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Sample records for neural cell growth

  1. Reflectin as a Material for Neural Stem Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods possess remarkable camouflage capabilities, which are enabled by their complex skin structure and sophisticated nervous system. Such unique characteristics have in turn inspired the design of novel functional materials and devices. Within this context, recent studies have focused on investigating the self-assembly, optical, and electrical properties of reflectin, a protein that plays a key role in cephalopod structural coloration. Herein, we report the discovery that reflectin constitutes an effective material for the growth of human neural stem/progenitor cells. Our findings may hold relevance both for understanding cephalopod embryogenesis and for developing improved protein-based bioelectronic devices. PMID:26703760

  2. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liu-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  3. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liu-lin; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Ting-hua

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews. PMID:27212919

  4. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  5. Tailored Fringed Platforms Produced by Laser Interference for Aligned Neural Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Ramón J; González-Mayorga, Ankor; Gutiérrez, María C; García-Rama, Concepción; Afonso, Carmen N; Serrano, María C

    2016-02-01

    Ordering neural cells is of interest for the development of neural interfaces. The aim of this work is to demonstrate an easy-to-use, versatile, and cost/time effective laser-based approach for producing platforms that promote oriented neural growth. We use laser interferometry to generate fringed channels with topography on partially reduced graphene oxide layers as a proof-of-concept substrate. We study cell adhesion, morphology, viability, and differentiation in cultures of embryonic neural progenitor cells on platforms with a 9.4 μm period. Results evidence that fringed platforms significantly promote neurite alignment (≈50% at 6 d), while preserving viability and neural differentiation.

  6. Neural Growth Factor Stimulates Proliferation of Spinal Cord Derived-Neural Precursor/Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Youngmin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recently, regenerative therapies have been used in clinical trials (heart, cartilage, skeletal). We don't make use of these treatments to spinal cord injury (SCI) patients yet, but regenerative therapies are rising interest in recent study about SCI. Neural precursor/stem cell (NPSC) proliferation is a significant event in functional recovery of the central nervous system (CNS). However, brain NPSCs and spinal cord NPSCs (SC-NPSCs) have many differences including gene expression and proliferation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of neural growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of SC-NPSCs. Methods NPSCs (2×104) were suspended in 100 µL of neurobasal medium containing NGF-7S (Sigma-Aldrich) and cultured in a 96-well plate for 12 days. NPSC proliferation was analyzed five times for either concentration of NGF (0.02 and 2 ng/mL). Sixteen rats after SCI were randomly allocated into two groups. In group 1 (SCI-vehicle group, n=8), animals received 1.0 mL of the saline vehicle solution. In group 2 (SCI-NGF group, n=8), the animals received single doses of NGF (Sigma-Aldrich). A dose of 0.02 ng/mL of NGF or normal saline as a vehicle control was intra-thecally injected daily at 24 hour intervals for 7 days. For Immunohistochemistry analysis, rats were sacrificed after one week and the spinal cords were obtained. Results The elevation of cell proliferation with 0.02 ng/mL NGF was significant (p<0.05) but was not significant for 2 ng/mL NGF. The optical density was increased in the NGF 0.02 ng/mL group compared to the control group and NGF 2 ng/mL groups. The density of nestin in the SCI-NGF group was significantly increased over the SCI-vehicle group (p<0.05). High power microscopy revealed that the density of nestin in the SCI-NGF group was significantly increased over the SCI-vehicle group. Conclusion SC-NPSC proliferation is an important pathway in the functional recovery of SCI. NGF enhances SC-NPSC proliferation in vitro and in

  7. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  8. PHBV microspheres as neural tissue engineering scaffold support neuronal cell growth and axon-dendrite polarization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhui; Tong, Yen Wah

    2012-02-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) microspheres, with properties such as slower degradation and more efficient drug delivery properties, have important benefits for neural tissue engineering. Our previous studies have shown PHBV microspheres to improve cell growth and differentiation. This study aimed to investigate if PHBV microspheres would support neurons to extend these benefits to neural tissue engineering. PHBV microspheres' suitability as neural tissue engineering scaffolds was investigated using PC12 cells, cortical neurons (CNs), and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to cover a variety of neuronal types for different applications. Microspheres were fabricated using an emulsion-solvent-evaporation technique. DNA quantification, cell viability assays, and immunofluorescent staining were carried out. PC12 cultures on PHBV microspheres showed growth trends comparable to two-dimensional controls. This was further verified by staining for cell spreading. Also, CNs expressed components of the signaling pathway on PHBV microspheres, and had greater axon-dendrite segregation (4.1 times for axon stains and 2.3 times for dendrite stains) than on coverslips. NPCs were also found to differentiate into neurons on the microspheres. Overall, the results indicate that PHBV microspheres, as scaffolds for neural tissue engineering, supported a variety of neuronal cell types and promoted greater axon-dendrite segregation.

  9. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xian-feng; Yang, Kai; Yang, Xiao-qing; Liu, Ying-fu; Cheng, Yuan-chi; Chen, Xu-yi; Tu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These findings confirm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus results in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes. PMID:26604916

  10. Cellular Neural Network Models of Growth and Immune of Effector Cells Response to Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yongmei; Min, Lequan

    Four reaction-diffusion cellular neural network (R-D CNN) models are set up based on the differential equation models for the growths of effector cells and cancer cells, and the model of the immune response to cancer proposed by Allison et al. The CNN models have different reaction-diffusion coefficients and coupling parameters. The R-D CNN models may provide possible quantitative interpretations, and are good in agreement with the in vitro experiment data reported by Allison et al.

  11. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promote Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells to Neural Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Min; Cao, Peipei; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Sun, Yuyu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Cui, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were the most widely used seed cells in the field of neural regeneration and bone tissue engineering, due to their easily isolation, lack of ethical controversy, low immunogenicity and low rates of transplantation rejection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. DPSCs were cultured in neural differentiation medium containing NGF and bFGF alone or combination for 7 days. Then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed using western blot and RT-PCR. Our study revealed that bFGF and NGF increased neural differentiation of DPSCs synergistically, compared with bFGF and NGF alone. The levels of Nestin, MAP-2, βIII-tubulin and GFAP were the most highest in the DPSCs + bFGF + NGF group. Our results suggested that bFGF and NGF signifiantly up-regulated the levels of Sirt1. After treatment with Sirt1 inhibitor, western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining showed that neural genes and protein markers had markedly decreased. Additionally, the ERK and AKT signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs stimulated with bFGF + NGF. These results suggested that manipulation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathway may be associated with the differentiation of bFGF and NGF treated DPSCs. Our date provided theoretical basis for DPSCs to treat neurological diseases and repair neuronal damage.

  12. Growth hormone and cell survival in the neural retina: caspase dependence and independence.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Sanders, Esmond J

    2006-11-06

    Growth hormone has recently been shown to be expressed in the retinal ganglion cells of embryonic chicks, in which it induces cell survival during neurogenesis. The mechanism of this action has been examined in neural retina explants from 6-day-old and 8-day-old embryos that were incubated for 48 h in 10 M growth hormone, to reduce the number of spontaneous apoptotic cells. This anti-apoptotic action was accompanied by a reduction in caspase-3 expression and, at embryonic day 8, by reduced expression of apoptosis inducing factor-1, which is caspase independent. These actions were specific, as other genes involved in apoptotic signaling (bcl-2, bcl-x, bid and inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) were unaffected. These results therefore demonstrate caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways in growth hormone-induced retinal cell survival.

  13. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  14. Differentiation of neural stem cells in three-dimensional growth factor-immobilized chitosan hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leipzig, Nic D; Wylie, Ryan G; Kim, Howard; Shoichet, Molly S

    2011-01-01

    The adult central nervous system (CNS) contains adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) that possess the ability to differentiate into the primary cell types found in the CNS and to regenerate lost or damaged tissue. The ability to specifically and spatially control differentiation is vital to enable cell-based CNS regenerative strategies. Here we describe the development of a protein-biomaterial system that allows rapid, stable and homogenous linking of a growth factor to a photocrosslinkable material. A bioactive recombinant fusion protein incorporating pro-neural rat interferon-γ (rIFN-γ) and the AviTag for biotinylation was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The photocrosslinkable biopolymer, methacrylamide chitosan (MAC), was thiolated, allowing conjugation of maleimide-strepatavidin via Michael-type addition. We demonstrated that biotin-rIFN-γ binds specifically to MAC-streptavidin in stoichiometric yields at 100 and 200 ng/mL in photocrosslinked hydrogels. For cell studies, NSPCs were photo-encapsulated in 100 ng/mL biotin-rIFN-γ immobilized MAC based scaffolds and compared to similar NSPC-seeded scaffolds combining 100 ng/mL soluble biotin-rIFN-γ vs. no growth factor. Cells were cultured for 8 days after which differentiation was assayed using immunohistochemistry for lineage specific markers. Quantification showed that immobilized biotin-rIFN-γ promoted neuronal differentiation (72.8 ± 16.0%) similar to soluble biotin-rIFN-γ (71.8 ± 13.2%). The percentage of nestin-positive (stem/progenitor) cells as well as RIP-positive (oligodendrocyte) cells were significantly higher in scaffolds with soluble vs. immobilized biotin-rIFN-γ suggesting that 3-D immobilization results in a more committed lineage specification.

  15. Concentration-dependent effect of nerve growth factor on cell fate determination of neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hui; Hu, Zhengqing

    2011-10-01

    Stem cell-based spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) replacement therapy has been proposed to be a promising strategy to restore hearing either via replacing degenerated neurons or by improving the efficacy of cochlear implants which rely on functional neurons. However, lack of suitable donor cells and low survival rate of implanted cells are the major obstacles to successful implementation of therapeutic transplantation. The present study investigated the potential of mouse inner ear statoacoustic ganglion (SAG)-derived neural progenitors (NPs) to differentiate toward SGN-like glutamatergic cells and the influence to cell survival and differentiation when nerve growth factor (NGF) was supplied. We found that SAG-NPs could form neurospheres, proliferate, and differentiate into cells expressing neuronal protein neurofilament and β-III tubulin. NGF affected the cell fate of SAG-NP in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Low concentration of NGF (2-5 ng/mL) promoted cell proliferation. Medium concentration of NGF (20-40 ng/mL) stimulated cells to differentiate into bi-polar SGN-like cells expressing glutamatergic proteins. High concentration of NGF (100 ng/mL) could rescue cells from induced apoptosis. In the in vivo study, NGF (100 ng/mL) dramatically enhanced SAG-NP survival rate after implantation into adult mammalian inner ear. This finding raises the possibility to further induce these NPs to differentiate into SGN-like neurons in future in vivo study. In conclusion, given the capability of proliferation and differentiation into SGN-like cells with the supplement of NGF in vitro, SAG-NPs can serve as donor cells in stem cell-based SGN replacement therapy. NGF improved the survival of SAG-NPs not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  16. The Evaluation of Nerve Growth Factor Over Expression on Neural Lineage Specific Genes in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Yousef; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh; Khamisipour, Gholamreza Khamisipour; Soleimani, Masoud; Teimuri, Ali; Shokri, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment and repair of neurodegenerative diseases such as brain tumors, spinal cord injuries, and functional disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, are challenging problems. A common treatment approach for such disorders involves the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source to replace injured cells. However, use of these cells in hosts may potentially cause adverse outcomes such as tumorigenesis and uncontrolled differentiation. In attempt to generate mesenchymal derived neural cells, we have infected MSCs with recombinant lentiviruses that expressed nerve growth factor (NGF) and assessed their neural lineage genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we cloned the NGF gene sequence into a helper dependent lentiviral vector that contained the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The recombinant vector was amplified in DH5 bacterial cells. Recombinant viruses were generated in the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) packaging cell line with the helper vectors and analyzed under fluorescent microscopy. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells were infected by recombinant viruses for three days followed by assessment of neural differentiation. We evaluated expression of NGF through measurement of the NGF protein in culture medium by ELISA; neural specific genes were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results We observed neural morphological changes after three days. Quantitative PCR showed that expressions of NESTIN, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) genes increased following induction of NGF overexpression, whereas expressions of endogenous NGF and brain derived neural growth factor (BDNF) genes reduced. Conclusion Ectopic expression of NGF can induce neurogenesis in MSCs. Direct injection of MSCs may cause tumorigenesis and an undesirable outcome. Therefore an alternative choice to overcome this obstacle may

  17. Transforming growth factor beta1 regulates melanocyte proliferation and differentiation in mouse neural crest cells via stem cell factor/KIT signaling.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tamihiro; Soma, Yoshinao; Kawa, Yoko; Ito, Masaru; Yamasaki, Emiko; Watabe, Hidenori; Hosaka, Eri; Yajima, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kayoko; Mizoguchi, Masako

    2002-03-01

    Stem cell factor is essential to the migration and differentiation of melanocytes during embryogenesis based on the observation that mutations in either the stem cell factor gene, or its ligand, KIT, result in defects in coat pigmentation in mice. Stem cell factor is also required for the survival of melanocyte precursors while they are migrating towards the skin. Transforming growth factor beta1 has been implicated in the regulation of both cellular proliferation and differentiation. NCC-melb4, an immortal cloned cell line, was cloned from a mouse neural crest cell. NCC-melb4 cells provide a model to study the specific stage of differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes. They also express KIT as a melanoblast marker. Using the NCC-melb4 cell line, we investigated the effect of transforming growth factor beta1 on the differentiation and proliferation of immature melanocyte precursors. Immunohistochemically, NCC-melb4 cells showed transforming growth factor beta1 expression. The anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody inhibited the cell growth, and downregulated the KIT protein and mRNA expression. To investigate further the activation of autocrine transforming growth factor beta1, NCC-melb4 cells were incubated in nonexogenous transforming growth factor beta1 culture medium. KIT protein decreased with anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that in NCC-melb4 cells, transforming growth factor beta1 promotes melanocyte precursor proliferation in autocrine and/or paracrine regulation. We further investigated the influence of transforming growth factor beta1 in vitro using a neural crest cell primary culture system from wild-type mice. Anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody decreased the number of KIT positive neural crest cell. In addition, the anti-transforming growth factor beta1 antibody supplied within the wild-type neural crest explants abolished the growth of the neural

  18. Growth and differentiation of adult hippocampal arctic ground squirrel neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drew, Kelly L; McGee, Rebecca C; Wells, Matthew S; Kelleher-Andersson, Judith A

    2011-01-07

    Arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii, AGS) are unique in their ability to hibernate with a core body temperature near or below freezing. These animals also resist ischemic injury to the brain in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. These unique qualities provided the impetus to isolate AGS neurons to examine inherent neuronal characteristics that could account for the capacity of AGS neurons to resist injury and cell death caused by ischemia and extremely cold temperatures. Identifying proteins or gene targets that allow for the distinctive properties of these cells could aid in the discovery of effective therapies for a number of ischemic indications and for the study of cold tolerance. Adult AGS hippocampus contains neural stem cells that continue to proliferate, allowing for easy expansion of these stem cells in culture. We describe here methods by which researchers can utilize these stem cells and differentiated neurons for any number of purposes. By closely following these steps the AGS neural stem cells can be expanded through two passages or more and then differentiated to a culture high in TUJ1-positive neurons (~50%) without utilizing toxic chemicals to minimize the number of dividing cells. Ischemia induces neurogenesis and neurogenesis which proceeds via MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt survival signaling pathways contributes to ischemia resistance in vivo and in vitro (Kelleher-Anderson, Drew et al., in preparation). Further characterization of these unique neural cells can advance on many fronts, using some or all of these methods.

  19. In vivo assessment of guided neural stem cell differentiation in growth factor immobilized chitosan-based hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Koenig, Andrew M; Sloan, Patricia; Leipzig, Nic D

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a unique growth factor-biomaterial system can offer spatial control of growth factors with sustained signaling to guide the specific lineage commitment of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in vivo. First, recombinant fusion proteins incorporating an N-terminal biotin tag and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), platelet derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), or bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) were immobilized to a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) based biopolymer via a streptavidin linker to specify NSPC differentiation into neurons, oligodendrocytes, or astrocytes, respectively. MAC was mixed with growth factors (immobilized or adsorbed), acrylated laminin, NSPCs, and crosslinked within chitosan conduits. This system mimics regenerative aspects of the central nervous system ECM, which is largely composed of a crosslinked polysaccharide matrix with cell-adhesive regions, and adds the new functionality of protein sequestration. We demonstrated that these growth factors are maintained at functionally significant levels for 28 d in vitro. In the main study, immobilized treatments were compared to absorbed and control treatments after 28 d in vivo (rat subcutaneous). Masson's Trichrome staining revealed that small collagen capsules formed around the chitosan conduits with an average acceptable thickness of 153.07 ± 6.02 μm for all groups. ED-1 staining showed mild macrophage clustering around the outside of chitosan conduits in all treatments with no macrophage invasion into hydrogel portions. Importantly, NSPC differentiation staining demonstrated that immobilized growth factors induced the majority of cells to differentiate into the desired cell types as compared with adsorbed growth factor treatments and controls by day 28. Interestingly, immobilized IFN-γ resulted in neural rosette-like arrangements and even structures resembling neural tubes, suggesting this treatment can lead to guided dedifferentiation and subsequent neurulation.

  20. Proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells irradiated with X-rays in logarithmic growth phase.

    PubMed

    Isono, Mayu; Otsu, Masahiro; Konishi, Teruaki; Matsubara, Kana; Tanabe, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Takashi; Inoue, Nobuo

    2012-07-01

    Exposure of the fetal brain to ionizing radiation causes congenital brain abnormalities. Normal brain formation requires regionally and temporally appropriate proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into neurons and glia. Here, we investigated the effects of X-irradiation on proliferating homogenous NSCs prepared from mouse ES cells. Cells irradiated with X-rays at a dose of 1Gy maintained the capabilities for proliferation and differentiation but stopped proliferation temporarily. In contrast, the cells ceased proliferation following irradiation at a dose of >5Gy. These results suggest that irradiation of the fetal brain at relatively low doses may cause congenital brain abnormalities as with relatively high doses.

  1. Noncanonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling in cranial neural crest cells causes tongue muscle developmental defects.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2013-10-11

    Microglossia is a congenital birth defect in humans and adversely impacts quality of life. In vertebrates, tongue muscle derives from the cranial mesoderm, whereas tendons and connective tissues in the craniofacial region originate from cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Loss of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor in CNC cells in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre) causes microglossia due to a failure of cell-cell communication between cranial mesoderm and CNC cells during tongue development. However, it is still unclear how TGFβ signaling in CNC cells regulates the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts during tongue development. Here we show that activation of the cytoplasmic and nuclear tyrosine kinase 1 (ABL1) cascade in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice results in a failure of CNC-derived cell differentiation followed by a disruption of TGFβ-mediated induction of growth factors and reduction of myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation activities. Among the affected growth factors, the addition of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) and neutralizing antibody for follistatin (FST; an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) could most efficiently restore cell proliferation, differentiation, and organization of muscle cells in the tongue of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Thus, our data indicate that CNC-derived fibroblasts regulate the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts through TGFβ-mediated regulation of FGF and BMP signaling during tongue development.

  2. Effects of ethanol on transforming growth factor Β1-dependent and -independent mechanisms of neural stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Steven D; Miller, Michael W

    2011-06-01

    Stem cell vitality is critical for the growth of the developing brain. Growth factors can define the survival of neural stem cells (NSCs) and ethanol can affect growth factor-mediated activities. The present study tested two hypotheses: (a) ethanol causes the apoptotic death of NSCs and (b) this effect is influenced by the ambient growth factor. Monolayer cultures of non-immortalized NS-5 cells were exposed to fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 or transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 in the absence or presence of ethanol for 48 h. Ethanol killed NSCs as measured by increases in the numbers of ethidium bromide+ and annexin V+ cells and decreases in the number of calcein AM+ (viable) cells. These toxic effects were promoted by TGFβ1. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction array of apoptosis-related mRNAs revealed an ethanol-induced increase (≥2-fold change; p<0.05) in transcripts involved in Fas ligand (FasL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling. These effects, particularly the FasL pathway, were potentiated by TGFβ1. Immunocytochemical analyses of NS-5 cells showed that transcriptional alterations translated into consistent up-regulation of protein expression. Experiments with the neocortical proliferative zones harvested from fetal mice exposed to ethanol showed that ethanol activated similar molecular systems in vivo. Thus, ethanol induces NSC death through two distinct molecular mechanisms, one is initiated by TGFβ1 (FasL) and another (through TNF) which is TGFβ1-independent.

  3. Toward intelligent synthetic neural circuits: directing and accelerating neuron cell growth by self-rolled-up silicon nitride microtube array.

    PubMed

    Froeter, Paul; Huang, Yu; Cangellaris, Olivia V; Huang, Wen; Dent, Erik W; Gillette, Martha U; Williams, Justin C; Li, Xiuling

    2014-11-25

    In neural interface platforms, cultures are often carried out on a flat, open, rigid, and opaque substrate, posing challenges to reflecting the native microenvironment of the brain and precise engagement with neurons. Here we present a neuron cell culturing platform that consists of arrays of ordered microtubes (2.7-4.4 μm in diameter), formed by strain-induced self-rolled-up nanomembrane (s-RUM) technology using ultrathin (<40 nm) silicon nitride (SiNx) film on transparent substrates. These microtubes demonstrated robust physical confinement and unprecedented guidance effect toward outgrowth of primary cortical neurons, with a coaxially confined configuration resembling that of myelin sheaths. The dynamic neural growth inside the microtube, evaluated with continuous live-cell imaging, showed a marked increase (20×) of the growth rate inside the microtube compared to regions outside the microtubes. We attribute the dramatic accelerating effect and precise guiding of the microtube array to three-dimensional (3D) adhesion and electrostatic interaction with the SiNx microtubes, respectively. This work has clear implications toward building intelligent synthetic neural circuits by arranging the size, site, and patterns of the microtube array, for potential treatment of neurological disorders.

  4. Toward Intelligent Synthetic Neural Circuits: Directing and Accelerating Neuron Cell Growth by Self-Rolled-Up Silicon Nitride Microtube Array

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In neural interface platforms, cultures are often carried out on a flat, open, rigid, and opaque substrate, posing challenges to reflecting the native microenvironment of the brain and precise engagement with neurons. Here we present a neuron cell culturing platform that consists of arrays of ordered microtubes (2.7–4.4 μm in diameter), formed by strain-induced self-rolled-up nanomembrane (s-RUM) technology using ultrathin (<40 nm) silicon nitride (SiNx) film on transparent substrates. These microtubes demonstrated robust physical confinement and unprecedented guidance effect toward outgrowth of primary cortical neurons, with a coaxially confined configuration resembling that of myelin sheaths. The dynamic neural growth inside the microtube, evaluated with continuous live-cell imaging, showed a marked increase (20×) of the growth rate inside the microtube compared to regions outside the microtubes. We attribute the dramatic accelerating effect and precise guiding of the microtube array to three-dimensional (3D) adhesion and electrostatic interaction with the SiNx microtubes, respectively. This work has clear implications toward building intelligent synthetic neural circuits by arranging the size, site, and patterns of the microtube array, for potential treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:25329686

  5. Co-localization of neural cell adhesion molecule and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 in early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2011-01-01

    During development there is a multitude of signaling events governing the assembly of the developing organism. Receptors for signaling molecules such as fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) enable the embryo to communicate with the surrounding environment and activate downstream pathways. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was first characterized as a cell adhesion molecule highly expressed in the nervous system, but recent studies have shown that it is also a signaling receptor. Using a novel single oocyte adaptation of the proximity ligation assay, we here show a close association between NCAM and FGFR2 in mouse oocytes and 2-cell embryos. Real-time PCR analyses revealed the presence of messenger RNA encoding key proteins in downstream signaling pathways in oocytes and early mouse embryos. In summary these findings show a co-localization of NCAM and FGFR2 in early vertebrate development with intracellular signaling pathways present to enable a cellular response.

  6. A Hydrogel Bridge Incorporating Immobilized Growth Factors and Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells to Treat Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Ham, Trevor R; Neill, Nicholas; Farrag, Mahmoud; Mohrman, Ashley E; Koenig, Andrew M; Leipzig, Nic D

    2016-04-06

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes permanent, often complete disruption of central nervous system (CNS) function below the damaged region, leaving patients without the ability to regenerate lost tissue. To engineer new CNS tissue, a unique spinal cord bridge is created to deliver stem cells and guide their organization and development with site-specifically immobilized growth factors. In this study, this bridge is tested, consisting of adult neural stem/progenitor cells contained within a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) hydrogel and protected by a chitosan conduit. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) are recombinantly produced and tagged with an N-terminal biotin. They are immobilized to streptavidin-functionalized MAC to induce either neuronal or oligodendrocytic lineages, respectively. These bridges are tested in a rat hemisection model of SCI between T8 and T9. After eight weeks treatments including chitosan conduits result in a significant reduction in lesion area and macrophage infiltration around the lesion site (p < 0.0001). Importantly, neither immobilized IFN-γ nor PDGF-AA increased macrophage infiltration. Retrograde tracing demonstrates improved neuronal regeneration through the use of immobilized growth factors. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrates that immobilized growth factors are effective in differentiating encapsulated cells into their anticipated lineages within the hydrogel, while qualitatively reducing glial fibrillary acid protein expression.

  7. Growth-associated protein 43 in differentiating peripheral nerve sheath tumors from other non-neural spindle cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shen; Chen, Pei-Ling; Lu, Dongsi; Lind, Anne C; Dehner, Louis P

    2014-02-01

    The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a relatively uncommon type of soft tissue sarcoma arising from a peripheral nerve or extraneural soft tissues and showing nerve sheath differentiation. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is one of the most challenging tasks in surgical pathology because of its uncommon type (5-10% soft tissue sarcomas), morphologic resemblance to other spindle cell neoplasms and lack of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical markers. The pathologic diagnosis is more straightforward in the clinical setting of neurofibromatosis-1, but problems are mainly centered on the non-neurofibromatosis-1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. To date, S100 protein is the most widely applied marker in the case of a suspected malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, yet its suboptimal sensitivity and its expression in other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma, clear-cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and monophasic synovial sarcoma, add to the diagnostic conundrum. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), a membrane-associated phosphoprotein expressed in neuronal growth cones and Schwann cell precursors during neural development and axonal regeneration, was applied to a set of nerve sheath and non-nerve sheath spindle cell neoplasms. The findings in this study indicate that GAP43 is expressed in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=18/21; 86%) and demonstrates a sensitivity superior to S100 protein (n=13/21; 62%). GAP43 is also positive in neurofibromas (n=17/18; 94%), schwannomas (n=11/12; 92%) and desmoplastic melanomas (n=7/10; 70%). In contrast, it is negative in the non-desmoplastic spindle cell melanomas (n=20/22; 91%). Of the other non-neural soft tissue sarcomas, GAP43 is non-reactive in most leiomyosarcomas (n=14/16; 88%) and clear-cell sarcomas (n=8/8), and only focally positive in monophasic synovial sarcomas (n=3/7; 43%). GAP43 is seemingly a highly sensitive marker for peripheral nerve

  8. Glutamate promotes neural stem cell proliferation by increasing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor of astrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, C X; Xu, X; Chen, X L; Yang, P B; Zhang, J S; Liu, Y

    2015-09-20

    The high levels of glutamate might involve in neurogenesis after brain injuries. However, the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of glutamate on the proliferation of rat embryonic neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) through regulating the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of astrocytes (ASTs) in vitro, and the cyclin D1 expression of NSCs. The results showed that glutamate promoted the expression and secretion of VEGF of rat astrocytes by activating group I mGluRs. Astrocyte conditioned medium-containing Glu [ACM (30%)] promoted the proliferation of embryonic NSCs compared with normal astrocyte conditioned medium+Glu [N-ACM (30%)+Glu (30 μM)] by increasing cell activity, diameter of neurospheres, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and cell division; while ACM+VEGF neutralizing antibody [ACM (30%)+VEGF NAb (15 μg/ml)] significantly inhibited the proliferation of embryonic NSCs compared with ACM (30%). ACM (30%) increased the expressions of cyclin D1 and decreased cell death compared with N-ACM (30%)+Glu (30 μM). ACM (30%)+VEGF NAb (15 μg/ml) decreased the expressions of cyclin D1 and increased cell death compared with ACM (30%). These results demonstrated that glutamate could also indirectly promote the proliferation of rat embryonic NSCs through inducing the VEGF expression of ASTs in vitro, and VEGF may increase the expression of cyclin D1. These finding suggest that glutamate may be a major molecule for regulating embryonic NSC proliferation and facilitate neural repair in the process of NSC transplants after brain injuries.

  9. Dynamic change of neural cell adhesion molecule polysialylation on human neuroblastoma (IMR-32) and rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells during growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Poongodi, Geetha L; Suresh, Nimmagadda; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chang, Tschining; Inoue, Sadako; Inoue, Yasuo

    2002-08-02

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a regulatory epitope of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in homophilic adhesion of neural cells mediated by NCAM, is also known to be re-expressed in several human tumors, thus serves as an oncodevelopmental antigen. In this study, using a recently developed ultrasensitive chemical method in addition to immunochemical methods, growth stage-dependent and retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation-dependent changes of PSA expression in human neuroblastoma (IMR-32) and rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Both IMR-32 and PC-12 cells expressed PSA on NCAM, and the level of PSA expressed per unit weight of cells increased with post-inoculation incubation time. The most prominent feature was seen at the full confluence stage. RA induced neuronal differentiation in both IMR-32 and CP-12 cells that paralleled the change in the PSA level. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of NCAM glycoforms differing in the degree of polymerization (DP) of oligo/polysialyl chains, whose DP was smaller than 40. DP distribution of PSA was different between the cell lines and was changed by the growth stage and the RA treatment. Thus DP analysis of PSA is important in understanding both mechanism and biological significance of its regulated expression.

  10. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD.

  11. A re-assessment of long distance growth and connectivity of neural stem cells after severe spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Kelli G; Yee, Kelly Matsudaira; Steward, Oswald

    2014-07-01

    As part of the NIH "Facilities of Research Excellence-Spinal Cord Injury" project to support independent replication, we repeated key parts of a study reporting robust engraftment of neural stem cells (NSCs) treated with growth factors after complete spinal cord transection in rats. Rats (n=20) received complete transections at thoracic level 3 (T3) and 2weeks later received NSC transplants in a fibrin matrix with a growth factor cocktail using 2 different transplantation methods (with and without removal of scar tissue). Control rats (n=9) received transections only. Hindlimb locomotor function was assessed with the BBB scale. Nine weeks post injury, reticulospinal tract axons were traced in 6 rats by injecting BDA into the reticular formation. Transplants grew to fill the lesion cavity in most rats although grafts made with scar tissue removal had large central cavities. Grafts blended extensively with host tissue obliterating the astroglial boundary at the cut ends, but in most cases there was a well-defined partition within the graft that separated rostral and caudal parts of the graft. In some cases, the partition contained non-neuronal scar tissue. There was extensive outgrowth of GFP labeled axons from the graft, but there was minimal ingrowth of host axons into the graft revealed by tract tracing and immunocytochemistry for 5HT. There were no statistically significant differences between transplant and control groups in the degree of locomotor recovery. Our results confirm the previous report that NSC transplants can fill lesion cavities and robustly extend axons, but reveal that most grafts do not create a continuous bridge of neural tissue between rostral and caudal segments.

  12. Polypyrrole-coated electrospun poly(lactic acid) fibrous scaffold: effects of coating on electrical conductivity and neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Sudwilai, Thitima; Ng, Jun Jye; Boonkrai, Chatikorn; Israsena, Nipan; Chuangchote, Surawut; Supaphol, Pitt

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activities play critical roles in both neurogenesis and neural regeneration. In that sense, electrically conductive and biocompatible biomaterial scaffolds can be applied in various applications of neural tissue engineering. In this study, we fabricated a novel biomaterial for neural tissue engineering applications by coating electrospun poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers with a conducting polymer, polypyrole (PPy), via admicellar polymerization. Optimal conditions for polymerization and preparation of PPy-coated electrospun PLA nanofibers were obtained by comparing results from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, and surface conductivity tests. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that PPy-coated electrospun PLA fibrous scaffold is not toxic. The scaffold could support attachment and migration of neural progenitor cells. Neurons derived from progenitor exhibited long neurite outgrowth under electrical stimulation. Our study concluded that PPy-coated electrospun PLA fibers had a good biocompatibility with neural progenitor cells and may serve as a promising material for controlling progenitor cell behaviors and enhancing neural repair.

  13. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Sapp, Shawn; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this paper we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10–20 S/cm and loses 40 wt% after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) towards either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared to control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (± 3%) without an observable directional preference, compared to the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:23964001

  14. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Sapp, Shawn; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-08-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this article, we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10-20 S/cm and loses 40 wt % after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) toward either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared with control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (±3%) without an observable directional preference, compared with the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair.

  15. Ensconsin/Map7 promotes microtubule growth and centrosome separation in Drosophila neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gallaud, Emmanuel; Caous, Renaud; Pascal, Aude; Bazile, Franck; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Huet, Sébastien; Poirier, Guy G.; Chrétien, Denis; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is crucial to achieve segregation of sister chromatids. To identify new mitotic spindle assembly regulators, we isolated 855 microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) from Drosophila melanogaster mitotic or interphasic embryos. Using RNAi, we screened 96 poorly characterized genes in the Drosophila central nervous system to establish their possible role during spindle assembly. We found that Ensconsin/MAP7 mutant neuroblasts display shorter metaphase spindles, a defect caused by a reduced microtubule polymerization rate and enhanced by centrosome ablation. In agreement with a direct effect in regulating spindle length, Ensconsin overexpression triggered an increase in spindle length in S2 cells, whereas purified Ensconsin stimulated microtubule polymerization in vitro. Interestingly, ensc-null mutant flies also display defective centrosome separation and positioning during interphase, a phenotype also detected in kinesin-1 mutants. Collectively, our results suggest that Ensconsin cooperates with its binding partner Kinesin-1 during interphase to trigger centrosome separation. In addition, Ensconsin promotes microtubule polymerization during mitosis to control spindle length independent of Kinesin-1. PMID:24687279

  16. Insulin-like Growth Factor-II (IGF-II) and IGF-II Analogs with Enhanced Insulin Receptor-a Binding Affinity Promote Neural Stem Cell Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Forbes, Briony E.; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to employ genetically engineered IGF-II analogs to establish which receptor(s) mediate the stemness promoting actions of IGF-II on mouse subventricular zone neural precursors. Neural precursors from the subventricular zone were propagated in vitro in culture medium supplemented with IGF-II analogs. Cell growth and identity were analyzed using sphere generation and further analyzed by flow cytometry. F19A, an analog of IGF-II that does not bind the IGF-2R, stimulated an increase in the proportion of neural stem cells (NSCs) while decreasing the proportion of the later stage progenitors at a lower concentration than IGF-II. V43M, which binds to the IGF-2R with high affinity but which has low binding affinity to the IGF-1R and to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A) failed to promote NSC growth. The positive effects of F19A on NSC growth were unaltered by the addition of a functional blocking antibody to the IGF-1R. Altogether, these data lead to the conclusion that IGF-II promotes stemness of NSCs via the IR-A and not through activation of either the IGF-1R or the IGF-2R. PMID:24398690

  17. Upregulation of Slc38a1 Gene Along with Promotion of Neurosphere Growth and Subsequent Neuronal Specification in Undifferentiated Neural Progenitor Cells Exposed to Theanine.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Ogura, Masato; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kakuda, Takami; Nakazato, Ryota; Kokubo, Hiroshi; Ikeno, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Saki; Kutsukake, Takaya; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    We have shown marked promotion of both cluster growth and neuronal specification in pluripotent P19 cells with overexpression of solute carrier 38a1 (Slc38a1), which is responsible for membrane transport of glutamine. In this study, we evaluated pharmacological profiles of the green tea amino acid ingredient theanine, which is a good substrate for glutamine transporters, on proliferation and neuronal specification in neural progenitor cells from embryonic rat neocortex. Sustained exposure to theanine, but not glutamine, accelerated the growth of neurospheres composed of proliferating cells and 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reducing activity at concentrations of 1-100 μM in undifferentiated progenitor cells. Such prior exposure to theanine promoted spontaneous and induced commitment to a neuronal lineage with concomitant deteriorated astroglial specification. Selective upregulation was seen in the expression of Slc38a1 in progenitor cells cultured with theanine. Similarly significant increases in cluster growth and MTT reducing activity were found in P19 cells cultured with theanine for 4 days. Luciferase activity was doubled in a manner sensitive to the deletion of promoter regions in P19 cells with a luciferase reporter plasmid of the Slc38a1 promoter after sustained exposure to theanine for 4 days. Overexpression of X-box binding protein-1 led to a marked increase in luciferase activity in P19 cells transfected with the Slc38a1 reporter plasmid. These results suggest that theanine accelerates cellular proliferation and subsequent neuronal specification through a mechanism relevant to upregulation of Slc38a1 gene in undifferentiated neural progenitor cells.

  18. Cytosine deaminase-expressing human neural stem cells inhibit tumor growth in prostate cancer-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jun; Doo, Seung Whan; Kim, Dae Hong; Cha, Young Joo; Kim, Jae Heon; Song, Yun Seob; Kim, Seung U

    2013-07-10

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy among men. Prostate cancer-related deaths are largely attributable to the development of hormone resistance in the tumor. No effective chemotherapy has yet been developed for advanced prostate cancer. It is desirable if a drug can be delivered directly and specifically to prostate cancer cells. Stem cells have selective migration ability toward cancer cells and therapeutic genes can be easily transduced into stem cells. In one form of gene therapy for cancer, the stem cells carry a gene encoding an enzyme that transforms an inert prodrug into a toxic product. Cytosine deaminase (CD) transforms the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine into highly cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The migration of the genetically modified stem cells was monitored by molecular magnetic resonance imaging, after labeling the stem cells with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Human neural stem cells encoding CD (HB1.F3.CD) were prepared and labeled with MNP. In tumor-bearing C57B mice, systemically transplanted HB1.F3.CD stem cells migrated toward the tumor and in combination with prodrug 5-FC, the volume of tumor implant was significantly reduced. These findings may contribute to development of a new selective chemotherapeutic strategy against prostate cancer.

  19. β-Arrestin1/miR-326 Transcription Unit Is Epigenetically Regulated in Neural Stem Cells Where It Controls Stemness and Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Begalli, Federica; Abballe, Luana; Catanzaro, Giuseppina; Vacca, Alessandra; Napolitano, Maddalena; Tafani, Marco; Giangaspero, Felice; Locatelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Cell development is regulated by a complex network of mRNA-encoded proteins and microRNAs, all funnelling onto the modulation of self-renewal or differentiation genes. How intragenic microRNAs and their host genes are transcriptionally coregulated and their functional relationships for the control of neural stem cells (NSCs) are poorly understood. We propose here the intragenic miR-326 and its host gene β-arrestin1 as novel players whose epigenetic silencing maintains stemness in normal cerebellar stem cells. Such a regulation is mediated by CpG islands methylation of the common promoter. Epigenetic derepression of β-arrestin1/miR-326 by differentiation signals or demethylating agents leads to suppression of stemness features and cell growth and promotes cell differentiation. β-Arrestin1 inhibits cell proliferation by enhancing the nuclear expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Therefore, we propose a new mechanism for the control of cerebellar NSCs where a coordinated epigenetic mechanism finely regulates β-arrestin1/miR-326 expression and consequently NSCs stemness and cell growth. PMID:28298929

  20. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neural cancer stem cells inside the tumour. The study is divided into three phases: removal of tumoral specimens in different areas of the tumour (centre, periphery, marginal zone) in an operative room equipped with a 1.5 T scanner; isolation and characterization of neural cancer stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme; identification of neural cancer stem cell distribution inside the tumour. PMID:24750704

  1. Human neural stem cells improve cognition and promote synaptic growth in two complementary transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Ager, Rahasson R; Davis, Joy L; Agazaryan, Andy; Benavente, Francisca; Poon, Wayne W; LaFerla, Frank M; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder, affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Together, these pathologies lead to marked neuronal and synaptic loss and corresponding impairments in cognition. Current treatments, and recent clinical trials, have failed to modify the clinical course of AD; thus, the development of novel and innovative therapies is urgently needed. Over the last decade, the potential use of stem cells to treat cognitive impairment has received growing attention. Specifically, neural stem cell transplantation as a treatment for AD offers a novel approach with tremendous therapeutic potential. We previously reported that intrahippocampal transplantation of murine neural stem cells (mNSCs) can enhance synaptogenesis and improve cognition in 3xTg-AD mice and the CaM/Tet-DT(A) model of hippocampal neuronal loss. These promising findings prompted us to examine a human neural stem cell population, HuCNS-SC, which has already been clinically tested for other neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we provide the first evidence that transplantation of research grade HuCNS-SCs can improve cognition in two complementary models of neurodegeneration. We also demonstrate that HuCNS-SC cells can migrate and differentiate into immature neurons and glia and significantly increase synaptic and growth-associated markers in both 3xTg-AD and CaM/Tet-DTA mice. Interestingly, improvements in aged 3xTg-AD mice were not associated with altered Aβ or tau pathology. Rather, our findings suggest that human NSC transplantation improves cognition by enhancing endogenous synaptogenesis. Taken together, our data provide the first preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a safe and effective therapeutic approach for treating AD.

  2. Three-dimensional bioprinting of rat embryonic neural cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhye; Pinckney, Jason; Lee, Vivian; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Fischer, Krisztina; Polio, Samuel; Park, Je-Kyun; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2009-05-27

    We present a direct cell printing technique to pattern neural cells in a three-dimensional (3D) multilayered collagen gel. A layer of collagen precursor was printed to provide a scaffold for the cells, and the rat embryonic neurons and astrocytes were subsequently printed on the layer. A solution of sodium bicarbonate was applied to the cell containing collagen layer as nebulized aerosols, which allowed the gelation of the collagen. This process was repeated layer-by-layer to construct the 3D cell-hydrogel composites. Upon characterizing the relationship between printing resolutions and the growth of printed neural cells, single/multiple layers of neural cell-hydrogel composites were constructed and cultured. The on-demand capability to print neural cells in a multilayered hydrogel scaffold offers flexibility in generating artificial 3D neural tissue composites.

  3. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) acts intracellularly to cause the transdifferentiation of avian neural crest-derived Schwann cell precursors into melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, L; Stocker, K M; Morrison, R; Ciment, G

    1993-08-01

    We previously found that cultured neural crest-derived cells from embryonic quail peripheral nerves, which consist mostly of Schwann cell precursors, gave rise to melanocytes following treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Here, we show that antisense deoxyoligonucleotides targeted against two regions of the bFGF mRNA transcript blocked this TPA-induced transdifferentiation of Schwann cell precursors. Neither sense nor scrambled antisense control oligonucleotides had any effect in this regard. TPA increased bFGF protein expression in cell lysates but not in conditioned media from these cultures, and this expression was localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, bFGF-neutralizing antibodies and inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) both inhibited pigmentation caused by exogenous bFGF, but had no affect on TPA-induced melanogenesis, suggesting that bFGF is not released by these cells. These data indicate that bFGF is necessary for the TPA-induced transdifferentiation of Schwann cell precursors into melanocytes and that bFGF acts via an intracrine mechanism.

  4. Self-renewing and differentiating properties of cortical neural stem cells are selectively regulated by basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling via specific FGF receptors.

    PubMed

    Maric, Dragan; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Chang, Yoong Hee; Barker, Jeffery L

    2007-02-21

    Developmental processes mediating the initiation of lineage commitment from self-renewing neural stem cells (NSCs) remain mostly unclear because of the persisting ambiguity in identifying true NSCs from proliferative lineage-restricted progenitors (LRPs), which are directly or indirectly derived from NSCs. Our multilineage immunohistochemical analyses of early embryonic rat telencephalon at the onset of neurogenesis revealed clear dorsoventral gradients in the emergence of two types of neuronal progenitors (NPs) from multilineage-negative NSCs. Enumeration of NSCs using comprehensive flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that their precipitous decline in vivo involved both active differentiation into NPs and an increased propensity toward apoptosis. Both processes paralleled the dorsoventral changes in fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) expressions. NSCs residing in the dorsal telencephalon coexpressed FGFR1 and FGFR3, whereas those residing in the ventral telencephalon also expressed FGFR2. NSCs exposed to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in vitro generated four stereotypical clonal expansion states: efficiently self-renewing, inefficiently self-renewing limited by apoptosis, exclusively neurogenic, and multipotential, generating up to five types of LRPs. The plasticity among these expansion states depended on ambient [bFGF], telencephalic developmental stage, and differential activation/inactivation of specific FGFRs. Coactivation of FGFR1 and FGFR3 promoted symmetrical divisions of NSCs (self-renewal), whereas inactivation of either triggered asymmetrical divisions and neurogenesis from these cells. Developmental upregulation of FGFR2 expression correlated with a shift of NSCs into a multipotential state or apoptosis. These results provide new insights regarding the roles of FGFRs in diversification of NSC properties and initiation of neural lineage-restricted differentiation.

  5. Proliferation control in neural stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Homem, Catarina CF; Repic, Marko; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuit function can be drastically affected by variations in the number of cells that are produced during development or by a reduction in adult cell number due to disease. Unlike many other organs, the brain is unable to compensate for such changes by increasing cell numbers or altering the size of the cells. For this reason, unique cell cycle and cell growth control mechanisms operate in the developing and adult brain. In Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian neural stem and progenitor cells these mechanisms are intricately coordinated with the developmental age and the nutritional, metabolic and hormonal state of the animal. Defects in neural stem cell proliferation that result in the generation of incorrect cell numbers or defects in neural stem cell differentiation can cause microcephaly or megalencephaly. PMID:26420377

  6. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  7. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  8. Ventrally emigrating neural tube (VENT) cells: a second neural tube-derived cell population.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Douglas P; Machnicki, Michal; Ali, Mohammed M; Zhang, Zhanying; Sohal, Gurkirpal S

    2004-08-01

    Two embryological fates for cells of the neural tube are well established. Cells from the dorsal part of the developing neural tube emigrate and become neural crest cells, which in turn contribute to the development of the peripheral nervous system and a variety of non-neural structures. Other neural tube cells form the neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This has led to the neural crest being treated as the sole neural tube-derived emigrating cell population, with the remaining neural tube cells assumed to be restricted to forming the CNS. However, this restriction has not been tested fully. Our investigations of chick, quail and duck embryos utilizing a variety of different labelling techniques (DiI, LacZ, GFP and quail chimera) demonstrate the existence of a second neural tube-derived emigrating cell population. These cells originate from the ventral part of the cranial neural tube, emigrate at the exit/entry site of the cranial nerves, migrate in association with the nerves and populate their target tissues. On the basis of its site of origin and route of migration we have named this cell population the ventrally emigrating neural tube (VENT) cells. VENT cells also differ from neural crest cells in that they emigrate considerably after the emigration of neural crest cells, and lack expression of the neural crest cell antigen HNK-1. VENT cells are multipotent, differentiating into cell types belonging to all four basic tissues in the body: the nerve, muscle, connective and epithelium. Thus, the neural tube provides at least two cell populations--neural crest and VENT cells--that contribute to the development of the peripheral nervous system and various non-neural structures. This review describes the origin of the idea of VENT cells, and discusses evidence for their existence and subsequent fates.

  9. EphrinA/EphA-induced ectodomain shedding of neural cell adhesion molecule regulates growth cone repulsion through ADAM10 metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Brennaman, Leann H; Moss, Marcia L; Maness, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    EphrinA/EphA-dependent axon repulsion is crucial for synaptic targeting in developing neurons but downstream molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, it is shown that ephrinA5/EphA3 triggers proteolysis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) by the metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 to promote growth cone collapse in neurons from mouse neocortex. EphrinA5 induced ADAM10 activity to promote ectodomain shedding of polysialic acid-NCAM in cortical neuron cultures, releasing a ~ 250 kDa soluble fragment consisting of most of its extracellular region. NCAM shedding was dependent on ADAM10 and EphA3 kinase activity as shown in HEK293T cells transfected with dominant negative ADAM10 and kinase-inactive EphA3 (K653R) mutants. Purified ADAM10 cleaved NCAM at a sequence within the E-F loop of the second fibronectin type III domain (Leu(671) -Lys(672) /Ser(673) -Leu(674) ) identified by mass spectrometry. Mutations of NCAM within the ADAM10 cleavage sequence prevented EphA3-induced shedding of NCAM in HEK293T cells. EphrinA5-induced growth cone collapse was dependent on ADAM10 activity, was inhibited in cortical cultures from NCAM null mice, and was rescued by WT but not ADAM10 cleavage site mutants of NCAM. Regulated proteolysis of NCAM through the ephrin5/EphA3/ADAM10 mechanism likely impacts synapse development, and may lead to excess NCAM shedding when disrupted, as implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PSA-NCAM and ephrinA/EphA3 coordinately regulate inhibitory synapse development. Here, we have found that ephrinA5 stimulates EphA3 kinase and ADAM10 activity to promote PSA-NCAM cleavage at a site in its second FNIII repeat, which regulates ephrinA5-induced growth cone collapse in GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons. These findings identify a new regulatory mechanism which may contribute to inhibitory connectivity.

  10. Enhanced expression of FNDC5 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells along with relevant embryonic neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghahrizjani, Fatemeh Ahmadi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salamian, Ahmad; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Nejati, Alireza Shoaraye; Salehi, Hossein; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has enhanced the capability of basic and clinical research in the context of human neural differentiation. Derivation of neural progenitor (NP) cells from hESCs facilitates the process of human embryonic development through the generation of neuronal subtypes. We have recently indicated that fibronectin type III domain containing 5 protein (FNDC5) expression is required for appropriate neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Bioinformatics analyses have shown the presence of three isoforms for human FNDC5 mRNA. To differentiate which isoform of FNDC5 is involved in the process of human neural differentiation, we have used hESCs as an in vitro model for neural differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) induction. The hESC line, Royan H5, was differentiated into a neural lineage in defined adherent culture treated by RA and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). We collected all cell types that included hESCs, rosette structures, and neural cells in an attempt to assess the expression of FNDC5 isoforms. There was a contiguous increase in all three FNDC5 isoforms during the neural differentiation process. Furthermore, the highest level of expression of the isoforms was significantly observed in neural cells compared to hESCs and the rosette structures known as neural precursor cells (NPCs). High expression levels of FNDC5 in human fetal brain and spinal cord tissues have suggested the involvement of this gene in neural tube development. Additional research is necessary to determine the major function of FDNC5 in this process.

  11. Expression of chondrogenic potential of mouse trunk neural crest cells by FGF2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Ido, Atsushi; Ito, Kazuo

    2006-02-01

    There is a significant difference between the developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells in the amniote. Thus, whereas cranial neural crest cells generate bone and cartilage, trunk neural crest cells do not contribute to skeletal derivatives. We examined whether mouse trunk neural crest cells can undergo chondrogenesis to analyze how the difference between the developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells arises. Our present data demonstrate that mouse trunk neural crest cells have chondrogenic potential and that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 is an inducing factor for their chondrogenesis in vitro. FGF2 altered the expression patterns of Hox9 genes and Id2, a cranial neural crest cell marker. These results suggest that environmental cues may play essential roles in generating the difference between developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells.

