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Sample records for neural interface systems

  1. The Science of Neural Interface Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Donoghue, John P.

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate goal of neural interface research is to create links between the nervous system and the outside world either by stimulating or by recording from neural tissue to treat or assist people with sensory, motor, or other disabilities of neural function. Although electrical stimulation systems have already reached widespread clinical application, neural interfaces that record neural signals to decipher movement intentions are only now beginning to develop into clinically viable systems to help paralyzed people. We begin by reviewing state-of-the-art research and early-stage clinical recording systems and focus on systems that record single-unit action potentials. We then address the potential for neural interface research to enhance basic scientific understanding of brain function by offering unique insights in neural coding and representation, plasticity, brain-behavior relations, and the neurobiology of disease. Finally, we discuss technical and scientific challenges faced by these systems before they are widely adopted by severely motor-disabled patients. PMID:19400719

  2. Neural interfaces at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Bioelectrical neural interfaces provide a means of recording the activity from the nervous system and delivering therapeutic stimulation to restore neurological function lost during disease or injury. Although neural interfaces have reached clinical utility, reducing the size of the bioelectrical interface to minimize damage to neural tissue and maximize selectivity has proven problematic. Nanotechnology may offer a means of interfacing with the nervous system with unprecedented specificity. Emergent applications of nanotechnology to neuroscience include molecular imaging, drug delivery across the BBB, scaffolds for neural regeneration and bioelectrical interfaces. In particular, carbon nanotubes offer the promises of material stability and low electrical impedance at physical dimensions that could have a significant impact on the future on neural interfaces. The purpose of this review is to present recent advances in carbon nanotube-based bioelectrical interfaces for the nervous system and discuss research challenges and opportunities. PMID:19025456

  3. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  4. Efficient Decoding With Steady-State Kalman Filter in Neural Interface Systems

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Wasim Q.; Truccolo, Wilson; Brown, Emery N.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2011-01-01

    The Kalman filter is commonly used in neural interface systems to decode neural activity and estimate the desired movement kinematics. We analyze a low-complexity Kalman filter implementation in which the filter gain is approximated by its steady-state form, computed offline before real-time decoding commences. We evaluate its performance using human motor cortical spike train data obtained from an intracortical recording array as part of an ongoing pilot clinical trial. We demonstrate that the standard Kalman filter gain converges to within 95% of the steady-state filter gain in 1.5 ± 0.5 s (mean ± s.d.). The difference in the intended movement velocity decoded by the two filters vanishes within 5 s, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 between the two decoded velocities over the session length. We also find that the steady-state Kalman filter reduces the computational load (algorithm execution time) for decoding the firing rates of 25 ± 3 single units by a factor of 7.0 ± 0.9. We expect that the gain in computational efficiency will be much higher in systems with larger neural ensembles. The steady-state filter can thus provide substantial runtime efficiency at little cost in terms of estimation accuracy. This far more efficient neural decoding approach will facilitate the practical implementation of future large-dimensional, multisignal neural interface systems. PMID:21078582

  5. Efficient decoding with steady-state Kalman filter in neural interface systems.

    PubMed

    Malik, Wasim Q; Truccolo, Wilson; Brown, Emery N; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2011-02-01

    The Kalman filter is commonly used in neural interface systems to decode neural activity and estimate the desired movement kinematics. We analyze a low-complexity Kalman filter implementation in which the filter gain is approximated by its steady-state form, computed offline before real-time decoding commences. We evaluate its performance using human motor cortical spike train data obtained from an intracortical recording array as part of an ongoing pilot clinical trial. We demonstrate that the standard Kalman filter gain converges to within 95% of the steady-state filter gain in 1.5±0.5 s (mean ±s.d.). The difference in the intended movement velocity decoded by the two filters vanishes within 5 s, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 between the two decoded velocities over the session length. We also find that the steady-state Kalman filter reduces the computational load (algorithm execution time) for decoding the firing rates of 25±3 single units by a factor of 7.0±0.9. We expect that the gain in computational efficiency will be much higher in systems with larger neural ensembles. The steady-state filter can thus provide substantial runtime efficiency at little cost in terms of estimation accuracy. This far more efficient neural decoding approach will facilitate the practical implementation of future large-dimensional, multisignal neural interface systems.

  6. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications.

    PubMed

    Green, Rylie; Abidian, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    Neural-interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system, lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review, the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices is discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery.

  7. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  8. Point-and-Click Cursor Control With an Intracortical Neural Interface System by Humans With Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Black, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a point-and-click intracortical neural interface system (NIS) that enables humans with tetraplegia to volitionally move a 2-D computer cursor in any desired direction on a computer screen, hold it still, and click on the area of interest. This direct brain–computer interface extracts both discrete (click) and continuous (cursor velocity) signals from a single small population of neurons in human motor cortex. A key component of this system is a multi-state probabilistic decoding algorithm that simultaneously decodes neural spiking activity of a small population of neurons and outputs either a click signal or the velocity of the cursor. The algorithm combines a linear classifier, which determines whether the user is intending to click or move the cursor, with a Kalman filter that translates the neural population activity into cursor velocity. We present a paradigm for training the multi-state decoding algorithm using neural activity observed during imagined actions. Two human participants with tetraplegia (paralysis of the four limbs) performed a closed-loop radial target acquisition task using the point-and-click NIS over multiple sessions. We quantified point-and-click performance using various human-computer interaction measurements for pointing devices. We found that participants could control the cursor motion and click on specified targets with a small error rate (<3% in one participant). This study suggests that signals from a small ensemble of motor cortical neurons (~40) can be used for natural point-and-click 2-D cursor control of a personal computer. PMID:21278024

  9. A wireless transmission neural interface system for unconstrained non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A.; Parajuli, Arun; Franklin, Robert; Sorenson, Michael; Felleman, Daniel J.; Hansen, Bryan J.; Hu, Ming; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Studying the brain in large animal models in a restrained laboratory rig severely limits our capacity to examine brain circuits in experimental and clinical applications. Approach. To overcome these limitations, we developed a high-fidelity 96-channel wireless system to record extracellular spikes and local field potentials from the neocortex. A removable, external case of the wireless device is attached to a titanium pedestal placed in the animal skull. Broadband neural signals are amplified, multiplexed, and continuously transmitted as TCP/IP data at a sustained rate of 24 Mbps. A Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA assembles the digital signals into serial data frames for transmission at 20 kHz though an 802.11n wireless data link on a frequency-shift key-modulated signal at 5.7-5.8 GHz to a receiver up to 10 m away. The system is powered by two CR123A, 3 V batteries for 2 h of operation. Main results. We implanted a multi-electrode array in visual area V4 of one anesthetized monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) of a freely moving monkey (Macaca mulatta). The implanted recording arrays were electrically stable and delivered broadband neural data over a year of testing. For the first time, we compared dlPFC neuronal responses to the same set of stimuli (food reward) in restrained and freely moving conditions. Although we did not find differences in neuronal responses as a function of reward type in the restrained and unrestrained conditions, there were significant differences in correlated activity. This demonstrates that measuring neural responses in freely moving animals can capture phenomena that are absent in the traditional head-fixed paradigm. Significance. We implemented a wireless neural interface for multi-electrode recordings in freely moving non-human primates, which can potentially move systems neuroscience to a new direction by allowing one to record neural signals while animals interact with their environment.

  10. Intra-day signal instabilities affect decoding performance in an intracortical neural interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perge, János A.; Homer, Mark L.; Malik, Wasim Q.; Cash, Sydney; Eskandar, Emad; Friehs, Gerhard; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Motor neural interface systems (NIS) aim to convert neural signals into motor prosthetic or assistive device control, allowing people with paralysis to regain movement or control over their immediate environment. Effector or prosthetic control can degrade if the relationship between recorded neural signals and intended motor behavior changes. Therefore, characterizing both biological and technological sources of signal variability is important for a reliable NIS. Approach. To address the frequency and causes of neural signal variability in a spike-based NIS, we analyzed within-day fluctuations in spiking activity and action potential amplitude recorded with silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in the motor cortex of three people with tetraplegia (BrainGate pilot clinical trial, IDE). Main results. 84% of the recorded units showed a statistically significant change in apparent firing rate (3.8 ± 8.71 Hz or 49% of the mean rate) across several-minute epochs of tasks performed on a single session, and 74% of the units showed a significant change in spike amplitude (3.7 ± 6.5 µV or 5.5% of mean spike amplitude). 40% of the recording sessions showed a significant correlation in the occurrence of amplitude changes across electrodes, suggesting array micro-movement. Despite the relatively frequent amplitude changes, only 15% of the observed within-day rate changes originated from recording artifacts such as spike amplitude change or electrical noise, while 85% of the rate changes most likely emerged from physiological mechanisms. Computer simulations confirmed that systematic rate changes of individual neurons could produce a directional ‘bias’ in the decoded neural cursor movements. Instability in apparent neuronal spike rates indeed yielded a directional bias in 56% of all performance assessments in participant cursor control (n = 2 participants, 108 and 20 assessments over two years), resulting in suboptimal performance in these sessions

  11. Intra-day signal instabilities affect decoding performance in an intracortical neural interface system

    PubMed Central

    Perge, János A.; Homer, Mark L.; Malik, Wasim Q.; Cash, Sydney; Eskandar, Emad; Friehs, Gerhard; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Motor Neural Interface Systems (NIS) aim to convert neural signals into motor prosthetic or assistive device control, allowing people with paralysis to regain movement or control over their immediate environment. Effector or prosthetic control can degrade if the relationship between recorded neural signals and intended motor behavior changes. Therefore, characterizing both biological and technological sources of signal variability is important for a reliable NIS. Approach To address the frequency and causes of neural signal variability in a spike-based NIS, we analyzed within-day fluctuations in spiking activity and action potential amplitude recorded with silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in the motor cortex of three people with tetraplegia (BrainGate pilot clinical trial, IDE). Main results Eighty-four percent of the recorded units showed a statistically significant change in apparent firing rate (3.8±8.71Hz or 49% of the mean rate) across several-minute epochs of tasks performed on a single session, and seventy-four percent of the units showed a significant change in spike amplitude (3.7±6.5μV or 5.5% of mean spike amplitude). Forty percent of the recording sessions showed a significant correlation in the occurrence of amplitude changes across electrodes, suggesting array micro-movement. Despite the relatively frequent amplitude changes, only 15% of the observed within-day rate changes originated from recording artifacts such as spike amplitude change or electrical noise, while 85% of the rate changes most likely emerged from physiological mechanisms. Computer simulations confirmed that systematic rate changes of individual neurons could produce a directional “bias” in the decoded neural cursor movements. Instability in apparent neuronal spike rates indeed yielded a directional bias in fifty-six percent of all performance assessments in participant cursor control (n=2 participants, 108 and 20 assessments over two years), resulting in

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of an effective connection between neural tissue and computers has inspired scientists and engineers to develop new ways of controlling and obtaining information from the nervous system. These applications range from `brain hacking' to neural control of artificial limbs with brain signals. Notwithstanding the significant advances in neural prosthetics in the last few decades and the success of some stimulation devices such as cochlear prosthesis, neurotechnology remains below its potential for restoring neural function in patients with nervous system disorders. One of the reasons for this limited impact can be found at the neural interface and close attention to the integration between electrodes and tissue should improve the possibility of successful outcomes. The neural interfaces research community consists of investigators working in areas such as deep brain stimulation, functional neuromuscular/electrical stimulation, auditory prostheses, cortical prostheses, neuromodulation, microelectrode array technology, brain-computer/machine interfaces. Following the success of previous neuroprostheses and neural interfaces workshops, funding (from NIH) was obtained to establish a biennial conference in the area of neural interfaces. The first Neural Interfaces Conference took place in Cleveland, OH in 2008 and several topics from this conference have been selected for publication in this special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering. Three `perspectives' review the areas of neural regeneration (Corredor and Goldberg), cochlear implants (O'Leary et al) and neural prostheses (Anderson). Seven articles focus on various aspects of neural interfacing. One of the most popular of these areas is the field of brain-computer interfaces. Fraser et al, report on a method to generate robust control with simple signal processing algorithms of signals obtained with electrodes implanted in the brain. One problem with implanted electrode arrays, however, is that

  13. Implanted neural interfaces: biochallenges and engineered solutions.

    PubMed

    Grill, Warren M; Norman, Sharon E; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2009-01-01

    Neural interfaces are connections that enable two-way exchange of information with the nervous system. These connections can occur at multiple levels, including with peripheral nerves, with the spinal cord, or with the brain; in many instances, fundamental biophysical and biological challenges are shared across these levels. We review these challenges, including selectivity, stability, resolution versus invasiveness, implant-induced injury, and the host-interface response. Subsequently, we review the engineered solutions to these challenges, including electrode designs and geometry, stimulation waveforms, materials, and surface modifications. Finally, we consider emerging opportunities to improve neural interfaces, including cellular-level silicon to neuron connections, optical stimulation, and approaches to control inflammation. Overcoming the biophysical and biological challenges will enable effective high-density neural interfaces for stimulation and recording.

  14. Analysis of neural activity in human motor cortex -- Towards brain machine interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secundo, Lavi

    , the correlation of ECoG activity to kinematic parameters of arm movement is context-dependent, an important constraint to consider in future development of BMI systems. The third chapter delves into a fundamental organizational principle of the primate motor system---cortical control of contralateral limb movements. However, ipsilateral motor areas also appear to play a role in the control of ipsilateral limb movements. Several studies in monkeys have shown that individual neurons in ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) may represent, on average, the direction of movements of the ipsilateral arm. Given the increasing body of evidence demonstrating that neural ensembles can reliably represent information with a high temporal resolution, here we characterize the distributed neural representation of ipsilateral upper limb kinematics in both monkey and man. In two macaque monkeys trained to perform center-out reaching movements, we found that the ensemble spiking activity in M1 could continuously represent ipsilateral limb position. We also recorded cortical field potentials from three human subjects and also consistently found evidence of a neural representation for ipsilateral movement parameters. Together, our results demonstrate the presence of a high-fidelity neural representation for ipsilateral movement and illustrates that it can be successfully incorporated into a brain-machine interface.

  15. An integrated interface for peripheral neural system recording and stimulation: system design, electrical tests and in-vivo results.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Caterina; Bisoni, Lorenzo; Carta, Nicola; Puddu, Roberto; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Navarro, Xavier; Raffo, Luigi; Barbaro, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The prototype of an electronic bi-directional interface between the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) and a neuro-controlled hand prosthesis is presented. The system is composed of 2 integrated circuits: a standard CMOS device for neural recording and a HVCMOS device for neural stimulation. The integrated circuits have been realized in 2 different 0.35μ m CMOS processes available from ams. The complete system incorporates 8 channels each including the analog front-end, the A/D conversion, based on a sigma delta architecture and a programmable stimulation module implemented as a 5-bit current DAC; two voltage boosters supply the output stimulation stage with a programmable voltage scalable up to 17V. Successful in-vivo experiments with rats having a TIME electrode implanted in the sciatic nerve were carried out, showing the capability of recording neural signals in the tens of microvolts, with a global noise of 7μ V r m s , and to selectively elicit the tibial and plantar muscles using different active sites of the electrode. PMID:27007860

  16. Artificial neural interfaces for bionic cardiovascular treatments.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    An artificial nerve, in the broad sense, may be conceptualized as a physical and logical interface system that reestablishes the information traffic between the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Studies on artificial nerves targeting the autonomic nervous system are in progress to explore new treatment strategies for several cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we will review our research targeting the autonomic nervous system to treat cardiovascular diseases. First, we identified the rule for decoding native sympathetic nerve activity into a heart rate using transfer function analysis, and established a framework for a neurally regulated cardiac pacemaker. Second, we designed a bionic baroreflex system to restore the baroreflex buffering function using electrical stimulation of the celiac ganglion in a rat model of orthostatic hypotension. Third, based on the hypothesis that autonomic imbalance aggravates chronic heart failure, we implanted a neural interface into the right vagal nerve and demonstrated that intermittent vagal stimulation significantly improved the survival rate in rats with chronic heart failure following myocardial infarction. Although several practical problems need to be resolved, such as those relating to the development of electrodes feasible for long-term nerve activity recording, studies of artificial neural interfaces with the autonomic nervous system have great possibilities in the field of cardiovascular treatment. We expect further development of artificial neural interfaces as novel strategies to cope with cardiovascular diseases resistant to conventional therapeutics.

  17. Carbon nanotubes in neural interfacing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voge, Christopher M.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2011-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are remarkable materials with a simple and inert molecular structure that gives rise to a range of potentially valuable physical and electronic properties, including high aspect ratio, high mechanical strength and excellent electrical conductivity. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to study and control cells of the nervous system. It includes the use of CNT as cell culture substrates, to create patterned surfaces and to study cell-matrix interactions. It also summarizes recent investigations of CNT toxicity, particularly as related to neural cells. The application of CNT-based materials to directing the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward neural lineages is also discussed. The emphasis is on how CNT surface chemistry and nanotopography can be altered, and how such changes can affect neural cell function. This knowledge can be applied to creating improved neural interfaces and devices, as well as providing new approaches to neural tissue engineering and regeneration.

  18. Carbon nanotubes in neural interfacing applications.

    PubMed

    Voge, Christopher M; Stegemann, Jan P

    2011-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are remarkable materials with a simple and inert molecular structure that gives rise to a range of potentially valuable physical and electronic properties, including high aspect ratio, high mechanical strength and excellent electrical conductivity. This review summarizes recent research on the application of CNT-based materials to study and control cells of the nervous system. It includes the use of CNT as cell culture substrates, to create patterned surfaces and to study cell-matrix interactions. It also summarizes recent investigations of CNT toxicity, particularly as related to neural cells. The application of CNT-based materials to directing the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells toward neural lineages is also discussed. The emphasis is on how CNT surface chemistry and nanotopography can be altered, and how such changes can affect neural cell function. This knowledge can be applied to creating improved neural interfaces and devices, as well as providing new approaches to neural tissue engineering and regeneration.

