal of GSA is to balance the load among the nodes by adaptively changing the gateway node in WBASN depending on the energy reserve of nodes. Computer modeling and simulations of the proposed GSA are carried out using OPNET. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed GSA approach. PMID:21057885

  7. Selective ATP-competitive inhibitors of TOR suppress rapamycin-insensitive function of TORC2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingsong; Ren, Tao; Fresques, Tara; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Niles, Brad J; Hur, Wooyoung; Sabatini, David M; Hall, Michael N; Powers, Ted; Gray, Nathanael S

    2012-06-15

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a critical regulator of growth, survival, and energy metabolism. The allosteric TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin has been used extensively to elucidate the TOR related signal pathway but is limited by its inability to inhibit TORC2. We used an unbiased cell proliferation assay of a kinase inhibitor library to discover QL-IX-55 as a potent inhibitor of S. cerevisiae growth. The functional target of QL-IX-55 is the ATP-binding site of TOR2 as evidenced by the discovery of resistant alleles of TOR2 through rational design and unbiased selection strategies. QL-IX-55 is capable of potently inhibiting both TOR complex 1 and 2 (TORC1 and TORC2) as demonstrated by biochemical IP kinase assays (IC(50) <50 nM) and cellular assays for inhibition of substrate YPK1 phosphorylation. In contrast to rapamycin, QL-IX-55 is capable of inhibiting TORC2-dependent transcription, which suggests that this compound will be a powerful probe to dissect the Tor2/TORC2-related signaling pathway in yeast.

  8. Set selection dynamical system neural networks with partial memories, with applications to Sudoku and KenKen puzzles.

    PubMed

    Boreland, B; Clement, G; Kunze, H

    2015-08-01

    After reviewing set selection and memory model dynamical system neural networks, we introduce a neural network model that combines set selection with partial memories (stored memories on subsets of states in the network). We establish that feasible equilibria with all states equal to ± 1 correspond to answers to a particular set theoretic problem. We show that KenKen puzzles can be formulated as a particular case of this set theoretic problem and use the neural network model to solve them; in addition, we use a similar approach to solve Sudoku. We illustrate the approach in examples. As a heuristic experiment, we use online or print resources to identify the difficulty of the puzzles and compare these difficulties to the number of iterations used by the appropriate neural network solver, finding a strong relationship.

  9. Set selection dynamical system neural networks with partial memories, with applications to Sudoku and KenKen puzzles.

    PubMed

    Boreland, B; Clement, G; Kunze, H

    2015-08-01

    After reviewing set selection and memory model dynamical system neural networks, we introduce a neural network model that combines set selection with partial memories (stored memories on subsets of states in the network). We establish that feasible equilibria with all states equal to ± 1 correspond to answers to a particular set theoretic problem. We show that KenKen puzzles can be formulated as a particular case of this set theoretic problem and use the neural network model to solve them; in addition, we use a similar approach to solve Sudoku. We illustrate the approach in examples. As a heuristic experiment, we use online or print resources to identify the difficulty of the puzzles and compare these difficulties to the number of iterations used by the appropriate neural network solver, finding a strong relationship. PMID:25984696

  10. Friendship networks and achievement goals: an examination of selection and influence processes and variations by gender.

    PubMed

    Shin, Huiyoung; Ryan, Allison M

    2014-09-01

    Interactions with friends are a salient part of students' experience at school. Thus, friends are likely to be an important source of influence on achievement goals. This study investigated processes within early adolescent friendships (selection and influence) with regard to achievement goals (mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals) among sixth graders (N = 587, 50% girls at wave 1, N = 576, 52% girls at wave 2) followed from fall to spring within one academic year. Students' gender was examined as a moderator in these processes. Longitudinal social network analysis found that friends were similar to each other in mastery goals and that this similarity was due to both selection and influence effects. Influence but not selection effects were found for performance-approach goals. Influence effects for performance-approach goals were stronger for boys compared to girls in the classroom. Neither selection, nor influence, effects were found in relation to performance-avoidance goals. However, the higher a student was in performance-avoidance goals, the less likely they were to be named as a friend by classmates. Implications for early adolescents' classroom adjustment are discussed.

  11. Adolescent girls' friendship networks, body dissatisfaction, and disordered eating: examining selection and socialization processes.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Kathryn E; Schniering, Carolyn A; Rapee, Ronald M; Taylor, Alan; Hutchinson, Delyse M

    2013-02-01

    Previous research has shown that adolescent girls tend to resemble their friends in their level of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. However, no studies to date have attempted to disentangle the underlying peer selection and socialization processes that may explain this homophily. The current study used longitudinal stochastic actor-based modeling to simultaneously examine these two processes in a large community sample of adolescent girls (N = 1,197) from nine Australian girls' high schools. Friendship nominations and measures of body dissatisfaction, dieting and bulimic behaviors were collected across three annual waves. Results indicated that selection rather than socialization effects contributed to similarity within friendship groups when both processes were examined simultaneously. Specifically, girls tended to select friends who were similar to themselves in terms of body dissatisfaction and bulimic behaviors, but dissimilar in terms of dieting. Network and individual attribute variables also emerged as significant in explaining changes in adolescents' friendships and behaviors. As well as having important clinical implications, the findings point to the importance of controlling for friendship selection when examining the role of peers in adolescent body image and eating problems.

  12. Optimal neural network architecture selection: effects on computer-aided detection of mammographic microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurcan, Metin N.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Petrick, Nicholas; Helvie, Mark A.

    2002-05-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an optimal convolution neural network (CNN) architecture selected by simulated annealing for improving the performance of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system designed for the detection of microcalcification clusters on digitized mammograms. The performances of the CAD programs with manually and optimally selected CNNs were compared using an independent test set. This set included 472 mammograms and contained 253 biopsy-proven malignant clusters. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis was used for evaluation of the detection accuracy. At a false positive (FP) rate of 0.7 per image, the film-based sensitivity was 84.6% with the optimized CNN, in comparison with 77.2% with the manually selected CNN. If clusters having images in both craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique views were analyzed together and a cluster was considered to be detected when it was detected in one or both views, at 0.7 FPs/image, the sensitivity was 93.3% with the optimized CNN and 87.0% with the manually selected CNN. This study indicates that classification of true positive and FP signals is an important step of the CAD program and that the detection accuracy of the program can be considerably improved by optimizing this step with an automated optimization algorithm.

  13. Target Inhibition Networks: Predicting Selective Combinations of Druggable Targets to Block Cancer Survival Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Karhinen, Leena; Xu, Tao; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero

    2013-01-01

    A recent trend in drug development is to identify drug combinations or multi-target agents that effectively modify multiple nodes of disease-associated networks. Such polypharmacological effects may reduce the risk of emerging drug resistance by means of attacking the disease networks through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. However, due to the exponentially increasing number of potential drug and target combinations, systematic approaches are needed for prioritizing the most potent multi-target alternatives on a global network level. We took a functional systems pharmacology approach toward the identification of selective target combinations for specific cancer cells by combining large-scale screening data on drug treatment efficacies and drug-target binding affinities. Our model-based prediction approach, named TIMMA, takes advantage of the polypharmacological effects of drugs and infers combinatorial drug efficacies through system-level target inhibition networks. Case studies in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated how the target inhibition modeling allows systematic exploration of functional interactions between drugs and their targets to maximally inhibit multiple survival pathways in a given cancer type. The TIMMA prediction results were experimentally validated by means of systematic siRNA-mediated silencing of the selected targets and their pairwise combinations, showing increased ability to identify not only such druggable kinase targets that are essential for cancer survival either individually or in combination, but also synergistic interactions indicative of non-additive drug efficacies. These system-level analyses were enabled by a novel model construction method utilizing maximization and minimization rules, as well as a model selection algorithm based on sequential forward floating search. Compared with an existing computational solution, TIMMA showed both enhanced prediction accuracies in

  14. Menstrual cycle effects on selective attention and its underlying cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Thimm, M; Weis, S; Hausmann, M; Sturm, W

    2014-01-31

    It was the aim of the present study to investigate menstrual cycle effects on selective attention and its underlying functional cerebral networks. Twenty-one healthy, right-handed, normally cycling women were investigated by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging using a go/no-go paradigm during the menstrual, follicular and luteal phase. On the behavioral level there was a significant interaction between visual half field and cycle phase with reaction times to right-sided compared to left-sided stimuli being faster in the menstrual compared to the follicular phase. These results might argue for a more pronounced functional cerebral asymmetry toward the left hemisphere in selective attention during the menstrual phase with low estradiol and progesterone levels. Functional imaging, however, did not reveal clear-cut menstrual phase-related changes in activation pattern in parallel to these behavioral findings. A functional connectivity analysis identified differences between the menstrual and the luteal phase: During the menstrual phase, left inferior parietal cortex showed a stronger negative correlation with the right middle frontal gyrus while the left medial frontal cortex showed a stronger negative correlation with the left middle frontal gyrus. These results can serve as further evidence of a modulatory effect of steroid hormones on networks of lateralized cognitive functions not only by interhemispheric inhibition but also by affecting intrahemispheric functional connectivity.

  15. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination's home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination's home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  16. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility †

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination’s home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination’s home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  17. Selectivity of direct and network-mediated stimulation of the retinal ganglion cells with epi-, sub- and intraretinal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boinagrov, David; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Goetz, Georges; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intra-retinal placement of stimulating electrodes can provide close and stable proximity to target neurons. We assessed improvement in stimulation thresholds and selectivity of the direct and network-mediated retinal stimulation with intraretinal electrodes, compared to epiretinal and subretinal placements. Approach. Stimulation thresholds of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in wild-type rat retina were measured using the patch-clamp technique. Direct and network-mediated responses were discriminated using various synaptic blockers. Main results. Three types of RGC responses were identified: short latency (SL, τ < 5 ms) originating in RGCs, medium latency (ML, 3 < τ < 70 ms) originating in the inner nuclear layer and long latency (LL, τ > 40 ms) originating in photoreceptors. Cathodic epiretinal stimulation exhibited the lowest threshold for direct RGC response and the highest direct selectivity (network/direct thresholds ratio), exceeding a factor of 3 with pulse durations below 0.5 ms. For network-mediated stimulation, the lowest threshold was obtained with anodic pulses in OPL position, and its network selectivity (direct/network thresholds ratio) increased with pulse duration, exceeding a factor of 4 at 10 ms. Latency of all three types of responses decreased with increasing strength of the stimulus. Significance. These results define the optimal range of pulse durations, pulse polarities and electrode placement for the retinal prostheses aiming at direct or network-mediated stimulation of RGCs.

  18. Analysis of Drug Design for a Selection of G Protein-Coupled Neuro- Receptors Using Neural Network Techniques.

    PubMed

    Agerskov, Claus; Mortensen, Rasmus M; Bohr, Henrik G

    2015-01-01

    A study is presented on how well possible drug-molecules can be predicted with respect to their function and binding to a selection of neuro-receptors by the use of artificial neural networks. The ligands investigated in this study are chosen to be corresponding to the G protein-coupled receptors µ-opioid, serotonin 2B (5-HT2B) and metabotropic glutamate D5. They are selected due to the availability of pharmacological drug-molecule binding data for these receptors. Feedback and deep belief artificial neural network architectures (NNs) were chosen to perform the task of aiding drugdesign. This is done by training on structural features, selected using a "minimum redundancy, maximum relevance"-test, and testing for successful prediction of categorized binding strength. An extensive comparison of the neural network performances was made in order to select the optimal architecture. Deep belief networks, trained with greedy learning algorithms, showed superior performance in prediction over the simple feedback NNs. The best networks obtained scores of more than 90 % accuracy in predicting the degree of binding drug molecules to the mentioned receptors and with a maximal Matthew`s coefficient of 0.925. The performance of 8 category networks (8 output classes for binding strength) obtained a prediction accuracy of above 60 %. After training the networks, tests were done on how well the systems could be used as an aid in designing candidate drug molecules. Specifically, it was shown how a selection of chemical characteristics could give the lowest observed IC50 values, meaning largest bio-effect pr. nM substance, around 0.03-0.06 nM. These ligand characteristics could be total number of atoms, their types etc. In conclusion, deep belief networks trained on drug-molecule structures were demonstrated as powerful computational tools, able to aid in drug-design in a fast and cheap fashion, compared to conventional pharmacological techniques.

  19. Analysis of Drug Design for a Selection of G Protein-Coupled Neuro- Receptors Using Neural Network Techniques.

    PubMed

    Agerskov, Claus; Mortensen, Rasmus M; Bohr, Henrik G

    2015-01-01

    A study is presented on how well possible drug-molecules can be predicted with respect to their function and binding to a selection of neuro-receptors by the use of artificial neural networks. The ligands investigated in this study are chosen to be corresponding to the G protein-coupled receptors µ-opioid, serotonin 2B (5-HT2B) and metabotropic glutamate D5. They are selected due to the availability of pharmacological drug-molecule binding data for these receptors. Feedback and deep belief artificial neural network architectures (NNs) were chosen to perform the task of aiding drugdesign. This is done by training on structural features, selected using a "minimum redundancy, maximum relevance"-test, and testing for successful prediction of categorized binding strength. An extensive comparison of the neural network performances was made in order to select the optimal architecture. Deep belief networks, trained with greedy learning algorithms, showed superior performance in prediction over the simple feedback NNs. The best networks obtained scores of more than 90 % accuracy in predicting the degree of binding drug molecules to the mentioned receptors and with a maximal Matthew`s coefficient of 0.925. The performance of 8 category networks (8 output classes for binding strength) obtained a prediction accuracy of above 60 %. After training the networks, tests were done on how well the systems could be used as an aid in designing candidate drug molecules. Specifically, it was shown how a selection of chemical characteristics could give the lowest observed IC50 values, meaning largest bio-effect pr. nM substance, around 0.03-0.06 nM. These ligand characteristics could be total number of atoms, their types etc. In conclusion, deep belief networks trained on drug-molecule structures were demonstrated as powerful computational tools, able to aid in drug-design in a fast and cheap fashion, compared to conventional pharmacological techniques. PMID:26463104

  20. Selective Attention to Semantic and Syntactic Features Modulates Sentence Processing Networks in Anterior Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rogalsky, Corianne

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified an anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region that responds preferentially to sentence-level stimuli. It is unclear, however, whether this activity reflects a response to syntactic computations or some form of semantic integration. This distinction is difficult to investigate with the stimulus manipulations and anomaly detection paradigms traditionally implemented. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study addresses this question via a selective attention paradigm. Subjects monitored for occasional semantic anomalies or occasional syntactic errors, thus directing their attention to semantic integration, or syntactic properties of the sentences. The hemodynamic response in the sentence-selective ATL region (defined with a localizer scan) was examined during anomaly/error-free sentences only, to avoid confounds due to error detection. The majority of the sentence-specific region of interest was equally modulated by attention to syntactic or compositional semantic features, whereas a smaller subregion was only modulated by the semantic task. We suggest that the sentence-specific ATL region is sensitive to both syntactic and integrative semantic functions during sentence processing, with a smaller portion of this area preferentially involved in the later. This study also suggests that selective attention paradigms may be effective tools to investigate the functional diversity of networks involved in sentence processing. PMID:18669589

  1. Selective breakdown of metallic pathways in double-walled carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Allen L; Sun, Yong; Powell, Lyndsey; Sun, Chuan-Fu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, YuHuang

    2015-01-01

    Covalently functionalized, semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit remarkable properties and can outperform their single-walled carbon nanotube counterparts. In order to harness their potential for electronic applications, metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes must be separated from the semiconductors. However, the inner wall is inaccessible to current separation techniques which rely on the surface properties. Here, the first approach to address this challenge through electrical breakdown of metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes, both inner and outer walls, within networks of mixed electronic types is described. The intact semiconductors demonstrate a ∼62% retention of the ON-state conductance in thin film transistors in response to covalent functionalization. The selective elimination of the metallic pathways improves the ON/OFF ratio, by more than 360 times, to as high as 40 700, while simultaneously retaining high ON-state conductance.

  2. Bivalve network reveals latitudinal selectivity gradient at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Vilhena, Daril A.; Harris, Elisha B.; Bergstrom, Carl T.; Maliska, Max E.; Ward, Peter D.; Sidor, Christian A.; Strömberg, Caroline A. E.; Wilson, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    Biogeographic patterns of survival help constrain the causal factors responsible for mass extinction. To test whether biogeography influenced end-Cretaceous (K-Pg) extinction patterns, we used a network approach to delimit biogeographic units (BUs) above the species level in a global Maastrichtian database of 329 bivalve genera. Geographic range is thought to buffer taxa from extinction, but the number of BUs a taxon occurred in superseded geographic range as an extinction predictor. Geographically, we found a latitudinal selectivity gradient for geographic range in the K-Pg, such that higher latitude BUs had lower extinction than expected given the geographic ranges of the genera, implying that (i) high latitude BUs were more resistant to extinction, (ii) the intensity of the K-Pg kill mechanism declined with distance from the tropics, or (iii) both. Our results highlight the importance of macroecological structure in constraining causal mechanisms of extinction and estimating extinction risk of taxa.

  3. Extracellular vesicles modulate the glioblastoma microenvironment via a tumor suppression signaling network directed by miR-1.

    PubMed

    Bronisz, Agnieszka; Wang, Yan; Nowicki, Michal O; Peruzzi, Pierpaolo; Ansari, Khairul I; Ogawa, Daisuke; Balaj, Leonora; De Rienzo, Gianluca; Mineo, Marco; Nakano, Ichiro; Ostrowski, Michael C; Hochberg, Fred; Weissleder, Ralph; Lawler, Sean E; Chiocca, E Antonio; Godlewski, Jakub

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles have emerged as important mediators of intercellular communication in cancer, including by conveying tumor-promoting microRNAs between cells, but their regulation is poorly understood. In this study, we report the findings of a comparative microRNA profiling and functional analysis in human glioblastoma that identifies miR-1 as an orchestrator of extracellular vesicle function and glioblastoma growth and invasion. Ectopic expression of miR-1 in glioblastoma cells blocked in vivo growth, neovascularization, and invasiveness. These effects were associated with a role for miR-1 in intercellular communication in the microenvironment mediated by extracellular vesicles released by cancer stem-like glioblastoma cells. An extracellular vesicle-dependent phenotype defined by glioblastoma invasion, neurosphere growth, and endothelial tube formation was mitigated by loading miR-1 into glioblastoma-derived extracellular vesicles. Protein cargo in extracellular vesicles was characterized to learn how miR-1 directed extracellular vesicle function. The mRNA encoding Annexin A2 (ANXA2), one of the most abundant proteins in glioblastoma-derived extracellular vesicles, was found to be a direct target of miR-1 control. In addition, extracellular vesicle-derived miR-1 along with other ANXA2 extracellular vesicle networking partners targeted multiple pro-oncogenic signals in cells within the glioblastoma microenvironment. Together, our results showed how extracellular vesicle signaling promotes the malignant character of glioblastoma and how ectopic expression of miR-1 can mitigate this character, with possible implications for how to develop a unique miRNA-based therapy for glioblastoma management. PMID:24310399

  4. Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey national stream water quality monitoring networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Slack, J.R.; Ludtke, A.S.; Fitzgerald, K.K.; Schertz, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    A nationally consistent and well-documented collection of water quality and quantity data compiled during the past 30 years for streams and rivers in the United States is now available on CD-ROM and accessible over the World Wide Web. The data include measurements from two U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) national networks for 122 physical, chemical, and biological properties of water collected at 680 monitoring stations from 1962 to 1995, quality assurance information that describes the sample collection agencies, laboratories, analytical methods, and estimates of laboratory measurement error (bias and variance), and information on selected cultural and natural characteristics of the station watersheds. The data are easily accessed via user-supplied software including Web browser, spreadsheet, and word processor, or may be queried and printed according to user-specified criteria using the supplied retrieval software on CD-ROM. The water quality data serve a variety of scientific uses including research and educational applications related to trend detection, flux estimation, investigations of the effects of the natural environment and cultural sources on water quality, and the development of statistical methods for designing efficient monitoring networks and interpreting water resources data.

  5. Nanocasting Design and Spatially Selective Sulfonation of Polystyrene-Based Polymer Networks as Solid Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Richter, Felix H; Sahraoui, Laila; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-09-12

    Nanocasting is a general and widely applied method in the generation of porous materials during which a sacrificial solid template is used as a mold on the nanoscale. Ideally, the resulting structure is the inverse of the template. However, replication is not always as direct as anticipated, so the influences of the degree of pore filling and of potential restructuring processes after removal of the template need to be considered. These apparent limitations give rise to opportunities in the synthesis of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PSD) polymer networks of widely varying porosities (BET surface area=63-562 m(2)  g(-1) ; Vtot =0.18-1.05 cm(3)  g(-1) ) by applying a single synthesis methodology. In addition, spatially selective sulfonation on the nanoscale seems possible. Together, nanocasting and sulfonation enable rational catalyst design. The highly porous nanocast and predominantly surface-sulfonated PSD networks approach the activity of the corresponding molecular catalyst, para-toluenesulfonic acid, and exceed those of commercial ion-exchange polymers in the depolymerization of macromolecular inulin.