  12. Incremental evolution of the neural crest, neural crest cells and neural crest-derived skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K; Gillis, J Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Urochordates (ascidians) have recently supplanted cephalochordates (amphioxus) as the extant sister taxon of vertebrates. Given that urochordates possess migratory cells that have been classified as 'neural crest-like'- and that cephalochordates lack such cells--this phylogenetic hypothesis may have significant implications with respect to the origin of the neural crest and neural crest-derived skeletal tissues in vertebrates. We present an overview of the genes and gene regulatory network associated with specification of the neural crest in vertebrates. We then use these molecular data--alongside cell behaviour, cell fate and embryonic context--to assess putative antecedents (latent homologues) of the neural crest or neural crest cells in ascidians and cephalochordates. Ascidian migratory mesenchymal cells--non-pigment-forming trunk lateral line cells and pigment-forming 'neural crest-like cells' (NCLC)--are unlikely latent neural crest cell homologues. Rather, Snail-expressing cells at the neural plate of border of urochordates and cephalochordates likely represent the extent of neural crest elaboration in non-vertebrate chordates. We also review evidence for the evolutionary origin of two neural crest-derived skeletal tissues--cartilage and dentine. Dentine is a bona fide vertebrate novelty, and dentine-secreting odontoblasts represent a cell type that is exclusively derived from the neural crest. Cartilage, on the other hand, likely has a much deeper origin within the Metazoa. The mesodermally derived cellular cartilages of some protostome invertebrates are much more similar to vertebrate cartilage than is the acellular 'cartilage-like' tissue in cephalochordate pharyngeal arches. Cartilage, therefore, is not a vertebrate novelty, and a well-developed chondrogenic program was most likely co-opted from mesoderm to the neural crest along the vertebrate stem. We conclude that the neural crest is a vertebrate novelty, but that neural crest cells and their

  13. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  14. Two outward potassium current types are expressed during the neural differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ruiying; Gao, Guowei; Xing, Ying; Xue, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of potassium ion channels are regarded as a basic index for determining the functional differentiation of neural stem cells. In this study, neural stem cells from the hippocampus of newborn rats were induced to differentiate with neurotrophic growth factor, and the electrophysiological properties of the voltage-gated potassium ion channels were observed. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the rapidly proliferating neural stem cells formed spheres in vitro that expressed high levels of nestin. The differentiated neurons were shown to express neuron-specific enolase. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the neural stem cells were actively dividing and the percentage of cells in the S + G2/M phase was high. However, the ratio of cells in the S + G2/M phase decreased obviously as differentiation proceeded. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed apparent changes in potassium ion currents as the neurons differentiated. The potassium ion currents consisted of one transient outward potassium ion current and one delayed rectifier potassium ion current, which were blocked by 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium, respectively. The experimental findings indicate that neural stem cells from newborn rat campus could be cultured and induced to differentiate into functional neurons under defined conditions in vitro. The differentiated neurons expressed two types of outward potassium ion currents similar to those of mature neurons in vivo. PMID:25206577

  15. Microfluidic systems for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Bahrami, Sajad; Mirshekari, Hamed; Basri, Seyed Masoud Moosavi; Nik, Amirala Bakhshian; Aref, Amir R; Akbari, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-07-05

    Neural tissue engineering aims at developing novel approaches for the treatment of diseases of the nervous system, by providing a permissive environment for the growth and differentiation of neural cells. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems provide a closer biomimetic environment, and promote better cell differentiation and improved cell function, than could be achieved by conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. With the recent advances in the discovery and introduction of different types of stem cells for tissue engineering, microfluidic platforms have provided an improved microenvironment for the 3D-culture of stem cells. Microfluidic systems can provide more precise control over the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical and physical cues at the cellular level compared to traditional systems. Various microsystems have been designed and fabricated for the purpose of neural tissue engineering. Enhanced neural migration and differentiation, and monitoring of these processes, as well as understanding the behavior of stem cells and their microenvironment have been obtained through application of different microfluidic-based stem cell culture and tissue engineering techniques. As the technology advances it may be possible to construct a "brain-on-a-chip". In this review, we describe the basics of stem cells and tissue engineering as well as microfluidics-based tissue engineering approaches. We review recent testing of various microfluidic approaches for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

  16. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  17. Monitoring the Differentiation and Migration Patterns of Neural Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Using a Microfluidic Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayeon; Park, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Ju Hun; Kwon, Jihye; Ko, Jung Jae; Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Aeri; Han, Baek Soo; Lee, Sang Chul; Jeon, Noo Li; Song, Jihwan

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics can provide unique experimental tools to visualize the development of neural structures within a microscale device, which is followed by guidance of neurite growth in the axonal isolation compartment. We utilized microfluidics technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We co-cultured hESCs with PA6 stromal cells, and isolated neural rosette-like structures, which subsequently formed neurospheres in suspension culture. Tuj1-positive neural cells, but not nestin-positive neural precursor cells (NPCs), were able to enter the microfluidics grooves (microchannels), suggesting that neural cell-migratory capacity was dependent upon neuronal differentiation stage. We also showed that bundles of axons formed and extended into the microchannels. Taken together, these results demonstrated that microfluidics technology can provide useful tools to study neurite outgrowth and axon guidance of neural cells, which are derived from human embryonic stem cells. PMID:24938227

  18. Monitoring the differentiation and migration patterns of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells using a microfluidic culture system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayeon; Park, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Ju Hun; Kwon, Jihye; Ko, Jung Jae; Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Aeri; Han, Baek Soo; Lee, Sang Chul; Jeon, Noo Li; Song, Jihwan

    2014-06-01

    Microfluidics can provide unique experimental tools to visualize the development of neural structures within a microscale device, which is followed by guidance of neurite growth in the axonal isolation compartment. We utilized microfluidics technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We co-cultured hESCs with PA6 stromal cells, and isolated neural rosette-like structures, which subsequently formed neurospheres in suspension culture. Tuj1-positive neural cells, but not nestin-positive neural precursor cells (NPCs), were able to enter the microfluidics grooves (microchannels), suggesting that neural cell-migratory capacity was dependent upon neuronal differentiation stage. We also showed that bundles of axons formed and extended into the microchannels. Taken together, these results demonstrated that microfluidics technology can provide useful tools to study neurite outgrowth and axon guidance of neural cells, which are derived from human embryonic stem cells.

  19. Human neural stem cells improve cognition and promote synaptic growth in two complementary transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal loss

    PubMed Central

    Ager, Rahasson R.; Davis, Joy L.; Agazaryan, Andy; Benavente, Francisca; Poon, Wayne W.; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age‐related neurodegenerative disorder, affecting over 35 million people worldwide. Pathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive accumulation of β‐amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Together, these pathologies lead to marked neuronal and synaptic loss and corresponding impairments in cognition. Current treatments, and recent clinical trials, have failed to modify the clinical course of AD; thus, the development of novel and innovative therapies is urgently needed. Over the last decade, the potential use of stem cells to treat cognitive impairment has received growing attention. Specifically, neural stem cell transplantation as a treatment for AD offers a novel approach with tremendous therapeutic potential. We previously reported that intrahippocampal transplantation of murine neural stem cells (mNSCs) can enhance synaptogenesis and improve cognition in 3xTg‐AD mice and the CaM/Tet‐DTA model of hippocampal neuronal loss. These promising findings prompted us to examine a human neural stem cell population, HuCNS‐SC, which has already been clinically tested for other neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we provide the first evidence that transplantation of research grade HuCNS‐SCs can improve cognition in two complementary models of neurodegeneration. We also demonstrate that HuCNS‐SC cells can migrate and differentiate into immature neurons and glia and significantly increase synaptic and growth‐associated markers in both 3xTg‐AD and CaM/Tet‐DTA mice. Interestingly, improvements in aged 3xTg‐AD mice were not associated with altered Aβ or tau pathology. Rather, our findings suggest that human NSC transplantation improves cognition by enhancing endogenous synaptogenesis. Taken together, our data provide the first preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a safe and effective therapeutic approach for treating AD. © 2014

  20. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  1. Capacity of Human Dental Follicle Cells to Differentiate into Neural Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Naomi; Takahashi, Kosuke; Ito, Ko; Suemitsu, Masaaki; Kuyama, Kayo

    2017-01-01

    The dental follicle is an ectomesenchymal tissue surrounding the developing tooth germ. Human dental follicle cells (hDFCs) have the capacity to commit to differentiation into multiple cell types. Here we investigated the capacity of hDFCs to differentiate into neural cells and the efficiency of a two-step strategy involving floating neurosphere-like bodies for neural differentiation. Undifferentiated hDFCs showed a spindle-like morphology and were positive for neural markers such as nestin, β-III-tubulin, and S100β. The cellular morphology of several cells was neuronal-like including branched dendrite-like processes and neurites. Next, hDFCs were used for neurosphere formation in serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and B27 supplement. The number of cells with neuronal-like morphology and that were strongly positive for neural markers increased with sphere formation. Gene expression of neural markers also increased in hDFCs with sphere formation. Next, gene expression of neural markers was examined in hDFCs during neuronal differentiation after sphere formation. Expression of Musashi-1 and Musashi-2, MAP2, GFAP, MBP, and SOX10 was upregulated in hDFCs undergoing neuronal differentiation via neurospheres, whereas expression of nestin and β-III-tubulin was downregulated. In conclusion, hDFCs may be another optimal source of neural/glial cells for cell-based therapies to treat neurological diseases. PMID:28261273

  2. Hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell transplantation therapy after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Takuma; Narasimhan, Purnima; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Wang, Eric; Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Chan, Pak H

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that intraparenchymal transplantation of neural stem cells ameliorates neurological deficits in animals with intracerebral hemorrhage. However, hemoglobin in the host brain environment causes massive grafted cell death and reduces the effectiveness of this approach. Several studies have shown that preconditioning induced by sublethal hypoxia can markedly improve the tolerance of treated subjects to more severe insults. Therefore, we investigated whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell resilience to the hemorrhagic stroke environment and improves therapeutic effects in mice. To assess whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell survival when exposed to hemoglobin, neural stem cells were exposed to 5% hypoxia for 24 hours before exposure to hemoglobin. To study the effectiveness of hypoxic preconditioning on grafted-neural stem cell recovery, neural stem cells subjected to hypoxic preconditioning were grafted into the parenchyma 3 days after intracerebral hemorrhage. Hypoxic preconditioning significantly enhanced viability of the neural stem cells exposed to hemoglobin and increased grafted-cell survival in the intracerebral hemorrhage brain. Hypoxic preconditioning also increased neural stem cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, transplanted neural stem cells with hypoxic preconditioning exhibited enhanced tissue-protective capability that accelerated behavioral recovery. Our results suggest that hypoxic preconditioning in neural stem cells improves efficacy of stem cell therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage.

  3. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Ludovica; Manfredi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies. PMID:28123398

  4. Comparison of Gompertz and neural network models of broiler growth.

    PubMed

    Roush, W B; Dozier, W A; Branton, S L

    2006-04-01

    Neural networks offer an alternative to regression analysis for biological growth modeling. Very little research has been conducted to model animal growth using artificial neural networks. Twenty-five male chicks (Ross x Ross 308) were raised in an environmental chamber. Body weights were determined daily and feed and water were provided ad libitum. The birds were fed a starter diet (23% CP and 3,200 kcal of ME/kg) from 0 to 21 d, and a grower diet (20% CP and 3,200 kcal of ME/ kg) from 22 to 70 d. Dead and female birds were not included in the study. Average BW of 18 birds were used as the data points for the growth curve to be modeled. Training data consisted of alternate-day weights starting with the first day. Validation data consisted of BW at all other age periods. Comparison was made between the modeling by the Gompertz nonlinear regression equation and neural network modeling. Neural network models were developed with the Neuroshell Predictor. Accuracy of the models was determined by mean square error (MSE), mean absolute deviation (MAD), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), and bias. The Gompertz equation was fit for the data. Forecasting error measurements were based on the difference between the model and the observed values. For the training data, the lowest MSE, MAD, MAPE, and bias were noted for the neural-developed neural network. For the validation data, the lowest MSE and MAD were noted with the genetic algorithm-developed neural network. Lowest bias was for the neural-developed network. As measured by bias, the Gompertz equation underestimated the values whereas the neural- and genetic-developed neural networks produced little or no overestimation of the observed BW responses. Past studies have attempted to interpret the biological significance of the estimates of the parameters of an equation. However, it may be more practical to ignore the relevance of parameter estimates and focus on the ability to predict responses.

  5. [Effects of endothelial cells on renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells].

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiwu; Su, Le; Mino, Junying

    2007-10-01

    It is well established that neural stem cells (NSCs) are not randomly distributed throughout the brain, but rather are concentrated around blood vessels. Although NSCs lie in a vascular niche, there is no direct evidence for a functional relationship between the NSCs and blood vessel component cells. It is reported that endothelial cells release soluble factors that stimulate the self-renewal of NSCs, inhibit their differentiation, and enhance their neuron production. Endothelial coculture can activate Notch to promote self-renewal. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a significant role in neural cells; it stimulates the growth and differentiation of astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, beyond their traditional role as structural components of blood vessels, endothelial cells are not only critical component of the neural stem cell niche, but they also are able to enhance neurogenesis, possibly through the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  6. Analysis of Neural Stem Cells from Human Cortical Brain Structures In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, M A; Poltavtseva, R A; Marei, M V; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-05-01

    Comparative immunohistochemical analysis of the neocortex from human fetuses showed that neural stem and progenitor cells are present in the brain throughout the gestation period, at least from week 8 through 26. At the same time, neural stem cells from the first and second trimester fetuses differed by the distribution, morphology, growth, and quantity. Immunocytochemical analysis of neural stem cells derived from fetuses at different gestation terms and cultured under different conditions showed their differentiation capacity. Detailed analysis of neural stem cell populations derived from fetuses on gestation weeks 8-9, 18-20, and 26 expressing Lex/SSEA1 was performed.

  7. Overexpression of MCT8 enhances the differentiation of ES cells into neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Mika; Nagaoka, Masato; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2007-09-07

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation is regulated by cytokines and growth factors, as well as small-compound chemicals incorporated into cells by transporter proteins. Little is known regarding the effect of transporters on ES cell differentiation. This study focused on the effect of transporters during the neural-lineage differentiation of ES cells. Among the 27 types of SLC family transporters, MCT8 expression was coincident with that of neural stem cell markers, and the overexpression of MCT8 accelerated the differentiation into neural cells. These results suggested that the transporters and their substrates also play a crucial role in the regulation of ES cell differentiation.

  8. A brief perspective on neural cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Pruszak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    For a range of nervous system disorders current treatment options remain limited. Focusing on Parkinson's disease as a neurodegenerative entity that affects an increasing quantity of people in our aging societies, we briefly discuss remaining challenges and opportunities that neural stem cell therapy might be able to offer. Providing a snapshot of neural transplantation paradigms, we contemplate possible imminent translational scenarios and discuss critical requirements to be considered before clinical implementation.

  9. VLSI Cells Placement Using the Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, Hacene; Zouaoui, Lamri; Mokhnache, Salah

    2008-06-12

    The artificial neural networks have been studied for several years. Their effectiveness makes it possible to expect high performances. The privileged fields of these techniques remain the recognition and classification. Various applications of optimization are also studied under the angle of the artificial neural networks. They make it possible to apply distributed heuristic algorithms. In this article, a solution to placement problem of the various cells at the time of the realization of an integrated circuit is proposed by using the KOHONEN network.

  10. Viral susceptibility, transfection and growth of SPB--a fish neural progenitor cell line from the brain of snubnose pompano, Trachinotus blochii (Lacépède).

    PubMed

    Wen, C-M; Ku, C-C; Wang, C-S

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the susceptibilities of the SPB cell line to fish viruses including giant seaperch iridovirus (GSIV-K1), red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV-Ku), grouper nervous necrosis virus (GNNV-K1), chum salmon reovirus (CSV) and eel herpesvirus (HVA). GSIV-K1, RSIV-Ku and CSV replicated well in SPB cells, with a significant cytopathic effect and virus production. However, the cells were HVA and GNNV refractory. To examine the ability of SPB cells to stably express foreign protein, expression vectors encoding GNNV B1 and B2 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and GSIV ORF35L fused to DsRed were constructed and introduced by transfection into SPB cells. Stable transfectants displayed different morphologies compared with SPB and with each other. EGFP-B1 was predominantly localized in the nuclei, EFPF-B2 was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus, and granular 35L-DsRed was localized with secreted vesicles. The expression of EFPF-B2 in SPB cells produced blebs on the surface, but the cells showing stable expression of EGFP, EGFP-B1 or 35L-DsRed showed normal morphologies. Results show the SPB cells and the transfected cells grow well at temperatures between 20 and 35 °C and with serum-dependent growth. SPB cells are suitable for studies on foreign protein expression and virology.

  11. ALK5-mediated transforming growth factor β signaling in neural crest cells controls craniofacial muscle development via tissue-tissue interactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Arum; Zhao, Hu; Li, Jingyuan; Pelikan, Richard; Chai, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The development of the craniofacial muscles requires reciprocal interactions with surrounding craniofacial tissues that originate from cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs). However, the molecular mechanism involved in the tissue-tissue interactions between CNCCs and muscle progenitors during craniofacial muscle development is largely unknown. In the current study, we address how CNCCs regulate the development of the tongue and other craniofacial muscles using Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice, in which loss of Alk5 in CNCCs results in severely disrupted muscle formation. We found that Bmp4 is responsible for reduced proliferation of the myogenic progenitor cells in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice during early myogenesis. In addition, Fgf4 and Fgf6 ligands were reduced in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice and are critical for differentiation of the myogenic cells. Addition of Bmp4 or Fgf ligands rescues the proliferation and differentiation defects in the craniofacial muscles of Alk5 mutant mice in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that CNCCs play critical roles in controlling craniofacial myogenic proliferation and differentiation through tissue-tissue interactions.

  12. Neural stem cell sex dimorphism in aromatase (CYP19) expression: a basis for differential neural fate

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Jay; McCourty, Althea; Lecanu, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation and pharmacologic activation of endogenous neurogenesis are two approaches that trigger a great deal of interest as brain repair strategies. However, the success rate of clinical attempts using stem cells to restore neurologic functions altered either after traumatic brain injury or as a consequence of neurodegenerative disease remains rather disappointing. This suggests that factors affecting the fate of grafted NSCs are largely understudied and remain to be characterized. We recently reported that aging differentially affects the neurogenic properties of male and female NSCs. Although the sex steroids androgens and estrogens participate in the regulation of neurogenesis, to our knowledge, research on how gender-based differences affect the capacity of NSCs to differentiate and condition their neural fate is lacking. In the present study, we explored further the role of cell sex as a determining factor of the neural fate followed by differentiating NSCs and its relationship with a potential differential expression of aromatase (CYP19), the testosterone-metabolizing enzyme. Results Using NSCs isolated from the subventricular zone of three-month-old male and female Long-Evans rats and maintained as neurospheres, we showed that differentiation triggered by retinoic acid resulted in a neural phenotype that depends on cell sex. Differentiated male NSCs mainly expressed markers of neuronal fate, including βIII-tubulin, microtubule associated protein 2, growth-associated protein 43, and doublecortin. In contrast, female NSCs essentially expressed the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. Quantification of the expression of aromatase showed a very low level of expression in undifferentiated female NSCs, whereas aromatase expression in male NSCs was 14-fold greater than the female level. Conclusion Our results confirm our previous data that the neural phenotype acquired by differentiating NSCs largely depends on

  13. Ocular nerve growth factor administration counteracts the impairment of neural precursor cell viability and differentiation in the brain subventricular area of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tirassa, Paola; Maccarone, Mattia; Carito, Valentina; De Nicolò, Sara; Fiore, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The ocular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) as eye drops (oNGF) has been shown to exert protective effects in forebrain-injured animal models, including adult diabetes induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg body weight). This type 1 diabetes model was used in this study to investigate whether oNGF might extend its actions on neuronal precursors localised in the subventricular zone (SVZ). NGF or saline was administrated as eye drops twice daily for 2 weeks in rats with STZ-induced diabetes and healthy control rats. The expression of mature and precursor NGF and the NGF receptors, tropomyosin-related kinase A and neurotrophin receptor p75, and the levels of DNA fragmentation were analysed by ELISA and western blotting. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine was used to trace newly formed cells. Nestin, polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), doublecortin (DCX) and glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies were used to identify the SVZ cells by confocal microscopy. It was found that oNGF counteracts the STZ-induced cell death and the alteration of mature/pro-NGF expression in the SVZ. It also affects the survival and differentiation of SVZ progenitors. In particular, oNGF counteracts the reduction in the number of cells expressing PSA-NCAM/DCX (neuroblast type A cells) and the related reductions in the number and distribution of nestin/DCX-positive cells (C-type cells), or glia-committed cells (type B cells), observed in the SVZ of diabetic rats. These findings show that oNGF treatment counteracts the effect of type 1 diabetes on neuronal precursors in the SVZ, and further support the neuroprotective and reparative role of oNGF in the brain.

  14. Neural syntax: cell assemblies, synapsembles and readers

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György

    2010-01-01

    Summary A widely discussed hypothesis in neuroscience is that transiently active ensembles of neurons, known as ‘cell assemblies’, underlie numerous operations of the brain, from encoding memories to reasoning. However, the mechanisms responsible for the formation and disbanding of cell assemblies and temporal evolution of cell assembly sequences are not well understood. I introduce and review three interconnected topics, which could facilitate progress in defining cell assemblies, identifying their neuronal organization and revealing causal relationships between assembly organization and behavior. First, I hypothesize that cell assemblies are best understood in light of their output product, as detected by ‘reader-actuator’ mechanisms. Second, I suggest that the hierarchical organization of cell assemblies may be regarded as a neural syntax. Third, constituents of the neural syntax are linked together by dynamically changing constellations of synaptic weights (‘synapsembles’). Existing support for this tripartite framework is reviewed and strategies for experimental testing of its predictions are discussed. PMID:21040841

  15. Neural stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parati, E A; Pozzi, S; Ottolina, A; Onofrj, M; Bez, A; Pagano, S F

    2004-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells are present in the majority of mammalian tissues where they are a renewable source of specialized cells. According to the several biological portions from which multipotent stem cells can be derived, they are characterized as a) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolated from the pluripotent inner-cell mass of the pre-implantation blastocyste-stage embryo; b) multipotent fetal stem cells (FSCs) from aborted fetuses; and c) adult stem cells (ASCs) localized in small zones of several organs known as "niche" where a subset of tissue cells and extracellular substrates can indefinitely house one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny production in vivo. ECSs have an high self-renewing capacity, plasticity and pluripotency over the years. Pluripotency is a property that makes a stem cell able to give rise to all cell type found in the embryo and adult animals.

  16. In vitro study of the long-term cortisol treatment effects on the growth rate and proliferation of the neural stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Abdanipour, Alireza; Sagha, Mohsen; Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Pakzad, Iraj; Tiraihi, Taki

    2015-02-01

    Adult neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs) residing in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are involved in the memory formations and psychological problems. It is believed that basal levels of glucocorticoids are essential for neuronal development, plasticity, and survival, while stress-mediated levels of glucocorticoids produce neuronal loss. Degeneration of NSPCs by the apoptotic and necrotic stimuli have great devastating outcomes on the brain and contributes to the pathophysiology of neurological as well as psychological disorders. Using MTT assay, acridine orange, and TUNEL assay, we have demonstrated that cortisol at high and excessive (more than 5 μM) levels had anti-proliferative effects on the NSPCs derived from subventricular and subgranular zones in a dose- and time-dependent manner through apoptosis as well as necrosis. These outcomes can highlight the role of stress-mediated decline of adult neurogenesis in the aging brain and interconnect stress-mediated cortisol secretion with brain aging diseases.

  17. ADULT NEURAL STEM CELLS: RESPONSE TO STROKE INJURY AND POTENTIAL FOR THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Barkho, Basam Z.; Zhao, Xinyu

    2011-01-01

    The plasticity of neural stem/progenitor cells allows a variety of different responses to many environmental cues. In the past decade, significant research has gone into understanding the regulation of neural stem/progenitor cell properties, because of their promise for cell replacement therapies in adult neurological diseases. Both endogenous and grafted neural stem/progenitor cells are known to have the ability to migrate long distances to lesioned sites after brain injury and differentiate into new neurons. Several chemokines and growth factors, including stromal cell-derived factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor, have been shown to stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural stem/progenitor cells, and investigators have now begun to identify the critical downstream effectors and signaling mechanisms that regulate these processes. Both our own lab and others have shown that the extracellular matrix and matrix remodeling factors play a critical role in directing cell differentiation and migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells within injured sites. Identification of these and other molecular pathways involved in stem cell homing into ischemic areas is vital for the development of new treatments. To ensure the best functional recovery, regenerative therapy may require the application of a combination approach that includes cell replacement, trophic support, and neural protection. Here we review the current state of our knowledge about endogenous adult and exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells as potential therapeutic agents for central nervous system injuries. PMID:21466483

  18. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    PubMed

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes.

  19. Neural stem cell transplantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean-Pyo; McKercher, Scott; Muller, Franz-Josef; Snyder, Evan Y

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the most primordial, least committed cells of the nervous system, and transplantation of these multipotent cells holds the promise of regenerative therapy for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This unit describes methods for NSC transplantation into neonatal mouse pups, embryonic mouse brain, and adult mouse brain. A description of options for detection of labeled donor cells in engrafted mouse brain is provided along with an example protocol for detecting lacZ-expressing cells in situ. Also included is a protocol for preparing NSCs for transplantation.

  20. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  1. Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal signals to activate dormant neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Coskun, Volkan; Liang, Aibing; Yu, Juehua; Cheng, Liming; Ge, Weihong; Shi, Zhanping; Zhang, Kunshan; Li, Chun; Cui, Yaru; Lin, Haijun; Luo, Dandan; Wang, Junbang; Lin, Connie; Dai, Zachary; Zhu, Hongwen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hailiang; deVellis, Jean; Horvath, Steve; Sun, Yi Eve; Li, Siguang

    2015-05-21

    The scarcity of tissue-specific stem cells and the complexity of their surrounding environment have made molecular characterization of these cells particularly challenging. Through single-cell transcriptome and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), we uncovered molecular properties of CD133(+)/GFAP(-) ependymal (E) cells in the adult mouse forebrain neurogenic zone. Surprisingly, prominent hub genes of the gene network unique to ependymal CD133(+)/GFAP(-) quiescent cells were enriched for immune-responsive genes, as well as genes encoding receptors for angiogenic factors. Administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activated CD133(+) ependymal neural stem cells (NSCs), lining not only the lateral but also the fourth ventricles and, together with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), elicited subsequent neural lineage differentiation and migration. This study revealed the existence of dormant ependymal NSCs throughout the ventricular surface of the CNS, as well as signals abundant after injury for their activation.

  2. Growth and splitting of neural sequences in songbird vocal development

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Tatsuo S.; Mackevicius, Emily L.; Payne, Hannah L.; Lynch, Galen F.; Fee, Michale S.

    2015-01-01

    Neural sequences are a fundamental feature of brain dynamics underlying diverse behaviors, but the mechanisms by which they develop during learning remain unknown. Songbirds learn vocalizations composed of syllables; in adult birds, each syllable is produced by a different sequence of action potential bursts in the premotor cortical area HVC. Here we carried out recordings of large populations of HVC neurons in singing juvenile birds throughout learning to examine the emergence of neural sequences. Early in vocal development, HVC neurons begin producing rhythmic bursts, temporally locked to a ‘prototype’ syllable. Different neurons are active at different latencies relative to syllable onset to form a continuous sequence. Through development, as new syllables emerge from the prototype syllable, initially highly overlapping burst sequences become increasingly distinct. We propose a mechanistic model in which multiple neural sequences can emerge from the growth and splitting of a common precursor sequence. PMID:26618871

  3. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  4. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  5. CXCR4 activation promotes differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Hua, Qiuhong; Tang, Kaiyi; Shi, Changjie; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Ru

    2016-11-19

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in many fundamental cellular responses such as growth, death, movement, transcription and excitation. Their roles in human stem cell neural specialization are not well understood. In this study, we aimed to identify GPCRs that may play a role in the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to neural stem cells (NSCs). Using a feeder-free hESC neural differentiation protocol, we found that the expression of several chemokine receptors changed dramatically during the hESC/NSC transition. Especially, the expression of CXCR4 increased approximately 50 folds in NSCs compared to the original hESCs. CXCR4 agonist SDF-1 promoted, whereas the antagonist AMD3100 delayed the neural induction process. In consistence with antagonizing CXCR4, knockdown of CXCR4 in hESCs also blocked the neural induction and cells with reduced CXCR4 were rarely positive for Nestin and Sox1-staining. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCR4 is involved in the neural induction process of hESC and it might be considered as a target to facilitate NSC production from hESCs in regenerative medicine.

  6. Reconstitution of a Patterned Neural Tube from Single Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keisuke; Ranga, Adrian; Lutolf, Matthias P; Tanaka, Elly M; Meinhardt, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The recapitulation of tissue development and patterning in three-dimensional (3D) culture is an important dimension of stem cell research. Here, we describe a 3D culture protocol in which single mouse ES cells embedded in Matrigel under neural induction conditions clonally form a lumen containing, oval-shaped epithelial structure within 3 days. By Day 7 an apicobasally polarized neuroepithelium with uniformly dorsal cell identity forms. Treatment with retinoic acid at Day 2 results in posteriorization and self-organization of dorsal-ventral neural tube patterning. Neural tube organoid growth is also supported by pure laminin gels as well as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based artificial extracellular matrix hydrogels, which can be fine-tuned for key microenvironment characteristics. The rapid generation of a simple, patterned tissue in well-defined culture conditions makes the neural tube organoid a tractable model for studying neural stem cell self-organization.

  7. Macro cell placement with neural net algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storti-Gajani, Giancarlo

    Placement of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) macro cells is one of the hard problems encountered in the process of integrated circuits design. Since the problem is essentially NP-complete a solution must be searched for with the aid of heuristics using, maybe, non deterministic strategies. A new algorithm for cell preplacement based on neural nets that may be very well extended to find solution of the final placement problem is presented. Simulations for the part of the algorithm concerning preplacement are carried out on several different examples giving always a sharply decreasing cost function (where cost is evaluated essentially on total length of wires given a rectangular boundary). The direct mapping between neural units and VLSI blocks that is adopted in the algorithm makes the extension to the final placement problem quite simple. Simulation programs are implemented in a interpreted mathematical simulation language and a C language implementation is currently under way.

  8. Three-dimensional graphene foam as a biocompatible and conductive scaffold for neural stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Song; Song, Qin; Huang, Rong; Wang, Long; Liu, Liwei; Dai, Jianwu; Tang, Mingliang; Cheng, Guosheng

    2013-04-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) based therapy provides a promising approach for neural regeneration. For the success of NSC clinical application, a scaffold is required to provide three-dimensional (3D) cell growth microenvironments and appropriate synergistic cell guidance cues. Here, we report the first utilization of graphene foam, a 3D porous structure, as a novel scaffold for NSCs in vitro. It was found that three-dimensional graphene foams (3D-GFs) can not only support NSC growth, but also keep cell at an active proliferation state with upregulation of Ki67 expression than that of two-dimensional graphene films. Meanwhile, phenotypic analysis indicated that 3D-GFs can enhance the NSC differentiation towards astrocytes and especially neurons. Furthermore, a good electrical coupling of 3D-GFs with differentiated NSCs for efficient electrical stimulation was observed. Our findings implicate 3D-GFs could offer a powerful platform for NSC research, neural tissue engineering and neural prostheses.

  9. Enhanced growth of neural networks on conductive cellulose-derived nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Kalogeropoulos, Theodoros; Thunberg, Johannes; Johannesson, Sara; Hägg, Daniel; Enoksson, Peter; Gatenholm, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The problem of recovery from neurodegeneration needs new effective solutions. Tissue engineering is viewed as a prospective approach for solving this problem since it can help to develop healthy neural tissue using supportive scaffolds. This study presents effective and sustainable tissue engineering methods for creating biomaterials from cellulose that can be used either as scaffolds for the growth of neural tissue in vitro or as drug screening models. To reach this goal, nanofibrous electrospun cellulose mats were made conductive via two different procedures: carbonization and addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The resulting scaffolds were much more conductive than untreated cellulose material and were used to support growth and differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The cells were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy methods over a period of 15 days at different time points. The results showed that the cellulose-derived conductive scaffolds can provide support for good cell attachment, growth and differentiation. The formation of a neural network occurred within 10 days of differentiation, which is a promising length of time for SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1. PMID:24996922

  11. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  12. Ketamine-Induced Toxicity in Neurons Differentiated from Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Slikker, William; Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Patterson, Tucker A; Sadovova, Natalya; Hanig, Joseph P; Paule, Merle G; Wang, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Ketamine is used as a general anesthetic, and recent data suggest that anesthetics can cause neuronal damage when exposure occurs during development. The precise mechanisms are not completely understood. To evaluate the degree of ketamine-induced neuronal toxicity, neural stem cells were isolated from gestational day 16 rat fetuses. On the eighth day in culture, proliferating neural stem cells were exposed for 24 h to ketamine at 1, 10, 100, and 500 μM. To determine the effect of ketamine on differentiated stem cells, separate cultures of neural stem cells were maintained in transition medium (DIV 6) for 1 day and kept in differentiation medium for another 3 days. Differentiated neural cells were exposed for 24 h to 10 μM ketamine. Markers of cellular proliferation and differentiation, mitochondrial health, cell death/damage, and oxidative damage were monitored to determine: (1) the effects of ketamine on neural stem cell proliferation and neural stem cell differentiation; (2) the nature and degree of ketamine-induced toxicity in proliferating neural stem cells and differentiated neural cells; and (3) to provide information regarding receptor expression and possible mechanisms underlying ketamine toxicity. After ketamine exposure at a clinically relevant concentration (10 μM), neural stem cell proliferation was not significantly affected and oxidative DNA damage was not induced. No significant effect on mitochondrial viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay) in neural stem cell cultures (growth medium) was observed at ketamine concentrations up to 500 μM. However, quantitative analysis shows that the number of differentiated neurons was substantially reduced in 10 μM ketamine-exposed cultures in differentiation medium, compared with the controls. No significant changes in the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes and O4-positive oligodendrocytes (in differentiation medium) were detected from ketamine-exposed cultures

  13. Integrating Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Neural Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Francesca L; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-02-01

    The central nervous system has a limited capacity to regenerate, and thus, traumatic injuries or diseases often have devastating consequences. Therefore, there is a distinct need to develop alternative treatments that can achieve functional recovery without side effects currently observed with some pharmacological treatments. Combining biomaterials with pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), either embryonic or induced, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. Biomaterials can mimic the extracellular matrix and present a myriad of relevant biochemical cues through rational design or further functionalization. Biomaterials such as nanofibers and hydrogels, including self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels can provide a superior cell culture environment. When these materials are then combined with PSCs, more accurate drug screening and disease modeling could be developed, and the generation of large number of cells with the appropriate phenotype can be achieved, for subsequent use in vitro. Biomaterials have also been shown to support endogenous cell growth after implantation, and, in particular, hydrogels and SAPs have effectively acted as cell delivery vehicles, increasing cell survival after transplantation. Few studies are yet to fully exploit the combination of PSCs and innovative biomaterials; however, initial studies with neural stem cells, for example, are promising, and, hence, such a combination for use in vitro and in vivo is an exciting new direction for the field of neural regeneration.

  14. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke.

  15. Confetti clarifies controversy: neural crest stem cells are multipotent.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Marianne

    2015-03-05

    Neural crest precursors generate diverse cell lineages during development, which have been proposed to arise either from multipotent precursor cells or pools of heterogeneous, restricted progenitors. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Baggiolini et al. (2015) perform rigorous in vivo lineage tracing to show that individual neural crest precursors are multipotent.

  16. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D.; Kornblum, Harley I.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  17. Adherent neural stem (NS) cells from fetal and adult forebrain.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Steven M; Conti, Luciano; Sun, Yirui; Goffredo, Donato; Smith, Austin

    2006-07-01

    Stable in vitro propagation of central nervous system (CNS) stem cells would offer expanded opportunities to dissect basic molecular, cellular, and developmental processes and to model neurodegenerative disease. CNS stem cells could also provide a source of material for drug discovery assays and cell replacement therapies. We have recently reported the generation of adherent, symmetrically expandable, neural stem (NS) cell lines derived both from mouse and human embryonic stem cells and from fetal forebrain (Conti L, Pollard SM, Gorba T, Reitano E, Toselli M, Biella G, Sun Y, Sanzone S, Ying QL, Cattaneo E, Smith A. 2005. Niche-independent symmetrical self-renewal of a mammalian tissue stem cell. PLoS Biol 3(9):e283). These NS cells retain neuronal and glial differentiation potential after prolonged passaging and are transplantable. NS cells are likely to comprise the resident stem cell population within heterogeneous neurosphere cultures. Here we demonstrate that similar NS cell cultures can be established from the adult mouse brain. We also characterize the growth factor requirements for NS cell derivation and self-renewal. We discuss our current understanding of the relationship of NS cell lines to physiological progenitor cells of fetal and adult CNS.

  18. Rhesus monkey neural stem cell transplantation promotes neural regeneration in rats with hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Li-Juan; Bian, Hui; Fan, Yao-Dong; Wang, Zheng-Bo; Yu, Hua-Lin; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Rhesus monkey neural stem cells are capable of differentiating into neurons and glial cells. Therefore, neural stem cell transplantation can be used to promote functional recovery of the nervous system. Rhesus monkey neural stem cells (1 × 10(5) cells/μL) were injected into bilateral hippocampi of rats with hippocampal lesions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that green fluorescent protein-labeled transplanted cells survived and grew well. Transplanted cells were detected at the lesion site, but also in the nerve fiber-rich region of the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum. Some transplanted cells differentiated into neurons and glial cells clustering along the ventricular wall, and integrated into the recipient brain. Behavioral tests revealed that spatial learning and memory ability improved, indicating that rhesus monkey neural stem cells noticeably improve spatial learning and memory abilities in rats with hippocampal lesions.

  19. When cells become depressed: focus on neural stem cells in novel treatment strategies against depression.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, J; Schmitt, A; Mössner, R; Lesch, K-P

    2002-05-01

    Clinical neuroscience enters a new era in understanding the pathophysiology of depressive illness and the mode of action of antidepressant therapy. While elucidation of factors that lead to depression is still in its infancy, biochemical malfunctions appear to have well defined morphological correlations, especially in the hippocampus. Hippocampus is one of the main sites in the brain habouring neural stem cells. Cytokines and neurotrophic factors like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a pivotal role in neural plasticity and potentially influence growth and migration of these progenitors. Not surprisingly, antidepressant drugs interfering with neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-HT) influence neurotrophins like BDNF, since 5-HT homeostasis is essential for brain development, neurogenesis, and neuroplasticity as well as complex behavior. In this review, the new area of neural stem cell research and the avenues of ongoing and future research sustaining the development of novel treatments for depression will be explored.

  20. Production of chick embryo extract for the cultivation of murine neural crest stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pajtler, Kristian; Bohrer, Anna; Maurer, Jochen; Schorle, Hubert; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Schulte, Johannes Hubertus

    2010-11-27

    The neural crest arises from the neuro-ectoderm during embryogenesis and persists only temporarily. Early experiments already proofed pluripotent progenitor cells to be an integral part of the neural crest(1). Phenotypically, neural crest stem cells (NCSC) are defined by simultaneously expressing p75 (low-affine nerve growth factor receptor, LNGFR) and SOX10 during their migration from the neural crest(2,3,4,5). These progenitor cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells, chromaffin cells, neurons and glial cells, as well as melanocytes, cartilage and bone(6,7,8,9). To cultivate NCSC in vitro, a special neural crest stem cell medium (NCSCM) is required(10). The most complex part of the NCSCM is the preparation of chick embryo extract (CEE) representing an essential source of growth factors for the NCSC as well as for other types of neural explants. Other NCSCM ingredients beside CEE are commercially available. Producing CCE using laboratory standard equipment it is of high importance to know about the challenging details as the isolation, maceration, centrifugation, and filtration processes. In this protocol we describe accurate techniques to produce a maximized amount of pure and high quality CEE.

  1. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Promotes Clustering and Activation of EphA3 Receptors in GABAergic Interneurons to Induce Ras Homolog Gene Family, Member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK)-mediated Growth Cone Collapse.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Chelsea S; Kümper, Maike; Temple, Brenda S; Maness, Patricia F

    2016-12-16

    Establishment of a proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory connectivity is achieved during development of cortical networks and adjusted through synaptic plasticity. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA3 regulate the perisomatic synapse density of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons in the mouse frontal cortex through ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse. In this study, it was demonstrated that binding of NCAM and EphA3 occurred between the NCAM Ig2 domain and EphA3 cysteine-rich domain (CRD). The binding interface was further refined through molecular modeling and mutagenesis and shown to be comprised of complementary charged residues in the NCAM Ig2 domain (Arg-156 and Lys-162) and the EphA3 CRD (Glu-248 and Glu-264). Ephrin-A5 induced co-clustering of surface-bound NCAM and EphA3 in GABAergic cortical interneurons in culture. Receptor clustering was impaired by a charge reversal mutation that disrupted NCAM/EphA3 association, emphasizing the importance of the NCAM/EphA3 binding interface for cluster formation. NCAM enhanced ephrin-A5-induced EphA3 autophosphorylation and activation of RhoA GTPase, indicating a role for NCAM in activating EphA3 signaling through clustering. NCAM-mediated clustering of EphA3 was essential for ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse in cortical GABAergic interneurons, and RhoA and a principal effector, Rho-associated protein kinase, mediated the collapse response. This study delineates a mechanism in which NCAM promotes ephrin-A5-dependent clustering of EphA3 through interaction of the NCAM Ig2 domain and the EphA3 CRD, stimulating EphA3 autophosphorylation and RhoA signaling necessary for growth cone repulsion in GABAergic interneurons in vitro, which may extend to remodeling of axonal terminals of interneurons in vivo.

  2. Neural stem cells in lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-W; Zhang, X; Huang, W-J

    2016-12-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure in the early stages of neurodevelopment results in long-lasting alterations that ultimately cognitive function and behaviour. The prime targets of lead toxicity are the multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). The present review will discuss the basic molecular physiology involved in the toxicity mechanisms induced by lead and its resultant counter effects on nervous system and physiology. The article shall help researchers working in the area to design new drugs and therapeutics for the efficient management of neuro-toxic states especially upon prenatal exposure to lead.

  3. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    PubMed

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  4. Presenilin-1 regulates neural progenitor cell differentiation in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gadadhar, Archana; Marr, Robert; Lazarov, Orly

    2011-01-01

    Presenilin-1 (PS1) is the catalytic core of the aspartyl protease γ-secretase. Previous genetic studies using germ-line deletion of PS1 and conditional knockout mice demonstrated that PS1 plays an essential role in neuronal differentiation during neural development, but it remained unclear whether PS1 plays a similar role in neurogenesis in the adult brain. Here we show that neural progenitor cells infected with lentiviral vectors expressing short interfering RNA (siRNA) for the exclusive knockdown of PS1 in the neurogenic microenvironments, exhibit a dramatic enhancement of cell differentiation. Infected cells differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, suggesting that multipotentiality of neural progenitor cells is not affected by reduced levels of PS1. Neurosphere cultures treated with γ-secretase inhibitors exhibit a similar phenotype of enhanced cell differentiation, suggesting that PS1 function in neural progenitor cells is γ-secretase-dependent. Neurospheres infected with lentiviral vectors expressing siRNA for the targeting of PS1 differentiated even in the presence of the proliferation factors epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), suggesting that PS1 dominates EFG and bFGF signaling pathways. Reduction of PS1 expression in neural progenitor cells was accompanied by a decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-catenin expression level, suggesting that they are downstream essential transducers of PS1 signaling in adult neural progenitor cells. These findings suggest a physiological role for PS1 in adult neurogenesis, and a potential target for the manipulation of neural progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:21325529

  5. Folate receptor alpha is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-03-02

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor-α (FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. FRα knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. FRα-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model for folate receptor interacting with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism may unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new means for preventing NTDs.

  6. Neural crest cell-derived VEGF promotes embryonic jaw extension

    PubMed Central

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Anderson, Peter; Kabbara, Samuela; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Schwarz, Quenten

    2015-01-01

    Jaw morphogenesis depends on the growth of Meckel’s cartilage during embryogenesis. However, the cell types and signals that promote chondrocyte proliferation for Meckel’s cartilage growth are poorly defined. Here we show that neural crest cells (NCCs) and their derivatives provide an essential source of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to enhance jaw vascularization and stabilize the major mandibular artery. We further show in two independent mouse models that blood vessels promote Meckel’s cartilage extension. Coculture experiments of arterial tissue with NCCs or chondrocytes demonstrated that NCC-derived VEGF promotes blood vessel growth and that blood vessels secrete factors to instruct chondrocyte proliferation. Computed tomography and X-ray scans of patients with hemifacial microsomia also showed that jaw hypoplasia correlates with mandibular artery dysgenesis. We conclude that cranial NCCs and their derivatives provide an essential source of VEGF to support blood vessel growth in the developing jaw, which in turn is essential for normal chondrocyte proliferation, and therefore jaw extension. PMID:25922531

  7. REN: a novel, developmentally regulated gene that promotes neural cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Rita; Zazzeroni, Francesca; Alesse, Edoardo; Mincione, Claudia; Borello, Ugo; Buanne, Pasquale; D'Eugenio, Roberta; Mackay, Andrew R; Argenti, Beatrice; Gradini, Roberto; Russo, Matteo A; Maroder, Marella; Cossu, Giulio; Frati, Luigi; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto

    2002-08-19

    Expansion and fate choice of pluripotent stem cells along the neuroectodermal lineage is regulated by a number of signals, including EGF, retinoic acid, and NGF, which also control the proliferation and differentiation of central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) neural progenitor cells. We report here the identification of a novel gene, REN, upregulated by neurogenic signals (retinoic acid, EGF, and NGF) in pluripotent embryonal stem (ES) cells and neural progenitor cell lines in association with neurotypic differentiation. Consistent with a role in neural promotion, REN overexpression induced neuronal differentiation as well as growth arrest and p27Kip1 expression in CNS and PNS neural progenitor cell lines, and its inhibition impaired retinoic acid induction of neurogenin-1 and NeuroD expression. REN expression is developmentally regulated, initially detected in the neural fold epithelium of the mouse embryo during gastrulation, and subsequently throughout the ventral neural tube, the outer layer of the ventricular encephalic neuroepithelium and in neural crest derivatives including dorsal root ganglia. We propose that REN represents a novel component of the neurogenic signaling cascade induced by retinoic acid, EGF, and NGF, and is both a marker and a regulator of neuronal differentiation.

  8. REST regulation of gene networks in adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shradha; Brulet, Rebecca; Zhang, Ling; Hsieh, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neural stem cells generate newborn neurons throughout life due to their ability to self-renew and exist as quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs) before differentiating into transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control adult neural stem cell self-renewal are still largely unknown. Conditional knockout of REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) results in precocious activation of QNPs and reduced neurogenesis over time. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which REST regulates adult neural stem cells, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA-sequencing to identify direct REST target genes. We find REST regulates both QNPs and TAPs, and importantly, ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and neuronal genes in the process. Furthermore, overexpression of individual REST target ribosome biogenesis or cell cycle genes is sufficient to induce activation of QNPs. Our data define novel REST targets to maintain the quiescent neural stem cell state. PMID:27819263

  9. REST regulation of gene networks in adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shradha; Brulet, Rebecca; Zhang, Ling; Hsieh, Jenny

    2016-11-07

    Adult hippocampal neural stem cells generate newborn neurons throughout life due to their ability to self-renew and exist as quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs) before differentiating into transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control adult neural stem cell self-renewal are still largely unknown. Conditional knockout of REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) results in precocious activation of QNPs and reduced neurogenesis over time. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which REST regulates adult neural stem cells, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA-sequencing to identify direct REST target genes. We find REST regulates both QNPs and TAPs, and importantly, ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and neuronal genes in the process. Furthermore, overexpression of individual REST target ribosome biogenesis or cell cycle genes is sufficient to induce activation of QNPs. Our data define novel REST targets to maintain the quiescent neural stem cell state.

  10. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu; Han, Zhe; Chuai, Manli; Wang, Li-jing; Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka; Geng, Jian-guo; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  11. Generation of diverse neural cell types through direct conversion

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Gayle F; Strappe, Padraig M

    2016-01-01

    A characteristic of neurological disorders is the loss of critical populations of cells that the body is unable to replace, thus there has been much interest in identifying methods of generating clinically relevant numbers of cells to replace those that have been damaged or lost. The process of neural direct conversion, in which cells of one lineage are converted into cells of a neural lineage without first inducing pluripotency, shows great potential, with evidence of the generation of a range of functional neural cell types both in vitro and in vivo, through viral and non-viral delivery of exogenous factors, as well as chemical induction methods. Induced neural cells have been proposed as an attractive alternative to neural cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells, with prospective roles in the investigation of neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative disease modelling, drug screening, and cellular replacement for regenerative medicine applications, however further investigations into improving the efficacy and safety of these methods need to be performed before neural direct conversion becomes a clinically viable option. In this review, we describe the generation of diverse neural cell types via direct conversion of somatic cells, with comparison against stem cell-based approaches, as well as discussion of their potential research and clinical applications. PMID:26981169

  12. In vivo blockade of neural activity alters dendritic development of neonatal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Groc, Laurent; Petanjek, Zdravko; Gustafsson, Bengt; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hanse, Eric; Khazipov, Roustem

    2002-11-01

    During development, neural activity has been proposed to promote neuronal growth. During the first postnatal week, the hippocampus is characterized by an oscillating neural network activity and a rapid neuronal growth. In the present study we tested in vivo, by injecting tetanus toxin into the hippocampus of P1 rats, whether this neural activity indeed promotes growth of pyramidal cells. We have previously shown that tetanus toxin injection leads to a strong reduction in the frequency of spontaneous GABA and glutamatergic synaptic currents, and to a complete blockade of the early neural network activity during the first postnatal week. Morphology of neurobiotin-filled CA1 pyramidal cells was analyzed at the end of the first postnatal week (P6-10). In activity-reduced neurons, the total length of basal dendritic tree was three times less than control. The number, but not the length, of basal dendritic branches was affected. The growth impairment was restricted to the basal dendrites. The apical dendrite, the axons, or the soma grew normally during activity deprivation. Thus, the in vivo neural activity in the neonate hippocampus seems to promote neuronal growth by initiating novel branches.

  13. Prolonged cultivation of hippocampal neural precursor cells shifts their differentiation potential and selects for aneuploid cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The Duy; Widera, Darius; Greiner, Johannes; Müller, Janine; Martin, Ina; Slotta, Carsten; Hauser, Stefan; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) are lineage-restricted neural stem cells with limited self-renewal, giving rise to a broad range of neural cell types such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Despite this developmental potential, the differentiation capacity of NPCs has been controversially discussed concerning the trespassing lineage boundaries, for instance resulting in hematopoietic competence. Assessing their in vitro plasticity, we isolated nestin+/Sox2+, NPCs from the adult murine hippocampus. In vitro-expanded adult NPCs were able to form neurospheres, self-renew, and differentiate into neuronal, astrocytic, and oligodendrocytic cells. Although NPCs cultivated in early passage efficiently gave rise to neuronal cells in a directed differentiation assay, extensively cultivated NPCs revealed reduced potential for ectodermal differentiation. We further observed successful differentiation of long-term cultured NPCs into osteogenic and adipogenic cell types, suggesting that NPCs underwent a fate switch during culture. NPCs cultivated for more than 12 passages were aneuploid (abnormal chromosome numbers such as 70 chromosomes). Furthermore, they showed growth factor-independent proliferation, a hallmark of tumorigenic transformation. In conclusion, our findings substantiate the lineage restriction of NPCs from adult mammalian hippocampus. Prolonged cultivation results, however, in enhanced differentiation potential, which may be attributed to transformation events leading to aneuploid cells.