  19. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  20. Assistive technology and robotic control using motor cortex ensemble-based neural interface systems in humans with tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, John P; Nurmikko, Arto; Black, Michael; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the rationale, early stage development, and initial human application of neural interface systems (NISs) for humans with paralysis. NISs are emerging medical devices designed to allow persons with paralysis to operate assistive technologies or to reanimate muscles based upon a command signal that is obtained directly from the brain. Such systems require the development of sensors to detect brain signals, decoders to transform neural activity signals into a useful command, and an interface for the user. We review initial pilot trial results of an NIS that is based on an intracortical microelectrode sensor that derives control signals from the motor cortex. We review recent findings showing, first, that neurons engaged by movement intentions persist in motor cortex years after injury or disease to the motor system, and second, that signals derived from motor cortex can be used by persons with paralysis to operate a range of devices. We suggest that, with further development, this form of NIS holds promise as a useful new neurotechnology for those with limited motor function or communication. We also discuss the additional potential for neural sensors to be used in the diagnosis and management of various neurological conditions and as a new way to learn about human brain function. PMID:17272345

  1. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  2. A Review of Organic and Inorganic Biomaterials for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Pouria; Yang, Guang; Kim, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have generated wide interest in applying nanomaterials for neural prostheses. An ideal neural interface should create seamless integration into the nervous system and performs reliably for long periods of time. As a result, many nanoscale materials not originally developed for neural interfaces become attractive candidates to detect neural signals and stimulate neurons. In this comprehensive review, an overview of state-of-the-art microelectrode technologies provided first, with focus on the material properties of these microdevices. The advancements in electro active nanomaterials are then reviewed, including conducting polymers, carbon nanotubes, graphene, silicon nanowires, and hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials, for neural recording, stimulation, and growth. Finally, technical and scientific challenges are discussed regarding biocompatibility, mechanical mismatch, and electrical properties faced by these nanomaterials for the development of long-lasting functional neural interfaces. PMID:24677434

  3. A review of organic and inorganic biomaterials for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Pouria; Yang, Guang; Kim, Gloria; Abidian, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-26

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have generated wide interest in applying nanomaterials for neural prostheses. An ideal neural interface should create seamless integration into the nervous system and performs reliably for long periods of time. As a result, many nanoscale materials not originally developed for neural interfaces become attractive candidates to detect neural signals and stimulate neurons. In this comprehensive review, an overview of state-of-the-art microelectrode technologies provided fi rst, with focus on the material properties of these microdevices. The advancements in electro active nanomaterials are then reviewed, including conducting polymers, carbon nanotubes, graphene, silicon nanowires, and hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials, for neural recording, stimulation, and growth. Finally, technical and scientific challenges are discussed regarding biocompatibility, mechanical mismatch, and electrical properties faced by these nanomaterials for the development of long-lasting functional neural interfaces.

  4. Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Formalization as Automata and Interface Design Using Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curilem, S. Gloria; Barbosa, Andrea R.; de Azevedo, Fernando M.

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a mathematical model of Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS), based on observations of the behaviour of these systems. One of the most important problems of pedagogical software is to establish a common language between the knowledge areas involved in their development, basically pedagogical, computing and domain areas. A…

  5. Flexible neural interfaces with integrated stiffening shank

    DOEpatents

    Tooker, Angela C.; Felix, Sarah H.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Shah, Kedar G.; Sheth, Heeral; Tolosa, Vanessa

    2016-07-26

    A neural interface includes a first dielectric material having at least one first opening for a first electrical conducting material, a first electrical conducting material in the first opening, and at least one first interconnection trace electrical conducting material connected to the first electrical conducting material. A stiffening shank material is located adjacent the first dielectric material, the first electrical conducting material, and the first interconnection trace electrical conducting material.

  6. Feasibility study for future implantable neural-silicon interface devices.

    PubMed

    Al-Armaghany, Allann; Yu, Bo; Mak, Terrence; Tong, Kin-Fai; Sun, Yihe

    2011-01-01

    The emerging neural-silicon interface devices bridge nerve systems with artificial systems and play a key role in neuro-prostheses and neuro-rehabilitation applications. Integrating neural signal collection, processing and transmission on a single device will make clinical applications more practical and feasible. This paper focuses on the wireless antenna part and real-time neural signal analysis part of implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) devices. We propose to use millimeter-wave for wireless connections between different areas of a brain. Various antenna, including microstrip patch, monopole antenna and substrate integrated waveguide antenna are considered for the intra-cortical proximity communication. A Hebbian eigenfilter based method is proposed for multi-channel neuronal spike sorting. Folding and parallel design techniques are employed to explore various structures and make a trade-off between area and power consumption. Field programmable logic arrays (FPGAs) are used to evaluate various structures. PMID:22254974

  7. Shaping the Dynamics of a Bidirectional Neural Interface

    PubMed Central

    Vato, Alessandro; Semprini, Marianna; Maggiolini, Emma; Szymanski, Francois D.; Fadiga, Luciano; Panzeri, Stefano; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in decoding neural signals has enabled the development of interfaces that translate cortical brain activities into commands for operating robotic arms and other devices. The electrical stimulation of sensory areas provides a means to create artificial sensory information about the state of a device. Taken together, neural activity recording and microstimulation techniques allow us to embed a portion of the central nervous system within a closed-loop system, whose behavior emerges from the combined dynamical properties of its neural and artificial components. In this study we asked if it is possible to concurrently regulate this bidirectional brain-machine interaction so as to shape a desired dynamical behavior of the combined system. To this end, we followed a well-known biological pathway. In vertebrates, the communications between brain and limb mechanics are mediated by the spinal cord, which combines brain instructions with sensory information and organizes coordinated patterns of muscle forces driving the limbs along dynamically stable trajectories. We report the creation and testing of the first neural interface that emulates this sensory-motor interaction. The interface organizes a bidirectional communication between sensory and motor areas of the brain of anaesthetized rats and an external dynamical object with programmable properties. The system includes (a) a motor interface decoding signals from a motor cortical area, and (b) a sensory interface encoding the state of the external object into electrical stimuli to a somatosensory area. The interactions between brain activities and the state of the external object generate a family of trajectories converging upon a selected equilibrium point from arbitrary starting locations. Thus, the bidirectional interface establishes the possibility to specify not only a particular movement trajectory but an entire family of motions, which includes the prescribed reactions to unexpected perturbations. PMID

  8. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    Neural engineers have made significant, if not remarkable, progress in interfacing with the nervous system in the last ten years. In particular, neuromodulation of the brain has generated significant therapeutic benefits [1-5]. EEG electrodes can be used to communicate with patients with locked-in syndrome [6]. In the central nervous system (CNS), electrode arrays placed directly over or within the cortex can record neural signals related to the intent of the subject or patient [7, 8]. A similar technology has allowed paralyzed patients to control an otherwise normal skeletal system with brain signals [9, 10]. This technology has significant potential to restore function in these and other patients with neural disorders such as stroke [11]. Although there are several multichannel arrays described in the literature, the workhorse for these cortical interfaces has been the Utah array [12]. This 100-channel electrode array has been used in most studies on animals and humans since the 1990s and is commercially available. This array and other similar microelectrode arrays can record neural signals with high quality (high signal-to-noise ratio), but these signals fade and disappear after a few months and therefore the current technology is not reliable for extended periods of time. Therefore, despite these major advances in communicating with the brain, clinical translation cannot be implemented. The reasons for this failure are not known but clearly involve the interface between the electrode and the neural tissue. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) as well as other federal funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health have provided significant financial support to investigate this problem without much success. A recent funding program from DARPA was designed to establish the failure modes in order to generate a reliable neural interface technology and again was unsuccessful at producing a robust

  9. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    Neural engineers have made significant, if not remarkable, progress in interfacing with the nervous system in the last ten years. In particular, neuromodulation of the brain has generated significant therapeutic benefits [1-5]. EEG electrodes can be used to communicate with patients with locked-in syndrome [6]. In the central nervous system (CNS), electrode arrays placed directly over or within the cortex can record neural signals related to the intent of the subject or patient [7, 8]. A similar technology has allowed paralyzed patients to control an otherwise normal skeletal system with brain signals [9, 10]. This technology has significant potential to restore function in these and other patients with neural disorders such as stroke [11]. Although there are several multichannel arrays described in the literature, the workhorse for these cortical interfaces has been the Utah array [12]. This 100-channel electrode array has been used in most studies on animals and humans since the 1990s and is commercially available. This array and other similar microelectrode arrays can record neural signals with high quality (high signal-to-noise ratio), but these signals fade and disappear after a few months and therefore the current technology is not reliable for extended periods of time. Therefore, despite these major advances in communicating with the brain, clinical translation cannot be implemented. The reasons for this failure are not known but clearly involve the interface between the electrode and the neural tissue. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) as well as other federal funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health have provided significant financial support to investigate this problem without much success. A recent funding program from DARPA was designed to establish the failure modes in order to generate a reliable neural interface technology and again was unsuccessful at producing a robust

  10. Stretchable Polymeric Multielectrode Array for Conformal Neural Interfacing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Ma, Mingming; Zhang, Ning; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Highly stretchable neural interface of concurrent robust electrical and mechanical properties is developed with a conducting polymer film as the sole conductor for both electrodes and leads. This neural interface offers benefits of conducting polymer electrodes in a demanding stretchable format, including low electrode impedance and high charge injection capacity, due to large electroactive surface area of the electrode. PMID:24150828

  11. Elastomeric and soft conducting microwires for implantable neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kolarcik, Christi L; Luebben, Silvia D; Sapp, Shawn A; Hanner, Jenna; Snyder, Noah; Kozai, Takashi D Y; Chang, Emily; Nabity, James A; Nabity, Shawn T; Lagenaur, Carl F; Cui, X Tracy

    2015-06-28

    Current designs for microelectrodes used for interfacing with the nervous system elicit a characteristic inflammatory response that leads to scar tissue encapsulation, electrical insulation of the electrode from the tissue and ultimately failure. Traditionally, relatively stiff materials like tungsten and silicon are employed which have mechanical properties several orders of magnitude different from neural tissue. This mechanical mismatch is thought to be a major cause of chronic inflammation and degeneration around the device. In an effort to minimize the disparity between neural interface devices and the brain, novel soft electrodes consisting of elastomers and intrinsically conducting polymers were fabricated. The physical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of these materials were extensively characterized to identify the formulations with the optimal combination of parameters including Young's modulus, elongation at break, ultimate tensile strength, conductivity, impedance and surface charge injection. Our final electrode has a Young's modulus of 974 kPa which is five orders of magnitude lower than tungsten and significantly lower than other polymer-based neural electrode materials. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated the favorable interaction between these soft materials and neurons, astrocytes and microglia, with higher neuronal attachment and a two-fold reduction in inflammatory microglia attachment on soft devices compared to stiff controls. Surface immobilization of neuronal adhesion proteins on these microwires further improved the cellular response. Finally, in vivo electrophysiology demonstrated the functionality of the elastomeric electrodes in recording single unit activity in the rodent visual cortex. The results presented provide initial evidence in support of the use of soft materials in neural interface applications.

  12. Elastomeric and soft conducting microwires for implantable neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Luebben, Silvia D.; Sapp, Shawn A.; Hanner, Jenna; Snyder, Noah; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Chang, Emily; Nabity, James A.; Nabity, Shawn T.; Lagenaur, Carl F.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Current designs for microelectrodes used for interfacing with the nervous system elicit a characteristic inflammatory response that leads to scar tissue encapsulation, electrical insulation of the electrode from the tissue and ultimately failure. Traditionally, relatively stiff materials like tungsten and silicon are employed which have mechanical properties several orders of magnitude different from neural tissue. This mechanical mismatch is thought to be a major cause of chronic inflammation and degeneration around the device. In an effort to minimize the disparity between neural interface devices and the brain, novel soft electrodes consisting of elastomers and intrinsically conducting polymers were fabricated. The physical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of these materials were extensively characterized to identify the formulations with the optimal combination of parameters including Young’s modulus, elongation at break, ultimate tensile strength, conductivity, impedance and surface charge injection. Our final electrode has a Young’s modulus of 974 kPa which is five orders of magnitude lower than tungsten and significantly lower than other polymer-based neural electrode materials. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated the favorable interaction between these soft materials and neurons, astrocytes and microglia, with higher neuronal attachment and a two-fold reduction in inflammatory microglia attachment on soft devices compared to stiff controls. Surface immobilization of neuronal adhesion proteins on these microwires further improved the cellular response. Finally, in vivo electrophysiology demonstrated the functionality of the elastomeric electrodes in recording single unit activity in the rodent visual cortex. The results presented provide initial evidence in support of the use of soft materials in neural interface applications. PMID:25993261

  13. Neural interfaces for upper-limb prosthesis control: opportunities to improve long-term reliability.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jack W

    2012-03-01

    Building on a long history of innovation in neural-recording interfaces, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has launched a program to address the key challenges related to transitioning advanced neuroprosthesis technology to clinical use for amputated service members. The goal of the Reliable Neural Technology (RE-NET) Program is to develop new technology to extract information from the nervous system at a scale and rate needed to reliably control modern robotic prostheses over the lifetime of the amputee. The RE-NET program currently encompasses three separate efforts: histology for interface stability over time (HIST), reliable peripheral interfaces (RPIs), and reliable central nervous system (CNS) interfaces (RCIs).

  14. Braided Multi-Electrode Probes (BMEPs) for Neural Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Gyo

    Although clinical use of invasive neural interfaces is very limited, due to safety and reliability concerns, the potential benefits of their use in brain machine interfaces (BMIs) seem promising and so they have been widely used in the research field. Microelectrodes as invasive neural interfaces are the core tool to record neural activities and their failure is a critical issue for BMI systems. Possible sources of this failure are neural tissue motions and their interactions with stiff electrode arrays or probes fixed to the skull. To overcome these tissue motion problems, we have developed novel braided multi-electrode probes (BMEPs). By interweaving ultra-fine wires into a tubular braid structure, we obtained a highly flexible multi-electrode probe. In this thesis we described BMEP designs and how to fabricate BMEPs, and explore experiments to show the advantages of BMEPs through a mechanical compliance comparison and a chronic immunohistological comparison with single 50microm nichrome wires used as a reference electrode type. Results from the mechanical compliance test showed that the bodies of BMEPs have 4 to 21 times higher compliance than the single 50microm wire and the tethers of BMEPs were 6 to 96 times higher compliance, depending on combinations of the wire size (9.6microm or 12.7microm), the wire numbers (12 or 24), and the length of tether (3, 5 or 10 mm). Results from the immunohistological comparison showed that both BMEPs and 50microm wires anchored to the skull caused stronger tissue reactions than unanchored BMEPs and 50microm wires, and 50microm wires caused stronger tissue reactions than BMEPs. In in-vivo tests with BMEPs, we succeeded in chronic recordings from the spinal cord of freely jumping frogs and in acute recordings from the spinal cord of decerebrate rats during air stepping which was evoked by mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) stimulation. This technology may provide a stable and reliable neural interface to spinal cord

  15. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13-week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  16. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  17. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  18. Designing tyrosine-derived polycarbonate polymers for biodegradable regenerative type neural interface capable of neural recording.

    PubMed

    Lewitus, Dan; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Zhen, Gehua; Choi, Young-Seok; Kohn, Joachim; Harshbarger, Stuart; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2011-04-01

    Next-generation neuroprosthetic limbs will require a reliable long-term neural interface to residual nerves in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). To this end, we have developed novel biocompatible materials and a fabrication technique to create high site-count microelectrodes for stimulating and recording from regenerated peripheral nerves. Our electrodes are based on a biodegradable tyrosine-derived polycarbonate polymer system with suitable degradation and erosion properties and a fabrication technique for deployment of the polymer in a porous, degradable, regenerative, multiluminal, multielectrode conduit. The in vitro properties of the polymer and the electrode were tuned to retain mechanical strength for over 24 days and to completely degrade and erode within 220 days. The fabrication technique resulted in a multiluminal conduit with at least 10 functioning electrodes maintaining recording site impedance in the single-digit kOhm range. Additionally, in vivo results showed that neural signals could be recorded from these devices starting at four weeks postimplantation and that signal strength increased over time. We conclude that our biodegradable regenerative-type neural interface is a good candidate for chronic high fidelity recording electrodes for integration with regenerated peripheral nerves.

  19. Neural tissue engineering for neuroregeneration and biohybridized interface microsystems in vivo (Part 2).

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Wolf, John A; Smith, Douglas H; Pfister, Bryan J

    2011-01-01

    Neural tissue engineering offers tremendous promise to combat the effects of disease, aging, or injury in the nervous system. Here we review neural tissue engineering with respect to the design of living tissue to directly replace damaged or diseased neural tissue, or to augment the capacity for nervous system regeneration and restore lost function. This article specifically addresses the development and implementation of tissue engineered three-dimensional (3-D) neural constructs and biohybridized neural-electrical microsystems. Living 3-D neural constructs may be "pre-engineered" in vitro with controlled neuroanatomical and functional characteristics for neuroregeneration, to recapitulate lost neuroanatomy, or to serve as a nervous tissue interface to a device. One application being investigated is developing constructs of axonal tracts that, upon transplantation, may facilitate nervous system repair by directly restoring lost connections or by serving as a targeted scaffold to promote host regeneration by exploiting axon-mediated axonal regeneration. In another application, living nervous tissue engineered constructs are being investigated to biohybridize neural-electrical interface microsystems for functional integration with the nervous system. With this design, in vivo neuritic ingrowth and synaptic integration may occur with the living component, potentially exploiting a more natural integration with the nonorganic interface. Overall, the use of tissue engineered 3-D neural constructs may significantly advance regeneration or device-based deficit mitigation in the nervous system that has not been achieved by non-tissue engineering approaches.