  6. Patterns of partner selection within a network of joint ventures in oil and gas exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Jeffrey Emmet

    Leaders of companies exploring for oil and gas had no means of characterizing the multitude of intercompany associations common to the industry. This study examined the patterns of intercompany associations, based on exploration lease joint ventures, for leases active on December 31, 2005 in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The company attributes examined in this study included company status, company size, lease joint venture network centrality, longevity of company lease ownership, and the extent of company operations. The joint count, network and spatial autocorrelation tests detected the significant patterning of intercompany associations by company status, but no patterning by company attributes including size, centrality, longevity, or extent. This study identified the strong tendency to homophily for major companies and heterophily for nonmajor companies. The overall tendency to heterophily by status remained across all the companies included in the study. Oil and gas company leaders and lease resource administrators can use insights from the observed patterns to inform partner selection decisions or lease administration practices.

  7. Nanocasting Design and Spatially Selective Sulfonation of Polystyrene-Based Polymer Networks as Solid Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Richter, Felix H; Sahraoui, Laila; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-09-12

    Nanocasting is a general and widely applied method in the generation of porous materials during which a sacrificial solid template is used as a mold on the nanoscale. Ideally, the resulting structure is the inverse of the template. However, replication is not always as direct as anticipated, so the influences of the degree of pore filling and of potential restructuring processes after removal of the template need to be considered. These apparent limitations give rise to opportunities in the synthesis of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PSD) polymer networks of widely varying porosities (BET surface area=63-562 m(2)  g(-1) ; Vtot =0.18-1.05 cm(3)  g(-1) ) by applying a single synthesis methodology. In addition, spatially selective sulfonation on the nanoscale seems possible. Together, nanocasting and sulfonation enable rational catalyst design. The highly porous nanocast and predominantly surface-sulfonated PSD networks approach the activity of the corresponding molecular catalyst, para-toluenesulfonic acid, and exceed those of commercial ion-exchange polymers in the depolymerization of macromolecular inulin. PMID:27561365

  8. Weed control and yield potential for a promising rice line, STG06L-35-061, selected from crosses between weed-suppressive indicas and commercial long-grain rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable weed control is an ongoing challenge in rice production. Indica rice lines such as PI 312777 that can suppress Echinochloa crus-galli and other troublesome C4 grass weeds have been evaluated extensively in Arkansas for more than a decade. In an ongoing breeding/selection program, we are...

  9. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B; Abadi, Ashraf H; Moyer, Mary P; Grizzle, William E; Chang, Wen-Chi; Clapper, Margie L; Piazza, Gary A

    2013-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from COX inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not require COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report that the NSAID sulindac sulfide inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. Sulindac sulfide did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors tadalafil and sildenafil also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which sulindac sulfide and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth involves the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin T-cell factor transcriptional activity, leading to downregulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP-degrading isozymes. PMID:23804703

  10. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D.; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B.; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Moyer, Mary P.; Grizzle, William E.; Chang, Wen-chi; Clapper, Margie L.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    NSAIDs display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not required COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here we report that the NSAID, sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cyclic guanosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. SS did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors, tadalafil and sildenafil, also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which SS and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth appears to involve the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin TCF transcriptional activity, leading to down-regulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes. PMID:23804703

  11. Pressure to drink but not to smoke: disentangling selection and socialization in adolescent peer networks and peer groups.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Noona; Burk, William J; Laursen, Brett; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-12-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants identified three school friends and described their alcohol and tobacco use on two occasions one year apart. Actor-based models simultaneously examined changes in peer network ties and changes in individual behaviors for all participants within each school. Multi-level analyses examined changes in individual behaviors for adolescents entering new peer groups and adolescents in stable peer groups, both of which were embedded within the school-based peer networks. Similar results emerged from both analytic methods: Selection and socialization contributed to similarity of alcohol use, but only selection was a factor in tobacco use.

  12. Using Nonlinear Stochastic Evolutionary Game Strategy to Model an Evolutionary Biological Network of Organ Carcinogenesis Under a Natural Selection Scheme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Tsai, Kun-Wei; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biologists have long recognized carcinogenesis as an evolutionary process that involves natural selection. Cancer is driven by the somatic evolution of cell lineages. In this study, the evolution of somatic cancer cell lineages during carcinogenesis was modeled as an equilibrium point (ie, phenotype of attractor) shifting, the process of a nonlinear stochastic evolutionary biological network. This process is subject to intrinsic random fluctuations because of somatic genetic and epigenetic variations, as well as extrinsic disturbances because of carcinogens and stressors. In order to maintain the normal function (ie, phenotype) of an evolutionary biological network subjected to random intrinsic fluctuations and extrinsic disturbances, a network robustness scheme that incorporates natural selection needs to be developed. This can be accomplished by selecting certain genetic and epigenetic variations to modify the network structure to attenuate intrinsic fluctuations efficiently and to resist extrinsic disturbances in order to maintain the phenotype of the evolutionary biological network at an equilibrium point (attractor). However, during carcinogenesis, the remaining (or neutral) genetic and epigenetic variations accumulate, and the extrinsic disturbances become too large to maintain the normal phenotype at the desired equilibrium point for the nonlinear evolutionary biological network. Thus, the network is shifted to a cancer phenotype at a new equilibrium point that begins a new evolutionary process. In this study, the natural selection scheme of an evolutionary biological network of carcinogenesis was derived from a robust negative feedback scheme based on the nonlinear stochastic Nash game strategy. The evolvability and phenotypic robustness criteria of the evolutionary cancer network were also estimated by solving a Hamilton-Jacobi inequality - constrained optimization problem. The simulation revealed that the phenotypic shift of the lung cancer

  13. Using Nonlinear Stochastic Evolutionary Game Strategy to Model an Evolutionary Biological Network of Organ Carcinogenesis Under a Natural Selection Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Tsai, Kun-Wei; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biologists have long recognized carcinogenesis as an evolutionary process that involves natural selection. Cancer is driven by the somatic evolution of cell lineages. In this study, the evolution of somatic cancer cell lineages during carcinogenesis was modeled as an equilibrium point (ie, phenotype of attractor) shifting, the process of a nonlinear stochastic evolutionary biological network. This process is subject to intrinsic random fluctuations because of somatic genetic and epigenetic variations, as well as extrinsic disturbances because of carcinogens and stressors. In order to maintain the normal function (ie, phenotype) of an evolutionary biological network subjected to random intrinsic fluctuations and extrinsic disturbances, a network robustness scheme that incorporates natural selection needs to be developed. This can be accomplished by selecting certain genetic and epigenetic variations to modify the network structure to attenuate intrinsic fluctuations efficiently and to resist extrinsic disturbances in order to maintain the phenotype of the evolutionary biological network at an equilibrium point (attractor). However, during carcinogenesis, the remaining (or neutral) genetic and epigenetic variations accumulate, and the extrinsic disturbances become too large to maintain the normal phenotype at the desired equilibrium point for the nonlinear evolutionary biological network. Thus, the network is shifted to a cancer phenotype at a new equilibrium point that begins a new evolutionary process. In this study, the natural selection scheme of an evolutionary biological network of carcinogenesis was derived from a robust negative feedback scheme based on the nonlinear stochastic Nash game strategy. The evolvability and phenotypic robustness criteria of the evolutionary cancer network were also estimated by solving a Hamilton–Jacobi inequality – constrained optimization problem. The simulation revealed that the phenotypic shift of the lung cancer

  14. Site selection for the future stations of the french permanent broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jérôme; Charade, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    RESIF (REseau SIsmologique et géodésique Français) is a new French research infrastructure dedicated to the observation of earth deformation based on seismic and geodetic instruments mainly located in France. One of its major component, called RESIF-CLB (Construction Large Bande), is devoted to the evolution of the permanent seismic broadband network in metropolitan France with the objective to complement the 45 existing stations with ~155 new stations within the next eight years. This network will be used for various scientific objectives including deep structures imaging and national seismicity monitoring. The chosen network topology consists in a backbone of homogeneously distributed stations (long wavelength array) completed by additional stations in seismically active regions. Management of the RESIF-CLB project is carried out by the technical division of INSU (Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers) who will rely on eight regional observatories and the CEA-LDG for the construction and operation of the stations. To optimize the performance of the network, we put a strong emphasis on the standardization of the stations in term of vault types, scientific and technical instrumentation and operation procedures. We also set up a procedure for site selection requiring that every potential site has to be tested for at least 3 weeks with a minimalist installation. Analysis of the continuous ambient noise records is then included in a standardized report submitted to all committed partners for acceptance. During the last two years, about 60 potential new sites have been tested, spanning various places and environments. We present a review of the seismic noise measurements at these sites and discuss the influence of different types of noise sources depending on the frequency band of interest. For example, we show that regional population distribution can be used as a proxy to infer the noise level at frequencies higher than 1 Hz. Based on similar noise analyses

  15. A Sensitive Secondary Users Selection Algorithm for Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aohan; Han, Guangjie; Wan, Liangtian; Shu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Secondary Users (SUs) are allowed to use the temporarily unused licensed spectrum without disturbing Primary Users (PUs) in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks (CRAHNs). Existing architectures for CRAHNs impose energy-consuming Cognitive Radios (CRs) on SUs. However, the advanced CRs will increase energy cost for their cognitive functionalities, which is undesirable for the battery powered devices. A new architecture referred to as spectral Requirement-based CRAHN (RCRAHN) is proposed to enhance energy efficiency for CRAHNs in this paper. In RCRAHNs, only parts of SUs are equipped with CRs. SUs equipped with CRs are referred to as Cognitive Radio Users (CRUs). To further enhance energy efficiency of CRAHNs, we aim to select minimum CRUs to sense available spectrum. A non-linear programming problem is mathematically formulated under the constraints of energy efficiency and real-time. Considering the NP-hardness of the problem, a framework of a heuristic algorithm referred to as Sensitive Secondary Users Selection (SSUS) was designed to compute the near-optimal solutions. The simulation results demonstrate that SSUS not only improves the energy efficiency, but also achieves satisfied performances in end-to-end delay and communication reliability. PMID:27023562

  16. A Sensitive Secondary Users Selection Algorithm for Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Aohan; Han, Guangjie; Wan, Liangtian; Shu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Secondary Users (SUs) are allowed to use the temporarily unused licensed spectrum without disturbing Primary Users (PUs) in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks (CRAHNs). Existing architectures for CRAHNs impose energy-consuming Cognitive Radios (CRs) on SUs. However, the advanced CRs will increase energy cost for their cognitive functionalities, which is undesirable for the battery powered devices. A new architecture referred to as spectral Requirement-based CRAHN (RCRAHN) is proposed to enhance energy efficiency for CRAHNs in this paper. In RCRAHNs, only parts of SUs are equipped with CRs. SUs equipped with CRs are referred to as Cognitive Radio Users (CRUs). To further enhance energy efficiency of CRAHNs, we aim to select minimum CRUs to sense available spectrum. A non-linear programming problem is mathematically formulated under the constraints of energy efficiency and real-time. Considering the NP-hardness of the problem, a framework of a heuristic algorithm referred to as Sensitive Secondary Users Selection (SSUS) was designed to compute the near-optimal solutions. The simulation results demonstrate that SSUS not only improves the energy efficiency, but also achieves satisfied performances in end-to-end delay and communication reliability. PMID:27023562

  17. An Efficient Next Hop Selection Algorithm for Multi-Hop Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahitafti, Vahid; Ngadi, Md Asri; Mohamad Sharif, Johan bin; Abdullahi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Body Area Networks (BANs) consist of various sensors which gather patient’s vital signs and deliver them to doctors. One of the most significant challenges faced, is the design of an energy-efficient next hop selection algorithm to satisfy Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for different healthcare applications. In this paper, a novel efficient next hop selection algorithm is proposed in multi-hop BANs. This algorithm uses the minimum hop count and a link cost function jointly in each node to choose the best next hop node. The link cost function includes the residual energy, free buffer size, and the link reliability of the neighboring nodes, which is used to balance the energy consumption and to satisfy QoS requirements in terms of end to end delay and reliability. Extensive simulation experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm using the NS-2 simulator. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in terms of energy consumption, number of packets forwarded, end to end delay and packet delivery ratio compared to the existing routing protocol. PMID:26771586

  18. Model selection for system identification by means of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuner, Hans

    2012-11-01

    System identification is one main task in modern deformation analysis. If the physical structure of the monitoring object is unknown or not accessible the system identification is performed in a behavioural framework. Therein the relations between input and output signals are formulated on the basis of regression models. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are a very flexible tool for modelling especially non-linear relationships between the input and the output measures. The universal approximation theorem ensures that every continuous relation can be modelled with this approach. However, some structural aspects of the ANN-based models, like the number of hidden nodes or the number of data needed to obtain a good generalisation, remain unspecified in the theorem. Therefore, one faces a model selection problem. In this article the methodology of modelling the deformations of a lock occurring due to water level and temperature changes is described. We emphasise the aspect of model selection, by presenting and discussing the results of various approaches for the determination of the number of hidden nodes. The first one is cross-validation. The second one is a weight deletion technique based on the exact computation of the Hessian matrix. Finally, the third method has a rigorous theoretical background and is based on the capacity concept of a model structure.

  19. A Sensitive Secondary Users Selection Algorithm for Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Aohan; Han, Guangjie; Wan, Liangtian; Shu, Lei

    2016-03-26

    Secondary Users (SUs) are allowed to use the temporarily unused licensed spectrum without disturbing Primary Users (PUs) in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks (CRAHNs). Existing architectures for CRAHNs impose energy-consuming Cognitive Radios (CRs) on SUs. However, the advanced CRs will increase energy cost for their cognitive functionalities, which is undesirable for the battery powered devices. A new architecture referred to as spectral Requirement-based CRAHN (RCRAHN) is proposed to enhance energy efficiency for CRAHNs in this paper. In RCRAHNs, only parts of SUs are equipped with CRs. SUs equipped with CRs are referred to as Cognitive Radio Users (CRUs). To further enhance energy efficiency of CRAHNs, we aim to select minimum CRUs to sense available spectrum. A non-linear programming problem is mathematically formulated under the constraints of energy efficiency and real-time. Considering the NP-hardness of the problem, a framework of a heuristic algorithm referred to as Sensitive Secondary Users Selection (SSUS) was designed to compute the near-optimal solutions. The simulation results demonstrate that SSUS not only improves the energy efficiency, but also achieves satisfied performances in end-to-end delay and communication reliability.

  20. Comparative genomics of the vertebrate insulin/TOR signal transduction pathway: a network-level analysis of selective pressures.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ponce, David; Aguadé, Montserrat; Rozas, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Complexity of biological function relies on large networks of interacting molecules. However, the evolutionary properties of these networks are not fully understood. It has been shown that selective pressures depend on the position of genes in the network. We have previously shown that in the Drosophila insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signal transduction pathway there is a correlation between the pathway position and the strength of purifying selection, with the downstream genes being most constrained. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary dynamics of this well-characterized pathway in vertebrates. More specifically, we determined the impact of natural selection on the evolution of 72 genes of this pathway. We found that in vertebrates there is a similar gradient of selective constraint in the insulin/TOR pathway to that found in Drosophila. This feature is neither the result of a polarity in the impact of positive selection nor of a series of factors affecting selective constraint levels (gene expression level and breadth, codon bias, protein length, and connectivity). We also found that pathway genes encoding physically interacting proteins tend to evolve under similar selective constraints. The results indicate that the architecture of the vertebrate insulin/TOR pathway constrains the molecular evolution of its components. Therefore, the polarity detected in Drosophila is neither specific nor incidental of this genus. Hence, although the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear, these may be similar in both vertebrates and Drosophila.

  1. Evolutionary model selection and parameter estimation for protein-protein interaction network based on differential evolution algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H.

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the underlying evolutionary mechanism plays an important role in understanding protein interaction networks in the cell. While many evolutionary models have been proposed, the problem about applying these models to real network data, especially for differentiating which model can better describe evolutionary process for the observed network urgently remains as a challenge. The traditional way is to use a model with presumed parameters to generate a network, and then evaluate the fitness by summary statistics, which however cannot capture the complete network structures information and estimate parameter distribution. In this work we developed a novel method based on Approximate Bayesian Computation and modified Differential Evolution (ABC-DEP) that is capable of conducting model selection and parameter estimation simultaneously and detecting the underlying evolutionary mechanisms more accurately. We tested our method for its power in differentiating models and estimating parameters on the simulated data and found significant improvement in performance benchmark, as compared with a previous method. We further applied our method to real data of protein interaction networks in human and yeast. Our results show Duplication Attachment model as the predominant evolutionary mechanism for human PPI networks and Scale-Free model as the predominant mechanism for yeast PPI networks. PMID:26357273

  2. Selective growth and integration of silver nanoparticles on silver nanowires at room conditions for transparent nano-network electrode.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haifei; Zhang, Di; Ren, Xingang; Liu, Jian; Choy, Wallace C H

    2014-10-28

    Recently, metal nanowires have received great research interests due to their potential as next-generation flexible transparent electrodes. While great efforts have been devoted to develop enabling nanowire electrodes, reduced contact resistance of the metal nanowires and improved electrical stability under continuous bias operation are key issues for practical applications. Here, we propose and demonstrate an approach through a low-cost, robust, room temperature and room atmosphere process to fabricate a conductive silver nano-network comprising silver nanowires and silver nanoparticles. To be more specific, silver nanoparticles are selectively grown and chemically integrated in situ at the junction where silver nanowires meet. The site-selective growth of silver nanoparticles is achieved by a plasmon-induced chemical reaction using a simple light source at very low optical power density. Compared to silver nanowire electrodes without chemical treatment, we observe tremendous conductivity improvement in our silver nano-networks, while the loss in optical transmission is negligible. Furthermore, the silver nano-networks exhibit superior electrical stability under continuous bias operation compared to silver nanowire electrodes formed by thermal annealing. Interestingly, our silver nano-network is readily peeled off in water, which can be easily transferred to other substrates and devices for versatile applications. We demonstrate the feasibly transferrable silver conductive nano-network as the top electrode in organic solar cells. Consequently, the transparent and conductive silver nano-networks formed by our approach would be an excellent candidate for various applications in optoelectronics and electronics.

  3. Outage Performance Analysis of Relay Selection Schemes in Wireless Energy Harvesting Cooperative Networks over Non-Identical Rayleigh Fading Channels.

    PubMed

    Do, Nhu Tri; Bao, Vo Nguyen Quoc; An, Beongku

    2016-02-26

    In this paper, we study relay selection in decode-and-forward wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks. In contrast to conventional cooperative networks, the relays harvest energy from the source's radio-frequency radiation and then use that energy to forward the source information. Considering power splitting receiver architecture used at relays to harvest energy, we are concerned with the performance of two popular relay selection schemes, namely, partial relay selection (PRS) scheme and optimal relay selection (ORS) scheme. In particular, we analyze the system performance in terms of outage probability (OP) over independent and non-identical (i.n.i.d.) Rayleigh fading channels. We derive the closed-form approximations for the system outage probabilities of both schemes and validate the analysis by the Monte-Carlo simulation. The numerical results provide comprehensive performance comparison between the PRS and ORS schemes and reveal the effect of wireless energy harvesting on the outage performances of both schemes. Additionally, we also show the advantages and drawbacks of the wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks and compare to the conventional cooperative networks.

  4. Pressure to Drink but Not to Smoke: Disentangling Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Peer Networks and Peer Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiuru, Noona; Burk, William J.; Laursen, Brett; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants identified three school friends and described…

  5. Massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computer-aided detection of polyps: Suppression of rectal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Naeppi, Janne; Dachman, Abraham H.

    2006-10-15

    One of the limitations of the current computer-aided detection (CAD) of polyps in CT colonography (CTC) is a relatively large number of false-positive (FP) detections. Rectal tubes (RTs) are one of the typical sources of FPs because a portion of a RT, especially a portion of a bulbous tip, often exhibits a cap-like shape that closely mimics the appearance of a small polyp. Radiologists can easily recognize and dismiss RT-induced FPs; thus, they may lose their confidence in CAD as an effective tool if the CAD scheme generates such ''obvious'' FPs due to RTs consistently. In addition, RT-induced FPs may distract radiologists from less common true positives in the rectum. Therefore, removal RT-induced FPs as well as other types of FPs is desirable while maintaining a high sensitivity in the detection of polyps. We developed a three-dimensional (3D) massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) for distinction between polyps and RTs in 3D CTC volumetric data. The 3D MTANN is a supervised volume-processing technique which is trained with input CTC volumes and the corresponding ''teaching'' volumes. The teaching volume for a polyp contains a 3D Gaussian distribution, and that for a RT contains zeros for enhancement of polyps and suppression of RTs, respectively. For distinction between polyps and nonpolyps including RTs, a 3D scoring method based on a 3D Gaussian weighting function is applied to the output of the trained 3D MTANN. Our database consisted of CTC examinations of 73 patients, scanned in both supine and prone positions (146 CTC data sets in total), with optical colonoscopy as a reference standard for the presence of polyps. Fifteen patients had 28 polyps, 15 of which were 5-9 mm and 13 were 10-25 mm in size. These CTC cases were subjected to our previously reported CAD scheme that included centerline-based segmentation of the colon, shape-based detection of polyps, and reduction of FPs by use of a Bayesian neural network based on geometric and texture

  6. Optimal artificial neural network architecture selection for performance prediction of compact heat exchanger with the EBaLM-OTR technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2011-07-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been used in the past to predict the performance of printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) with satisfactory accuracy. Typically published literature has focused on optimizing ANN using a training dataset to train the network and a testing dataset to evaluate it. Although this may produce outputs that agree with experimental results, there is a risk of over-training or overlearning the network rather than generalizing it, which should be the ultimate goal. An over-trained network is able to produce good results with the training dataset but fails when new datasets with subtle changes are introduced. In this paper we present EBaLM-OTR (error back propagation and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithms for over training resilience) technique, which is based on a previously discussed method of selecting neural network architecture that uses a separate validation set to evaluate different network architectures based on mean square error (MSE), and standard deviation of MSE. The method uses k-fold cross validation. Therefore in order to select the optimal architecture for the problem, the dataset is divided into three parts which are used to train, validate and test each network architecture. Then each architecture is evaluated according to their generalization capability and capability to conform to original data. The method proved to be a comprehensive tool in identifying the weaknesses and advantages of different network architectures. The method also highlighted the fact that the architecture with the lowest training error is not always the most generalized and therefore not the optimal. Using the method the testing error achieved was in the order of magnitude of within 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -3}. It was also show that the absolute error achieved by EBaLM-OTR was an order of magnitude better than the lowest error achieved by EBaLM-THP.