  14. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy.

  15. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  16. Analysing human neural stem cell ontogeny by consecutive isolation of Notch active neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Edri, Reuven; Yaffe, Yakey; Ziller, Michael J; Mutukula, Naresh; Volkman, Rotem; David, Eyal; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Malcov, Hagar; Levy, Carmit; Rechavi, Gideon; Gat-Viks, Irit; Meissner, Alexander; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-03-23

    Decoding heterogeneity of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural progeny is fundamental for revealing the origin of diverse progenitors, for defining their lineages, and for identifying fate determinants driving transition through distinct potencies. Here we have prospectively isolated consecutively appearing PSC-derived primary progenitors based on their Notch activation state. We first isolate early neuroepithelial cells and show their broad Notch-dependent developmental and proliferative potential. Neuroepithelial cells further yield successive Notch-dependent functional primary progenitors, from early and midneurogenic radial glia and their derived basal progenitors, to gliogenic radial glia and adult-like neural progenitors, together recapitulating hallmarks of neural stem cell (NSC) ontogeny. Gene expression profiling reveals dynamic stage-specific transcriptional patterns that may link development of distinct progenitor identities through Notch activation. Our observations provide a platform for characterization and manipulation of distinct progenitor cell types amenable for developing streamlined neural lineage specification paradigms for modelling development in health and disease.

  17. Adult vascular smooth muscle cells in culture express neural stem cell markers typical of resident multipotent vascular stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eimear; Mooney, Ciaran J; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Guha, Shaunta; Collins, Laura E; Loscher, Christine E; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Differentiation of resident multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) or de-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) might be responsible for the SMC phenotype that plays a major role in vascular diseases such as arteriosclerosis and restenosis. We examined vSMCs from three different species (rat, murine and bovine) to establish whether they exhibit neural stem cell characteristics typical of MVSCs. We determined their SMC differentiation, neural stem cell marker expression and multipotency following induction in vitro by using immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MVSCs isolated from rat aortic explants, enzymatically dispersed rat SMCs and rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells served as controls. Murine carotid artery lysates and primary rat aortic vSMCs were both myosin-heavy-chain-positive but weakly expressed the neural crest stem cell marker, Sox10. Each vSMC line examined expressed SMC differentiation markers (smooth muscle α-actin, myosin heavy chain and calponin), neural crest stem cell markers (Sox10(+), Sox17(+)) and a glia marker (S100β(+)). Serum deprivation significantly increased calponin and myosin heavy chain expression and decreased stem cell marker expression, when compared with serum-rich conditions. vSMCs did not differentiate to adipocytes or osteoblasts following adipogenic or osteogenic inductive stimulation, respectively, or respond to transforming growth factor-β1 or Notch following γ-secretase inhibition. Thus, vascular SMCs in culture express neural stem cell markers typical of MVSCs, concomitant with SMC differentiation markers, but do not retain their multipotency. The ultimate origin of these cells might have important implications for their use in investigations of vascular proliferative disease in vitro.

  18. In Vitro Differentiation of Human iPS Cells into Neural like Cells on a Biomimetic Polyurea.

    PubMed

    Hoveizi, Elham; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Tavakol, Shima; Sanamiri, Khadije

    2017-01-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have the pluripotency to differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro and have been considered potent candidates for regenerative medicine as an unlimited source of cells for therapeutic applications. Neural tissue engineering is an important area of research in the field of tissue-engineering especially for neurodegenerative disease. Here, we investigated the use of poly lactic acid/gelatin (PLA/gelatin) scaffold as three-dimensional (3D) system which increase neural cell differentiation. Through neural induction, neural-like cells (NLCs) were derived from hiPSCs on nanofibrous PLA/gelatin scaffold. Enhanced numbers of neural structures and staining of neural markers were observed with hiPS cell-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds when compared with control medium. The results revealed that hiPSCs attach and grow on the nanofibrous PLA/gelatin scaffold, and hiPSCs cultured on scaffold have the potential to differentiate in neuronal cells in the presence of growth factors. The result of this study may have impact in tissue engineering and cells-base therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and have a great potential for wide application.

  19. Pannexin 1 regulates postnatal neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pannexin 1 forms ion and metabolite permeable hexameric channels and is abundantly expressed in the brain. After discovering pannexin 1 expression in postnatal neural stem and progenitor cells we sought to elucidate its functional role in neuronal development. Results We detected pannexin 1 in neural stem and progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo. We manipulated pannexin 1 expression and activity in Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells and primary postnatal neurosphere cultures to demonstrate that pannexin 1 regulates neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation likely through the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Conclusions Permeable to ATP, a potent autocrine/paracine signaling metabolite, pannexin 1 channels are ideally suited to influence the behavior of neural stem and progenitor cells. Here we demonstrate they play a robust role in the regulation of neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation. Endogenous postnatal neural stem and progenitor cells are crucial for normal brain health, and their numbers decline with age. Furthermore, these special cells are highly responsive to neurological injury and disease, and are gaining attention as putative targets for brain repair. Therefore, understanding the fundamental role of pannexin 1 channels in neural stem and progenitor cells is of critical importance for brain health and disease. PMID:22458943

  20. Endothelial Cells Stimulate Self-Renewal and Expand Neurogenesis of Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qin; Goderie, Susan K.; Jin, Li; Karanth, Nithin; Sun, Yu; Abramova, Natalia; Vincent, Peter; Pumiglia, Kevin; Temple, Sally

    2004-05-01

    Neural stem cells are reported to lie in a vascular niche, but there is no direct evidence for a functional relationship between the stem cells and blood vessel component cells. We show that endothelial cells but not vascular smooth muscle cells release soluble factors that stimulate the self-renewal of neural stem cells, inhibit their differentiation, and enhance their neuron production. Both embryonic and adult neural stem cells respond, allowing extensive production of both projection neuron and interneuron types in vitro. Endothelial coculture stimulates neuroepithelial cell contact, activating Notch and Hes1 to promote self-renewal. These findings identify endothelial cells as a critical component of the neural stem cell niche.

  1. Pig Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Rosettes Parallel Human Differentiation Into Sensory Neural Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Webb, Robin L; Gallegos-Cárdenas, Amalia; Miller, Colette N; Solomotis, Nicholas J; Liu, Hong-Xiang; West, Franklin D; Stice, Steven L

    2017-04-01

    The pig is the large animal model of choice for study of nerve regeneration and wound repair. Availability of porcine sensory neural cells would conceptually allow for analogous cell-based peripheral nerve regeneration in porcine injuries of similar severity and size to those found in humans. After recently reporting that porcine (or pig) induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs) differentiate into neural rosette (NR) structures similar to human NRs, here we demonstrate that pig NR cells could differentiate into neural crest cells and other peripheral nervous system-relevant cell types. Treatment with either bone morphogenetic protein 4 or fetal bovine serum led to differentiation into BRN3A-positive sensory cells and increased expression of sensory neuron TRK receptor gene family: TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC. Porcine sensory neural cells would allow determination of parallels between human and porcine cells in response to noxious stimuli, analgesics, and reparative mechanisms. In vitro differentiation of pig sensory neurons provides a novel model system for neural cell subtype specification and would provide a novel platform for the study of regenerative therapeutics by elucidating the requirements for innervation following injury and axonal survival.

  2. Surface topography during neural stem cell differentiation regulates cell migration and cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Czeisler, Catherine; Short, Aaron; Nelson, Tyler; Gygli, Patrick; Ortiz, Cristina; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Stocker, Ben; Cronin, James; Lannutti, John; Winter, Jessica; Otero, José Javier

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of scaffold topography to the migration and morphology of neural stem cells by mimicking anatomical features of scaffolds found in vivo. We mimicked two types of central nervous system scaffolds encountered by neural stem cells during development in vitro by constructing different diameter electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber mats, a substrate that we have shown to be topographically similar to brain scaffolds. We compared the effects of large fibers (made to mimic blood vessel topography) with those of small-diameter fibers (made to mimic radial glial process topography) on the migration and differentiation of neural stem cells. Neural stem cells showed differential migratory and morphological reactions with laminin in different topographical contexts. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neural stem cell biological responses to laminin are dependent on topographical context. Large-fiber topography without laminin prevented cell migration, which was partially reversed by treatment with rock inhibitor. Cell morphology complexity assayed by fractal dimension was inhibited in nocodazole- and cytochalasin-D-treated neural precursor cells in large-fiber topography, but was not changed in small-fiber topography with these inhibitors. These data indicate that cell morphology has different requirements on cytoskeletal proteins dependent on the topographical environment encountered by the cell. We propose that the physical structure of distinct scaffolds induces unique signaling cascades that regulate migration and morphology in embryonic neural precursor cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3485-3502, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Inhibition of FGF signaling accelerates neural crest cell differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Muangchan, Pattamon; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-12-02

    Neural crest (NC) is a transient population, arising during embryonic development and capable of differentiating into various somatic cells. The defects of neural crest development leads to neurocristopathy. Several signaling pathways were revealed their significance in NC cell specification. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is recognized as an important signaling during NC development, for instance Xenopus and avian; however, its contributions in human species are remained elusive. Here we used human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to investigate the consequences of FGF inhibition during NC cell differentiation. The specific-FGF receptor inhibitor, SU5402, was used in this investigation. The inhibition of FGF did not found to affect the proliferation or death of hPSC-derived NC cells, but promoted hPSCs to commit NC cell fate. NC-specific genes, including PAX3, SLUG, and TWIST1, were highly upregulated, while hPSC genes, such as OCT4, and E-CAD, rapidly reduced upon FGF signaling blockage. Noteworthy, TFAP-2α, a marker of migratory NC cells, abundantly presented in SU5402-induced cells. This accelerated NC cell differentiation could be due to the activation of Notch signaling upon the blockage of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, since NICD was increased by SU5402. Altogether, this study proposed the contributions of FGF signaling in controlling human NC cell differentiation from hPSCs, the crosstalk between FGF and Notch, and might imply to the influences of FGF signaling in neurocristophatic diseases.

  4. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  5. Trunk neural crest cells: formation, migration and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vega-Lopez, Guillermo A; Cerrizuela, Santiago; Aybar, Manuel J

    2017-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a multipotent, migratory cell population that generates an astonishingly diverse array of cell types during vertebrate development. The trunk neural crest has long been considered of particular significance. First, it has been held that the trunk neural crest has a morphogenetic role, acting to coordinate the development of the peripheral nervous system, secretory cells of the endocrine system and pigment cells of the skin. Second, the trunk neural crest additionally has skeletal potential. However, it has been demonstrated that a key role of the trunk neural crest streams is to organize the innervation of the intestine. Although trunk NCCs have a limited capacity for self-renewal, sometimes they become neural-crest-derived tumor cells and reveal the fact that that NCCs and tumor cells share the same molecular machinery. In this review we describe the routes taken by trunk NCCs and consider the signals and cues that pattern these trajectories. We also discuss recent advances in the characterization of the properties of trunk NCCs for various model organisms in order to highlight common themes. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the need to translate the wealth of data from animal studies to the clinical area in order to develop treatments for neural crest-related human diseases.

  6. Chemo-mechanical control of neural stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geishecker, Emily R.

    Cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled in part by cell interactions with the microenvironment. Cells can sense and respond to a variety of stimuli, including soluble and insoluble factors (such as proteins and small molecules) and externally applied mechanical stresses. Mechanical properties of the environment, such as substrate stiffness, have also been suggested to play an important role in cell processes. The roles of both biochemical and mechanical signaling in fate modification of stem cells have been explored independently. However, very few studies have been performed to study well-controlled chemo-mechanotransduction. The objective of this work is to design, synthesize, and characterize a chemo-mechanical substrate to encourage neuronal differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In Chapter 2, Polyacrylamide (PA) gels of varying stiffnesses are functionalized with differing amounts of whole collagen to investigate the role of protein concentration in combination with substrate stiffness. As expected, neurons on the softest substrate were more in number and neuronal morphology than those on stiffer substrates. Neurons appeared locally aligned with an expansive network of neurites. Additional experiments would allow for statistical analysis to determine if and how collagen density impacts C17.2 differentiation in combination with substrate stiffness. Due to difficulties associated with whole protein approaches, a similar platform was developed using mixed adhesive peptides, derived from fibronectin and laminin, and is presented in Chapter 3. The matrix elasticity and peptide concentration can be individually modulated to systematically probe the effects of chemo-mechanical signaling on differentiation of C17.2 cells. Polyacrylamide gel stiffness was confirmed using rheological techniques and found to support values published by Yeung et al. [1]. Cellular growth and differentiation were assessed by cell counts

  7. Regulated GDNF Delivery in Vivo Using Neural Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    which do not kill cell bodies within the striatum but induce retrograde death of dopamine bodies in the brain stem showed a level of survival and...Neural Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clive Svendsen, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Wisconsin...Regulated GDNF Delivery in Vivo Using Neural Stem Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0122 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  8. Regulated GDNF Delivery In Vivo using Neural Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    attached as Appendix 2. Body Task 1. To produce rat and monkey neural stem cells which secrete GDNF under an inducible promoter. a. Assess and optimize GDNF...AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0122 TITLE: Regulated GDNF Delivery In Vivo Using Neural Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clive N. Svendsen, Ph.D...analysis of 4 rats for PET. This system is now ready for the new stem cell transplants and carrying out the experiments outlined in year three which

  9. Monocarboxylate transporter 8 in neuronal cell growth.

    PubMed

    James, S R; Franklyn, J A; Reaves, B J; Smith, V E; Chan, S Y; Barrett, T G; Kilby, M D; McCabe, C J

    2009-04-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal growth and development of the fetus, and even small alterations in maternal thyroid hormone status during early pregnancy may be associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities in childhood. Mutations in the novel and specific thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) have been associated with severe neurodevelopmental impairment. However, the mechanism by which MCT8 influences neural development remains poorly defined. We have therefore investigated the effect of wild-type (WT) MCT8, and the previously reported L471P mutant, on the growth and function of human neuronal precursor NT2 cells as well as MCT8-null JEG-3 cells. HA-tagged WT MCT8 correctly localized to the plasma membrane in NT2 cells and increased T(3) uptake in both cell types. In contrast, L471P MCT8 was largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and displayed no T(3) transport activity. Transient overexpression of WT and mutant MCT8 proteins failed to induce endoplasmic reticular stress or apoptosis. However, MCT8 overexpression significantly repressed cell proliferation in each cell type in both the presence and absence of the active thyroid hormone T(3) and in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, L471P MCT8 showed no such influence. Finally, small interfering RNA depletion of endogenous MCT8 resulted in increased cell survival and decreased T(3) uptake. Given that T(3) stimulated proliferation in embryonic neuronal NT2 cells, whereas MCT8 repressed cell growth, these data suggest an entirely novel role for MCT8 in addition to T(3) transport, mediated through the modulation of cell proliferation in the developing brain.

  10. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation and CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Hamblin, Milton H; Lee, Jean-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    In neurological disorders, pathological lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) may be globally dispersed throughout the brain or localized to specific regions. Although native neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in the adult mammalian brain, intrinsic self-repair of injured adult CNS tissue is inadequate or ineffective. The brain's poor regenerative ability may be due to the fact that NSCs are restricted to discrete locations, are few in number, or are surrounded by a microenvironment that does not support neuronal differentiation. Therapeutic potential of NSC transplantation in CNS diseases characterized by global degeneration requires that gene products and/or replaced cells be widely distributed. Global degenerative CNS diseases include inherited pediatric neurodegenerative diseases (inborn errors of metabolism, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), such as Tay-Sachs-related Sandhoff disease), hypoxic or ischemic encephalopathy, and some adult CNS diseases (such as multiple sclerosis). Both mouse and human NSCs express many chemokines and chemokine receptors (including CXCR4 and adhesion molecules, such as integrins, selectins, and immunoglobulins) that mediate homing to sources of inflammatory chemokines, such as SDF-1α. In mammalian brains of all ages, NSCs may be attracted even at a great distance to regions of neurodegeneration. Consequently, NSC transplantation presents a promising strategy for treating many CNS diseases.

  11. Role of neural precursor cells in promoting repair following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dibajnia, Pooya; Morshead, Cindi M

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of stroke have received considerable attention. Two broad approaches to stem cell-based therapies have been taken: the transplantation of exogenous stem cells, and the activation of endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (together termed neural precursors). Studies examining the transplantation of exogenous cells have demonstrated that neural stem and progenitor cells lead to the most clinically promising results. Endogenous activation of neural precursors has also been explored based on the fact that resident precursor cells have the inherent capacity to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature neurons in the uninjured adult brain. Studies have revealed that these neural precursor cell behaviours can be activated following stroke, whereby neural precursors will expand in number, migrate to the infarct site and differentiate into neurons. However, this innate response is insufficient to lead to functional recovery, making it necessary to enhance the activation of endogenous precursors to promote tissue repair and functional recovery. Herein we will discuss the current state of the stem cell-based approaches with a focus on endogenous repair to treat the stroke injured brain. PMID:23064725

  12. The influence of electric fields on hippocampal neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Carlos Atico; Fleury, Asha T; Tormos, Christian J; Petruk, Vadim; Chawla, Sagar; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2010-12-01

    The differentiation and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) depend on various in vivo environmental factors or cues, which may include an endogenous electrical field (EF), as observed during nervous system development and repair. In this study, we investigate the morphologic, phenotypic, and mitotic alterations of adult hippocampal NPCs that occur when exposed to two EFs of estimated endogenous strengths. NPCs treated with a 437 mV/mm direct current (DC) EF aligned perpendicularly to the EF vector and had a greater tendency to differentiate into neurons, but not into oligodendrocytes or astrocytes, compared to controls. Furthermore, NPC process growth was promoted perpendicularly and inhibited anodally in the 437 mV/mm DC EF. Yet fewer cells were observed in the DC EF, which in part was due to a decrease in cell viability. The other EF applied was a 46 mV/mm alternating current (AC) EF. However, the 46 mV/mm AC EF showed no major differences in alignment or differentiation, compared to control conditions. For both EF treatments, the percent of mitotic cells during the last 14 h of the experiment were statistically similar to controls. Reported here, to our knowledge, is the first evidence of adult NPC differentiation affected in an EF in vitro. Further investigation and application of EFs on stem cells is warranted to elucidate the utility of EFs to control phenotypic behavior. With progress, the use of EFs may be engineered to control differentiation and target the growth of transplanted cells in a stem cell-based therapy to treat nervous system disorders.

  13. Behavior of neural stem cells in the Alzheimer brain.

    PubMed

    Waldau, B; Shetty, A K

    2008-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) and a progressive loss of neurons leading to dementia. Because hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to functions such as learning, memory and mood, there has been great interest in examining the effects of AD on hippocampal neurogenesis. This article reviews the pertinent studies and tries to unite them in one possible disease model. Early in the disease, oligomeric Abeta may transiently promote the generation of immature neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs). However, reduced concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors and higher levels of fibroblast growth factor-2 seem to induce a developmental arrest of newly generated neurons. Furthermore, fibrillary Abeta and down-regulation of oligodendrocyte-lineage transcription factor-2 (OLIG2) may cause the death of these nonfunctional neurons. Therefore, altering the brain microenvironment for fostering apt maturation of graft-derived neurons may be critical for improving the efficacy of NSC transplantation therapy for AD.

  14. Comparative aspects of adult neural stem cell activity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Grandel, Heiner; Brand, Michael

    2013-03-01

    At birth or after hatching from the egg, vertebrate brains still contain neural stem cells which reside in specialized niches. In some cases, these stem cells are deployed for further postnatal development of parts of the brain until the final structure is reached. In other cases, postnatal neurogenesis continues as constitutive neurogenesis into adulthood leading to a net increase of the number of neurons with age. Yet, in other cases, stem cells fuel neuronal turnover. An example is protracted development of the cerebellar granular layer in mammals and birds, where neurogenesis continues for a few weeks postnatally until the granular layer has reached its definitive size and stem cells are used up. Cerebellar growth also provides an example of continued neurogenesis during adulthood in teleosts. Again, it is the granular layer that grows as neurogenesis continues and no definite adult cerebellar size is reached. Neuronal turnover is most clearly seen in the telencephalon of male canaries, where projection neurons are replaced in nucleus high vocal centre each year before the start of a new mating season--circuitry reconstruction to achieve changes of the song repertoire in these birds? In this review, we describe these and other examples of adult neurogenesis in different vertebrate taxa. We also compare the structure of the stem cell niches to find common themes in their organization despite different functions adult neurogenesis serves in different species. Finally, we report on regeneration of the zebrafish telencephalon after injury to highlight similarities and differences of constitutive neurogenesis and neuronal regeneration.

  15. Cell attachment functionality of bioactive conducting polymers for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Green, Rylie A; Lovell, Nigel H; Poole-Warren, Laura A

    2009-08-01

    Bioactive coatings for neural electrodes that are tailored for cell interactions have the potential to produce superior implants with improved charge transfer capabilities. In this study synthetically produced anionically modified laminin peptides DEDEDYFQRYLI and DCDPGYIGSR were used to dope poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) electrodeposited on platinum (Pt) electrodes. Performance of peptide doped films was compared to conventional polymer PEDOT/paratoluene sulfonate (pTS) films using SEM, XPS, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, mechanical hardness and adherence. Bioactivity of incorporated peptides and their affect on cell growth was assessed using a PC12 neurite outgrowth assay. It was demonstrated that large peptide dopants produced softer PEDOT films with a minimal decrease in electrochemical stability, compared to the conventional dopant, pTS. Cell studies revealed that the YFQRYLI ligand retained neurite outgrowth bioactivity when DEDEDYFQRYLI was used as a dopant, but the effect was strongly dependant on initial cell attachment. Alternate peptide dopant, DCDPGYIGSR was found to impart superior cell attachment properties when compared to DEDEDYFQRYLI, but attachment on both peptide doped polymers could be enhanced by coating with whole native laminin.

  16. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs.

  17. Development of novel microfluidic platforms for neural stem cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Bonggeun

    This dissertation describes the development and characterization of novel microfluidic platforms to study proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis of neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs hold tremendous promise for fundamental biological studies and cell-based therapies in human disorders. NSCs are defined as cells that can self-renew yet maintain the ability to generate the three principal cell types of the central nervous system such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. NSCs therefore have therapeutic possibilities in multiple neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite their promise, cell-based therapies are limited by the inability to precisely control their behavior in culture. Compared to traditional culture tools, microfluidic platforms can provide much greater control over cell microenvironments and optimize proliferation and differentiation conditions of cells exposed to combinatorial mixtures of growth factors. Human NSCs were cultured for more than 1 week in the microfluidic device while constantly exposed to a continuous gradient of a growth factor mixture. NSCs proliferated and differentiated in a graded and proportional fashion that varied directly with growth factor concentration. In parallel to the study of growth and differentiation of NSCs, we are interested in proliferation and apoptosis of mouse NSCs exposed to morphogen gradients. Morphogen gradients are fundamental to animal brain development. Nonetheless, much controversy remains about the mechanisms by which morphogen gradients act on the developing brain. To overcome limitations of in-vitro models of gradients, we have developed a hybrid microfluidic platform that can mimic morphogen gradient profiles. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity in the developing cortex is graded and cortical NSC responses to BMPs are highly dependent on concentration and gradient slope of BMPs. To make novel microfluidic devices integrated with multiple functions, we have

  18. Functional electrical stimulation-facilitated proliferation and regeneration of neural precursor cells in the brains of rats with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yun; Liu, Huihua; Yan, Tiebin; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Jin, Dongmei; Peng, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that proliferation of endogenous neural precursor cells cannot alone compensate for the damage to neurons and axons. From the perspective of neural plasticity, we observed the effects of functional electrical stimulation treatment on endogenous neural precursor cell proliferation and expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor in the rat brain on the infarct side. Functional electrical stimulation was performed in rat models of acute middle cerebral artery occlusion. Simultaneously, we set up a placebo stimulation group and a sham-operated group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that, at 7 and 14 days, compared with the placebo group, the numbers of nestin (a neural precursor cell marker)-positive cells in the subgranular zone and subventricular zone were increased in the functional electrical stimulation treatment group. Western blot assays and reverse-transcription PCR showed that total protein levels and gene expression of epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor were also upregulated on the infarct side. Prehensile traction test results showed that, at 14 days, prehension function of rats in the functional electrical stimulation group was significantly better than in the placebo group. These results suggest that functional electrical stimulation can promote endogenous neural precursor cell proliferation in the brains of acute cerebral infarction rats, enhance expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, and improve the motor function of rats. PMID:25206808

  19. Multiple phenotypes in Huntington disease mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ritch, James J; Valencia, Antonio; Alexander, Jonathan; Sapp, Ellen; Gatune, Leah; Sangrey, Gavin R; Sinha, Saurabh; Scherber, Cally M; Zeitlin, Scott; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Irimia, Daniel; Difiglia, Marian; Kegel, Kimberly B

    2012-05-01

    Neural stem (NS) cells are a limitless resource, and thus superior to primary neurons for drug discovery provided they exhibit appropriate disease phenotypes. Here we established NS cells for cellular studies of Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a heritable neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation resulting in an increased number of glutamines (Q) within a polyglutamine tract in Huntingtin (Htt). NS cells were isolated from embryonic wild-type (Htt(7Q/7Q)) and "knock-in" HD (Htt(140Q/140Q)) mice expressing full-length endogenous normal or mutant Htt. NS cells were also developed from mouse embryonic stem cells that were devoid of Htt (Htt(-/-)), or knock-in cells containing human exon1 with an N-terminal FLAG epitope tag and with 7Q or 140Q inserted into one of the mouse alleles (Htt(F7Q/7Q) and Htt(F140Q/7Q)). Compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells, HD Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells showed significantly reduced levels of cholesterol, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impaired motility. The heterozygous Htt(F140Q/7Q) NS cells had increased ROS and decreased motility compared to Htt(F7Q/7Q). These phenotypes of HD NS cells replicate those seen in HD patients or in primary cell or in vivo models of HD. Huntingtin "knock-out" NS cells (Htt(-/-)) also had impaired motility, but in contrast to HD cells had increased cholesterol. In addition, Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells had higher phospho-AKT/AKT ratios than Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells in resting conditions and after BDNF stimulation, suggesting mutant htt affects AKT dependent growth factor signaling. Upon differentiation, the Htt(7Q/7Q) and Htt(140Q/140Q) generated numerous Beta(III)-Tubulin- and GABA-positive neurons; however, after 15 days the cellular architecture of the differentiated Htt(140Q/140Q) cultures changed compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) cultures and included a marked increase of GFAP-positive cells. Our findings suggest that NS cells expressing endogenous mutant Htt will be useful for study of mechanisms of HD

  20. Epigenetic regulation of neural stem cell fate during corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    MuhChyi, Chai; Juliandi, Berry; Matsuda, Taito; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2013-10-01

    The cerebral cortex comprises over three quarters of the brain, and serves as structural basis for the sophisticated perceptual and cognitive functions. It develops from common multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) that line the neural tube. Development of the NSCs encompasses sequential phases of progenitor expansion, neurogenesis, and gliogenesis along with the progression of developmental stages. Interestingly, NSCs steadfastly march through all of these phases and give rise to specific neural cell types in a temporally defined and highly predictable manner. Herein, we delineate the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that dictate the progression and tempo of NSC differentiation during cerebral cortex development, and how epigenetic modifications contribute to the dynamic properties of NSCs.

  1. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  2. Gap Junction Proteins in the Blood-Brain Barrier Control Nutrient-Dependent Reactivation of Drosophila Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spéder, Pauline; Brand, Andrea H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells in the adult brain exist primarily in a quiescent state but are reactivated in response to changing physiological conditions. How do stem cells sense and respond to metabolic changes? In the Drosophila CNS, quiescent neural stem cells are reactivated synchronously in response to a nutritional stimulus. Feeding triggers insulin production by blood-brain barrier glial cells, activating the insulin/insulin-like growth factor pathway in underlying neural stem cells and stimulating their growth and proliferation. Here we show that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier glia mediate the influence of metabolic changes on stem cell behavior, enabling glia to respond to nutritional signals and reactivate quiescent stem cells. We propose that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier are required to translate metabolic signals into synchronized calcium pulses and insulin secretion. PMID:25065772

  3. Neural stem cells and Alzheimer's disease: challenges and hope.

    PubMed

    Zhongling Feng; Gang Zhao; Lei Yu

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of synapses and neurons in brain regions critical for learning and memory functions. The endogenous generation of new neurons in certain regions of the mature brain, derived from primitive cells termed neural stem cells, has raised hope that neural stem cells may be recruited for structural brain repair. Stem cell therapy has been suggested as a possible strategy for replacing damaged circuitry and restoring learning and memory abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we outline the promising investigations that are raising hope, and understanding the challenges behind translating underlying stem cell biology into novel clinical therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Human epidermal neural crest stem cells as a source of Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Motoharu; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2015-01-01

    We show that highly pure populations of human Schwann cells can be derived rapidly and in a straightforward way, without the need for genetic manipulation, from human epidermal neural crest stem cells [hEPI-NCSC(s)] present in the bulge of hair follicles. These human Schwann cells promise to be a useful tool for cell-based therapies, disease modelling and drug discovery. Schwann cells are glia that support axons of peripheral nerves and are direct descendants of the embryonic neural crest. Peripheral nerves are damaged in various conditions, including through trauma or tumour-related surgery, and Schwann cells are required for their repair and regeneration. Schwann cells also promise to be useful for treating spinal cord injuries. Ex vivo expansion of hEPI-NCSC isolated from hair bulge explants, manipulating the WNT, sonic hedgehog and TGFβ signalling pathways, and exposure of the cells to pertinent growth factors led to the expression of the Schwann cell markers SOX10, KROX20 (EGR2), p75NTR (NGFR), MBP and S100B by day 4 in virtually all cells, and maturation was completed by 2 weeks of differentiation. Gene expression profiling demonstrated expression of transcripts for neurotrophic and angiogenic factors, as well as JUN, all of which are essential for nerve regeneration. Co-culture of hEPI-NCSC-derived human Schwann cells with rodent dorsal root ganglia showed interaction of the Schwann cells with axons, providing evidence of Schwann cell functionality. We conclude that hEPI-NCSCs are a biologically relevant source for generating large and highly pure populations of human Schwann cells. PMID:26251357

  5. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T.; Seiz, Emma G.; Ramos, Milagros; Meyer, Morten; Juliusson, Bengt; Kusk, Philip

    2009-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal of growth factors, proliferation and expression of v-myc were dramatically reduced and the cells differentiated into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. hVM1 cells yield a large number of dopaminergic neurons (about 12% of total cells are TH{sup +}) after differentiation, which also produce dopamine. In addition to proneural genes (NGN2, MASH1), differentiated cells show expression of several genuine mesencephalic dopaminergic markers such as: LMX1A, LMX1B, GIRK2, ADH2, NURR1, PITX3, VMAT2 and DAT, indicating that they retain their regional identity. Our data indicate that this cell line and its clonal derivatives may constitute good candidates for the study of development and physiology of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro, and to develop tools for Parkinson's disease cell replacement preclinical research and drug testing.

  6. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  7. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kafi, Md. Abdul; Cho, Hyeon-Yeol; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C), C(RGD)4 ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot) or three dimensional (rod or pillar) like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD), graphene oxide (GO) and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  8. Regulation of mouse embryonic stem cell neural differentiation by retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mijeong; Habiba, Ayman; Doherty, Jason M.; Mills, Jason C.; Mercer, Robert W.; Huettner, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from the early blastocyst can differentiate in vitro into a variety of somatic cell types including lineages from all three embryonic germ layers. Protocols for ES cell neural differentiation typically involve induction by retinoic acid (RA), or by exposure to growth factors or medium conditioned by other cell types. A serum-free differentiation (SFD) medium completely lacking exogenous retinoids was devised that allows for efficient conversion of aggregated mouse ESCs into neural precursors and immature neurons. Neural cells produced in this medium express neuronal ion channels, establish polarity, and form functional excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Brief exposure to RA during the period of cell aggregation speeds neuronal maturation and suppresses cell proliferation. Differentiation without RA yields neurons and neural progenitors with apparent telencephalic identity, whereas cells differentiated with exposure to RA express markers of hindbrain and spinal cord. Transcriptional profiling indicates a substantial representation of transit amplifying neuroblasts in SFD cultures not exposed to RA. PMID:19217899

  9. Electrical Property Characterization of Neural Stem Cells in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Chen, Deyong; Li, Zhaohui; Fan, Beiyuan; George, Julian; Xue, Chengcheng; Cui, Zhanfeng; Wang, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical property characterization of stem cells could be utilized as a potential label-free biophysical approach to evaluate the differentiation process. However, there has been a lack of technology or tools that can quantify the intrinsic cellular electrical markers (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) for a large amount of stem cells or differentiated cells. In this paper, a microfluidic platform enabling the high-throughput quantification of Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm from hundreds of single neural stem cells undergoing differentiation was developed to explore the feasibility to characterize the neural stem cell differentiation process without biochemical staining. Experimental quantification using biochemical markers (e.g., Nestin, Tubulin and GFAP) of neural stem cells confirmed the initiation of the differentiation process featured with gradual loss in cellular stemness and increased cell markers for neurons and glial cells. The recorded electrical properties of neural stem cells undergoing differentiation showed distinctive and unique patterns: 1) in the suspension culture before inducing differentiation, a large distribution and difference in σcytoplasm among individual neural stem cells was noticed, which indicated heterogeneity that may result from the nature of suspension culture of neurospheres; and 2) during the differentiation in adhering monolayer culture, significant changes and a large difference in Cspecific membrane were located indicating different expressions of membrane proteins during the differentiation process, and a small distribution difference in σcytoplasm was less significant that indicated the relatively consistent properties of cytoplasm during the culture. In summary, significant differences in Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm were observed during the neural stem cell differentiation process, which may potentially be used as label-free biophysical markers

  10. MIO-M1 cells and similar muller glial cell lines derived from adult human retina exhibit neural stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jean M; Singhal, Shweta; Bhatia, Bhairavi; Keegan, David J; Reh, Thomas A; Luthert, Philip J; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, Gloria Astrid

    2007-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that glial cells may have a role as neural precursors in the adult central nervous system. Although it has been shown that Müller cells exhibit progenitor characteristics in the postnatal chick and rat retinae, their progenitor-like role in developed human retina is unknown. We first reported the Müller glial characteristics of the spontaneously immortalized human cell line MIO-M1, but recently we have derived similar cell lines from the neural retina of several adult eye donors. Since immortalization is one of the main properties of stem cells, we investigated whether these cells expressed stem cell markers. Cells were grown as adherent monolayers, responded to epidermal growth factor, and could be expanded indefinitely without growth factors under normal culture conditions. They could be frozen and thawed without losing their characteristics. In the presence of extracellular matrix and fibroblast growth factor-2 or retinoic acid, they acquired neural morphology, formed neurospheres, and expressed neural stem cell markers including betaIII tubulin, Sox2, Pax6, Chx10, and Notch 1. They also expressed markers of postmitotic retinal neurons, including peripherin, recoverin, calretinin, S-opsin, and Brn3. When grafted into the subretinal space of dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons rats or neonatal Lister hooded rats, immortalized cells migrated into the retina, where they expressed various markers of retinal neurons. These observations indicate that adult human neural retina harbors a population of cells that express both Müller glial and stem cell markers and suggest that these cells may have potential use for cell-based therapies to restore retinal function. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  11. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung Ho; Yeo, Sang Won; Troy, Frederic A

    2014-10-17

    During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia-NCAMs) modulate cell-cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia-NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb's to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell-cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders.

  12. ETOH inhibits embryonic neural stem/precursor cell proliferation via PLD signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yuko; Hiroyama, Masami; Sanbe, Atsushi Yamauchi, Junji; Murase, Shoko; Tanoue, Akito

    2008-05-23

    While a mother's excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy is known to have adverse effects on fetal neural development, little is known about the underlying mechanism of these effects. In order to investigate these mechanisms, we investigated the toxic effect of ethanol (ETOH) on neural stem/precursor cell (NSC) proliferation. In cultures of NSCs, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated following stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). Exposure of NSCs to ETOH suppresses cell proliferation, while it has no effect on cell death. Phosphatidic acid (PA), which is a signaling messenger produced by PLD, reverses ETOH inhibition of NSC proliferation. Blocking the PLD signal by 1-butanol suppresses the proliferation. ETOH-induced suppression of NSC proliferation and the protective effect of PA for ETOH-induced suppression are mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. These results indicate that exposure to ETOH impairs NSC proliferation by altering the PLD signaling pathway.

  13. ETOH inhibits embryonic neural stem/precursor cell proliferation via PLD signaling.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuko; Hiroyama, Masami; Sanbe, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Junji; Murase, Shoko; Tanoue, Akito

    2008-05-23

    While a mother's excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy is known to have adverse effects on fetal neural development, little is known about the underlying mechanism of these effects. In order to investigate these mechanisms, we investigated the toxic effect of ethanol (ETOH) on neural stem/precursor cell (NSC) proliferation. In cultures of NSCs, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated following stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). Exposure of NSCs to ETOH suppresses cell proliferation, while it has no effect on cell death. Phosphatidic acid (PA), which is a signaling messenger produced by PLD, reverses ETOH inhibition of NSC proliferation. Blocking the PLD signal by 1-butanol suppresses the proliferation. ETOH-induced suppression of NSC proliferation and the protective effect of PA for ETOH-induced suppression are mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. These results indicate that exposure to ETOH impairs NSC proliferation by altering the PLD signaling pathway.

  14. Pleiotrophin enhances PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis through increased proliferation of neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Laaniste, Liisi; Jiang, Yiwen; Alafuzoff, Irina; Uhrbom, Lene; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) augments tumor growth by increasing proliferation of tumor cells and promoting vascular abnormalization, but its role in early gliomagenesis has not been evaluated. Through analysis of publically available datasets, we demonstrate that increased PTN mRNA expression is associated with amplification of chromosome 7, identified as one of the earliest steps in glioblastoma development. To elucidate the role of PTN in tumor initiation we employed the RCAS/tv-a model that allows glioma induction by RCAS-virus mediated expression of oncogenes in neural progenitor cells. Intracranial injection of RCAS-PTN did not induce glioma formation when administrated alone, but significantly enhanced RCAS-platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)B-induced gliomagenesis. PTN co-treatment augmented PDGFB-induced Akt activation in neural progenitor cells in vitro, and enhanced neural sphere size associated with increased proliferation. Our data indicates that PTN expression is associated with chromosome 7 gain, and that PTN enhances PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis by stimulating proliferation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27806344

  15. Pleiotrophin enhances PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis through increased proliferation of neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Laaniste, Liisi; Jiang, Yiwen; Alafuzoff, Irina; Uhrbom, Lene; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-12-06

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) augments tumor growth by increasing proliferation of tumor cells and promoting vascular abnormalization, but its role in early gliomagenesis has not been evaluated. Through analysis of publically available datasets, we demonstrate that increased PTN mRNA expression is associated with amplification of chromosome 7, identified as one of the earliest steps in glioblastoma development. To elucidate the role of PTN in tumor initiation we employed the RCAS/tv-a model that allows glioma induction by RCAS-virus mediated expression of oncogenes in neural progenitor cells. Intracranial injection of RCAS-PTN did not induce glioma formation when administrated alone, but significantly enhanced RCAS-platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)B-induced gliomagenesis. PTN co-treatment augmented PDGFB-induced Akt activation in neural progenitor cells in vitro, and enhanced neural sphere size associated with increased proliferation. Our data indicates that PTN expression is associated with chromosome 7 gain, and that PTN enhances PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis by stimulating proliferation of neural progenitor cells.

  16. Three-dimensional graphene foam as a biocompatible and conductive scaffold for neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Song; Song, Qin; Huang, Rong; Wang, Long; Liu, Liwei; Dai, Jianwu; Tang, Mingliang; Cheng, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) based therapy provides a promising approach for neural regeneration. For the success of NSC clinical application, a scaffold is required to provide three-dimensional (3D) cell growth microenvironments and appropriate synergistic cell guidance cues. Here, we report the first utilization of graphene foam, a 3D porous structure, as a novel scaffold for NSCs in vitro. It was found that three-dimensional graphene foams (3D-GFs) can not only support NSC growth, but also keep cell at an active proliferation state with upregulation of Ki67 expression than that of two-dimensional graphene films. Meanwhile, phenotypic analysis indicated that 3D-GFs can enhance the NSC differentiation towards astrocytes and especially neurons. Furthermore, a good electrical coupling of 3D-GFs with differentiated NSCs for efficient electrical stimulation was observed. Our findings implicate 3D-GFs could offer a powerful platform for NSC research, neural tissue engineering and neural prostheses. PMID:23549373

  17. ERK-dependent and -independent pathways trigger human neural progenitor cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Michaela . E-mail: moors@uni-duesseldorf.de; Cline, Jason E. . E-mail: jason.cline@uni-duesseldorf.de; Abel, Josef . E-mail: josef.abel@uni-duesseldorf.de; Fritsche, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.fritsche@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-05-15

    Besides differentiation and apoptosis, cell migration is a basic process in brain development in which neural cells migrate several centimeters within the developing brain before reaching their proper positions and forming the right connections. For identifying signaling events that control neural migration and are therefore potential targets of chemicals to disturb normal brain development, we developed a human neurosphere-based migration assay based on normal human neural progenitor (NHNP) cells, in which the distance is measured that cells wander over time. Applying this assay, we investigated the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the regulation of NHNP cell migration. Exposure to model substances like ethanol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) revealed a correlation between ERK1/2 activation and cell migration. The participation of phospho-(P-) ERK1/2 was confirmed by exposure of the cells to the MEK inhibitor PD98059, which directly prohibits ERK1/2 phosphorylation and inhibited cell migration. We identified protein kinase C (PKC) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as upstream signaling kinases governing ERK1/2 activation, thereby controlling NHNP cell migration. Additionally, treatments with src kinase inhibitors led to a diminished cell migration without affecting ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Based on these results, we postulate that migration of NHNP cells is controlled via ERK1/2-dependent and -independent pathways.

  18. Lingo-1 shRNA and Notch signaling inhibitor DAPT promote differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells into neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Ye, Zhizhong; Zheng, Shuhui; Chen, Luming; Wan, Yong; Deng, Yubin; Yang, Ruirui

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the exogenous factors that regulate differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes is an important step in the clinical therapy of spinal cord injury (SCI). The Notch pathway inhibits the differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells and Lingo-1 is a strong negative regulator for myelination and axon growth. While Lingo-1 shRNA and N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-1-alanyl]-S-Phenylglycinet-butylester (DAPT), a Notch pathway inhibitor, have been used separately to help repair SCI, the results have been unsatisfactory. Here we investigated and elucidated the preliminary mechanism for the effect of Lingo-1 shRNA and DAPT on neural stem/progenitor cells differentiation. We found that neural stem/progenitor cells from E14 rat embryos expressed Nestin, Sox-2 and Lingo-1, and we optimized the transduction of neural stem/progenitor cells using lentiviral vectors encoding Lingo-1 shRNA. The addition of DAPT decreased the expression of Notch intracellular domain (NICD) as well as the downstream genes Hes1 and Hes5. Expression of NeuN, CNPase and GFAP in DAPT treated cells and expression of NeuN in Lingo-1 shRNA treated cells confirmed differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. These results revealed that while Lingo-1 shRNA and Notch signaling inhibitor DAPT both promoted differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons, only DAPT was capable of driving neural stem/progenitor cells differentiation into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Since we were able to show that both Lingo-1 shRNA and DAPT could drive neural stem/progenitor cells differentiation, our data might aid the development of more effective SCI therapies using Lingo-1 shRNA and DAPT.

  19. Matrigel supports neural, melanocytic and chondrogenic differentiation of trunk neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Da-Costa, Meline C; Trentin, Andréa G; Calloni, Giordano W

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is composed of highly multipotent precursor cells able to differentiate into both neural and mesenchymal phenotypes. Until now, most studies focusing on NC cell differentiation have been performed with traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems. However, such culture systems do not reflect the complex three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments of in vivo NC cells. To address this limitation, we have developed a method of Matrigel™ coating to create 2D and 3D microenvironments in the same culture well. When we performed cultures of trunk neural crest cells (TNCCs) on three different lots of basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™), we observed that all analyzed Matrigel™ lots were equally efficient in allowing the appearance of glial cells, neurons, melanocytes, smooth muscle cells and chondrocytes. We further observed that chondrocytes were found predominantly in the 3D microenvironment, whereas smooth muscle cells were almost exclusively located in the 2D microenvironment. Glial cells were present in both environments, but with broader quantities on the 2D surface. Melanocytes and neurons were equally distributed in both 2D and 3D microenvironments, but with distinct morphologies. It is worth noting the higher frequency of chondrocytes detected in this study using the 3D Matrigel™ microenvironment compared to previous reports of chondrogenesis obtained from TNCCs on traditional 2D cultures. In conclusion, Matrigel™ represents an attractive scaffold to study NC multipotentiality and differentiation, since it permits the appearance of the major NC phenotypes.

  20. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  1. Rapid determination of bacterial abundance, biovolume, morphology, and growth by neural network-based image analysis

    PubMed

    Blackburn; Hagstrom; Wikner; Cuadros-Hansson; Bjornsen

    1998-09-01

    Annual bacterial plankton dynamics at several depths and locations in the Baltic Sea were studied by image analysis. Individual bacteria were classified by using an artificial neural network which also effectively identified nonbacterial objects. Cell counts and frequencies of dividing cells were determined, and the data obtained agreed well with visual observations and previously published values. Cell volumes were measured accurately by comparison with bead standards. The survey included 690 images from a total of 138 samples. Each image contained approximately 200 bacteria. The images were analyzed automatically at a rate of 100 images per h. Bacterial abundance exhibited coherent patterns with time and depth, and there were distinct subsurface peaks in the summer months. Four distinct morphological classes were resolved by the image analyzer, and the dynamics of each could be visualized. The bacterial growth rates estimated from frequencies of dividing cells were different from the bacterial growth rates estimated by the thymidine incorporation method. With minor modifications, the image analysis technique described here can be used to analyze other planktonic classes.

  2. Rapid Determination of Bacterial Abundance, Biovolume, Morphology, and Growth by Neural Network-Based Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Nicholas; Hagström, Åke; Wikner, Johan; Cuadros-Hansson, Rocio; Bjørnsen, Peter Koefoed

    1998-01-01

    Annual bacterial plankton dynamics at several depths and locations in the Baltic Sea were studied by image analysis. Individual bacteria were classified by using an artificial neural network which also effectively identified nonbacterial objects. Cell counts and frequencies of dividing cells were determined, and the data obtained agreed well with visual observations and previously published values. Cell volumes were measured accurately by comparison with bead standards. The survey included 690 images from a total of 138 samples. Each image contained approximately 200 bacteria. The images were analyzed automatically at a rate of 100 images per h. Bacterial abundance exhibited coherent patterns with time and depth, and there were distinct subsurface peaks in the summer months. Four distinct morphological classes were resolved by the image analyzer, and the dynamics of each could be visualized. The bacterial growth rates estimated from frequencies of dividing cells were different from the bacterial growth rates estimated by the thymidine incorporation method. With minor modifications, the image analysis technique described here can be used to analyze other planktonic classes. PMID:9726867

  3. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-02-06

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming.

  4. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming. PMID:26861316

  5. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu; Han, Zhe; Chuai, Manli; Wang, Li-jing; Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka; Geng, Jian-guo; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1(+) migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug(+) pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1(+) migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug(+) pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube development by tightly

  6. Neural Network Modeling of Degradation of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Himanshu; Ghosh, Bahniman; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2011-05-25

    Neural network modeling has been used to predict the degradation in conversion efficiency of solar cells in this work. The model takes intensity of light, temperature and exposure time as inputs and predicts the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Backpropagation algorithm has been used to train the network. It is found that the neural network model satisfactorily predicts the degradation in efficiency of the solar cell with exposure time. The error in the computed results, after comparison with experimental results, lies in the range of 0.005-0.01, which is quite low.

  7. Induction of Excess Centrosomes in Neural Progenitor Cells during the Development of Radiation-Induced Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Mikio; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kato, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic brain is one of the tissues most vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In this study, we showed that ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in the neural progenitors of the mouse cerebral cortex, and that the surviving progenitor cells subsequently develop a considerable amount of supernumerary centrosomes. When mouse embryos at Day 13.5 were exposed to γ-rays, brains sizes were reduced markedly in a dose-dependent manner, and these size reductions persisted until birth. Immunostaining with caspase-3 antibodies showed that apoptosis occurred in 35% and 40% of neural progenitor cells at 4 h after exposure to 1 and 2 Gy, respectively, and this was accompanied by a disruption of the apical layer in which mitotic spindles were positioned in unirradiated mice. At 24 h after 1 Gy irradiation, the apoptotic cells were completely eliminated and proliferation was restored to a level similar to that of unirradiated cells, but numerous spindles were localized outside the apical layer. Similarly, abnormal cytokinesis, which included multipolar division and centrosome clustering, was observed in 19% and 24% of the surviving neural progenitor cells at 48 h after irradiation with 1 and 2 Gy, respectively. Because these cytokinesis aberrations derived from excess centrosomes result in growth delay and mitotic catastrophe-mediated cell elimination, our findings suggest that, in addition to apoptosis at an early stage of radiation exposure, radiation-induced centrosome overduplication could contribute to the depletion of neural progenitors and thereby lead to microcephaly. PMID:27367050

  8. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    PubMed Central

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  9. Stem cell media culture of melanoma results in the induction of a nonrepresentative neural expression profile.

    PubMed

    Anaka, Matthew; Freyer, Claudia; Gedye, Craig; Caballero, Otavia; Davis, Ian D; Behren, Andreas; Cebon, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    The ability of cell lines to accurately represent cancer is a major concern in preclinical research. Culture of glioma cells as neurospheres in stem cell media (SCM) has been shown to better represent the genotype and phenotype of primary glioblastoma in comparison to serum cell lines. Despite the use of neurosphere-like models of many malignancies, there has been no robust analysis of whether other cancers benefit from a more representative phenotype and genotype when cultured in SCM. We analyzed the growth properties, transcriptional profile, and genotype of melanoma cells grown de novo in SCM, as while melanocytes share a common precursor with neural cells, melanoma frequently demonstrates divergent behavior in cancer stem cell assays. SCM culture of melanoma cells induced a neural lineage gene expression profile that was not representative of matched patient tissue samples and which could be induced in serum cell lines by switching them into SCM. There was no enrichment for expression of putative melanoma stem cell markers, but the SCM expression profile did overlap significantly with that of SCM cultures of glioma, suggesting that the observed phenotype is media-specific rather than melanoma-specific. Xenografts derived from either culture condition provided the best representation of melanoma in situ. Finally, SCM culture of melanoma did not prevent ongoing acquisition of DNA copy number abnormalities. In conclusion, SCM culture of melanoma does not provide a better representation of the phenotype or genotype of metastatic melanoma, and the resulting neural bias could potentially confound therapeutic target identification.