  20. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Kristin N.; Kalayjian, Zaven K.; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A.; Fridman, Gene Y.; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O.; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C.; Andreou, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45 ± 0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 µs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68–130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9–16.7°/s for the MVP2 and 2.0–14.2°/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference (t-test, p = 0.034), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2. PMID:25974945

  1. Systems interface biology

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Francis J; Stelling, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    The field of systems biology has attracted the attention of biologists, engineers, mathematicians, physicists, chemists and others in an endeavour to create systems-level understanding of complex biological networks. In particular, systems engineering methods are finding unique opportunities in characterizing the rich behaviour exhibited by biological systems. In the same manner, these new classes of biological problems are motivating novel developments in theoretical systems approaches. Hence, the interface between systems and biology is of mutual benefit to both disciplines. PMID:16971329

  2. Intravascular Neural Interface with Nanowire Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hirobumi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakao, Masayuki; Walton, Kerry; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A minimally invasive electrical recording and stimulating technique capable of simultaneously monitoring the activity of a significant number (e.g., 103 to 104) of neurons is an absolute prerequisite in developing an effective brain–machine interface. Although there are many excellent methodologies for recording single or multiple neurons, there has been no methodology for accessing large numbers of cells in a behaving experimental animal or human individual. Brain vascular parenchyma is a promising candidate for addressing this problem. It has been proposed [1, 2] that a multitude of nanowire electrodes introduced into the central nervous system through the vascular system to address any brain area may be a possible solution. In this study we implement a design for such microcatheter for ex vivo experiments. Using Wollaston platinum wire, we design a submicron-scale electrode and develop a fabrication method. We then evaluate the mechanical properties of the electrode in a flow when passing through the intricacies of the capillary bed in ex vivo Xenopus laevis experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of intravascular recording in the spinal cord of Xenopus laevis. PMID:21572940

  3. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

  4. Hafnium transistor process design for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses 1-D process simulations of Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) structures to design the threshold voltage of hafnium oxide based transistors used for neural recording. The methodology is comprised of 1-D analytical equations for threshold voltage specification, and doping profiles, and 1-D MIS Technical Computer Aided Design (TCAD) to design a process to implement a specific threshold voltage, which minimized simulation time. The process was then verified with a 2-D process/electrical TCAD simulation. Hafnium oxide films (HfO) were grown and characterized for dielectric constant and fixed oxide charge for various annealing temperatures, two important design variables in threshold voltage design.

  5. The emergent neural modeling system.

    PubMed

    Aisa, Brad; Mingus, Brian; O'Reilly, Randy

    2008-10-01

    Emergent (http://grey.colorado.edu/emergent) is a powerful tool for the simulation of biologically plausible, complex neural systems that was released in August 2007. Inheriting decades of research and experience in network algorithms and modeling principles from its predecessors, PDP++ and PDP, Emergent has been redesigned as an efficient workspace for academic research and an engaging, easy-to-navigate environment for students. The system provides a modern and intuitive interface for programming and visualization centered around hierarchical, tree-based navigation and drag-and-drop reorganization. Emergent contains familiar, high-level simulation constructs such as Layers and Projections, a wide variety of algorithms, general-purpose data handling and analysis facilities and an integrated virtual environment for developing closed-loop cognitive agents. For students, the traditional role of a textbook has been enhanced by wikis embedded in every project that serve to explain, document, and help newcomers engage the interface and step through models using familiar hyperlinks. For advanced users, the software is easily extensible in all respects via runtime plugins, has a powerful shell with an integrated debugger, and a scripting language that is fully symmetric with the interface. Emergent strikes a balance between detailed, computationally expensive spiking neuron models and abstract, Bayesian or symbolic systems. This middle level of detail allows for the rapid development and successful execution of complex cognitive models while maintaining biological plausibility.

  6. Progress towards biocompatible intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-02-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing.

  7. Progress Towards Biocompatible Intracortical Microelectrodes for Neural Interfacing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing. PMID:25460808

  8. Hafnium transistor design for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses the EKV model and the g(m)/I(D) biasing technique to design hafnium oxide field effect transistors that are suitable for neural recording circuitry. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is correlated to the structural properties of a Field Effect Transistor (FET) and a Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitor. This approach allows a transistor designer to use a design flow that starts with simple and intuitive 1-D equations for gain that can be verified in 1-D MIS capacitor TCAD simulations, before final TCAD process verification of transistor properties. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is optimized by using fast 1-D simulations and using slower, complex 2-D simulations only for verification. The 1-D equations are used to show that the increased dielectric constant of hafnium oxide allows a higher DC gain for a given oxide thickness. An additional benefit is that the MIS capacitor can be employed to test additional performance parameters important to an open gate transistor such as dielectric stability and ionic penetration.

  9. Modulation Depth Estimation and Variable Selection in State-Space Models for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  10. Modulation depth estimation and variable selection in state-space models for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malik, Wasim Q; Hochberg, Leigh R; Donoghue, John P; Brown, Emery N

    2015-02-01

    Rapid developments in neural interface technology are making it possible to record increasingly large signal sets of neural activity. Various factors such as asymmetrical information distribution and across-channel redundancy may, however, limit the benefit of high-dimensional signal sets, and the increased computational complexity may not yield corresponding improvement in system performance. High-dimensional system models may also lead to overfitting and lack of generalizability. To address these issues, we present a generalized modulation depth measure using the state-space framework that quantifies the tuning of a neural signal channel to relevant behavioral covariates. For a dynamical system, we develop computationally efficient procedures for estimating modulation depth from multivariate data. We show that this measure can be used to rank neural signals and select an optimal channel subset for inclusion in the neural decoding algorithm. We present a scheme for choosing the optimal subset based on model order selection criteria. We apply this method to neuronal ensemble spike-rate decoding in neural interfaces, using our framework to relate motor cortical activity with intended movement kinematics. With offline analysis of intracortical motor imagery data obtained from individuals with tetraplegia using the BrainGate neural interface, we demonstrate that our variable selection scheme is useful for identifying and ranking the most information-rich neural signals. We demonstrate that our approach offers several orders of magnitude lower complexity but virtually identical decoding performance compared to greedy search and other selection schemes. Our statistical analysis shows that the modulation depth of human motor cortical single-unit signals is well characterized by the generalized Pareto distribution. Our variable selection scheme has wide applicability in problems involving multisensor signal modeling and estimation in biomedical engineering systems. PMID

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2011-07-01

    Implantable neural interfaces provide substantial benefits to individuals with neurological disorders. That was the unequivocal message delivered by speaker after speaker from the podium of the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference (NIC2010) held in Long Beach, California, in June 2010. Giving benefit to patients is the most important measure for any biomedical technology, and myriad presentations at NIC2010 made clear that implantable neurostimulation technology has achieved this goal. Cochlear implants allow deaf people to communicate through speech. Deep brain stimulators give back mobility and dexterity necessary for so many daily tasks that are often taken for granted. Chronic pain can be alleviated through spinal cord stimulation. Motor prosthesis systems have been demonstrated in humans, through both reanimation of paralyzed limbs and neural control of robotic arms. Earlier this year, a retinal prosthesis was approved for sale in Europe, providing some hope for the blind. In sum, current clinical implants have been tremendously beneficial for today's patients and experimental systems that will be translated to the clinic promise to expand the number of people helped through bioelectronic therapies. Yet there are significant opportunities for improvement. For sensory prostheses, patients report an artificial sensation, clearly different from the natural sensation they remember. Neuromodulation systems, such as deep brain stimulation and pain stimulators, often have side effects that are tolerated as long as the side effects are less impactful than the disease. The papers published in the special issue from NIC2010 reflect the maturing and expanding field of neural interfaces. Our field has moved past proof-of-principle demonstrations and is now focusing on proving the longevity required for clinical implementation of new devices, extending existing approaches to new diseases and improving current devices for better outcomes. Closed-loop neuromodulation is a

  12. Integration of active devices on smart polymers for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano-Bolivar, Adrian Emmanuel

    The increasing ability to ever more precisely identify and measure neural interactions and other phenomena in the central and peripheral nervous systems is revolutionizing our understanding of the human body and brain. To facilitate further understanding, more sophisticated neural devices, perhaps using microelectronics processing, must be fabricated. Materials often used in these neural interfaces, while compatible with these fabrication processes, are not optimized for long-term use in the body and are often orders of magnitude stiffer than the tissue with which they interact. Using the smart polymer substrates described in this work, suitability for processing as well as chronic implantation is demonstrated. We explore how to integrate reliable circuitry onto these flexible, biocompatible substrates that can withstand the aggressive environment of the body. To increase the capabilities of these devices beyond individual channel sensing and stimulation, active electronics must also be included onto our systems. In order to add this functionality to these substrates and explore the limits of these devices, we developed a process to fabricate single organic thin film transistors with mobilities up to 0.4 cm2/Vs and threshold voltages close to 0V. A process for fabricating organic light emitting diodes on flexible substrates is also addressed. We have set a foundation and demonstrated initial feasibility for integrating multiple transistors onto thin-film flexible devices to create new applications, such as matrix addressable functionalized electrodes and organic light emitting diodes. A brief description on how to integrate waveguides for their use in optogenetics is addressed. We have built understanding about device constraints on mechanical, electrical and in vivo reliability and how various conditions affect the electronics' lifetime. We use a bi-layer gate dielectric using an inorganic material such as HfO 2 combined with organic Parylene-c. A study of

  13. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  14. 3D-nanostructured boron-doped diamond for microelectrode array neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Piret, Gaëlle; Hébert, Clément; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Cottance, Myline; Lissorgues, Gaelle; Heuschkel, Marc O; Picaud, Serge; Bergonzo, Philippe; Yvert, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    The electrode material is a key element in the design of long-term neural implants and neuroprostheses. To date, the ideal electrode material offering high longevity, biocompatibility, low-noise recording and high stimulation capabilities remains to be found. We show that 3D-nanostructured boron doped diamond (BDD), an innovative material consisting in a chemically stable material with a high aspect ratio structure obtained by encapsulation of a carbon nanotube template within two BDD nanolayers, allows neural cell attachment, survival and neurite extension. Further, we developed arrays of 20-μm-diameter 3D-nanostructured BDD microelectrodes for neural interfacing. These microelectrodes exhibited low impedances and low intrinsic recording noise levels. In particular, they allowed the detection of low amplitude (10-20 μV) local-field potentials, single units and multiunit bursts neural activity in both acute whole embryonic hindbrain-spinal cord preparations and long-term hippocampal cell cultures. Also, cyclic voltammetry measurements showed a wide potential window of about 3 V and a charge storage capacity of 10 mC.cm(-2), showing high potentiality of this material for neural stimulation. These results demonstrate the attractiveness of 3D-nanostructured BDD as a novel material for neural interfacing, with potential applications for the design of biocompatible neural implants for the exploration and rehabilitation of the nervous system.

  15. 3D-nanostructured boron-doped diamond for microelectrode array neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Piret, Gaëlle; Hébert, Clément; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Cottance, Myline; Lissorgues, Gaelle; Heuschkel, Marc O; Picaud, Serge; Bergonzo, Philippe; Yvert, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    The electrode material is a key element in the design of long-term neural implants and neuroprostheses. To date, the ideal electrode material offering high longevity, biocompatibility, low-noise recording and high stimulation capabilities remains to be found. We show that 3D-nanostructured boron doped diamond (BDD), an innovative material consisting in a chemically stable material with a high aspect ratio structure obtained by encapsulation of a carbon nanotube template within two BDD nanolayers, allows neural cell attachment, survival and neurite extension. Further, we developed arrays of 20-μm-diameter 3D-nanostructured BDD microelectrodes for neural interfacing. These microelectrodes exhibited low impedances and low intrinsic recording noise levels. In particular, they allowed the detection of low amplitude (10-20 μV) local-field potentials, single units and multiunit bursts neural activity in both acute whole embryonic hindbrain-spinal cord preparations and long-term hippocampal cell cultures. Also, cyclic voltammetry measurements showed a wide potential window of about 3 V and a charge storage capacity of 10 mC.cm(-2), showing high potentiality of this material for neural stimulation. These results demonstrate the attractiveness of 3D-nanostructured BDD as a novel material for neural interfacing, with potential applications for the design of biocompatible neural implants for the exploration and rehabilitation of the nervous system. PMID:25890717

  16. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber as nano-neuron interface for monitoring neural function

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, Milton Nance; McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Morrison, Barclay; Yu, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Neural chips, which are capable of simultaneous, multi-site neural recording and stimulation, have been used to detect and modulate neural activity for almost 30 years. As a neural interface, neural chips provide dynamic functional information for neural decoding and neural control. By improving sensitivity and spatial resolution, nano-scale electrodes may revolutionize neural detection and modulation at cellular and molecular levels as nano-neuron interfaces. We developed a carbon-nanofiber neural chip with lithographically defined arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrodes and demonstrated its capability of both stimulating and monitoring electrophysiological signals from brain tissues in vitro and monitoring dynamic information of neuroplasticity. This novel nano-neuron interface can potentially serve as a precise, informative, biocompatible, and dual-mode neural interface for monitoring of both neuroelectrical and neurochemical activity at the single cell level and even inside the cell.

  17. Multichannel neural recording with a 128 Mbps UWB wireless transmitter for implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Takizawa, K; Yoshida, T; Matsushita, K; Hirata, M; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    To realize a low-invasive and high accuracy BMI (Brain-machine interface) system, we have already developed a fully-implantable wireless BMI system which consists of ECoG neural electrode arrays, neural recording ASICs, a Wi-Fi based wireless data transmitter and a wireless power receiver with a rechargeable battery. For accurate estimation of movement intentions, it is important for a BMI system to have a large number of recording channels. In this paper, we report a new multi-channel BMI system which is able to record up to 4096-ch ECoG data by multiple connections of 64-ch ASICs and time division multiplexing of recorded data. This system has an ultra-wide-band (UWB) wireless unit for transmitting the recorded neural signals to outside the body. By preliminary experiments with a human body equivalent liquid phantom, we confirmed 4096-ch UWB wireless data transmission at 128 Mbps mode below 20 mm distance.

  18. Voltage Biasing, Cyclic Voltammetry, & Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Seth J.; Richner, Tom J.; Brodnick, Sarah K.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Williams, Justin C.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measure properties of the electrode-tissue interface without additional invasive procedures, and can be used to monitor electrode performance over the long term. EIS measures electrical impedance at multiple frequencies, and increases in impedance indicate increased glial scar formation around the device, while cyclic voltammetry measures the charge carrying capacity of the electrode, and indicates how charge is transferred at different voltage levels. As implanted electrodes age, EIS and CV data change, and electrode sites that previously recorded spiking neurons often exhibit significantly lower efficacy for neural recording. The application of a brief voltage pulse to implanted electrode arrays, known as rejuvenation, can bring back spiking activity on otherwise silent electrode sites for a period of time. Rejuvenation alters EIS and CV, and can be monitored by these complementary methods. Typically, EIS is measured daily as an indication of the tissue response at the electrode site. If spikes are absent in a channel that previously had spikes, then CV is used to determine the charge carrying capacity of the electrode site, and rejuvenation can be applied to improve the interface efficacy. CV and EIS are then repeated to check the changes at the electrode-tissue interface, and neural recordings are collected. The overall goal of rejuvenation is to extend the functional lifetime of implanted arrays. PMID:22395095

  19. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  20. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  1. Intelligent Support for Interface Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teskey, F. N.

    This paper describes how a language for building information systems that is being developed by the Office for Research at OCLC can be linked to an artificial intelligence environment, Poplog. The demonstration system--ISIS (Intelligent Support for Interface systems)--shows how Poplog could provide some intelligent support for a D interface,…

  2. On Design and Implementation of Neural-Machine Interface for Artificial Legs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Fan; Ren, Jin; Sun, Yan (Lindsay); Yang, Qing

    2011-01-01

    The quality of life of leg amputees can be improved dramatically by using a cyber physical system (CPS) that controls artificial legs based on neural signals representing amputees’ intended movements. The key to the CPS is the neural-machine interface (NMI) that senses electromyographic (EMG) signals to make control decisions. This paper presents a design and implementation of a novel NMI using an embedded computer system to collect neural signals from a physical system - a leg amputee, provide adequate computational capability to interpret such signals, and make decisions to identify user’s intent for prostheses control in real time. A new deciphering algorithm, composed of an EMG pattern classifier and a post-processing scheme, was developed to identify the user’s intended lower limb movements. To deal with environmental uncertainty, a trust management mechanism was designed to handle unexpected sensor failures and signal disturbances. Integrating the neural deciphering algorithm with the trust management mechanism resulted in a highly accurate and reliable software system for neural control of artificial legs. The software was then embedded in a newly designed hardware platform based on an embedded microcontroller and a graphic processing unit (GPU) to form a complete NMI for real time testing. Real time experiments on a leg amputee subject and an able-bodied subject have been carried out to test the control accuracy of the new NMI. Our extensive experiments have shown promising results on both subjects, paving the way for clinical feasibility of neural controlled artificial legs. PMID:22389637

  3. Organic electrode coatings for next-generation neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Aregueta-Robles, Ulises A.; Woolley, Andrew J.; Poole-Warren, Laura A.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Green, Rylie A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional neuronal interfaces utilize metallic electrodes which in recent years have reached a plateau in terms of the ability to provide safe stimulation at high resolution or rather with high densities of microelectrodes with improved spatial selectivity. To achieve higher resolution it has become clear that reducing the size of electrodes is required to enable higher electrode counts from the implant device. The limitations of interfacing electrodes including low charge injection limits, mechanical mismatch and foreign body response can be addressed through the use of organic electrode coatings which typically provide a softer, more roughened surface to enable both improved charge transfer and lower mechanical mismatch with neural tissue. Coating electrodes with conductive polymers or carbon nanotubes offers a substantial increase in charge transfer area compared to conventional platinum electrodes. These organic conductors provide safe electrical stimulation of tissue while avoiding undesirable chemical reactions and cell damage. However, the mechanical properties of conductive polymers are not ideal, as they are quite brittle. Hydrogel polymers present a versatile coating option for electrodes as they can be chemically modified to provide a soft and conductive scaffold. However, the in vivo chronic inflammatory response of these conductive hydrogels remains unknown. A more recent approach proposes tissue engineering the electrode interface through the use of encapsulated neurons within hydrogel coatings. This approach may provide a method for activating tissue at the cellular scale, however, several technological challenges must be addressed to demonstrate feasibility of this innovative idea. The review focuses on the various organic coatings which have been investigated to improve neural interface electrodes. PMID:24904405

  4. Encapsulating Elastically Stretchable Neural Interfaces: Yield, Resolution, and Recording/Stimulation of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Barclay; Goletiani, Cezar; Yu, Zhe; Wagner, Sigurd

    2013-01-01

    A high resolution elastically stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) to interface with neural tissue is described. The SMEA consists of an elastomeric substrate, such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), elastically stretchable gold conductors, and an electrically insulating encapsulating layer in which contact holes are opened. We demonstrate the feasibility of producing contact holes with 40 µm × 40 µm openings, show why the adhesion of the encapsulation layer to the underlying silicone substrate is weakened during contact hole fabrication, and provide remedies. These improvements result in greatly increased fabrication yield and reproducibility. An SMEA with 28 microelectrodes was fabricated. The contact holes (100 µm × 100 µm) in the encapsulation layer are only ~10% the size of the previous generation, allowing a larger number of microelectrodes per unit area, thus affording the capability to interface with a smaller neural population per electrode. This new SMEA is used to record spontaneous and evoked activity in organotypic hippocampal tissue slices at 0% strain before stretching, at 5 % and 10 % equibiaxial strain, and again at 0% strain after relaxation. The noise of the recordings increases with increasing strain. The frequency of spontaneous neural activity also increases when the SMEA is stretched. Upon relaxation, the noise returns to pre-stretch levels, while the frequency of neural activity remains elevated. Stimulus-response curves at each strain level are measured. The SMEA shows excellent biocompatibility for at least two weeks. PMID:24093006

  5. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Jonathan A; Hughes, Stephen; Soares, Paulo; Popat, Ketul C

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line.