  7. Selective dissociation between core and extended regions of the face processing network in congenital prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Galia; Tanzer, Michal; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Liu, Ning; Ungerleider, Leslie G; Behrmann, Marlene

    2014-06-01

    There is growing consensus that accurate and efficient face recognition is mediated by a neural circuit composed of a posterior "core" and an anterior "extended" set of regions. Here, we characterize the distributed face network in human individuals with congenital prosopagnosia (CP)-a lifelong impairment in face processing-relative to that of matched controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we first uncover largely normal activation patterns in the posterior core face patches in CP. We also document normal activity of the amygdala (emotion processing) as well as normal or even enhanced functional connectivity between the amygdala and the core regions. Critically, in the same individuals, activation of the anterior temporal cortex (identity processing) is reduced and connectivity between this region and the posterior core regions is disrupted. The dissociation between the neural profiles of the anterior temporal lobe and amygdala was evident both during a task-related face scan and during a resting state scan, in the absence of visual stimulation. Taken together, these findings elucidate selective disruptions in neural circuitry in CP and offer an explanation for the known differential difficulty in identity versus emotional expression recognition in many individuals with CP.

  8. Application of an artificial neural network model for selection of potential lung cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ligor, Tomasz; Pater, Łukasz; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-06-01

    Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaled breath samples of lung cancer patients and healthy controls was carried out by SPME-GC/MS (solid phase microextraction- gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry) analyses. In order to compensate for the volatile exogenous contaminants, ambient air blank samples were also collected and analyzed. We recruited a total of 123 patients with biopsy-confirmed lung cancer and 361 healthy controls to find the potential lung cancer biomarkers. Automatic peak deconvolution and identification were performed using chromatographic data processing software (AMDIS with NIST database). All of the VOCs sample data operation, storage and management were performed using the SQL (structured query language) relational database. The selected eight VOCs could be possible biomarker candidates. In cross-validation on test data sensitivity was 63.5% and specificity 72.4% AUC 0.65. The low performance of the model has been mainly due to overfitting and the exogenous VOCs that exist in breath. The dedicated software implementing a multilayer neural network using a genetic algorithm for training was built. Further work is needed to confirm the performance of the created experimental model. PMID:25944812

  9. How Natural Selection Can Create Both Self- and Other-Regarding Preferences, and Networked Minds

    PubMed Central

    Grund, Thomas; Waloszek, Christian; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Biological competition is widely believed to result in the evolution of selfish preferences. The related concept of the ‘homo economicus’ is at the core of mainstream economics. However, there is also experimental and empirical evidence for other-regarding preferences. Here we present a theory that explains both, self-regarding and other-regarding preferences. Assuming conditions promoting non-cooperative behaviour, we demonstrate that intergenerational migration determines whether evolutionary competition results in a ‘homo economicus’ (showing self-regarding preferences) or a ‘homo socialis’ (having other-regarding preferences). Our model assumes spatially interacting agents playing prisoner's dilemmas, who inherit a trait determining ‘friendliness’, but mutations tend to undermine it. Reproduction is ruled by fitness-based selection without a cultural modification of reproduction rates. Our model calls for a complementary economic theory for ‘networked minds’ (the ‘homo socialis’) and lays the foundations for an evolutionarily grounded theory of other-regarding agents, explaining individually different utility functions as well as conditional cooperation. PMID:23508001

  10. Joint path planning and sensor subset selection for multistatic sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharmarasa, R.; Lang, Tom; Kirubarajan, T.

    2008-04-01

    Due to the availability of cheap passive sensors, it is possible to deploy a large number of them for tracking purposes in anti-submarine warfare (ASW). However, modern submarines are quiet and difficult to track with passive sensors alone. Multistatic sensor networks, which have few transmitters (e.g., dipping sonars) in addition to passive receivers, have the potential to improve the tracking performance. We can improve the performance further by moving the transmitters according to existing target states and any possible new targets. Even though a large number of passive sensors are available, due to frequency, processing power and other physical limitations, only a few of them can be used at any one time. Then the problems are to decide the path of the transmitters and select a subset from the available passive sensors in order to optimize tracking performance. In this paper, the PCRLB, which gives a lower bound on estimation uncertainty, is used as the performance measure. We present an algorithm to decide jointly the optimal path of the movable transmitters, by considering their operational constraints, and the optimal subset of passive sensors that should be used at each time steps for tracking multiple, possibly time-varying, number of targets. Finding the optimal solution in real time is difficult for large scale problems, and we propose a genetic algorithm based suboptimal solution technique. Simulation results illustrating the performance of the proposed algorithm are also presented.

  11. Enhancing the selection of backoff interval using fuzzy logic over wireless Ad Hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Radha; Kannan, Kathiravan

    2015-01-01

    IEEE 802.11 is the de facto standard for medium access over wireless ad hoc network. The collision avoidance mechanism (i.e., random binary exponential backoff-BEB) of IEEE 802.11 DCF (distributed coordination function) is inefficient and unfair especially under heavy load. In the literature, many algorithms have been proposed to tune the contention window (CW) size. However, these algorithms make every node select its backoff interval between [0, CW] in a random and uniform manner. This randomness is incorporated to avoid collisions among the nodes. But this random backoff interval can change the optimal order and frequency of channel access among competing nodes which results in unfairness and increased delay. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that schedules the medium access in a fair and effective manner. This algorithm enhances IEEE 802.11 DCF with additional level of contention resolution that prioritizes the contending nodes according to its queue length and waiting time. Each node computes its unique backoff interval using fuzzy logic based on the input parameters collected from contending nodes through overhearing. We evaluate our algorithm against IEEE 802.11, GDCF (gentle distributed coordination function) protocols using ns-2.35 simulator and show that our algorithm achieves good performance.

  12. Intragranular cellular segregation network structure strengthening 316L stainless steel prepared by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Leifeng; Wikman, Stefan; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) supported by Fusion for Energy (F4E). Almost fully dense 316L stainless steel (SS316L) components were prepared from gas-atomized powder and with optimized SLM processing parameters. Tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C and 250 °C and the results showed that SLM SS316L fulfill the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterization reveals the presence of hierarchical macro-, micro- and nano-structures in as-built samples that were very different from SS316L microstructures prepared by other established methods. The formation of a characteristic intragranular cellular segregation network microstructure appears to contribute to the increase of yield strength without losing ductility. Silicon oxide nano-inclusions were formed during the SLM process that generated a micro-hardness fluctuation in the building direction. The combined influence of a cellular microstructure and the nano-inclusions constraints the size of ductile dimples to nano-scale. The crack propagation is hindered by a pinning effect that improves the defect-tolerance of the SLM SS316L. This work proves that it was possible to manufacture SS316L with properties suitable for ITER First Wall panels. Further studies on irradiation properties of SLM SS316L and manufacturing of larger real-size components are needed.

  13. Computerized stratified random site-selection approaches for design of a ground-water-quality sampling network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Computer software was written to randomly select sites for a ground-water-quality sampling network. The software uses digital cartographic techniques and subroutines from a proprietary geographic information system. The report presents the approaches, computer software, and sample applications. It is often desirable to collect ground-water-quality samples from various areas in a study region that have different values of a spatial characteristic, such as land-use or hydrogeologic setting. A stratified network can be used for testing hypotheses about relations between spatial characteristics and water quality, or for calculating statistical descriptions of water-quality data that account for variations that correspond to the spatial characteristic. In the software described, a study region is subdivided into areal subsets that have a common spatial characteristic to stratify the population into several categories from which sampling sites are selected. Different numbers of sites may be selected from each category of areal subsets. A population of potential sampling sites may be defined by either specifying a fixed population of existing sites, or by preparing an equally spaced population of potential sites. In either case, each site is identified with a single category, depending on the value of the spatial characteristic of the areal subset in which the site is located. Sites are selected from one category at a time. One of two approaches may be used to select sites. Sites may be selected randomly, or the areal subsets in the category can be grouped into cells and sites selected randomly from each cell.

  14. Social Networks and the Diffusion of Adolescent Problem Behavior: Reliable Estimates of Selection and Influence from Sixth Through Ninth Grades.

    PubMed

    Osgood, D Wayne; Feinberg, Mark E; Ragan, Daniel T

    2015-08-01

    Seeking to reduce problematic peer influence is a prominent theme of programs to prevent adolescent problem behavior. To support the refinement of this aspect of prevention programming, we examined peer influence and selection processes for three problem behaviors (delinquency, alcohol use, and smoking). We assessed not only the overall strengths of these peer processes, but also their consistency versus variability across settings. We used dynamic stochastic actor-based models to analyze five waves of friendship network data across sixth through ninth grades for a large sample of U.S. adolescents. Our sample included two successive grade cohorts of youth in 26 school districts participating in the PROSPER study, yielding 51 longitudinal social networks based on respondents' friendship nominations. For all three self-reported antisocial behaviors, we found evidence of both peer influence and selection processes tied to antisocial behavior. There was little reliable variance in these processes across the networks, suggesting that the statistical imprecision of the peer influence and selection estimates in previous studies likely accounts for inconsistencies in results. Adolescent friendship networks play a strong role in shaping problem behavior, but problem behaviors also inform friendship choices. In addition to preferring friends with similar levels of problem behavior, adolescents tend to choose friends who engage in problem behaviors, thus creating broader diffusion.

  15. Selective disruption of sociocognitive structural brain networks in autism and alexithymia.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Valk, Sofie L; Silani, Giorgia; Bird, Geoffrey; Frith, Uta; Singer, Tania

    2014-12-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormal social cognition. A core feature of ASC is disrupted Theory of Mind (ToM), our ability to take the mental perspective of others. ASC is also associated with alexithymia, a trait characterized by altered emotional interoception and empathy. Here, we applied structural MRI covariance analysis to assess whether ASC and alexithymia differentially affect structural brain networks associated with sociocognitive and socioaffective functions. Based on previous functional MRI findings, we expected disrupted ToM networks (centered on dorsomedial prefontal cortex [dmPFC], and temporo-parietal junction [TPJ]) in ASC, while alexithymia would affect networks centered on fronto-insular cortex (FI), regions associated with interoception of emotion and empathy. Relative to controls, ASC indeed showed reduced covariance in networks centered on dmPFC and TPJ, but not within FI networks. Irrespective of ASC, covariance was negatively modulated by alexithymia in networks extending from FI to posterior regions. Network findings were complemented by self-reports, indicating decreased perspective taking but normal empathic concern in ASC. Our results show divergent effects of ASC and alexithymia on inter-regional structural networks, suggesting that networks mediating socioaffective processes may be separable from networks mediating sociocognitive processing.

  16. Network Analysis of Genome-Wide Selective Constraint Reveals a Gene Network Active in Early Fetal Brain Intolerant of Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinmyung; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Daly, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Using robust, integrated analysis of multiple genomic datasets, we show that genes depleted for non-synonymous de novo mutations form a subnetwork of 72 members under strong selective constraint. We further show this subnetwork is preferentially expressed in the early development of the human hippocampus and is enriched for genes mutated in neurological Mendelian disorders. We thus conclude that carefully orchestrated developmental processes are under strong constraint in early brain development, and perturbations caused by mutation have adverse outcomes subject to strong purifying selection. Our findings demonstrate that selective forces can act on groups of genes involved in the same process, supporting the notion that purifying selection can act coordinately on multiple genes. Our approach provides a statistically robust, interpretable way to identify the tissues and developmental times where groups of disease genes are active. PMID:27305007

  17. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions.

  18. Simple Random Sampling-Based Probe Station Selection for Fault Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rimao; Qiu, Xuesong; Rui, Lanlan

    2011-01-01

    Fault detection for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been studied intensively in recent years. Most existing works statically choose the manager nodes as probe stations and probe the network at a fixed frequency. This straightforward solution leads however to several deficiencies. Firstly, by only assigning the fault detection task to the manager node the whole network is out of balance, and this quickly overloads the already heavily burdened manager node, which in turn ultimately shortens the lifetime of the whole network. Secondly, probing with a fixed frequency often generates too much useless network traffic, which results in a waste of the limited network energy. Thirdly, the traditional algorithm for choosing a probing node is too complicated to be used in energy-critical wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we study the distribution characters of the fault nodes in wireless sensor networks, validate the Pareto principle that a small number of clusters contain most of the faults. We then present a Simple Random Sampling-based algorithm to dynamic choose sensor nodes as probe stations. A dynamic adjusting rule for probing frequency is also proposed to reduce the number of useless probing packets. The simulation experiments demonstrate that the algorithm and adjusting rule we present can effectively prolong the lifetime of a wireless sensor network without decreasing the fault detected rate. PMID:22163789

  19. Emergence of network structure due to spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent neuronal networks. I. Input selectivity--strengthening correlated input pathways.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B; Thomas, Doreen A; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2009-08-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) determines the evolution of the synaptic weights according to their pre- and post-synaptic activity, which in turn changes the neuronal activity. In this paper, we extend previous studies of input selectivity induced by (STDP) for single neurons to the biologically interesting case of a neuronal network with fixed recurrent connections and plastic connections from external pools of input neurons. We use a theoretical framework based on the Poisson neuron model to analytically describe the network dynamics (firing rates and spike-time correlations) and thus the evolution of the synaptic weights. This framework incorporates the time course of the post-synaptic potentials and synaptic delays. Our analysis focuses on the asymptotic states of a network stimulated by two homogeneous pools of "steady" inputs, namely Poisson spike trains which have fixed firing rates and spike-time correlations. The (STDP) model extends rate-based learning in that it can implement, at the same time, both a stabilization of the individual neuron firing rates and a slower weight specialization depending on the input spike-time correlations. When one input pathway has stronger within-pool correlations, the resulting synaptic dynamics induced by (STDP) are shown to be similar to those arising in the case of a purely feed-forward network: the weights from the more correlated inputs are potentiated at the expense of the remaining input connections. PMID:19536560

  20. Genetic algorithm based input selection for a neural network function approximator with applications to SSME health monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Charles C.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used to select the inputs to a neural network function approximator. In the application considered, modeling critical parameters of the space shuttle main engine (SSME), the functional relationship between measured parameters is unknown and complex. Furthermore, the number of possible input parameters is quite large. Many approaches have been used for input selection, but they are either subjective or do not consider the complex multivariate relationships between parameters. Due to the optimization and space searching capabilities of genetic algorithms they were employed to systematize the input selection process. The results suggest that the genetic algorithm can generate parameter lists of high quality without the explicit use of problem domain knowledge. Suggestions for improving the performance of the input selection process are also provided.

  1. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity.

  2. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity. PMID:27439315

  3. Embedding global and collective in a torus network with message class map based tree path selection

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Eisley, Noel A.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Senger, Robert M; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka; Takken, Todd E.

    2016-06-21

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a global barrier and global interrupt network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. The computer system includes a multitude of nodes. In one embodiment, the method comprises taking inputs from a set of receivers of the nodes, dividing the inputs from the receivers into a plurality of classes, combining the inputs of each of the classes to obtain a result, and sending said result to a set of senders of the nodes. Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a collective network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. In one embodiment, the method comprises adding to a torus network a central collective logic to route messages among at least a group of nodes in a tree structure.

  4. FRCA: A Fuzzy Relevance-Based Cluster Head Selection Algorithm for Wireless Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chongdeuk; Jeong, Taegwon

    2011-01-01

    Clustering is an important mechanism that efficiently provides information for mobile nodes and improves the processing capacity of routing, bandwidth allocation, and resource management and sharing. Clustering algorithms can be based on such criteria as the battery power of nodes, mobility, network size, distance, speed and direction. Above all, in order to achieve good clustering performance, overhead should be minimized, allowing mobile nodes to join and leave without perturbing the membership of the cluster while preserving current cluster structure as much as possible. This paper proposes a Fuzzy Relevance-based Cluster head selection Algorithm (FRCA) to solve problems found in existing wireless mobile ad hoc sensor networks, such as the node distribution found in dynamic properties due to mobility and flat structures and disturbance of the cluster formation. The proposed mechanism uses fuzzy relevance to select the cluster head for clustering in wireless mobile ad hoc sensor networks. In the simulation implemented on the NS-2 simulator, the proposed FRCA is compared with algorithms such as the Cluster-based Routing Protocol (CBRP), the Weighted-based Adaptive Clustering Algorithm (WACA), and the Scenario-based Clustering Algorithm for Mobile ad hoc networks (SCAM). The simulation results showed that the proposed FRCA achieves better performance than that of the other existing mechanisms. PMID:22163905

  5. FRCA: a fuzzy relevance-based cluster head selection algorithm for wireless mobile ad-hoc sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chongdeuk; Jeong, Taegwon

    2011-01-01

    Clustering is an important mechanism that efficiently provides information for mobile nodes and improves the processing capacity of routing, bandwidth allocation, and resource management and sharing. Clustering algorithms can be based on such criteria as the battery power of nodes, mobility, network size, distance, speed and direction. Above all, in order to achieve good clustering performance, overhead should be minimized, allowing mobile nodes to join and leave without perturbing the membership of the cluster while preserving current cluster structure as much as possible. This paper proposes a Fuzzy Relevance-based Cluster head selection Algorithm (FRCA) to solve problems found in existing wireless mobile ad hoc sensor networks, such as the node distribution found in dynamic properties due to mobility and flat structures and disturbance of the cluster formation. The proposed mechanism uses fuzzy relevance to select the cluster head for clustering in wireless mobile ad hoc sensor networks. In the simulation implemented on the NS-2 simulator, the proposed FRCA is compared with algorithms such as the Cluster-based Routing Protocol (CBRP), the Weighted-based Adaptive Clustering Algorithm (WACA), and the Scenario-based Clustering Algorithm for Mobile ad hoc networks (SCAM). The simulation results showed that the proposed FRCA achieves better performance than that of the other existing mechanisms.

  6. Pattern selection and self-organization induced by random boundary initial values in a neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Xu, Ying; Wang, Chunni; Jin, Wuyin

    2016-11-01

    Regular spatial patterns could be observed in spatiotemporal systems far from equilibrium states. Artificial networks with different topologies are often designed to reproduce the collective behaviors of nodes (or neurons) which the local kinetics of node is described by kinds of oscillator models. It is believed that the self-organization of network much depends on the bifurcation parameters and topology connection type. Indeed, the boundary effect is every important on the pattern formation of network. In this paper, a regular network of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons is designed in a two-dimensional square array with nearest-neighbor connection type. The neurons on the boundary are excited with random stimulus. It is found that spiral waves, even a pair of spiral waves could be developed in the network under appropriate coupling intensity. Otherwise, the spatial distribution of network shows irregular states. A statistical variable is defined to detect the collective behavior by using mean field theory. It is confirmed that regular pattern could be developed when the synchronization degree is low. The potential mechanism could be that random perturbation on the boundary could induce coherence resonance-like behavior thus spiral wave could be developed in the network.

  7. A model of direction selectivity in the starburst amacrine cell network.

    PubMed

    Enciso, Germán A; Rempe, Michael; Dmitriev, Andrey V; Gavrikov, Konstantin E; Terman, David; Mangel, Stuart C

    2010-06-01

    Displaced starburst amacrine cells (SACs) are retinal interneurons that exhibit GABA( A ) receptor-mediated and Cl (-) cotransporter-mediated, directionally selective (DS) light responses in the rabbit retina. They depolarize to stimuli that move centrifugally through the receptive field surround and hyperpolarize to stimuli that move centripetally through the surround (Gavrikov et al, PNAS 100(26):16047-16052, 2003, PNAS 103(49):18793-18798, 2006). They also play a key role in the activity of DS ganglion cells (DS GC; Amthor et al, Vis Neurosci 19:495-509 2002; Euler et al, Nature 418:845-852, 2002; Fried et al, Nature 420:411- 414, 2002; Gavrikov et al, PNAS 100(26):16047-16052, 2003, PNAS 103(49):18793-18798, 2006; Lee and Zhou, Neuron 51:787-799 2006; Yoshida et al, Neuron 30:771-780, 2001). In this paper we present a model of strong DS behavior of SACs which relies on the GABA-mediated communication within a tightly interconnected network of these cells and on the glutamate signal that the SACs receive from bipolar cells (a presynaptic cell that receives input from cones). We describe how a moving light stimulus can produce a large, sustained depolarization of the SAC dendritic tips that point in the direction that the stimulus moves (i.e., centrifugal motion), but produce a minimal depolarization of the dendritic tips that point in the opposite direction (i.e., centripetal motion). This DS behavior, which is quantified based on the relative size and duration of the depolarizations evoked by stimulus motion at dendritic tips pointing in opposite directions, is robust to changes of many different parameter values and consistent with experimental data. In addition, the DS behavior is strengthened under the assumptions that the Cl(-) cotransporters Na( + )-K( + )-Cl( -) and K( + )-Cl( -) are located in different regions of the SAC dendritic tree (Gavrikov et al, PNAS 103(49):18793-18798, 2006) and that GABA evokes a long-lasting response (Gavrikov et al, PNAS 100

  8. The Relationships between Selected Organizational Variables and ATM Technology Adoption in Campus Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Engui

    1998-01-01

    Determines the relationships between ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) adoption and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information-processing maturity. Identifies the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking in the United States. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  9. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator. PMID:26878722

  10. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator.