  10. Induction of neural stem cell-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jai-Hee; Yoon, Byung Sun; Kim, Bona; Park, Gyuman; Jung, Hye-Youn; Maeng, Isaac; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Seung Jun; Kim, Aeree; Oh, Sejong; Whang, Kwang Youn; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ki Dong; You, Seungkwon

    2008-06-27

    Recently, Bmi1 was shown to control the proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we demonstrated the induction of NSC-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1 under NSC culture conditions. These NSCLCs exhibited the morphology and growth properties of NSCs, and expressed NSC marker genes, including nestin, CD133, and Sox2. In vitro differentiation of NSCLCs resulted in differentiated cell populations containing astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Following treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A and valproic acid), the potential of NSCLCs for proliferation, dedifferentiation, and self-renewal was significantly inhibited. Our data indicate that multipotent NSCLCs can be generated directly from astrocytes by the addition of Bmi1.

  11. Mechanism of cell fate choice between neural and mesodermal development during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2013-06-01

    During early embryogenesis, Sox2 expression distinguishes the neural plate from other embryonic domains, suggesting that the mechanism underlying the activation of the Sox2 gene is highly relevant to the development of this tissue. At the earliest stages of neural plate development, the Sox2 enhancer N1 regulates Sox2 expression in the extending posterior end of the neural plate. The N1 enhancer is initially activated in the axial stem cells, bipotential precursors of both neural and mesodermal lineages, therefore the activation does not immediately lead to Sox2 expression. A population of axial stem cells that remains in the superficial layer starts expressing Sox2, whereas another population that migrates through the primitive streak loses the N1 activity and becomes mesoderm. Multiple signaling cascades and transcription factors, including Wnt, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Tbx6, are responsible for the regulation of Sox2 expression in axial stem cells to guide the development of the posterior neural plate and paraxial mesoderm.

  12. Substrate-mediated reprogramming of human fibroblasts into neural crest stem-like cells and their applications in neural repair.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Cell- and gene-based therapies have emerged as promising strategies for treating neurological diseases. The sources of neural stem cells are limited while the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have risk of tumor formation. Here, we proposed the generation of self-renewable, multipotent, and neural lineage-related neural crest stem-like cells by chitosan substrate-mediated gene transfer of a single factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) for the use in neural repair. A simple, non-toxic, substrate-mediated method was applied to deliver the naked FOXD3 plasmid into human fibroblasts. The transfection of FOXD3 increased cell proliferation and up-regulated the neural crest marker genes (FOXD3, SOX2, and CD271), stemness marker genes (OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2), and neural lineage-related genes (Nestin, β-tubulin and GFAP). The expression levels of stemness marker genes and neural crest maker genes in the FOXD3-transfected fibroblasts were maintained until the fifth passage. The FOXD3 reprogrammed fibroblasts based on the new method significantly rescued the neural function of the impaired zebrafish. The chitosan substrate-mediated delivery of naked plasmid showed feasibility in reprogramming somatic cells. Particularly, the FOXD3 reprogrammed fibroblasts hold promise as an easily accessible cellular source with neural crest stem-like behavior for treating neural diseases in the future.

  13. Regulated GDNF Delivery in Vivo Using Neural Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    other neurodegenerative models including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and stroke (Kaspar et al., 2003; Cao et al., 2003; Guan et al., 2001...learning more about stem cell drug delivery it may be possible to explore other therapies for war injuries in the future. References Bilak...Neural Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clive Svendsen CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Wisconsin-Madison

  14. Isolation and culture of neural crest stem cells from human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Xu, Xiaowei

    2013-04-06

    Hair follicles undergo lifelong growth and hair cycle is a well-controlled process involving stem cell proliferation and quiescence. Hair bulge is a well-characterized niche for adult stem cells. This segment of the outer root sheath contains a number of different types of stem cells, including epithelial stem cells, melanocyte stem cells and neural crest like stem cells. Hair follicles represent an accessible and rich source for different types of human stem cells. We and others have isolated neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) from human fetal and adult hair follicles. These human stem cells are label-retaining cells and are capable of self-renewal through asymmetric cell division in vitro. They express immature neural crest cell markers but not differentiation markers. Our expression profiling study showed that they share a similar gene expression pattern with murine skin immature neural crest cells. They exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, melanocytic, and neuronal cell lineages after in vitro clonal single cell culture. Differentiated cells not only acquire lineage-specific markers but also demonstrate appropriate functions in ex vivo conditions. In addition, these NCSCs show differentiation potential toward mesenchymal lineages. Differentiated neuronal cells can persist in mouse brain and retain neuronal differentiation markers. It has been shown that hair follicle derived NCSCs can help nerve regrowth, and they improve motor function in mice transplanted with these stem cells following transecting spinal cord injury. Furthermore, peripheral nerves have been repaired with stem cell grafts, and implantation of skin-derived precursor cells adjacent to crushed sciatic nerves has resulted in remyelination. Therefore, the hair follicle/skin derived NCSCs have already shown promising results for regenerative therapy in preclinical models. Somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has shown enormous potential for

  15. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds for Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Bottai, Daniele; Vescovi, Angleo; Zhang, Shuguang

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with β-Tubulin+, GFAP+ and Nestin+ markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology. PMID:17205123

  16. Insulin concentration is critical in culturing human neural stem cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Y-H; Choi, M; Lee, H-S; Park, C-H; Kim, S-M; Yi, S-H; Oh, S-M; Cha, H-J; Chang, M-Y; Lee, S-H

    2013-01-01

    Cell culture of human-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) is a useful tool that contributes to our understanding of human brain development and allows for the development of therapies for intractable human brain disorders. Human NSC (hNSC) cultures, however, are not commonly used, mainly because of difficulty with consistently maintaining the cells in a healthy state. In this study, we show that hNSC cultures, unlike NSCs of rodent origins, are extremely sensitive to insulin, an indispensable culture supplement, and that the previously reported difficulty in culturing hNSCs is likely because of a lack of understanding of this relationship. Like other neural cell cultures, insulin is required for hNSC growth, as withdrawal of insulin supplementation results in massive cell death and delayed cell growth. However, severe apoptotic cell death was also detected in insulin concentrations optimized to rodent NSC cultures. Thus, healthy hNSC cultures were only produced in a narrow range of relatively low insulin concentrations. Insulin-mediated cell death manifested not only in all human NSCs tested, regardless of origin, but also in differentiated human neurons. The underlying cell death mechanism at high insulin concentrations was similar to insulin resistance, where cells became less responsive to insulin, resulting in a reduction in the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway critical to cell survival signaling. PMID:23928705

  17. Isolation and manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giachino, Claudio; Basak, Onur; Taylor, Verdon

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells are potentially a source of cells not only for replacement therapy but also as drug vectors, bringing bioactive molecules into the brain. Stem cell-like cells can be isolated readily from the human brain, thus, it is important to find culture systems that enable expansion in a multipotent state to generate cells that are of potential use for therapy. Currently, two systems have been described for the maintenance and expansion of multipotent progenitors, an adhesive substrate bound and the neurosphere culture. Both systems have pros and cons, but the neurosphere may be able to simulate the three-dimensional environment of the niche in which the cells reside in vivo. Thus, the neurosphere, when used and cultured appropriately, can expand and provide important information about the mechanisms that potentially control neural stem cells in vivo.

  18. Leptin Enhances Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; Alpini, Gianfranco; Rychlicki, Chiara; Saccomanno, Stefania; DeMorrow, Sharon; Trozzi, Luciano; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Venter, Julie; Di Sario, Antonio; Marzioni, Marco; Bearzi, Italo; Glaser, Shannon; Alvaro, Domenico; Marucci, Luca; Francis, Heather; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Benedetti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a strongly aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Effective therapeutic strategies are lacking because molecular mechanisms regulating cholangiocarcinoma cell growth are unknown. Furthermore, experimental in vivo animal models useful to study the pathophysiologic mechanisms of malignant cholangiocytes are lacking. Leptin, the hormone regulating caloric homeostasis, which is increased in obese patients, stimulates the growth of several cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to define if leptin stimulates cholangiocarcinoma growth. We determined the expression of leptin receptors in normal and malignant human cholangiocytes. Effects on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (HuH-28) cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the in vitro exposure to leptin, together with the intracellular pathways, were then studied. Moreover, cholangiocarcinoma was experimentally induced in obese fa/fa Zucker rats, a genetically established animal species with faulty leptin receptors, and in their littermates by chronic feeding with thioacetamide, a potent carcinogen. After 24 weeks, the effect of leptin on cholangiocarcinoma development and growth was assessed. Normal and malignant human cholangiocytes express leptin receptors. Leptin increased the proliferation and the metastatic potential of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro through a signal transducers and activators of transcription 3–dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Leptin increased the growth and migration, and was antiapoptotic for cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the loss of leptin function reduced the development and the growth of cholangiocarcinoma. The experimental carcinogenesis model induced by thioacetamide administration is a valid and reproducible method to study cholangiocarcinoma pathobiology. Modulation of the leptin-mediated signal could be considered a valid tool for the prevention and treatment of

  19. Enumeration of Neural Stem Cells Using Clonal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Gunaseelan; Yu, Yuan Hong; Tham, Muly; Gan, Hui Theng; Ramasamy, Srinivas; Sankaran, Shvetha; Hariharan, Srivats; Ahmed, Sohail

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to self-renew and generate the three major neural lineages — astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes. NSCs and neural progenitors (NPs) are commonly cultured in vitro as neurospheres. This protocol describes in detail how to determine the NSC frequency in a given cell population under clonal conditions. The protocol begins with the seeding of the cells at a density that allows for the generation of clonal neurospheres. The neurospheres are then transferred to chambered coverslips and differentiated under clonal conditions in conditioned medium, which maximizes the differentiation potential of the neurospheres. Finally, the NSC frequency is calculated based on neurosphere formation and multipotency capabilities. Utilities of this protocol include the evaluation of candidate NSC markers, purification of NSCs, and the ability to distinguish NSCs from NPs. This method takes 13 days to perform, which is much shorter than current methods to enumerate NSC frequency. PMID:27768074

  20. Pulsed DC Electric Field–Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K.; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders. PMID:27352251

  1. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders.

  2. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis stimulates neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the premature brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jinqiao; Sha, Bin; Zhou, Wenhao; Yang, Yi

    2010-03-26

    This study investigated the effects of angiogenesis on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the premature brain. We observed the changes in neurogenesis that followed the stimulation and inhibition of angiogenesis by altering vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a 3-day-old rat model. VEGF expression was overexpressed by adenovirus transfection and down-regulated by siRNA interference. Using immunofluorescence assays, Western blot analysis, and real-time PCR methods, we observed angiogenesis and the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the number of vWF-positive areas peaked at day 7, and they were highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at every time point. The number of neural stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the subventricular zone gradually increased over time in the VEGF up-regulation group. Among the three groups, the number of these cells was highest in the VEGF up-regulation group and lowest in the VEGF down-regulation group at the same time point. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR confirmed these results. These data suggest that angiogenesis may stimulate the proliferation of neural stem cells and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes in the premature brain.

  3. Neuroendocrine Cells of the Prostate Derive from the Neural Crest*

    PubMed Central

    Szczyrba, Jaroslaw; Wagner, Mathias; Wandernoth, Petra M.; Aumüller, Gerhard; Wennemuth, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    The histogenesis of prostatic neuroendocrine cells is controversial: a stem cell hypothesis with a urogenital sinus-derived progeny of all prostatic epithelial cells is opposed by a dual origin hypothesis, favoring the derivation of neuroendocrine cells from the neural crest, with the secretory and basal cells being of urogenital sinus origin. A computer-assisted 3D reconstruction was used to analyze the distribution of chromogranin A immunoreactive cells in serial sections of human fetal prostate specimens (gestation weeks 18 and 25). Immunohistochemical double labeling studies with YFP and serotonin antisera combined with electron microscopy were carried out on double-transgenic Wnt1-Cre/ROSA26-YFP mice showing stable YFP expression in all neural crest-derived cell populations despite loss of Wnt1 expression. 3D reconstruction of the distribution pattern of neuroendocrine cells in the human fetal prostate indicates a migration of paraganglionic cells passing the stroma and reaching the prostate ducts. Double-transgenic mice showed 55% double labeling of periurethral neuroendocrine cells expressing both serotonin and YFP, whereas single serotonin labeling was observed in 36% and exclusive YFP labeling in 9%. The results favor the assumption of a major fraction of neural crest-derived neuroendocrine cells in both the human and murine prostates. PMID:28003366

  4. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-11

    Chilton, Jamie ArunA Biomedical, Inc. 425 River Road Athens, GA 30602 QTR-11102010.4 Director, Naval Research Lab Attn: Code 5596 4555 Overlook...Modification P00001 Submitted by: Dr. Steven L. Stice, Principle Investigator ArunA Biomedical, Inc. 425 River Road Athens, GA 30602 Phone: 706...Progress Report v1.doc ArunA Biomedical, Inc. Page 1 of 1 Summary As a more biologically relevant model of human physiology, human neural progenitor

  5. Axonal alignment and enhanced neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells on graphene-nanoparticle hybrid structures.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Aniruddh; Chueng, Sy-Tsong Dean; Yin, Perry T; Kappera, Rajesh; Chhowalla, Manish; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2013-10-11

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) cultured on graphene-nanoparticle hybrid structures show a unique behavior wherein the axons from the differentiating hNSCs show enhanced growth and alignment. We show that the axonal alignment is primarily due to the presence of graphene and the underlying nanoparticle monolayer causes enhanced neuronal differentiation of the hNSCs, thus having great implications of these hybrid-nanostructures for neuro-regenerative medicine.

  6. Methylene blue promotes quiescence of rat neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luokun; Choudhury, Gourav R; Wang, Jixian; Park, Yong; Liu, Ran; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Chun-Li; Yorio, Thomas; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cell-based treatment holds a new therapeutic opportunity for neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effect of methylene blue on proliferation and differentiation of rat neural progenitor cells (NPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. We found that methylene blue inhibited proliferation and promoted quiescence of NPCs in vitro without affecting committed neuronal differentiation. Consistently, intracerebroventricular infusion of methylene blue significantly inhibited NPC proliferation at the subventricular zone (SVZ). Methylene blue inhibited mTOR signaling along with down-regulation of cyclins in NPCs in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our study indicates that methylene blue may delay NPC senescence through enhancing NPCs quiescence.

  7. The Hippo signalling pathway maintains quiescence in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rouven; Weynans, Kevin; Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-29

    Stem cells control their mitotic activity to decide whether to proliferate or to stay in quiescence. Drosophila neural stem cells (NSCs) are quiescent at early larval stages, when they are reactivated in response to metabolic changes. Here we report that cell-contact inhibition of growth through the canonical Hippo signalling pathway maintains NSC quiescence. Loss of the core kinases hippo or warts leads to premature nuclear localization of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie and initiation of growth and proliferation in NSCs. Yorkie is necessary and sufficient for NSC reactivation, growth and proliferation. The Hippo pathway activity is modulated via inter-cellular transmembrane proteins Crumbs and Echinoid that are both expressed in a nutrient-dependent way in niche glial cells and NSCs. Loss of crumbs or echinoid in the niche only is sufficient to reactivate NSCs. Finally, we provide evidence that the Hippo pathway activity discriminates quiescent from non-quiescent NSCs in the Drosophila nervous system.

  8. The Hippo signalling pathway maintains quiescence in Drosophila neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Rouven; Weynans, Kevin; Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S.; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells control their mitotic activity to decide whether to proliferate or to stay in quiescence. Drosophila neural stem cells (NSCs) are quiescent at early larval stages, when they are reactivated in response to metabolic changes. Here we report that cell-contact inhibition of growth through the canonical Hippo signalling pathway maintains NSC quiescence. Loss of the core kinases hippo or warts leads to premature nuclear localization of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie and initiation of growth and proliferation in NSCs. Yorkie is necessary and sufficient for NSC reactivation, growth and proliferation. The Hippo pathway activity is modulated via inter-cellular transmembrane proteins Crumbs and Echinoid that are both expressed in a nutrient-dependent way in niche glial cells and NSCs. Loss of crumbs or echinoid in the niche only is sufficient to reactivate NSCs. Finally, we provide evidence that the Hippo pathway activity discriminates quiescent from non-quiescent NSCs in the Drosophila nervous system. PMID:26821647

  9. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyoung Ho; Yeo, Sang Won; Troy, Frederic A.

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders.

  10. Nanoengineering neural stem cells on biomimetic substrates using magnetofection technology.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher F; Dickson, Andrew W; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Chari, Divya M

    2016-10-20

    Tissue engineering studies are witnessing a major paradigm shift to cell culture on biomimetic materials that replicate native tissue features from which the cells are derived. Few studies have been performed in this regard for neural cells, particularly in nanomedicine. For example, platforms such as magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have proven efficient as multifunctional tools for cell tracking and genetic engineering of neural transplant populations. However, as far as we are aware, all current studies have been conducted using neural cells propagated on non-neuromimetic substrates that fail to represent the mechano-elastic properties of brain and spinal cord microenvironments. Accordingly, it can be predicted that such data is of less translational and physiological relevance than that derived from cells grown in neuromimetic environments. Therefore, we have performed the first test of magnetofection technology (enhancing MNP delivery using applied magnetic fields with significant potential for therapeutic application) and its utility in genetically engineering neural stem cells (NSCs; a population of high clinical relevance) propagated in biomimetic hydrogels. We demonstrate magnetic field application safely enhances MNP mediated transfection of NSCs grown as 3D spheroid structures in collagen which more closely replicates the intrinsic mechanical and structural properties of neural tissue than routinely used hard substrates. Further, as it is well known that MNP uptake is mediated by endocytosis we also investigated NSC membrane activity grown on both soft and hard substrates. Using high resolution scanning electron microscopy we were able to prove that NSCs display lower levels of membrane activity on soft substrates compared to hard, a finding which could have particular impact on MNP mediated engineering strategies of cells propagated in physiologically relevant systems.

  11. Secretome profiling of differentiated neural mes-c-myc A1 cell line endowed with stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Severino, Valeria; Farina, Annarita; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Reccia, Mafalda Giovanna; Volpicelli, Floriana; Parente, Augusto; Chambery, Angela

    2013-11-01

    Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation play a crucial role in the formation and wiring of neuronal connections forming neuronal circuits. During neural tissues development, a large diversity of neuronal phenotypes is produced from neural precursor cells. In recent years, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which specific types of neurons are generated have been explored with the aim to elucidate the complex events leading to the generation of different phenotypes via distinctive developmental programs that control self-renewal, differentiation, and plasticity. The extracellular environment is thought to provide instructive influences that actively induce the production of specific neuronal phenotypes. In this work, the secretome profiling of differentiated neural mes-c-myc A1 (A1) cell line endowed with stem cell properties was analyzed by applying a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. The results provide a list of secreted molecules with potential relevance for the functional and biological features characterizing the A1 neuronal phenotype. Proteins involved in biological processes closely related to nervous system development including neurites growth, differentiation of neurons and axonogenesis were identified. Among them, proteins belonging to extracellular matrix and cell-adhesion complexes as well as soluble factors with well established neurotrophic properties were detected. The presented work provides the basis to clarify the complex extracellular protein networks implicated in neuronal differentiation and in the acquisition of the neuronal phenotype. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  12. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural constructs for predicting neural toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael P; Hou, Zhonggang; Propson, Nicholas E; Zhang, Jue; Engstrom, Collin J; Santos Costa, Vitor; Jiang, Peng; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer M; Daly, William; Wang, Yu; Stewart, Ron; Page, C David; Murphy, William L; Thomson, James A

    2015-10-06

    Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro models that reflect human physiology have the potential to reduce the number of drug failures in clinical trials and offer a cost-effective approach for assessing chemical safety. Here, human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitor cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and microglia/macrophage precursors were combined on chemically defined polyethylene glycol hydrogels and cultured in serum-free medium to model cellular interactions within the developing brain. The precursors self-assembled into 3D neural constructs with diverse neuronal and glial populations, interconnected vascular networks, and ramified microglia. Replicate constructs were reproducible by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and expressed neurogenesis, vasculature development, and microglia genes. Linear support vector machines were used to construct a predictive model from RNA-Seq data for 240 neural constructs treated with 34 toxic and 26 nontoxic chemicals. The predictive model was evaluated using two standard hold-out testing methods: a nearly unbiased leave-one-out cross-validation for the 60 training compounds and an unbiased blinded trial using a single hold-out set of 10 additional chemicals. The linear support vector produced an estimate for future data of 0.91 in the cross-validation experiment and correctly classified 9 of 10 chemicals in the blinded trial.

  13. Behavior of neural stem cells in the Alzheimer brain

    PubMed Central

    Waldau, B.; Shetty, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and a progressive loss of neurons leading to dementia. Because hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to functions such as learning, memory and mood, there has been great interest in examining the effects of AD on hippocampal neurogenesis. This article reviews the pertinent studies and tries to unite them in one possible disease model. Early in the disease, oligomeric Aβ may transiently promote the generation of immature neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs). However, reduced concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors and higher levels of fibroblast growth factor-2 seem to induce a developmental arrest of newly generated neurons. Furthermore, fibrillary Aβ and down-regulation of oligodendrocyte-lineage transcription factor-2 (OLIG2) may cause the death of these nonfunctional neurons. Therefore, altering the brain microenvironment for fostering apt maturation of graft-derived neurons may be critical for improving the efficacy of NSC transplantation therapy for AD. PMID:18500448

  14. Induction of osteoblastic differentiation of neural crest-derived stem cells from hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Urano-Morisawa, Eri; Takami, Masamichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Akifumi; Osumi, Noriko; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) arises near the neural tube during embryo development. NC cells migrate throughout the embryo and have potential to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as peripheral nerves, glial, cardiac smooth muscle, endocrine, and pigment cells, and craniofacial bone. In the present study, we induced osteoblast-like cells using whisker follicles obtained from the NC of mice. Hair follicle cells derived from the NC labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were collected from protein zero-Cre/floxed-EGFP double transgenic mice and cultured, then treated and cultured in stem cell growth medium. After growth for 14 days, results of flow cytometry analysis showed that 95% of the EGFP-positive (EGFP+) hair follicle cells derived from the NC had proliferated and 76.2% of those expressed mesenchymal stem cells markers, such as platelet-derived growth factor α and stem cell antigen-1, and also showed constitutive expression of Runx2 mRNA. Cells stimulated with bone morphogenetic protein-2 expressed osteocalcin, osterix, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA, resulting in production of mineralized matrices, which were detected by von Kossa and alizarin red staining. Moreover, EGFP+ hair follicle cells consistently expressed macrophage colony-stimulating factor and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Addition of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] (10-8 M) to the cultures suppressed OPG expression and induced RANKL production in the cells. Furthermore, multinucleated osteoclasts appeared within 6 days after starting co-cultures of bone marrow cells with EGFP+ cells in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2. These results suggest that NC-derived hair follicle cells possess a capacity for osteoblastic differentiation and may be useful for developing new bone regenerative medicine therapies.

  15. Kuwanon V Inhibits Proliferation, Promotes Cell Survival and Increases Neurogenesis of Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sun-Young; Park, Min-Hye; Lee, Mina; Kim, Jae-Ouk; Lee, Ha-Rim; Han, Byung Woo; Svendsen, Clive N.; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia. Regulation of NSC fate by small molecules is important for the generation of a certain type of cell. The identification of small molecules that can induce new neurons from NSCs could facilitate regenerative medicine and drug development for neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we screened natural compounds to identify molecules that are effective on NSC cell fate determination. We found that Kuwanon V (KWV), which was isolated from the mulberry tree (Morus bombycis) root, increased neurogenesis in rat NSCs. In addition, during NSC differentiation, KWV increased cell survival and inhibited cell proliferation as shown by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine pulse experiments, Ki67 immunostaining and neurosphere forming assays. Interestingly, KWV enhanced neuronal differentiation and decreased NSC proliferation even in the presence of mitogens such as epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2. KWV treatment of NSCs reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, increased mRNA expression levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, down-regulated Notch/Hairy expression levels and up-regulated microRNA miR-9, miR-29a and miR-181a. Taken together, our data suggest that KWV modulates NSC fate to induce neurogenesis, and it may be considered as a new drug candidate that can regenerate or protect neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25706719

  16. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neural stem cells or neurons for neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Lu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neurons or neural stem cells is one of the most important frontier fields in current neuroscience research. Without undergoing the pluripotency stage, induced neurons or induced neural stem cells are a safer and timelier manner resource in comparison to those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. In this prospective, we review the recent advances in generation of induced neurons and induced neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo and their potential treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:26981072

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 13 is essential for neural differentiation in Xenopus early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Satoko; Nishida, Eisuke

    2007-08-17

    In Xenopus embryonic development, the MEK5-ERK5 pathway, one of the MAPK pathways, lies downstream of SoxD and upstream of Xngnr1 in a signaling pathway regulating neural differentiation. It remains unclear, however, how the MEK5-ERK5 pathway is regulated in Xenopus neural development. As SoxD is a transcription factor, we hypothesized that some growth factor should be induced by SoxD and activate the MEK5-ERK5 pathway. As the expression level of fibroblast growth factor 13 (FGF13) is increased by SoxD, we analyzed the function of FGF13 in neural development. Knockdown of FGF13 with antisense morpholino-oligonucleotides (MOs) results in the reduced head structure and inhibition of neural differentiation. FGF13 MOs inhibit the SoxD-induced expression of Xngnr1 and the Xngnr1-induced expression of NeuroD, suggesting that FGF13 is necessary both upstream and downstream of Xngnr1 in neural differentiation. In addition, FGF13 MOs inhibit the activation of the MEK5-ERK5 pathway by dominant-negative bone morphogenetic protein receptor, a mimicker of neural inducers, indicating that FGF13 is involved in the activation of the MEK5-ERK5 pathway. Together, these results identify a role of FGF13 in Xenopus neural differentiation.

  18. Defining a developmental path to neural fate by global expression profiling of mouse embryonic stem cells and adult neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Kazuhiro; Sharov, Alexei A; Carter, Mark G; Foroni, Chiara; Vescovi, Angelo L; Ko, Minoru S H

    2006-04-01

    To understand global features of gene expression changes during in vitro neural differentiation, we carried out the microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), embryonal carcinoma cells, and adult neural stem/progenitor (NS) cells. Expression profiling of ESCs during differentiation in monolayer culture revealed three distinct phases: undifferentiated ESCs, primitive ectoderm-like cells, and neural progenitor cells. Principal component (PC) analysis revealed that these cells were aligned on PC1 over the course of 6 days. This PC1 represents approximately 4,000 genes, the expression of which increased with neural commitment/differentiation. Furthermore, NS cells derived from adult brain and their differentiated cells were positioned along this PC axis further away from undifferentiated ESCs than embryonic stem-derived neural progenitors. We suggest that this PC1 defines a path to neural fate, providing a scale for the degree of commitment/differentiation.

  19. Isolation and culture of neural crest cells from embryonic murine neural tube.

    PubMed

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R; Mundell, Nathan A; Labosky, Patricia A

    2012-06-02

    The embryonic neural crest (NC) is a multipotent progenitor population that originates at the dorsal aspect of the neural tube, undergoes an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migrates throughout the embryo, giving rise to diverse cell types. NC also has the unique ability to influence the differentiation and maturation of target organs. When explanted in vitro, NC progenitors undergo self-renewal, migrate and differentiate into a variety of tissue types including neurons, glia, smooth muscle cells, cartilage and bone. NC multipotency was first described from explants of the avian neural tube. In vitro isolation of NC cells facilitates the study of NC dynamics including proliferation, migration, and multipotency. Further work in the avian and rat systems demonstrated that explanted NC cells retain their NC potential when transplanted back into the embryo. Because these inherent cellular properties are preserved in explanted NC progenitors, the neural tube explant assay provides an attractive option for studying the NC in vitro. To attain a better understanding of the mammalian NC, many methods have been employed to isolate NC populations. NC-derived progenitors can be cultured from post-migratory locations in both the embryo and adult to study the dynamics of post-migratory NC progenitors, however isolation of NC progenitors as they emigrate from the neural tube provides optimal preservation of NC cell potential and migratory properties. Some protocols employ fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate a NC population enriched for particular progenitors. However, when starting with early stage embryos, cell numbers adequate for analyses are difficult to obtain with FACS, complicating the isolation of early NC populations from individual embryos. Here, we describe an approach that does not rely on FACS and results in an approximately 96% pure NC population based on a Wnt1-Cre activated lineage reporter. The method presented here is adapted from

  20. Aneuploidy causes premature differentiation of neural and intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gogendeau, Delphine; Siudeja, Katarzyna; Gambarotto, Davide; Pennetier, Carole; Bardin, Allison J.; Basto, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer and microcephaly. Although many studies have addressed the consequences of a non-euploid genome in cells, little is known about their overall consequences in tissue and organism development. Here we use two different mutant conditions to address the consequences of aneuploidy during tissue development and homeostasis in Drosophila. We show that aneuploidy causes brain size reduction due to a decrease in the number of proliferative neural stem cells (NSCs), but not through apoptosis. Instead, aneuploid NSCs present an extended G1 phase, which leads to cell cycle exit and premature differentiation. Moreover, we show that this response to aneuploidy is also present in adult intestinal stem cells but not in the wing disc. Our work highlights a neural and intestine stem cell-specific response to aneuploidy, which prevents their proliferation and expansion. PMID:26573328

  1. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-11

    astrocytes using defined medium conditions, (3) cell-based methods to detect botulinum toxin, and (4) HTS amenable assays for proliferation...progenitors into dopaminergic neurons, motoneurons and astrocytes using defined medium conditions, (3) cell-based methods to detect botulinum toxin...cell line developed for potential commercial distribution. (3) Development of cell based methods to detect botulinum toxin There has been

  2. The transcription factor Nerfin-1 prevents reversion of neurons into neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Froldi, Francesca; Szuperak, Milan; Weng, Chen-Fang; Shi, Wei; Papenfuss, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular dedifferentiation is the regression of a cell from a specialized state to a more multipotent state and is implicated in cancer. However, the transcriptional network that prevents differentiated cells from reacquiring stem cell fate is so far unclear. Neuroblasts (NBs), the Drosophila neural stem cells, are a model for the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Here we show that the Drosophila zinc finger transcription factor Nervous fingers 1 (Nerfin-1) locks neurons into differentiation, preventing their reversion into NBs. Following Prospero-dependent neuronal specification in the ganglion mother cell (GMC), a Nerfin-1-specific transcriptional program maintains differentiation in the post-mitotic neurons. The loss of Nerfin-1 causes reversion to multipotency and results in tumors in several neural lineages. Both the onset and rate of neuronal dedifferentiation in nerfin-1 mutant lineages are dependent on Myc- and target of rapamycin (Tor)-mediated cellular growth. In addition, Nerfin-1 is required for NB differentiation at the end of neurogenesis. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis show that Nerfin-1 administers its function by repression of self-renewing-specific and activation of differentiation-specific genes. Our findings support the model of bidirectional interconvertibility between neural stem cells and their post-mitotic progeny and highlight the importance of the Nerfin-1-regulated transcriptional program in neuronal maintenance. PMID:25593306

  3. Highly efficient neural differentiation of human somatic stem cells, isolated by minimally invasive periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Widera, Darius; Grimm, Wolf-Dieter; Moebius, Jeannette M; Mikenberg, Ilja; Piechaczek, Christoph; Gassmann, Georg; Wolff, Natascha A; Thévenod, Frank; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2007-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are potential sources for cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and for drug screening. Despite their potential benefits, ethical and practical considerations limit the application of NSCs derived from human embryonic stem cells (ES) or adult brain tissue. Thus, alternative sources are required to satisfy the criteria of ready accessibility, rapid expansion in chemically defined media and reliable induction to a neuronal fate. We isolated somatic stem cells from the human periodontium that were collected during minimally invasive periodontal access flap surgery as part of guided tissue regeneration therapy. These cells could be propagated as neurospheres in serum-free medium, which underscores their cranial neural crest cell origin. Culture in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) under serum-free conditions resulted in large numbers of nestin-positive/Sox-2-positive NSCs. These periodontium-derived (pd) NSCs are highly proliferative and migrate in response to chemokines that have been described as inducing NSC migration. We used immunocytochemical techniques and RT-PCR analysis to assess neural differentiation after treatment of the expanded cells with a novel induction medium. Adherence to substrate, growth factor deprivation, and retinoic acid treatment led to the acquisition of neuronal morphology and stable expression of markers of neuronal differentiation by more than 90% of the cells. Thus, our novel method might provide nearly limitless numbers of neuronal precursors from a readily accessible autologous adult human source, which could be used as a platform for further experimental studies and has potential therapeutic implications.

  4. p73 regulates maintenance of neural stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, Massimiliano; Tucci, Paola; Bano, Daniele; Nicotera, Pierluigi; McKeon, Frank; Melino, Gerry

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} TAp73 is expressed in neural stem cells and its expression increases following their differentiation. {yields} Neural stem cells from p73 null mice have a reduced proliferative potential. {yields} p73-deficient neural stem cells show reduced expression of members of the Sox-2 and Notch gene families. {yields} Neurogenic areas are reduced in the brains of embryonic and adult p73-/- mice. -- Abstract: p73, a member of the p53 family, is a transcription factor that plays a key role in many biological processes. In the present study, we show that TAp73 is expressed in neural stem cells (NSC) and its expression increases following their differentiation. NSC from p73 null mice have a reduced proliferative potential, together with reduced expression of members of the Sox-2 and Notch gene families known to be important for NSC proliferation. In parallel with this in vitro data, the width of the neurogenic areas was reduced in the brains of embryonic and adult p73-/- mice. These data suggest that p73, and in particular TAp73, is important for maintenance of the NSC pool.

  5. Autocrine regulation of neural crest cell development by steel factor.

    PubMed

    Guo, C S; Wehrle-Haller, B; Rossi, J; Ciment, G

    1997-04-01

    Steel factor (SLF) and its cognate receptor, c-kit, have been implicated in the generation of melanocytes from migrating neural crest (NC) cells during early vertebrate embryogenesis. However, the source of SLF in the early avian embryo and its precise role in melanogenesis are unclear. We report here that NC cells themselves express and release SLF protein, which in turn acts as an autocrine factor to induce melanogenesis in nearby NC cells. These results indicate that NC cell subpopulations play an active role in the determination of their cell fate and suggest a different developmental role for the embryonic microenvironment than what has been previously proposed.

  6. Methods for derivation of multipotent neural crest cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide-range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly-efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well-suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration. PMID:25986498

  7. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-11

    neurons, motoneurons and astrocytes using defined medium conditions, (3) cell-based methods to detect botulinum toxin, and (4) fluorescence based assays...medium conditions, (3) cell-based methods to detect botulinum toxin, and (4) fluorescence based assays for proliferation, cell migration, mitochondrial...line will begin shortly. (3) Development of cell based methods to detect botulinum toxin There has been substantial progress in the development

  8. Molecular Analysis of Stromal Cells-Induced Neural Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ramila; Buchanan, James Carlton; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Morris, Nathan; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Deriving specific neural cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a promising approach for cell replacement therapies of neurodegenerative diseases. When co-cultured with certain stromal cells, mouse ESCs (mESCs) differentiate efficiently to neural cells. In this study, a comprehensive gene and protein expression analysis of differentiating mESCs is performed over a two-week culture period to track temporal progression of cells from a pluripotent state to specific terminally-differentiated neural cells such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Expression levels of 26 genes consisting of marker genes for pluripotency, neural progenitors, and specific neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendrocytic cells are tracked using real time q-PCR. The time-course gene expression analysis of differentiating mESCs is combined with the hierarchal clustering and functional principal component analysis (FPCA) to elucidate the evolution of specific neural cells from mESCs at a molecular level. These statistical analyses identify three major gene clusters representing distinct phases of transition of stem cells from a pluripotent state to a terminally-differentiated neuronal or glial state. Temporal protein expression studies using immunohistochemistry demonstrate the generation of neural stem/progenitor cells and specific neural lineages and show a close agreement with the gene expression profiles of selected markers. Importantly, parallel gene and protein expression analysis elucidates long-term stability of certain proteins compared to those with a quick turnover. Describing the molecular regulation of neural cells commitment of mESCs due to stromal signaling will help identify major promoters of differentiation into specific cell types for use in cell replacement therapy applications. PMID:27832161

  9. Neural stem cells: from neurobiology to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Andressen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing numbers of publications about cell replacement therapies in various neurodegenerative diseases, reports on therapeutic benefits are still rare due to the huge array of parameters affecting the clinically relevant outcome. Limiting conditions can be attributed to origin and number of cells used for transplantation, their in vitro storage, propagation and/or predifferentiation. In addition, the ability of these cells for a site directed differentiation and functional integration in sufficient numbers is known to depend on extrinsic factors including intracerebral position of graft(s). Thus, obstacles to the use of cells in replacement therapies of neurological disorders reflect the molecular as well as cellular complexity of affected functional systems. This review will highlight central aspects of cell replacement strategies that are currently regarded as the most limiting issues in respect to survival, cell identity and site directed differentiation as well as functional integration of grafts. Special attention will be paid to neural stem cells, derived from either fetal or adult central nervous tissue. Unravelling the molecular biology of these proliferating cells in combination with instructive environmental cues for their site directed differentiation will pave the way to high reproducibility in collection, propagation, and predifferentiation of transplantable cells in vitro. In addition, this knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic cues for a site directed neural differentiation during development will broaden the perspective for any pluripotent stem cell, namely embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells, as an alternate source for a cell based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Isolation and purification of self-renewable human neural stem cells for cell therapy in experimental model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L; Daadi, Marcel M

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent with a strong self-renewable ability making them a virtually unlimited source of neural cells for structural repair in neurological disorders. Currently, hESCs are one of the most promising cell sources amenable for commercialization of off-shelf cell therapy products. However, along with this strong proliferative capacity of hESCs comes the tumorigenic potential of these cells after transplantation. Thus, the isolation and purification of a homogeneous, population of neural stem cells (hNSCs) are of paramount importance to avoid tumor formation in the host brain. This chapter describes the isolation, neuralization, and long-term perpetuation of hNSCs derived from hESCs through use of specific mitogenic growth factors and the preparation of hNSCs for transplantation in an experimental model of stroke. Additionally, we describe methods to analyze the stroke and size of grafts using magnetic resonance imaging and Osirix software, and neuroanatomical tracing procedures to study axonal remodeling after stroke and cell transplantation.

  11. Neural crest cell signaling pathways critical to cranial bone development and pathology.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Yuji; Snider, Taylor Nicholas

    2014-07-15

    Neural crest cells appear early during embryogenesis and give rise to many structures in the mature adult. In particular, a specific population of neural crest cells migrates to and populates developing cranial tissues. The ensuing differentiation of these cells via individual complex and often intersecting signaling pathways is indispensible to growth and development of the craniofacial complex. Much research has been devoted to this area of development with particular emphasis on cell signaling events required for physiologic development. Understanding such mechanisms will allow researchers to investigate ways in which they can be exploited in order to treat a multitude of diseases affecting the craniofacial complex. Knowing how these multipotent cells are driven towards distinct fates could, in due course, allow patients to receive regenerative therapies for tissues lost to a variety of pathologies. In order to realize this goal, nucleotide sequencing advances allowing snapshots of entire genomes and exomes are being utilized to identify molecular entities associated with disease states. Once identified, these entities can be validated for biological significance with other methods. A crucial next step is the integration of knowledge gleaned from observations in disease states with normal physiology to generate an explanatory model for craniofacial development. This review seeks to provide a current view of the landscape on cell signaling and fate determination of the neural crest and to provide possible avenues of approach for future research.

  12. Alternative generation of CNS neural stem cells and PNS derivatives from neural crest-derived peripheral stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marlen; Apostolova, Galina; Widera, Darius; Mittelbronn, Michel; Dechant, Georg; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Rohrer, Hermann

    2015-02-01

    Neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) from the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) can be reprogrammed in neurosphere (NS) culture to rNCSCs that produce central nervous system (CNS) progeny, including myelinating oligodendrocytes. Using global gene expression analysis we now demonstrate that rNCSCs completely lose their previous PNS characteristics and acquire the identity of neural stem cells derived from embryonic spinal cord. Reprogramming proceeds rapidly and results in a homogenous population of Olig2-, Sox3-, and Lex-positive CNS stem cells. Low-level expression of pluripotency inducing genes Oct4, Nanog, and Klf4 argues against a transient pluripotent state during reprogramming. The acquisition of CNS properties is prevented in the presence of BMP4 (BMP NCSCs) as shown by marker gene expression and the potential to produce PNS neurons and glia. In addition, genes characteristic for mesenchymal and perivascular progenitors are expressed, which suggests that BMP NCSCs are directed toward a pericyte progenitor/mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate. Adult NCSCs from mouse palate, an easily accessible source of adult NCSCs, display strikingly similar properties. They do not generate cells with CNS characteristics but lose the neural crest markers Sox10 and p75 and produce MSC-like cells. These findings show that embryonic NCSCs acquire a full CNS identity in NS culture. In contrast, MSC-like cells are generated from BMP NCSCs and pNCSCs, which reveals that postmigratory NCSCs are a source for MSC-like cells up to the adult stage.

  13. Differentiation of human CD146-positive endometrial stem cells to adipogenic-, osteogenic-, neural progenitor-, and glial-like cells.

    PubMed

    Fayazi, Mehri; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Ziaei, Saeideh

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential differentiation of CD146(+) endometrial stem cells to several lineages. Endometrial stromal cells were cultured using Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/Hams F-12 (DMEM/F-12) and were passaged every 7-10 d when cultures reached 80-100% of confluency. The immunophenotypes of single endometrial cells were analyzed using flow cytometry at fourth passage. Then the CD146(+) cells were sorted using magnetic-activated cell sorting, and they were cultured and analyzed for in vitro differentiation to several lineages. Detection of adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells were assessed by oil red O and alizarin red staining, respectively. For detection of neural progenitor and oligodendrocyte-like cells, the cells were immunostained by neurofilament 68 and oligo2, respectively. The rates of CD90, CD105, CD146, CD31, CD34, and CD9 of cultured endometrial cells were 94.98 ± 3%, 95.77 ± 2.5%, 27.61 ± 2%, 0.79 ± 0.05%, 1.43 ± 0.1%, and 1.01 ± 0.06%, respectively. CD146(+) cells were isolated to high purity. CD146(+)-differentiated cells to adipogenic cell with typical lipid-rich vacuoles and osteogenic cells were observed and confirmed their mesenchymal origin. They also differentiated into neural progenitor and glial differentiation by retinoic acid, basic fibroblast growth factor, and epidermal growth factor signaling molecules, respectively, and confirmed by neurofilament 68 and oligo2 immunocytochemistry. The efficiency of differentiation to neural progenitor and oligodendrocyte-like cells was 90 ± 3.4% and 79 ± 2.8%, respectively. This study showed that CD146(+) cells from human endometrium after in vitro cultivation can differentiate into adipogenic-, osteogenic-, neural progenitor-, and glial-like cells. They may provide available alternative source of stem cells for future cell-based therapies and tissue engineering applications.

  14. Tissue growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila: cell polarity and the Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Helena E; Portela, Marta

    2017-03-28

    Cell polarity regulation is critical for defining membrane domains required for the establishment and maintenance of the apical-basal axis in epithelial cells (apico-basal polarity), asymmetric cell divisions, planar organization of tissues (planar cell polarity), and the formation of the front-rear axis in cell migration (front-rear polarity). In the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, cell polarity regulators also interact with the Hippo tissue growth control signaling pathway. In this review we survey the recent Drosophila literature linking cell polarity regulators with the Hippo pathway in epithelial tissue growth, neural stem cell asymmetric divisions and in cell migration in physiological and tumorigenic settings.

  15. Derivation of Neural Precursor Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for DNA Methylomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Ivan; Park, Sun Joo; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent cells with competency to differentiate into all three-germ lineages. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic and epigenetic molecular mechanisms in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency. Stem cells are under unique molecular and cellular regulations different from somatic cells. Proper regulation should be ensured to maintain their unique self-renewal and undifferentiated characteristics. Understanding key mechanisms in stem cell biology will be important for the successful application of stem cells for regenerative therapeutic medicine. More importantly practical use of stem cells will require our knowledge on how to properly direct and differentiate stem cells into the necessary type of cells. Embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells have been used as study models to unveil molecular and cellular mechanisms in various signaling pathways. They are especially beneficial to developmental studies where in vivo molecular/cellular study models are not available. We have derived neural stem cells from human embryonic stem cells as a model to study the effect of teratogen in neural development. We have tested commercial neural differentiation system and successfully derived neural precursor cells exhibiting key molecular features of neural stem cells, which will be useful for experimental application.

  16. Efficient cultivation of neural stem cells with controlled delivery of FGF-2.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, U; Peluso, G; Di Bernardo, G; Calarco, A; D'Apolito, M; Petillo, O; Cipollaro, M; Fusco, F R; Melone, M A B

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) raised the hope for cell-based therapies in human neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Current research strategies aim to isolate, enrich, and propagate homogeneous populations of neural stem cells. Unfortunately, several concerns with NSC cultures currently may limit their therapeutic promise. Exhaustion of growth factors and/or their uncontrolled release with burst and fall in their concentration may greatly affect the in vitro behavior of NSCs. In this context, we investigate whether a device containing heparan sulfate (HS), which is a co-factor in growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation, could potentiate and prolong the delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and thus improve in vitro NSC cultivation. We demonstrated that NSCs cultivated in media with a controlled release of FGF-2 from a polyelectrolyte polymer showed a higher proliferation rate, and reduced apoptosis and senescence. In these experimental conditions NSCs preserve their stemness properties for a longer period of time compared with controls. Also of interest is that cell fate properties are conserved as well. The controlled release of FGF-2 reduced the level of oxidative stress and this is associated with a lower level of damaged DNA. This result may explain the reduced level of senescence and apoptosis in NSCs cultivated in the presence of hydrogel-releasing FGF-2.

  17. Three-dimensional hydrogel cell culture systems for modeling neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, John

    Two-dimensional (2-D) neural cell culture systems have served as physiological models for understanding the cellular and molecular events that underlie responses to physical and chemical stimuli, control sensory and motor function, and lead to the development of neurological diseases. However, the development of three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture systems will be essential for the advancement of experimental research in a variety of fields including tissue engineering, chemical transport and delivery, cell growth, and cell-cell communication. In 3-D cell culture, cells are provided with an environment similar to tissue, in which they are surrounded on all sides by other cells, structural molecules and adhesion ligands. Cells grown in 3-D culture systems display morphologies and functions more similar to those observed in vivo, and can be cultured in such a way as to recapitulate the structural organization and biological properties of tissue. This thesis describes a hydrogel-based culture system, capable of supporting the growth and function of several neural cell types in 3-D. Alginate hydrogels were characterized in terms of their biomechanical and biochemical properties and were functionalized by covalent attachment of whole proteins and peptide epitopes. Methods were developed for rapid cross-linking of alginate hydrogels, thus permitting the incorporation of cells into 3-D scaffolds without adversely affecting cell viability or function. A variety of neural cell types were tested including astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. Cells remained viable and functional for longer than two weeks in culture and displayed process outgrowth in 3-D. Cell constructs were created that varied in cell density, type and organization, providing experimental flexibility for studying cell interactions and behavior. In one set of experiments, 3-D glial-endothelial cell co-cultures were used to model blood-brain barrier (BBB) structure and function. This co-culture system was

  18. Aebp2 as an Epigenetic Regulator for Neural Crest Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hana; Kang, Keunsoo; Ekram, Muhammad B.; Roh, Tae-Young; Kim, Joomyeong

    2011-01-01

    Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2). We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism. PMID:21949878

  19. Triennial Growth Symposium: neural regulation of feed intake: modification by hormones, fasting, and disease.

    PubMed

    Sartin, J L; Whitlock, B K; Daniel, J A

    2011-07-01

    Appetite is a complex process that results from the integration of multiple signals at the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus receives neural signals; hormonal signals such as leptin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin; and nutrient signals such as glucose, FFA, AA, and VFA. This effect is processed by a specific sequence of neurotransmitters beginning with the arcuate nucleus and orexigenic cells containing neuropeptide Y or agouti-related protein and anorexigenic cells containing proopiomelanocortin (yielding the neurotransmitter α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) or cells expressing cocaine amphetamine-related transcript. These so-called first-order neurons act on second-order orexigenic neurons (containing either melanin-concentrating hormone or orexin) or act on anorexigenic neurons (e.g., expressing corticotropin-releasing hormone) to alter feed intake. In addition, satiety signals from the liver and gastrointestinal tract signal through the vagus nerve to the nucleus tractus solitarius to cause meal termination, and in combination with the hypothalamus, integrate the various signals to determine the feeding response. The activities of these neuronal pathways are also influenced by numerous factors such as nutrients, fasting, and disease to modify appetite and hence affect growth and reproduction. This review will begin with the central nervous system pathways and then discuss the ways in which hormones and metabolites may alter the process to affect feed intake with emphasis on farm animals.

  20. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-10

    botulinum toxin, and (4) development of fluorescence based assays for proliferation, mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species generation as sensor...dopaminergic neurons, motoneurons and astrocytes using defined medium conditions, (3) development of cell-based methods to detect botulinum toxin, and...neurons are the target cell type for botulinum toxin and would be a useful cell type for the detection of this potential bioterrorism agent. Astrocytes

  1. Monitoring the growth of the neural representations of new animal concepts.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andrew James; Just, Marcel Adam

    2015-08-01

    Although enormous progress has recently been made in identifying the neural representations of individual object concepts, relatively little is known about the growth of a neural knowledge representation as a novel object concept is being learned. In this fMRI study, the growth of the neural representations of eight individual extinct animal concepts was monitored as participants learned two features of each animal, namely its habitat (i.e., a natural dwelling or scene) and its diet or eating habits. Dwelling/scene information and diet/eating-related information have each been shown to activate their own characteristic brain regions. Several converging methods were used here to capture the emergence of the neural representation of a new animal feature within these characteristic, a priori-specified brain regions. These methods include statistically reliable identification (classification) of the eight newly acquired multivoxel patterns, analysis of the neural representational similarity among the newly learned animal concepts, and conventional GLM assessments of the activation in the critical regions. Moreover, the representation of a recently learned feature showed some durability, remaining intact after another feature had been learned. This study provides a foundation for brain research to trace how a new concept makes its way from the words and graphics used to teach it, to a neural representation of that concept in a learner's brain.

  2. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E. Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system. PMID:26940741

  3. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system.

  4. Neural stem cells: generating and regenerating the brain.

    PubMed

    Gage, Fred H; Temple, Sally

    2013-10-30

    One of the landmark events of the past 25 years in neuroscience research was the establishment of neural stem cells (NSCs) as a life-long source of neurons and glia, a concept that shattered the dogma that the nervous system lacked regenerative power. Stem cells afford the plasticity to generate, repair, and change nervous system function. Combined with reprogramming technology, human somatic cell-derived NSCs and their progeny can model neurological diseases with improved accuracy. As technology advances, we anticipate further important discoveries and novel therapies based on the knowledge and application of these powerful cells.