  6. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Jonathan A.; Hughes, Stephen; Soares, Paulo; Popat, Ketul C.

    2015-01-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. PMID:25687003

  7. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Jonathan A; Hughes, Stephen; Soares, Paulo; Popat, Ketul C

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. PMID:25687003

  8. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies.

    PubMed

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions. PMID:27601981

  9. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions.

  10. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions. PMID:27601981

  11. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  12. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface for Recording Cortical Circuit Dynamics in Moving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims, and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable, and effective. Approach We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous, and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based MEA via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1Hz to 7.8kHz, ×200 gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized, and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) was transmitted by a wireless data link carried on an frequency shift key modulated signal at 3.2GHz and 3.8GHz to a receiver 1 meter away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7-hour continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2MHz. Main results Device verification and early validation was performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight on how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have

  13. Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Automated remote fluid servicing will be necessary for future space missions, as future satellites will be designed for on-orbit consumable replenishment. In order to develop an on-orbit remote servicing capability, a standard interface between a tanker and the receiving satellite is needed. The objective of the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) program is to design, fabricate, and functionally demonstrate compliance with all design requirements for an automated fluid interface system. A description and documentation of the Fairchild AFIS design is provided.

  14. Integration of High-Charge-Injection-Capacity Electrodes onto Polymer Softening Neural Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Arreaga-Salas, David E; Avendaño-Bolívar, Adrian; Simon, Dustin; Reit, Radu; Garcia-Sandoval, Aldo; Rennaker, Robert L; Voit, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Softening neural interfaces are implanted stiff to enable precise insertion, and they soften in physiological conditions to minimize modulus mismatch with tissue. In this work, a high-charge-injection-capacity iridium electrode fabrication process is detailed. For the first time, this process enables integration of iridium electrodes onto softening substrates using photolithography to define all features in the device. Importantly, no electroplated layers are utilized, leading to a highly scalable method for consistent device fabrication. The iridium electrode is metallically bonded to the gold conductor layer, which is covalently bonded to the softening substrate via sulfur-based click chemistry. The resulting shape-memory polymer neural interfaces can deliver more than 2 billion symmetric biphasic pulses (100 μs/phase), with a charge of 200 μC/cm(2) and geometric surface area (GSA) of 300 μm(2). A transfer-by-polymerization method is used in combination with standard semiconductor processing techniques to fabricate functional neural probes onto a thiol-ene-based, thin film substrate. Electrical stability is tested under simulated physiological conditions in an accelerated electrical aging paradigm with periodic measurement of electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and charge storage capacity (CSC) at various intervals. Electrochemical characterization and both optical and scanning electron microscopy suggest significant breakdown of the 600 nm-thick parylene-C insulation, although no delamination of the conductors or of the final electrode interface was observed. Minor cracking at the edges of the thin film iridium electrodes was occasionally observed. The resulting devices will provide electrical recording and stimulation of the nervous system to better understand neural wiring and timing, to target treatments for debilitating diseases, and to give neuroscientists spatially selective and specific tools to interact with the body. This approach has uses for

  15. Integration of High-Charge-Injection-Capacity Electrodes onto Polymer Softening Neural Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Arreaga-Salas, David E; Avendaño-Bolívar, Adrian; Simon, Dustin; Reit, Radu; Garcia-Sandoval, Aldo; Rennaker, Robert L; Voit, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Softening neural interfaces are implanted stiff to enable precise insertion, and they soften in physiological conditions to minimize modulus mismatch with tissue. In this work, a high-charge-injection-capacity iridium electrode fabrication process is detailed. For the first time, this process enables integration of iridium electrodes onto softening substrates using photolithography to define all features in the device. Importantly, no electroplated layers are utilized, leading to a highly scalable method for consistent device fabrication. The iridium electrode is metallically bonded to the gold conductor layer, which is covalently bonded to the softening substrate via sulfur-based click chemistry. The resulting shape-memory polymer neural interfaces can deliver more than 2 billion symmetric biphasic pulses (100 μs/phase), with a charge of 200 μC/cm(2) and geometric surface area (GSA) of 300 μm(2). A transfer-by-polymerization method is used in combination with standard semiconductor processing techniques to fabricate functional neural probes onto a thiol-ene-based, thin film substrate. Electrical stability is tested under simulated physiological conditions in an accelerated electrical aging paradigm with periodic measurement of electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and charge storage capacity (CSC) at various intervals. Electrochemical characterization and both optical and scanning electron microscopy suggest significant breakdown of the 600 nm-thick parylene-C insulation, although no delamination of the conductors or of the final electrode interface was observed. Minor cracking at the edges of the thin film iridium electrodes was occasionally observed. The resulting devices will provide electrical recording and stimulation of the nervous system to better understand neural wiring and timing, to target treatments for debilitating diseases, and to give neuroscientists spatially selective and specific tools to interact with the body. This approach has uses for

  16. Computer interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An interface logic circuit permitting the transfer of information between two computers having asynchronous clocks is disclosed. The information transfer involves utilization of control signals (including request, return-response, ready) to generate properly timed data strobe signals. Noise problems are avoided because each control signal, upon receipt, is verified by at least two clock pulses at the receiving computer. If control signals are verified, a data strobe pulse is generated to accomplish a data transfer. Once initiated, the data strobe signal is properly completed independently of signal disturbances in the control signal initiating the data strobe signal. Completion of the data strobe signal is announced by automatic turn-off of a return-response control signal.

  17. Modality-Specific Axonal Regeneration: Toward Selective Regenerative Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Parisa; Garde, Kshitija; Chouhan, Amit K.; Bengali, Ebrahim; Romero-Ortega, Mario I.

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed sub-modality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5-fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased threefold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3D “Y”-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a fivefold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a “Y”-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted toward the sural nerve, while N-52+ large-diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces. PMID:22016734

  18. User interfaces to expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Expert Systems are becoming increasingly popular in environments where the user is not well versed in computers or the subject domain. They offer expert advice and can also explain their lines of reasoning. As these systems are applied to highly technical areas, they become complex and large. Therefore, User Systems Interfaces (USIs) become critical. This paper discusses recent technologies that can be applied to improved user communication. In particular, bar menus/graphics, mouse interfaces, touch screens, and voice links will be highlighted. Their applications in the context of SOFTMAN (The Software Manager Apprentice) a knowledge-based system are discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    PubMed

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W; Sanchez, Justin C

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled. PMID:24498055

  20. Using Reinforcement Learning to Provide Stable Brain-Machine Interface Control Despite Neural Input Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W.; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder’s neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled. PMID:24498055

  1. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    PubMed

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W; Sanchez, Justin C

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  2. Memory Storage and Neural Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkon, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates memory storage and molecular nature of associative-memory formation by analyzing Pavlovian conditioning in marine snails and rabbits. Presented is the design of a computer-based memory system (neural networks) using the rules acquired in the investigation. Reports that the artificial network recognized patterns well. (YP)

  3. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, M; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Tan, T S; Ismail, K; Ali, J; Dee-Uam, C; Pavaganun, C; Yupapin, P P

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human-machine interface (HMI) technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG)-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2-11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy >90% of chosen combinations proved their ability to be used as command controllers.

  4. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Michael; Bawab, Sebastian; Yoon, Hargsoon

    2016-01-01

    The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. PMID:27322338

  5. Neural system prediction and identification challenge

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Zaytsev, Yury V.; Spreizer, Sebastian; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Can we infer the function of a biological neural network (BNN) if we know the connectivity and activity of all its constituent neurons?This question is at the core of neuroscience and, accordingly, various methods have been developed to record the activity and connectivity of as many neurons as possible. Surprisingly, there is no theoretical or computational demonstration that neuronal activity and connectivity are indeed sufficient to infer the function of a BNN. Therefore, we pose the Neural Systems Identification and Prediction Challenge (nuSPIC). We provide the connectivity and activity of all neurons and invite participants (1) to infer the functions implemented (hard-wired) in spiking neural networks (SNNs) by stimulating and recording the activity of neurons and, (2) to implement predefined mathematical/biological functions using SNNs. The nuSPICs can be accessed via a web-interface to the NEST simulator and the user is not required to know any specific programming language. Furthermore, the nuSPICs can be used as a teaching tool. Finally, nuSPICs use the crowd-sourcing model to address scientific issues. With this computational approach we aim to identify which functions can be inferred by systematic recordings of neuronal activity and connectivity. In addition, nuSPICs will help the design and application of new experimental paradigms based on the structure of the SNN and the presumed function which is to be discovered. PMID:24399966

  6. A microsystem integration platform dedicated to build multi-chip-neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Amer E; Gosselin, Benoit; Sawan, Mohamad

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an electrical discharge machining (EDM) technique associated with electrochemical steps to construct an appropriate biological interface to neural tissues. The presented microprobe design permits to short the time of production compared to available techniques, while improving the integrity of the electrodes. In addition, we are using a 3D approach to create compact and independent microsystem integration platefrom incorporating array of electrodes and signal processing chips. System-in-package and die-stacking are used to connect the integrated circuits and the array of electrodes on the platform. This approach enables to build a device that will fit in a volume smaller than 1.7 x 1.7 x 3.0 mm(3). This demonstrates the possibility of creating small devices that are suitable to fit in restricted areas for interfacing the brain. PMID:18003539

  7. Peripheral neural activity recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Loi, D; Carboni, C; Angius, G; Angotzi, G N; Barbaro, M; Raffo, L; Raspopovic, S; Navarro, X

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a portable, embedded, microcontroller-based system for bidirectional communication (recording and stimulation) between an electrode, implanted in the peripheral nervous system, and a host computer. The device is able to record and digitize spontaneous and/or evoked neural activities and store them in data files on a PC. In addition, the system has the capability of providing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, injecting biphasic current pulses with programmable duration, intensity, and frequency. The recording system provides a highly selective band-pass filter from 800 Hz to 3 kHz, with a gain of 56 dB. The amplification range can be further extended to 96 dB with a variable gain amplifier. The proposed acquisition/stimulation circuitry has been successfully tested through in vivo measurements, implanting a tf-LIFE electrode in the sciatic nerve of a rat. Once implanted, the device showed an input referred noise of 0.83 μVrms, was capable of recording signals below 10 μ V, and generated muscle responses to injected stimuli. The results demonstrate the capability of processing and transmitting neural signals with very low distortion and with a power consumption lower than 1 W. A graphic, user-friendly interface has been developed to facilitate the configuration of the entire system, providing the possibility to activate stimulation and monitor recordings in real time.

  8. Volitional control of neural activity: implications for brain–computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fetz, Eberhard E

    2007-01-01

    Successful operation of brain–computer interfaces (BCI) and brain–machine interfaces (BMI) depends significantly on the degree to which neural activity can be volitionally controlled. This paper reviews evidence for such volitional control in a variety of neural signals, with particular emphasis on the activity of cortical neurons. Some evidence comes from conventional experiments that reveal volitional modulation in neural activity related to behaviours, including real and imagined movements, cognitive imagery and shifts of attention. More direct evidence comes from studies on operant conditioning of neural activity using biofeedback, and from BCI/BMI studies in which neural activity controls cursors or peripheral devices. Limits in the degree of accuracy of control in the latter studies can be attributed to several possible factors. Some of these factors, particularly limited practice time, can be addressed with long-term implanted BCIs. Preliminary observations with implanted circuits implementing recurrent BCIs are summarized. PMID:17234689

  9. Photochemically modified diamond-like carbon surfaces for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hopper, A P; Dugan, J M; Gill, A A; Regan, E M; Haycock, J W; Kelly, S; May, P W; Claeyssens, F

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) was modified using a UV functionalization method to introduce surface-bound amine and aldehyde groups. The functionalization process rendered the DLC more hydrophilic and significantly increased the viability of neurons seeded to the surface. The amine functionalized DLC promoted adhesion of neurons and fostered neurite outgrowth to a degree indistinguishable from positive control substrates (glass coated with poly-L-lysine). The aldehyde-functionalized surfaces performed comparably to the amine functionalized surfaces and both additionally supported the adhesion and growth of primary rat Schwann cells. DLC has many properties that are desirable in biomaterials. With the UV functionalization method demonstrated here it may be possible to harness these properties for the development of implantable devices to interface with the nervous system.

  10. Photochemically modified diamond-like carbon surfaces for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hopper, A P; Dugan, J M; Gill, A A; Regan, E M; Haycock, J W; Kelly, S; May, P W; Claeyssens, F

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) was modified using a UV functionalization method to introduce surface-bound amine and aldehyde groups. The functionalization process rendered the DLC more hydrophilic and significantly increased the viability of neurons seeded to the surface. The amine functionalized DLC promoted adhesion of neurons and fostered neurite outgrowth to a degree indistinguishable from positive control substrates (glass coated with poly-L-lysine). The aldehyde-functionalized surfaces performed comparably to the amine functionalized surfaces and both additionally supported the adhesion and growth of primary rat Schwann cells. DLC has many properties that are desirable in biomaterials. With the UV functionalization method demonstrated here it may be possible to harness these properties for the development of implantable devices to interface with the nervous system. PMID:26478422

  11. The LILARTI neural network system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.D. Jr.; Schell, F.M.; Dodd, C.V.

    1992-10-01

    The material of this Technical Memorandum is intended to provide the reader with conceptual and technical background information on the LILARTI neural network system of detail sufficient to confer an understanding of the LILARTI method as it is presently allied and to facilitate application of the method to problems beyond the scope of this document. Of particular importance in this regard are the descriptive sections and the Appendices which include operating instructions, partial listings of program output and data files, and network construction information.

  12. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  13. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction. PMID:26694407

  14. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoko; Ishii, Kenji; Sakuma, Naoko; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Oda, Keiichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET). We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song), sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics), and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody). The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control) that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control) showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition. PMID:23029492

  15. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoko; Ishii, Kenji; Sakuma, Naoko; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Oda, Keiichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET). We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song), sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics), and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody). The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control) that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control) showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  16. Long term in vitro functional stability and recording longevity of fully integrated wireless neural interfaces based on the Utah Slant Electrode Array.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Asha; Rieth, Loren; Tathireddy, Prashant; Harrison, Reid; Oppermann, Hermann; Klein, Matthias; Töpper, Michael; Jung, Erik; Normann, Richard; Clark, Gregory; Solzbacher, Florian

    2011-08-01

    We evaluate the encapsulation and packaging reliability of a fully integrated wireless neural interface based on a Utah Slant Electrode Array/integrated neural interface-recording version 5 (USEA/INI-R5) system by monitoring the long term in vitro functional stability and recording longevity. The INI encapsulated with 6 µm Parylene-C was immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for a period of over 276 days (with the monitoring of the functional device still ongoing). The full functionality (wireless radio-frequency power, command and signal transmission) and the ability of the electrodes to record artificial neural signals even after 276 days of PBS soaking with little change (within 14%) in signal/noise amplitude constitute a major milestone in long term stability and allow us to study and evaluate the encapsulation reliability, functional stability and its potential usefulness for a wireless neural interface for future chronic implants. PMID:21775785

  17. A regenerative microchannel neural interface for recording from and stimulating peripheral axons in vivo.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, James J; Lago, Natalia; Benmerah, Samia; Serra, Jordi; Watling, Christopher P; Cameron, Ruth E; Tarte, Edward; Lacour, Stéphanie P; McMahon, Stephen B; Fawcett, James W

    2012-02-01

    Neural interfaces are implanted devices that couple the nervous system to electronic circuitry. They are intended for long term use to control assistive technologies such as muscle stimulators or prosthetics that compensate for loss of function due to injury. Here we present a novel design of interface for peripheral nerves. Recording from axons is complicated by the small size of extracellular potentials and the concentration of current flow at nodes of Ranvier. Confining axons to microchannels of ~100 µm diameter produces amplified potentials that are independent of node position. After implantation of microchannel arrays into rat sciatic nerve, axons regenerated through the channels forming 'mini-fascicles', each typically containing ~100 myelinated fibres and one or more blood vessels. Regenerated motor axons reconnected to distal muscles, as demonstrated by the recovery of an electromyogram and partial prevention of muscle atrophy. Efferent motor potentials and afferent signals evoked by muscle stretch or cutaneous stimulation were easily recorded from the mini-fascicles and were in the range of 35-170 µV. Individual motor units in distal musculature were activated from channels using stimulus currents in the microampere range. Microchannel interfaces are a potential solution for applications such as prosthetic limb control or enhancing recovery after nerve injury.

  18. A regenerative microchannel neural interface for recording from and stimulating peripheral axons in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.; Lago, Natalia; Benmerah, Samia; Serra, Jordi; Watling, Christopher P.; Cameron, Ruth E.; Tarte, Edward; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Fawcett, James W.

    2012-02-01

    Neural interfaces are implanted devices that couple the nervous system to electronic circuitry. They are intended for long term use to control assistive technologies such as muscle stimulators or prosthetics that compensate for loss of function due to injury. Here we present a novel design of interface for peripheral nerves. Recording from axons is complicated by the small size of extracellular potentials and the concentration of current flow at nodes of Ranvier. Confining axons to microchannels of ˜100 µm diameter produces amplified potentials that are independent of node position. After implantation of microchannel arrays into rat sciatic nerve, axons regenerated through the channels forming ‘mini-fascicles’, each typically containing ˜100 myelinated fibres and one or more blood vessels. Regenerated motor axons reconnected to distal muscles, as demonstrated by the recovery of an electromyogram and partial prevention of muscle atrophy. Efferent motor potentials and afferent signals evoked by muscle stretch or cutaneous stimulation were easily recorded from the mini-fascicles and were in the range of 35-170 µV. Individual motor units in distal musculature were activated from channels using stimulus currents in the microampere range. Microchannel interfaces are a potential solution for applications such as prosthetic limb control or enhancing recovery after nerve injury.