  11. Nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, suppresses obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic insulin resistance through the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Kishina, Manabu; Koda, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kohei; Harada, Yusuke; Yoshida, Akio; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors suppress non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine how the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide suppresses NAFLD in a murine model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NC), an HFD, or HFD plus nimesulide (HFD-nime) for 12 weeks. Body weight, hepatic COX-2 mRNA expression and triglyceride accumulation were significantly increased in the HFD group. Triglyceride accumulation was suppressed in the HFD-nime group. The mRNA expression of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the natural PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) were significantly increased in the HFD group and significantly suppressed in the HFD-nime group. Glucose metabolism was impaired in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and it was significantly improved in the HFD-nime group. In addition, the plasma insulin levels in the HFD group were increased compared with those in the NC group, and were decreased in the HFD-nime group. These results indicate that HFD-induced NAFLD is mediated by the increased hepatic expression of COX-2. We suggest that the production of 15d-PGJ2, which is mediated by COX-2, induces NAFLD and hepatic insulin resistance by activating PPARγ. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), procollagen-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as the number of F4/80-positive hepatic (Kupffer) cells, were significantly increased in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and they were reduced by nimesulide. In conclusion, COX-2 may emerge as a molecular target for preventing the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in diet-related obesity. PMID:27431935

  12. Suppression of transverse-mode spurious responses for SAW resonators on SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure by selective removal of SiO2.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Goto, Rei; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2011-10-01

    A SiO(2)/Al/LiNbO(3) structure has a large electromechanical coupling factor (K(2)) and good temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) for applications as a SAW duplexer of the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) Band I. However, the SiO(2)/Al/LiNbO(3) structure also supports two unwanted spurious responses; one is caused by the Rayleigh mode and the other by the transverse mode. As the authors have previously discussed, the Rayleigh-mode spurious response can be suppressed by controlling the cross-sectional shape of a SiO(2) overlay deposited on resonator electrodes. In this paper, a new technique to suppress the transverse-mode spurious responses is proposed. In the technique, the SiO(2) overlay is selectively removed from the dummy electrode region. The spurious responses are analyzed by the laser probe system. The results indicate that the spurious responses in question were hybrid modes caused by the coupling between the main (SH) SAW and another (Rayleigh) SAW with different velocities. The hybrid-mode spurious behavior was dependent on the velocities in the IDT and the dummy regions (v(i) and v(d)). The hybrid-mode spurious responses could be suppressed by selectively removing SiO(2). Furthermore, the SAW energy confinement could be enhanced in the IDT electrode region when v(i) < v(d). The transverse-mode spurious responses were successfully suppressed without degrading the SAW resonator performances. PMID:21989882

  13. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks.

    PubMed

    Grady, Cheryl L; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina; Macoveanu, Julian; Paulson, Olaf B; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender of neutral, fearful and angry faces. In three separate and counterbalanced sessions, participants received citalopram (CIT) to raise serotonin levels, underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower serotonin, or were studied without pharmacological challenge (Control). An analysis designed to identify distributed brain responses identified two brain networks with modulations of activity related to face emotion and serotonin level. The first network included the left amygdala, bilateral striatum, and fusiform gyri. During the Control session this network responded only to fearful faces; increasing serotonin decreased this response to fear, whereas reducing serotonin enhanced the response of this network to angry faces. The second network involved bilateral amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and these regions also showed increased activity to fear during the Control session. Both drug challenges enhanced the neural response of this set of regions to angry faces, relative to Control, and CIT also enhanced activity for neutral faces. The net effect of these changes in both networks was to abolish the selective response to fearful expressions. These results suggest that a normal level of serotonin is critical for maintaining a differentiated brain response to threatening face emotions. Lower serotonin leads to a broadening of a normally fear-specific response to anger, and higher levels reduce the differentiated brain response to aversive face emotions.

  14. Selected Flight Test Results for Online Learning Neural Network-Based Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System project team developed a series of flight control concepts designed to demonstrate neural network-based adaptive controller benefits, with the objective to develop and flight-test control systems using neural network technology to optimize aircraft performance under nominal conditions and stabilize the aircraft under failure conditions. This report presents flight-test results for an adaptive controller using stability and control derivative values from an online learning neural network. A dynamic cell structure neural network is used in conjunction with a real-time parameter identification algorithm to estimate aerodynamic stability and control derivative increments to baseline aerodynamic derivatives in flight. This open-loop flight test set was performed in preparation for a future phase in which the learning neural network and parameter identification algorithm output would provide the flight controller with aerodynamic stability and control derivative updates in near real time. Two flight maneuvers are analyzed - pitch frequency sweep and automated flight-test maneuver designed to optimally excite the parameter identification algorithm in all axes. Frequency responses generated from flight data are compared to those obtained from nonlinear simulation runs. Flight data examination shows that addition of flight-identified aerodynamic derivative increments into the simulation improved aircraft pitch handling qualities.

  15. Social anxiety as a basis for friendship selection and socialization in adolescents' social networks.

    PubMed

    Van Zalk, Nejra; Van Zalk, Maarten; Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Håkan

    2011-06-01

    Socially anxious children and adolescents have previously been found to have friends with similarly socially anxious, withdrawn behavioral characteristics. How peers might socialize social anxiety over time has, however, not been thoroughly investigated. We examined this in a sample of 834 youths (339 girls and 495 boys; M=14.29), followed for 3 years. We used the social network analysis software SIENA to analyze the data. The results showed that youths who were socially anxious were less popular and chose fewer friends in the network. They also tended to choose friends who were socially anxious, and over time they influenced each other into becoming more socially anxious--over and above other effects. Finally, girls' social anxiety was more influenced than boys' by their friends' social anxiety levels. The results showed the significance of looking at socially anxious youths' friendships over time and embedded in social networks.

  16. A near-optimum procedure for selecting stations in a streamgaging network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanfear, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    Two questions are fundamental to Federal government goals for a network of streamgages which are operated by the U.S. Geological Survey: (1) how well does the present network of streamagaging stations meet defined Federal goals and (2) what is the optimum set of stations to add or reactivate to support remaining goals? The solution involves an incremental-stepping procedure that is based on Basic Feasible Incremental Solutions (BFIS?s) where each BFIS satisfies at least one Federal streamgaging goal. A set of minimum Federal goals for streamgaging is defined to include water measurements for legal compacts and decrees, flooding, water budgets, regionalization of streamflow characteristics, and water quality. Fully satisfying all these goals by using the assumptions outlined in this paper would require adding 887 new streamgaging stations to the U.S. Geological Survey network and reactivating an additional 857 stations that are currently inactive.

  17. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein’s rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces. PMID:27380265

  18. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution.

    PubMed

    Mannakee, Brian K; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2016-07-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein's rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces.

  19. Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey national stream water-quality monitoring networks (WQN) on CD-ROM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Ludtke, A.S.; Fitzgerald, K.K.; Schertz, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    records of important changes in network sample collection and laboratory analytical methods, water reference sample data for estimating laboratory measurement bias and variability for 34 dissolved constituents for the period 1985-95, discussions of statistical methods for using water reference sample data to evaluate the accuracy of network stream water-quality data, and a bibliography of scientific investigations using national network data and other publications relevant to the networks. The data structure of the CD-ROMs is designed to allow users to efficiently enter the water-quality data to user-supplied software packages including statistical analysis, modeling, or geographic information systems. On one disc, all data are stored in ASCII form accessible from any computer system with a CD-ROM driver. The data also can be accessed using DOS-based retrieval software supplied on a second disc. This software supports logical queries of the water-quality data based on constituent concentrations, sample- collection date, river name, station name, county, state, hydrologic unit number, and 1990 population and 1987 land-cover characteristics for station watersheds. User-selected data may be output in a variety of formats including dBASE, flat ASCII, delimited ASCII, or fixed-field for subsequent use in other software packages.

  20. Structures and Dynamics of Social Networks: Selection, Influence, and Self-Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Go, Myong-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the social structures and dynamics of human networks: how peers at the micro level and physical environments at the macro level interact with the individual preferences and attributes and shape social dynamics. It is composed of three parts. The first essay, "Friendship Choices and Group Effects in Adolescent Smoking"…

  1. Use of Social Networking Sites by Academic Librarians in Six Selected States of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Adeyinka; Olarongbe, Shuaib Agboola; Akanbi-Ademolake, Hauwa Bolanle; Adisa, Mulikat Y.

    2013-01-01

    The attractiveness of social networking sites (SNSs) has extended to almost all professionals in numerous human organizations including the library. Librarians as a result of this development are now making use of these sites to connect to other libraries and librarians both within and outside their environment. However, it is observed that the…

  2. A comparative quantitative analysis of the IDEAL (iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation) and the CHESS (chemical shift selection suppression) techniques in 3.0 T L-spine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eng-Chan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Ki-Hong; Choi, Cheon-Woong; Seok, Jong-min; Na, Kil-Ju; Han, Man-Seok

    2013-03-01

    This study was conducted on 20 patients who had undergone pedicle screw fixation between March and December 2010 to quantitatively compare a conventional fat suppression technique, CHESS (chemical shift selection suppression), and a new technique, IDEAL (iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least squares estimation). The general efficacy and usefulness of the IDEAL technique was also evaluated. Fat-suppressed transverse-relaxation-weighed images and longitudinal-relaxation-weighted images were obtained before and after contrast injection by using these two techniques with a 1.5T MR (magnetic resonance) scanner. The obtained images were analyzed for image distortion, susceptibility artifacts and homogenous fat removal in the target region. The results showed that the image distortion due to the susceptibility artifacts caused by implanted metal was lower in the images obtained using the IDEAL technique compared to those obtained using the CHESS technique. The results of a qualitative analysis also showed that compared to the CHESS technique, fewer susceptibility artifacts and more homogenous fat removal were found in the images obtained using the IDEAL technique in a comparative image evaluation of the axial plane images before and after contrast injection. In summary, compared to the CHESS technique, the IDEAL technique showed a lower occurrence of susceptibility artifacts caused by metal and lower image distortion. In addition, more homogenous fat removal was shown in the IDEAL technique.

  3. The most remote point method for the site selection of the future GGOS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Hayo; Pedreros, Felipe

    2014-10-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) proposes 30-40 geodetic observatories as global infrastructure for the most accurate reference frame to monitor the global change. To reach this goal, several geodetic observatories have upgrade plans to become GGOS stations. Most initiatives are driven by national institutions following national interests. From a global perspective, the site distribution remains incomplete and the initiatives to improve this are up until now insufficient. This article is a contribution to answer the question on where to install new GGOS observatories and where to add observation techniques to existing observatories. It introduces the iterative most remote point (MRP) method for filling in the largest gaps in existing technique-specific networks. A spherical version of the Voronoi-diagram is used to pick the optimal location of the new observatory, but practical concerns determine its realistic location. Once chosen, the process is iterated. A quality and a homogeneity parameter of global networks measure the progress of improving the homogeneity of the global site distribution. This method is applied to the global networks of VGOS, and VGOS co-located with SLR to derive some clues about where additional observatory sites or additional observation techniques at existing observatories will improve the GGOS network configuration. With only six additional VGOS-stations, the homogeneity of the global VGOS-network could be significantly improved by more than . From the presented analysis, 25 known or new co-located VGOS and SLR sites are proposed as the future GGOS backbone: Colombo, Easter Island, Fairbanks, Fortaleza, Galapagos, GGAO, Hartebeesthoek, Honiara, Ibadan, Kokee Park, La Plata, Mauritius, McMurdo, Metsahövi, Ny Alesund, Riyadh, San Diego, Santa Maria, Shanghai, Syowa, Tahiti, Tristan de Cunha, Warkworth, Wettzell, and Yarragadee.

  4. Selected Flight Test Results for Online Learning Neural Network-Based Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peggy S.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System project team has developed a series of flight control concepts designed to demonstrate the benefits of a neural network-based adaptive controller. The objective of the team is to develop and flight-test control systems that use neural network technology to optimize the performance of the aircraft under nominal conditions as well as stabilize the aircraft under failure conditions. Failure conditions include locked or failed control surfaces as well as unforeseen damage that might occur to the aircraft in flight. This report presents flight-test results for an adaptive controller using stability and control derivative values from an online learning neural network. A dynamic cell structure neural network is used in conjunction with a real-time parameter identification algorithm to estimate aerodynamic stability and control derivative increments to the baseline aerodynamic derivatives in flight. This set of open-loop flight tests was performed in preparation for a future phase of flights in which the learning neural network and parameter identification algorithm output would provide the flight controller with aerodynamic stability and control derivative updates in near real time. Two flight maneuvers are analyzed a pitch frequency sweep and an automated flight-test maneuver designed to optimally excite the parameter identification algorithm in all axes. Frequency responses generated from flight data are compared to those obtained from nonlinear simulation runs. An examination of flight data shows that addition of the flight-identified aerodynamic derivative increments into the simulation improved the pitch handling qualities of the aircraft.

  5. Response control networks are selectively modulated by attention to rare events and memory load regardless of the need for inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wijeakumar, Sobanawartiny; Magnotta, Vincent A; Buss, Aaron T; Ambrose, Joseph P; Wifall, Timothy A; Hazeltine, Eliot; Spencer, John P

    2015-10-15

    Recent evidence has sparked debate about the neural bases of response selection and inhibition. In the current study, we employed two reactive inhibition tasks, the Go/Nogo (GnG) and Simon tasks, to examine questions central to these debates. First, we investigated whether a fronto-cortical-striatal system was sensitive to the need for inhibition per se or the presentation of infrequent stimuli, by manipulating the proportion of trials that do not require inhibition (Go/Compatible trials) relative to trials that require inhibition (Nogo/Incompatible trials). A cortico-subcortical network composed of insula, putamen, and thalamus showed greater activation on salient and infrequent events, regardless of the need for inhibition. Thus, consistent with recent findings, key parts of the fronto-cortical-striatal system are engaged by salient events and do not appear to play a selective role in response inhibition. Second, we examined how the fronto-cortical-striatal system is modulated by working memory demands by varying the number of stimulus-response (SR) mappings. Right inferior parietal lobule showed decreasing activation as the number of SR mappings increased, suggesting that a form of associative memory - rather than working memory - might underlie performance in these tasks. A broad motor planning and control network showed similar trends that were also modulated by the number of motor responses required in each task. Finally, bilateral lingual gyri were more robustly engaged in the Simon task, consistent with the role of this area in shifts of visuo-spatial attention. The current study sheds light on how the fronto-cortical-striatal network is selectively engaged in reactive control tasks and how control is modulated by manipulations of attention and memory load. PMID:26190403

  6. Response control networks are selectively modulated by attention to rare events and memory load regardless of the need for inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wijeakumar, Sobanawartiny; Magnotta, Vincent A; Buss, Aaron T; Ambrose, Joseph P; Wifall, Timothy A; Hazeltine, Eliot; Spencer, John P

    2015-10-15

    Recent evidence has sparked debate about the neural bases of response selection and inhibition. In the current study, we employed two reactive inhibition tasks, the Go/Nogo (GnG) and Simon tasks, to examine questions central to these debates. First, we investigated whether a fronto-cortical-striatal system was sensitive to the need for inhibition per se or the presentation of infrequent stimuli, by manipulating the proportion of trials that do not require inhibition (Go/Compatible trials) relative to trials that require inhibition (Nogo/Incompatible trials). A cortico-subcortical network composed of insula, putamen, and thalamus showed greater activation on salient and infrequent events, regardless of the need for inhibition. Thus, consistent with recent findings, key parts of the fronto-cortical-striatal system are engaged by salient events and do not appear to play a selective role in response inhibition. Second, we examined how the fronto-cortical-striatal system is modulated by working memory demands by varying the number of stimulus-response (SR) mappings. Right inferior parietal lobule showed decreasing activation as the number of SR mappings increased, suggesting that a form of associative memory - rather than working memory - might underlie performance in these tasks. A broad motor planning and control network showed similar trends that were also modulated by the number of motor responses required in each task. Finally, bilateral lingual gyri were more robustly engaged in the Simon task, consistent with the role of this area in shifts of visuo-spatial attention. The current study sheds light on how the fronto-cortical-striatal network is selectively engaged in reactive control tasks and how control is modulated by manipulations of attention and memory load.

  7. Neuronal apoptosis induced by selective inhibition of Rac GTPase versus global suppression of Rho family GTPases is mediated by alterations in distinct mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Ramaswami, Sai Anandi; Bouchard, Ron J; Aktories, Klaus; Linseman, Daniel A

    2015-04-10

    Rho family GTPases play integral roles in neuronal differentiation and survival. We have shown previously that Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), an inhibitor of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, induces apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we compared the effects of ToxB to a selective inhibitor of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Trio (NSC23766). In a manner similar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis associated with enhanced caspase-3 activation and reduced phosphorylation of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase. In contrast to ToxB, caspase inhibitors do not protect CGNs from targeted inhibition of Rac. Also dissimilar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac does not inhibit MEK1/2/ERK1/2 or activate JNK/c-Jun. Instead, targeted inhibition of Rac suppresses distinct MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent signaling cascades known to regulate the localization and expression of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bad. Adenoviral expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK5 is sufficient to attenuate neuronal cell death induced by selective inhibition of Rac with NSC23766 but not apoptosis induced by global inhibition of Rho GTPases with ToxB. Collectively, these data demonstrate that global suppression of Rho family GTPases with ToxB causes a loss of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and activation of JNK/c-Jun, resulting in diminished degradation and enhanced transcription of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bim. In contrast, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis by repressing unique MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent prosurvival pathways, ultimately leading to enhanced expression, dephosphorylation, and mitochondrial localization of proapoptotic Bad.

  8. Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Selective Inhibition of Rac GTPase versus Global Suppression of Rho Family GTPases Is Mediated by Alterations in Distinct Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascades*

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Ramaswami, Sai Anandi; Bouchard, Ron J.; Aktories, Klaus; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases play integral roles in neuronal differentiation and survival. We have shown previously that Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), an inhibitor of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, induces apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we compared the effects of ToxB to a selective inhibitor of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Trio (NSC23766). In a manner similar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis associated with enhanced caspase-3 activation and reduced phosphorylation of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase. In contrast to ToxB, caspase inhibitors do not protect CGNs from targeted inhibition of Rac. Also dissimilar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac does not inhibit MEK1/2/ERK1/2 or activate JNK/c-Jun. Instead, targeted inhibition of Rac suppresses distinct MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent signaling cascades known to regulate the localization and expression of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bad. Adenoviral expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK5 is sufficient to attenuate neuronal cell death induced by selective inhibition of Rac with NSC23766 but not apoptosis induced by global inhibition of Rho GTPases with ToxB. Collectively, these data demonstrate that global suppression of Rho family GTPases with ToxB causes a loss of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and activation of JNK/c-Jun, resulting in diminished degradation and enhanced transcription of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bim. In contrast, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis by repressing unique MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent prosurvival pathways, ultimately leading to enhanced expression, dephosphorylation, and mitochondrial localization of proapoptotic Bad. PMID:25666619

  9. The Selection Algorithm for Connection Modes of Medium Voltage Power Distribution Network Based on FAHP-GRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wu; Han, Lin; Bin, Chen; Han, Wu; ying, Wen Bu

    This paper used fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP) and gray relational analysis (GRA) to solve the selection for the connection modes of medium voltage (MV) power distribution network. Firstly, it established the comprehensive evaluation indicator system from technicality, economy, and adaptability. Secondly, FAHP can evaluate the indicator weights, and avoid the ambiguity and uncertainty of judgment matrix. Finally, it combined with GRA to complete the comprehensive decision-making. This method also solves the error of the fuzzy albino number caused by fuzzy comprehensive evaluation theory. In the end, a practical example verified the reasonable and practical of this method.