  5. Neuroprotection of VEGF-expression neural stem cells in neonatal cerebral palsy rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiang-Rong; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Yin, Fei; Tang, Jie-Lu; Yang, Yu-Jia; Wang, Xia; Zhong, Le

    2012-04-21

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a very common neural system development disorder that can cause physical disability in human. Here, we studied the neuroprotective effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-transfected neural stem cells (NSCs) in newborn rats with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation (control group), PBS transplantation (PBS group), VEGF+NSCs transplantation (transgene NSCs group) and NSCs transplantation groups (NSCs group). PBS, Transgene NSCs and NSCs groups respectively received stereotactic injections of PBS, lentiviral vector (pGC-FU-VEGF) infected NSCs or a NSCs suspension in the left sensory-motor cortex 3 days after CP model was established. The NSCs activity, their impacts on neural cell growth and apoptosis, brain development and animal behaviors were examined on the animals up to age 35-days. As expected, unilateral carotid artery occlusion plus hypoxia (cerebral palsy model) resulted in severe neural developmental disorders, including slowed growth, increased in cortical neuron apoptosis, decreased cerebral cortex micro-vessel density and retarded behavior developments. Transplantation of NSCs not only resulted in increases in VEGF protein expression in rat brains, but also largely prevented the behavioral defects and brain tissue pathology that resulted from cerebral palsy procedure, with animals received VEGF transfected NSCs always being marginally better than these received un-transfected cells. In conclusion, NSCs transplantation can partially prevent/slow down the brain damages that are associated with CP in the newborn rats, suggesting a new possible strategy for CP treatment.

  6. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule-Derived Peptide FGL Facilitates Long-Term Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallerac, Glenn; Zerwas, Meike; Novikova, Tatiana; Callu, Delphine; Leblanc-Veyrac, Pascale; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir; Rampon, Claire; Doyere, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is known to play a role in developmental and structural processes but also in synaptic plasticity and memory of the adult animal. Recently, FGL, a NCAM mimetic peptide that binds to the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR-1), has been shown to have a beneficial impact on normal memory functioning, as…

  7. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    mechanism(s)-of- action for known developmental neurotoxicants (Yamauchi, et al., 2007; Lein, P., et al., 2000; Howard, et al., 2005; Audesirk , et...Inc. Page 8 of 9 CONFIDENTIAL REFERENCES Audesirk , T, et al. (1991) Effects of inorganic lead on the differentiation and growth of cultured

  8. Lgr5 Marks Neural Crest Derived Multipotent Oral Stromal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Boddupally, Keerthi; Wang, Guangfang; Chen, Yibu; Kobielak, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that multipotent stem cells with neural crest (NC) origin persist into adulthood in oral mucosa. However their exact localization and role in normal homeostasis is unknown. In this study, we discovered that Lgr5 is expressed in NC cells during embryonic development, which give rise to the dormant stem cells in the adult tongue and oral mucosa. Those Lgr5 positive oral stromal stem cells display properties of NC stem cells including clonal growth and multipotent differentiation. RNA sequencing revealed that adult Lgr5+ oral stromal stem cells express high number of neural crest related markers like Sox9, Twist1, Snai1, Myc, Ets1, Crabp1, Epha2, and Itgb1. Using lineage-tracing experiments, we show that these cells persist more than a year in the ventral tongue and some areas of the oral mucosa and give rise to stromal progeny. In vivo transplantation demonstrated that these cells reconstitute the stroma. Our studies show for the first time that Lgr5 is expressed in the NC cells at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) and is maintained during embryonic development and postnataly in the stroma of the ventral tongue, and some areas of the oral mucosa and that Lgr5+ cells participate in the maintenance of the stroma.

  9. Bio-printing of collagen and VEGF-releasing fibrin gel scaffolds for neural stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong-Bae; Polio, Samuel; Lee, Wonhye; Dai, Guohao; Menon, Lata; Carroll, Rona S; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2010-06-01

    Time-released delivery of soluble growth factors (GFs) in engineered hydrogel tissue constructs promotes the migration and proliferation of embedded cells, which is an important factor for designing scaffolds that ultimately aim for neural tissue regeneration. We report a tissue engineering technique to print murine neural stem cells (C17.2), collagen hydrogel, and GF (vascular endothelial growth factor: VEGF)-releasing fibrin gel to construct an artificial neural tissue. We examined the morphological changes of the printed C17.2 cells embedded in the collagen and its migration toward the fibrin gel. The cells showed high viability (92.89+/-2.32%) after printing, which was equivalent to that of manually-plated cells. C17.2 cells printed within 1mm from the border of VEGF-releasing fibrin gel showed GF-induced changes in their morphology. The cells printed in this range also migrated toward the fibrin gel, with the total migration distance of 102.4+/-76.1microm over 3days. The cells in the control samples (fibrin without the VEGF or VEGF printed directly in collagen) neither proliferated nor migrated. The results demonstrated that bio-printing of VEGF-containing fibrin gel supported sustained release of the GF in the collagen scaffold. The presented method can be gainfully used in the development of three-dimensional (3D) artificial tissue assays and neural tissue regeneration applications.

  10. Potential of adult neural stem cells in stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Andres, Robert H; Choi, Raymond; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2008-11-01

    Despite state-of-the-art therapy, clinical outcome after stroke remains poor, with many patients left permanently disabled and dependent on care. Stem cell therapy has evolved as a promising new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of stroke in experimental studies, and recent clinical trials have proven its feasibility and safety in patients. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of different cell types, such as embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells, human fetal tissue and genetically engineered cell lines. Adult neural stem cells offer the advantage of avoiding the ethical problems associated with embryonic or fetal stem cells and can be harvested as autologous grafts from the individual patients. Furthermore, stimulation of endogenous adult stem cell-mediated repair mechanisms in the brain might offer new avenues for stroke therapy without the necessity of transplantation. However, important scientific issues need to be addressed to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the critical steps in cell-based repair to allow the introduction of these experimental techniques into clinical practice. This review describes up-to-date experimental concepts using adult neural stem cells for the treatment of stroke.

  11. Immune Influence on Adult Neural Stem Cell Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pamela A.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) lie at the heart of central nervous system development and repair, and deficiency or dysregulation of NSCs or their progeny can have significant consequences at any stage of life. Immune signaling is emerging as one of the influential variables that define resident NSC behavior. Perturbations in local immune signaling accompany virtually every injury or disease state and signaling cascades that mediate immune activation, resolution, or chronic persistence influence resident stem and progenitor cells. Some aspects of immune signaling are beneficial, promoting intrinsic plasticity and cell replacement, while others appear to inhibit the very type of regenerative response that might restore or replace neural networks lost in injury or disease. Here we review known and speculative roles that immune signaling plays in the postnatal and adult brain, focusing on how environments encountered in disease or injury may influence the activity and fate of endogenous or transplanted NSCs. PMID:19840551

  12. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhang, Kaiming; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Yin, Yixia

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Schwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more significantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy. PMID:25206862

  13. Neural crest stem cells: discovery, properties and potential for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are a migratory cell population synonymous with vertebrate evolution. They generate a wide variety of cell and tissue types during embryonic and adult development including cartilage and bone, connective tissue, pigment and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia amongst many others. Such incredible lineage potential combined with a limited capacity for self-renewal, which persists even into adult life, demonstrates that NC cells bear the key hallmarks of stem and progenitor cells. In this review, we describe the identification, characterization and isolation of NC stem and progenitor cells from different tissues in both embryo and adult organisms. We discuss their specific properties and their potential application in cell-based tissue and disease-specific repair. PMID:22231630

  14. Sonic hedgehog elevates N-myc gene expression in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wang, Shouyu; Cui, Yan; Shen, Lun; Du, Yanping; Li, Guilin; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Renzhi

    2012-08-05

    Proliferation of neural stem cells is regulated by the secreted signaling molecule sonic hedgehog. In this study, neural stem cells were infected with recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing sonic hedgehog-N-enhanced green fluorescent protein. The results showed that overexpression of sonic hedgehog in neural stem cells induced the increased expression of Gli1 and N-myc, a target gene of sonic hedgehog. These findings suggest that N-myc is a direct downstream target of the sonic hedgehog signal pathway in neural stem cells. Sonic hedgehog and N-myc are important mediators of sonic hedgehog-induced proliferation of neural stem cells.

  15. Rapid Induction of Neural Differentiation in Human Umbilical Cord Matrix Mesenchymal Stem Cells by cAMP-elevating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Atefeh; Safa, Majid; Alikarami, Fatemeh; Kargozar, Saeid; Asadi, Mohammad Hossein; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Soleimani, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord matrix (hUCM) is considered as a promising source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to several advantages over other tissues. The potential of neural differentiation of hUCM-MSCs is of great interest in the context of treating neurodegenerative diseases. In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to establish in vitro conditions for improving the differentiation of hUCM-MSCs toward neuronal cells. In the present study, we evaluated the neural differentiation potential of hUCM-MSCs in the presence of cAMP-elevating agents forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). hUCM-MSCs were isolated from fetal umbilical cord and characterized by flow cytometry analysis for mesenchymal specific markers. Mesodermal differentiation potential was assessed through selective media with lineage-specific induction factors. For assessment of neural differentiation, cells were cultured in the presence of cAMP-elevating agents for 8 and 24 h. The neuronal differentiated MSCs were characterized for neuronal specific markers by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Isolated hUCM-MSCs were found positive for mesenchymal markers (CD73, CD90, and CD105) while negative for hematopoietic markers (CD34 and CD45) .Following neural induction, most cells represented neural-like cells morphology. Neural markers including β-tubulin III (Tuj-1), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and nestin were expressed in treated cells with respect to control group. The astrocyte specific marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was also shown by immunofluorescence in treated cells. (These findings demonstrate that hUCM-MSCs have the ability to rapidly differentiate into neural cell types of neuron-like cells and astrocytes by cAMP-elevating agents without the presence of growth factors. PMID:27942503

  16. Rapid Induction of Neural Differentiation in Human Umbilical Cord Matrix Mesenchymal Stem Cells by cAMP-elevating Agents.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Atefeh; Safa, Majid; Alikarami, Fatemeh; Kargozar, Saeid; Asadi, Mohammad Hossein; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Soleimani, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord matrix (hUCM) is considered as a promising source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to several advantages over other tissues. The potential of neural differentiation of hUCM-MSCs is of great interest in the context of treating neurodegenerative diseases. In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to establish in vitro conditions for improving the differentiation of hUCM-MSCs toward neuronal cells. In the present study, we evaluated the neural differentiation potential of hUCM-MSCs in the presence of cAMP-elevating agents forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). hUCM-MSCs were isolated from fetal umbilical cord and characterized by flow cytometry analysis for mesenchymal specific markers. Mesodermal differentiation potential was assessed through selective media with lineage-specific induction factors. For assessment of neural differentiation, cells were cultured in the presence of cAMP-elevating agents for 8 and 24 h. The neuronal differentiated MSCs were characterized for neuronal specific markers by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Isolated hUCM-MSCs were found positive for mesenchymal markers (CD73, CD90, and CD105) while negative for hematopoietic markers (CD34 and CD45) .Following neural induction, most cells represented neural-like cells morphology. Neural markers including β-tubulin III (Tuj-1), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and nestin were expressed in treated cells with respect to control group. The astrocyte specific marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was also shown by immunofluorescence in treated cells. (These findings demonstrate that hUCM-MSCs have the ability to rapidly differentiate into neural cell types of neuron-like cells and astrocytes by cAMP-elevating agents without the presence of growth factors.

  17. Neuralized functions cell autonomously to regulate Drosophila sense organ development.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Zhou, L; Rudzik, N; Boulianne, G L

    2000-09-01

    Neurogenic genes, including Notch and Delta, are thought to play important roles in regulating cell-cell interactions required for Drosophila sense organ development. To define the requirement of the neurogenic gene neuralized (neu) in this process, two independent neu alleles were used to generate mutant clones. We find that neu is required for determination of cell fates within the proneural cluster and that cells mutant for neu autonomously adopt neural fates when adjacent to wild-type cells. Furthermore, neu is required within the sense organ lineage to determine the fates of daughter cells and accessory cells. To gain insight into the mechanism by which neu functions, we used the GAL4/UAS system to express wild-type and epitope-tagged neu constructs. We show that Neu protein is localized primarily at the plasma membrane. We propose that the function of neu in sense organ development is to affect the ability of cells to receive Notch-Delta signals and thus modulate neurogenic activity that allows for the specification of non-neuronal cell fates in the sense organ.

  18. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) promotes the neural differentiation of full-term amniotic fluid-derived stem cells towards neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liyang; Zhao, Mingyan; Ye, Wei; Huang, Jinzhi; Chu, Jiaqi; Yan, Shouquan; Wang, Chaojun; Zeng, Rong

    2016-08-01

    The amniotic fluid has a heterogeneous population of cells. Some human amniotic fluid-derived stem (hAFS) cells have been shown to harbor the potential to differentiate into neural cells. However, the neural differentiation efficiency of hAFS cells remains low. In this study, we isolated CD117-positive hAFS cells from amniotic fluid and then examined the pluripotency of these cells through the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs). Additionally, we induced the neural differentiation of these cells using neuroectodermal medium. This study revealed that the GSK3-beta inhibitor SB216763 was able to stimulate the proliferation of CD117-positive hAFS cells without influencing their undifferentiated state. Moreover, SB216763 can efficiently promote the neural differentiation of CD117-positive hAFS cells towards neural progenitor cells in the presence of DMEM/F12 and N2 supplement. These findings provide an easy and low-cost method to maintain the proliferation of hAFS cells, as well as induce an efficacious generation of neural progenitor cells from hAFS cells. Such induction of the neural commitment of hAFS cells may provide an option for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by hAFS cells-based therapies.

  19. The early postnatal nonhuman primate neocortex contains self-renewing multipotent neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Homman-Ludiye, Jihane; Merson, Tobias D; Bourne, James A

    2012-01-01

    The postnatal neocortex has traditionally been considered a non-neurogenic region, under non-pathological conditions. A few studies suggest, however, that a small subpopulation of neural cells born during postnatal life can differentiate into neurons that take up residence within the neocortex, implying that postnatal neurogenesis could occur in this region, albeit at a low level. Evidence to support this hypothesis remains controversial while the source of putative neural progenitors responsible for generating new neurons in the postnatal neocortex is unknown. Here we report the identification of self-renewing multipotent neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the postnatal day 14 (PD14) marmoset monkey primary visual cortex (V1, striate cortex). While neuronal maturation within V1 is well advanced by PD14, we observed cells throughout this region that co-expressed Sox2 and Ki67, defining a population of resident proliferating progenitor cells. When cultured at low density in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and/or fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), dissociated V1 tissue gave rise to multipotent neurospheres that exhibited the ability to differentiate into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. While the capacity to generate neurones and oligodendrocytes was not observed beyond the third passage, astrocyte-restricted neurospheres could be maintained for up to 6 passages. This study provides the first direct evidence for the existence of multipotent NPCs within the postnatal neocortex of the nonhuman primate. The potential contribution of neocortical NPCs to neural repair following injury raises exciting new possibilities for the field of regenerative medicine.

  20. Angiogenic growth factors in neural embryogenesis and neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Zagzag, D.

    1995-01-01

    "Blood vessels have the power to increase within themselves which is according to the necessity whether natural or diseased. As a further proof that this is a general principle, we find that all growing parts are much more vascular than those that are come to their full growth; because growth is an operation beyond the simple support of the part. This is the reason why young animals are more vascular than those that are full grown. This is not peculiar to the natural operation of growth, but applies also to disease and restoration." PMID:7531952

  1. Direct cell-cell contact with the vascular niche maintains quiescent neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ottone, Cristina; Krusche, Benjamin; Whitby, Ariadne; Clements, Melanie; Quadrato, Giorgia; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Adams, Ralf H.; Parrinello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature is a prominent component of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche. Although quiescent neural stem cells physically contact blood vessels at specialised endfeet, the significance of this interaction is not understood. In contrast, it is well established that vasculature-secreted soluble factors promote lineage progression of committed progenitors. Here we specifically investigated the role of cell-cell contact-dependent signalling in the vascular niche. Unexpectedly, we find that direct cell-cell interactions with endothelial cells enforces quiescence and promotes stem cell identity. Mechanistically, endothelial ephrinB2 and Jagged1 mediate these effects by suppressing cell-cycle entry downstream of mitogens and inducing stemness genes to jointly inhibit differentiation. In vivo, endothelial-specific ablation of either of the genes which encode these proteins, Efnb2 and Jag1 respectively, aberrantly activates quiescent stem cells, resulting in depletion. Thus, we identify the vasculature as a critical niche compartment for stem cell maintenance, furthering our understanding of how anchorage to the niche maintains stem cells within a pro-differentiative microenvironment. PMID:25283993

  2. Emergence of the small-world architecture in neural networks by activity dependent growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafarov, F. M.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a model describing the growth and development of neural networks based on the latest achievements of experimental neuroscience. The model is based on two evolutionary equations. The first equation is for the evolution of the neurons state and the second is for the growth of axon tips. By using the model, we demonstrated the neuronal growth process from disconnected neurons to fully connected three-dimensional networks. For the analysis of the network's connections structure, we used the random graphs theory methods. It is shown that the growth in neural networks results in the formation of a well-known ;small-world; network model. The analysis of the connectivity distribution shows the presence of a strictly non-Gaussian but no scale-free degree distribution for the in-degree node distribution. In terms of the graphs theory, this study developed a new model of dynamic graph.

  3. Vagal neural crest cell migratory behavior: a transition between the cranial and trunk crest.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Bryan R; Erickson, Carol A

    2011-09-01

    Migration and differentiation of cranial neural crest cells are largely controlled by environmental cues, whereas pathfinding at the trunk level is dictated by cell-autonomous molecular changes owing to early specification of the premigratory crest. Here, we investigated the migration and patterning of vagal neural crest cells. We show that (1) vagal neural crest cells exhibit some developmental bias, and (2) they take separate pathways to the heart and to the gut. Together these observations suggest that prior specification dictates initial pathway choice. However, when we challenged the vagal neural crest cells with different migratory environments, we observed that the behavior of the anterior vagal neural crest cells (somite-level 1-3) exhibit considerable migratory plasticity, whereas the posterior vagal neural crest cells (somite-level 5-7) are more restricted in their behavior. We conclude that the vagal neural crest is a transitional population that has evolved between the head and the trunk.

  4. Coordinating cell and tissue behavior during zebrafish neural tube morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Araya, Claudio; Ward, Laura C; Girdler, Gemma C; Miranda, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    The development of a vertebrate neural epithelium with well-organized apico-basal polarity and a central lumen is essential for its proper function. However, how this polarity is established during embryonic development and the potential influence of surrounding signals and tissues on such organization has remained less understood. In recent years the combined superior transparency and genetics of the zebrafish embryo has allowed for in vivo visualization and quantification of the cellular and molecular dynamics that govern neural tube structure. Here, we discuss recent studies revealing how co-ordinated cell-cell interactions coupled with adjacent tissue dynamics are critical to regulate final neural tissue architecture. Furthermore, new findings show how the spatial regulation and timing of orientated cell division is key in defining precise lumen formation at the tissue midline. In addition, we compare zebrafish neurulation with that of amniotes and amphibians in an attempt to understand the conserved cellular mechanisms driving neurulation and resolve the apparent differences among animals. Zebrafish neurulation not only offers fundamental insights into early vertebrate brain development but also the opportunity to explore in vivo cell and tissue dynamics during complex three-dimensional animal morphogenesis.

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K.; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P.; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:28000662

  6. Liquid crystal cells and optical fibers in neural network implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanski, Andrzej W.; Buczynski, Ryszard; Sierakowski, Marek W.

    1995-08-01

    Optical binary computer may be as easy to operate as parallel system. For such configuration Boolean logic is not very convenient and therefore neural networks should be introduced. In works leading to the paper we used liquid crystal cells as a standard system of liquid crystalline layer between to conducting electrodes in 'sandwich' geometry. We have used 25 micrometers display cells filled with nematic 6CHBT working on 'twisted nematic' effect. Based on such elements a mode of a simple Hopfield network was set up. More advanced experiments were carried out on a model of neurone with supervised learning. The model consists of four laser diodes pigtailed to the multimode optical fibers with 50 micrometers core diameter. The directional couplers help to control the level of input optical power. Four liquid crystal cells allow to change the transmission level according to superivised learning requirements. All the signals were detected by one photodiode. The presented results of experiments are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. An additional study was done to check the possibility to build up a linear neural network with Grossberg layer, a neural network with Kohonen layer, and a counter propagation network with two layers of neurones. We have proved that such models may be set up based on simple liquid crystals cells and optical fiber networks.

  7. Coculture with embryonic stem cells improves neural differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, L; Taha, M F; Javeri, A

    2014-07-11

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells secrete some soluble factors which may affect the differentiation potential of adult stem cells toward different lineages. In the present study, we evaluated neural differentiation of mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) following coculture with ES cells. For this purpose, ADSCs were induced in a medium supplemented with a synthetic serum replacement and various concentrations of retinoic acid (RA). Then, third-passaged ADSCs were indirectly cocultured with ES cells, and the expression levels of pluripotency markers, OCT4 and Sox2, mesenchymal stem cell markers, CD73 and CD105, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), were assessed in the cocultured ADSCs. Moreover, the control and cocultured ADSCs were differentiated with or without RA treatment. We showed here that 2-week differentiated ADSCs expressed several neuron-specific genes, and RA treatment improved neural differentiation of the ADSCs. The expression levels of OCT4, Sox2 and PCNA were upregulated in the cocultured ADSCs. Moreover, coculture with the ES cells significantly improved neural differentiation of the ADSCs. Treatment of the cocultured ADSCs with RA diminished the expression of neural maturation markers. Coculture with the ES cells efficiently improves neural differentiation of the ADSCs. Non-contact coculture with the ES cells may be used as an efficient strategy to improve differentiation potential of adult stem cells for developmental studies and regenerative medicine.

  8. Artificial Neural Networks, and Evolutionary Algorithms as a systems biology approach to a data-base on fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Street, Maria E; Buscema, Massimo; Smerieri, Arianna; Montanini, Luisa; Grossi, Enzo

    2013-12-01

    One of the specific aims of systems biology is to model and discover properties of cells, tissues and organisms functioning. A systems biology approach was undertaken to investigate possibly the entire system of intra-uterine growth we had available, to assess the variables of interest, discriminate those which were effectively related with appropriate or restricted intrauterine growth, and achieve an understanding of the systems in these two conditions. The Artificial Adaptive Systems, which include Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Algorithms lead us to the first analyses. These analyses identified the importance of the biochemical variables IL-6, IGF-II and IGFBP-2 protein concentrations in placental lysates, and offered a new insight into placental markers of fetal growth within the IGF and cytokine systems, confirmed they had relationships and offered a critical assessment of studies previously performed.

  9. L1 Retrotransposition in Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (LINE-1 or L1) is a family of non-LTR retrotransposons that can replicate and reintegrate into the host genome. L1s have considerably influenced mammalian genome evolution by retrotransposing during germ cell development or early embryogenesis, leading to massive genome expansion. For many years, L1 retrotransposons were viewed as a selfish DNA parasite that had no contribution in somatic cells. Historically, L1s were thought to only retrotranspose during gametogenesis and in neoplastic processes, but recent studies have shown that L1s are extremely active in the mouse, rat, and human neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs). These de novo L1 insertions can impact neuronal transcriptional expression, creating unique transcriptomes of individual neurons, possibly contributing to the uniqueness of the individual cognition and mental disorders in humans.

  10. The Cellular Prion Protein Controls Notch Signaling in Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Halliez, Sophie; Hirsch, Théo Z; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Passet, Bruno; Tomkiewicz, Céline; Villa-Diaz, Ana; Torres, Juan-Maria; Launay, Jean-Marie; Béringue, Vincent; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    The prion protein is infamous for its involvement in a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. In the longstanding quest to decipher the physiological function of its cellular isoform, PrP(C) , the discovery of its participation to the self-renewal of hematopoietic and neural stem cells has cast a new spotlight on its potential role in stem cell biology. However, still little is known on the cellular and molecular mechanisms at play. Here, by combining in vitro and in vivo murine models of PrP(C) depletion, we establish that PrP(C) deficiency severely affects the Notch pathway, which plays a major role in neural stem cell maintenance. We document that the absence of PrP(C) in a neuroepithelial cell line or in primary neurospheres is associated with drastically reduced expression of Notch ligands and receptors, resulting in decreased levels of Notch target genes. Similar alterations of the Notch pathway are recovered in the neuroepithelium of Prnp(-/-) embryos during a developmental window encompassing neural tube closure. In addition, in line with Notch defects, our data show that the absence of PrP(C) results in altered expression of Nestin and Olig2 as well as N-cadherin distribution. We further provide evidence that PrP(C) controls the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) downstream from Notch. Finally, we unveil a negative feedback action of EGFR on both Notch and PrP(C) . As a whole, our study delineates a molecular scenario through which PrP(C) takes part to the self-renewal of neural stem and progenitor cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:754-765.

  11. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for glial and neural-related molecules in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures: neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lisak, Robert P; Benjamins, Joyce A; Bealmear, Beverly; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Yao, Bin; Land, Susan; Studzinski, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis, inflammatory cells are found in both active and chronic lesions, and it is increasingly clear that cytokines are involved directly and indirectly in both formation and inhibition of lesions. We propose that cytokine mixtures typical of Th1 or Th2 lymphocytes, or monocyte/macrophages each induce unique molecular changes in glial cells. Methods To examine changes in gene expression that might occur in glial cells exposed to the secreted products of immune cells, we have used gene array analysis to assess the early effects of different cytokine mixtures on mixed CNS glia in culture. We compared the effects of cytokines typical of Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M) on CNS glia after 6 hours of treatment. Results In this paper we focus on changes with potential relevance for neuroprotection and axon/glial interactions. Each mixture of cytokines induced a unique pattern of changes in genes for neurotrophins, growth and maturation factors and related receptors; most notably an alternatively spliced form of trkC was markedly downregulated by Th1 and M/M cytokines, while Th2 cytokines upregulated BDNF. Genes for molecules of potential importance in axon/glial interactions, including cell adhesion molecules, connexins, and some molecules traditionally associated with neurons showed significant changes, while no genes for myelin-associated genes were regulated at this early time point. Unexpectedly, changes occurred in several genes for proteins initially associated with retina, cancer or bone development, and not previously reported in glial cells. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures induced specific changes in gene expression that could be altered by pharmacologic strategies to promote protection of the central nervous system. PMID:18088439

  12. Control of neural stem cell adhesion and density by an electronic polymer surface switch.

    PubMed

    Saltó, Carmen; Saindon, Emilien; Bolin, Maria; Kanciurzewska, Anna; Fahlman, Mats; Jager, Edwin W H; Tengvall, Pentti; Arenas, Ernest; Berggren, Magnus

    2008-12-16

    Adhesion is an essential parameter for stem cells. It regulates the overall cell density along the carrying surface, which further dictates the differentiation scheme of stem cells toward a more matured and specified population as well as tissue. Electronic control of the seeding density of neural stem cells (c17.2) is here reported. Thin electrode films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT):Tosylate were manufactured along the floor of cell growth dishes. As the oxidation state of the conjugated polymer electrodes was controlled, the seeding density could be varied by a factor of 2. Along the oxidized PEDOT:Tosylate-electrodes, a relatively lower density of, and less tightly bonded, human serum albumin (HSA) was observed as compared to reduced electrodes. We found that this favors adhesion of the specific stem cells studied. Surface analysis experiments, such as photoelectron spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements, were carried out to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the electronic control of the seeding density of the c17.2 neural stem cells. Further, our findings may provide an opening for electronic control of stem cell differentiation.

  13. Neural Stem Cells and Fetal-Onset Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M

    2017-01-27

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, but also a brain disorder. How can we explain the inborn and, so far, irreparable neurological impairment in children born with hydrocephalus? We hypothesize that a cell junction pathology of neural stem cells (NSC) leads to two inseparable phenomena: hydrocephalus and abnormal neurogenesis. All neurons, glial cells, and ependymal cells of the mammalian central nervous system originate from the NSC forming the ventricular zone (VZ) and the neural progenitor cells (NPC) forming the subventricular zone. Several genetic mutations and certain foreign signals all convey into a final common pathway leading to cell junction pathology of NSC and VZ disruption. VZ disruption follows a temporal and spatial pattern; it leads to aqueduct obliteration and hydrocephalus in the cerebral aqueduct, while it results in abnormal neurogenesis in the telencephalon. The disrupted NSC and NPC are released into the CSF and may transform into neurospheres displaying a junctional pathology similar to that of NSC of the disrupted VZ. These cells can then be utilized to investigate molecular alterations underlying the disease and open an avenue into possible NSC therapy.

  14. Aging differentially affects male and female neural stem cell neurogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Jay; McCourty, Althea; Lecanu, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Neural stem cell transplantation as a brain repair strategy is a very promising technology. However, despite many attempts, the clinical success remains very deceiving. Despite clear evidence that sexual dimorphism rules many aspects of human biology, the occurrence of a sex difference in neural stem cell biology is largely understudied. Herein, we propose to determine whether gender is a dimension that drives the fate of neural stem cells through aging. Should it occur, we believe that neural stem cell sexual dimorphism and its variation during aging should be taken into account to refine clinical approaches of brain repair strategies. Methods Neural stem cells were isolated from the subventricular zone of three- and 20-month-old male and female Long-Evans rats. Expression of the estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and glucocorticoid receptor was analyzed and quantified by Western blotting on undifferentiated neural stem cells. A second set of neural stem cells was treated with retinoic acid to trigger differentiation, and the expression of neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial markers was determined using Western blotting. Conclusion We provided in vitro evidence that the fate of neural stem cells is affected by sex and aging. Indeed, young male neural stem cells mainly expressed markers of neuronal and oligodendroglial fate, whereas young female neural stem cells underwent differentiation towards an astroglial phenotype. Aging resulted in a lessened capacity to express neuron and astrocyte markers. Undifferentiated neural stem cells displayed sexual dimorphism in the expression of steroid receptors, in particular ERα and ERβ, and the expression level of several steroid receptors increased during aging. Such sexual dimorphism might explain, at least in part, the sex difference in neural fate we observed in young and old neural stem cells. These results suggest that sex and aging are two factors to be taken

  15. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-11

    types have potential for being physiologically relevant in vitro models for botulinum toxin detection and neuron-glia interactions, respectively...unknown neurotoxicants. (5) We developed an immunoblot based method for detecting botulinum toxin using the mixed neuronal hN2™ cell line, thus creating...a first generation human cellular model for botulinum toxin detection – standard of comparison for existing and future models.neurotoxicity

  16. Interplay between cell growth and cell cycle in plants.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, Robert; Carnier Dornelas, Marcelo

    2014-06-01

    The growth of organs and whole plants depends on both cell growth and cell-cycle progression, but the interaction between both processes is poorly understood. In plants, the balance between growth and cell-cycle progression requires coordinated regulation of four different processes: macromolecular synthesis (cytoplasmic growth), turgor-driven cell-wall extension, mitotic cycle, and endocycle. Potential feedbacks between these processes include a cell-size checkpoint operating before DNA synthesis and a link between DNA contents and maximum cell size. In addition, key intercellular signals and growth regulatory genes appear to target at the same time cell-cycle and cell-growth functions. For example, auxin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroid all have parallel links to cell-cycle progression (through S-phase Cyclin D-CDK and the anaphase-promoting complex) and cell-wall functions (through cell-wall extensibility or microtubule dynamics). Another intercellular signal mediated by microtubule dynamics is the mechanical stress caused by growth of interconnected cells. Superimposed on developmental controls, sugar signalling through the TOR pathway has recently emerged as a central control point linking cytoplasmic growth, cell-cycle and cell-wall functions. Recent progress in quantitative imaging and computational modelling will facilitate analysis of the multiple interconnections between plant cell growth and cell cycle and ultimately will be required for the predictive manipulation of plant growth.

  17. Neural Correlates of Posttraumatic Growth after Severe Motor Vehicle Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe, Sirko; Zollner, Tanja; Maercker, Andreas; Karl, Anke

    2006-01-01

    Frontal brain asymmetry has been associated with emotion- and motivation-related constructs. The authors examined the relationship between frontal brain asymmetry and subjective perception of posttraumatic growth (PTG) after severe motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). Eighty-two survivors of MVAs completed self-report measures of PTG, trait and state…

  18. Differentiation of isolated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ji-Ming; Duan, Hong-Tao; Kong, Jia-Hui; Wang, Yue-Xin; Dong, Meng; Bi, Xue; Song, Jian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether umbilical cord human mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) was able to differentiate into neural stem cell and neuron in vitro. METHODS The umbilical cords were obtained from pregnant women with their written consent and the approval of the Clinic Ethnics Committee. UC-MSC were isolated by adherent culture in the medium contains 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS), then they were maintained in the medium contain 10% FBS and induced to neural cells in neural differentiation medium. We investigated whether UC-MSC was able to differentiate into neural stem cell and neuron in vitro by using flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence (IF) analyzes. RESULTS A substantial number of UC-MSC was harvested using the tissue explants adherent method at about 2wk. Flow cytometric study revealed that these cells expressed common markers of MSCs, such as CD105 (SH2), CD73 (SH3) and CD90. After induction of differentiation of neural stem cells, the cells began to form clusters; RT-PCR and IF showed that the neuron specific enolase (NSE) and neurogenic differentiation 1-positive cells reached 87.3%±14.7% and 72.6%±11.8%, respectively. Cells showed neuronal cell differentiation after induced, including neuron-like protrusions, plump cell body, obviously and stronger refraction. RT-PCR and IF analysis showed that microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and nuclear factor-M-positive cells reached 43.1%±10.3% and 69.4%±19.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION Human umbilical cord derived MSCs can be cultured and proliferated in vitro and differentiate into neural stem cells, which may be a valuable source for cell therapy of neurodegenerative eye diseases. PMID:26949608

  19. Proliferation and cilia dynamics in neural stem cells prospectively isolated from the SEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Priti; Obernier, Kirsten; Simeonova, Ina K.; Hellwig, Andrea; Hölzl-Wenig, Gabriele; Mandl, Claudia; Scholl, Catharina; Wölfl, Stefan; Winkler, Johannes; Gaspar, John A.; Sachinidis, Agapios; Ciccolini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) generate new neurons in vivo and in vitro throughout adulthood and therefore are physiologically and clinically relevant. Unveiling the mechanisms regulating the lineage progression from NSCs to newborn neurons is critical for the transition from basic research to clinical application. However, the direct analysis of NSCs and their progeny is still elusive due to the problematic identification of the cells. We here describe the isolation of highly purified genetically unaltered NSCs and transit-amplifying precursors (TAPs) from the adult subependymal zone (SEZ). Using this approach we show that a primary cilium and high levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at the cell membrane characterize quiescent and cycling NSCs, respectively. However, we also observed non-ciliated quiescent NSCs and NSCs progressing into the cell cycle without up-regulating EGFR expression. Thus, the existence of NSCs displaying distinct molecular and structural conformations provides more flexibility to the regulation of quiescence and cell cycle progression.

  20. Cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase functions during neural crest cell migration and neurulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell migration and neurite outgrowth are mediated in part by binding of cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) to N-linked oligosaccharides within the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, we determined whether cell surface GalTase functions during neural crest cell migration and neural development in vivo using antibodies raised against affinity-purified chicken serum GalTase. The antibodies specifically recognized two embryonic proteins of 77 and 67 kD, both of which express GalTase activity. The antibodies also immunoprecipitated and inhibited chick embryo GalTase activity, and inhibited neural crest cell migration on laminin matrices in vitro. Anti-GalTase antibodies were microinjected into the head mesenchyme of stage 7-9 chick embryos or cranial to Henson's node of stage 6 embryos. Anti-avian GalTase IgG decreased cranial neural crest cell migration on the injected side but did not cross the embryonic midline and did not affect neural crest cell migration on the uninjected side. Anti-avian GalTase Fab crossed the embryonic midline and perturbed cranial neural crest cell migration throughout the head. Neural fold elevation and neural tube closure were also disrupted by Fab fragments. Cell surface GalTase was localized to migrating neural crest cells and to the basal surfaces of neural epithelia by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas GalTase was undetectable on neural crest cells prior to migration. These results suggest that, during early embryogenesis, cell surface GalTase participates during neural crest cell migration, perhaps by interacting with laminin, a major component of the basal lamina. Cell surface GalTase also appears to play a role in neural tube formation, possibly by mediating neural epithelial adhesion to the underlying basal lamina. PMID:1560031

  1. Prosencephalic neural folds give rise to neural crest cells in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Kundrát, Martin; Joss, Jean M P; Olsson, Lennart

    2009-03-15

    Here we present a fate map of the prosencephalic neural fold (PNF) for the Australian lungfish. The experimental procedures were carried out on lungfish embryos at Kemp's stage 24 using three different approaches. First, either medial PNF (MPNF) or lateral PNF (LPNF) were ablated and the embryos cultured until they reached Kemp's stage 42 and 44. Ablation of the LPNF provided phenotypes with arrested development of the eye, reduction of periocular pigmentation, frontonasal deformity, and a slightly reduced olfactory organ, whereas the MPNF-ablated phenotypes resulted in arrested development of the cornea and frontonasal deformity. Second, we labeled the mid-axial level of the PNF with vital DiI and traced the migration of labeled cells following culture to Kemp's stage 33. Labeled PNF-derived cells populated a basal layer of the olfactory placode, migrated into the frontonasal region, the antero-dorsal periocular quadrant, and also terminated at positions where the forebrain meninges form at later stages. Third, we examined HNK-1 immunoreactivity in the forebrain-related region. We conclude that in the Australian lungfish: (1) LPNF-derived neuroepithelium gives rise to the basal layer and contributes to the apical layer of the olfactory placode; (2) PNF-derived NC cells appear to give rise to meningeal, periocular, and frontonasal ectomesenchyme and likely infiltrate the olfactory placode as developmental precusors of the terminal nerve; (3) HNK-1 epitope is temporarily expressed in cells of the neural tube, NC cells, and neurogenic placodal cells. Our experiments have provided the first evidence for a premandibular NC stream (sensu Kundrát, 2008) in a fish.

  2. Functional identification of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Grade, Sofia; Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Malva, João O

    2012-01-01

    Directing neural stem cells (NSCs) differentiation towards oligodendroglial cell lineage is a crucial step in the endeavor of developing cell replacement-based therapies for demyelinating diseases. Evaluation of NSCs differentiation is mostly performed by methodologies that use fixed cells, like immunocytochemistry, or lysates, like Western blot. On the other hand, electrophysiology allows differentiation studies on living cells, but it is highly time-consuming and endowed with important limitations concerning population studies. Herein, we describe a functional method, based on single cell calcium imaging, which accurately and rapidly distinguishes cell types among NSCs progeny, in living cultures prepared from the major reservoir of NSCs in the postnatal mouse brain, the subventricular zone (SVZ). Indeed, by applying a rational sequence of three stimuli-KCl, histamine, and thrombin-to the heterogeneous SVZ cell population, one can identify each cell phenotype according to its unique calcium signature. Mature oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system, are the thrombin-responsive cells in SVZ cell culture and display no intracellular calcium increase upon KCl or histamine perfusion. On the other hand, KCl and histamine stimulate neurons and immature cells, respectively. The method described in this chapter is a valuable tool to identify novel pro-oligodendrogenic compounds, which may play an important role in the design of future treatments for demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

  3. Neural stem cell-based treatment for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung U; Lee, Hong J; Kim, Yun B

    2013-10-01

    Human neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by a loss of neurons and glia in the brain or spinal cord. Neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs), and stem cell-based cell therapies for neurodegenerative diseases have been developed. A recent advance in generation of a new class of pluripotent stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), derived from patients' own skin fibroblasts, opens doors for a totally new field of personalized medicine. Transplantation of NSCs, neurons or glia generated from stem cells in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, including PD, HD, ALS and AD, demonstrates clinical improvement and also life extension of these animals. Additional therapeutic benefits in these animals can be provided by stem cell-mediated gene transfer of therapeutic genes such as neurotrophic factors and enzymes. Although further research is still needed, cell and gene therapy based on stem cells, particularly using neurons and glia derived from iPSCs, ESCs or NSCs, will become a routine treatment for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases and also stroke and spinal cord injury.

  4. Generating trunk neural crest from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miller; Miller, Matthew L; McHenry, Lauren K; Zheng, Tina; Zhen, Qiqi; Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin; Conklin, Bruce R; Bronner, Marianne E; Weiss, William A

    2016-01-27

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are stem cells that generate different lineages, including neuroendocrine, melanocytic, cartilage, and bone. The differentiation potential of NCC varies according to the level from which cells emerge along the neural tube. For example, only anterior "cranial" NCC form craniofacial bone, whereas solely posterior "trunk" NCC contribute to sympathoadrenal cells. Importantly, the isolation of human fetal NCC carries ethical and scientific challenges, as NCC induction typically occur before pregnancy is detectable. As a result, current knowledge of NCC biology derives primarily from non-human organisms. Important differences between human and non-human NCC, such as expression of HNK1 in human but not mouse NCC, suggest a need to study human NCC directly. Here, we demonstrate that current protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) to NCC are biased toward cranial NCC. Addition of retinoic acid drove trunk-related markers and HOX genes characteristic of a posterior identity. Subsequent treatment with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) enhanced differentiation to sympathoadrenal cells. Our approach provides methodology for detailed studies of human NCC, and clarifies roles for retinoids and BMPs in the differentiation of human PSC to trunk NCC and to sympathoadrenal lineages.

  5. Live Imaging of Adult Neural Stem Cells in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Felipe; Costa, Marcos R.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cells of the neural lineage within the brain is not restricted to early development. New neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes are produced in the adult brain throughout the entire murine life. However, despite the extensive research performed in the field of adult neurogenesis during the past years, fundamental questions regarding the cell biology of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) remain to be uncovered. For instance, it is crucial to elucidate whether a single aNSC is capable of differentiating into all three different macroglial cell types in vivo or these distinct progenies constitute entirely separate lineages. Similarly, the cell cycle length, the time and mode of division (symmetric vs. asymmetric) that these cells undergo within their lineage progression are interesting questions under current investigation. In this sense, live imaging constitutes a valuable ally in the search of reliable answers to the previous questions. In spite of the current limitations of technology new approaches are being developed and outstanding amount of knowledge is being piled up providing interesting insights in the behavior of aNSCs. Here, we will review the state of the art of live imaging as well as the alternative models that currently offer new answers to critical questions. PMID:27013941

  6. Encapsulated neural stem cell neuronal differentiation in fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Wijekoon, Asanka; Leipzig, Nic D

    2014-07-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) are able to differentiate into the primary cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes) of the adult nervous system. This attractive property of NSPCs offers a potential solution for neural regeneration. 3D implantable scaffolds should mimic the microstructure and dynamic properties found in vivo, enabling the natural exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors for cell survival and differentiation. We have previously reported a new class of materials consisting of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) conjugated to methacrylamide chitosan (MAC), which possess the ability to repeatedly take-up and release oxygen at beneficial levels for favorable cell metabolism and proliferation. In this study, the neuronal differentiation responses of NSPCs to fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan (MACF) hydrogels were studied for 8 days. Two treatments, with oxygen reloading or without oxygen reloading, were performed during culture. Oxygen concentration distributions within cell-seeded MACF hydrogels were found to have higher concentrations of oxygen at the edge of the hydrogels and less severe drops in O2 gradient as compared with MAC hydrogel controls. Total cell number was enhanced in MACF hydrogels as the number of conjugated fluorines via PFC substitution increased. Additionally, all MACF hydrogels supported significantly more cells than MAC controls (p < 0.001). At day 8, MACF hydrogels displayed significantly greater neuronal differentiation than MAC controls (p = 0.001), and among MACF groups methacrylamide chitosan with 15 fluorines per addition (MAC(Ali15)F) demonstrated the best ability to promote NSPC differentiation.

  7. Lack of endothelial cell survivin causes embryonic defects in angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, and neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Zwerts, Femke; Lupu, Florea; De Vriese, Astrid; Pollefeyt, Saskia; Moons, Lieve; Altura, Rachel A; Jiang, Yuying; Maxwell, Patrick H; Hill, Peter; Oh, Hideyasu; Rieker, Claus; Collen, Désiré; Conway, Simon J; Conway, Edward M

    2007-06-01

    We explored the physiologic role of endothelial cell apoptosis during development by generating mouse embryos lacking the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin in endothelium. This was accomplished by intercrossing survivin(lox/lox) mice with mice expressing cre recombinase under the control of the endothelial cell specific tie1 promoter (tie1-cre mice). Lack of endothelial cell survivin resulted in embryonic lethality. Mutant embryos had prominent and diffuse hemorrhages from embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) and died before E13.5. Heart development was strikingly abnormal. Survivin-null endocardial lineage cells could not support normal epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), resulting in hypoplastic endocardial cushions and in utero heart failure. In addition, 30% of mutant embryos had neural tube closure defects (NTDs) that were not caused by bleeding or growth retardation, but were likely due to alterations in the release of soluble factors from endothelial cells that otherwise support neural stem cell proliferation and neurulation. Thus, regulation of endothelial cell survival, and maintenance of vascular integrity by survivin are crucial for normal embryonic angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  8. Generation of Neural Crest-Like Cells From Human Periodontal Ligament Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Hynes, Kim; Ng, Jia; Menicanin, Danijela; Camp, Esther; Arthur, Agnes; Gronthos, Stan; Mark Bartold, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) hold great promise for tissue engineering, however the inability to easily obtain large numbers of NCC is a major factor limiting their use in studies of regenerative medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are emerging as a novel candidate that could provide an unlimited source of NCC. In the present study, we examined the potential of neural crest tissue-derived periodontal ligament (PDL) iPSC to differentiate into neural crest-like cells (NCLC) relative to iPSC generated from a non-neural crest derived tissue, foreskin fibroblasts (FF). We detected high HNK1 expression during the differentiation of PDL and FF iPSC into NCLC as a marker for enriching for a population of cells with NCC characteristics. We isolated PDL iPSC- and FF iPSC-derived NCLC, which highly expressed HNK1. A high proportion of the HNK1-positive cell populations generated, expressed the MSC markers, whilst very few cells expressed the pluripotency markers or the hematopoietic markers. The PDL and FF HNK1-positive populations gave rise to smooth muscle, neural, glial, osteoblastic and adipocytic like cells and exhibited higher expression of smooth muscle, neural, and glial cell-associated markers than the PDL and FF HNK1-negative populations. Interestingly, the HNK1-positive cells derived from the PDL-iPSC exhibited a greater ability to differentiate into smooth muscle, neural, glial cells and adipocytes, than the HNK1-positive cells derived from the FF-iPSC. Our work suggests that HNK1-enriched NCLC from neural crest tissue-derived iPSC more closely resemble the phenotypic and functional hallmarks of NCC compared to the HNK1-low population and non-neural crest iPSC-derived NCLC. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 402-416, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of polyvinylidene fluoride electrospun fiber orientation on neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lins, Luanda C; Wianny, Florence; Livi, Sebastien; Dehay, Colette; Duchet-Rumeau, Jannick; Gérard, Jean-François

    2016-08-29

    Electrospun polymer piezoelectric fibers can be used in neural tissue engineering (NTE) to mimic the physical, biological, and material properties of the native extracellular matrix. In this work, we have developed scaffolds based on polymer fiber architectures for application in NTE. To study the role of such three-dimensional scaffolds, a rotating drum collector was used for electrospinning poly(vinylidene) fluoride (PVDF) polymer at various rotation speeds. The morphology, orientation, polymorphism, as well as the mechanical behavior of the nonaligned and aligned fiber-based architectures were characterized. We have demonstrated that the jet flow and the electrostatic forces generated by electrospinning of PVDF induced local conformation changes which promote the generation of the β-phase. Fiber anisotropy could be a critical feature for the design of suitable scaffolds for NTEs. We thus assessed the impact of PVDF fiber alignment on the behavior of monkey neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs were seeded on nonaligned and aligned scaffolds and their morphology, adhesion, and differentiation capacities into the neuronal and glial pathways were studied using microscopic techniques. Significant changes in the growth and differentiation capacities of NSCs into neuronal and glial cells as a function of the fiber alignment were evidenced. These results demonstrate that PVDF scaffolds may serve as instructive scaffolds for NSC survival and differentiation, and may be valuable tools for the development of cell- and scaffold-based strategies for neural repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  10. Enhanced proliferation of PC12 neural cells on untreated, nanotextured glass coverslips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Muhymin; Atmaramani, Rahul; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Santaneel; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system is a significant health problem. There is no effective treatment available partly because of the complexity of the system. Implementation of multifunctional micro- and nano-device based combinatorial therapeutics can provide biocompatible and tunable approaches to perform on-demand release of specific drugs. This can help the damaged cells to improve neuronal survival, regeneration of axons, and their reconnection to appropriate targets. Nano-topological features induced rapid cell growth is especially important towards the design of effective platforms to facilitate damaged neural circuit reconstruction. In this study, for the first time, feasibility of neuron-like PC12 cell growth on untreated and easy to prepare nanotextured surfaces has been carried out. The PC12 neuron-like cells were cultured on micro reactive ion etched nanotextured glass coverslips. The effect of nanotextured topology as physical cue for the growth of PC12 cells was observed exclusively, eliminating the possible influence(s) of the enhanced concentration of coated materials on the surface. The cell density was observed to increase by almost 200% on nanotextured coverslips compared to plain coverslips. The morphology study indicated that PC12 cell attachment and growth on the nanotextured substrates did not launch any apoptotic machinery of the cell. Less than 5% cells deformed and depicted condensed nuclei with apoptotic bodies on nanotextured surfaces which is typical for the normal cell handling and culture. Enhanced PC12 cell proliferation by such novel and easy to prepare substrates is not only attractive for neurite outgrowth and guidance, but may be used to increase the affinity of similar cancerous cells (ex: B35 neuroblastoma) and rapid proliferation thereafter—towards the development of combinatorial theranostics to diagnose and treat aggressive cancers like neuroblastoma.

  11. Enhanced proliferation of PC12 neural cells on untreated, nanotextured glass coverslips.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhymin; Atmaramani, Rahul; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Santaneel; Iqbal, Samir M

    2016-10-14

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system is a significant health problem. There is no effective treatment available partly because of the complexity of the system. Implementation of multifunctional micro- and nano-device based combinatorial therapeutics can provide biocompatible and tunable approaches to perform on-demand release of specific drugs. This can help the damaged cells to improve neuronal survival, regeneration of axons, and their reconnection to appropriate targets. Nano-topological features induced rapid cell growth is especially important towards the design of effective platforms to facilitate damaged neural circuit reconstruction. In this study, for the first time, feasibility of neuron-like PC12 cell growth on untreated and easy to prepare nanotextured surfaces has been carried out. The PC12 neuron-like cells were cultured on micro reactive ion etched  nanotextured glass coverslips. The effect of nanotextured topology as physical cue for the growth of PC12 cells was observed exclusively, eliminating the possible influence(s) of the enhanced concentration of coated materials on the surface. The cell density was observed to increase by almost 200% on nanotextured coverslips compared to plain coverslips. The morphology study indicated that PC12 cell attachment and growth on the nanotextured substrates did not launch any apoptotic machinery of the cell. Less than 5% cells deformed and depicted condensed nuclei with apoptotic bodies on nanotextured surfaces which is typical for the normal cell handling and culture. Enhanced PC12 cell proliferation by such novel and easy to prepare substrates is not only attractive for neurite outgrowth and guidance, but may be used to increase the affinity of similar cancerous cells (ex: B35 neuroblastoma) and rapid proliferation thereafter-towards the development of combinatorial theranostics to diagnose and treat aggressive cancers like neuroblastoma.