  19. A regenerative microchannel neural interface for recording from and stimulating peripheral axons in vivo.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, James J; Lago, Natalia; Benmerah, Samia; Serra, Jordi; Watling, Christopher P; Cameron, Ruth E; Tarte, Edward; Lacour, Stéphanie P; McMahon, Stephen B; Fawcett, James W

    2012-02-01

    Neural interfaces are implanted devices that couple the nervous system to electronic circuitry. They are intended for long term use to control assistive technologies such as muscle stimulators or prosthetics that compensate for loss of function due to injury. Here we present a novel design of interface for peripheral nerves. Recording from axons is complicated by the small size of extracellular potentials and the concentration of current flow at nodes of Ranvier. Confining axons to microchannels of ~100 µm diameter produces amplified potentials that are independent of node position. After implantation of microchannel arrays into rat sciatic nerve, axons regenerated through the channels forming 'mini-fascicles', each typically containing ~100 myelinated fibres and one or more blood vessels. Regenerated motor axons reconnected to distal muscles, as demonstrated by the recovery of an electromyogram and partial prevention of muscle atrophy. Efferent motor potentials and afferent signals evoked by muscle stretch or cutaneous stimulation were easily recorded from the mini-fascicles and were in the range of 35-170 µV. Individual motor units in distal musculature were activated from channels using stimulus currents in the microampere range. Microchannel interfaces are a potential solution for applications such as prosthetic limb control or enhancing recovery after nerve injury. PMID:22258138

  20. Learning in Artificial Neural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheus, Christopher J.; Hohensee, William E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of learning in Artificial Neural Systems (ANS's). It begins with a general introduction to neural networks and connectionist approaches to information processing. The basis for learning in ANS's is then described, and compared with classical Machine learning. While similar in some ways, ANS learning deviates from tradition in its dependence on the modification of individual weights to bring about changes in a knowledge representation distributed across connections in a network. This unique form of learning is analyzed from two aspects: the selection of an appropriate network architecture for representing the problem, and the choice of a suitable learning rule capable of reproducing the desired function within the given network. The various network architectures are classified, and then identified with explicit restrictions on the types of functions they are capable of representing. The learning rules, i.e., algorithms that specify how the network weights are modified, are similarly taxonomized, and where possible, the limitations inherent to specific classes of rules are outlined.

  1. All-optical bidirectional neural interfacing using hybrid multiphoton holographic optogenetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Paluch-Siegler, Shir; Mayblum, Tom; Dana, Hod; Brosh, Inbar; Gefen, Inna; Shoham, Shy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our understanding of neural information processing could potentially be advanced by combining flexible three-dimensional (3-D) neuroimaging and stimulation. Recent developments in optogenetics suggest that neurophotonic approaches are in principle highly suited for noncontact stimulation of network activity patterns. In particular, two-photon holographic optical neural stimulation (2P-HONS) has emerged as a leading approach for multisite 3-D excitation, and combining it with temporal focusing (TF) further enables axially confined yet spatially extended light patterns. Here, we study key steps toward bidirectional cell-targeted 3-D interfacing by introducing and testing a hybrid new 2P-TF-HONS stimulation path for accurate parallel optogenetic excitation into a recently developed hybrid multiphoton 3-D imaging system. The system is shown to allow targeted all-optical probing of in vitro cortical networks expressing channelrhodopsin-2 using a regeneratively amplified femtosecond laser source tuned to 905 nm. These developments further advance a prospective new tool for studying and achieving distributed control over 3-D neuronal circuits both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26217673

  2. iSpike: a spiking neural interface for the iCub robot.

    PubMed

    Gamez, D; Fidjeland, A K; Lazdins, E

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents iSpike: a C++ library that interfaces between spiking neural network simulators and the iCub humanoid robot. It uses a biologically inspired approach to convert the robot's sensory information into spikes that are passed to the neural network simulator, and it decodes output spikes from the network into motor signals that are sent to control the robot. Applications of iSpike range from embodied models of the brain to the development of intelligent robots using biologically inspired spiking neural networks. iSpike is an open source library that is available for free download under the terms of the GPL. PMID:22617339

  3. Using brain–computer interfaces to induce neural plasticity and restore function

    PubMed Central

    Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Mattia, Donatella; Oweiss, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing neural signals and providing feedback in realtime is one of the core characteristics of a brain–computer interface (BCI). As this feature may be employed to induce neural plasticity, utilizing BCI technology for therapeutic purposes is increasingly gaining popularity in the BCI community. In this paper, we discuss the state-of-the-art of research on this topic, address the principles of and challenges in inducing neural plasticity by means of a BCI, and delineate the problems of study design and outcome evaluation arising in this context. We conclude with a list of open questions and recommendations for future research in this field. PMID:21436534

  4. Using brain-computer interfaces to induce neural plasticity and restore function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Mattia, Donatella; Oweiss, Karim

    2011-04-01

    Analyzing neural signals and providing feedback in realtime is one of the core characteristics of a brain-computer interface (BCI). As this feature may be employed to induce neural plasticity, utilizing BCI technology for therapeutic purposes is increasingly gaining popularity in the BCI community. In this paper, we discuss the state-of-the-art of research on this topic, address the principles of and challenges in inducing neural plasticity by means of a BCI, and delineate the problems of study design and outcome evaluation arising in this context. We conclude with a list of open questions and recommendations for future research in this field.

  5. Biomaterials. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Minev, Ivan R; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury. PMID:25574019

  6. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, Richard B.; Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process.

  7. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

    1998-04-28

    A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

  8. Neural Control of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundman, Eva; Olofsson, Peder S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural reflexes support homeostasis by modulating the function of organ systems. Recent advances in neuroscience and immunology have revealed that neural reflexes also regulate the immune system. Activation of the vagus nerve modulates leukocyte cytokine production and alleviates experimental shock and autoimmune disease, and recent data have…

  9. Neural network system for traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Elibiary, Khalid J.; Petersson, L. E. Rickard

    1992-09-01

    Atlanta will be the home of several special events during the next five years ranging from the 1996 Olympics to the 1994 Super Bowl. When combined with the existing special events (Braves, Falcons, and Hawks games, concerts, festivals, etc.), the need to effectively manage traffic flow from surface streets to interstate highways is apparent. This paper describes a system for traffic event response and management for intelligent navigation utilizing signals (TERMINUS) developed at Georgia Tech for adaptively managing special event traffic flows in the Atlanta, Georgia area. TERMINUS (the original name given Atlanta, Georgia based upon its role as a rail line terminating center) is an intelligent surface street signal control system designed to manage traffic flow in Metro Atlanta. The system consists of three components. The first is a traffic simulation of the downtown Atlanta area around Fulton County Stadium that models the flow of traffic when a stadium event lets out. Parameters for the surrounding area include modeling for events during various times of day (such as rush hour). The second component is a computer graphics interface with the simulation that shows the traffic flows achieved based upon intelligent control system execution. The final component is the intelligent control system that manages surface street light signals based upon feedback from control sensors that dynamically adapt the intelligent controller's decision making process. The intelligent controller is a neural network model that allows TERMINUS to control the configuration of surface street signals to optimize the flow of traffic away from special events.

  10. High-density stretchable microelectrode arrays: An integrated technology platform for neural and muscular surface interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Numerous applications in neuroscience research and neural prosthetics, such as retinal prostheses, spinal-cord surface stimulation for prosthetics, electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording for epilepsy detection, etc., involve electrical interaction with soft excitable tissues using a surface stimulation and/or recording approach. These applications require an interface that is able to set up electrical communications with a high throughput between electronics and the excitable tissue and that can dynamically conform to the shape of the soft tissue. Being a compliant and biocompatible material with mechanical impedance close to that of soft tissues, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) offers excellent potential as the substrate material for such neural interfaces. However, fabrication of electrical functionalities on PDMS has long been very challenging. This thesis work has successfully overcome many challenges associated with PDMS-based microfabrication and achieved an integrated technology platform for PDMS-based stretchable microelectrode arrays (sMEAs). This platform features a set of technological advances: (1) we have fabricated uniform current density profile microelectrodes as small as 10 mum in diameter; (2) we have patterned high-resolution (feature as small as 10 mum), high-density (pitch as small as 20 mum) thin-film gold interconnects on PDMS substrate; (3) we have developed a multilayer wiring interconnect technology within the PDMS substrate to further boost the achievable integration density of such sMEA; and (4) we have invented a bonding technology---via-bonding---to facilitate high-resolution, high-density integration of the sMEA with integrated circuits (ICs) to form a compact implant. Taken together, this platform provides a high-resolution, high-density integrated system solution for neural and muscular surface interfacing. sMEAs of example designs are evaluated through in vitro and in vivo experimentations on their biocompatibility, surface conformability

  11. New User Interface Capabilities for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Latest technologies promise new control system User Interface (UI) features and greater interoperability of applications. New developments using Java and Eclipse aim to unify diverse control systems and make communication between applications seamless. Web based user interfaces can improve portability and remote access. Modern programming tools improve efficiency, support testing and facilitate shared code. This paper will discuss new developments aimed at improving control system interfaces and their development environment.

  12. A PDMS-based integrated stretchable microelectrode array (isMEA) for neural and muscular surface interfacing.

    PubMed

    Liang Guo; Guvanasen, G S; Xi Liu; Tuthill, C; Nichols, T R; DeWeerth, S P

    2013-02-01

    Numerous applications in neuroscience research and neural prosthetics, such as electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording and retinal prosthesis, involve electrical interactions with soft excitable tissues using a surface recording and/or stimulation approach. These applications require an interface that is capable of setting up high-throughput communications between the electrical circuit and the excitable tissue and that can dynamically conform to the shape of the soft tissue. Being a compliant material with mechanical impedance close to that of soft tissues, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) offers excellent potential as a substrate material for such neural interfaces. This paper describes an integrated technology for fabrication of PDMS-based stretchable microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Specifically, as an integral part of the fabrication process, a stretchable MEA is directly fabricated with a rigid substrate, such as a thin printed circuit board (PCB), through an innovative bonding technology-via-bonding-for integrated packaging. This integrated strategy overcomes the conventional challenge of high-density packaging for this type of stretchable electronics. Combined with a high-density interconnect technology developed previously, this stretchable MEA technology facilitates a high-resolution, high-density integrated system solution for neural and muscular surface interfacing. In this paper, this PDMS-based integrated stretchable MEA (isMEA) technology is demonstrated by an example design that packages a stretchable MEA with a small PCB. The resulting isMEA is assessed for its biocompatibility, surface conformability, electrode impedance spectrum, and capability to record muscle fiber activity when applied epimysially.

  13. Intelligent subsystem interface for modular hardware system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krening, Douglas N. (Inventor); Lannan, Gregory B. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Robert A. (Inventor); Caffrey, Robert T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A single chip application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which provides a flexible, modular interface between a subsystem and a standard system bus. The ASIC includes a microcontroller/microprocessor, a serial interface for connection to the bus, and a variety of communications interface devices available for coupling to the subsystem. A three-bus architecture, utilizing arbitration, provides connectivity within the ASIC and between the ASIC and the subsystem. The communication interface devices include UART (serial), parallel, analog, and external device interface utilizing bus connections paired with device select signals. A low power (sleep) mode is provided as is a processor disable option.

  14. Neural control of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Sundman, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Neural reflexes support homeostasis by modulating the function of organ systems. Recent advances in neuroscience and immunology have revealed that neural reflexes also regulate the immune system. Activation of the vagus nerve modulates leukocyte cytokine production and alleviates experimental shock and autoimmune disease, and recent data have suggested that vagus nerve stimulation can improve symptoms in human rheumatoid arthritis. These discoveries have generated an increased interest in bioelectronic medicine, i.e., therapeutic delivery of electrical impulses that activate nerves to regulate immune system function. Here, we discuss the physiology and potential therapeutic implications of neural immune control. PMID:25039084

  15. Interfaces for Distributed Systems of Information Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Brewster; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes two systems--Wide Area Information Servers (WAIS) and Rosebud--that provide protocol-based mechanisms for accessing remote full-text information servers. Design constraints, human interface design, and implementation are examined for five interfaces to these systems developed to run on the Macintosh or Unix terminals. Sample screen…

  16. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J.; Fleger, S.; Barnes V.

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  17. Brain-Computer Interface for Control of Wheelchair Using Fuzzy Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Nurullah; Aytac, Ersin; Günsel, Irfan; Çağman, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The design of brain-computer interface for the wheelchair for physically disabled people is presented. The design of the proposed system is based on receiving, processing, and classification of the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and then performing the control of the wheelchair. The number of experimental measurements of brain activity has been done using human control commands of the wheelchair. Based on the mental activity of the user and the control commands of the wheelchair, the design of classification system based on fuzzy neural networks (FNN) is considered. The design of FNN based algorithm is used for brain-actuated control. The training data is used to design the system and then test data is applied to measure the performance of the control system. The control of the wheelchair is performed under real conditions using direction and speed control commands of the wheelchair. The approach used in the paper allows reducing the probability of misclassification and improving the control accuracy of the wheelchair. PMID:27777953

  18. Optimizing growth and post treatment of diamond for high capacitance neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; Fox, Kate; Zamani, Akram; Turnley, Ann M; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Ahnood, Arman; Cicione, Rosemary; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven; Stacey, Alastair; Garrett, David J

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical and biological properties are two crucial criteria in the selection of the materials to be used as electrodes for neural interfaces. For neural stimulation, materials are required to exhibit high capacitance and to form intimate contact with neurons for eliciting effective neural responses at acceptably low voltages. Here we report on a new high capacitance material fabricated using nitrogen included ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD). After exposure to oxygen plasma for 3 h, the activated N-UNCD exhibited extremely high electrochemical capacitance greater than 1 mF/cm(2), which originates from the special hybrid sp(2)/sp(3) structure of N-UNCD. The in vitro biocompatibility of the activated N-UNCD was then assessed using rat cortical neurons and surface roughness was found to be critical for healthy neuron growth, with best results observed on surfaces with a roughness of approximately 20 nm. Therefore, by using oxygen plasma activated N-UNCD with appropriate surface roughness, and considering the chemical and mechanical stability of diamond, the fabricated neural interfaces are expected to exhibit high efficacy, long-term stability and a healthy neuron/electrode interface. PMID:27424214

  19. Optimizing growth and post treatment of diamond for high capacitance neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; Fox, Kate; Zamani, Akram; Turnley, Ann M; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Ahnood, Arman; Cicione, Rosemary; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven; Stacey, Alastair; Garrett, David J

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical and biological properties are two crucial criteria in the selection of the materials to be used as electrodes for neural interfaces. For neural stimulation, materials are required to exhibit high capacitance and to form intimate contact with neurons for eliciting effective neural responses at acceptably low voltages. Here we report on a new high capacitance material fabricated using nitrogen included ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD). After exposure to oxygen plasma for 3 h, the activated N-UNCD exhibited extremely high electrochemical capacitance greater than 1 mF/cm(2), which originates from the special hybrid sp(2)/sp(3) structure of N-UNCD. The in vitro biocompatibility of the activated N-UNCD was then assessed using rat cortical neurons and surface roughness was found to be critical for healthy neuron growth, with best results observed on surfaces with a roughness of approximately 20 nm. Therefore, by using oxygen plasma activated N-UNCD with appropriate surface roughness, and considering the chemical and mechanical stability of diamond, the fabricated neural interfaces are expected to exhibit high efficacy, long-term stability and a healthy neuron/electrode interface.

  20. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz–7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models. PMID:26437411

  1. Applying neural networks in autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornbrugh, Allison L.; Layne, J. D.; Wilson, James M., III

    1992-03-01

    Autonomous and teleautonomous operations have been defined in a variety of ways by different groups involved with remote robotic operations. For example, Conway describes architectures for producing intelligent actions in teleautonomous systems. Applying neural nets in such systems is similar to applying them in general. However, for autonomy, learning or learned behavior may become a significant system driver. Thus, artificial neural networks are being evaluated as components in fully autonomous and teleautonomous systems. Feed- forward networks may be trained to perform adaptive signal processing, pattern recognition, data fusion, and function approximation -- as in control subsystems. Certain components of particular autonomous systems become more amenable to implementation using a neural net due to a match between the net's attributes and desired attributes of the system component. Criteria have been developed for distinguishing such applications and then implementing them. The success of hardware implementation is a crucial part of this application evaluation process. Three basic applications of neural nets -- autoassociation, classification, and function approximation -- are used to exemplify this process and to highlight procedures that are followed during the requirements, design, and implementation phases. This paper assumes some familiarity with basic neural network terminology and concentrates upon the use of different neural network types while citing references that cover the underlying mathematics and related research.

  2. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  3. Graphics-System Color-Code Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulppo, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit originally developed for a flight simulator interfaces a computer graphics system with color monitor. Subsystem is intended for particular display computer (AGT-130, ADAGE Graphics Terminal) and specific color monitor (beam penetration tube--Penetron). Store-and-transmit channel is one of five in graphics/color-monitor interface. Adding 5-bit color code to existing graphics programs requires minimal programing effort.

  4. Learning and adaptation in fuzzy neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Madan M.

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of researchers have become involved in the subject of fuzzy neural networks in the hope of combining the reasoning strength of fuzzy logic and the learning and adaptation power of neural networks. This provides a more powerful tool for fuzzy information processing and for exploring the functioning of human brains. In this paper, an attempt has been made to establish some basic models for fuzzy neurons. First, several possible fuzzy neuron models are proposed. Second, synaptic and somatic learning and adaptation mechanisms are proposed. Finally, the possibility of applying nonfuzzy neural networks approaches to fuzzy systems is also described.

  5. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  6. Concept of software interface for BCI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejda, Jaromir; Zak, Roman; Jasek, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology is intended to control external system by brain activity. One of main part of such system is software interface, which carries about clear communication between brain and either computer or additional devices connected to computer. This paper is organized as follows. Firstly, current knowledge about human brain is briefly summarized to points out its complexity. Secondly, there is described a concept of BCI system, which is then used to build an architecture of proposed software interface. Finally, there are mentioned disadvantages of sensing technology discovered during sensing part of our research.

  7. A flexible microchannel electrode array for peripheral nerves to interface with neural prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrith, Ryan; Nothnagle, Caleb; Kim, Young-tae; Wijesundara, Muthu B. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to control neural prosthetics by recording signals from peripheral nerves with the required specificity, high density electrode arrays that can be easily implanted on very small peripheral nerves (50μm-500μm) are needed. Interfacing with these small nerves is surgically challenging due to their size and fragile nature. To address this problem, a Flexible MicroChannel Electrode Array for interfacing with small diameter peripheral nerves and nerve fascicles was developed. The electrochemical characterization and electrophysiological recordings from the common peroneal nerve of a rat are presented along with demonstration of the surgical ease-of-use of the array.