  10. The effects of networks on U.S. institution selection by foreign doctoral students in science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanyildiz, Zeynep Esra

    The United States has been a very attractive destination for foreign Science and Engineering (S&E) graduate students and postdoctoral scholars for a considerable period of time. Several studies have documented significant contributions of foreign students and foreign scientists in S&E. These contributions in turn foster economic development. Recent studies suggest, however, that the U.S. is losing its dominance in attracting foreign talent. Increased competition outside the U.S. contributes to the change as do changes in visa regulations. Despite the important role of foreign doctoral students in the U.S., relatively little is known about factors influencing their decision to attend an institution. One factor that is rarely explored is the effect of networks on institution selection. Through their networks, students learn about application procedures, studying at an institution, housing opportunities, general culture and people. In doing this, they draw both on the experience of the alumni as well as the support of current students and faculty at their target institution. Thus, networks can play an important role in where foreign doctoral students actually end up studying. This study aims to provide both qualitative and quantitative information about the role networks play in foreign doctoral students' institution selection. This three-part study utilizes different methodologies: (1) focus group interviews conducted with Turkish doctoral students at the Georgia Institute of Technology; (2) a web study of research laboratories in science and engineering; and (3) the estimation of Random Utility Model (RUM) of institution selection. These three components build on each other, in addition to the individual contributions that they make. Together they provide an in-depth and comprehensive analysis of the role of networks. The results from guided focus group interviews indicate that students, alumni, faculty and local community of the same nationality influence

  11. The effects of networks on U.S. institution selection by foreign doctoral students in science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanyildiz, Zeynep Esra

    The United States has been a very attractive destination for foreign Science and Engineering (S&E) graduate students and postdoctoral scholars for a considerable period of time. Several studies have documented significant contributions of foreign students and foreign scientists in S&E. These contributions in turn foster economic development. Recent studies suggest, however, that the U.S. is losing its dominance in attracting foreign talent. Increased competition outside the U.S. contributes to the change as do changes in visa regulations. Despite the important role of foreign doctoral students in the U.S., relatively little is known about factors influencing their decision to attend an institution. One factor that is rarely explored is the effect of networks on institution selection. Through their networks, students learn about application procedures, studying at an institution, housing opportunities, general culture and people. In doing this, they draw both on the experience of the alumni as well as the support of current students and faculty at their target institution. Thus, networks can play an important role in where foreign doctoral students actually end up studying. This study aims to provide both qualitative and quantitative information about the role networks play in foreign doctoral students' institution selection. This three-part study utilizes different methodologies: (1) focus group interviews conducted with Turkish doctoral students at the Georgia Institute of Technology; (2) a web study of research laboratories in science and engineering; and (3) the estimation of Random Utility Model (RUM) of institution selection. These three components build on each other, in addition to the individual contributions that they make. Together they provide an in-depth and comprehensive analysis of the role of networks. The results from guided focus group interviews indicate that students, alumni, faculty and local community of the same nationality influence

  12. Speech Emotion Feature Selection Method Based on Contribution Analysis Algorithm of Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojia; Mao, Qirong; Zhan, Yongzhao

    2008-11-01

    There are many emotion features. If all these features are employed to recognize emotions, redundant features may be existed. Furthermore, recognition result is unsatisfying and the cost of feature extraction is high. In this paper, a method to select speech emotion features based on contribution analysis algorithm of NN is presented. The emotion features are selected by using contribution analysis algorithm of NN from the 95 extracted features. Cluster analysis is applied to analyze the effectiveness for the features selected, and the time of feature extraction is evaluated. Finally, 24 emotion features selected are used to recognize six speech emotions. The experiments show that this method can improve the recognition rate and the time of feature extraction

  13. Speech Emotion Feature Selection Method Based on Contribution Analysis Algorithm of Neural Network

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaojia; Mao Qirong; Zhan Yongzhao

    2008-11-06

    There are many emotion features. If all these features are employed to recognize emotions, redundant features may be existed. Furthermore, recognition result is unsatisfying and the cost of feature extraction is high. In this paper, a method to select speech emotion features based on contribution analysis algorithm of NN is presented. The emotion features are selected by using contribution analysis algorithm of NN from the 95 extracted features. Cluster analysis is applied to analyze the effectiveness for the features selected, and the time of feature extraction is evaluated. Finally, 24 emotion features selected are used to recognize six speech emotions. The experiments show that this method can improve the recognition rate and the time of feature extraction.

  14. Identifying and Promoting Best Practices in Residency Application and Selection in a Complex Academic Health Network.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Glen; Abrahams, Caroline; Ruetalo, Mariela; Hanson, Mark D; Nickell, Leslie; Spadafora, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    Medical education institutions have a social mandate to produce a diverse physician workforce that meets the public's needs. Recent reports have framed the admission process outcome of undergraduate and postgraduate medical education (UGME and PGME) programs as a key determinant of the collective contributions graduating cohorts will make to society, creating a sense of urgency around the issue of who gets accepted. The need for evidence-informed residency application and selection processes is growing because of the increasing size and diversity of the applicant pool and the need for equity, fairness, social accountability, and health human resource planning. The selection literature, however, is dominated by a UGME focus and emphasizes determination of desirable qualities of future physicians and selection instrument reliability and validity. Gaps remain regarding PGME selection, particularly the creation of specialty-specific selection criteria, suitable outcome measures, and reliable selection systems.In this Perspective, the authors describe the University of Toronto's centralized approach to defining system-level best practices for residency application and selection. Over the 2012-2013 academic year, the Best Practices in Application and Selection working group reviewed relevant literature and reports, consulted content experts, surveyed local practices, and conducted iterative stakeholder consultations on draft recommendations. Strong agreement arose around the resulting 13 principles and 24 best practices, which had either empirical support or face validity. These recommendations, which are shared in this article, have been adopted by the university's PGME advisory committee and will inform a national initiative to improve trainees' transition from UGME to PGME in Canada.

  15. Identifying and Promoting Best Practices in Residency Application and Selection in a Complex Academic Health Network.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Glen; Abrahams, Caroline; Ruetalo, Mariela; Hanson, Mark D; Nickell, Leslie; Spadafora, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    Medical education institutions have a social mandate to produce a diverse physician workforce that meets the public's needs. Recent reports have framed the admission process outcome of undergraduate and postgraduate medical education (UGME and PGME) programs as a key determinant of the collective contributions graduating cohorts will make to society, creating a sense of urgency around the issue of who gets accepted. The need for evidence-informed residency application and selection processes is growing because of the increasing size and diversity of the applicant pool and the need for equity, fairness, social accountability, and health human resource planning. The selection literature, however, is dominated by a UGME focus and emphasizes determination of desirable qualities of future physicians and selection instrument reliability and validity. Gaps remain regarding PGME selection, particularly the creation of specialty-specific selection criteria, suitable outcome measures, and reliable selection systems.In this Perspective, the authors describe the University of Toronto's centralized approach to defining system-level best practices for residency application and selection. Over the 2012-2013 academic year, the Best Practices in Application and Selection working group reviewed relevant literature and reports, consulted content experts, surveyed local practices, and conducted iterative stakeholder consultations on draft recommendations. Strong agreement arose around the resulting 13 principles and 24 best practices, which had either empirical support or face validity. These recommendations, which are shared in this article, have been adopted by the university's PGME advisory committee and will inform a national initiative to improve trainees' transition from UGME to PGME in Canada. PMID:26488571

  16. Optimal sensor selection for noisy binary detection in stochastic pooling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Li, Feng; Amblard, P.-O.; Grant, Alex J.

    2013-08-01

    Stochastic Pooling Networks (SPNs) are a useful model for understanding and explaining how naturally occurring encoding of stochastic processes can occur in sensor systems ranging from macroscopic social networks to neuron populations and nanoscale electronics. Due to the interaction of nonlinearity, random noise, and redundancy, SPNs support various unexpected emergent features, such as suprathreshold stochastic resonance, but most existing mathematical results are restricted to the simplest case where all sensors in a network are identical. Nevertheless, numerical results on information transmission have shown that in the presence of independent noise, the optimal configuration of a SPN is such that there should be partial heterogeneity in sensor parameters, such that the optimal solution includes clusters of identical sensors, where each cluster has different parameter values. In this paper, we consider a SPN model of a binary hypothesis detection task and show mathematically that the optimal solution for a specific bound on detection performance is also given by clustered heterogeneity, such that measurements made by sensors with identical parameters either should all be excluded from the detection decision or all included. We also derive an algorithm for numerically finding the optimal solution and illustrate its utility with several examples, including a model of parallel sensory neurons with Poisson firing characteristics.

  17. A distributed network critical for selecting among tool-directed actions.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christine E; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2015-04-01

    Tools pose a challenge to the need to select actions appropriate for task goals and environmental constraints. For many tools (e.g., calculator), actions for "using" and "grasping-to-move" conflict with each other and may compete during selection. To date, little is known about the mechanisms that enable selection between possible tool actions or their neural substrates. The study of patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke, many of whom are deficient in tool-use action (apraxic), provides an opportunity to elucidate these issues. Here, 31 such patients pantomimed or recognized tool use actions for "conflict" and "non-conflict" tools. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM), lesion subtraction, and tractographic overlap analyses were used to determine brain regions necessary for selecting among tool-directed actions. Lesions to posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) and anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) tended to impair production of use actions similarly for both conflict and non-conflict tools. By contrast, lesions to the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)/anterior insula, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) specifically impaired production of use actions for conflict tools. Patients' errors on conflict tools suggested inappropriate selection of grasping actions and difficulty selecting single actions. Use/grasp conflict had no effect on action recognition. We suggest that the SMG/SLF/IFG pathway implements biased competition between possible tool actions, while aIPS and pMTG compute the structure-based and skilled use actions, respectively, that constitute input to this competitive process. This is the first study to demonstrate a reliable link between a characteristic of single tools (i.e., their association with different use and grasp actions) and action selection difficulties. Additionally, the data allow us to posit an SMG-involved subtype of apraxia characterized by an inability to resolve action competition.

  18. A Distributed Network Critical for Selecting Among Tool-Directed Actions

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christine E.; Buxbaum, Laurel J.

    2015-01-01

    Tools pose a challenge to the need to select actions appropriate for task goals and environmental constraints. For many tools (e.g., calculator), actions for “using” and “grasping-to-move” conflict with each other and may compete during selection. To date, little is known about the mechanisms that enable selection between possible tool actions or their neural substrates. The study of patients with chronic left hemisphere stroke, many of whom are deficient in tool-use action (apraxic), provides an opportunity to elucidate these issues. Here, 31 such patients pantomimed or recognized tool use actions for “conflict” and “non-conflict” tools. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping, lesion subtraction, and tractographic overlap analyses were used to determine brain regions necessary for selecting among tool-directed actions. Lesions to posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) and anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) tended to impair production of use actions similarly for both conflict and non-conflict tools. By contrast, lesions to the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)/anterior insula, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) specifically impaired production of use actions for conflict tools. Patients' errors on conflict tools suggested inappropriate selection of grasping actions and difficulty selecting single actions. Use/grasp conflict had no effect on action recognition. We suggest that the SMG/SLF/IFG pathway implements biased competition between possible tool actions, while aIPS and pMTG compute the structure-based and skilled use actions, respectively, that constitute input to this competitive process. This is the first study to demonstrate a reliable link between a characteristic of single tools (i.e., their association with different use and grasp actions) and action selection difficulties. Additionally, the data allow us to posit a SMG-involved subtype of apraxia characterized by an inability to resolve action competition

  19. a New Framework for Geospatial Site Selection Using Artificial Neural Networks as Decision Rules: a Case Study on Landfill Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abujayyab, S. K. M.; Ahamad, M. A. S.; Yahya, A. S.; Saad, A.-M. H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    This paper briefly introduced the theory and framework of geospatial site selection (GSS) and discussed the application and framework of artificial neural networks (ANNs). The related literature on the use of ANNs as decision rules in GSS is scarce from 2000 till 2015. As this study found, ANNs are not only adaptable to dynamic changes but also capable of improving the objectivity of acquisition in GSS, reducing time consumption, and providing high validation. ANNs make for a powerful tool for solving geospatial decision-making problems by enabling geospatial decision makers to implement their constraints and imprecise concepts. This tool offers a way to represent and handle uncertainty. Specifically, ANNs are decision rules implemented to enhance conventional GSS frameworks. The main assumption in implementing ANNs in GSS is that the current characteristics of existing sites are indicative of the degree of suitability of new locations with similar characteristics. GSS requires several input criteria that embody specific requirements and the desired site characteristics, which could contribute to geospatial sites. In this study, the proposed framework consists of four stages for implementing ANNs in GSS. A multilayer feed-forward network with a backpropagation algorithm was used to train the networks from prior sites to assess, generalize, and evaluate the outputs on the basis of the inputs for the new sites. Two metrics, namely, confusion matrix and receiver operating characteristic tests, were utilized to achieve high accuracy and validation. Results proved that ANNs provide reasonable and efficient results as an accurate and inexpensive quantitative technique for GSS.

  20. Selection of bi-level image compression method for reduction of communication energy in wireless visual sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khursheed, Khursheed; Imran, Muhammad; Ahmad, Naeem; O'Nils, Mattias

    2012-06-01

    Wireless Visual Sensor Network (WVSN) is an emerging field which combines image sensor, on board computation unit, communication component and energy source. Compared to the traditional wireless sensor network, which operates on one dimensional data, such as temperature, pressure values etc., WVSN operates on two dimensional data (images) which requires higher processing power and communication bandwidth. Normally, WVSNs are deployed in areas where installation of wired solutions is not feasible. The energy budget in these networks is limited to the batteries, because of the wireless nature of the application. Due to the limited availability of energy, the processing at Visual Sensor Nodes (VSN) and communication from VSN to server should consume as low energy as possible. Transmission of raw images wirelessly consumes a lot of energy and requires higher communication bandwidth. Data compression methods reduce data efficiently and hence will be effective in reducing communication cost in WVSN. In this paper, we have compared the compression efficiency and complexity of six well known bi-level image compression methods. The focus is to determine the compression algorithms which can efficiently compress bi-level images and their computational complexity is suitable for computational platform used in WVSNs. These results can be used as a road map for selection of compression methods for different sets of constraints in WVSN.

  1. Structure of social networks in a passerine bird: consequences for sexual selection and the evolution of mating strategies.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kevin P; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2010-09-01

    The social environment is a critical determinant of fitness and, in many taxa, is shaped by an individual's behavioral discrimination among social contexts, suggesting that animals can actively influence the selection they experience. In competition to attract females, males may modify sexual selection by choosing social environments in which they are more attractive relative to rivals. Across the population, such behaviors should influence sexual selection patterns by altering the relationship between male mating success and sexual ornament elaboration. Here we use network analysis to examine patterns of male social behavior in relation to plumage ornamentation and mating success in a free-living population of house finches. During the nonbreeding season, less elaborate males changed associations with distinct social groups more frequently, compared to more elaborate males that showed greater fidelity to a single social group. By the onset of pair formation, socially labile males effectively increased their attractiveness relative to other males in the same flocks. Consequently, males that frequently moved between social groups had greater pairing success than less social individuals with equivalent sexual ornamentation. We discuss these results in relation to conditional mating tactics and the role of social behavior in evolutionary change by sexual selection.

  2. Relay Selection Based Double-Differential Transmission for Cooperative Networks with Multiple Carrier Frequency Offsets: Model, Analysis, and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Bangning; Pan, Kegang; Liu, Aijun; Guo, Daoxing

    2014-07-01

    Due to the distributed nature, cooperative networks are generally subject to multiple carrier frequency offsets (MCFOs), which make the channels time-varying and drastically degrade the system performance. In this paper, to address the MCFOs problem in detect-andforward (DetF) multi-relay cooperative networks, a robust relay selection (RS) based double-differential (DD) transmission scheme, termed RSDDT, is proposed, where the best relay is selected to forward the source's double-differentially modulated signals to the destination with the DetF protocol. The proposed RSDDT scheme can achieve excellent performance over fading channels in the presence of unknown MCFOs. Considering double-differential multiple phase-shift keying (DDMPSK) is applied, we first derive exact expressions for the outage probability and average bit error rate (BER) of the RSDDT scheme. Then, we look into the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime and present simple and informative asymptotic outage probability and average BER expressions, which reveal that the proposed scheme can achieve full diversity. Moreover, to further improve the BER performance of the RSDDT scheme, we investigate the optimum power allocation strategy among the source and the relay nodes, and simple analytical solutions are obtained. Numerical results are provided to corroborate the derived analytical expressions and it is demonstrated that the proposed optimum power allocation strategy offers substantial BER performance improvement over the equal power allocation strategy.

  3. Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples Influence Selective Activation of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Raphael; Adhikari, Mohit H.; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mantini, Dante; Murayama, Yusuke; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The default mode network (DMN) is a commonly observed resting-state network (RSN) that includes medial temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions involved in episodic memory [1, 2, 3]. The behavioral relevance of endogenous DMN activity remains elusive, despite an emerging literature correlating resting fMRI fluctuations with memory performance [4, 5]—particularly in DMN regions [6, 7, 8]. Mechanistic support for the DMN’s role in memory consolidation might come from investigation of large deflections (sharp-waves) in the hippocampal local field potential that co-occur with high-frequency (>80 Hz) oscillations called ripples—both during sleep [9, 10] and awake deliberative periods [11, 12, 13]. Ripples are ideally suited for memory consolidation [14, 15], since the reactivation of hippocampal place cell ensembles occurs during ripples [16, 17, 18, 19]. Moreover, the number of ripples after learning predicts subsequent memory performance in rodents [20, 21, 22] and humans [23], whereas electrical stimulation of the hippocampus after learning interferes with memory consolidation [24, 25, 26]. A recent study in macaques showed diffuse fMRI neocortical activation and subcortical deactivation specifically after ripples [27]. Yet it is unclear whether ripples and other hippocampal neural events influence endogenous fluctuations in specific RSNs—like the DMN—unitarily. Here, we examine fMRI datasets from anesthetized monkeys with simultaneous hippocampal electrophysiology recordings, where we observe a dramatic increase in the DMN fMRI signal following ripples, but not following other hippocampal electrophysiological events. Crucially, we find increases in ongoing DMN activity after ripples, but not in other RSNs. Our results relate endogenous DMN fluctuations to hippocampal ripples, thereby linking network-level resting fMRI fluctuations with behaviorally relevant circuit-level neural dynamics. PMID:26898464

  4. Aspects Regarding The Possibility To Use "Neural Networks" In The Selection Of The "R & D" Strategy In The "Nonconventional Technologies" Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, Simona-Ioana; Titu, Mihail

    2015-09-01

    The paper referes to the possibility of using neural networks in selecting the "Research-Development" strategy, in the nonconventional technologies field. It presents a selection and the main key elements of the Research and Development (R & D) strategies, applicable in the nonconventional technologies (NT) field and, thus, the specific analytical elements of such a methodology. It also refers to the possibility of using neural networks ("NN") up to the level of taking managerial decisions regarding the manufacturing processes. Research Objectives: Defining components from the neuron `s structure into the organizational systems, in order to select ptime strategies for the organizational management. Expected Results: Transposing the entire methodology in a software.

  5. Early Adolescent Friendships and Academic Adjustment: Examining Selection and Influence Processes with Longitudinal Social Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Huiyoung; Ryan, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated early adolescent friendship selection and social influence with regard to academic motivation (self-efficacy and intrinsic value), engagement (effortful and disruptive behavior), and achievement (GPA calculated from report card grades) among 6th graders (N = 587, 50% girls at Wave 1; N = 576, 52% girls at Wave 2) followed…

  6. Nanorecycling: Monolithic Integration of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanowire Network Electrode through Selective Reversible Photothermochemical Reduction.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungyong; Hong, Sukjoon; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Dongkwan; Kang, Bongchul; Yang, Min-Yang; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Laser induced selective photothermochemical reduction is demonstrated to locally and reversibly control the oxidation state of Cu and Cu oxide nanowires in ambient conditions without any inert gas environment. This new concept of "nanorecycling" can monolithically integrate Cu and Cu oxide nanowires by restoring oxidized Cu, considered unusable for the electrode, back to a metallic state for repetitive reuse.

  7. Hierarchical Distributed Networks in the Neuropsychology of Selective Attention. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.

    A general framework is outlined for describing the relationship of cognition to brain systems. The model provides for empirical investigations at many levels--computational, chronometric, spatial imaging, and cellular--and argues for the logical interrelationship of these areas of investigation. It is applied to selective visual-spatial attention…

  8. Hybrid crosstalk aware Q-Factor analysis for selection of optical virtual private network connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Samantray, A. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of physical layer impairments (PLIs) in high-speed optical virtual private network (OVPN) over wavelength-division multiplexing/ dense-wavelength division multiplexing network degrades the connection quality (CQ). The quality can be numerically expressed as the quality factor (Q-Factor) of the connection. The CQ can be further affected by the increasing demand of connections and data speed. It is important to have an efficient OVPN control manager (OVPNCM) to maintain the CQ. OVPNCM can ensure better quality of transmission to the OVPN clients. Traditional routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) algorithms have less regards to the PLIs and cannot provide guaranteed OVPN connection (OVPNC) quality. In order to achieve a guaranteed CQ, we proposed a wavelength assignment (WA) scheme and a hybrid crosstalk model based on linear in-band and nonlinear four-wave mixing crosstalk. The performance of the proposed WA scheme with the hybrid crosstalk model is demonstrated. The results show that the proposed hybrid crosstalk model with WA scheme not only provides a guaranteed OVPNC, but also improves the OVPN performance in terms of blocking probability.