  12. Isolation of neural stem cells from the postnatal cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Audra; Kessler, Jessica D; Read, Tracy-Ann; Kaiser, Constanze; Corbeil, Denis; Huttner, Wieland B; Johnson, Jane E; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J

    2005-06-01

    The cerebellum is critical for motor coordination and cognitive function and is the target of transformation in medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Although the development of granule cells, the most abundant neurons in the cerebellum, has been studied in detail, the origins of other cerebellar neurons and glia remain poorly understood. Here we show that the murine postnatal cerebellum contains multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). These cells can be prospectively isolated based on their expression of the NSC marker prominin-1 (CD133) and their lack of markers of neuronal and glial lineages (lin-). Purified prominin+ lin- cells form self-renewing neurospheres and can differentiate into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons in vitro. Moreover, they can generate each of these lineages after transplantation into the cerebellum. Identification of cerebellar stem cells has important implications for the understanding of cerebellar development and the origins of medulloblastoma.

  13. Expression Profiles of the Nuclear Receptors and Their Transcriptional Coregulators During Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Androutsellis-Theotokis, A.; Chrousos, G. P.; McKay, R. D.; DeCherney, A. H.; Kino, T.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are pluripotent precursors with the ability to proliferate and differentiate into 3 neural cell lineages, neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these biologic processes is essential for understanding both physiologic and pathologic neural development and regeneration after injury. Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and their transcriptional coregulators also play crucial roles in neural development, functions and fate. To identify key NRs and their transcriptional regulators in NSC differentiation, we examined mRNA expression of 49 NRs and many of their coregulators during differentiation (0–5 days) of mouse embryonic NSCs induced by withdrawal of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). 37 out of 49 NRs were expressed in NSCs before induction of differentiation, while receptors known to play major roles in neural development, such as THRα, RXRs, RORs, TRs, and COUPTFs, were highly expressed. CAR, which plays important roles in xenobiotic metabolism, was also highly expressed. FGF2 withdrawal induced mRNA expression of RORγ, RXRγ, and MR by over 20-fold. Most of the transcriptional coregulators examined were expressed basally and throughout differentiation without major changes, while FGF2 withdrawal strongly induced mRNA expression of several histone deacetylases (HDACs), including HDAC11. Dexamethasone and aldosterone, respectively a synthetic glucocorticoid and natural mineralocorticoid, increased NSC numbers and induced differentiation into neurons and astrocytes. These results indicate that the NRs and their coregulators are present and/or change their expression during NSC differentiation, suggesting that they may influence development of the central nervous system in the absence or presence of their ligands. PMID:22990992

  14. Mesoderm is required for coordinated cell movements within zebrafish neural plate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis of the zebrafish neural tube requires the coordinated movement of many cells in both time and space. A good example of this is the movement of the cells in the zebrafish neural plate as they converge towards the dorsal midline before internalizing to form a neural keel. How these cells are regulated to ensure that they move together as a coherent tissue is unknown. Previous work in other systems has suggested that the underlying mesoderm may play a role in this process but this has not been shown directly in vivo. Results Here we analyze the roles of subjacent mesoderm in the coordination of neural cell movements during convergence of the zebrafish neural plate and neural keel formation. Live imaging demonstrates that the normal highly coordinated movements of neural plate cells are lost in the absence of underlying mesoderm and the movements of internalization and neural tube formation are severely disrupted. Despite this, neuroepithelial polarity develops in the abnormal neural primordium but the resulting tissue architecture is very disorganized. Conclusions We show that the movements of cells in the zebrafish neural plate are highly coordinated during the convergence and internalization movements of neurulation. Our results demonstrate that the underlying mesoderm is required for these coordinated cell movements in the zebrafish neural plate in vivo. PMID:24755297

  15. Axonal control of the adult neural stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D; Tecott, Laurence H; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-04-03

    The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSCs) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain's neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C.

  16. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  17. Automatic discovery of cell types and microcircuitry from neural connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Eric; Kording, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Neural connectomics has begun producing massive amounts of data, necessitating new analysis methods to discover the biological and computational structure. It has long been assumed that discovering neuron types and their relation to microcircuitry is crucial to understanding neural function. Here we developed a non-parametric Bayesian technique that identifies neuron types and microcircuitry patterns in connectomics data. It combines the information traditionally used by biologists in a principled and probabilistically coherent manner, including connectivity, cell body location, and the spatial distribution of synapses. We show that the approach recovers known neuron types in the retina and enables predictions of connectivity, better than simpler algorithms. It also can reveal interesting structure in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans and an old man-made microprocessor. Our approach extracts structural meaning from connectomics, enabling new approaches of automatically deriving anatomical insights from these emerging datasets. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04250.001 PMID:25928186

  18. Isolation of Human Neural Stem Cells from the Amniotic Fluid with Diagnosed Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Su, Hong-Lin; Hsu, Lee-Feng; Huang, Po-Jui; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Hsu, Li-Wen; Tsai, Ming-Song; Chen, Chih-Ping; Chang, Yao-Lung; Chao, An-Shine; Hwang, Shiaw-Min

    2015-08-01

    Human neural stem cells (NSCs) are particularly valuable for the study of neurogenesis process and have a therapeutic potential in treating neurodegenerative disorders. However, current progress in the use of human NSCs is limited due to the available NSC sources and the complicated isolation and culture techniques. In this study, we describe an efficient method to isolate and propagate human NSCs from the amniotic fluid with diagnosed neural tube defects (NTDs), specifically, anencephaly. These amniotic fluid-derived NSCs (AF-NSCs) formed neurospheres and underwent long-term expansion in vitro. In addition, these cells showed normal karyotypes and telomerase activity and expressed NSC-specific markers, including Nestin, Sox2, Musashi-1, and the ATP-binding cassette G2 (ABCG2). AF-NSCs displayed typical morphological patterns and expressed specific markers that were consistent with neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and dopaminergic neurons after proper induction conditions. Furthermore, grafted AF-NSCs improved the physiological functions in a rat stroke model. The ability to isolate and bank human NSCs from this novel source provides a unique opportunity for translational studies of neurological disorders.

  19. Netrin-4 regulates angiogenic responses and tumor cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nacht, Mariana; St Martin, Thia B.; Byrne, Ann; Klinger, Katherine W.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Madden, Stephen L. Jiang, Yide

    2009-03-10

    Netrin-4 is a 628 amino acid basement membrane component that promotes neurite elongation at low concentrations but inhibits neurite extension at high concentrations. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that several molecules, including netrins, are regulators of both neuronal and vascular growth. It is believed that molecules that guide neural growth and development are also involved in regulating morphogenesis of the vascular tree. Further, netrins have recently been implicated in controlling epithelial cell branching morphogenesis in the breast, lung and pancreas. Characterization of purified netrin-4 in in vitro angiogenesis assays demonstrated that netrin-4 markedly inhibits HMVEC migration and tube formation. Moreover, netrin-4 inhibits proliferation of a variety of human tumor cells in vitro. Netrin-4 has only modest effects on proliferation of endothelial and other non-transformed cells. Netrin-4 treatment results in phosphorylation changes of proteins that are known to control cell growth. Specifically, Phospho-Akt-1, Phospho-Jnk-2, and Phospho-c-Jun are reduced in tumor cells that have been treated with netrin-4. Together, these data suggest a potential role for netrin-4 in regulating tumor growth.

  20. In vitro differentiation of quail neural crest cells into sensory-like neuroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber-Blum, Maya; Kumar, Sanjiv R.; Riley, Danny A.

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of quail neural-crest embrionic cells grown as primary culture to differentiate in vitro into sensorylike neuroblasts. After 7-14 days of growth as primary culture, many of the putative sensory neuroblasts displayed substance P (SP)-like immunoreactivity and some exhibited histochemical carbonic anhydrase activity. Double staining experiments showed that the SP-like immunoreactive neuroblasts did not contain detectable levels of tyrosine hydroxylase or dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. The neuronal nature of the cultured sensorylike neuroblasts was further documented by double labeling for antibodies against the 68 kDa neurofilament polypeptide and substance P.

  1. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells.

  2. Fgf20b is required for the ectomesenchymal fate establishment of cranial neural crest cells in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Hajime; Goto, Mami; Katayama, Mika; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The establishment of the ectomesenchymal lineage within the cranial neural crest is of great significance. {yields} Fgf20b knockdown zebrafish embryos showed dysplasticneurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. {yields} Fgf20b is required for ectomesenchymal fate establishment via the activation of Fgfr1 in zebrafish. -- Abstract: In cranial skeletal development, the establishment of the ectomesenchymal lineage within the cranial neural crest is of great significance. Fgfs are polypeptide growth factors with diverse functions in development and metabolism. Fgf20b knockdown zebrafish embryos showed dysplastic neurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. Ectomesenchymal cells from cranial neural crest cells were significantly decreased in Fgf20b knockdown embryos, but cranial neural crest cells with a non-ectomesnchymal fate were increased. However, the proliferation and apoptosis of cranial neural crest cells were essentially unchanged. Fgfr1 knockdown embryos also showed dysplastic neurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. The present findings indicate that Fgf20b is required for ectomesenchymal fate establishment via the activation of Fgfr1 in zebrafish.

  3. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  4. Fabrication and surface modification of poly lactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with epidermal growth factor for neural tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Tanit; Noel, Samantha; Liberelle, Benoît; El Ayoubi, Rouwayda; Ajji, Abdellah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an effort to design biomaterials that may promote repair of the central nervous system, 3-dimensional scaffolds made of electrospun poly lactic acid nanofibers with interconnected pores were fabricated. These scaffolds were functionalized with polyallylamine to introduce amine groups by wet chemistry. Experimental conditions of the amination protocol were thoroughly studied and selected to introduce a high amount of amine group while preserving the mechanical and structural properties of the scaffold. Subsequent covalent grafting of epidermal growth factor was then performed to further tailor these aminated structures. The scaffolds were then tested for their ability to support Neural Stem-Like Cells (NSLCs) culture. Of interest, NSLCs were able to proliferate on these EGF-grafted substrates and remained viable up to 14 d even in the absence of soluble growth factors in the medium. PMID:27740881

  5. Development of a microfluidic platform with integrated power splitting waveguides for optogenetic neural cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hongtao; Shu, Weiliang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yi; Wang, Liping; Chen, Yan

    2015-10-01

    We present a microfluidic platform with integrated power splitting waveguides for optogenetic neural cell stimulation. A liquid-core/PDMS-cladding waveguide with a power splitter design was integrated with a neural cell culture chamber to provide a simple way of precise localized optical stimulation. The parallel on-chip excitation of individual neural cells using a single optical fiber input is demonstrated for optogenetic neural cell studies, and the excitation of each individual waveguide can be independently controlled by pneumatic valves. Light delivery and loss mechanisms through the waveguides were studied and characterized. The waveguide power splitter platform is capable of providing sufficient irradiance to evoke spikes in ChR2-expressing neural cells. The system enables high-resolution stimulation of neural cells in a controllable manner. The microfluidic platform described here represents a novel methodology for studying optogenetics in a compact integrated system with high spatial resolutions.

  6. Generation of human cortical neurons from a new immortal fetal neural stem cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Cacci, E.; Villa, A.; Parmar, M.; Cavallaro, M.; Mandahl, N.; Lindvall, O.; Martinez-Serrano, A.; Kokaia, Z. . E-mail: Zaal.Kokaia@med.lu.se

    2007-02-01

    Isolation and expansion of neural stem cells (NSCs) of human origin are crucial for successful development of cell therapy approaches in neurodegenerative diseases. Different epigenetic and genetic immortalization strategies have been established for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new, clonal NSC (hc-NSC) line, derived from human fetal cortical tissue, based on v-myc immortalization. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that these cells retain the characteristics of NSCs after more than 50 passages. Under proliferation conditions, when supplemented with epidermal and basic fibroblast growth factors, the hc-NSCs expressed neural stem/progenitor cell markers like nestin, vimentin and Sox2. When growth factors were withdrawn, proliferation and expression of v-myc and telomerase were dramatically reduced, and the hc-NSCs differentiated into glia and neurons (mostly glutamatergic and GABAergic, as well as tyrosine hydroxylase-positive, presumably dopaminergic neurons). RT-PCR analysis showed that the hc-NSCs retained expression of Pax6, Emx2 and Neurogenin2, which are genes associated with regionalization and cell commitment in cortical precursors during brain development. Our data indicate that this hc-NSC line could be useful for exploring the potential of human NSCs to replace dead or damaged cortical cells in animal models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Taking advantage of its clonality and homogeneity, this cell line will also be a valuable experimental tool to study the regulatory role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in human NSC biology.

  7. Neuromodulatory loop mediated by nerve growth factor and interleukin 6 in thymic stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Screpanti, I; Meco, D; Scarpa, S; Morrone, S; Frati, L; Gulino, A; Modesti, A

    1992-01-01

    Neural crest cell derivatives have been suggested to be involved in thymus development. We established nonlymphoid thymic stromal cell cultures capable of supporting T-cell differentiation. In these nonlymphoid cell cultures, we identified cells with phenotypic and biochemical markers specific for neuronal cells. Neurofilament mRNA and 68- and 160-kDa neurofilament proteins, as well as 74-kDa synapsin I isoform, were expressed in many of the cultured cells. For example, neurofilament immunoreactivity was detected in 20-30% of the cells. To see whether thymic neuronal-like cells were involved in a neural differentiation pathway, we investigated the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two known neurotrophic factors. The expression of the above-described neural markers was enhanced by NGF and IL-6, which we report to be produced in an autocrine way by thymic stromal cell cultures. Finally, we found that IL-6 gene expression in these cell cultures was enhanced by NGF. Evidence is thus offered of a neuromodulatory loop within the thymic stromal cell population supported by local production of NGF and IL-6 and involving neural cell elements. Interestingly, IL-6, which is known to be implicated in thymocyte differentiation, also displays a neuromodulatory activity on thymic stromal cells, suggesting a multivalent role for this cytokine within the thymus. Images PMID:1373490

  8. Phosphofructokinase-1 Negatively Regulates Neurogenesis from Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengyun; Qian, Xiaodan; Qin, Cheng; Lin, Yuhui; Wu, Haiyin; Chang, Lei; Luo, Chunxia; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), a major regulatory glycolytic enzyme, has been implicated in the functions of astrocytes and neurons. Here, we report that PFK-1 negatively regulates neurogenesis from neural stem cells (NSCs) by targeting pro-neural transcriptional factors. Using in vitro assays, we found that PFK-1 knockdown enhanced, and PFK-1 overexpression inhibited the neuronal differentiation of NSCs, which was consistent with the findings from NSCs subjected to 5 h of hypoxia. Meanwhile, the neurogenesis induced by PFK-1 knockdown was attributed to the increased proliferation of neural progenitors and the commitment of NSCs to the neuronal lineage. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of PFK-1 also increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Finally, we demonstrated that the neurogenesis mediated by PFK-1 was likely achieved by targeting mammalian achaete-scute homologue-1 (Mash 1), neuronal differentiation factor (NeuroD), and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-related HMG box 2 (Sox2). All together, our results reveal PFK-1 as an important regulator of neurogenesis.

  9. Utility of poly(ethylene glycol) based hydrogels for improved neural cell culture and cell delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, Rachael

    Cell transplant therapy is a very promising treatment for patients afflicted with neurodegenerative diseases and involves replacing dying neurons with fresh fetal tissue that is composed of both new neurons and multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs). Unfortunately, this therapy is not clinically feasible given the scarcity of fresh donor fetal tissue. The NPCs present in fetal tissue may be a promising renewable cell source because they can be instructed to divide indefinitely in culture, expanding the number of NPCs that are available. Importantly, NPCs can also be instructed to differentiate into the therapeutic neurons needed to treat patients. However, when NPCs are expanded in culture, they increasingly differentiate into glial cells. Glial cell contamination not only introduces many uncharacterized signals into NSC cultures, but when transplanted into the brain, glia can contribute to inflammation and glial scarring. The goal of this project is to identify in vitro culture conditions that can be used to expand fresh NPCs while completely avoiding glial differentiation, only allowing the generation of neuronal progeny with therapeutic potential. The culture system used in this work was chosen carefully, and after exploring the utility of standard neural cell culture systems such as monolayer, neurosphere, and three-dimensional fibrin matrices, an advantageous culture system was identified. The chosen culture system is a synthetic, degradable, photo-polymerizable, poly (ethylene) glycocl (PEG) hydrogel. This thesis experimentally demonstrates advantages of PEG hydrogel culture over the other culture systems including enrichment of the initial cell population for NPCs, clonal expansion capabilities, increased potency of proliferation-stimulating mitogens, decreased reactivity and growth of glial cells, and control over the initiation and orientation of neural process growth. PEG hydrogels were used to directly assess the influence of various ECM proteins and

  10. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  11. A neural extracellular matrix-based method for in vitro hippocampal neuron culture and dopaminergic differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to recreate an optimal cellular microenvironment is critical to understand neuronal behavior and functionality in vitro. An organized neural extracellular matrix (nECM) promotes neural cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Here, we expanded previous observations on the ability of nECM to support in vitro neuronal differentiation, with the following goals: (i) to recreate complex neuronal networks of embryonic rat hippocampal cells, and (ii) to achieve improved levels of dopaminergic differentiation of subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells. Methods Hippocampal cells from E18 rat embryos were seeded on PLL- and nECM-coated substrates. Neurosphere cultures were prepared from the SVZ of P4-P7 rat pups, and differentiation of neurospheres assayed on PLL- and nECM-coated substrates. Results When seeded on nECM-coated substrates, both hippocampal cells and SVZ progenitor cells showed neural expression patterns that were similar to their poly-L-lysine-seeded counterparts. However, nECM-based cultures of both hippocampal neurons and SVZ progenitor cells could be maintained for longer times as compared to poly-L-lysine-based cultures. As a result, nECM-based cultures gave rise to a more branched neurite arborization of hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, the prolonged differentiation time of SVZ progenitor cells in nECM allowed us to obtain a purer population of dopaminergic neurons. Conclusions We conclude that nECM-based coating is an efficient substrate to culture neural cells at different stages of differentiation. In addition, neural ECM-coated substrates increased neuronal survival and neuronal differentiation efficiency as compared to cationic polymers such as poly-L-lysine. PMID:23594371

  12. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  13. Directed differentiation of human pluripotent cells to neural crest stem cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Laura; Kulik, Michael J; Page, Austin T; Park, Sarah S; Lauderdale, James D; Cunningham, Michael L; Dalton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) have the potential to generate a wide range of cell types including melanocytes; peripheral neurons; and smooth muscle, bone, cartilage and fat cells. This protocol describes in detail how to perform a highly efficient, lineage-specific differentiation of human pluripotent cells to a NCSC fate. The approach uses chemically defined media under feeder-free conditions, and it uses two small-molecule compounds to achieve efficient conversion of human pluripotent cells to NCSCs in ~15 d. After completion of this protocol, NCSCs can be used for numerous applications, including the generation of sufficient cell numbers to perform drug screens, for the development of cell therapeutics on an industrial scale and to provide a robust model for human disease. This protocol can be also be applied to patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and thus used to further the knowledge of human disease associated with neural crest development, for example, Treacher-Collins Syndrome.

  14. Diffusible Factors Secreted by Glioblastoma and Medulloblastoma Cells Induce Oxidative Stress in Bystander Neural Stem Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neha; Colangelo, Nicholas W.; de Toledo, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Harmful effects that alter the homeostasis of neural stem or progenitor cells (NSPs) can affect regenerative processes in the central nervous system. We investigated the effect of soluble factors secreted by control or 137Cs-γ-irradiated glioblastoma or medulloblastoma cells on redox-modulated endpoints in recipient human NSPs. Growth medium harvested from the nonirradiated brain tumor cells, following 24 h of growth, induced prominent oxidative stress in recipient NSPs as judged by overall increases in mitochondrial superoxide radical levels (p < .001), activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, and decrease in the active form of FoxO3a. The induced oxidative stress was associated with phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15, a marker of DNA damage, induction of the cyclin-cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p21Waf1 and p27Kip1, and perturbations in cell cycle progression (p < .001). These changes were also associated with increased apoptosis as determined by enhanced annexin V staining (p < .001) and caspase 8 activation (p < .05) and altered expression of critical regulators of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. Exposure of the tumor cells to radiation only slightly altered the induced oxidative changes in the bystander NSPs, except for medium from irradiated medulloblastoma cells that was more potent at inducing apoptosis in the NSPs than medium from nonirradiated cells (p < .001). The elucidation of such stressful bystander effects provides avenues to understand the biochemical events underlying the development or exacerbation of degenerative outcomes associated with brain cancers. It is also relevant to tissue culture protocols whereby growth medium conditioned by tumor cells is often used to support the growth of stem cells. PMID:27511909

  15. [The Evolutionary Origin of Placodes and Neural Crest Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The long-term goal of this NASA-supported research is to understand the evolutionary origin of placodes and neural crest cells, with particular reference to evolution of the inner ear, and their evolutionary and developmental relationships. The cephalochordcate amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative of the vertebrates is used as a stand-in for the ancestral vertebrate. The research, which has supported one graduate student, Jr-Kai Yu, has resulted in ten publications by the Holland laboratory in peer-reviewed journals.

  16. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  17. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  18. Dscam-Mediated Cell Recognition Regulates Neural Circuit Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Daisuke; Millard, S. Sean; Wojtowicz, Woj M.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    The Dscam family of immunoglobulin cell surface proteins mediates recognition events between neurons that play an essential role in the establishment of neural circuits. The Drosophila Dscam1 locus encodes tens of thousands of cell surface proteins via alternative splicing. These isoforms exhibit exquisite isoform-specific binding in vitro that mediates homophilic repulsion in vivo. These properties provide the molecular basis for self-avoidance, an essential developmental mechanism that allows axonal and dendritic processes to uniformly cover their synaptic fields. In a mechanistically similar fashion, homophilic repulsion mediated by Drosophila Dscam2 prevents processes from the same class of cells from occupying overlapping synaptic fields through a process called tiling. Genetic studies in the mouse visual system support the view that vertebrate DSCAM also promotes both self-avoidance and tiling. By contrast, DSCAM and DSCAM-L promote layer-specific targeting in the chick visual system, presumably through promoting homophilic adhesion. The fly and mouse studies underscore the importance of homophilic repulsion in regulating neural circuit assembly, whereas the chick studies suggest that DSCA Mproteins may mediate a variety of different recognition events during wiring in a context-dependent fashion. PMID:18837673

  19. Vertebrate Neural Stem Cells: Development, Plasticity, and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Natural recovery from disease and damage in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is limited compared with that in lower vertebrate species, including fish and salamanders. Species-specific differences in the plasticity of the CNS reflect these differences in regenerative capacity. Despite numerous extensive studies in the field of CNS regeneration, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms determining the regenerative capacity of the CNS is still relatively poor. The discovery of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in mammals, including humans, in the early 1990s has opened up new possibilities for the treatment of CNS disorders via self-regeneration through the mobilization of these cells. However, we now know that aNSCs in mammals are not plastic enough to induce significant regeneration. In contrast, aNSCs in some regenerative species have been found to be as highly plastic as early embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs). We must expand our knowledge of NSCs and of regenerative processes in lower vertebrates in an effort to develop effective regenerative treatments for damaged CNS in humans.

  20. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol's effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  1. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol’s effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  2. OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO. J.B. Smith, K.K. Sulik, E.S. Hunter III. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
    The induction of craniofacial defects by ethanol exposure is mediated in part by...

  3. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M; Davis, Jason A; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-03-16

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system.

  4. Shared Pluripotency Programs Suggest Derivation of Vertebrate Neural Crest from Blastula Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Delgado, Elsy; Nordin, Kara; Rao, Anjali; Geary, Lauren; LaBonne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Neural Crest cells, unique to vertebrates, are derived from the ectoderm but also generate mesodermal cell types. This broad developmental potential persists past the time when most ectoderm-derived cells have become lineage restricted. The ability of neural crest to contribute mesodermal derivatives to the bauplan has raised questions about how this apparent gain in developmental potential is achieved. Here we describe shared molecular underpinnings of potency in neural crest and blastula cells. We show that in Xenopus, key neural crest regulatory factors are also expressed in blastula animal pole cells and promote pluripotency in both cell types. We suggest that neural crest cells may have evolved as a consequence of a subset of blastula animal pole cells retaining activity of the regulatory network underlying pluripotency. PMID:25931449

  5. Cell-replacement therapy and neural repair in the retina.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Christian W; Wohl, Stefanie G; Isenmann, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    Visual impairment severely affects the quality of life of patients and their families and is also associated with a deep economic impact. The most common pathologies responsible for visual impairment and legally defined blindness in developed countries include age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. These conditions share common pathophysiological features: dysfunction and loss of retinal neurons. To date, two main approaches are being taken to develop putative therapeutic strategies: neuroprotection and cell replacement. Cell replacement is a novel therapeutic approach to restore visual capabilities to the degenerated adult neural retina and represents an emerging field of regenerative neurotherapy. The discovery of a population of proliferative cells in the mammalian retina has raised the possibility of harnessing endogenous retinal stem cells to elicit retinal repair. Furthermore, the development of suitable protocols for the reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells to a pluripotent state further increases the therapeutic potential of stem-cell-based technologies for the treatment of major retinal diseases. Stem-cell transplantation in animal models has been most effectively used for the replacement of photoreceptors, although this therapeutic approach is also being used for inner retinal pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of cell-replacement approaches for the treatment of currently incurable degenerative retinal diseases.

  6. Oligodendrogenesis from neural stem cells: perspectives for remyelinating strategies.

    PubMed

    Grade, Sofia; Bernardino, Liliana; Malva, João O

    2013-11-01

    Mobilization of remyelinating cells spontaneously occurs in the adult brain. These cellular resources are specially active after demyelinating episodes in early phases of multiple sclerosis (MS). Indeed, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) actively proliferate, migrate to and repopulate the lesioned areas. Ultimately, efficient remyelination is accomplished when new oligodendrocytes reinvest nude neuronal axons, restoring the normal properties of impulse conduction. As the disease progresses this fundamental process fails. Multiple causes seem to contribute to such transient decline, including the failure of OPCs to differentiate and enwrap the vulnerable neuronal axons. Regenerative medicine for MS has been mainly centered on the recruitment of endogenous self-repair mechanisms, or on transplantation approaches. The latter commonly involves grafting of neural precursor cells (NPCs) or neural stem cells (NSCs), with myelinogenic potential, in the injured areas. Both strategies require further understanding of the biology of oligodendrocyte differentiation and remyelination. Indeed, the success of transplantation largely depends on the pre-commitment of transplanted NPCs or NSCs into oligodendroglial cell type, while the endogenous differentiation of OPCs needs to be boosted in chronic stages of the disease. Thus, much effort has been focused on finding molecular targets that drive oligodendrocytes commitment and development. The present review explores several aspects of remyelination that must be considered in the design of a cell-based therapy for MS, and explores more deeply the challenge of fostering oligodendrogenesis. In this regard, we discuss herein a tool developed in our research group useful to search novel oligodendrogenic factors and to study oligodendrocyte differentiation in a time- and cost-saving manner.

  7. Application of artificial neural network with extreme learning machine for economic growth estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milačić, Ljubiša; Jović, Srđan; Vujović, Tanja; Miljković, Jovica

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and apply the artificial neural network (ANN) with extreme learning machine (ELM) to forecast gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate. The economic growth forecasting was analyzed based on agriculture, manufacturing, industry and services value added in GDP. The results were compared with ANN with back propagation (BP) learning approach since BP could be considered as conventional learning methodology. The reliability of the computational models was accessed based on simulation results and using several statistical indicators. Based on results, it was shown that ANN with ELM learning methodology can be applied effectively in applications of GDP forecasting.

  8. Neural stem cell progeny regulate stem cell death in a Notch and Hox dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Arya, R; Sarkissian, T; Tan, Y; White, K

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is a prevalent, well-controlled and fundamental aspect of development, particularly in the nervous system. In Drosophila, specific neural stem cells are eliminated by apoptosis during embryogenesis. In the absence of apoptosis, these stem cells continue to divide, resulting in a dramatically hyperplastic central nervous system and adult lethality. Although core cell death pathways have been well described, the spatial, temporal and cell identity cues that activate the cell death machinery in specific cells are largely unknown. We identified a cis-regulatory region that controls the transcription of the cell death activators reaper, grim and sickle exclusively in neural stem cells. Using a reporter generated from this regulatory region, we found that Notch activity is required for neural stem cell death. Notch regulates the expression of the abdominalA homeobox protein, which provides important spatial cues for death. Importantly, we show that pro-apoptotic Notch signaling is activated by the Delta ligand expressed on the neighboring progeny of the stem cell. Thus we identify a previously undescribed role for progeny in regulating the proper developmental death of their parental stem cells. PMID:25633198

  9. Lithium increases proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells and rescues irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Giulia; Di Martino, Elena; Omelyanenko, Anna; Andäng, Michael; Delle, Ulla; Elmroth, Kecke; Blomgren, Klas

    2015-11-10

    Radiotherapy in children causes debilitating cognitive decline, partly linked to impaired neurogenesis. Irradiation targets primarily cancer cells but also endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) leading to cell death or cell cycle arrest. Here we evaluated the effects of lithium on proliferation, cell cycle and DNA damage after irradiation of young NSPCs in vitro.NSPCs were treated with 1 or 3 mM LiCl and we investigated proliferation capacity (neurosphere volume and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation). Using flow cytometry, we analysed apoptosis (annexin V), cell cycle (propidium iodide) and DNA damage (γH2AX) after irradiation (3.5 Gy) of lithium-treated NSPCs.Lithium increased BrdU incorporation and, dose-dependently, the number of cells in replicative phase as well as neurosphere growth. Irradiation induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M phases. Treatment with 3 mM LiCl was sufficient to increase NSPCs in S phase, boost neurosphere growth and reduce DNA damage. Lithium did not affect the levels of apoptosis, suggesting that it does not rescue NSPCs committed to apoptosis due to accumulated DNA damage.Lithium is a very promising candidate for protection of the juvenile brain from radiotherapy and for its potential to thereby improve the quality of life for those children who survive their cancer.

  10. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Anna-Lena; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Zerfass, Christina; Senner, Volker; Ehrlich, Marc; Psathaki, Olympia E; Han, Dong Wook; Tapia, Natalia; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Hargus, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs.

  11. Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cells during Differentiation into Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Ali; Hatami, Maryam; Hajihosseini, Vahid; Fattahi, Faranak; Kiani, Sahar; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    Global gene expression analysis of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that differentiate into neural cells would help to further define the molecular mechanisms involved in neurogenesis in humans. We performed a comprehensive transcripteome analysis of hESC differentiation at three different stages: early neural differentiation, neural ectoderm, and differentiated neurons. We identified and validated time-dependent gene expression patterns and showed that the gene expression patterns reflect early ESC differentiation. Sets of genes are induced in primary ectodermal lineages and then in differentiated neurons, constituting consecutive waves of known and novel genes. Pathway analysis revealed dynamic expression patterns of members of several signaling pathways, including NOTCH, mTOR and Toll like receptors (TLR), during neural differentiation. An interaction network analysis revealed that the TGFβ family of genes, including LEFTY1, ID1 and ID2, are possible key players in the proliferation and maintenance of neural ectoderm. Collectively, these results enhance our understanding of the molecular dynamics underlying neural commitment and differentiation. PMID:21829537

  12. Effects of Triclosan on Neural Stem Cell Viability and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo Kyung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Yang, Sung Min; Bang, Minji; Choi, Chang Soon; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial or sanitizing agent used in personal care and household products such as toothpaste, soaps, mouthwashes and kitchen utensils. There are increasing evidence of the potentially harmful effects of triclosan in many systemic and cellular processes of the body. In this study, we investigated the effects of triclosan in the survivability of cultured rat neural stem cells (NSCs). Cortical cells from embryonic day 14 rat embryos were isolated and cultured in vitro. After stabilizing the culture, triclosan was introduced to the cells with concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 50 μM and in varied time periods. Thereafter, cell viability parameters were measured using MTT assay and PI staining. TCS decreased the cell viability of treated NSC in a concentration-dependent manner along with increased expressions of apoptotic markers, cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, while reduced expression of Bcl2. To explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of TCS in NSC, we measured the activation of MAPKs and intracellular ROS. TCS at 50 μM induced the activations of both p38 and JNK, which may adversely affect cell survival. In contrast, the activities of ERK, Akt and PI3K, which are positively correlated with cell survival, were inhibited. Moreover, TCS at this concentration augmented the ROS generation in treated NSC and depleted the glutathione activity. Taken together, these results suggest that TCS can induce neurodegenerative effects in developing rat brains through mechanisms involving ROS activation and apoptosis initiation. PMID:26759708

  13. Identification and molecular regulation of neural stem cells in the olfactory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Beites, Crestina L.; Kawauchi, Shimako; Crocker, Candice E.; Calof, Anne L. . E-mail: alcalof@uci.edu

    2005-06-10

    The sensory neurons that subserve olfaction, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), are regenerated throughout life, making the neuroepithelium in which they reside [the olfactory epithelium (OE)] an excellent model for studying how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate stem cell dynamics and neurogenesis during development and regeneration. Numerous studies indicate that transcription factors and signaling molecules together regulate generation of ORNs from stem and progenitor cells during development, and work on regenerative neurogenesis indicates that these same factors may operate at postnatal ages as well. This review describes our current knowledge of the identity of the OE neural stem cell; the different cell types that are thought to be the progeny (directly or indirectly) of this stem cell; and the factors that influence cell differentiation in the OE neuronal lineage. We review data suggesting that (1) the ORN lineage contains three distinct proliferating cell types-a stem cell and two populations of transit amplifying cells; (2) in established OE, these three cell types are present within the basal cell compartment of the epithelium; and (3) the stem cell that gives rise ultimately to ORNs may also generate two glial cell types of the primary olfactory pathway: sustentacular cells (SUS), which lie within OE proper; and olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), which envelope the olfactory nerve. In addition, we describe factors that are both made by and found within the microenvironment of OE stem and progenitor cells, and which exert crucial growth regulatory effects on these cells. Thus, as with other regenerating tissues, the basis of regeneration in the OE appears be a population of stem cells, which resides within a microenvironment (niche) consisting of factors crucial for maintenance of its capacity for proliferation and differentiation.

  14. Guided migration of neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells by an electric field.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Nolta, Jan; Zhao, Min

    2012-02-01

    Small direct current (DC) electric fields (EFs) guide neurite growth and migration of rodent neural stem cells (NSCs). However, this could be species dependent. Therefore, it is critical to investigate how human NSCs (hNSCs) respond to EF before any possible clinical attempt. Aiming to characterize the EF-stimulated and guided migration of hNSCs, we derived hNSCs from a well-established human embryonic stem cell line H9. Small applied DC EFs, as low as 16 mV/mm, induced significant directional migration toward the cathode. Reversal of the field polarity reversed migration of hNSCs. The galvanotactic/electrotactic response was both time and voltage dependent. The migration directedness and distance to the cathode increased with the increase of field strength. (Rho-kinase) inhibitor Y27632 is used to enhance viability of stem cells and has previously been reported to inhibit EF-guided directional migration in induced pluripotent stem cells and neurons. However, its presence did not significantly affect the directionality of hNSC migration in an EF. Cytokine receptor [C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)] is important for chemotaxis of NSCs in the brain. The blockage of CXCR4 did not affect the electrotaxis of hNSCs. We conclude that hNSCs respond to a small EF by directional migration. Applied EFs could potentially be further exploited to guide hNSCs to injured sites in the central nervous system to improve the outcome of various diseases.

  15. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  16. Optimizing growth and post treatment of diamond for high capacitance neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; Fox, Kate; Zamani, Akram; Turnley, Ann M; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Ahnood, Arman; Cicione, Rosemary; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven; Stacey, Alastair; Garrett, David J

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical and biological properties are two crucial criteria in the selection of the materials to be used as electrodes for neural interfaces. For neural stimulation, materials are required to exhibit high capacitance and to form intimate contact with neurons for eliciting effective neural responses at acceptably low voltages. Here we report on a new high capacitance material fabricated using nitrogen included ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD). After exposure to oxygen plasma for 3 h, the activated N-UNCD exhibited extremely high electrochemical capacitance greater than 1 mF/cm(2), which originates from the special hybrid sp(2)/sp(3) structure of N-UNCD. The in vitro biocompatibility of the activated N-UNCD was then assessed using rat cortical neurons and surface roughness was found to be critical for healthy neuron growth, with best results observed on surfaces with a roughness of approximately 20 nm. Therefore, by using oxygen plasma activated N-UNCD with appropriate surface roughness, and considering the chemical and mechanical stability of diamond, the fabricated neural interfaces are expected to exhibit high efficacy, long-term stability and a healthy neuron/electrode interface.

  17. Trunk lateral cells are neural crest-like cells in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: insights into the ancestry and evolution of the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R; Chiba, Takuto; Krajka, Florian Razy; Deyts, Carole; Satoh, Nori; Joly, Jean-Stéphane

    2008-12-01

    Neural crest-like cells (NCLC) that express the HNK-1 antigen and form body pigment cells were previously identified in diverse ascidian species. Here we investigate the embryonic origin, migratory activity, and neural crest related gene expression patterns of NCLC in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. HNK-1 expression first appeared at about the time of larval hatching in dorsal cells of the posterior trunk. In swimming tadpoles, HNK-1 positive cells began to migrate, and after metamorphosis they were localized in the oral and atrial siphons, branchial gill slits, endostyle, and gut. Cleavage arrest experiments showed that NCLC are derived from the A7.6 cells, the precursors of trunk lateral cells (TLC), one of the three types of migratory mesenchymal cells in ascidian embryos. In cleavage arrested embryos, HNK-1 positive TLC were present on the lateral margins of the neural plate and later became localized adjacent to the posterior sensory vesicle, a staging zone for their migration after larval hatching. The Ciona orthologues of seven of sixteen genes that function in the vertebrate neural crest gene regulatory network are expressed in the A7.6/TLC lineage. The vertebrate counterparts of these genes function downstream of neural plate border specification in the regulatory network leading to neural crest development. The results suggest that NCLC and neural crest cells may be homologous cell types originating in the common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates and support the possibility that a putative regulatory network governing NCLC development was co-opted to produce neural crest cells during vertebrate evolution.

  18. Biophysical Characteristics Reveal Neural Stem Cell Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mulhall, Hayley J.; Marchenko, Steve A.; Hoettges, Kai F.; Estrada, Laura C.; Lee, Abraham P.; Hughes, Michael P.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Distinguishing human neural stem/progenitor cell (huNSPC) populations that will predominantly generate neurons from those that produce glia is currently hampered by a lack of sufficient cell type-specific surface markers predictive of fate potential. This limits investigation of lineage-biased progenitors and their potential use as therapeutic agents. A live-cell biophysical and label-free measure of fate potential would solve this problem by obviating the need for specific cell surface markers. Methodology/Principal Findings We used dielectrophoresis (DEP) to analyze the biophysical, specifically electrophysiological, properties of cortical human and mouse NSPCs that vary in differentiation potential. Our data demonstrate that the electrophysiological property membrane capacitance inversely correlates with the neurogenic potential of NSPCs. Furthermore, as huNSPCs are continually passaged they decrease neuron generation and increase membrane capacitance, confirming that this parameter dynamically predicts and negatively correlates with neurogenic potential. In contrast, differences in membrane conductance between NSPCs do not consistently correlate with the ability of the cells to generate neurons. DEP crossover frequency, which is a quantitative measure of cell behavior in DEP, directly correlates with neuron generation of NSPCs, indicating a potential mechanism to separate stem cells biased to particular differentiated cell fates. Conclusions/Significance We show here that whole cell membrane capacitance, but not membrane conductance, reflects and predicts the neurogenic potential of human and mouse NSPCs. Stem cell biophysical characteristics therefore provide a completely novel and quantitative measure of stem cell fate potential and a label-free means to identify neuron- or glial-biased progenitors. PMID:21980464

  19. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  20. A nerve guidance conduit with topographical and biochemical cues: potential application using human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Phillip M; Laughter, Melissa R; Lee, David J; Lee, Young M; Freed, Curt R; Park, Daewon

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the pathophysiological understanding of peripheral nerve damage, the treatment of nerve injuries still remains an unmet medical need. Nerve guidance conduits present a promising treatment option by providing a growth-permissive environment that 1) promotes neuronal cell survival and axon growth and 2) directs axonal extension. To this end, we designed an electrospun nerve guidance conduit using a blend of polyurea and poly-caprolactone with both biochemical and topographical cues. Biochemical cues were integrated into the conduit by functionalizing the polyurea with RGD to improve cell attachment. Topographical cues that resemble natural nerve tissue were incorporated by introducing intraluminal microchannels aligned with nanofibers. We determined that electrospinning the polymer solution across a two electrode system with dissolvable sucrose fibers produced a polymer conduit with the appropriate biomimetic properties. Human neural stem cells were cultured on the conduit to evaluate its ability to promote neuronal growth and axonal extension. The nerve guidance conduit was shown to enhance cell survival, migration, and guide neurite extension.

  1. A nerve guidance conduit with topographical and biochemical cues: potential application using human neural stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Phillip M.; Laughter, Melissa R.; Lee, David J.; Lee, Young M.; Freed, Curt R.; Park, Daewon

    2015-06-01

    Despite major advances in the pathophysiological understanding of peripheral nerve damage, the treatment of nerve injuries still remains an unmet medical need. Nerve guidance conduits present a promising treatment option by providing a growth-permissive environment that 1) promotes neuronal cell survival and axon growth and 2) directs axonal extension. To this end, we designed an electrospun nerve guidance conduit using a blend of polyurea and poly-caprolactone with both biochemical and topographical cues. Biochemical cues were integrated into the conduit by functionalizing the polyurea with RGD to improve cell attachment. Topographical cues that resemble natural nerve tissue were incorporated by introducing intraluminal microchannels aligned with nanofibers. We determined that electrospinning the polymer solution across a two electrode system with dissolvable sucrose fibers produced a polymer conduit with the appropriate biomimetic properties. Human neural stem cells were cultured on the conduit to evaluate its ability to promote neuronal growth and axonal extension. The nerve guidance conduit was shown to enhance cell survival, migration, and guide neurite extension.

  2. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells in neural regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Da-Chuan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Lin, Zung-Sheng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have two essential characteristics with regard to regenerative medicine: the convenient and efficient generation of large numbers of multipotent cells and in vitro proliferation without a loss of stemness. The implementation of clinical trials has prompted widespread concern regarding safety issues and has shifted research toward the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells in dealing with neural degeneration in cases such as stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, cavernous nerve injury, and traumatic brain injury. Most existing studies have reported that cell therapies may be able to replenish lost cells and promote neuronal regeneration, protect neuronal survival, and play a role in overcoming permanent paralysis and loss of sensation and the recovery of neurological function. The mechanisms involved in determining therapeutic capacity remain largely unknown; however, this concept can still be classified in a methodical manner by citing current evidence. Possible mechanisms include the following: 1) the promotion of angiogenesis, 2) the induction of neuronal differentiation and neurogenesis, 3) reductions in reactive gliosis, 4) the inhibition of apoptosis, 5) the expression of neurotrophic factors, 6) immunomodulatory function, and 7) facilitating neuronal integration. In this study, several human clinical trials using ADSCs for neuronal disorders were investigated. It is suggested that ADSCs are one of the choices among various stem cells for translating into clinical application in the near future.

  3. Functional evaluation of neural stem cell differentiation by single cell calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Eiriz, Maria Francisca; Grade, Sofia; Rosa, Alexandra; Xapelli, Sara; Bernardino, Liliana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain occurs in two specific brain areas, the subventricular zone (SVZ) bordering the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. Although these regions are prone to produce new neurons, cultured cells from these neurogenic niches tend to be mixed cultures, containing both neurons and glial cells. Several reports highlight the potential of the self-healing capacity of the brain following injury. Even though much knowledge has been produced on the neurogenesis itself, brain repairing strategies are still far away from patients cure. Here we review general concepts in the neurogenesis field, also addressing the methods available to study neural stem cell differentiation. A major problem faced by research groups and companies dedicated to brain regenerative medicine resides on the lack of good methods to functionally identify neural stem cell differentiation and novel drug targets. To address this issue, we developed a unique single cell calcium imaging-based method to functionally discriminate different cell types derived from SVZ neural stem cell cultures. The unique functional profile of each SVZ cell type was correlated at the single cell level with the immunodetection of specific phenotypic markers. This platform was raised on the basis of the functional response of neurons, oligodendrocytes and immature cells to depolarising agents, to thrombin and to histamine, respectively. We also outline key studies in which our new platform was extremely relevant in the context of drug discovery and development in the area of brain regenerative medicine.

  4. Susceptibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells to Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shih-Cheng; Shen, Ching-I; Lin, Ho; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Lai, Ping-Shan; Su, Hong-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be efficiently directed to become immature neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPCs) and functional mature neural cells, including neurotransmitter-secreting neurons and glial cells. Investigating the susceptibility of these hESCs-derived neural cells to neurotrophic viruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), provides insight into the viral cell tropism in the infected human brain. We demonstrate that hESC-derived NPCs are highly vulnerable to JEV infection at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI). In addition, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-expressing glial cells are also susceptible to JEV infection. In contrast, only a few mature neurons were infected at MOI 10 or higher on the third day post-infection. In addition, functional neurotransmitter-secreting neurons are also resistant to JEV infection at high MOI. Moreover, we discover that vimentin intermediate filament, reported as a putative neurovirulent JEV receptor, is highly expressed in NPCs and glial cells, but not mature neurons. These results indicate that the expression of vimentin in neural cells correlates to the cell tropism of JEV. Finally, we further demonstrate that membranous vimentin is necessary for the susceptibility of hESC-derived NPCs to JEV infection. PMID:25517725

  5. Wnt signaling pathway participates in valproic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Yuan; Li, Sen; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells that have the capacity for differentiation into the major cell types of the nervous system, i.e. neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely prescribed drug for seizures and bipolar disorder in clinic. Previously, a number of researches have been shown that VPA has differential effects on growth, proliferation and differentiation in many types of cells. However, whether VPA can induce NSCs from embryonic cerebral cortex differentiate into neurons and its possible molecular mechanism is also not clear. Wnt signaling is implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation during CNS development in animal model, but its action at the cellular level has been poorly understood. In this experiment, we examined neuronal differentiation of NSCs induced by VPA culture media using vitro immunochemistry assay. The neuronal differentiation of NSCs was examined after treated with 0.75 mM VPA for three, seven and ten days. RT-PCR assay was employed to examine the level of Wnt-3α and β-catenin. The results indicated that there were more β-tublin III positive cells in NSCs treated with VPA medium compared to the control group. The expression of Wnt-3α and β-catenin in NSCs treated with VPA medium was significantly greater compared to that of control media. In conclusion, these findings indicated that VPA could induce neuronal differentiation of NSCs by activating Wnt signal pathway.

  6. The differentiation of embryonic stem cells seeded on electrospun nanofibers into neural lineages

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingwei; Willerth, Stephanie M.; Li, Xiaoran; Macewan, Matthew R.; Rader, Allison; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.; Xia, Younan

    2008-01-01

    Due to advances in stem cell biology, embryonic stem (ES) cells can be induced to differentiate into a particular mature cell lineage when cultured as embryoid bodies. Although transplantation of ES cells-derived neural progenitor cells has been demonstrated with some success for either spinal cord injury repair in small animal model, control of ES cell differentiation into complex, viable, higher ordered tissues is still challenging. Mouse ES cells have been induced to become neural progenitors by adding retinoic acid to embryoid body cultures for 4 days. In this study, we examine the use of electrospun biodegradable polymers as scaffolds not only for enhancing the differentiation of mouse ES cells into neural lineages but also for promoting and guiding the neurite outgrowth. A combination of electrospun fiber scaffolds and ES cells-derived neural progenitor cells could lead to the development of a better strategy for nerve injury repair. PMID:18930315

  7. Neural stem cell-encoded temporal patterning delineates an early window of malignant susceptibility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine; Lanet, Elodie; Dillard, Caroline; Foppolo, Sophie; Chen, Ching-Huan; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Sokol, Nicholas S; Maurange, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric neural tumors are often initiated during early development and can undergo very rapid transformation. However, the molecular basis of this early malignant susceptibility remains unknown. During Drosophila development, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide asymmetrically and generate intermediate progenitors that rapidly differentiate in neurons. Upon gene inactivation, these progeny can dedifferentiate and generate malignant tumors. Here, we find that intermediate progenitors are prone to malignancy only when born during an early window of development while expressing the transcription factor Chinmo, and the mRNA-binding proteins Imp/IGF2BP and Lin-28. These genes compose an oncogenic module that is coopted upon dedifferentiation of early-born intermediate progenitors to drive unlimited tumor growth. In late larvae, temporal transcription factor progression in NSCs silences the module, thereby limiting mitotic potential and terminating the window of malignant susceptibility. Thus, this study identifies the gene regulatory network that confers malignant potential to neural tumors with early developmental origins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13463.001 PMID:27296804

  8. Stemness enhancement of human neural stem cells following bone marrow MSC coculture.

    PubMed

    Haragopal, Hariprakash; Yu, Dou; Zeng, Xiang; Kim, Soo-Woo; Han, In-Bo; Ropper, Alexander E; Anderson, Jamie E; Teng, Yang D

    2015-01-01

    Rapid loss of stemness capacity in purified prototype neural stem cells (NSCs) remains a serious challenge to basic and clinical studies aiming to repair the central nervous system. Based on the essential role of mesodermal guidance in the process of neurulation, we hypothesized that coculture of human NSCs (hNSCs) with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (hMSCs) could enhance the stemness of hNSCs through Notch-1 signaling. We have now tested the hypothesis by assessing behaviors of hNSCs and hMSCs under systematically designed coculture conditions relative to monocultures, with or without Notch-1 manipulation in vitro. Our data demonstrate that expression levels of Notch-1 and Hes-1 as determined by immunocytochemistry are significantly higher in hNSCs cocultured with hMSCs than those of controls. Furthermore, coculturing significantly increases immunoreactivity of CD15, a neural stemness marker, but decreases CD24, a marker of neural/neuronal commitment in hNSCs. The effect is independent from the physical status of cell growth since coculture and notch signaling actually promotes hNSC adhesion. Importantly, coculture with hMSCs markedly augments hNSC proliferation rate (e.g., higher yield in G2/M phase subpopulation in a notch-dependent manner detected by flow cytometry) without diminishing their lineage differentiation capabilities. The results suggest that coculture of hNSCs with hMSCs enhances stemness biology of hNSCs partially via activation of Notch-1 signal transduction. Our finding sheds new light on mesoderm-ectoderm cell fate determination via contact-based hMSC-hNSC interactions and provides mechanistic leads for devising effective regimens to sustain and augment stemness of in vitro established hNSC and hMSC lines for basic science, translational and clinical applications.

  9. Rhomboid Enhancer Activity Defines a Subset of Drosophila Neural Precursors Required for Proper Feeding, Growth and Viability.