  8. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, M. |; Selverston, A.; Rubchinsky, L.; Huerta, R.

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Electrodeposited polypyrrole/carbon nanotubes composite films electrodes for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Li, Tao; Zhao, Xueqing; Li, Mei; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi; Duan, Yanwen Y

    2010-07-01

    The search for new electrode materials including new electrode modification methods is crucial for improving long-term performance of neuroprosthetic devices. In this study, an investigation of electrochemically co-deposited polypyrrole/single-walled carbon nanotube (PPy/SWCNT) films for improving the electrode-neural interface was reported. The PPy/SWCNT microelectrodes exhibited a particularly high safe charge injection (Q(inj)) limit of approximately 7.5 mC/cm(2) and low electrode impedance at 1 kHz, as well as good stability. Cell attachment and neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells on the PPy/SWCNT deposited substrates were clearly observed by Calcein-AM staining and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Furthermore, tissue response was studied by a 6-week implantation in the cortex of rats. A significantly lower (p<0.05) glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and higher (p<0.05) neuronal nuclei (NeuN) immunostaining were found on comparison of the test group (n=11) with the control group (n=8), in the zone within the distance of 100 microm to the implant interface. All of these characteristics are desirable for chronically implantable neural probes with high density microelectrodes. Importantly, this technique can easily incorporate other modification methods to build a more advanced electrode-neural interface.

  10. Microfabricated polymer-based neural interface for electrical stimulation/recording, drug delivery, and chemical sensing--development.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Angela; Madsen, Teresa E; Yorita, Allison; Crowell, Andrea; Shah, Kedar G; Felix, Sarah; Mayberg, Helen S; Pannu, Satinderpall; Rainnie, Donald G; Tolosa, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    We present here a microfabricated, multi-functional neural interface with the ability to selectively apply electrical and chemical stimuli, while simultaneously monitoring both electrical and chemical activity in the brain. Such a comprehensive approach is required to understand and treat neuropsychiatric disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD), and to understand the mechanisms underlying treatments, such as pharmaceutical therapies and deep brain stimulation (DBS). The polymer-based, multi-functional neural interface is capable of electrical stimulation and recording, targeted drug delivery, and electrochemical sensing. A variety of different electrode and fluidic channel arrangements are possible with this fabrication process. Preliminary testing has shown the suitability of these neural interfaces for in vivo electrical stimulation and recording, as well as in vitro chemical sensing. Testing of the in vitro drug delivery and combined in vivo functionalities this neural interface are currently underway.

  11. A User Interface for Multiple Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teskey, Niall; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reviews current systems designed to help end-users search online databases without the assistance of an intermediary and describes a prototype system which emulates the Deco (the text storage and retrieval system used by Unilever) interface on Dialog and Data-Star. Initial trials of the prototype system are reported. (15 references) (MES)

  12. Microchannel neural interface manufacture by stacking silicone and metal foil laminae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancashire, Henry T.; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Ajam, Yazan Al; Magee, Elliot; Donaldson, Nick; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Microchannel neural interfaces (MNIs) overcome problems with recording from peripheral nerves by amplifying signals independent of node of Ranvier position. Selective recording and stimulation using an MNI requires good insulation between microchannels and a high electrode density. We propose that stacking microchannel laminae will improve selectivity over single layer MNI designs due to the increase in electrode number and an improvement in microchannel sealing. Approach. This paper describes a manufacturing method for creating MNIs which overcomes limitations on electrode connectivity and microchannel sealing. Laser cut silicone—metal foil laminae were stacked using plasma bonding to create an array of microchannels containing tripolar electrodes. Electrodes were DC etched and electrode impedance and cyclic voltammetry were tested. Main results. MNIs with 100 μm and 200 μm diameter microchannels were manufactured. High electrode density MNIs are achievable with electrodes present in every microchannel. Electrode impedances of 27.2 ± 19.8 kΩ at 1 kHz were achieved. Following two months of implantation in Lewis rat sciatic nerve, micro-fascicles were observed regenerating through the MNI microchannels. Significance. Selective MNIs with the peripheral nervous system may allow upper limb amputees to control prostheses intuitively.

  13. Parietal Neural Prosthetic Control of a Computer Cursor in a Graphical-User-Interface Task

    PubMed Central

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, the majority of Brain Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in Area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like “Face in a Crowd” task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the “Crowd”) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the Crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a “Crowd Off” condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main Results Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the Crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  14. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  15. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system.

  16. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system. PMID:25769171

  17. Multitask neural network for vision machine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Madan M.; Knopf, George K.

    1991-02-01

    A multi-task dynamic neural network that can be programmed for storing processing and encoding spatio-temporal visual information is presented in this paper. This dynamic neural network called the PNnetwork is comprised of numerous densely interconnected neural subpopulations which reside in one of the two coupled sublayers P or N. The subpopulations in the P-sublayer transmit an excitatory or a positive influence onto all interconnected units whereas the subpopulations in the N-sublayer transmit an inhibitory or negative influence. The dynamical activity generated by each subpopulation is given by a nonlinear first-order system. By varying the coupling strength between these different subpopulations it is possible to generate three distinct modes of dynamical behavior useful for performing vision related tasks. It is postulated that the PN-network can function as a basic programmable processor for novel vision machine systems. 1. 0

  18. A lysinated thiophene-based semiconductor as a multifunctional neural bioorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Simone; Pistone, Assunta; Brucale, Marco; Karges, Saskia; Favaretto, Laura; Zambianchi, Massimo; Posati, Tamara; Sagnella, Anna; Caprini, Marco; Toffanin, Stefano; Zamboni, Roberto; Camaioni, Nadia; Muccini, Michele; Melucci, Manuela; Benfenati, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Lysinated molecular organic semiconductors are introduced as valuable multifunctional platforms for neural cells growth and interfacing. Cast films of quaterthiophene (T4) semiconductor covalently modified with lysine-end moieties (T4Lys) are fabricated and their stability, morphology, optical/electrical, and biocompatibility properties are characterized. T4Lys films exhibit fluorescence and electronic transport as generally observed for unsubstituted oligothiophenes combined to humidity-activated ionic conduction promoted by the charged lysine-end moieties. The Lys insertion in T4 enables adhesion of primary culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which is not achievable by plating cells on T4. Notably, on T4Lys, the number on adhering neurons/area is higher and displays a twofold longer neurite length than neurons plated on glass coated with poly-l-lysine. Finally, by whole-cell patch-clamp, it is shown that the biofunctionality of neurons cultured on T4Lys is preserved. The present study introduces an innovative concept for organic material neural interface that combines optical and iono-electronic functionalities with improved biocompatibility and neuron affinity promoted by Lys linkage and the softness of organic semiconductors. Lysinated organic semiconductors could set the scene for the fabrication of simplified bioorganic devices geometry for cells bidirectional communication or optoelectronic control of neural cells biofunctionality. PMID:25721438

  19. A lysinated thiophene-based semiconductor as a multifunctional neural bioorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Simone; Pistone, Assunta; Brucale, Marco; Karges, Saskia; Favaretto, Laura; Zambianchi, Massimo; Posati, Tamara; Sagnella, Anna; Caprini, Marco; Toffanin, Stefano; Zamboni, Roberto; Camaioni, Nadia; Muccini, Michele; Melucci, Manuela; Benfenati, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Lysinated molecular organic semiconductors are introduced as valuable multifunctional platforms for neural cells growth and interfacing. Cast films of quaterthiophene (T4) semiconductor covalently modified with lysine-end moieties (T4Lys) are fabricated and their stability, morphology, optical/electrical, and biocompatibility properties are characterized. T4Lys films exhibit fluorescence and electronic transport as generally observed for unsubstituted oligothiophenes combined to humidity-activated ionic conduction promoted by the charged lysine-end moieties. The Lys insertion in T4 enables adhesion of primary culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which is not achievable by plating cells on T4. Notably, on T4Lys, the number on adhering neurons/area is higher and displays a twofold longer neurite length than neurons plated on glass coated with poly-l-lysine. Finally, by whole-cell patch-clamp, it is shown that the biofunctionality of neurons cultured on T4Lys is preserved. The present study introduces an innovative concept for organic material neural interface that combines optical and iono-electronic functionalities with improved biocompatibility and neuron affinity promoted by Lys linkage and the softness of organic semiconductors. Lysinated organic semiconductors could set the scene for the fabrication of simplified bioorganic devices geometry for cells bidirectional communication or optoelectronic control of neural cells biofunctionality.

  20. Accelerating bioelectric functional development of neural stem cells by graphene coupling: Implications for neural interfacing with conductive materials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongrong; Zhang, Shasha; Xiao, Miao; Qian, Fuping; He, Zuhong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Huawei; Yang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ming; Chai, Renjie; Tang, Mingliang

    2016-11-01

    In order to govern cell-specific behaviors in tissue engineering for neural repair and regeneration, a better understanding of material-cell interactions, especially the bioelectric functions, is extremely important. Graphene has been reported to be a potential candidate for use as a scaffold and neural interfacing material. However, the bioelectric evolvement of cell membranes on these conductive graphene substrates remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we used a neural stem cell (NSC) model to explore the possible changes in membrane bioelectric properties - including resting membrane potentials and action potentials - and cell behaviors on graphene films under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. We used a combination of single-cell electrophysiological recordings and traditional cell biology techniques. Graphene did not affect the basic membrane electrical parameters (capacitance and input resistance), but resting membrane potentials of cells on graphene substrates were more strongly negative under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. Also, NSCs and their progeny on graphene substrates exhibited increased firing of action potentials during development compared to controls. However, graphene only slightly affected the electric characterizations of mature NSC progeny. The modulation of passive and active bioelectric properties on the graphene substrate was accompanied by enhanced NSC differentiation. Furthermore, spine density, synapse proteins expressions and synaptic activity were all increased in graphene group. Modeling of the electric field on conductive graphene substrates suggests that the electric field produced by the electronegative cell membrane is much higher on graphene substrates than that on control, and this might explain the observed changes of bioelectric development by graphene coupling. Our results indicate that graphene is able to accelerate NSC maturation during development, especially with regard to

  1. Accelerating bioelectric functional development of neural stem cells by graphene coupling: Implications for neural interfacing with conductive materials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongrong; Zhang, Shasha; Xiao, Miao; Qian, Fuping; He, Zuhong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Huawei; Yang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ming; Chai, Renjie; Tang, Mingliang

    2016-11-01

    In order to govern cell-specific behaviors in tissue engineering for neural repair and regeneration, a better understanding of material-cell interactions, especially the bioelectric functions, is extremely important. Graphene has been reported to be a potential candidate for use as a scaffold and neural interfacing material. However, the bioelectric evolvement of cell membranes on these conductive graphene substrates remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we used a neural stem cell (NSC) model to explore the possible changes in membrane bioelectric properties - including resting membrane potentials and action potentials - and cell behaviors on graphene films under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. We used a combination of single-cell electrophysiological recordings and traditional cell biology techniques. Graphene did not affect the basic membrane electrical parameters (capacitance and input resistance), but resting membrane potentials of cells on graphene substrates were more strongly negative under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. Also, NSCs and their progeny on graphene substrates exhibited increased firing of action potentials during development compared to controls. However, graphene only slightly affected the electric characterizations of mature NSC progeny. The modulation of passive and active bioelectric properties on the graphene substrate was accompanied by enhanced NSC differentiation. Furthermore, spine density, synapse proteins expressions and synaptic activity were all increased in graphene group. Modeling of the electric field on conductive graphene substrates suggests that the electric field produced by the electronegative cell membrane is much higher on graphene substrates than that on control, and this might explain the observed changes of bioelectric development by graphene coupling. Our results indicate that graphene is able to accelerate NSC maturation during development, especially with regard to

  2. Evaluating neural networks and artificial intelligence systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, David S.

    1994-02-01

    Systems have no intrinsic value in and of themselves, but rather derive value from the contributions they make to the missions, decisions, and tasks they are intended to support. The estimation of the cost-effectiveness of systems is a prerequisite for rational planning, budgeting, and investment documents. Neural network and expert system applications, although similar in their incorporation of a significant amount of decision-making capability, differ from each other in ways that affect the manner in which they can be evaluated. Both these types of systems are, by definition, evolutionary systems, which also impacts their evaluation. This paper discusses key aspects of neural network and expert system applications and their impact on the evaluation process. A practical approach or methodology for evaluating a certain class of expert systems that are particularly difficult to measure using traditional evaluation approaches is presented.

  3. Integrated Neural Flight and Propulsion Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated neural flight and propulsion control system. which uses a neural network based approach for applying alternate sources of control power in the presence of damage or failures. Under normal operating conditions, the system utilizes conventional flight control surfaces. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions and for different aircraft configurations. Under damage or failure conditions, the system may utilize unconventional flight control surface allocations, along with integrated propulsion control, when additional control power is necessary for achieving desired flight control performance. In this case, neural networks are used to adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and control allocation schemes. Of significant importance here is the fact that this system can operate without emergency or backup flight control mode operations. An additional advantage is that this system can utilize, but does not require, fault detection and isolation information or explicit parameter identification. Piloted simulation studies were performed on a commercial transport aircraft simulator. Subjects included both NASA test pilots and commercial airline crews. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increasing survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  4. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    PubMed

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  5. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System

    PubMed Central

    El-Helw, Hadi M.; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  6. NeuroArray: a universal interface for patterning and interrogating neural circuitry with single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices. PMID:24759264

  7. NeuroArray: A Universal Interface for Patterning and Interrogating Neural Circuitry with Single Cell Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices.

  8. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electronic neural networks for space station are presented. Topics covered include: electronic neural networks; electronic implementations; VLSI/thin film hybrid hardware for neurocomputing; computations with analog parallel processing; features of neuroprocessors; applications of neuroprocessors; neural network hardware for terrain trafficability determination; a dedicated processor for path planning; neural network system interface; neural network for robotic control; error backpropagation algorithm for learning; resource allocation matrix; global optimization neuroprocessor; and electrically programmable read only thin-film synaptic array.

  9. CMOS On-Chip Optoelectronic Neural Interface Device with Integrated Light Source for Optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawadsaringkarn, Y.; Kimura, H.; Maezawa, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Sasagawa, K.; Noda, T.; Tokuda, T.; Ohta, J.

    2012-03-01

    A novel optoelectronic neural interface device is proposed for target applications in optogenetics for neural science. The device consists of a light emitting diode (LED) array implemented on a CMOS image sensor for on-chip local light stimulation. In this study, we designed a suitable CMOS image sensor equipped with on-chip electrodes to drive the LEDs, and developed a device structure and packaging process for LED integration. The prototype device produced an illumination intensity of approximately 1 mW with a driving current of 2.0 mA, which is expected to be sufficient to activate channelrhodopsin (ChR2). We also demonstrated the functions of light stimulation and on-chip imaging using a brain slice from a mouse as a target sample.

  10. An optical neural interface: in vivo control of rodent motor cortex with integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravanis, Alexander M.; Wang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A.; Mogri, Murtaza Z.; Schneider, M. Bret; Deisseroth, Karl

    2007-09-01

    Neural interface technology has made enormous strides in recent years but stimulating electrodes remain incapable of reliably targeting specific cell types (e.g. excitatory or inhibitory neurons) within neural tissue. This obstacle has major scientific and clinical implications. For example, there is intense debate among physicians, neuroengineers and neuroscientists regarding the relevant cell types recruited during deep brain stimulation (DBS); moreover, many debilitating side effects of DBS likely result from lack of cell-type specificity. We describe here a novel optical neural interface technology that will allow neuroengineers to optically address specific cell types in vivo with millisecond temporal precision. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), an algal light-activated ion channel we developed for use in mammals, can give rise to safe, light-driven stimulation of CNS neurons on a timescale of milliseconds. Because ChR2 is genetically targetable, specific populations of neurons even sparsely embedded within intact circuitry can be stimulated with high temporal precision. Here we report the first in vivo behavioral demonstration of a functional optical neural interface (ONI) in intact animals, involving integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology. We developed a solid-state laser diode system that can be pulsed with millisecond precision, outputs 20 mW of power at 473 nm, and is coupled to a lightweight, flexible multimode optical fiber, ~200 µm in diameter. To capitalize on the unique advantages of this system, we specifically targeted ChR2 to excitatory cells in vivo with the CaMKIIα promoter. Under these conditions, the intensity of light exiting the fiber (~380 mW mm-2) was sufficient to drive excitatory neurons in vivo and control motor cortex function with behavioral output in intact rodents. No exogenous chemical cofactor was needed at any point, a crucial finding for in vivo work in large mammals. Achieving modulation of behavior with optical control of

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Prosthetic interfaces with the visual system: biological issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-06-01

    The design of effective visual prostheses for the blind represents a challenge for biomedical engineers and neuroscientists. Significant progress has been made in the miniaturization and processing power of prosthesis electronics; however development lags in the design and construction of effective machine brain interfaces with visual system neurons. This review summarizes what has been learned about stimulating neurons in the human and primate retina, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex. Each level of the visual system presents unique challenges for neural interface design. Blind patients with the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are a common population in clinical trials of visual prostheses. The visual performance abilities of normals and RP patients are compared. To generate pattern vision in blind patients, the visual prosthetic interface must effectively stimulate the retinotopically organized neurons in the central visual field to elicit patterned visual percepts. The development of more biologically compatible methods of stimulating visual system neurons is critical to the development of finer spatial percepts. Prosthesis electrode arrays need to adapt to different optimal stimulus locations, stimulus patterns, and patient disease states.

  12. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients' brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies.

  13. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients’ brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  14. System and method for determining stability of a neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Disclosed are methods, systems, and computer-readable media for determining stability of a neural system. The method includes tracking a function world line of an N element neural system within at least one behavioral space, determining whether the tracking function world line is approaching a psychological stability surface, and implementing a quantitative solution that corrects instability if the tracked function world line is approaching the psychological stability surface.