  9. A Co2+-selective and chirality-sensitive supermolecular metallohydrogel with a nanofiber network skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; He, Ting; Yang, Lan; Wu, Huiqiong; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenzhu; Shen, Rujuan; Xiang, Juan; Zhang, Yi; Wei, Chuanwan

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a new metallohydrogel precursor that offers a peculiar gelation response to Co2+ at pH 7-8. It is notable that the stability of this metallohydrogel is significantly dependent on its enantiomeric purity. In addition to the expected multi-stimuli responsive properties, including thixotropy, as well as re-assembly properties on adding HCl, this metallohydrogel possesses excellent self-healing behavior, which is uncommon in low-molecular-weight gelators. Electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that the cryodried remains of this gel presented as well an organized three dimensional (3D) network of fibrils. This interesting metallohydrogel shows potential for developing new soft materials with drug delivery and catalysis properties.This paper introduces a new metallohydrogel precursor that offers a peculiar gelation response to Co2+ at pH 7-8. It is notable that the stability of this metallohydrogel is significantly dependent on its enantiomeric purity. In addition to the expected multi-stimuli responsive properties, including thixotropy, as well as re-assembly properties on adding HCl, this metallohydrogel possesses excellent self-healing behavior, which is uncommon in low-molecular-weight gelators. Electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that the cryodried remains of this gel presented as well an organized three dimensional (3D) network of fibrils. This interesting metallohydrogel shows potential for developing new soft materials with drug delivery and catalysis properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00822d

  10. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  11. Simulating Dynamic Network Models and Adolescent Smoking: The Impact of Varying Peer Influence and Peer Selection.

    PubMed

    Lakon, Cynthia M; Hipp, John R; Wang, Cheng; Butts, Carter T; Jose, Rupa

    2015-12-01

    We used a stochastic actor-based approach to examine the effect of peer influence and peer selection--the propensity to choose friends who are similar--on smoking among adolescents. Data were collected from 1994 to 1996 from 2 schools involved in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, with respectively 2178 and 976 students, and different levels of smoking. Our experimental manipulations of the peer influence and selection parameters in a simulation strategy indicated that stronger peer influence decreased school-level smoking. In contrast to the assumption that a smoker may induce a nonsmoker to begin smoking, adherence to antismoking norms may result in an adolescent nonsmoker inducing a smoker to stop smoking and reduce school-level smoking.

  12. [Network meta-analysis on selecting Chinese medical injections in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ge, Long; Mao, Lei; Tian, Jin-hui; Shi, Fang-yu; Lou Li-li; Qiu, Xia; Li, Jin-long; Yang, Ke-hu

    2015-09-01

    To assess the clinical effect and safety of Chinese traditional medicine injection combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. The relative randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of Chinese medical injections (CMI) combined with radiotherapy as well as simple radiotherapy for esophageal cancer were searched from PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database(CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang Database and VIP Database as at September 2014. Two researchers completed the data extraction and quality evaluation independently. The data were analyzed by GeMTC 0.14.3 and Stata 12. 0 software. Finally, 43 RCTs involving 3 289 patients were finally included. The star network was constructed by different comparison groups. The results of network meta-analysis showed that the seven CMIs combined with radiotherapy was superior to simple radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer in efficacy, quality of life, and reduction in the incidence of nausea and leucopenia, but with no significant difference among the seven CMIs. Probability ranking result showed a great possibility for Shenqi Fuzheng and astragalus polysaccharide injections in improving the overall response rate and quality of life, which were followed by cinobufagin and kangai injections. However, only one study was included for Shenqi Fuzheng and astragalus polysaccharide injections. Therefore, cinobufagin or kangai injections were preferred in improving the overall response rate and quality of life. Aidi or compound sophora injections were better than other CMIs in reducing? the incidences of nausea (III-IV) and leukopenia. More RCTs of Shenqi Fuzheng and astragalus polysaccharide injections combined with radiotherapy for patients with esophageal cancer were expected in the future to confirm our results. Moreover, study findings will be reported, particularly for the adverse events in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  13. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  14. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  15. A-21st-century-approach to firefighting in the Western US: How microwave-based seismic networks can change fire suppression from reactive to proactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Smith, K. D.; Williams, M. C.; Slater, D. E.; Plank, G.; McCarthy, M.; Rojas-Gonzalez, R.; Vernon, F.; Driscoll, N. W.; Hidley, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at UNR has recently embarked on a bold technical initiative, installing a high-speed (up to 190 Mb/sec) mountaintop-based Internet Protocol (IP) microwave network, enabling a myriad of sensor systems for Multi-Hazard Early Warning detection and response. In the Tahoe Basin, this system is known as AlertTahoe; a similar network has been deployed in north-central Nevada as part of a 5-year-long grant with BLM. The UNR network mirrors the successful HPWREN multi-hazard network run through UCSD; the UNR "Alert" program (Access to Leverage Emergency information in Real Time) has expanded on the original concept by providing a framework for early fire detection and discovery. Both systems do not rely on open-access public Internet services such as those provided by cellular service providers. Instead, they utilize private wireless communication networks to collect data 24/7 in real-time from multiple sensors throughout the system. Utilizing this restricted-access private communication platform enhances system reliability, capability, capacity and versatility for staff and its community of certified users. Both UNR and UCSD fire camera systems are presently being confederated under a common framework to provide end users (e.g., BLM, USFS, CalFire) a unified interface. Earthquake response has been both organizations' primary mission for decades; high-speed IP microwave fundamentally changes the playing field allowing for rapid early detection of wildfires, earthquakes and other natural disasters, greatly improving local and regional disaster response/recovery. For example, networked cameras can be optimally placed for wildfire detection and are significantly less vulnerable due infrastructure hardening and the ability to avoid extreme demands by the public on cellular and other public networks during a crisis. These systems also provide a backup for emergency responders to use when public access communications become overwhelmed or

  16. Model-Based Hookload Monitoring and Prediction at Drilling Rigs using Neural Networks and Forward-Selection Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaout, A.; Fruhwirth, R.; Winter, M.; Esmael, B.; Thonhauser, G.

    2012-04-01

    optimal network. A forward-selection algorithm was applied to the data to identify the relevant features necessary for the prediction/monitoring process. The results show that a very small set of features are required to obtain a prediction accuracy in the magnitude of about ±3 tons, equivalent to about ±1% of the maximum hookload.

  17. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Vinton G.

    1991-01-01

    The demands placed on the networks transporting the information and knowledge generated by the increased diversity and sophistication of computational machinery are described. What is needed to support this increased flow, the structures already in place, and what must be built are topics of discussion. (KR)

  18. SPARC Expression Is Selectively Suppressed in Tumor Initiating Urospheres Isolated from As+3- and Cd+2-Transformed Human Urothelial Cells (UROtsa) Stably Transfected with SPARC

    PubMed Central

    Slusser-Nore, Andrea; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Ruowen; Zhou, Xu Dong; Somji, Seema; Garrett, Scott H.; Sens, Donald A.; Dunlevy, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    Background This laboratory previously analyzed the expression of SPARC in the parental UROtsa cells, their arsenite (As+3) and cadmium (Cd+2)-transformed cell lines, and tumor transplants generated from the transformed cells. It was demonstrated that SPARC expression was down-regulated to background levels in Cd+2-and As+3-transformed UROtsa cells and tumor transplants compared to parental cells. In the present study, the transformed cell lines were stably transfected with a SPARC expression vector to determine the effect of SPARC expression on the ability of the cells to form tumors in immune-compromised mice. Methods Real time PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to define the expression of SPARC in the As+3-and Cd+2-transformed cell lines, and urospheres isolated from these cell lines, following their stable transfection with an expression vector containing the SPARC open reading frame (ORF). Transplantation of the cultured cells into immune-compromised mice by subcutaneous injection was used to assess the effect of SPARC expression on tumors generated from the above cell lines and urospheres. Results It was shown that the As+3-and Cd+2-transformed UROtsa cells could undergo stable transfection with a SPARC expression vector and that the transfected cells expressed both SPARC mRNA and secreted protein. Tumors formed from these SPARC-transfected cells were shown to have no expression of SPARC. Urospheres isolated from cultures of the SPARC-transfected As+3-and Cd+2-transformed cell lines were shown to have only background expression of SPARC. Urospheres from both the non-transfected and SPARC-transfected cell lines were tumorigenic and thus fit the definition for a population of tumor initiating cells. Conclusions Tumor initiating cells isolated from SPARC-transfected As+3-and Cd+2-transformed cell lines have an inherent mechanism to suppress the expression of SPARC mRNA. PMID:26783756

  19. No selection of CXCR4-using variants in cell reservoirs of dual-mixed HIV-infected patients on suppressive maraviroc therapy.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Stéphanie; Nicot, Florence; Carcenac, Romain; Jeanne, Nicolas; Cazabat, Michelle; Requena, Mary; Cuzin, Lise; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-03-27

    We used ultradeep sequencing to investigate the evolution of the frequency of CXCR4-using viruses in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 22 patients infected with both CCR5 and CXCR4-using viruses treated with the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc for 24 weeks and a stable antiviral therapy. The mean CXCR4-using virus frequency in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 59% before maraviroc intensification and 52% after 24 weeks of effective treatment, indicating no selection by maraviroc. PMID:26752281

  20. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus.

    PubMed

    John, Yohan J; Zikopoulos, Basilis; Bullock, Daniel; Barbas, Helen

    2016-02-01

    In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective 'framing' effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. A novel discovery of IK1 channel agonist: zacopride selectively enhances IK1 current and suppresses triggered arrhythmias in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Hua; Li, Xiao-Li; Xu, Yan-Wu; Lin, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Ji-Min; Wu, Bo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the inward rectifier K current (IK1) has profound effect on cardiac excitability and underlies new antiarrhythmic strategies. However, IK1-specific pharmacological tools, especially the selective IK1 agonists, are still lacking in the market. Zacopride, a gastrointestinal prokinetic drug, was found to be a selective IK1 channel agonist. By using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, it was found that zacopride (0.1-10 μmole/L) dose dependently enhanced the IK1 current in isolated rat cardiomyocytes, had no effects on other ion channels, transporters, or pumps. At the same dosage range, zacopride hyperpolarized the resting potential and shortened the action potential duration. When applied at the optimal dose of 1.0 μmole/L, zacopride could prevent or eliminate aconitine induced after depolarization and triggered activity in isolated cardiomyocytes. In a rat model of aconitine-induced arrhythmias both ex vivo and in vivo, zacopride (1.0 μmole/L or 25 μg/kg, respectively) treatment apparently protected the heart from ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which compares favorably with 7.5 mg/kg of lidocaine, a classical aconitine antidote. In conclusion, zacopride was found to be a selective IK1 agonist, and agonizing IK1 could prevent or eliminate aconitine-induced arrhythmias in the rat.

  2. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Daniel; Barbas, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective ‘framing’ effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26828203

  3. Real Time Selective Harmonic Minimization for Multilevel Inverters Connected to Solar Panels Using Artificial Neural Network Angle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Filho, Faete; Cao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    This work approximates the selective harmonic elimination problem using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to generate the switching angles in an 11-level full-bridge cascade inverter powered by five varying dc input sources. Each of the five full bridges of the cascade inverter was connected to a separate 195-W solar panel. The angles were chosen such that the fundamental was kept constant and the low-order harmonics were minimized or eliminated. A nondeterministic method is used to solve the system for the angles and to obtain the data set for the ANN training. The method also provides a set of acceptable solutions in the space where solutions do not exist by analytical methods. The trained ANN is a suitable tool that brings a small generalization effect on the angles' precision and is able to perform in real time (50-/60-Hz time window).

  4. Uncovering phonological and orthographic selectivity across the reading network using fMRI-RA.

    PubMed

    Glezer, Laurie S; Eden, Guinevere; Jiang, Xiong; Luetje, Megan; Napoliello, Eileen; Kim, Judy; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2016-09-01

    Reading has been shown to rely on a dorsal brain circuit involving the temporoparietal cortex (TPC) for grapheme-to-phoneme conversion of novel words (Pugh et al., 2001), and a ventral stream involving left occipitotemporal cortex (OTC) (in particular in the so-called "visual word form area", VWFA) for visual identification of familiar words. In addition, portions of the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) have been posited to be an output of the dorsal reading pathway involved in phonology. While this dorsal versus ventral dichotomy for phonological and orthographic processing of words is widely accepted, it is not known if these brain areas are actually strictly sensitive to orthographic or phonological information. Using an fMRI rapid adaptation technique we probed the selectivity of the TPC, OTC, and IFC to orthographic and phonological features during single word reading. We found in two independent experiments using different task conditions in adult normal readers, that the TPC is exclusively sensitive to phonology and the VWFA in the OTC is exclusively sensitive to orthography. The dorsal IFC (BA 44), however, showed orthographic but not phonological selectivity. These results support the theory that reading involves a specific phonological-based temporoparietal region and a specific orthographic-based ventral occipitotemporal region. The dorsal IFC, however, was not sensitive to phonological processing, suggesting a more complex role for this region. PMID:27252037

  5. From Neuron Biophysics to Orientation Selectivity in Electrically Coupled Networks of Neocortical L2/3 Large Basket Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amsalem, Oren; Van Geit, Werner; Muller, Eilif; Markram, Henry; Segev, Idan

    2016-01-01

    In the neocortex, inhibitory interneurons of the same subtype are electrically coupled with each other via dendritic gap junctions (GJs). The impact of multiple GJs on the biophysical properties of interneurons and thus on their input processing is unclear. The present experimentally based theoretical study examined GJs in L2/3 large basket cells (L2/3 LBCs) with 3 goals in mind: (1) To evaluate the errors due to GJs in estimating the cable properties of individual L2/3 LBCs and suggest ways to correct these errors when modeling these cells and the networks they form; (2) to bracket the GJ conductance value (0.05–0.25 nS) and membrane resistivity (10 000–40 000 Ω cm2) of L2/3 LBCs; these estimates are tightly constrained by in vitro input resistance (131 ± 18.5 MΩ) and the coupling coefficient (1–3.5%) of these cells; and (3) to explore the functional implications of GJs, and show that GJs: (i) dynamically modulate the effective time window for synaptic integration; (ii) improve the axon's capability to encode rapid changes in synaptic inputs; and (iii) reduce the orientation selectivity, linearity index, and phase difference of L2/3 LBCs. Our study provides new insights into the role of GJs and calls for caution when using in vitro measurements for modeling electrically coupled neuronal networks. PMID:27288316

  6. From Neuron Biophysics to Orientation Selectivity in Electrically Coupled Networks of Neocortical L2/3 Large Basket Cells.

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Oren; Van Geit, Werner; Muller, Eilif; Markram, Henry; Segev, Idan

    2016-08-01

    In the neocortex, inhibitory interneurons of the same subtype are electrically coupled with each other via dendritic gap junctions (GJs). The impact of multiple GJs on the biophysical properties of interneurons and thus on their input processing is unclear. The present experimentally based theoretical study examined GJs in L2/3 large basket cells (L2/3 LBCs) with 3 goals in mind: (1) To evaluate the errors due to GJs in estimating the cable properties of individual L2/3 LBCs and suggest ways to correct these errors when modeling these cells and the networks they form; (2) to bracket the GJ conductance value (0.05-0.25 nS) and membrane resistivity (10 000-40 000 Ω cm(2)) of L2/3 LBCs; these estimates are tightly constrained by in vitro input resistance (131 ± 18.5 MΩ) and the coupling coefficient (1-3.5%) of these cells; and (3) to explore the functional implications of GJs, and show that GJs: (i) dynamically modulate the effective time window for synaptic integration; (ii) improve the axon's capability to encode rapid changes in synaptic inputs; and (iii) reduce the orientation selectivity, linearity index, and phase difference of L2/3 LBCs. Our study provides new insights into the role of GJs and calls for caution when using in vitro measurements for modeling electrically coupled neuronal networks.

  7. Suppression of optical beat interference-noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yong-Yuk; Jung, Sang-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-08-01

    A new technique, which reduces optical beat interference (OBI) noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) links, is proposed. A self-homodyne balanced detection, which uses a single laser for the optical line terminal (OLT) as well as for the optical network unit (ONU), reduces OBI noise and also improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal. The proposed scheme is verified by transmitting quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK)-modulated DMT signal over a 20-km single mode fiber. The optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR), that is required for BER of 10-5, is reduced by 2 dB in the balanced detection compared with a single channel due to the cancellation of OBI noise in conjunction with the local laser.

  8. Short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity ameliorates the suppressed expression of key β-cell factors under diabetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Naoki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Takebe, Satomi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneto, Hideaki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-11-27

    Alleviation of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidemia improves pancreatic β-cell function in type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. In this study, we aimed to elucidate how the expression alterations of key β-cell factors are altered by the short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity or lipotoxicity. We treated db/db mice for one week with empagliflozin and/or bezafibrate to alleviate glucotoxicity and/or liptotoxicity, respectively. The gene expression levels of Pdx1 and Mafa, and their potential targets, insulin 1, Slc2a2, and Glp1r, were higher in the islets of empagliflozin-treated mice, and levels of insulin 2 were higher in mice treated with both reagents, than in untreated mice. Moreover, compared to the pretreatment levels, Mafa and insulin 1 expression increased in empagliflozin-treated mice, and Slc2a2 increased in combination-treated mice. In addition, empagliflozin treatment enhanced β-cell proliferation assessed by Ki-67 immunostaining. Our date clearly demonstrated that the one-week selective alleviation of glucotoxicity led to the better expression levels of the key β-cell factors critical for β-cell function over pretreatment levels, and that the alleviation of lipotoxicity along with glucotoxicity augmented the favorable effects under diabetic conditions. PMID:26471305

  9. "Every Gene Is Everywhere but the Environment Selects": Global Geolocalization of Gene Sharing in Environmental Samples through Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Karkman, Antti; Tamminen, Manu V; Bosi, Emanuele; Virta, Marko; Fani, Renato; Alm, Eric; McInerney, James O

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of microbes on our planet is famously formulated in the Baas Becking hypothesis as "everything is everywhere but the environment selects." While this hypothesis does not strictly rule out patterns caused by geographical effects on ecology and historical founder effects, it does propose that the remarkable dispersal potential of microbes leads to distributions generally shaped by environmental factors rather than geographical distance. By constructing sequence similarity networks from uncultured environmental samples, we show that microbial gene pool distributions are not influenced nearly as much by geography as ecology, thus extending the Bass Becking hypothesis from whole organisms to microbial genes. We find that gene pools are shaped by their broad ecological niche (such as sea water, fresh water, host, and airborne). We find that freshwater habitats act as a gene exchange bridge between otherwise disconnected habitats. Finally, certain antibiotic resistance genes deviate from the general trend of habitat specificity by exhibiting a high degree of cross-habitat mobility. The strong cross-habitat mobility of antibiotic resistance genes is a cause for concern and provides a paradigmatic example of the rate by which genes colonize new habitats when new selective forces emerge. PMID:27190206

  10. "Every Gene Is Everywhere but the Environment Selects": Global Geolocalization of Gene Sharing in Environmental Samples through Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Karkman, Antti; Tamminen, Manu V; Bosi, Emanuele; Virta, Marko; Fani, Renato; Alm, Eric; McInerney, James O

    2016-05-13

    The spatial distribution of microbes on our planet is famously formulated in the Baas Becking hypothesis as "everything is everywhere but the environment selects." While this hypothesis does not strictly rule out patterns caused by geographical effects on ecology and historical founder effects, it does propose that the remarkable dispersal potential of microbes leads to distributions generally shaped by environmental factors rather than geographical distance. By constructing sequence similarity networks from uncultured environmental samples, we show that microbial gene pool distributions are not influenced nearly as much by geography as ecology, thus extending the Bass Becking hypothesis from whole organisms to microbial genes. We find that gene pools are shaped by their broad ecological niche (such as sea water, fresh water, host, and airborne). We find that freshwater habitats act as a gene exchange bridge between otherwise disconnected habitats. Finally, certain antibiotic resistance genes deviate from the general trend of habitat specificity by exhibiting a high degree of cross-habitat mobility. The strong cross-habitat mobility of antibiotic resistance genes is a cause for concern and provides a paradigmatic example of the rate by which genes colonize new habitats when new selective forces emerge.

  11. Computational screening and selection of cyclic peptide hairpin mimetics by molecular simulation and kinetic network models.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Asghar M; Wuest, William M; Voelz, Vincent A

    2014-05-27

    Designing peptidomimetic compounds to have a preorganized structure in solution is highly nontrivial. To show how simulation-based approaches can help speed this process, we performed an extensive simulation study of designed cyclic peptide mimics of a β-hairpin from bacterial protein LapD involved in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) pertinent to bacterial biofilm formation. We used replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation to screen 20 covalently cross-linked designs with varying stereochemistry and selected the most favorable of these for massively parallel simulation on Folding@home in explicit solvent. Markov state models (MSMs) built from the trajectory data reveal how subtle chemical modifications can have a significant effect on conformational populations, leading to the overall stabilization of the target structure. In particular, we identify a key steric interaction between a methyl substituent and a valine side chain that acts to allosterically shift population between native and near-native states, which could be exploited in future designs. Visualization of this mechanism is aided considerably by the tICA method, which identifies degrees of freedom most important in slow conformational transitions. The combination of quantitative detail and human comprehension provided by MSMs suggests such approaches will be increasingly useful for design.

  12. Selective Broadcast Interconnection (sbi) For Wideband Fiber-Optic Local Area Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Yitzhak; Marhic, Michel E.; Tobagi, Fouad A.