    PubMed

    Gresser, Amy L; Gutzwiller, Lisa M; Gauck, Mackenzie K; Hartenstein, Volker; Cook, Tiffany A; Gebelein, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Organismal growth regulation requires the interaction of multiple metabolic, hormonal and neuronal pathways. While the molecular basis for many of these are well characterized, less is known about the developmental origins of growth regulatory structures and the mechanisms governing control of feeding and satiety. For these reasons, new tools and approaches are needed to link the specification and maturation of discrete cell populations with their subsequent regulatory roles. In this study, we characterize a rhomboid enhancer element that selectively labels four Drosophila embryonic neural precursors. These precursors give rise to the hypopharyngeal sensory organ of the peripheral nervous system and a subset of neurons in the deutocerebral region of the embryonic central nervous system. Post embryogenesis, the rhomboid enhancer is active in a subset of cells within the larval pharyngeal epithelium. Enhancer-targeted toxin expression alters the morphology of the sense organ and results in impaired larval growth, developmental delay, defective anterior spiracle eversion and lethality. Limiting the duration of toxin expression reveals differences in the critical periods for these effects. Embryonic expression causes developmental defects and partially penetrant pre-pupal lethality. Survivors of embryonic expression, however, ultimately become viable adults. In contrast, post-embryonic toxin expression results in fully penetrant lethality. To better define the larval growth defect, we used a variety of assays to demonstrate that toxin-targeted larvae are capable of locating, ingesting and clearing food and they exhibit normal food search behaviors. Strikingly, however, following food exposure these larvae show a rapid decrease in consumption suggesting a satiety-like phenomenon that correlates with the period of impaired larval growth. Together, these data suggest a critical role for these enhancer-defined lineages in regulating feeding, growth and viability.

  10. Rhomboid Enhancer Activity Defines a Subset of Drosophila Neural Precursors Required for Proper Feeding, Growth and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, Amy L.; Gutzwiller, Lisa M.; Gauck, Mackenzie K.; Hartenstein, Volker; Cook, Tiffany A.; Gebelein, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Organismal growth regulation requires the interaction of multiple metabolic, hormonal and neuronal pathways. While the molecular basis for many of these are well characterized, less is known about the developmental origins of growth regulatory structures and the mechanisms governing control of feeding and satiety. For these reasons, new tools and approaches are needed to link the specification and maturation of discrete cell populations with their subsequent regulatory roles. In this study, we characterize a rhomboid enhancer element that selectively labels four Drosophila embryonic neural precursors. These precursors give rise to the hypopharyngeal sensory organ of the peripheral nervous system and a subset of neurons in the deutocerebral region of the embryonic central nervous system. Post embryogenesis, the rhomboid enhancer is active in a subset of cells within the larval pharyngeal epithelium. Enhancer-targeted toxin expression alters the morphology of the sense organ and results in impaired larval growth, developmental delay, defective anterior spiracle eversion and lethality. Limiting the duration of toxin expression reveals differences in the critical periods for these effects. Embryonic expression causes developmental defects and partially penetrant pre-pupal lethality. Survivors of embryonic expression, however, ultimately become viable adults. In contrast, post-embryonic toxin expression results in fully penetrant lethality. To better define the larval growth defect, we used a variety of assays to demonstrate that toxin-targeted larvae are capable of locating, ingesting and clearing food and they exhibit normal food search behaviors. Strikingly, however, following food exposure these larvae show a rapid decrease in consumption suggesting a satiety-like phenomenon that correlates with the period of impaired larval growth. Together, these data suggest a critical role for these enhancer-defined lineages in regulating feeding, growth and viability. PMID

  11. Cell Motility and Invasiveness of Neurofibromin-Deficient Neural Crest Cells and Malignant Triton Tumor Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    derived cells, we isolated first branchial arch mesenchymal populations, as well as trigeminal ganglion non- neuronal cells, from mouse embryos and measured...for the source of MPNSTs, peripheral nerve, by pooling tissues (sciatic nerve and trigeminal ganglia ) dissected from several mice of the same genotype...neural crest-derived cell types can be isolated prior to this stage and maintained in culture. Sensory and sympathetic neurons isolated from Nfl

  12. Migratory patterns and developmental potential of trunk neural crest cells in the axolotl embryo.

    PubMed

    Epperlein, Hans-Henning; Selleck, Mark A J; Meulemans, Daniel; Mchedlishvili, Levan; Cerny, Robert; Sobkow, Lidia; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2007-02-01

    Using cell markers and grafting, we examined the timing of migration and developmental potential of trunk neural crest cells in axolotl. No obvious differences in pathway choice were noted for DiI-labeling at different lateral or medial positions of the trunk neural folds in neurulae, which contributed not only to neural crest but also to Rohon-Beard neurons. Labeling wild-type dorsal trunks at pre- and early-migratory stages revealed that individual neural crest cells migrate away from the neural tube along two main routes: first, dorsolaterally between the epidermis and somites and, later, ventromedially between the somites and neural tube/notochord. Dorsolaterally migrating crest primarily forms pigment cells, with those from anterior (but not mid or posterior) trunk neural folds also contributing glia and neurons to the lateral line. White mutants have impaired dorsolateral but normal ventromedial migration. At late migratory stages, most labeled cells move along the ventromedial pathway or into the dorsal fin. Contrasting with other anamniotes, axolotl has a minor neural crest contribution to the dorsal fin, most of which arises from the dermomyotome. Taken together, the results reveal stereotypic migration and differentiation of neural crest cells in axolotl that differ from other vertebrates in timing of entry onto the dorsolateral pathway and extent of contribution to some derivatives.

  13. Spatiotemporal recapitulation of central nervous system development by murine embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohei; Matsumoto, Arifumi; Shimazaki, Takuya; Enoki, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Amane; Ishii, Seiji; Itoyama, Yasuto; Sobue, Gen; Okano, Hideyuki

    2008-12-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) can generate a wide variety of neural cells. However, their fates are generally restricted, depending on the time and location of NS/PC origin. Here we demonstrate that we can recapitulate the spatiotemporal regulation of central nervous system (CNS) development in vitro by using a neurosphere-based culture system of embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived NS/PCs. This ES cell-derived neurosphere system enables the efficient derivation of highly neurogenic fibroblast growth factor-responsive NS/PCs with early temporal identities and high cell-fate plasticity. Over repeated passages, these NS/PCs exhibit temporal progression, becoming epidermal growth factor-responsive gliogenic NS/PCs with late temporal identities; this change is accompanied by an alteration in the epigenetic status of the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, similar to that observed in the developing brain. Moreover, the rostrocaudal and dorsoventral spatial identities of the NS/PCs can be successfully regulated by sequential administration of several morphogens. These NS/PCs can differentiate into early-born projection neurons, including cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic, and motor neurons, that exhibit action potentials in vitro. Finally, these NS/PCs differentiate into neurons that form synaptic contacts with host neurons after their transplantation into wild-type and disease model animals. Thus, this culture system can be used to obtain specific neurons from ES cells, is a simple and powerful tool for investigating the underlying mechanisms of CNS development, and is applicable to regenerative treatment for neurological disorders.

  14. The tropism of neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells towards C6 glioma.

    PubMed

    Long, Qianfa; Liu, Weiping; Zhong, Jun; Yi, Xicai; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yuanyang; Yang, Yang; Han, Rui; Fei, Zhou

    2011-10-24

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have significant tropism towards glioma which makes them play an important role in carrying genes/drugs to inhibit the growth of glioma as cell vehicles. But BMSCs may differentiate into neural cells under entocranial environment and few researches support the idea that neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (N-D-BMSCs) still hold the capacity of migrating to the tumor sites. The aim of our study was to investigate the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma. In vitro migration assay was employed by transwell co-culture system and Student's t-test analysis indicated that N-D-BMSCs had the significant tropism towards C6 glioma-conditioned medium (GCM) (P<0.01). Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) bioactivity of the C6 GCM was neutralized by the anti-rat VEGF antibody and our data suggested that the VEGF from C6 GCM hold chemoattraction for N-D-BMSCs and some other cytokines from the C6 GCM may be responsible for the chemoattraction for N-D-BMSCs. In vivo migration assay was carried out with cells transplantation and one way ANOVA analysis indicated that the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites presented time variation (P-value=2.9E-20). Moreover, multiple comparisons for the time variables with the Student's t-test and the results suggested that the migration capacity of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites reach the peak on the 7th day after transplantation. These results demonstrate that N-D-BMSCs as well as BMSCs have significant tropism towards C6 glioma.

  15. From cradle to grave: the multiple roles of fibroblast growth factors in neural development.

    PubMed

    Guillemot, François; Zimmer, Céline

    2011-08-25

    The generation of a functional nervous system involves a multitude of steps that are controlled by just a few families of extracellular signaling molecules. Among these, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family is particularly prominent for the remarkable diversity of its functions. FGFs are best known for their roles in the early steps of patterning of the neural primordium and proliferation of neural progenitors. However, other equally important functions have emerged more recently, including in the later steps of neuronal migration, axon navigation, and synaptogenesis. We review here these diverse functions and discuss the mechanisms that account for this unusual range of activities. FGFs are essential components of most protocols devised to generate therapeutically important neuronal populations in vitro or to stimulate neuronal repair in vivo. How FGFs promote the development of the nervous system and maintain its integrity will thus remain an important focus of research in the future.

  16. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10230.001 PMID:26568310

  17. Neural cells play an inhibitory role in pancreatic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Morooka, Mayu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Sakano, Daisuke; Ogaki, Soichiro; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic endocrine β-cells derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have received attention as screening systems for therapeutic drugs and as the basis for cell-based therapies. Here, we used a 12-day β-cell differentiation protocol for mouse ES cells and obtained several hit compounds that promoted β-cell differentiation. One of these compounds, mycophenolic acid (MPA), effectively promoted ES cell differentiation with a concomitant reduction of neuronal cells. The existence of neural cell-derived inhibitory humoral factors for β-cell differentiation was suggested using a co-culture system. Based on gene array analysis, we focused on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and showed that the Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed MPA-induced β-cell differentiation. Wnt pathway activation promoted β-cell differentiation also in human iPS cells. Our results showed that Wnt signaling activation positively regulates β-cell differentiation, and represent a downstream target of the neural inhibitory factor.

  18. HEp-2 Cell Image Classification with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhimin; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Luping; Zhang, Jianjia

    2016-02-08

    Efficient Human Epithelial-2 (HEp-2) cell image classification can facilitate the diagnosis of many autoimmune diseases. This paper proposes an automatic framework for this classification task, by utilizing the deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) which have recently attracted intensive attention in visual recognition. In addition to describing the proposed classification framework, this paper elaborates several interesting observations and findings obtained by our investigation. They include the important factors that impact network design and training, the role of rotation-based data augmentation for cell images, the effectiveness of cell image masks for classification, and the adaptability of the CNN-based classification system across different datasets. Extensive experimental study is conducted to verify the above findings and compares the proposed framework with the well-established image classification models in the literature. The results on benchmark datasets demonstrate that i) the proposed framework can effectively outperform existing models by properly applying data augmentation; ii) our CNN-based framework has excellent adaptability across different datasets, which is highly desirable for cell image classification under varying laboratory settings. Our system is ranked high in the cell image classification competition hosted by ICPR 2014.

  19. Embryonic stem-derived versus somatic neural stem cells: a comparative analysis of their developmental potential and molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Elena; Giannelli, Serena G; Galli, Rossella; Tagliafico, Enrico; Foroni, Chiara; Tenedini, Elena; Ferrari, Sergio; Ferrari, Stefano; Corte, Giorgio; Vescovi, Angelo; Cossu, Giulio; Broccoli, Vania

    2006-04-01

    Reliable procedures to induce neural commitment of totipotent undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells have provided new tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying cell fate choices. We extensively characterized the developmental potential of ES-induced neural cells obtained using an adaptation of the multistep induction protocol. We provided evidence that ES-derived neural proliferating cells are endowed with stem cell properties such as extensive self-renewal capacity and single-cell multipotency. In differentiating conditions, cells matured exclusively into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. All these features have been previously described in only somatic neural stem cells (NSCs). Therefore, we consider it more appropriate to rename our cells ES-derived NSCs. These similarities between the two NSC populations induced us to carefully compare their proliferation ability and differentiation potential. Although they were very similar in overall behavior, we scored specific differences. For instance, ES-derived NSCs proliferated at higher rate and consistently generated a higher number of neurons compared with somatic NSCs. To further investigate their relationships, we carried out a molecular analysis comparing their transcriptional profiles during proliferation. We observed a large fraction of shared expressed transcripts, including genes previously described to be critical in defining somatic NSC traits. Among the genes differently expressed, candidate genes possibly responsible for divergences between the two cell types were selected and further investigated. In particular, we showed that an enhanced MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling is acting in ES-induced NSCs, probably triggered by insulin-like growth factor-II. This may contribute to the high proliferation rate exhibited by these cells in culture.

  20. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  1. Protein Kinase-A Inhibition Is Sufficient to Support Human Neural Stem Cells Self-Renewal.

    PubMed

    Georges, Pauline; Boissart, Claire; Poulet, Aurélie; Peschanski, Marc; Benchoua, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells offer unprecedented opportunities for producing specific types of neurons for several biomedical applications. However, to achieve it, protocols of production and amplification of human neural stem cells need to be standardized, cost effective, and safe. This means that small molecules should progressively replace the use of media containing cocktails of protein-based growth factors. Here we have conducted a phenotypical screening to identify pathways involved in the regulation of hNSC self-renewal. We analyzed 80 small molecules acting as kinase inhibitors and identified compounds of the 5-isoquinolinesulfonamide family, described as protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase G inhibitors, as candidates to support hNSC self-renewal. Investigating the mode of action of these compounds, we found that modulation of PKA activity was central in controlling the choice between self-renewal or terminal neuronal differentiation of hNSC. We finally demonstrated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKA using the small molecule HA1004 was sufficient to support the full derivation, propagation, and long-term maintenance of stable hNSC in absence of any other extrinsic signals. Our results indicated that tuning of PKA activity is a core mechanism regulating hNSC self-renewal and differentiation and delineate the minimal culture media requirement to maintain undifferentiated hNSC in vitro.

  2. In vivo differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into neural stem cells by chimera formation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Jong Soo; Song, Hyuk; Cho, Ssang Gu; Bae, Hojae; Kim, Changsung; Byun, Sung June; Do, Jeong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Like embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into all three germ layers in an in vitro system. Here, we developed a new technology for obtaining neural stem cells (NSCs) from iPSCs through chimera formation, in an in vivo environment. iPSCs contributed to the neural lineage in the chimera, which could be efficiently purified and directly cultured as NSCs in vitro. The iPSC-derived, in vivo-differentiated NSCs expressed NSC markers, and their gene-expression pattern more closely resembled that of fetal brain-derived NSCs than in vitro-differentiated NSCs. This system could be applied for differentiating pluripotent stem cells into specialized cell types whose differentiation protocols are not well established. PMID:28141814

  3. Mimicking Neural Stem Cell Niche by Biocompatible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Regalado-Santiago, Citlalli; Juárez-Aguilar, Enrique; Olivares-Hernández, Juan David; Tamariz, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) participate in the maintenance, repair, and regeneration of the central nervous system. During development, the primary NSCs are distributed along the ventricular zone of the neural tube, while, in adults, NSCs are mainly restricted to the subependymal layer of the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. The circumscribed areas where the NSCs are located contain the secreted proteins and extracellular matrix components that conform their niche. The interplay among the niche elements and NSCs determines the balance between stemness and differentiation, quiescence, and proliferation. The understanding of niche characteristics and how they regulate NSCs activity is critical to building in vitro models that include the relevant components of the in vivo niche and to developing neuroregenerative approaches that consider the extracellular environment of NSCs. This review aims to examine both the current knowledge on neurogenic niche and how it is being used to develop biocompatible substrates for the in vitro and in vivo mimicking of extracellular NSCs conditions. PMID:26880934

  4. Human neural stem cells can target and deliver therapeutic genes to breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyeung Min; Park, In H; Shin, Ji Y; Jin, Juyoun; Kang, Bong Gu; Kim, Mi Hyun; Lee, Se Jeong; Jo, Mi-young; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2009-03-01

    The tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) led to the development of a novel strategy for delivering therapeutic genes to tumors in the brain. To apply this strategy to the treatment of brain metastases, we made a human NSC line expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD), which converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer agent. In vitro, the F3.CD cells significantly inhibited the growth of tumor cell lines in the presence of the prodrug 5-FC. In vivo, MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells were implanted into the brain of immune-deficient mouse stereotactically, and F3.CD cells were injected into the contralateral hemisphere followed by systemic 5-FC administration. The F3.CD cells migrated selectively into the brain metastases located in the opposite hemisphere and resulted in significantly reduced volumes. The F3.CD and 5-FC treatment also decreased both tumor volume and number of tumor mass significantly, when immune-deficient mouse had MDA-MB-435 cells injected into the internal carotid artery and F3.CD cells were transplanted into the contralateral brain hemisphere stereotactically. Taken together, brain transplantation of human NSCs, encoding the suicide enzyme CD, combined with systemic administration of the prodrug 5-FC, is an effective treatment regimen for brain metastases of tumors.

  5. Oleic acid promotes the expression of neural markers in differentiated human endometrial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kojour, Maryam Ali Mohammadie; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Kouchesfehani, Homa Mohseni; Jalali, Hanieh; Ebrahim, Mohammah Hosein Karbalaie

    2017-01-01

    Variety of neurodegenerative diseases in humans are caused by loss of cells along with loss of function and disability. Cell replacement therapy is a potential strategy to cure neurodegenerative diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells are pluripotent non-hematopoietic cells that can be isolated from numerous tissues. Human endometrial-derived stem cell (hEnSC) are the abundant and easy available source with no immunological response, for cell replacement therapy. In the nervous system, where fatty acids are found in huge amounts, they participate in its development and maintenance throughout life. Oleic acid is a kind of the saturated fatty acids which plays crucial role in brain development. Oleic acid released by astrocytes is used by neurons for the synthesis of phospholipids and is specifically incorporated into growth cones. Human endometrial-derived stem cells in the third passage were divided into 3 groups including: control, sham (cultured in full differentiation medium without oleic acid) and experimental group (cultured in full differentiation medium with oleic acid) to differentiate over a 18-day period. Data from Real-Time PCR showed that mRNA levels of NF and β-TUBULIN were increased significantly (p<0.05) in oleic acid treated cells in comparison to control and sham groups. Immunocytochemistry analysis of Chat and NF expression also showed the same results. The present study clearly demonstrates that oleic acid promotes neural differentiation of hEnSC through regulation of gene expression.

  6. Zhichan decoction induces differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease rats after neural stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huifen; Song, Jie; Yang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to increase the dopamine content and reduce dopaminergic metabolites in the brain of Parkinson's disease rats. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we found that dopamine and dopaminergic metabolite (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) content in the midbrain of Parkinson's disease rats was increased after neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction, compared with neural stem cell transplantation alone. Our genetic algorithm results show that dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels achieve global optimization. Neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction increased dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels up to 10-fold, while transplantation alone resulted in a 3-fold increment. Homovanillic acid levels showed no apparent change. Our experimental findings show that after neural stem cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rats, Zhichan decoction can promote differentiation of neural stem cells into dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25206914

  7. Cancer cells. 3: Growth factors and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Feramisco, J.; Ozanne, B.; Stiles, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure of Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Expression of Normal and Variant mRNAs in Epdermoid Carcinoma Cells; Tyrosine Kinase Activity Associated with the v-erb-B Gene Product; Cloning and Characterization of Human Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor Gene Sequences in A431 Carcinoma Cells; Anti-oncogenes and the Suppression of Tumor Formation; and Normal Human sis/PDGF-2 Gene Expression Induces Cellular Transformation.

  8. The evolution of the neural crest: new perspectives from lamprey and invertebrate neural crest-like cells.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is an embryonic cell population that gives rise to an array of tissues and structures in adult vertebrates including most of the head skeleton. Because neural crest cells (NCCs), and many of their derivatives, are unique to vertebrates, the evolution of the neural crest is thought to have potentiated vertebrate origins and diversification. However, the lack of clear NCC homologs in invertebrate chordates has made it difficult to reconstruct the evolutionary history of modern NCCs. In this review, the development of NCCs in the basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, is compared with the development of neural crest-like cells in a range of invertebrates to deduce features of the first NCCs and their evolutionary precursors. These comparisons demonstrate that most of the defining attributes of NCCs are widespread features of invertebrate embryonic ectoderm. In addition, they suggest ancient origins for the neural border domain and chondroid skeletal tissue in the first bilaterian, and show that NCCs must have evolved in a chordate with an unduplicated invertebrate-type genome. On the basis of these observations, a stepwise model for the evolution of NCCs involving heterotopic and heterochronic activation of ancient ectodermal gene programs and new responsiveness to preexisting inducing signals is proposed. In light of the phylogenetic distribution of neural crest-like cells, the deep homology of developmental gene networks, and the central role of evolutionary loss in deuterostome evolution, this article concludes with suggestions for future studies in a broad range of bilaterians to test key aspects of this model. WIREs Dev Biol 2013, 2:1-15. doi: 10.1002/wdev.85 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  10. Development of a multi-classification neural network model to determine the microbial growth/no growth interface.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Navarro, Francisco; Valero, Antonio; Hervás-Martínez, César; Gutiérrez, Pedro A; García-Gimeno, Rosa M; Zurera-Cosano, Gonzalo

    2010-07-15

    Boundary models have been recognized as useful tools to predict the ability of microorganisms to grow at limiting conditions. However, at these conditions, microbial behaviour can vary, being difficult to distinguish between growth or no growth. In this paper, the data from the study of Valero et al. [Valero, A., Pérez-Rodríguez, F., Carrasco, E., Fuentes-Alventosa, J.M., García-Gimeno, R.M., Zurera, G., 2009. Modelling the growth boundaries of Staphylococcus aureus: Effect of temperature, pH and water activity. International Journal of Food Microbiology 133 (1-2), 186-194] belonging to growth/no growth conditions of Staphylococcus aureus against temperature, pH and a(w) were divided into three categorical classes: growth (G), growth transition (GT) and no growth (NG). Subsequently, they were modelled by using a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) in order to create a multi-classification model that was able to predict the probability of belonging at one of the three mentioned classes. The model was developed through an over sampling procedure using a memetic algorithm (MA) in order to balance in part the size of the classes and to improve the accuracy of the classifier. The multi-classification model, named Smote Memetic Radial Basis Function (SMRBF) provided a quite good adjustment to data observed, being able to correctly classify the 86.30% of training data and the 82.26% of generalization data for the three observed classes in the best model. Besides, the high number of replicates per condition tested (n=30) produced a smooth transition between growth and no growth. At the most stringent conditions, the probability of belonging to class GT was higher, thus justifying the inclusion of the class in the new model. The SMRBF model presented in this study can be used to better define microbial growth/no growth interface and the variability associated to these conditions so as to apply this knowledge to a food safety in a decision-making process.

  11. Neuroprotection for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Role of Stem Cells, Growth Factors, and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Mao, Lilly L. J.; Zhou, Edward W.; Bowser, Robert; Zhu, Zhenglun; Zhu, Yongjin; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Various molecular mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity have been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), though the exact mechanisms have yet to be specified. Furthermore, the underlying restorative molecular mechanisms resulting in neuronal and/or non-neuronal regeneration have to be yet elucidated. Therapeutic agents targeting one or more of these mechanisms to combat either initiation or progression of the disease are under research. Novel treatments including stem cell therapy, growth factors, and gene therapy might prolong survival and delay progression of symptoms. Harnessing the regenerative potential of the central nervous system would be a novel approach for the treatment of motor neuron death resulting from ALS. Endogenous neural replacement, if augmented with administration of exogenous growth factors or with pharmaceuticals that increase the rate of neural progenitor formation, neural migration, and neural maturation could slow the rate of cell loss enough to result in clinical improvement. In this review, we discuss the impact of therapeutic treatment involving stem cell therapy, trophic factors, gene therapy, and combination therapy on disease onset and progression of ALS. In addition, we summarize human clinical trials of stem cell therapy, growth factor therapy, and gene therapy in individuals with ALS. PMID:22283698

  12. The Effect of Controlled Growth Factor Delivery on Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Inside of Fibrin Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Willerth, Stephanie M.; Rader, Allison; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop 3-D biomaterial scaffolds that present cues to direct differentiation of embryonic stem cell derived neural progenitor cells (ESNPCs) seeded inside into mature neural phenotypes, specifically neurons and oligodendrocytes. Release studies were performed to determine the appropriate conditions for retention of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), sonic hedgehog (Shh), and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) by an affinity-based delivery system (ABDS) incorporated into fibrin scaffolds. Embryoid bodies (EBs) containing neural progenitors were formed from mouse ES cells, using a 4−/4+ retinoic acid treatment protocol, and then seeded inside of fibrin scaffolds containing the drug delivery system. This delivery system was used to deliver various growth factor doses and combinations to the cells seeded inside of the scaffolds. Controlled delivery of NT-3 and PDGF simultaneously increased the fraction of neural progenitors, neurons, and oligodendrocytes while decreasing the fraction of astrocytes obtained compared to control cultures seeded inside of unmodified fibrin scaffolds with no growth factors present in the media. These results demonstrate that such a strategy can be used to generate an engineered tissue for the potential treatment of spinal cord injury and could be extended to study of differentiation in other tissues. PMID:19383401

  13. Influence of random and oriented electrospun fibrous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds on neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Laura E; Reis, Karina P; Pozzobon, Laura G; Girardi, Carolina S; Pranke, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Engineering neural tissue by combining biodegradable materials, cells and growth factors is a promising strategy for the treatment of central and peripheral nervous system injuries. In this study, neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) was investigated in combination with three dimensional (3D) electrospun nanofibers as a substitute for the extracellular matrix (ECM). Nano/microfibrous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) 3D scaffolds were fabricated through electrospinning and characterized. The scaffolds consisted of either a randomly oriented or an aligned structure of PLGA fibers. The mESCs were induced to differentiate into neuronal lineage and the effect of the polymer and fiber orientation on cell survival, morphology and differentiation efficiency was studied. The neural progenitors derived from the mESCs could survive and migrate onto the fibrous scaffolds. Aligned fibers provided more contact guidance with the neurites preferentially extending along the long axis of fiber. The mESCs differentiated into neural lineages expressing neural markers as seen by the immunocytochemistry. The nestin and beta3-tubulin expression was enhanced on the PLGA aligned fibers in comparison with the other groups, as seen by the quantitative analysis. Taken together, a combination of electrospun fiber scaffolds and mESC derived neural progenitor cells could provide valuable information about the effects of topology on neural differentiation and axonal regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1333-1345, 2017.

  14. Chandelier Cells in Functional and Dysfunctional Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqing; Zhang, Peng; Wyskiel, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Chandelier cells (ChCs; also called axo-axonic cells) are a specialized GABAergic interneuron subtype that selectively innervates pyramidal neurons at the axon initial segment (AIS), the site of action potential generation. ChC connectivity allows for powerful yet precise modulation of large populations of pyramidal cells, suggesting ChCs have a critical role in brain functions. Dysfunctions in ChC connectivity are associated with brain disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia; however, whether this is causative, contributory or compensatory is not known. A likely stumbling block toward mechanistic discoveries and uncovering potential therapeutic targets is the apparent lack of rudimentary understanding of ChCs. For example, whether cortical ChCs are inhibitory or excitatory remains unresolved, and thus whether altered ChC activity results in altered inhibition or excitation is not clear. Recent studies have shed some light onto this excitation-inhibition controversy. In addition, new findings have identified preferential cell-type connectivities established by cortical ChCs, greatly expanding our understanding of the role of ChCs in the cortical microcircuit. Here we aim to bring more attention to ChC connectivity to better understand its role in neural circuits, address whether ChCs are inhibitory or excitatory in light of recent findings and discuss ChC dysfunctions in brain disorders. PMID:27199673

  15. Paraoxon and Pyridostigmine Interfere with Neural Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Berríos, Verónica O.; Boukli, Nawal M.; Rodriguez, Jose W.; Negraes, Priscilla D.; Schwindt, Telma T.; Trujillo, Cleber A.; Oliveira, Sophia L. B.; Cubano, Luis A.; Ferchmin, P. A.; Eterovic, Vesna A.; Ulrich, Henning; Martins, Antonio H.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition has been described as the main mechanism of organophosphate (OP)-evoked toxicity. OPs represent a human health threat, because chronic exposure to low doses can damage the developing brain, and acute exposure can produce long-lasting damage to adult brains, despite post-exposure medical countermeasures. Although the main mechanism of OP toxicity is AChE inhibition, several lines of evidence suggest that OPs also act by other mechanisms. We hypothesized that rat neural progenitor cells extracted on embryonic day 14.5 would be affected by constant inhibition of AChE from chronic exposure to OP or pyri-dostigmine (a reversible AChE blocker) during differentiation. In this work, the OP paraoxon decreased cell viability in concentrations >50 μM, as measured with the MTT assay; however, this effect was not dose-dependent. Reduced viability could not be attributed to blockade of AChE activity, since treatment with 200 μM pyri-dostigmine did not affect cell viability, even after 6 days. Although changes in protein expression patterns were noted in both treatments, the distribution of differentiated phenotypes, such as the percentages of neurons and glial cells, was not altered, as determined by flow cytometry. Since paraoxon and pyridostigmine each decreased neurite outgrowth (but did not prevent differentiation), we infer that developmental patterns may have been affected. PMID:25758980

  16. Modeling of frost crystal growth over a flat plate using artificial neural networks and fractal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahavvor, Ali Reza

    2017-03-01

    In the present study artificial neural network and fractal geometry are used to predict frost thickness and density on a cold flat plate having constant surface temperature under forced convection for different ambient conditions. These methods are very applicable in this area because phase changes such as melting and solidification are simulated by conventional methods but frost formation is a most complicated phase change phenomenon consists of coupled heat and mass transfer. Therefore conventional mathematical techniques cannot capture the effects of all parameters on its growth and development because this process influenced by many factors and it is a time dependent process. Therefore, in this work soft computing method such as artificial neural network and fractal geometry are used to do this manner. The databases for modeling are generated from the experimental measurements. First, multilayer perceptron network is used and it is found that the back-propagation algorithm with Levenberg-Marquardt learning rule is the best choice to estimate frost growth properties due to accurate and faster training procedure. Second, fractal geometry based on the Von-Koch curve is used to model frost growth procedure especially in frost thickness and density. Comparison is performed between experimental measurements and soft computing methods. Results show that soft computing methods can be used more efficiently to determine frost properties over a flat plate. Based on the developed models, wide range of frost formation over flat plates can be determined for various conditions.

  17. Neural stem cells: the need for a proper orientation.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Bart; Gutierrez, Irene; Martí, Elisa; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2010-08-01

    Drosophila neuroblasts and mouse radial glial cells can divide asymmetrically to self-renew while producing differentiating daughter cells that contribute to brain growth. Intense research activity in the past few years has started to unveil some of the processes that govern asymmetric division in these two cell types. Here we discuss the case of centrosome asymmetry and the contribution of spindle orientation and non-spindle-related centrosome functions. Although still fragmentary, the emerging picture suggests that both notable parallelisms and striking differences apply.

  18. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  19. Probabilistic neural networks using Bayesian decision strategies and a modified Gompertz model for growth phase classification in the batch culture of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Simon; Nazmul Karim M

    2001-01-01

    Probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) were used in conjunction with the Gompertz model for bacterial growth to classify the lag, logarithmic, and stationary phases in a batch process. Using the fermentation time and the optical density of diluted cell suspensions, sampled from a culture of Bacillus subtilis, PNNs enabled a reliable determination of the growth phases. Based on a Bayesian decision strategy, the Gompertz based PNN used newly proposed definition of the lag and logarithmic phases to estimate the latent, logarithmic and stationary phases. This network topology has the potential for use with on-line turbidimeter for the automation and control of cultivation processes.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor-2 regulates early neural and cardiovascular system development in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Lori; Glynn, Catherine; Nolan, Catherine M; Grealy, Maura; Byrnes, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family is essential for normal embryonic growth and development and it is highly conserved through vertebrate evolution. However, the roles that the individual members of the IGF family play in embryonic development have not been fully elucidated. This study focuses on the role of IGF-2 in zebrafish embryonic development. Two igf-2 genes, igf-2a and igf-2b, are present in the zebrafish genome. Antisense morpholinos were designed to knock down both igf-2 genes. The neural and cardiovascular defects in IGF-2 morphant embryos were then examined further using wholemount in situ hybridisation, TUNEL analysis and O-dianisidine staining. Knockdown of igf-2a or igf-2b resulted in ventralised embryos with reduced growth, reduced eyes, disrupted brain structures and a disrupted cardiovascular system, with igf-2b playing a more significant role in development. During gastrulation, igf-2a and igf-2b are required for development of anterior neural structures and for regulation of genes critical to dorsal-ventral patterning. As development proceeds, igf-2a and igf-2b play anti-apoptotic roles. Gene expression analysis demonstrates that igf-2a and igf-2b play overlapping roles in angiogenesis and cardiac outflow tract development. Igf-2b is specifically required for cardiac valve development and cardiac looping. Injection of a dominant negative IGF-1 receptor led to similar defects in angiogenesis and cardiac valve development, indicating IGF-2 signals through this receptor to regulate cardiovascular development. This is the first study describing two functional igf-2 genes in zebrafish. This work demonstrates that igf-2a and igf-2b are critical to neural and cardiovascular development in zebrafish embryos. The finding that igf-2a and igf-2b do not act exclusively in a redundant manner may explain why both genes have been stably maintained in the genome.

  1. Basic FGF and TGF-beta 1 influence commitment to melanogenesis in neural crest-derived cells of avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Stocker, K M; Sherman, L; Rees, S; Ciment, G

    1991-02-01

    In previous studies, we showed that neural crest (NC)-derived cells from embryonic quail dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and peripheral nerve (PN), which do not normally give rise to melanocytes, become committed to melanogenesis following treatment in culture with the phorbol ester drug 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). These and other observations support the notion that melanocytes and Schwann cells are derived from a common bipotent intermediate in the neural crest lineage--the melanocyte/Schwann cell progenitor. In this study, we test the possibility that peptide growth factors found in the embryonic environment might act similarly to TPA to influence the fates of these cells. DRG and PN explants were cultured in medium supplemented with a variety of growth factors, and then the cultures were examined for the presence of pigment cells. We found that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), but not various other growth factors, induced pigmentation in about 20% of these cultures. When low concentrations of TPA were included in the culture medium, bFGF augmented the TPA-induced pigmentation, significantly increasing the proportion of pigmented cultures. These effects of bFGF were age-dependent, and could be blocked by addition of a bFGF-neutralizing antibody to the culture medium. In contrast to these stimulatory effects of bFGF, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) was found to inhibit the TPA- or bFGF-induced pigmentation of DRG cultures. These data suggest, therefore, that at least some NC-derived cells are responsive to bFGF and TGF-beta 1, and that these growth factors may play an important role in the control of NC cell fate.

  2. Roles of chromatin remodelers in maintenance mechanisms of multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells in the formation of neural crest-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyohei; Ogawa, Ryuhei; Kawawaki, Syunsaku; Ito, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    We analyzed roles of two chromatin remodelers, Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable-B (SWI/SNF-B), and Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)/Wnt signaling in the maintenance of the multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells, leading to the formation of mouse neural crest-derived stem cells (mouse NCSCs). CHD7 was expressed in the undifferentiated neural crest cells and in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sciatic nerve, typical tissues containing NCSCs. BMP/Wnt signaling stimulated the expression of CHD7 and participated in maintaining the multipotency of neural crest cells. Furthermore, the promotion of CHD7 expression maintained the multipotency of these cells. The inhibition of CHD7 and SWI/SNF-B expression significantly suppressed the maintenance of the multipotency of these cells. In addition, BMP/Wnt treatment promoted CHD7 expression and caused the increase of the percentage of multipotent cells in DRG. Thus, the present data suggest that the chromatin remodelers as well as BMP/Wnt signaling play essential roles in the maintenance of the multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells and in the formation of mouse NCSCs.

  3. History of Neural Stem Cell Research and Its Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    TAKAGI, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    “Once development was ended…in the adult centers, the nerve paths are something fixed and immutable. Everything may die, nothing may be regenerated,” wrote Santiago Ramón y Cajal, a Spanish neuroanatomist and Nobel Prize winner and the father of modern neuroscience. This statement was the central dogma in neuroscience for a long time. However, in the 1960s, neural stem cells (NSCs) were discovered. Since then, our knowledge about NSCs has continued to grow. This review focuses on our current knowledge about NSCs and their surrounding microenvironment. In addition, the clinical application of NSCs for the treatment of various central nervous system diseases is also summarized. PMID:26888043

  4. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  5. Isolation of neural precursor cells from skeletal muscle tissues and their differentiation into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sik; Kim, Soyeon; Han, Dong Keun; Lee, Ji Youl; Ghil, Sung Ho

    2007-08-31

    Skeletal muscle contains several precursor cells that generate muscle, bone, cartilage and blood cells. Although there are reports that skeletal muscle-derived cells can trans-differentiate into neural-lineage cells, methods for isolating precursor cells, and procedures for successful neural induction have not been fully established. Here, we show that the preplate cell isolation method, which separates cells based on their adhesion characteristics, permits separation of cells possessing neural precursor characteristics from other cells of skeletal muscle tissues. We term these isolated cells skeletal muscle-derived neural precursor cells (SMNPs). The isolated SMNPs constitutively expressed neural stem cell markers. In addition, we describe effective neural induction materials permitting the neuron-like cell differentiation of SMNPs. Treatment with retinoic acid or forskolin facilitated morphological changes in SMNPs; they differentiated into neuron-like cells that possessed specific neuronal markers. These results suggest that the preplate isolation method, and treatment with retinoic acid or forskolin, may provide vital assistance in the use of SMNPs in cell-based therapy of neuronal disease.

  6. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  7. Slit molecules prevent entrance of trunk neural crest cells in developing gut.

    PubMed

    Zuhdi, Nora; Ortega, Blanca; Giovannone, Dion; Ra, Hannah; Reyes, Michelle; Asención, Viviana; McNicoll, Ian; Ma, Le; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2015-04-01

    Neural crest cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube early in development and give rise to sensory and sympathetic ganglia, adrenal cells, teeth, melanocytes and especially enteric nervous system. Several inhibitory molecules have been shown to play important roles in neural crest migration, among them are the chemorepulsive Slit1-3. It was known that Slits chemorepellants are expressed at the entry to the gut, and thus could play a role in the differential ability of vagal but not trunk neural crest cells to invade the gut and form enteric ganglia. Especially since trunk neural crest cells express Robo receptor while vagal do not. Thus, although we know that Robo mediates migration along the dorsal pathway in neural crest cells, we do not know if it is responsible in preventing their entry into the gut. The goal of this study was to further corroborate a role for Slit molecules in keeping trunk neural crest cells away from the gut. We observed that when we silenced Robo receptor in trunk neural crest, the sympathoadrenal (somites 18-24) were capable of invading gut mesenchyme in larger proportion than more rostral counterparts. The more rostral trunk neural crest tended not to migrate beyond the ventral aorta, suggesting that there are other repulsive molecules keeping them away from the gut. Interestingly, we also found that when we silenced Robo in sacral neural crest they did not wait for the arrival of vagal crest but entered the gut and migrated rostrally, suggesting that Slit molecules are the ones responsible for keeping them waiting at the hindgut mesenchyme. These combined results confirm that Slit molecules are responsible for keeping the timeliness of colonization of the gut by neural crest cells.

  8. Polyploidization of glia in neural development links tissue growth to blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Proper development requires coordination in growth of the cell types composing an organ. Many plant and animal cells are polyploid, but how these polyploid tissues contribute to organ growth is not well understood. We found the Drosophila melanogaster subperineurial glia (SPG) to be polyploid, and ploidy is coordinated with brain mass. Inhibition of SPG polyploidy caused rupture of the septate junctions necessary for the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the increased SPG cell size resulting from polyploidization is required to maintain the SPG envelope surrounding the growing brain. Polyploidization likely is a conserved strategy to coordinate tissue growth during organogenesis, with potential vertebrate examples.

  9. Generation of parthenogenetic induced pluripotent stem cells from parthenogenetic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Jeong Tae; Joo, Jin Young; Han, Dong Wook; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Kim, Min Jung; Greber, Boris; Zaehres, Holm; Sobek-Klocke, Ingeborg; Chung, Hyung Min; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-12-01

    Somatic cells can achieve a pluripotent cell state in a process called pluripotential reprogramming. Multipotent stem cells can differentiate into cells of only one lineage, but pluripotent stem cells can give rise to cells of all three germ layers of an organism. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from bimaternal (uniparental) parthenogenetic neural stem cells (pNSCs) by transduction with either four (4F: Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc) or two (2F: Oct4 and Klf4) transcription factors. The resultant maternal iPS cells, which were reprogrammed directly from pNSCs, were capable of generating germ line-competent chimeras. Interestingly, analysis of global gene expression and imprinting status revealed that parthenogenetic iPS cells clustered closer to parthenogenetic ESCs than to female ESCs, with patterns that were clearly distinct from those of pNSCs.

  10. X-box-binding protein 1-modified neural stem cells for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Si, Lihui; Xu, Tianmin; Wang, Fengzhang; Liu, Qun; Cui, Manhua

    2012-04-05

    X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells were transplanted into the right lateral ventricles of rats with rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease. The survival capacities and differentiation rates of cells expressing the dopaminergic marker tyrosine hydroxylase were higher in X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells compared to non-transfected cells. Moreover, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the substantia nigra were significantly increased, α-synuclein expression was decreased, and neurological behaviors were significantly ameliorated in rats following transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells. These results indicate that transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells can promote stem cell survival and differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, increase dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels, reduce α-synuclein aggregation in the substantia nigra, and improve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in rats.

  11. Neural differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from GFP transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Juri; E-mail: juri-f@nms.ac.jp; Ogawa, Rei; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2005-07-22

    Taking advantage of homogeneously marked cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, we have recently reported that adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) could differentiate into mesenchymal lineages in vitro. In this study, we performed neural induction using ASCs from GFP transgenic mice and were able to induce these ASCs into neuronal and glial cell lineages. Most of the neurally induced cells showed bipolar or multipolar appearance morphologically and expressed neuronal markers. Electron microscopy revealed their neuronal morphology. Some cells also showed glial phenotypes, as shown immunocytochemically. The present study clearly shows that ASCs derived from GFP transgenic mice differentiate into neural lineages in vitro, suggesting that these cells might provide an ideal source for further neural stem cell research with possible therapeutic application for neurological disorders.

  12. Polydopamine-mediated surface modification of scaffold materials for human neural stem cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kisuk; Lee, Jung Seung; Kim, Jin; Lee, Yu Bin; Shin, Heungsoo; Um, Soong Ho; Kim, Jeong Beom; Park, Kook In; Lee, Haeshin; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2012-10-01

    Surface modification of tissue engineering scaffolds and substrates is required for improving the efficacy of stem cell therapy by generating physicochemical stimulation promoting proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. However, typical surface modification methods including chemical conjugation or physical absorption have several limitations such as multistep, complicated procedures, surface denaturation, batch-to-batch inconsistencies, and low surface conjugation efficiency. In this study, we report a mussel-inspired, biomimetic approach to surface modification for efficient and reliable manipulation of human neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation and proliferation. Our study demonstrates that polydopamine coating facilitates highly efficient, simple immobilization of neurotrophic growth factors and adhesion peptides onto polymer substrates. The growth factor or peptide-immobilized substrates greatly enhance differentiation and proliferation of human NSCs (human fetal brain-derived NSCs and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs) at a level comparable or greater than currently available animal-derived coating materials (Matrigel) with safety issues. Therefore, polydopamine-mediated surface modification can provide a versatile platform technology for developing chemically defined, safe, functional substrates and scaffolds for therapeutic applications of human NSCs.

  13. JAM-C is an apical surface marker for neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Sandra; Worlitzer, Maik M A; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Hemmer, Kathrin; Rugani, Kirité; Werthschulte, Inga; Schön, Anna-Lena; Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Bunk, Eva C; Palm, Thomas; Ebnet, Klaus; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2012-03-20

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is an adhesive cell surface protein expressed in various cell types. JAM-C localizes to the apically localized tight junctions (TJs) between contacting endothelial and epithelial cells, where it contributes to cell-cell adhesions. Just as those epithelial cells, also neural stem cells are highly polarized along their apical-basal axis. The defining feature of all stem cells, including neural stem cells (NSCs) is their ability to self renew. This self-renewal depends on the tight control of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. In NSCs, the decision whether a division is symmetric or asymmetric largely depends on the distribution of the apical membrane and cell fate determinants on the basal pole of the cell. In this study we demonstrate that JAM-C is expressed on neural progenitor cells and neural stem cells in the embryonic as well as the adult mouse brain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in vivo JAM-C shows enrichment at the apical surface and therefore is asymmetrically distributed during cell divisions. These results define JAM-C as a novel surface marker for neural stem cells.

  14. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis – A potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid; Alhonen, Leena; Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J.

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. • Alcohol administration perturbs polyamine levels in the tissues with various patterns. • Total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc is critical for development. • The deficiency is associated with reduction in endothelial cell sprouting in the head. • Retarded migration of neural crest cells may cause development of neural tube defect. - Abstract: Introduction: Polyamines play a fundamental role during embryogenesis by regulating cell growth and proliferation and by interacting with RNA, DNA and protein. The polyamine pools are regulated by metabolism and uptake from exogenous sources. The use of certain inhibitors of polyamine synthesis causes similar defects to those seen in alcohol exposure e.g. retarded embryo growth and endothelial cell sprouting. Methods: CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The fetal head, trunk, yolk sac and placenta were collected at 9.5 and 12.5 dpc and polyamine concentrations were determined. Results: No measurable quantity of polyamines could be detected in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc, 12 h after ethanol exposure. Putrescine was not detectable in the trunk of the embryo at that time, whereas polyamines in yolk sac and placenta were at control level. Polyamine deficiency was associated with slow cell growth, reduction in endothelial cell sprouting, an altered pattern of blood vessel network formation and consequently retarded migration of neural crest cells and growth restriction. Discussion: Our results indicate that the polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. Alcohol administration, at the critical stage, perturbs polyamine levels with various patterns, depending on the tissue and its developmental stage. The total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc may explain why this

  15. Molecular Evolution of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell and Neural Stem Cell Regulating Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F

    2015-10-27

    Here, we study the molecular evolution of a near complete set of genes that had functional evidence in the regulation of the Drosophila germline and neural stem cell. Some of these genes have previously been shown to be rapidly evolving by positive selection raising the possibility that stem cell genes as a group have elevated signatures of positive selection. Using recent Drosophila comparative genome sequences and population genomic sequences of Drosophila melanogaster, we have investigated both long- and short-term evolution occurring across these two different stem cell systems, and compared them with a carefully chosen random set of genes to represent the background rate of evolution. Our results showed an excess of genes with evidence of a recent selective sweep in both germline and neural stem cells in D. melanogaster. However compared with their control genes, both stem cell systems had no significant excess of genes with long-term recurrent positive selection in D. melanogaster, or across orthologous sequences from the melanogaster group. The evidence of long-term positive selection was limited to a subset of genes with specific functions in both the germline and neural stem cell system.

  16. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions.

  17. Enhanced neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth on graphene-based biomimetic substrates.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suck Won; Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Han, Dong-Wook; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine.

  18. Cadherin-6B undergoes macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis during cranial neural crest cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Rangarajan; Taneyhill, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for the formation of migratory neural crest cells during development and is co-opted in human diseases such as cancer metastasis. Chick premigratory cranial neural crest cells lose intercellular contacts, mediated in part by Cadherin-6B (Cad6B), migrate extensively, and later form a variety of adult derivatives. Importantly, modulation of Cad6B is crucial for proper neural crest cell EMT. Although Cad6B possesses a long half-life, it is rapidly lost from premigratory neural crest cell membranes, suggesting the existence of post-translational mechanisms during EMT. We have identified a motif in the Cad6B cytoplasmic tail that enhances Cad6B internalization and reduces the stability of Cad6B upon its mutation. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Cad6B is removed from premigratory neural crest cells through cell surface internalization events that include clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Both of these processes are dependent upon the function of dynamin, and inhibition of Cad6B internalization abrogates neural crest cell EMT and migration. Collectively, our findings reveal the significance of post-translational events in controlling cadherins during neural crest cell EMT and migration. PMID:25795298

  19. Profiling of Proteins Regulated by Venlafaxine during Neural Differentiation of Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Doh, Mi Sook; Han, Dal Mu Ri; Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seok Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antidepressants are known to positively influence several factors in patients with depressive disorders, resulting in increased neurogenesis and subsequent relief of depressive disorders. To study the effects of venlafaxine during neural differentiation at the cellular level, we looked at its effect on protein expression and regulation mechanisms during neural differentiation. Methods After exposing NCCIT cell-derived EBs to venlafaxine during differentiation (1 day and 7 days), changes in protein expression were analyzed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Gene levels of proteins regulated by venlafaxine were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Results Treatment with venlafaxine decreased expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4HB), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2K (HIP2) and plastin 3 (T-plastin), and up-regulated expression of growth factor beta-3 (TGF-β3), dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 (DPYSL3), and pyruvate kinase (PKM) after differentiation for 1 and 7 days. In cells exposed to venlafaxine, the mRNA expression patterns of HIP2 and PKM, which function as negative and positive regulators of differentiation and neuronal survival, respectively, were consistent with the observed changes in protein expression. Conclusion Our findings may contribute to improve understanding of molecular mechanism of venlafaxine. PMID:25670950

  20. Cell metabolism: an essential link between cell growth and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Emily F.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Growth factor-stimulated or cancerous cells require sufficient nutrients to meet the metabolic demands of cell growth and division. If nutrients are insufficient, metabolic checkpoints are triggered that lead to cell cycle arrest and the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade through a process dependent on the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Given the connections between metabolism and apoptosis, the notion of targeting metabolism to induce cell death in cancer cells has recently garnered much attention. However, the signaling pathways by which metabolic stresses induce apoptosis have not as of yet been fully elucidated. Thus, the best approach to this promising therapeutic avenue remains unclear. This review will discuss the intricate links between metabolism, growth, and intrinsic apoptosis and will consider ways in which manipulation of metabolism might be exploited to promote apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. PMID:20816705

  1. Characterization of neural stemness status through the neurogenesis process for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Maeda H; Al-shammari, Ahmed M; Al-Juboory, Ahmad Adnan; Yaseen, Nahi Y

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro isolation, identification, differentiation, and neurogenesis characterization of the sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were investigated to produce two types of cells in culture: neural cells and neural stem cells (NSCs). These types of stem cells were used as successful sources for the further treatment of central nervous system defects and injuries. The mouse bone marrow MSCs were used as the source of the stem cells in this study. β-Mercaptoethanol (BME) was used as the main inducer of the neurogenesis pathway to induce neural cells and to identify NSCs. Three types of neural markers were used: nestin as the immaturation stage marker, neurofilament light chain as the early neural marker, and microtubule-associated protein 2 as the maturation marker through different time intervals in the neurogenesis process starting from the MSCs, (as undifferentiated cells), NSCs, production stages, and toward neuron cells (as differentiated cells). The results of different exposure times to BME of the neural markers analysis done by immunocytochemistry and real time-polymerase chain reaction helped us to identify the exact timing for the neural stemness state. The results showed that the best exposure time that may be used for the production of NSCs was 6 hours. The best maintenance media for NSCs were also identified. Furthermore, we optimized exposure to BME with different times and concentrations, which could be an interesting way to modulate specific neuronal differentiation and obtain autologous neuronal phenotypes. This study was able to characterize NSCs in culture under differentiation for neurogenesis in the pathway of the neural differentiation process by studying the expressed neural genes and the ability to maintain these NSCs in culture for further differentiation in thousands of functional neurons for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries and defects. PMID:27143939

  2. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  3. Urban Growth Modeling Using AN Artificial Neural Network a Case Study of Sanandaj City, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammady, S.; Delavar, M. R.; Pahlavani, P.