  15. Analysis of complex systems using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1992-01-01

    The application of neural networks, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies (expert systems, fuzzy logic, and/or genetic algorithms), to some of the problems of complex engineering systems has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of these systems. Typically, the measured variables from the systems are analog variables that must be sampled and normalized to expected peak values before they are introduced into neural networks. Often data must be processed to put it into a form more acceptable to the neural network (e.g., a fast Fourier transformation of the time-series data to produce a spectral plot of the data). Specific applications described include: (1) Diagnostics: State of the Plant (2) Hybrid System for Transient Identification, (3) Sensor Validation, (4) Plant-Wide Monitoring, (5) Monitoring of Performance and Efficiency, and (6) Analysis of Vibrations. Although specific examples described deal with nuclear power plants or their subsystems, the techniques described can be applied to a wide variety of complex engineering systems.

  16. Analysis of complex systems using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E. |

    1992-12-31

    The application of neural networks, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies (expert systems, fuzzy logic, and/or genetic algorithms), to some of the problems of complex engineering systems has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of these systems. Typically, the measured variables from the systems are analog variables that must be sampled and normalized to expected peak values before they are introduced into neural networks. Often data must be processed to put it into a form more acceptable to the neural network (e.g., a fast Fourier transformation of the time-series data to produce a spectral plot of the data). Specific applications described include: (1) Diagnostics: State of the Plant (2) Hybrid System for Transient Identification, (3) Sensor Validation, (4) Plant-Wide Monitoring, (5) Monitoring of Performance and Efficiency, and (6) Analysis of Vibrations. Although specific examples described deal with nuclear power plants or their subsystems, the techniques described can be applied to a wide variety of complex engineering systems.

  17. A 96-channel neural stimulation system for driving AIROF microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P; Cogan, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and testing of a 96-channel stimulation system to drive activated iridium oxide (AIROF) microelectrodes within safe charge-injection limits. Our system improves upon the traditional capacitively coupled, symmetric charge-balanced biphasic stimulation waveform so as to maximize charge-injection capacity without endangering the microelectrodes. It can deliver computer-controlled cathodic current pulse for to up to 96 AIROF microelectrodes and positively bias them during the inter-pulse interval. The stimulation system is comprised of (1) 12 custom-designed PCB boards each hosting an 8-channel ASIC chip, (2) a motherboard to communicate between these 12 boards and the PC, (3) the PC interface equipped with a DIO card and the corresponding software. We plan to use this system in animal experiments for intracortical neural stimulation of implanted electrodes within our visual prosthesis project. PMID:17271241

  18. Interfaces for Distributed Systems of Information Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Brewster M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes five interfaces to remote, full-text databases accessed through distributed systems of servers. These are WAIStation for the Macintosh, XWAIS for X-Windows, GWAIS for Gnu-Emacs; SWAIS for dumb terminals, and Rosebud for the Macintosh. Sixteen illustrations provide examples of display screens. Problems and needed improvements are…

  19. A Modular System of Interfacing Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Describes a system of interfacing allowing a range of signal conditioning and control modules to be connected to microcomputers, enabling execution of such experiments as: examining rate of cooling; control by light-activated switch; pH measurements; control frequency of signal generators; and making automated measurements of frequency response of…

  20. Garden Banks 388 ROV interface systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granhaug, O.; Brewster, D.; Soliah, J.; Dubea, C.

    1995-12-31

    ROV systems integration has become an important part of the planning and implementation of deep water field development. This paper provides an overview of the GB 388 subsea development project and describes the ROV interface systems in use on the various subsea production components. The paper continues with an account of the purpose-built ROV system developed for the project. Finally, the paper describes in some detail the specialized ROV tooling and intervention systems that have been developed to assist in the installation, operation and maintenance of the subsea production equipment. The subsea intervention solutions developed for the GB 388 development project have direct application to all deep water field development projects. ROV interface systems are an integral part of current and future subsea completion technology.

  1. A 128-Channel Extreme Learning Machine-Based Neural Decoder for Brain Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Yao, Enyi; Basu, Arindam

    2016-06-01

    Currently, state-of-the-art motor intention decoding algorithms in brain-machine interfaces are mostly implemented on a PC and consume significant amount of power. A machine learning coprocessor in 0.35- μm CMOS for the motor intention decoding in the brain-machine interfaces is presented in this paper. Using Extreme Learning Machine algorithm and low-power analog processing, it achieves an energy efficiency of 3.45 pJ/MAC at a classification rate of 50 Hz. The learning in second stage and corresponding digitally stored coefficients are used to increase robustness of the core analog processor. The chip is verified with neural data recorded in monkey finger movements experiment, achieving a decoding accuracy of 99.3% for movement type. The same coprocessor is also used to decode time of movement from asynchronous neural spikes. With time-delayed feature dimension enhancement, the classification accuracy can be increased by 5% with limited number of input channels. Further, a sparsity promoting training scheme enables reduction of number of programmable weights by ≈ 2X.

  2. NEVESIM: event-driven neural simulation framework with a Python interface.

    PubMed

    Pecevski, Dejan; Kappel, David; Jonke, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes) between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies. PMID:25177291

  3. NEVESIM: event-driven neural simulation framework with a Python interface

    PubMed Central

    Pecevski, Dejan; Kappel, David; Jonke, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes) between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies. PMID:25177291

  4. NEVESIM: event-driven neural simulation framework with a Python interface.

    PubMed

    Pecevski, Dejan; Kappel, David; Jonke, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes) between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies.

  5. The desktop interface in intelligent tutoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudendistel, Stephen; Hua, Grace

    1987-01-01

    The interface between an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) and the person being tutored is critical to the success of the learning process. If the interface to the ITS is confusing or non-supportive of the tutored domain, the effectiveness of the instruction will be diminished or lost entirely. Consequently, the interface to an ITS should be highly integrated with the domain to provide a robust and semantically rich learning environment. In building an ITS for ZetaLISP on a LISP Machine, a Desktop Interface was designed to support a programming learning environment. Using the bitmapped display, windows, and mouse, three desktops were designed to support self-study and tutoring of ZetaLISP. Through organization, well-defined boundaries, and domain support facilities, the desktops provide substantial flexibility and power for the student and facilitate learning ZetaLISP programming while screening the student from the complex LISP Machine environment. The student can concentrate on learning ZetaLISP programming and not on how to operate the interface or a LISP Machine.

  6. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida Kozai, Takashi D.; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  7. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-01-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants. PMID:23142839

  8. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B; Patel, Paras R; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A; Kipke, Daryl R

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants. PMID:23142839

  9. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B; Patel, Paras R; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A; Kipke, Daryl R

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  10. Neuromechanism Study of Insect–Machine Interface: Flight Control by Neural Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A.; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect–machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee–machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  11. Neuromechanism study of insect-machine interface: flight control by neural electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect-machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee-machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  12. This Neural Implant is designed to be implanted in the Human Central and Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-29

    A new class of neural implants being developed at the Livermore Lab are the first clinical quality devices capable of two-way conversations with the human nervous systems. Unlike existing interfaces that only sense or only stimulate, these devices are capable of stimulating and sensing using both electric and chemical signals.

  13. Simulating neural systems with Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Warrender, Christina E.; Aimone, James Bradley; Teeter, Corinne; Duda, Alex M.

    2012-12-01

    Sandias parallel circuit simulator, Xyce, can address large scale neuron simulations in a new way extending the range within which one can perform high-fidelity, multi-compartment neuron simulations. This report documents the implementation of neuron devices in Xyce, their use in simulation and analysis of neuron systems.

  14. Instantaneous estimation of motor cortical neural encoding for online brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwen; Principe, Jose C.

    2010-10-01

    Recently, the authors published a sequential decoding algorithm for motor brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that infers movement directly from spike trains and produces a new kinematic output every time an observation of neural activity is present at its input. Such a methodology also needs a special instantaneous neuronal encoding model to relate instantaneous kinematics to every neural spike activity. This requirement is unlike the tuning methods commonly used in computational neuroscience, which are based on time windows of neural and kinematic data. This paper develops a novel, online, encoding model that uses the instantaneous kinematic variables (position, velocity and acceleration in 2D or 3D space) to estimate the mean value of an inhomogeneous Poisson model. During BMI decoding the mapping from neural spikes to kinematics is one to one and easy to implement by simply reading the spike times directly. Due to the high temporal resolution of the encoding, the delay between motor cortex neurons and kinematics needs to be estimated in the encoding stage. Mutual information is employed to select the optimal time index defined as the lag for which the spike event is maximally informative with respect to the kinematics. We extensively compare the windowed tuning models with the proposed method. The big difference between them resides in the high firing rate portion of the tuning curve, which is rather important for BMI-decoding performance. This paper shows that implementing such an instantaneous tuning model in sequential Monte Carlo point process estimation based on spike timing provides statistically better kinematic reconstructions than the linear and exponential spike-tuning models.

  15. Interfacing the expert: Characteristics and requirements for the user interface in expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Because expert systems deal with new sets of problems presenting unique interface requirements, special issues requiring special attention are presented to user interface designers. External knowledge representation (how knowdedge is represented across the user interface), modes of user-system interdependence (advisory, cooperative, and autonomous), and management of uncertainty (deciding what actions to take or recommend based on incomplete evidence) are discussed.

  16. The endocannabinoid system drives neural progenitor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Tania; Monory, Krisztina; Palazuelos, Javier; Stella, Nephi; Cravatt, Benjamin; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kokaia, Zaal; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2005-10-01

    The discovery of multipotent neural progenitor (NP) cells has provided strong support for the existence of neurogenesis in the adult brain. However, the signals controlling NP proliferation remain elusive. Endocannabinoids, the endogenous counterparts of marijuana-derived cannabinoids, act as neuromodulators via presynaptic CB1 receptors and also control neural cell death and survival. Here we show that progenitor cells express a functional endocannabinoid system that actively regulates cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, NPs produce endocannabinoids and express the CB1 receptor and the endocannabinoid-inactivating enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). CB1 receptor activation promotes cell proliferation and neurosphere generation, an action that is abrogated in CB1-deficient NPs. Accordingly, proliferation of hippocampal NPs is increased in FAAH-deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that endocannabinoids constitute a new group of signaling cues that regulate NP proliferation and thus open novel therapeutic avenues for manipulation of NP cell fate in the adult brain.

  17. Low-cost wireless neural recording system and software.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Jeffrey A; Borna, Amir; Roy, Sabyasachi; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lewandowski, Brian; Schmidt, Marc; Najafi, Khalil

    2009-01-01

    We describe a flexible wireless neural recording system, which is comprised of a 15-channel analog FM transmitter, digital receiver and custom user interface software for data acquisition. The analog front-end is constructed from commercial off the shelf (COTS) components and weighs 6.3g (including batteries) and is capable of transmitting over 24 hours up to a range over 3m with a 25microV(rms) in-vivo noise floor. The Software Defined Radio (SDR) and the acquisition software provide a data acquisition platform with real time data display and can be customized based on the specifications of various experiments. The described system was characterized with in-vitro and in-vivo experiments and the results are presented. PMID:19965244

  18. Low-Cost Wireless Neural Recording System and Software

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Jeffrey A.; Borna, Amir; Roy, Sabyasachi; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lewandowski, Brian; Schmidt, Marc; Najafi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    We describe a flexible wireless neural recording system, which is comprised of a 15-channel analog FM transmitter, digital receiver and custom user interface software for data acquisition. The analog front-end is constructed from commercial off the shelf (COTS) components and weighs 6.3g (including batteries) and is capable of transmitting over 24 hours up to a range over 3m with a 25μVrms in-vivo noise floor. The Software Defined Radio (SDR) and the acquisition software provide a data acquisition platform with real time data display and can be customized based on the specifications of various experiments. The described system was characterized with in-vitro and in-vivo experiments and the results are presented. PMID:19965244

  19. Testing of the Automated Fluid Interface System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. S.; Tyler, Tony R.

    1998-01-01

    The Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) is an advanced development prototype satellite servicer. The device was designed to transfer consumables from one spacecraft to another. An engineering model was built and underwent development testing at Marshall Space Flight Center. While the current AFIS is not suitable for spaceflight, testing and evaluation of the AFIS provided significant experience which would be beneficial in building a flight unit.

  20. Development of closed-loop neural interface technology in a rat model: combining motor cortex operant conditioning with visual cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Timothy Charles; Lehmkuhle, Mark J; Gage, Gregory J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2010-04-01

    Closed-loop neural interface technology that combines neural ensemble decoding with simultaneous electrical microstimulation feedback is hypothesized to improve deep brain stimulation techniques, neuromotor prosthetic applications, and epilepsy treatment. Here we describe our iterative results in a rat model of a sensory and motor neurophysiological feedback control system. Three rats were chronically implanted with microelectrode arrays in both the motor and visual cortices. The rats were subsequently trained over a period of weeks to modulate their motor cortex ensemble unit activity upon delivery of intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the visual cortex in order to receive a food reward. Rats were given continuous feedback via visual cortex ICMS during the response periods that was representative of the motor cortex ensemble dynamics. Analysis revealed that the feedback provided the animals with indicators of the behavioral trials. At the hardware level, this preparation provides a tractable test model for improving the technology of closed-loop neural devices.

  1. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  2. Dynamic artificial neural networks with affective systems.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Catherine D; Birdwell, J Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are processors that are trained to perform particular tasks. We couple a computational ANN with a simulated affective system in order to explore the interaction between the two. In particular, we design a simple affective system that adjusts the threshold values in the neurons of our ANN. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that this simple affective system can control the firing rate of the ensemble of neurons in the ANN, as well as to explore the coupling between the affective system and the processes of long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD), and the effect of the parameters of the affective system on its performance. We apply our networks with affective systems to a simple pole balancing example and briefly discuss the effect of affective systems on network performance.

  3. A user-system interface agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakim, Nagi T.; Srivastava, Sadanand; Bousaidi, Mehdi; Goh, Gin-Hua

    1995-01-01

    Agent-based technologies answer to several challenges posed by additional information processing requirements in today's computing environments. In particular, (1) users desire interaction with computing devices in a mode which is similar to that used between people, (2) the efficiency and successful completion of information processing tasks often require a high-level of expertise in complex and multiple domains, (3) information processing tasks often require handling of large volumes of data and, therefore, continuous and endless processing activities. The concept of an agent is an attempt to address these new challenges by introducing information processing environments in which (1) users can communicate with a system in a natural way, (2) an agent is a specialist and a self-learner and, therefore, it qualifies to be trusted to perform tasks independent of the human user, and (3) an agent is an entity that is continuously active performing tasks that are either delegated to it or self-imposed. The work described in this paper focuses on the development of an interface agent for users of a complex information processing environment (IPE). This activity is part of an on-going effort to build a model for developing agent-based information systems. Such systems will be highly applicable to environments which require a high degree of automation, such as, flight control operations and/or processing of large volumes of data in complex domains, such as the EOSDIS environment and other multidisciplinary, scientific data systems. The concept of an agent as an information processing entity is fully described with emphasis on characteristics of special interest to the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). Issues such as agent 'existence' and 'qualification' are discussed in this paper. Based on a definition of an agent and its main characteristics, we propose an architecture for the development of interface agents for users of an IPE that is agent-oriented and whose resources

  4. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic—they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions. PMID:27408709

  5. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic-they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions.

  6. Glove-TalkII--a neural-network interface which maps gestures to parallel formant speech synthesizer controls.

    PubMed

    Fels, S S; Hinton, G E

    1998-01-01

    Glove-TalkII is a system which translates hand gestures to speech through an adaptive interface. Hand gestures are mapped continuously to ten control parameters of a parallel formant speech synthesizer. The mapping allows the hand to act as an artificial vocal tract that produces speech in real time. This gives an unlimited vocabulary in addition to direct control of fundamental frequency and volume. Currently, the best version of Glove-TalkII uses several input devices (including a Cyberglove, a ContactGlove, a three-space tracker, and a foot pedal), a parallel formant speech synthesizer, and three neural networks. The gesture-to-speech task is divided into vowel and consonant production by using a gating network to weight the outputs of a vowel and a consonant neural network. The gating network and the consonant network are trained with examples from the user. The vowel network implements a fixed user-defined relationship between hand position and vowel sound and does not require any training examples from the user. Volume, fundamental frequency, and stop consonants are produced with a fixed mapping from the input devices. One subject has trained to speak intelligibly with Glove-TalkII. He speaks slowly but with far more natural sounding pitch variations than a text-to-speech synthesizer. PMID:18252442

  7. Glove-talk II - a neural-network interface which maps gestures to parallel formant speech synthesizer controls.

    PubMed

    Fels, S S; Hinton, G E

    1997-01-01

    Glove-Talk II is a system which translates hand gestures to speech through an adaptive interface. Hand gestures are mapped continuously to ten control parameters of a parallel formant speech synthesizer. The mapping allows the hand to act as an artificial vocal tract that produces speech in real time. This gives an unlimited vocabulary in addition to direct control of fundamental frequency and volume. Currently, the best version of Glove-Talk II uses several input devices, a parallel formant speech synthesizer, and three neural networks. The gesture-to-speech task is divided into vowel and consonant production by using a gating network to weight the outputs of a vowel and a consonant neural network. The gating network and the consonant network are trained with examples from the user. The vowel network implements a fixed user-defined relationship between hand position and vowel sound and does not require any training examples from the user. Volume, fundamental frequency, and stop consonants are produced with a fixed mapping from the input devices. With Glove-Talk II, the subject can speak slowly but with far more natural sounding pitch variations than a text-to-speech synthesizer. PMID:18255700

  8. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interaction with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

  9. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interactionmore » with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.« less

  10. Design and validation of a real-time spiking-neural-network decoder for brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethier, Julie; Nuyujukian, Paul; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Cortically-controlled motor prostheses aim to restore functions lost to neurological disease and injury. Several proof of concept demonstrations have shown encouraging results, but barriers to clinical translation still remain. In particular, intracortical prostheses must satisfy stringent power dissipation constraints so as not to damage cortex. Approach. One possible solution is to use ultra-low power neuromorphic chips to decode neural signals for these intracortical implants. The first step is to explore in simulation the feasibility of translating decoding algorithms for brain-machine interface (BMI) applications into spiking neural networks (SNNs). Main results. Here we demonstrate the validity of the approach by implementing an existing Kalman-filter-based decoder in a simulated SNN using the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF), a general method for mapping control algorithms onto SNNs. To measure this system’s robustness and generalization, we tested it online in closed-loop BMI experiments with two rhesus monkeys. Across both monkeys, a Kalman filter implemented using a 2000-neuron SNN has comparable performance to that of a Kalman filter implemented using standard floating point techniques. Significance. These results demonstrate the tractability of SNN implementations of statistical signal processing algorithms on different monkeys and for several tasks, suggesting that a SNN decoder, implemented on a neuromorphic chip, may be a feasible computational platform for low-power fully-implanted prostheses. The validation of this closed-loop decoder system and the demonstration of its robustness and generalization hold promise for SNN implementations on an ultra-low power neuromorphic chip using the NEF.