    1986-07-01

    The selective broadcast interconnection (SBI) is a scheme for directly interconnecting transmitting stations, each equipped with CT transmitters, and receiving stations, each equipped with CR receivers, such that each transmitting station is always connected to all receiving stations through passive communication channels with no intermediate switches. S BI consists of CT CR separate broadcast subnetworks, each of which interconnects a subset of transmitting stations and a subset of receiving stations, such that each transmitting station and receiving station are interconnected through a single subnetwork. Each subnetwork is shared by its transmitting members via some multiple-access scheme. Comparing S B I with CT=CR=C with the use of C broadcast buses, each connecting all transmitting stations to all receiving stations, one finds that in some cases, including that of equal single-destination traffic requirements for all source-destination pairs, the aggregate throughput with S B I can be higher by a factor of C, while the stations' hardware is the same. For nonuniform traffic requirements, however, the maximum aggregate throughput with S B 1 can be C times lower (in extreme situations). For fiber-optic implementations employing a central wiring closet, the two schemes require the same amount of fiber and, if the same elementary couplers are used to construct the required star couplers, SBI requires fewer couplers. Clearly, the same number of couplers and up to C times more fibers may be required for S B I in a linear-bus implementation. In all cases, transmitter power need only reach N/C receivers with S B I (instead of N with C parallel buses); this allows to accommodate a larger number of stations when implementing the interconnection with passive components.

  13. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    PubMed

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced cocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients.

  14. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation. PMID:22875828

  15. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation.

  16. Rapid Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure–activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  17. Trends in Surface-Water Quality at Selected Ambient-Monitoring Network Stations in Kentucky, 1979-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crain, Angela S.; Martin, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly complex water-management decisions require water-quality monitoring programs that provide data for multiple purposes, including trend analyses, to detect improvement or deterioration in water quality with time. Understanding surface-water-quality trends assists resource managers in identifying emerging water-quality concerns, planning remediation efforts, and evaluating the effectiveness of the remediation. This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet-Kentucky Division of Water, to analyze and summarize long-term water-quality trends of selected properties and water-quality constituents in selected streams in Kentucky's ambient stream water-quality monitoring network. Trends in surface-water quality for 15 properties and water-quality constituents were analyzed at 37 stations with drainage basins ranging in size from 62 to 6,431 square miles. Analyses of selected physical properties (temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, hardness, and suspended solids), for major ions (chloride and sulfate), for selected metals (iron and manganese), for nutrients (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate), and for fecal coliform were compiled from the Commonwealth's ambient water-quality monitoring network. Trend analyses were completed using the S-Plus statistical software program S-Estimate Trend (S-ESTREND), which detects trends in water-quality data. The trend-detection techniques supplied by this software include the Seasonal Kendall nonparametric methods for use with uncensored data or data censored with only one reporting limit and the Tobit-regression parametric method for use with data censored with multiple reporting limits. One of these tests was selected for each property and water-quality constituent and applied to all station records so that results of the trend procedure could be compared among

  18. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression.

  19. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  20. Identification of ATR-Chk1 pathway inhibitors that selectively target p53-deficient cells without directly suppressing ATR catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawasumi, Masaoki; Bradner, James E.; Tolliday, Nicola; Thibodeau, Renee; Sloan, Heather; Brummond, Kay M.; Nghiem, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is a barrier to effective treatment that appears to be augmented by p53 functional deficiency in many cancers. In p53-deficient cells where the G1/S checkpoint is compromised, cell viability after DNA damage relies upon intact intra-S and G2/M checkpoints mediated by the ATR and Chk1 kinases. Thus, a logical rationale to sensitize p53-deficient cancers to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is through the use of ATP-competitive inhibitors of ATR or Chk1. To discover small molecules that may act on uncharacterized components of the ATR pathway, we performed a phenotype-based screen of 9,195 compounds for their ability to inhibit hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of Ser345 on Chk1, known to be a critical ATR substrate. This effort led to the identification of four small-molecule compounds, three of which were derived from known bioactive library (anthothecol, dihydrocelastryl, and erysolin) and one of which was a novel synthetic compound termed MARPIN. These compounds all inhibited ATR-selective phosphorylation and sensitized p53-deficient cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these compounds did not inhibit ATR catalytic activity in vitro, unlike typical ATP-competitive inhibitors, but acted in a mechanistically distinct manner to disable ATR-Chk1 function. Our results highlight a set of novel molecular probes to further elucidate druggable mechanisms to improve cancer therapeutic responses produced by DNA-damaging drugs. PMID:25336189

  1. A New Ligustrazine Derivative-Selective Cytotoxicity by Suppression of NF-κB/p65 and COX-2 Expression on Human Hepatoma Cells. Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenze; Yan, Wenqiang; Li, Bi; Xu, Bing; Gong, Yan; Chu, Fuhao; Zhang, Yuzhong; Yao, Qiuli; Wang, Penglong; Lei, Haimin

    2015-01-01

    A new anticancer ligustrazine derivative, 3β-hydroxyolea-12-en-28-oic acid-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-methylester (T-OA, C38H58O3N2), was previously reported. It was synthesized via conjugating hepatoprotective and anticancer ingredients of traditional Chinese medicine. We found that T-OA exerted its anticancer activity by preventing the expression of nuclear transcription factor NF-κB/p65 and COX-2 in S180 mice. However, the selective cytotoxicity of T-OA on various kinds of cell lines has not been studied sufficiently. In the present study, compared with Cisplatin, T-OA was more toxic to human hepatoma cell line Bel-7402 (IC50 = 6.36 ± 1.56 µM) than other three cancer cell lines (HeLa, HT-29, BGC-823), and no toxicity was observed toward Madin–Darby canine kidney cell line MDCK (IC50 > 150 µM). The morphological changes of Bel-7402 cells demonstrated that T-OA had an apoptosis-inducing effect which had been substantiated using 4ʹ,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) staining, flow cytometry and mitochondrial membrane potential assay. Combining the immumohistochemical staining, we found T-OA could prevent the expression of NF-κB/p65 and COX-2 in Bel-7402 cells. Both of the proteins have been known to play roles in apoptosis and are mainly located in the nuclei. Moreover subcellular localization was performed to reveal that T-OA exerts in nuclei of Bel-7402 cells. The result was in accordance with the effects of down-regulating the expression of NF-κB/p65 and COX-2. PMID:26193270

  2. Gray matter and intrinsic network changes in the posterior cingulate cortex after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor intake.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Christoph; Ganger, Sebastian; Losak, Jan; Hahn, Andreas; Savli, Markus; Kranz, Georg S; Baldinger, Pia; Windischberger, Christian; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) challenge changes neuronal circuitries and microarchitecture. However, evidence in human subjects is missing. Pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) applying selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and high-resolution structural and functional brain assessment is able to demonstrate the impact of 5-HT challenge on neuronal network morphology and functional activity. To determine how SSRIs induce changes in gray matter and neuronal activity, we conducted a longitudinal study using citalopram and escitalopram. Seventeen healthy subjects completed a structural and functional phMRI study with randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. Significant gray matter increases were observed (among other regions) in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the ventral precuneus after SSRI intake of 10days, while decreases were observed within the pre- and postcentral gyri (all P<0.05, family-wise error [FWE] corrected). Furthermore, enhanced resting functional connectivity (rFC) within the ventral precuneus and PCC was associated with gray matter increases in the PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Corroborating these results, whole-brain connectivity density, measuring the brain's functional network hubs, was significantly increased after SSRI-intake in the ventral precuneus and PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Short-term administration of SSRIs changes gray matter structures, consistent with previous work reporting enhancement of neuroplasticity by serotonergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, increased gray matter in the PCC is associated with increased functional connectivity in one of the brain's metabolically most active regions. Our novel findings provide convergent evidence for dynamic alterations of brain structure and function associated with SSRI pharmacotherapy.

  3. Approaching a network connectivity-driven classification of the psychosis continuum: a selective review and suggestions for future research

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Smieskova, Renata; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Lang, Undine E.; McGuire, Philip; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Brain changes in schizophrenia evolve along a dynamic trajectory, emerging before disease onset and proceeding with ongoing illness. Recent investigations have focused attention on functional brain interactions, with experimental imaging studies supporting the disconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia. These studies have revealed a broad spectrum of abnormalities in brain connectivity in patients, particularly for connections integrating the frontal cortex. A critical point is that brain connectivity abnormalities, including altered resting state connectivity within the fronto-parietal (FP) network, are already observed in non-help-seeking individuals with psychotic-like experiences. If we consider psychosis as a continuum, with individuals with psychotic-like experiences at the lower and psychotic patients at the upper ends, individuals with psychotic-like experiences represent a key population for investigating the validity of putative biomarkers underlying the onset of psychosis. This paper selectively addresses the role played by FP connectivity in the psychosis continuum, which includes patients with chronic psychosis, early psychosis, clinical high risk, genetic high risk, as well as the general population with psychotic experiences. We first discuss structural connectivity changes among the FP pathway in each domain in the psychosis continuum. This may provide a basis for us to gain an understanding of the subsequent changes in functional FP connectivity. We further indicate that abnormal FP connectivity may arise from glutamatergic disturbances of this pathway, in particular from abnormal NMDA receptor-mediated plasticity. In the second part of this paper we propose some concepts for further research on the use of network connectivity in the classification of the psychosis continuum. These concepts are consistent with recent efforts to enhance the role of data in driving the diagnosis of psychiatric spectrum diseases. PMID:25628553

  4. Development of a selective left-hemispheric fronto-temporal network for processing syntactic complexity in language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yaqiong; Friederici, Angela D.; Margulies, Daniel S.; Brauer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The development of language comprehension abilities in childhood is closely related to the maturation of the brain, especially the ability to process syntactically complex sentences. Recent studies proposed that the fronto-temporal connection within left perisylvian regions, supporting the processing of syntactically complex sentences, is still immature at preschool age. In the current study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from typically developing 5-year-old children and adults to shed further light on the brain functional development. Children additionally performed a behavioral syntactic comprehension test outside the scanner. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations was analyzed in order to identify the functional correlation networks of language-relevant brain regions. Results showed an intrahemispheric correlation between left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) in adults, whereas an interhemispheric correlation between left IFG and its right-hemispheric homolog was predominant in children. Correlation analysis between resting-state functional connectivity and sentence processing performance in 5-year-olds revealed that local connectivity within the left IFG is associated with competence of processing syntactically simple canonical sentences, while long-range connectivity between IFG and pSTS in left hemisphere is associated with competence of processing syntactically relatively more complex non-canonical sentences. The present developmental data suggest that a selective left fronto-temporal connectivity network for processing complex syntax is already in functional connection at the age of 5 years when measured in a non-task situation. The correlational findings provide new insight into the relationship between intrinsic functional connectivity and syntactic language abilities in preschool children. PMID:26352468

  5. Gray matter and intrinsic network changes in the posterior cingulate cortex after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor intake.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Christoph; Ganger, Sebastian; Losak, Jan; Hahn, Andreas; Savli, Markus; Kranz, Georg S; Baldinger, Pia; Windischberger, Christian; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) challenge changes neuronal circuitries and microarchitecture. However, evidence in human subjects is missing. Pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) applying selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and high-resolution structural and functional brain assessment is able to demonstrate the impact of 5-HT challenge on neuronal network morphology and functional activity. To determine how SSRIs induce changes in gray matter and neuronal activity, we conducted a longitudinal study using citalopram and escitalopram. Seventeen healthy subjects completed a structural and functional phMRI study with randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. Significant gray matter increases were observed (among other regions) in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the ventral precuneus after SSRI intake of 10days, while decreases were observed within the pre- and postcentral gyri (all P<0.05, family-wise error [FWE] corrected). Furthermore, enhanced resting functional connectivity (rFC) within the ventral precuneus and PCC was associated with gray matter increases in the PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Corroborating these results, whole-brain connectivity density, measuring the brain's functional network hubs, was significantly increased after SSRI-intake in the ventral precuneus and PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Short-term administration of SSRIs changes gray matter structures, consistent with previous work reporting enhancement of neuroplasticity by serotonergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, increased gray matter in the PCC is associated with increased functional connectivity in one of the brain's metabolically most active regions. Our novel findings provide convergent evidence for dynamic alterations of brain structure and function associated with SSRI pharmacotherapy. PMID:23988273

  6. The anti-inflammatory drug BAY 11-7082 suppresses the MyD88-dependent signalling network by targeting the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Strickson, Sam; Campbell, David G; Emmerich, Christoph H; Knebel, Axel; Plater, Lorna; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Shpiro, Natalia; Cohen, Philip

    2013-05-01

    The compound BAY 11-7082 inhibits IκBα [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)α] phosphorylation in cells and has been used to implicate the canonical IKKs (IκB kinases) and NF-κB in >350 publications. In the present study we report that BAY 11-7082 does not inhibit the IKKs, but suppresses their activation in LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-stimulated RAW macrophages and IL (interleukin)-1-stimulated IL-1R (IL-1 receptor) HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. BAY 11-7082 exerts these effects by inactivating the E2-conjugating enzymes Ubc (ubiquitin conjugating) 13 and UbcH7 and the E3 ligase LUBAC (linear ubiquitin assembly complex), thereby preventing the formation of Lys63-linked and linear polyubiquitin chains. BAY 11-7082 prevents ubiquitin conjugation to Ubc13 and UbcH7 by forming a covalent adduct with their reactive cysteine residues via Michael addition at the C3 atom of BAY 11-7082, followed by the release of 4-methylbenzene-sulfinic acid. BAY 11-7082 stimulated Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain formation in cells and protected HIF1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) from proteasomal degradation, suggesting that it inhibits the proteasome. The results of the present study indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of BAY 11-7082, its ability to induce B-cell lymphoma and leukaemic T-cell death and to prevent the recruitment of proteins to sites of DNA damage are exerted via inhibition of components of the ubiquitin system and not by inhibiting NF-κB.

  7. The anti-inflammatory drug BAY 11-7082 suppresses the MyD88-dependent signalling network by targeting the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Strickson, Sam; Campbell, David G; Emmerich, Christoph H; Knebel, Axel; Plater, Lorna; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Shpiro, Natalia; Cohen, Philip

    2013-05-01

    The compound BAY 11-7082 inhibits IκBα [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)α] phosphorylation in cells and has been used to implicate the canonical IKKs (IκB kinases) and NF-κB in >350 publications. In the present study we report that BAY 11-7082 does not inhibit the IKKs, but suppresses their activation in LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-stimulated RAW macrophages and IL (interleukin)-1-stimulated IL-1R (IL-1 receptor) HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. BAY 11-7082 exerts these effects by inactivating the E2-conjugating enzymes Ubc (ubiquitin conjugating) 13 and UbcH7 and the E3 ligase LUBAC (linear ubiquitin assembly complex), thereby preventing the formation of Lys63-linked and linear polyubiquitin chains. BAY 11-7082 prevents ubiquitin conjugation to Ubc13 and UbcH7 by forming a covalent adduct with their reactive cysteine residues via Michael addition at the C3 atom of BAY 11-7082, followed by the release of 4-methylbenzene-sulfinic acid. BAY 11-7082 stimulated Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain formation in cells and protected HIF1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) from proteasomal degradation, suggesting that it inhibits the proteasome. The results of the present study indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of BAY 11-7082, its ability to induce B-cell lymphoma and leukaemic T-cell death and to prevent the recruitment of proteins to sites of DNA damage are exerted via inhibition of components of the ubiquitin system and not by inhibiting NF-κB. PMID:23441730

  8. The anti-inflammatory drug BAY 11-7082 suppresses the MyD88-dependent signalling network by targeting the ubiquitin system

    PubMed Central

    Strickson, Sam; Campbell, David G.; Emmerich, Christoph H.; Knebel, Axel; Plater, Lorna; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Shpiro, Natalia; Cohen, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The compound BAY 11-7082 inhibits IκBα [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)α] phosphorylation in cells and has been used to implicate the canonical IKKs (IκB kinases) and NF-κB in >350 publications. In the present study we report that BAY 11-7082 does not inhibit the IKKs, but suppresses their activation in LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-stimulated RAW macrophages and IL (interleukin)-1-stimulated IL-1R (IL-1 receptor) HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. BAY 11-7082 exerts these effects by inactivating the E2-conjugating enzymes Ubc (ubiquitin conjugating) 13 and UbcH7 and the E3 ligase LUBAC (linear ubiquitin assembly complex), thereby preventing the formation of Lys63-linked and linear polyubiquitin chains. BAY 11-7082 prevents ubiquitin conjugation to Ubc13 and UbcH7 by forming a covalent adduct with their reactive cysteine residues via Michael addition at the C3 atom of BAY 11-7082, followed by the release of 4-methylbenzene-sulfinic acid. BAY 11-7082 stimulated Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain formation in cells and protected HIF1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) from proteasomal degradation, suggesting that it inhibits the proteasome. The results of the present study indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of BAY 11-7082, its ability to induce B-cell lymphoma and leukaemic T-cell death and to prevent the recruitment of proteins to sites of DNA damage are exerted via inhibition of components of the ubiquitin system and not by inhibiting NF-κB. PMID:23441730

  9. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  10. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  11. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  12. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  13. Selective Activation of Resting-State Networks following Focal Stimulation in a Connectome-Based Network Model of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When the brain is stimulated, for example, by sensory inputs or goal-oriented tasks, the brain initially responds with activities in specific areas. The subsequent pattern formation of functional networks is constrained by the structural connectivity (SC) of the brain. The extent to which information is processed over short- or long-range SC is unclear. Whole-brain models based on long-range axonal connections, for example, can partly describe measured functional connectivity dynamics at rest. Here, we study the effect of SC on the network response to stimulation. We use a human whole-brain network model comprising long- and short-range connections. We systematically activate each cortical or thalamic area, and investigate the network response as a function of its short- and long-range SC. We show that when the brain is operating at the edge of criticality, stimulation causes a cascade of network recruitments, collapsing onto a smaller space that is partly constrained by SC. We found both short- and long-range SC essential to reproduce experimental results. In particular, the stimulation of specific areas results in the activation of one or more resting-state networks. We suggest that the stimulus-induced brain activity, which may indicate information and cognitive processing, follows specific routes imposed by structural networks explaining the emergence of functional networks. We provide a lookup table linking stimulation targets and functional network activations, which potentially can be useful in diagnostics and treatments with brain stimulation. PMID:27752540

  14. An Analytic Network Process approach for the environmental aspect selection problem — A case study for a hand blender

    SciTech Connect

    Bereketli Zafeirakopoulos, Ilke Erol Genevois, Mujde

    2015-09-15

    Life Cycle Assessment is a tool to assess, in a systematic way, the environmental aspects and its potential environmental impacts and resources used throughout a product's life cycle. It is widely accepted and considered as one of the most powerful tools to support decision-making processes used in ecodesign and sustainable production in order to learn about the most problematic parts and life cycle phases of a product and to have a projection for future improvements. However, since Life Cycle Assessment is a cost and time intensive method, companies do not intend to carry out a full version of it, except for large corporate ones. Especially for small and medium sized enterprises, which do not have enough budget for and knowledge on sustainable production and ecodesign approaches, focusing only on the most important possible environmental aspect is unavoidable. In this direction, finding the right environmental aspect to work on is crucial for the companies. In this study, a multi-criteria decision-making methodology, Analytic Network Process is proposed to select the most relevant environmental aspect. The proposed methodology aims at providing a simplified environmental assessment to producers. It is applied for a hand blender, which is a member of the Electrical and Electronic Equipment family. The decision criteria for the environmental aspects and relations of dependence are defined. The evaluation is made by the Analytic Network Process in order to create a realistic approach to inter-dependencies among the criteria. The results are computed via the Super Decisions software. Finally, it is observed that the procedure is completed in less time, with less data, with less cost and in a less subjective way than conventional approaches. - Highlights: • We present a simplified environmental assessment methodology to support LCA. • ANP is proposed to select the most relevant environmental aspect. • ANP deals well with the interdependencies between aspects and

  15. The Role of Sex of Peers and Gender-Typed Activities in Young Children’s Peer Affiliative Networks: A Longitudinal Analysis of Selection and Influence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Kornienko, Olga; Schaefer, David R.; Hanish, Laura D.; Fabes, Richard A.; Goble, Priscilla

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic actor-based model was used to investigate the origins of sex segregation by examining how similarity in sex and time spent in gender-typed activities affected affiliation network selection and how peers influenced children’s (N = 292; M age = 4.3 years) activity involvement. Gender had powerful effects on interactions through direct and indirect pathways. Children selected playmates of the same-sex and with similar levels of gender-typed activities. Selection based on gender-typed activities partially mediated selection based on sex. Children influenced one another’s engagement in gender-typed activities. When mechanisms producing sex segregation were compared, the largest contributor was selection based on sex; less was due to activity-based selection and peer influence. Implications for sex segregation and gender development are discussed. PMID:23252713

  16. The role of sex of peers and gender-typed activities in young children's peer affiliative networks: a longitudinal analysis of selection and influence.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Kornienko, Olga; Schaefer, David R; Hanish, Laura D; Fabes, Richard A; Goble, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic actor-based model was used to investigate the origins of sex segregation by examining how similarity in sex of peers and time spent in gender-typed activities affected affiliation network selection and how peers influenced children's (N = 292; Mage = 4.3 years) activity involvement. Gender had powerful effects on interactions through direct and indirect pathways. Children selected playmates of the same sex and with similar levels of gender-typed activities. Selection based on gender-typed activities partially mediated selection based on sex of peers. Children influenced one another's engagement in gender-typed activities. When mechanisms producing sex segregation were compared, the largest contributor was selection based on sex of peers; less was due to activity-based selection and peer influence. Implications for sex segregation and gender development are discussed. PMID:23252713

  17. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for selected sites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Huang, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Increasingly, hydrologic studies require information on the isotopic composition of natural waters. This report presents stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen isotope ratios (δ180) of precipitation samples from seven selected sites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN) collected during the years 1992-1994.