    2014-10-01

    Land use activity is a major issue and challenge for town and country planners. Modelling and managing urban growth is a complex problem. Cities are now recognized as complex, non-linear and dynamic process systems. The design of a system that can handle these complexities is a challenging prospect. Local governments that implement urban growth models need to estimate the amount of urban land required in the future given anticipated growth of housing, business, recreation and other urban uses within the boundary. There are so many negative implications related with the type of inappropriate urban development such as increased traffic and demand for mobility, reduced landscape attractively, land use fragmentation, loss of biodiversity and alterations of the hydrological cycle. The aim of this study is to use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to make a powerful tool for simulating urban growth patterns. Our study area is Sanandaj city located in the west of Iran. Landsat imageries acquired at 2000 and 2006 are used. Dataset were used include distance to principle roads, distance to residential areas, elevation, slope, distance to green spaces and distance to region centers. In this study an appropriate methodology for urban growth modelling using satellite remotely sensed data is presented and evaluated. Percent Correct Match (PCM) and Figure of Merit were used to evaluate ANN results.

  4. Regulation of programmed cell death during neural induction in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Anna; Robinson, Neil; Streit, Andrea; Sheng, Guojun; Stern, Claudio D

    2011-01-01

    To study early responses to neural inducing signals from the organizer (Hensen's node), a differential screen was performed in primitive streak stage chick embryos, comparing cells that had or had not been exposed to a node graft for 5 hours. Three of the genes isolated have been implicated in Programmed Cell Death (PCD): Defender Against Cell Death (Dad1), Polyubiquitin II (UbII) and Ferritin Heavy chain (fth1). We therefore explored the potential involvement of PCD in neural induction. Dad1, UbII and fth1 are expressed in partly overlapping domains during early neural plate development, along with the pro-apoptotic gene Cas9 and the death effector Cas3. Dad1 and UbII are induced by a node graft within 3 hours. TUNEL staining revealed that PCD is initially random, but both during normal development and following neural induction by a grafted node, it becomes concentrated at the border of the forming neural plate and anterior non-neural ectoderm and downregulated from the neural plate itself. PCD was observed in regions of Caspase expression that are free from Dad1, consistent with the known anti-apoptotic role of Dad1. However, gain- and loss-of-function of any of these genes had no detectable effect on cell identity or on neural plate development. This study reveals that early development of the neural plate is accompanied by induction of putative pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in distinct domains. We suggest that the neural plate is protected against apoptosis, confining cell death to its border and adjacent non-neural ectoderm.

  5. Neural conversion of ES cells by an inductive activity on human amniotic membrane matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Morio; Matsumura, Michiru; Watanabe, Kiichi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Osakada, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Masayo; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2006-01-01

    Here we report a human-derived material with potent inductive activity that selectively converts ES cells into neural tissues. Both mouse and human ES cells efficiently differentiate into neural precursors when cultured on the matrix components of the human amniotic membrane in serum-free medium [amniotic membrane matrix-based ES cell differentiation (AMED)]. AMED-induced neural tissues have regional characteristics (brainstem) similar to those induced by coculture with mouse PA6 stromal cells [a common method called stromal cell-derived inducing activity (SDIA) culture]. Like the SDIA culture, the AMED system is applicable to the in vitro generation of various CNS tissues, including dopaminergic neurons, motor neurons, and retinal pigment epithelium. In contrast to the SDIA method, which uses animal cells, the AMED culture uses a noncellular inductive material derived from an easily available human tissue; therefore, AMED should provide a more suitable and versatile system for generating a variety of neural tissues for clinical applications. PMID:16766664

  6. The novel steroidal alkaloids dendrogenin A and B promote proliferation of adult neural stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifa, Shaden A.M.; Medina, Philippe de; Erlandsson, Anna; El-Seedi, Hesham R.; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Dendrogenin A and B are new aminoalkyl oxysterols. • Dendrogenins stimulated neural stem cells proliferation. • Dendrogenins induce neuronal outgrowth from neurospheres. • Dendrogenins provide new therapeutic options for neurodegenerative disorders. - Abstract: Dendrogenin A (DDA) and dendrogenin B (DDB) are new aminoalkyl oxysterols which display re-differentiation of tumor cells of neuronal origin at nanomolar concentrations. We analyzed the influence of dendrogenins on adult mice neural stem cell proliferation, sphere formation and differentiation. DDA and DDB were found to have potent proliferative effects in neural stem cells. Additionally, they induce neuronal outgrowth from neurospheres during in vitro cultivation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for dendrogenins A and B in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which further increases their likely importance to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the brain.

  7. Near infrared laser stimulation of human neural stem cells into neurons on graphene nanomesh semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Omid; Ghaderi, Elham; Shirazian, Soheil A

    2015-02-01

    Reduced graphene oxide nanomeshes (rGONMs), as p-type semiconductors with band-gap energy of ∼ 1 eV, were developed and applied in near infrared (NIR) laser stimulation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into neurons. The biocompatibility of the rGONMs in growth of hNSCs was found similar to that of the graphene oxide (GO) sheets. Proliferation of the hNSCs on the GONMs was assigned to the excess oxygen functional groups formed on edge defects of the GONMs, resulting in superhydrophilicity of the surface. Under NIR laser stimulation, the graphene layers (especially the rGONMs) exhibited significant cell differentiations, including more elongations of the cells and higher differentiation of neurons than glia. The higher hNSC differentiation on the rGONM than the reduced GO (rGO) was assigned to the stimulation effects of the low-energy photoexcited electrons injected from the rGONM semiconductors into the cells, while the high-energy photoelectrons of the rGO (as a zero band-gap semiconductor) could suppress the cell proliferation and/or even cause cell damages. Using conventional heating of the culture media up to ∼ 43 °C (the temperature typically reached under the laser irradiation), no significant differentiation was observed in dark. This further confirmed the role of photoelectrons in the hNSC differentiation.

  8. Dendritic cells and macrophages neurally hard-wired in the lymph node.

    PubMed

    Wülfing, Clemens; Günther, Hauke S

    2015-11-19

    The neural hard-wired pathways in which the lymphoid organs are innervated by the nervous system is of special interest with respect to suggested afferent and sensory systems informing the central nervous system about the status of the immune system. Until today efferent also like afferent innervation seem to be unspecific, targeting many types of cells by affecting many cells at the same time. We for the first time show that antigen presenting cells (APC) are abundantly innervated in the T-cell enriched area, the subsinoidal layer and the cortical extrafollicular zone of lymph nodes in rats by a mesh of filamentous neurofilament positive structures originating from single nerve fibers and covering each single APC similar to a glass fishing float, so that we termed them "wired" APC (wAPC). These wAPC also found in humans seem to be restricted to the cell body, not to follow membranous extensions, they may be dynamic and receptive as MAP2 is expressed and axonal growth cones can be detected and they probably lack vesicular activity through missing synaptophysin expression. The specific innervation targeting single cells which show a distribution divided in several areas in one lymph node suggests a form of topographically organized afferent sensory system.

  9. Dendritic cells and macrophages neurally hard-wired in the lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Wülfing, Clemens; Günther, Hauke S.

    2015-01-01

    The neural hard-wired pathways in which the lymphoid organs are innervated by the nervous system is of special interest with respect to suggested afferent and sensory systems informing the central nervous system about the status of the immune system. Until today efferent also like afferent innervation seem to be unspecific, targeting many types of cells by affecting many cells at the same time. We for the first time show that antigen presenting cells (APC) are abundantly innervated in the T-cell enriched area, the subsinoidal layer and the cortical extrafollicular zone of lymph nodes in rats by a mesh of filamentous neurofilament positive structures originating from single nerve fibers and covering each single APC similar to a glass fishing float, so that we termed them “wired” APC (wAPC). These wAPC also found in humans seem to be restricted to the cell body, not to follow membranous extensions, they may be dynamic and receptive as MAP2 is expressed and axonal growth cones can be detected and they probably lack vesicular activity through missing synaptophysin expression. The specific innervation targeting single cells which show a distribution divided in several areas in one lymph node suggests a form of topographically organized afferent sensory system. PMID:26581550

  10. Time-lapse live imaging of clonally related neural progenitor cells in the developing zebrafish forebrain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiqiang; Wagle, Mahendra; Guo, Su

    2011-04-06

    Precise patterns of division, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells are crucial for proper brain development and function. To understand the behavior of neural progenitor cells in the complex in vivo environment, time-lapse live imaging of neural progenitor cells in an intact brain is critically required. In this video, we exploit the unique features of zebrafish embryos to visualize the development of forebrain neural progenitor cells in vivo. We use electroporation to genetically and sparsely label individual neural progenitor cells. Briefly, DNA constructs coding for fluorescent markers were injected into the forebrain ventricle of 22 hours post fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos and electric pulses were delivered immediately. Six hours later, the electroporated zebrafish embryos were mounted with low melting point agarose in glass bottom culture dishes. Fluorescently labeled neural progenitor cells were then imaged for 36 hours with fixed intervals under a confocal microscope using water dipping objective lens. The present method provides a way to gain insights into the in vivo development of forebrain neural progenitor cells and can be applied to other parts of the central nervous system of the zebrafish embryo.

  11. Correlation between receptor-interacting protein 140 expression and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhu-Ran; Yu, Wei-Dong; Shi, Cheng; Liang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Xue; Mu, Qing; Shen, Huan; Guo, Jing-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) promotes neuronal differentiation of N2a cells via extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. However, involvement of RIP140 in human neural differentiation remains unclear. We found both RIP140 and ERK1/2 expression increased during neural differentiation of H1 human embryonic stem cells. Moreover, RIP140 negatively correlated with stem cell markers Oct4 and Sox2 during early stages of neural differentiation, and positively correlated with the neural stem cell marker Nestin during later stages. Thus, ERK1/2 signaling may provide the molecular mechanism by which RIP140 takes part in neural differentiation to eventually affect the number of neurons produced.

  12. Correlation between receptor-interacting protein 140 expression and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhu-ran; Yu, Wei-dong; Shi, Cheng; Liang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Xue; Mu, Qing; Shen, Huan; Guo, Jing-zhu

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) promotes neuronal differentiation of N2a cells via extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. However, involvement of RIP140 in human neural differentiation remains unclear. We found both RIP140 and ERK1/2 expression increased during neural differentiation of H1 human embryonic stem cells. Moreover, RIP140 negatively correlated with stem cell markers Oct4 and Sox2 during early stages of neural differentiation, and positively correlated with the neural stem cell marker Nestin during later stages. Thus, ERK1/2 signaling may provide the molecular mechanism by which RIP140 takes part in neural differentiation to eventually affect the number of neurons produced. PMID:28250757

  13. Transplantation of enteric neural stem/progenitor cells into the irradiated young mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Osman, Ahmed M; Zhou, Kai; Zhu, Changlian; Blomgren, Klas

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for brain tumors but often results in cognitive deficits in survivors. Transplantation of embryonic or brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (BNSPCs) ameliorated cognitive impairment after irradiation (IR) in animal models. However, such an approach in patients requires a clinically relevant source of cells. We show for the first time the utilization of enteric neural stem/progenitor cells (ENSPCs) from the postnatal intestinal wall as a source of autologous cells for brain repair after injury caused by IR. Cells were isolated from the intestinal wall and propagated in vitro for 1 week. Differentiation assays showed that ENSPCs are multipotent and generated neurons, astrocytes, and myofibroblasts. To investigate whether ENSPCs can be used in vivo, postnatal day 9 mice were subjected to a single moderate irradiation dose (6 or 8 Gy). Twelve days later, mice received an intrahippocampal injection of syngeneic ENSPCs. Four weeks after transplantation, 0.5% and 1% of grafted ENSPCs were detected in the dentate gyrus of sham and irradiated animals, respectively, and only 0.1% was detected after 16 weeks. Grafted ENSPCs remained undifferentiated but failed to restore IR-induced loss of BNSPCs and the subsequent impaired growth of the dentate gyrus. We observed microglia activation, astrogliosis, and loss of granule neurons associated with grafted ENSPC clusters. Transplantation of ENSPCs did not ameliorate IR-induced impaired learning and memory. In summary, while autologous ENSPC grafting to the brain worked technically, even in the absence of immunosuppression, the protocols need to be modified to improve survival and integration.

  14. Cancer Cells Hijack Gluconeogenic Enzymes to Fuel Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Balsa-Martinez, Eduardo; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-11-19

    In this issue and the October 15th issue of Molecular Cell, studies by Montal et al. (2015) and Vincent et al. (2015) report that certain types of cancer cells utilize the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 2 (PCK2) to reprogram anabolic metabolism and support cell growth.

  15. Gene transfer of lacZ into avian neural tube and neural crest cells by retroviral infection of grafted embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Stocker, K M; Brown, A M; Ciment, G

    1993-01-01

    We describe here a new method for transferring genes into cells of the neural tube and neural crest of early avian embryos in vivo. Using the marker gene lacZ as an example, we infected dissected neural tubes from Hamburger-Hamilton stage 12-13 quail embryos with a replication-defective retrovirus carrying lacZ during a 2 hr period of exposure to the virus in culture. Infected neural tubes were then grafted into uninfected host chicken embryos in ovo and, after continued development for several days, the chimeric embryos were processed for beta-galactosidase histochemistry to identify the progeny of infected cells. We show that virus-infected neural tubes grafted isotopically into the trunk region of host embryos gave rise to cells of both the spinal cord and neural crest. Infected neural crest cells localized within dorsal root ganglia, sympathetic ganglia, peripheral nerves, and within the skin, where they were likely to give rise to melanocytes. These data are consistent with those using other cell marking techniques applied to the neural crest, indicating that retrovirus infection in culture, grafting, and beta-galactosidase expression has a neutral effect on neural crest cell migration and localization. These results indicate the heterospecific grafting of early avian tissues infected with retroviruses carrying foreign genes may be an effective strategy for testing the biological role of various gene products during development.

  16. Inhibition of neurosphere formation in neural stem/progenitor cells by acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jong-Hang; Lee, Don-Ching; Chen, Mei-Shu; Ko, Ying-Chin; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that transplantation of cultured neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) could improve functional recovery for various neurological diseases. This study aims to develop a stem cell-based model for predictive toxicology of development in the neurological system after acrylamide exposure. Treatment of mouse (KT98/F1B-GFP) and human (U-1240 MG/F1B-GFP) NSPCs with 0.5 mM acrylamide resulted in the inhibition of neurosphere formation (definition of self-renewal ability in NSPCs), but not inhibition of cell proliferation. Apoptosis and differentiation of KT98 (a precursor of KT98/F1B-GFP) and KT98/F1B-GFP are not observed in acrylamide-treated neurospheres. Analysis of secondary neurosphere formation and differentiation of neurons and glia illustrated that acrylamide-treated KT98 and KT98/F1B-GFP neurospheres retain the NSPC properties, such as self-renewal and differentiation capacity. Correlation of acrylamide-inhibited neurosphere formation with cell-cell adhesion was observed in mouse NSPCs by live cell image analysis and the presence of acrylamide. Protein expression levels of cell adhesion molecules [neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and N-cadherin] and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in acrylamide-treated KT98/F1B-GFP and U-1240 MG/F1B-GFP neurospheres demonstrated that NCAM decreased and phospho-ERK (pERK) increased, whereas expression of N-cadherin remained unchanged. Analysis of AKT (protein kinase B, PKB)/β-catenin pathway showed decrease in phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and cyclin D1 expression in acrylamide-treated neurospheres of KT98/F1B-GFP. Furthermore, PD98059, an ERK phosphorylation inhibitor, attenuated acrylamide-induced ERK phosphorylation, indicating that pERK contributed to the cell proliferation, but not in neurosphere formation in mouse NSPCs. Coimmunoprecipitation results of KT98/F1B-GFP cell lysates showed that the complex of NCAM and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) is present in the neurosphere, and the

  17. Signal transduction of the physical environment in the neural differentiation of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Neural differentiation is largely dependent on extracellular signals within the cell microenvironment. These extracellular signals are mainly in the form of soluble factors that activate intracellular signaling cascades that drive changes in the cell nucleus. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the physical microenvironment provides signals that can also influence lineage commitment and very low modulus surfaces has been repeatedly demonstrated to promote neurogenesis. The molecular mechanisms governing mechano-induced neural differentiation are still largely uncharacterized; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that physical stimuli can regulate known signaling cascades and transcription factors involved in neural differentiation. Understanding how the physical environment affects neural differentiation at the molecular level will enable research and design of materials that will eventually enhance neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation, homogeneity and specificity. PMID:27785459

  18. Comparative capability of menstrual blood versus bone marrow derived stem cells in neural differentiation.

    PubMed

    Azedi, Fereshteh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Soleimani, Masoud; Shojaei, Amir; Arasteh, Shaghayegh

    2017-02-01

    In order to characterize the potency of menstrual blood stem cells (MenSCs) for future cell therapy of neurological disorders instead of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) as a well-known and conventional source of adult stem cells, we examined the in vitro differentiation potential of these stem cells into neural-like cells. The differentiation potential of MenSCs to neural cells in comparison with BMSCs was assessed under two step neural differentiation including conversion to neurosphere-like cells and final differentiation. The expression levels of Nestin, Microtubule-associated protein 2, gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit 1 and 2, and Tubulin, beta 3 class III mRNA and/or protein were up-regulated during development of MenSCs into neurosphere-like cells (NSCs) and neural-like cells. The up-regulation level of these markers in differentiated neural-like cells from MenSCs was comparable with differentiated cells from BMSCs. Moreover, both differentiated MenSCs and BMSCs expressed high levels of potassium, calcium and sodium channel genes developing functional channels with electrophysiological recording. For the first time, we demonstrated that MenSCs are a unique cell population with differentiation ability into neural-like cells comparable to BMSCs. In addition, we have introduced an approach to generate NSCs from MenSCs and BMSCs and their further differentiation into neural-like cells in vitro. Our results hold a promise to future stem cell therapy of neurological disorders using NSCs derived from menstrual blood, an accessible source in every woman.

  19. Knock-down of ZBED6 in insulin-producing cells promotes N-cadherin junctions between beta-cells and neural crest stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Xie, Beichen; Qi, Yu; Wallerman, Ola; Vasylovska, Svitlana; Andersson, Leif; Kozlova, Elena Nickolaevna; Welsh, Nils

    2016-01-01

    The role of the novel transcription factor ZBED6 for the adhesion/clustering of insulin-producing mouse MIN6 and βTC6 cells was investigated. Zbed6-silencing in the insulin producing cells resulted in increased three-dimensional cell-cell clustering and decreased adhesion to mouse laminin and human laminin 511. This was paralleled by a weaker focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at laminin binding sites. Zbed6-silenced cells expressed less E-cadherin and more N-cadherin at cell-to-cell junctions. A strong ZBED6-binding site close to the N-cadherin gene transcription start site was observed. Three-dimensional clustering in Zbed6-silenced cells was prevented by an N-cadherin neutralizing antibody and by N-cadherin knockdown. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) with Zbed6-silenced cells, but not with control cells, stimulated the outgrowth of NCSC processes. The cell-to-cell junctions between NCSCs and βTC6 cells stained more intensely for N-cadherin when Zbed6-silenced cells were co-cultured with NCSCs. We conclude that ZBED6 decreases the ratio between N- and E-cadherin. A lower N- to E-cadherin ratio may hamper the formation of three-dimensional beta-cell clusters and cell-to-cell junctions with NCSC, and instead promote efficient attachment to a laminin support and monolayer growth. Thus, by controlling beta-cell adhesion and cell-to-cell junctions, ZBED6 might play an important role in beta-cell differentiation, proliferation and survival. PMID:26750727

  20. The neuro-glial properties of adipose-derived adult stromal (ADAS) cells are not regulated by Notch 1 and are not derived from neural crest lineage.

    PubMed

    Wrage, Philip C; Tran, Thi; To, Khai; Keefer, Edward W; Ruhn, Kelly A; Hong, John; Hattangadi, Supriya; Treviño, Isaac; Tansey, Malú G

    2008-01-16

    We investigated whether adipose-derived adult stromal (ADAS) are of neural crest origin and the extent to which Notch 1 regulates their growth and differentiation. Mouse ADAS cells cultured in media formulated for neural stem cells (NSC) displayed limited capacity for self-renewal, clonogenicity, and neurosphere formation compared to NSC from the subventricular zone in the hippocampus. Although ADAS cells expressed Nestin, GFAP, NSE and Tuj1 in vitro, exposure to NSC differentiation supplements did not induce mature neuronal marker expression. In contrast, in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) media, ADAS cells retained their ability to proliferate and differentiate beyond 20 passages and expressed high levels of Nestin. In neuritizing cocktails, ADAS cells extended processes, downregulated Nestin expression, and displayed depolarization-induced Ca(2+) transients but no spontaneous or evoked neural network activity on Multi-Electrode Arrays. Deletion of Notch 1 in ADAS cell cultures grown in NSC proliferation medium did not significantly alter their proliferative potential in vitro or the differentiation-induced downregulation of Nestin. Co-culture of ADAS cells with fibroblasts that stably expressed the Notch ligand Jagged 1 or overexpression of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) did not alter ADAS cell growth, morphology, or cellular marker expression. ADAS cells did not display robust expression of neural crest transcription factors or genes (Sox, CRABP2, and TH); and lineage tracing analyses using Wnt1-Cre;Rosa26R-lacZ or -EYFP reporter mice confirmed that fewer than 2% of the ADAS cell population derived from a Wnt1-positive population during development. In summary, although media formulations optimized for MSCs or NSCs enable expansion of mouse ADAS cells in vitro, we find no evidence that these cells are of neural crest origin, that they can undergo robust terminal differentiation into functionally mature neurons, and that Notch 1 is likely to be a key

  1. Single-Cell Phenotype Classification Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Oliver; Sick, Beate

    2016-10-01

    Deep learning methods are currently outperforming traditional state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms in diverse applications and recently even surpassed human performance in object recognition. Here we demonstrate the potential of deep learning methods to high-content screening-based phenotype classification. We trained a deep learning classifier in the form of convolutional neural networks with approximately 40,000 publicly available single-cell images from samples treated with compounds from four classes known to lead to different phenotypes. The input data consisted of multichannel images. The construction of appropriate feature definitions was part of the training and carried out by the convolutional network, without the need for expert knowledge or handcrafted features. We compare our results against the recent state-of-the-art pipeline in which predefined features are extracted from each cell using specialized software and then fed into various machine learning algorithms (support vector machine, Fisher linear discriminant, random forest) for classification. The performance of all classification approaches is evaluated on an untouched test image set with known phenotype classes. Compared to the best reference machine learning algorithm, the misclassification rate is reduced from 8.9% to 6.6%.

  2. Effects of melatonin and its analogues on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiaqi; Tu, Yalin; Chen, Jingkao; Tan, Dunxian; Liu, Xingguo; Pi, Rongbiao

    2016-01-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells which are capable of self-replication and differentiation into neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). NSCs are found in two main regions in the adult brain: the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The recent discovery of NSCs in the adult mammalian brain has fostered a plethora of translational and preclinical studies to investigate novel approaches for the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Melatonin is the major secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland and shows both a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms from bacteria to humans and a great functional versatility. Recently, accumulated experimental evidence showed that melatonin plays an important role in NSCs, including its proliferation, differentiation and survival, which are modulated by many factors including MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, histone acetylation, neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and apoptotic genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the beneficial effects of melatonin on NSCs and further to discuss the potential usage of melatonin and its derivatives or analogues in the treatment of CNS neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Neural stem/progenitor cells in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tincer, Gizem; Mashkaryan, Violeta; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Kizil, Caghan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and a worldwide health challenge. Different therapeutic approaches are being developed to reverse or slow the loss of affected neurons. Another plausible therapeutic way that may complement the studies is to increase the survival of existing neurons by mobilizing the existing neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) — i.e. “induce their plasticity” — to regenerate lost neurons despite the existing pathology and unfavorable environment. However, there is controversy about how NSPCs are affected by the unfavorable toxic environment during AD. In this review, we will discuss the use of stem cells in neurodegenerative diseases and in particular how NSPCs affect the AD pathology and how neurodegeneration affects NSPCs. In the end of this review, we will discuss how zebrafish as a useful model organism with extensive regenerative ability in the brain might help to address the molecular programs needed for NSPCs to respond to neurodegeneration by enhanced neurogenesis. PMID:27505014

  4. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; López-Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Erceg, Slaven

    2017-04-01

    Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal-free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal-free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217-1226.

  5. Independent expression of the adrenergic phenotype by neural crest cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A M

    1977-01-01

    Neural crest cells obtained from Japanese quail and grown in vitro without other embryonic tissues differentiate into adrenergic cells. These cells show intense catecholamine-specific histochemical fluorescence, and some have long, varicose neuronal processes. Ultrastructural examination shows two populations of cells, one with small (about 90 nm) dense-core vesicles resembling principal sympathetic neurons and the other with larger (about 150 nm) dense-core granules resembling chromaffin or small intensely fluorescent cells. Neuronal cells without adrenergic characteristics are also present. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that a population of cells determined along neuronal lines exists in the neural crest prior to migration. Images PMID:268641

  6. Notch signaling acts before cell division to promote asymmetric cleavage and cell fate of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-10-21

    Asymmetric cell divisions in the central nervous system generate neurons of diverse fates. In Drosophila melanogaster, the protein Numb localizes asymmetrically to dividing neural precursor cells such that only one daughter cell inherits Numb. Numb inhibits Notch signaling in this daughter cell, resulting in a different cell fate from the Notch-induced fate in the other-Numb-negative-daughter cell. Precursor cells undergo asymmetric cytokinesis generating daughter cells of different sizes. I found that inactivation of Notch in fly embryonic neural precursor cells disrupted the asymmetric positioning of the cleavage furrow and produced daughter cells of the same size and fate. Moreover, inactivation of Notch at different times altered the degree of asymmetric Numb localization, such that earlier inactivation of Notch caused symmetric distribution of Numb and later inactivation produced incomplete asymmetric localization of Numb. The extent of asymmetrically localized Numb positively correlated with the degree of asymmetric cytokinesis and the size disparity in daughter cells. Loss of Numb or expression of constitutively active Notch led to premature specification of the precursor cells into the fate of one of the daughter cells. Thus, in addition to its role in the specification of daughter cell fate after division, Notch controls Numb localization in the precursor cells to determine the size and fate of daughter cells. Numb also inhibits Notch signaling in precursor cells to prevent Notch-induced differentiation of the precursor cell, forming an autoregulatory loop.

  7. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  8. Three-Dimensional Stiff Graphene Scaffold on Neural Stem Cells Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qinqin; Yang, Lingyan; Jiang, Ziyun; Song, Qin; Xiao, Miao; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Xun; Wen, Tieqiao; Cheng, Guosheng

    2016-12-21

    Physical cues of the scaffolds, elasticity, and stiffness significantly guide adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. In addressable microenvironments constructed by three-dimensional graphene foams (3D-GFs), neural stem cells (NSCs) interact with and respond to the structural geometry and mechanical properties of porous scaffolds. Our studies aim to investigate NSC behavior on the various stiffness of 3D-GFs. Two kinds of 3D-GFs scaffolds present soft and stiff properties with elasticity moduli of 30 and 64 kPa, respectively. Stiff scaffold enhanced NSC attachment and proliferation with vinculin and integrin gene expression were up-regulated by 2.3 and 1.5 folds, respectively, compared with the soft one. Meanwhile, up-regulated Ki67 expression and almost no variation of nestin expression in a group of the stiff scaffold were observed, implying that the stiff substrate fosters NSC growth and keeps the cells in an active stem state. Furthermore, NSCs grown on stiff scaffold exhibited enhanced differentiation to astrocytes. Interestingly, differentiated neurons on stiff scaffold are suppressed since growth associated protein-43 expression was significantly improved by 5.5 folds.

  9. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  10. Perspectives on the role of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Arias, Juan C.; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E.; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that targeted deletion of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cells of the ventricular zone impairs the maintenance of these cells in healthy and stroke-injured brain. Here we frame this exciting new finding in the context of our previous studies on Pannexin 1 in neural precursors as well as the close relationship between Pannexin 1 and purinergic receptors established by other groups. Moreover, we identify important gaps in our understanding of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology in terms of the underlying molecular mechanisms and functional/behavioural outcomes. PMID:27904473

  11. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  12. Neural stem cell transplantation promotes behavioral recovery in a photothrombosis stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junning; Gao, Junwei; Hou, Boru; Liu, Jixing; Chen, Sihua; Yan, Guizhong; Ren, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy provides a promising approach for treat stroke. Neural stem cells isolated from mice hippocampus possessing the capacity of differentiate into neurons and astrocytes both in vitro and vivo. Here, we investigated the capability of neural stem cell transplantation in photothrombosis stroke model. Nissl staining revealed that the cortical infarct significantly decreased by 16.32% (Vehicle: 27.93le: an mm3, n=6, NSC: 23.37le: ai mm3, n=6, P<0.05) in the NSC group compared with the vehicle. More over transplantation of neural stem cells significantly (P<0.01) improved neurological performance compared with vehicle. These results indicate that transplantation of neural stem cell is an effective therapy in ischemic stroke. PMID:26339348

  13. Emergence of signs of neural cells after exposure of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to fetal brain extract

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Iman Razeghian; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi, Ali; Seno, Mohammad Mahdi Ghahramani; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Zare, Shahrokh; Tamadon, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Nowadays much effort is being invested in order to diagnose the mechanisms involved in neural differentiation. By clarifying this, making desired neural cells in vitro and applying them into diverse neurological disorders suffered from neural cell malfunctions could be a feasible choice. Thus, the present study assessed the capability of fetal brain extract (FBE) to induce rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) toward neural cells. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, BM-MSCs were collected from rats and cultured and their mesenchymal properties were confirmed. After exposure of the BM-MSCs to fetal brain extract, the cells were evaluated and harvested at days 3 and 7 after treatment. Results: The BM-MSCs that were exposed to FBE changed their appearance dramatically from spindle shape to cells with dendrite-like processes. Those neural like processes were absent in the control group. In addition, a neural specific marker, vimentin, was expressed significantly in the treatment group but not in the negative control group. Conclusion: This study presented the FBE as a natural neural differentiation agent, which probably has required factors for making neurons. In addition, vimentin overexpression was observed in the treated group which confirms neuron-like cell differentiation of BM-MSCs after induction. PMID:28392903

  14. Neural stem cells sustain natural killer cells that dictate recovery from brain inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Sanai, Nader; Jin, Wei-Na; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Recovery from organ-specific autoimmune diseases largely relies on the mobilization of endogenous repair mechanisms and local factors that control them. Natural killer (NK) cells are swiftly mobilized to organs targeted by autoimmunity and typically undergo numerical contraction when inflammation wanes. We report the unexpected finding that NK cells are retained in the brain subventricular zone (SVZ) during the chronic phase of multiple sclerosis in humans and its animal model in mice. These NK cells were found preferentially in close proximity to SVZ neural stem cells (NSCs) that produce interleukin-15 and sustain functionally competent NK cells. Moreover, NK cells limited the reparative capacity of NSCs following brain inflammation. These findings reveal that reciprocal interactions between NSCs and NK cells regulate neurorepair. PMID:26752157

  15. Accelerating bioelectric functional development of neural stem cells by graphene coupling: Implications for neural interfacing with conductive materials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongrong; Zhang, Shasha; Xiao, Miao; Qian, Fuping; He, Zuhong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Huawei; Yang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ming; Chai, Renjie; Tang, Mingliang

    2016-11-01

    In order to govern cell-specific behaviors in tissue engineering for neural repair and regeneration, a better understanding of material-cell interactions, especially the bioelectric functions, is extremely important. Graphene has been reported to be a potential candidate for use as a scaffold and neural interfacing material. However, the bioelectric evolvement of cell membranes on these conductive graphene substrates remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we used a neural stem cell (NSC) model to explore the possible changes in membrane bioelectric properties - including resting membrane potentials and action potentials - and cell behaviors on graphene films under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. We used a combination of single-cell electrophysiological recordings and traditional cell biology techniques. Graphene did not affect the basic membrane electrical parameters (capacitance and input resistance), but resting membrane potentials of cells on graphene substrates were more strongly negative under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. Also, NSCs and their progeny on graphene substrates exhibited increased firing of action potentials during development compared to controls. However, graphene only slightly affected the electric characterizations of mature NSC progeny. The modulation of passive and active bioelectric properties on the graphene substrate was accompanied by enhanced NSC differentiation. Furthermore, spine density, synapse proteins expressions and synaptic activity were all increased in graphene group. Modeling of the electric field on conductive graphene substrates suggests that the electric field produced by the electronegative cell membrane is much higher on graphene substrates than that on control, and this might explain the observed changes of bioelectric development by graphene coupling. Our results indicate that graphene is able to accelerate NSC maturation during development, especially with regard to

  16. Dual function of Slit2 in repulsion and enhanced migration of trunk, but not vagal, neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    De Bellard, Maria Elena; Rao, Yi; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-07-21

    Neural crest precursors to the autonomic nervous system form different derivatives depending upon their axial level of origin; for example, vagal, but not trunk, neural crest cells form the enteric ganglia of the gut. Here, we show that Slit2 is expressed at the entrance of the gut, which is selectively invaded by vagal, but not trunk, neural crest. Accordingly, only trunk neural crest cells express Robo receptors. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that trunk, not vagal, crest cells avoid cells or cell membranes expressing Slit2, thereby contributing to the differential ability of neural crest populations to invade and innervate the gut. Conversely, exposure to soluble Slit2 significantly increases the distance traversed by trunk neural crest cells. These results suggest that Slit2 can act bifunctionally, both repulsing and stimulating the motility of trunk neural crest cells.

  17. The amniotic fluid as a source of neural stem cells in the setting of experimental neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher G; Klein, Justin D; Wang, Junmei; Thakor, Devang; Benedict, Darcy; Ahmed, Azra; Teng, Yang D; Fauza, Dario O

    2013-02-15

    We sought to determine whether neural stem cells (NSCs) can be isolated from the amniotic fluid in the setting of neural tube defects (NTDs), as a prerequisite for eventual autologous perinatal therapies. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams (n=62) were divided into experimental (n=42) and control (n=20) groups, depending on prenatal exposure to retinoic acid for the induction of fetal NTDs. Animals were killed before term for analysis (n=685 fetuses). Amniotic fluid samples from both groups underwent epigenetic selection for NSCs, followed by exposure to neural differentiation media. Representative cell samples underwent multiple morphological and phenotypical analyses at different time points. No control fetus (n=267) had any structural abnormality, whereas at least one type of NTD developed in 52% (217/418) of the experimental fetuses (namely, isolated spina bifida, n=144; isolated exencephaly, n=24; or a combination of the two, n=49). Only amniotic samples from fetuses with a NTD yielded cells with typical neural progenitor morphology and robust expression of both Nestin and Sox-2, primary markers of NSCs. These cells responded to differentiation media by displaying typical morphological changes, along with expression of beta-tubulin III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and/or O4, markers for immature neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively. This was concurrent with downregulation of Nestin and Sox-2. We conclude that the amniotic fluid can harbor disease-specific stem cells, for example, NSCs in the setting of experimental NTDs. The amniotic fluid may be a practical source of autologous NSCs applicable to novel forms of therapies for spina bifida.

  18. Nox4-generated superoxide drives angiotensin II-induced neural stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Topchiy, Elena; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Griffin, W Sue T; Barger, Steven W; Das, Mita; Zawada, W Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to affect neural stem cell self-renewal and therefore may be important for normal development and may influence neurodegenerative processes when ROS activity is elevated. To determine if increasing production of superoxide, via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox), increases neural stem cell proliferation, 100 nM angiotensin II (Ang II) - a strong stimulator of Nox - was applied to cultures of a murine neural stem cell line, C17.2. Twelve hours following a single treatment with Ang II, there was a doubling of the number of neural stem cells. This increase in neural stem cell numbers was preceded by a gradual elevation of superoxide levels (detected by dihydroethidium fluorescence) from the steady state at 0, 5, and 30 min and gradually increasing from 1 h to the maximum at 12 h, and returning to baseline at 24 h. Ang II-dependent proliferation was blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of two sources of intracellular ROS in C17.2 cells: (i) mitochondrial and (ii) extramitochondrial; the latter indicative of the involvement of one or more specific isoforms of Nox. Of the Nox family, mRNA expression for one member, Nox4, is abundant in neural stem cell cultures, and Ang II treatment resulted in elevation of the relative levels of Nox4 protein. SiRNA targeting of Nox4 mRNA reduced both the constitutive and Ang II-induced Nox4 protein levels and attenuated Ang II-driven increases in superoxide levels and stem cell proliferation. Our findings are consistent with our hypothesis that Ang II-induced proliferation of neural stem cells occurs via Nox4-generated superoxide, suggesting that an Ang II/Nox4 axis is an important regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal and as such may fine-tune normal, stress- or disease-modifying neurogenesis.

  19. Nox4-generated superoxide drives angiotensin II-induced neural stem cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Barger, Steven W.; Das, Mita; Zawada, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to affect neural stem cell self-renewal and therefore may be important for normal development and may influence neurodegenerative processes when ROS activity is elevated. To determine if increasing production of superoxide, via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox), increases neural stem cell proliferation, 100nM angiotensin II (Ang II) – a strong stimulator of Nox – was applied to cultures of a murine neural stem cell line C17.2. Twelve hours following a single treatment with Ang II there was a doubling of the number of neural stem cells. This increase in neural stem cell numbers was preceded by a gradual elevation of superoxide levels (detected by dihydroethidium, DHE, fluorescence) from the steady state at 0, 5, and 30 minutes and gradually increasing from one hour to the maximum at 12 h, and returning to baseline at 24 h. Ang II-dependent proliferation was blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of two sources of intracellular ROS in C17.2 cells: i) mitochondrial and ii) extramitochondrial; the latter indicative of involvement of one or more specific isoforms of Nox. Of the Nox family, mRNA expression for one member, Nox4, is abundant in neural stem cell cultures, and Ang II treatment resulted in elevation of the relative levels of Nox4 protein. SiRNA targeting of Nox4 mRNA reduced both the constitutive and Ang II-induced Nox4 protein levels and attenuated Ang II-driven increases in superoxide levels and stem cell proliferation. Our findings are consistent with our hypothesis that Ang II-induced proliferation of neural stem cells occurs via Nox4-generated superoxide, suggesting that an Ang II/Nox4 axis is an important regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal and as such may fine-tune normal or stress- or disease-modifying neurogenesis. PMID:23751520

  20. Towards the fabrication of artificial 3D microdevices for neural cell networks.

    PubMed

    Gill, Andrew A; Ortega, Ílida; Kelly, Stephen; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2015-04-01

    This work reports first steps towards the development of artificial neural stem cell microenvironments for the control and assessment of neural stem cell behaviour. Stem cells have been shown to be found in specific, supportive microenvironments (niches) and are believed to play an important role in tissue regeneration mechanisms. These environments are intricate spaces with chemical and biological features. Here we present work towards the development of physically defined microdevices in which neural and neural stem cells can be studied in 3-dimensions. We have approached this challenge by creating bespoke, microstructured polymer environments using both 2-photon polymerisation and soft lithography techniques. Specifically, we have designed and fabricated biodegradable microwell-shaped devices using an in house synthetized polymer (4-arm photocurable poly-lactid acid) on a bespoke 2-photon polymerisation (2PP) set-up. We have studied swelling and degradation of the constructs as well as biocompatibility. Moreover, we have explored the potential of these constructs as artificial neural cell substrates by culturing NG108-15 cells (mouse neuroblastoma; rat glioma hybrid) and human neural progenitor cells on the microstructures. Finally, we have studied the effects of our artificial microenvironments upon neurite length and cell density.

  1. The cell biology of bone growth.

    PubMed

    Price, J S; Oyajobi, B O; Russell, R G

    1994-02-01

    The field of bone cell biology is clearly of relevance to the problem of stunting in children, as in the final analysis the cells of the growing long bone are the ultimate 'regulators'. It is the alterations in the functions of these cells that manifests as a reduction in height. Normal longitudinal growth is achieved by the coordinated recruitment, proliferation, differentiation, maturation and eventual death of the cells of growth plate and bone. Cellular activity is closely regulated by endocrine factors acting directly or indirectly, with factors produced locally and stored within the bone and cartilage microenvironment having a critical role in intercellular communication. Disruption of any of these processes can lead to growth disturbances, since it only requires a defect in a single gene to have profound effects. Studies in recent years have shed light on the biochemical and molecular effects of cytokines and growth factors and have shown that these regulatory molecules may mediate the effects of certain hormones important in controlling growth. However, the complex interrelationship of these molecules is still not clear. Notwithstanding, understanding of the mechanisms involved in bone remodelling is increasing, as this area attracts much research because of the high incidence of metabolic bone disease in Western society. Although studies of adult bone remodelling are of relevance, there is a requirement for increased research directed specifically at the mechanisms of endochondral ossification and its regulation. Longitudinal bone growth is a challenge to the cell biologist, since it is an accelerated cycle of cellular division and differentiation, within which it is not easy to separate events temporally and spatially. In addition, different regulatory mechanisms are probably important at different stages of growth. Another difficulty impeding progress in this field is the lack of appropriate animal models for research. Much information has come from

  2. Neutralization of nerve growth factor impairs proliferation and differentiation of adult neural progenitors in the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Scardigli, Raffaella; Capelli, Paolo; Vignone, Domenico; Brandi, Rossella; Ceci, Marcello; La Regina, Federico; Piras, Eleonora; Cintoli, Simona; Berardi, Nicoletta; Capsoni, Simona; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2014-09-01

    Adult neurogenesis is a multistep process regulated by several extrinsic factors, including neurotrophins. Among them, little is known about the role of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the neurogenic niches of the mouse. Here we analyzed the biology of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of AD11 anti-NGF transgenic mice, in which the expression of the recombinant antibody aD11 leads to a chronic postnatal neutralization of endogenous NGF. We showed that AD11-NSCs proliferate 10-fold less, with respect to their control counterparts, and display a significant impairment in their ability to differentiate into β-tubulin positive neurons. We found a considerable reduction in the number of SVZ progenitors and neuroblasts also in vivo, which correlates with a lower number of newborn neurons in the olfactory bulbs of AD11 mice and a severe deficit in the ability of these mice to discriminate between different odors. We also demonstrated that, in AD11 mice, the morphology of both SVZ-resident and neurosphere-derived astrocytes is significantly altered. We were able to reproduce the AD11 phenotype in vitro, by acutely treating wild type NSCs with the anti-NGF antibody, further demonstrating that both the proliferation and the differentiation defects are due to the NGF deprivation. Consistently, the proliferative impairment of AD11 progenitors, as well as the atrophic morphology of AD11 astrocytes, can be partly rescued in vitro and in vivo by exogenous NGF addition. Altogether, our results demonstrate a causal link between NGF signaling and proper proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells from the SVZ.

  3. The fate of cranial neural crest cells in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Rolf; Joss, Jean; Olsson, Lennart

    2008-06-15

    The cranial neural crest has been shown to give rise to a diversity of cells and tissues, including cartilage, bone and connective tissue, in a variety of tetrapods and in the zebrafish. It has been claimed, however, that in the Australian lungfish these tissues are not derived from the cranial neural crest, and even that no migrating cranial neural crest cells exist in this species. We have earlier documented that cranial neural crest cells do migrate, although they emerge late, in the Australian lungfish. Here, we have used the lipophilic fluorescent dye, DiI, to label premigratory cranial neural crest cells and follow their fate until stage 43, when several cranial skeletal elements have started to differentiate. The timing and extent of their migration was investigated, and formation of mandibular, hyoid and branchial streams documented. Cranial neural crest was shown to contribute cells to several parts of the head skeleton, including the trabecula cranii and derivatives of the mandibular arch (e.g., Meckel's cartilage, quadrate), the hyoid arch (e.g., the ceratohyal) and the branchial arches (ceratobranchials I-IV), as well as to the connective tissue surrounding the myofibers in cranial muscles. We conclude that cranial neural crest migration and fate in the Australian lungfish follow the stereotyped pattern documented in other vertebrates.

  4. A human YAC transgene rescues craniofacial and neural tube development in PDGFRalpha knockout mice and uncovers a role for PDGFRalpha in prenatal lung growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Jayatilake, D; Afink, G B; Ataliotis, P; Nistér, M; Richardson, W D; Smith, H K

    2000-11-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptor (PDGFRalpha) plays a vital role in the development of vertebrate embryos, since mice lacking PDGFRalpha die in mid-gestation. PDGFRalpha is expressed in several types of migratory progenitor cells in the embryo including cranial neural crest cells, lung smooth muscle progenitors and oligodendrocyte progenitors. To study PDGFRalpha gene regulation and function during development, we generated transgenic mice by pronuclear injection of a 380 kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing the human PDGFRalpha gene. The YAC transgene was expressed in neural crest cells, rescued the profound craniofacial abnormalities and spina bifida observed in PDGFRalpha knockout mice and prolonged survival until birth. The ultimate cause of death was respiratory failure due to a defect in lung growth, stemming from failure of the transgene to be expressed correctly in lung smooth muscle progenitors. However, the YAC transgene was expressed faithfully in oligodendrocyte progenitors, which was not previously observed with plasmid-based transgenes containing only upstream PDGFRalpha control sequences. Our data illustrate the complexity of PDGFRalpha genetic control, provide clues to the location of critical regulatory elements and reveal a requirement for PDGF signalling in prenatal lung growth, which is distinct from the known requirement in postnatal alveogenesis. In addition, we found that the YAC transgene did not prolong survival of Patch mutant mice, indicating that genetic defects outside the PDGFRalpha locus contribute to the early embryonic lethality of Patch mice.

  5. Protein Content and Methyl Donors in Maternal Diet Interact to Influence the Proliferation Rate and Cell Fate of Neural Stem Cells in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Amarger, Valérie; Lecouillard, Angèle; Ancellet, Laure; Grit, Isabelle; Castellano, Blandine; Hulin, Philippe; Parnet, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy and early postnatal life influences the setting up of normal physiological functions in the offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate cell differentiation during embryonic development and may mediate gene/environment interactions. We showed here that high methyl donors associated with normal protein content in maternal diet increased the in vitro proliferation rate of neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from rat E19 fetuses. Gene expression on whole hippocampi at weaning confirmed this effect as evidenced by the higher expression of the Nestin and Igf2 genes, suggesting a higher amount of undifferentiated precursor cells. Additionally, protein restriction reduced the expression of the insulin receptor gene, which is essential to the action of IGFII. Inhibition of DNA methylation in neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro increased the expression of the astrocyte-specific Gfap gene and decreased the expression of the neuron-specific Dcx gene, suggesting an impact on cell differentiation. Our data suggest a complex interaction between methyl donors and protein content in maternal diet that influence the expression of major growth factors and their receptors and therefore impact the proliferation and differentiation capacities of neural stem cells, either through external hormone signals or internal genomic regulation. PMID:25317634

  6. An update on Schwann cell biology--immunomodulation, neural regulation and other surprises.

    PubMed

    Armati, Patricia J; Mathey, Emily K

    2013-10-15

    Schwann cells are primarily discussed in the context of their ability to form myelin. However there are many subtypes of these neural crest derived cells including satellite cells of the dorsal root ganglia and autonomic ganglia, the perisynaptic Schwann cells of the neuromuscular junction and the non-myelin forming Schwann cells which ensheathe the unmyelinated fibres of the peripheral nervous system which are about 80% of peripheral nerves. This review discusses the many functions of these Schwann cell subsets including their seminal role in axonal ensheathment, perineuronal organisation, maintenance of normal neural function, synapse formation, response to damage and repair and an increasingly recognised active role in pain syndromes.

  7. Differentiation Induction of Mouse Neural Stem Cells in Hydrogel Tubular Microenvironments with Controlled Tube Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Onoe, Hiroaki; Kato-Negishi, Midori; Itou, Akane; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a tubular 3D microenvironment created in a calcium alginate hydrogel microtube with respect to the effect of scaffold dimensions on the differentiation of mouse neuronal stem cells (mNSCs) is evaluated. Five types of hydrogel microtubes with different core diameters (≈65-200 μm) and shell thicknesses (≈30-110 μm) are fabricated by using a double coaxial microfluidic device, and differentiation of encapsulated mNSCs is induced by changing the growth medium to the differentiation medium. The influence of the microtube geometries is examined by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent immunocytochemistry. The analyses reveal that differences in microtube thickness within 30-110 μm affected the relative Tuj1 expression but do not affect the morphology of encapsulated mNSCs. The diameters of cores influence both the relative Tuj1 expression and morphology of the differentiated neurons. It is found that the tubular microenvironment with a core diameter of less than ≈100 μm contributes to forming highly viable and aligned neural tissue. The tubular microenvironment can provide an effective method for constructing microfiber-shaped neural tissues with geometrically controlled differentiation induction.

  8. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    axonal rewiring and dendritic plasticity and to induce long-term functional recovery. The observed therapeutic effect of neural precursor cells seems to underlie their capacity to upregulate the glial glutamate transporter on astrocytes through the vascular endothelial growth factor inducing favorable changes in the electrical and molecular stroke microenvironment. Cell-based approaches able to influence plasticity seem particularly suited to favor poststroke recovery. PMID:27733606

  9. Neural stem cells differentiated from iPS cells spontaneously regain pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Sol; Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2014-10-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by transduction of exogenous reprogramming factors. After induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are established, exogenous genes are silenced. In the pluripotent state, retroviral genes integrated in the host genome are kept inactive through epigenetic transcriptional regulation. In this study, we tried to determine whether exogenous genes remain silenced or are reactivated upon loss of pluripotency or on differentiation using an in vitro system. We induced differentiation of iPS cells into neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro; the NSCs appeared morphologically indistinguishable from brain-derived NSCs and stained positive for the NSC markers Nestin and Sox2. These iPS cell-derived NSCs (iPS-NSCs) were also capable of differentiating into all three neural subtypes. Interestingly, iPS-NSCs spontaneously formed aggregates on long-term culture and showed reactivation of the Oct4-GFP marker, which was followed by the formation of embryonic stem cell-like colonies. The spontaneously reverted green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive (iPS-NSC-GFP(+) ) cells expressed high levels of pluripotency markers (Oct4 and Nanog) and formed germline chimeras, indicating that iPS-NSC-GFP(+) cells had the same pluripotency as the original iPS cells. The reactivation of silenced exogenous genes was tightly correlated with the downregulation of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) during differentiation of iPS cells. This phenomenon was not observed in doxycycline-inducible iPS cells, where the reactivation of exogenous genes could be induced only by doxycycline treatment. These results indicate that pluripotency can be regained through reactivation of exogenous genes, which is associated with dynamic change of Dnmt levels during differentiation of iPS cells.

  10. G protein-coupled receptor signaling through Gq and JNK negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Norikazu; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Sato, Maiko; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Kurose, Hitoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    In the early development of the central nervous system, neural progenitor cells divide in an asymmetric manner and migrate along the radial glia