  18. ERIC Processing Manual. Rules and Guidelines for the Acquisition, Selection, and Technical Processing of Documents and Journal Articles by the Various Components of the ERIC Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandhorst, Ted, Ed.; And Others

    This loose-leaf manual provides the detailed rules, guidelines, and examples to be used by the components of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) Network in acquiring and selecting documents and in processing them (i.e., cataloging, indexing, abstracting) for input to the ERIC computer system and subsequent announcement in…

  19. Outage Performance Analysis of Relay Selection Schemes in Wireless Energy Harvesting Cooperative Networks over Non-Identical Rayleigh Fading Channels †

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nhu Tri; Bao, Vo Nguyen Quoc; An, Beongku

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study relay selection in decode-and-forward wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks. In contrast to conventional cooperative networks, the relays harvest energy from the source’s radio-frequency radiation and then use that energy to forward the source information. Considering power splitting receiver architecture used at relays to harvest energy, we are concerned with the performance of two popular relay selection schemes, namely, partial relay selection (PRS) scheme and optimal relay selection (ORS) scheme. In particular, we analyze the system performance in terms of outage probability (OP) over independent and non-identical (i.n.i.d.) Rayleigh fading channels. We derive the closed-form approximations for the system outage probabilities of both schemes and validate the analysis by the Monte-Carlo simulation. The numerical results provide comprehensive performance comparison between the PRS and ORS schemes and reveal the effect of wireless energy harvesting on the outage performances of both schemes. Additionally, we also show the advantages and drawbacks of the wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks and compare to the conventional cooperative networks. PMID:26927119

  20. An evaluation of Bayesian techniques for controlling model complexity and selecting inputs in a neural network for short-term load forecasting.

    PubMed

    Hippert, Henrique S; Taylor, James W

    2010-04-01

    Artificial neural networks have frequently been proposed for electricity load forecasting because of their capabilities for the nonlinear modelling of large multivariate data sets. Modelling with neural networks is not an easy task though; two of the main challenges are defining the appropriate level of model complexity, and choosing the input variables. This paper evaluates techniques for automatic neural network modelling within a Bayesian framework, as applied to six samples containing daily load and weather data for four different countries. We analyse input selection as carried out by the Bayesian 'automatic relevance determination', and the usefulness of the Bayesian 'evidence' for the selection of the best structure (in terms of number of neurones), as compared to methods based on cross-validation.

  1. Optimization of the decision-making process for the selection of therapeutics to undergo clinical testing for spinal cord injury in the North American Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Guest, James; Harrop, James S; Aarabi, Bizhan; Grossman, Robert G; Fawcett, James W; Fehlings, Michael G; Tator, Charles H

    2012-09-01

    The North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) includes 9 clinical centers funded by the US Department of Defense and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. Its purpose is to accelerate clinical testing of promising therapeutics in spinal cord injury (SCI) through the development of a robust interactive infrastructure. This structure includes key committees that serve to provide longitudinal guidance to the Network. These committees include the Executive, Data Management, and Neurological Outcome Assessments Committees, and the Therapeutic Selection Committee (TSC), which is the subject of this manuscript. The NACTN brings unique elements to the SCI field. The Network's stability is not restricted to a single clinical trial. Network members have diverse expertise and include experts in clinical care, clinical trial design and methodology, pharmacology, preclinical and clinical research, and advanced rehabilitation techniques. Frequent systematic communication is assigned a high value, as is democratic process, fairness and efficiency of decision making, and resource allocation. This article focuses on how decision making occurs within the TSC to rank alternative therapeutics according to 2 main variables: quality of the preclinical data set, and fit with the Network's aims and capabilities. This selection process is important because if the Network's resources are committed to a therapeutic, alternatives cannot be pursued. A proposed methodology includes a multicriteria decision analysis that uses a Multi-Attribute Global Inference of Quality matrix to quantify the process. To rank therapeutics, the TSC uses a series of consensus steps designed to reduce individual and group bias and limit subjectivity. Given the difficulties encountered by industry in completing clinical trials in SCI, stable collaborative not-for-profit consortia, such as the NACTN, may be essential to clinical progress in SCI. The evolution of the NACTN also offers substantial

  2. Optimal Prediction by Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nils B.; Mugler, Andrew; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    Living cells can enhance their fitness by anticipating environmental change. We study how accurately linear signaling networks in cells can predict future signals. We find that maximal predictive power results from a combination of input-noise suppression, linear extrapolation, and selective readout of correlated past signal values. Single-layer networks generate exponential response kernels, which suffice to predict Markovian signals optimally. Multilayer networks allow oscillatory kernels that can optimally predict non-Markovian signals. At low noise, these kernels exploit the signal derivative for extrapolation, while at high noise, they capitalize on signal values in the past that are strongly correlated with the future signal. We show how the common motifs of negative feedback and incoherent feed-forward can implement these optimal response functions. Simulations reveal that E. coli can reliably predict concentration changes for chemotaxis, and that the integration time of its response kernel arises from a trade-off between rapid response and noise suppression.

  3. Exploiting disorder for global response: Independence of bond-level response and selected-bond removal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Sidney R.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of amorphous solids near jamming are qualitatively different from those of simple crystals. In a crystal with only one atom per unit cell, all atoms play the same role in producing the solid's global response to an external perturbation; disordered materials are not similarly constrained. We will demonstrate a new principle that emerges for disordered matter: independence of bond-level response. This independence refers not only to the dearth of strong correlations between the response of one bond compared to another, but also, and more importantly, to the variation of response of any specific bond to different external perturbations. Using selected-bond removal networks, where individual bonds can be successively removed , we demonstrate that one can drive the overall system to different regimes of behavior. Consequently one can exploit disorder to achieve unique, varied, textured and tunable global response. Work done in collaboration with Carl P. Goodrich and Andrea J. Liu. Research supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

  4. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  5. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  6. Social Networks and the Diffusion of Adolescent Problem Behavior: Reliable Estimates of Selection and Influence from 6th through 9th Grade

    PubMed Central

    Osgood, D. Wayne; Feinberg, Mark E.; Ragan, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Seeking to reduce problematic peer influence is a prominent theme of programs to prevent adolescent problem behavior. To support the refinement of this aspect of prevention programming, we examined peer influence and selection processes for three problem behaviors (delinquency, alcohol use, and smoking). We assessed not only the overall strengths of these peer processes, but also their consistency versus variability across settings. We used dynamic stochastic actor-based models to analyze five waves of friendship network data across sixth through ninth grades for a large sample of U.S. adolescents. Our sample included two successive grade cohorts of youth in 26 school districts participating in the PROSPER study, yielding 51 longitudinal social networks based on respondents’ friendship nominations. For all three self-reported antisocial behaviors, we found evidence of both peer influence and selection processes tied to antisocial behavior. There was little reliable variance in these processes across the networks, suggesting that the statistical imprecision of the peer influence and selection estimates in previous studies likely accounts for inconsistencies in results. Adolescent friendship networks play a strong role in shaping problem behavior, but problem behaviors also inform friendship choices. In addition to preferring friends with similar levels of problem behavior, adolescents tend to choose friends who engage in problem behaviors, thus creating broader diffusion. PMID:25943034

  7. Selective anticancer agents suppress aging in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Kogan, Valeria; Fedichev, Peter; Moskalev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the PI3K, TOR, iNOS, and NF-κB genes increase lifespan of model organisms and reduce the risk of some aging-associated diseases. We studied the effects of inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), TOR (rapamycin), iNOS (1400W), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate and QNZ), and the combined effects of inhibitors: PI3K (wortmannin) and TOR (rapamycin), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamates) and PI3K (wortmannin), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamates) and TOR (rapamycin) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and quality of life (locomotor activity and fertility). Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, TOR, NF-κB, and iNOS increases lifespan of Drosophila without decreasing quality of life. The greatest lifespan expanding effect was achieved by a combination of rapamycin (5 μM) and wortmannin (5 μM) (by 23.4%). The bioinformatic analysis (KEGG, REACTOME.PATH, DOLite, and GO.BP) showed the greatest aging-suppressor activity of rapamycin, consistent with experimental data. PMID:24096697

  8. Selective anticancer agents suppress aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Kogan, Valeria; Fedichev, Peter; Moskalev, Alexey

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of the PI3K, TOR, iNOS, and NF-κB genes increase lifespan of model organisms and reduce the risk of some aging-associated diseases. We studied the effects of inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), TOR (rapamycin), iNOS (1400W), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate and QNZ), and the combined effects of inhibitors: PI3K (wortmannin) and TOR (rapamycin), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamates) and PI3K (wortmannin), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamates) and TOR (rapamycin) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and quality of life (locomotor activity and fertility). Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, TOR, NF-κB, and iNOS increases lifespan of Drosophila without decreasing quality of life. The greatest lifespan expanding effect was achieved by a combination of rapamycin (5 μM) and wortmannin (5 μM) (by 23.4%). The bioinformatic analysis (KEGG, REACTOME.PATH, DOLite, and GO.BP) showed the greatest aging-suppressor activity of rapamycin, consistent with experimental data. PMID:24096697

  9. Performance of the MM/GBSA scoring using a binding site hydrogen bond network-based frame selection: the protein kinase case.

    PubMed

    Adasme-Carreño, Francisco; Muñoz-Gutierrez, Camila; Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2014-07-21

    A conformational selection method, based on hydrogen bond (Hbond) network analysis, has been designed in order to rationalize the configurations sampled using molecular dynamics (MD), which are commonly used in the estimation of the relative binding free energy of ligands to macromolecules through the MM/GBSA or MM/PBSA method. This approach makes use of protein-ligand complexes obtained from X-ray crystallographic data, as well as from molecular docking calculations. The combination of several computational approaches, like long MD simulations on protein-ligand complexes, Hbond network-based selection by scripting techniques and finally MM/GBSA, provides better statistical correlations against experimental binding data than previous similar reported studies. This approach has been successfully applied in the ranking of several protein kinase inhibitors (CDK2, Aurora A and p38), which present both diverse and related chemical structures. PMID:24901037

  10. Trends in surface-water quality at selected National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) stations, in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syed, Atiq U.; Fogarty, Lisa R.

    2005-01-01

    To demonstrate the value of long-term, water-quality monitoring, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), initiated a study to evaluate potential trends in water-quality constituents for selected National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) stations in Michigan. The goal of this study is to assist the MDEQ in evaluating the effectiveness of water-pollution control efforts and the identification of water-quality concerns. The study included a total of nine NASQAN stations in Michigan. Approximately 28 constituents were analyzed for trend tests. Station selection was based on data availability, land-use characteristics, and station priority for the MDEQ Water Chemistry Monitoring Project. Trend analyses were completed using the uncensored Seasonal Kendall Test in the computer program Estimate Trend (ESTREND), a software program for the detection of trends in water-quality data. The parameters chosen for the trend test had (1) at least a 5-year period of record (2) about 5 percent of the observations censored at a single reporting limit, and (3) 40 percent of the values within the beginning one-fifth and ending one-fifth of the selected period. In this study, a negative trend indicates a decrease in concentration of a particular constituent, which generally means an improvement in water quality; whereas a positive trend means an increase in concentration and possible degradation of water quality. The results of the study show an overall improvement in water quality at the Clinton River at Mount Clemens, Manistee River at Manistee, and Pigeon River near Caseville. The detected trend for these stations show decreases in concentrations of various constituents such as nitrogen compounds, conductance, sulfate, fecal coliform bacteria, and fecal streptococci bacteria. The negative trend may indicate an overall improvement in agricultural practices, municipal and industrial wastewater

  11. Improving the Global Geodetic Observing System network by applying the Most Remote Point method to the selection of new sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System shall consist of globally well distributed geodetic observatories. The GGOS network will be based on a number of technique specific observatories which contribute their observation data to the international services like the IVS, ILRS, IGS, IGFS. The distribution of reference points in these global geodetic networks is not optimal. In order to establish the Global Geodetic Observing System the current distribution of observatory sites must be reviewed with a global perspective. We developed the most remote point (mrp) method to identify gaps in the geometry of global networks. This method is applied to the individual space geodetic VLBI and SLR network. In each iteration step the identified most remote point is assumed to become a new observatory site improving such the homogeneity of the global network. As a result possible new locations for GGOS observatories can be evaluated and suggested.

  12. The Role of Sex of Peers and Gender-Typed Activities in Young Children's Peer Affiliative Networks: A Longitudinal Analysis of Selection and Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Kornienko, Olga; Schaefer, David R.; Hanish, Laura D.; Fabes, Richard A.; Goble, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic actor-based model was used to investigate the origins of sex segregation by examining how similarity in sex of peers and time spent in gender-typed activities affected affiliation network selection and how peers influenced children's ("N" = 292; "M"[subscript age] = 4.3 years) activity involvement. Gender had powerful effects on…

  13. Effective suppressibility of chaos.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-06-01

    Suppression of chaos is a relevant phenomenon that can take place in nonlinear dynamical systems when a parameter is varied. Here, we investigate the possibilities of effectively suppressing the chaotic motion of a dynamical system by a specific time independent variation of a parameter of our system. In realistic situations, we need to be very careful with the experimental conditions and the accuracy of the parameter measurements. We define the suppressibility, a new measure taking values in the parameter space, that allows us to detect which chaotic motions can be suppressed, what possible new choices of the parameter guarantee their suppression, and how small the parameter variations from the initial chaotic state to the final periodic one are. We apply this measure to a Duffing oscillator and a system consisting on ten globally coupled Hénon maps. We offer as our main result tool sets that can be used as guides to suppress chaotic dynamics. PMID:23822472

  14. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  15. Identifying separate components of surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision.

  16. Response suppression delays the planning of subsequent stimulus-driven saccades.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Mitchell, Trina; Heath, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The completion of an antisaccade selectively increases the reaction tiME (RT) of a subsequent prosaccade: a result that has been interpreted to reflect the residual inhibition of stimulus-driven saccade networks [1], [2]. In the present investigation we sought to determine whether the increase in prosaccade RT is contingent on the constituent antisaccade planning processes of response suppression and vector inversion or is limited to response suppression. To that end, in one block participants alternated between pro- and antisaccades after every second trial (task-switching block), and in another block participants completed a series of prosaccades that were randomly (and infrequently) interspersed with no-go catch-trials (go/no-go block). Notably, such a design provides a framework for disentangling whether response suppression and/or vector inversion delays the planning of subsequent prosaccades. As expected, results for the task-switching block showed that antisaccades selectively increased the RTs of subsequent prosaccades. In turn, results for the go/no-go block showed that prosaccade RTs were increased when preceded by a no-go catch-trial. Moreover, the magnitude of the RT 'cost' was equivalent across the task-switching and go/no-go blocks. That prosaccades preceded by an antisaccade or a no-go catch-trial produced equivalent RT costs indicates that the conjoint processes of response suppression and vector inversion do not drive the inhibition of saccade planning mechanisms. Rather, the present findings indicate that a general consequence of response suppression is a residual inhibition of stimulus-driven saccade networks.

  17. Bias and precision of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated a blind audit sample program during 1974 to test the effects of the sample handling and shipping procedures used by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network on the quality of wet deposition data produced by the combined networks. Blind audit samples, which were dilutions of standard reference water samples, were submitted by network site operators to the central analytical laboratory disguised as actual wet deposition samples. Results from the analyses of blind audit samples were used to calculate estimates of analyte bias associated with all network wet deposition samples analyzed in 1984 and to estimate analyte precision. Concentration differences between double blind samples that were submitted to the central analytical laboratory and separate analyses of aliquots of those blind audit samples that had not undergone network sample handling and shipping were used to calculate analyte masses that apparently were added to each blind audit sample by routine network handling and shipping procedures. These calculated masses indicated statistically significant biases for magnesium, sodium , potassium, chloride, and sulfate. Median calculated masses were 41.4 micrograms (ug) for calcium, 14.9 ug for magnesium, 23.3 ug for sodium, 0.7 ug for potassium, 16.5 ug for chloride and 55.3 ug for sulfate. Analyte precision was estimated using two different sets of replicate measures performed by the central analytical laboratory. Estimated standard deviations were similar to those previously reported. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Beyond the core face-processing network: Intracerebral stimulation of a face-selective area in the right anterior fusiform gyrus elicits transient prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Rossion, Bruno; Brissart, Hélène; Frismand, Solène; Jacques, Corentin; Hossu, Gabriela; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Vespignani, Hervé; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Maillard, Louis

    2015-11-01

    According to neuropsychological evidence, a distributed network of regions of the ventral visual pathway - from the lateral occipital cortex to the temporal pole - supports face recognition. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have generally confined ventral face-selective areas to the posterior section of the occipito-temporal cortex, i.e., the inferior occipital gyrus occipital face area (OFA) and the posterior and middle fusiform gyrus fusiform face area (FFA). There is recent evidence that intracranial electrical stimulation of these areas in the right hemisphere elicits face matching and recognition impairments (i.e., prosopagnosia) as well as perceptual face distortions. Here we report a case of transient inability to recognize faces following electrical stimulation of the right anterior fusiform gyrus, in a region located anteriorly to the FFA. There was no perceptual face distortion reported during stimulation. Although no fMRI face-selective responses were found in this region due to a severe signal drop-out as in previous studies, intracerebral face-selective event-related potentials and gamma range electrophysiological responses were found at the critical site of stimulation. These results point to a causal role in face recognition of the right anterior fusiform gyrus and more generally of face-selective areas located beyond the "core" face-processing network in the right ventral temporal cortex. It also illustrates the diagnostic value of intracerebral electrophysiological recordings and stimulation in understanding the neural basis of face recognition and visual recognition in general.

  19. Beyond the core face-processing network: Intracerebral stimulation of a face-selective area in the right anterior fusiform gyrus elicits transient prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Rossion, Bruno; Brissart, Hélène; Frismand, Solène; Jacques, Corentin; Hossu, Gabriela; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Vespignani, Hervé; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Maillard, Louis

    2015-11-01

    According to neuropsychological evidence, a distributed network of regions of the ventral visual pathway - from the lateral occipital cortex to the temporal pole - supports face recognition. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have generally confined ventral face-selective areas to the posterior section of the occipito-temporal cortex, i.e., the inferior occipital gyrus occipital face area (OFA) and the posterior and middle fusiform gyrus fusiform face area (FFA). There is recent evidence that intracranial electrical stimulation of these areas in the right hemisphere elicits face matching and recognition impairments (i.e., prosopagnosia) as well as perceptual face distortions. Here we report a case of transient inability to recognize faces following electrical stimulation of the right anterior fusiform gyrus, in a region located anteriorly to the FFA. There was no perceptual face distortion reported during stimulation. Although no fMRI face-selective responses were found in this region due to a severe signal drop-out as in previous studies, intracerebral face-selective event-related potentials and gamma range electrophysiological responses were found at the critical site of stimulation. These results point to a causal role in face recognition of the right anterior fusiform gyrus and more generally of face-selective areas located beyond the "core" face-processing network in the right ventral temporal cortex. It also illustrates the diagnostic value of intracerebral electrophysiological recordings and stimulation in understanding the neural basis of face recognition and visual recognition in general. PMID:26143305

  20. Joint feature selection and classification using a Bayesian neural network with automatic relevance determination priors: potential use in CAD of medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijie; Zur, Richard M.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2007-03-01

    Bayesian neural network (BNN) with automatic relevance determination (ARD) priors has the ability to assess the relevance of each input feature during network training. Our purpose is to investigate the potential use of BNN-with-ARD-priors for joint feature selection and classification in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of medical imaging. With ARD priors, each group of weights that connect an input feature to the hidden units is associated with a hyperparameter controlling the magnitudes of the weights. The hyperparameters and the weights are updated simultaneously during neural network training. A smaller hyperparameter will likely result in larger weight values and the corresponding feature will likely be more relevant to the output, and thus, to the classification task. For our study, a multivariate normal feature space is designed to include one feature with high classification performance in terms of both ideal observer and linear observer, two features with high ideal observer performance but low linear observer performance and 7 useless features. An exclusive-OR (XOR) feature space is designed to include 2 XOR features and 8 useless features. Our simulation results show that the ARD-BNN approach has the ability to select the optimal subset of features on the designed nonlinear feature spaces on which the linear approach fails. ARD-BNN has the ability to recognize features that have high ideal observer performance. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SWLDA) has the ability to select features that have high linear observer performance but fails to select features that have high ideal observer performance and low linear observer performance. The cross-validation results on clinical breast MRI data show that ARD-BNN yields statistically significant better performance than does the SWLDA-LDA approach. We believe that ARD-BNN is a promising method for pattern recognition in computer-aided diagnosis of medical imaging.