  11. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  12. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately. PMID:27147955

  13. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately. PMID:27147955

  14. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  15. Power system interface and umbilical system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    System requirements and basic design criteria were defined for berthing or docking a payload to the 25 kW power module which will provide electrical power and attitude control, cooling, data transfer, and communication services to free-flying and Orbiter sortie payloads. The selected umbilical system concept consists of four assemblies and command and display equipment to be installed at the Orbiter payload specialist station: (1) a movable platen assembly which is attached to the power system with EVA operable devices; (2) a slave platen assembly which is attached to the payload with EVA operable devices; (3) a fixed secondary platen permanently installed in the power system; and (4) a fixed secondary platen permanently installed on the payload. Operating modes and sequences are described.

  16. Convolutional neural networks for P300 detection with application to brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, Hubert; Gräser, Axel

    2011-03-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a specific type of human-computer interface that enables the direct communication between human and computers by analyzing brain measurements. Oddball paradigms are used in BCI to generate event-related potentials (ERPs), like the P300 wave, on targets selected by the user. A P300 speller is based on this principle, where the detection of P300 waves allows the user to write characters. The P300 speller is composed of two classification problems. The first classification is to detect the presence of a P300 in the electroencephalogram (EEG). The second one corresponds to the combination of different P300 responses for determining the right character to spell. A new method for the detection of P300 waves is presented. This model is based on a convolutional neural network (CNN). The topology of the network is adapted to the detection of P300 waves in the time domain. Seven classifiers based on the CNN are proposed: four single classifiers with different features set and three multiclassifiers. These models are tested and compared on the Data set II of the third BCI competition. The best result is obtained with a multiclassifier solution with a recognition rate of 95.5 percent, without channel selection before the classification. The proposed approach provides also a new way for analyzing brain activities due to the receptive field of the CNN models.

  17. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid; Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc; Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip; Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena; Clark, Robert; Cotton, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  18. HermesC: low-power wireless neural recording system for freely moving primates.

    PubMed

    Chestek, Cynthia A; Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Kier, Ryan J; Solzbacher, Florian; Ryu, Stephen I; Harrison, Reid R; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2009-08-01

    Neural prosthetic systems have the potential to restore lost functionality to amputees or patients suffering from neurological injury or disease. Current systems have primarily been designed for immobile patients, such as tetraplegics functioning in a rather static, carefully tailored environment. However, an active patient such as amputee in a normal dynamic, everyday environment may be quite different in terms of the neural control of movement. In order to study motor control in a more unconstrained natural setting, we seek to develop an animal model of freely moving humans. Therefore, we have developed and tested HermesC-INI3, a system for recording and wirelessly transmitting neural data from electrode arrays implanted in rhesus macaques who are freely moving. This system is based on the integrated neural interface (INI3) microchip which amplifies, digitizes, and transmits neural data across a approximately 900 MHz wireless channel. The wireless transmission has a range of approximately 4 m in free space. All together this device consumes 15.8 mA and 63.2 mW. On a single 2 A-hr battery pack, this device runs contiguously for approximately six days. The smaller size and power consumption of the custom IC allows for a smaller package (51 x 38 x 38 mm (3)) than previous primate systems. The HermesC-INI3 system was used to record and telemeter one channel of broadband neural data at 15.7 kSps from a monkey performing routine daily activities in the home cage.

  19. Support for User Interfaces for Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eychaner, Glenn; Niessner, Albert

    2005-01-01

    An extensible Java(TradeMark) software framework supports the construction and operation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for distributed computing systems typified by ground control systems that send commands to, and receive telemetric data from, spacecraft. Heretofore, such GUIs have been custom built for each new system at considerable expense. In contrast, the present framework affords generic capabilities that can be shared by different distributed systems. Dynamic class loading, reflection, and other run-time capabilities of the Java language and JavaBeans component architecture enable the creation of a GUI for each new distributed computing system with a minimum of custom effort. By use of this framework, GUI components in control panels and menus can send commands to a particular distributed system with a minimum of system-specific code. The framework receives, decodes, processes, and displays telemetry data; custom telemetry data handling can be added for a particular system. The framework supports saving and later restoration of users configurations of control panels and telemetry displays with a minimum of effort in writing system-specific code. GUIs constructed within this framework can be deployed in any operating system with a Java run-time environment, without recompilation or code changes.

  20. Decentralized Multisensory Information Integration in Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-hao; Chen, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    How multiple sensory cues are integrated in neural circuitry remains a challenge. The common hypothesis is that information integration might be accomplished in a dedicated multisensory integration area receiving feedforward inputs from the modalities. However, recent experimental evidence suggests that it is not a single multisensory brain area, but rather many multisensory brain areas that are simultaneously involved in the integration of information. Why many mutually connected areas should be needed for information integration is puzzling. Here, we investigated theoretically how information integration could be achieved in a distributed fashion within a network of interconnected multisensory areas. Using biologically realistic neural network models, we developed a decentralized information integration system that comprises multiple interconnected integration areas. Studying an example of combining visual and vestibular cues to infer heading direction, we show that such a decentralized system is in good agreement with anatomical evidence and experimental observations. In particular, we show that this decentralized system can integrate information optimally. The decentralized system predicts that optimally integrated information should emerge locally from the dynamics of the communication between brain areas and sheds new light on the interpretation of the connectivity between multisensory brain areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To extract information reliably from ambiguous environments, the brain integrates multiple sensory cues, which provide different aspects of information about the same entity of interest. Here, we propose a decentralized architecture for multisensory integration. In such a system, no processor is in the center of the network topology and information integration is achieved in a distributed manner through reciprocally connected local processors. Through studying the inference of heading direction with visual and vestibular cues, we show that

  1. Time-free spiking neural P systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linqiang; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Xingyi

    2011-05-01

    Different biological processes take different times to be completed, which can also be influenced by many environmental factors. In this work, a realistic definition of nonsynchronized spiking neural P systems (SN P systems, for short) is considered: during the work of an SN P system, the execution times of spiking rules cannot be known exactly (i.e., they are arbitrary). In order to establish robust systems against the environmental factors, a special class of SN P systems, called time-free SN P systems, is introduced, which always produce the same computation result independent of the execution times of the rules. The universality of time-free SN P systems is investigated. It is proved that these P systems with extended rules (several spikes can be produced by a rule) are equivalent to register machines. However, if the number of spikes present in the system is bounded, then the power of time-free SN P systems falls, and in this case, a characterization of semilinear sets of natural numbers is obtained.

  2. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-02-15

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers - features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine - consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems evolved

  3. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-02-15

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers - features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine - consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems evolved

  4. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Leonid L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers – features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and ‘classical’ neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine – consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems

  5. A real-time virtual integration environment for the design and development of neural prosthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Bishop, William; Armiger, Robert; Burck, James; Bridges, Michael; Hauschild, Markus; Englehart, Kevin; Scheme, Erik; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Beaty, James; Harshbarger, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a virtual integration environment (VIE) for the development of neural prosthetic systems. The VIE is a software environment that modularizes the core functions of a neural prosthetic system--receiving signals, decoding signals and controlling a real or simulated device. Complete prosthetic systems can be quickly assembled by linking pre-existing modules together through standard interfaces. Systems can be simulated in real-time, and simulated components can be swapped out for real hardware. This paper is the first of two companion papers that describe the VIE and its use. In this paper, we first describe the architecture of the VIE and review implemented modules. We then describe the use of the VIE for the real-time validation of neural decode algorithms from pre-recorded data, the use of the VIE in closed loop primate experiments and the use of the VIE in the clinic.

  6. The crew activity planning system bus interface unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The hardware and software designs used to implement a high speed parallel communications interface to the MITRE 307.2 kilobit/second serial bus communications system are described. The primary topic is the development of the bus interface unit.

  7. Is Neural Activity Detected by ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Task Specific?

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Markus A.; Almeida, Inês; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that are based on event-related potentials (ERPs) can estimate to which stimulus a user pays particular attention. In typical BCIs, the user silently counts the selected stimulus (which is repeatedly presented among other stimuli) in order to focus the attention. The stimulus of interest is then inferred from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Detecting attention allocation implicitly could be also beneficial for human-computer interaction (HCI), because it would allow software to adapt to the user’s interest. However, a counting task would be inappropriate for the envisaged implicit application in HCI. Therefore, the question was addressed if the detectable neural activity is specific for silent counting, or if it can be evoked also by other tasks that direct the attention to certain stimuli. Approach Thirteen people performed a silent counting, an arithmetic and a memory task. The tasks required the subjects to pay particular attention to target stimuli of a random color. The stimulus presentation was the same in all three tasks, which allowed a direct comparison of the experimental conditions. Results Classifiers that were trained to detect the targets in one task, according to patterns present in the EEG signal, could detect targets in all other tasks (irrespective of some task-related differences in the EEG). Significance The neural activity detected by the classifiers is not strictly task specific but can be generalized over tasks and is presumably a result of the attention allocation or of the augmented workload. The results may hold promise for the transfer of classification algorithms from BCI research to implicit relevance detection in HCI. PMID:27792781

  8. DataHigh: Graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Benjamin R.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Butler, Zachary S.; Churchland, Mark M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Yu, Byron M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Analyzing and interpreting the activity of a heterogeneous population of neurons can be challenging, especially as the number of neurons, experimental trials, and experimental conditions increases. One approach is to extract a set of latent variables that succinctly captures the prominent co-fluctuation patterns across the neural population. A key problem is that the number of latent variables needed to adequately describe the population activity is often greater than three, thereby preventing direct visualization of the latent space. By visualizing a small number of 2-d projections of the latent space or each latent variable individually, it is easy to miss salient features of the population activity. Approach To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (called DataHigh) that allows the user to quickly and smoothly navigate through a continuum of different 2-d projections of the latent space. We also implemented a suite of additional visualization tools (including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses) and an optional tool for performing dimensionality reduction. Main results To demonstrate the utility and versatility of DataHigh, we used it to analyze single-trial spike count and single-trial timecourse population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded using single electrodes. Significance DataHigh was developed to fulfill a need for visualization in exploratory neural data analysis, which can provide intuition that is critical for building scientific hypotheses and models of population activity. PMID:24216250

  9. Straddle Carrier Interface and Dispatching System

    2012-09-13

    SCIDS is the Data Dispatching and Transfer Point (DDTP) component of a straddle carrier-based radiation detection system developed for the DOE Megaports Initiative for scanning shipping containers in transshipment ports. Its purpose is to communicate with a Radiation Detection Straddle Carrier (RDSC) developed by Detector Networks International, sending commands to the RDSC and receiving sensor data from the RDSC. Incoming sensor and status data from the RDSC is forwarded to a back-end data storage andmore » display system that is external to SCIDS. SCIDS provides a graphical user interface for port operations personnel that displays location and status of the RDSC and status of each container in the port, and accepts commands from the operator directing the scanning operations of the RDSC.« less

  10. Straddle Carrier Interface and Dispatching System

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    SCIDS is the Data Dispatching and Transfer Point (DDTP) component of a straddle carrier-based radiation detection system developed for the DOE Megaports Initiative for scanning shipping containers in transshipment ports. Its purpose is to communicate with a Radiation Detection Straddle Carrier (RDSC) developed by Detector Networks International, sending commands to the RDSC and receiving sensor data from the RDSC. Incoming sensor and status data from the RDSC is forwarded to a back-end data storage and display system that is external to SCIDS. SCIDS provides a graphical user interface for port operations personnel that displays location and status of the RDSC and status of each container in the port, and accepts commands from the operator directing the scanning operations of the RDSC.

  11. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  12. Simulation of large systems with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been shown capable of simulating the behavior of complex, nonlinear, systems, including structural systems. Under certain circumstances, it is desirable to simulate structures that are analyzed with the finite element method. For example, when we perform a probabilistic analysis with the Monte Carlo method, we usually perform numerous (hundreds or thousands of) repetitions of a response simulation with different input and system parameters to estimate the chance of specific response behaviors. In such applications, efficiency in computation of response is critical, and response simulation with ANNs can be valuable. However, finite element analyses of complex systems involve the use of models with tens or hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom, and ANNs are practically limited to simulations that involve far fewer variables. This paper develops a technique for reducing the amount of information required to characterize the response of a general structure. We show how the reduced information can be used to train a recurrent ANN. Then the trained ANN can be used to simulate the reduced behavior of the original system, and the reduction transformation can be inverted to provide a simulation of the original system. A numerical example is presented.

  13. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongcheng; Sun, Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems.

  14. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongcheng; Sun, Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems. PMID:25992579

  15. A recurrent neural network for closed-loop intracortical brain-machine interface decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussillo, David; Nuyujukian, Paul; Fan, Joline M.; Kao, Jonathan C.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen; Shenoy, Krishna

    2012-04-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) are useful tools for learning nonlinear relationships in time series data with complex temporal dependences. In this paper, we explore the ability of a simplified type of RNN, one with limited modifications to the internal weights called an echostate network (ESN), to effectively and continuously decode monkey reaches during a standard center-out reach task using a cortical brain-machine interface (BMI) in a closed loop. We demonstrate that the RNN, an ESN implementation termed a FORCE decoder (from first order reduced and controlled error learning), learns the task quickly and significantly outperforms the current state-of-the-art method, the velocity Kalman filter (VKF), using the measure of target acquire time. We also demonstrate that the FORCE decoder generalizes to a more difficult task by successfully operating the BMI in a randomized point-to-point task. The FORCE decoder is also robust as measured by the success rate over extended sessions. Finally, we show that decoded cursor dynamics are more like naturalistic hand movements than those of the VKF. Taken together, these results suggest that RNNs in general, and the FORCE decoder in particular, are powerful tools for BMI decoder applications.

  16. Microfabrication, characterization and in vivo MRI compatibility of diamond microelectrodes array for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Clément; Warnking, Jan; Depaulis, Antoine; Garçon, Laurie Amandine; Mermoux, Michel; Eon, David; Mailley, Pascal; Omnès, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing still requires highly stable and biocompatible materials, in particular for in vivo applications. Indeed, most of the currently used materials are degraded and/or encapsulated by the proximal tissue leading to a loss of efficiency. Here, we considered boron doped diamond microelectrodes to address this issue and we evaluated the performances of a diamond microelectrode array. We described the microfabrication process of the device and discuss its functionalities. We characterized its electrochemical performances by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in saline buffer and observed the typical diamond electrode electrochemical properties, wide potential window and low background current, allowing efficient electrochemical detection. The charge storage capacitance and the modulus of the electrochemical impedance were found to remain in the same range as platinum electrodes used for standard commercial devices. Finally we observed a reduced Magnetic Resonance Imaging artifact when the device was implanted on a rat cortex, suggesting that boron doped-diamond is a very promising electrode material allowing functional imaging.

  17. A recurrent neural network for closed-loop intracortical brain–machine interface decoders

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Nuyujukian, Paul; Fan, Joline M; Kao, Jonathan C; Stavisky, Sergey D; Ryu, Stephen; Shenoy, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) are useful tools for learning nonlinear relationships in time series data with complex temporal dependences. In this paper, we explore the ability of a simplified type of RNN, one with limited modifications to the internal weights called an echostate network (ESN), to effectively and continuously decode monkey reaches during a standard center-out reach task using a cortical brain–machine interface (BMI) in a closed loop. We demonstrate that the RNN, an ESN implementation termed a FORCE decoder (from first order reduced and controlled error learning), learns the task quickly and significantly outperforms the current state-of-the-art method, the velocity Kalman filter (VKF), using the measure of target acquire time. We also demonstrate that the FORCE decoder generalizes to a more difficult task by successfully operating the BMI in a randomized point-to-point task. The FORCE decoder is also robust as measured by the success rate over extended sessions. Finally, we show that decoded cursor dynamics are more like naturalistic hand movements than those of the VKF. Taken together, these results suggest that RNNs in general, and the FORCE decoder in particular, are powerful tools for BMI decoder applications. PMID:22427488

  18. Orbiter Interface Unit and Early Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobbs, Ronald M.; Cooke, Michael P.; Cox, Gary L.; Ellenberger, Richard; Fink, Patrick W.; Haynes, Dena S.; Hyams, Buddy; Ling, Robert Y.; Neighbors, Helen M.; Phan, Chau T.; Prendergast, Kelly M.; Siekierski, James D.; Wade, Randall S.; Weisskopf, George A.; Yim, Hester J.; Adkins, Antha A.; Carl, James R..; Loh, Y. C.; Roberts, Charles; Steele, Douglas J.; DeSilva, Buveneka Kanishka; Killenb, Harold B.; Williams, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the Orbiter Interface Unit (OIU) and the Early Communication System (ECOMM), which are systems of electronic hardware and software that serve as the primary communication links for the International Space Station (ISS). When a space shuttle is at or near the ISS during assembly and resupply missions, the OIU sends groundor crew-initiated commands from the space shuttle to the ISS and relays telemetry from the ISS to the space shuttle s payload data systems. The shuttle then forwards the telemetry to the ground. In the absence of a space shuttle, the ECOMM handles communications between the ISS and Johnson Space Center via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Innovative features described in the report include (1) a "smart data-buffering algorithm that helps to preserve synchronization (and thereby minimize loss) of telemetric data between the OIU and the space-shuttle payload data interleaver; (2) an ECOMM antenna-autotracking algorithm that selects whichever of two phased-array antennas gives the best TDRSS signal and electronically steers that antenna to track the TDRSS source; and (3) an ECOMM radiation-latchup controller, which detects an abrupt increase in current indicative of radiation-induced latchup and temporarily turns off power to clear the latchup, restoring power after the charge dissipates.

  19. Identification of power system load dynamics using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bostanci, M.; Koplowitz, J.; Taylor, C.W. |

    1997-11-01

    Power system loads are important for planning and operation of an electric power system. Load characteristics can significantly influence the results of synchronous stability and voltage stability studies. This paper presents a methodology for identification of power system load dynamics using neural networks. Input-output data of a power system dynamic load is used to design a neural network model which comprises delayed inputs and feedback connections. The developed neural network model can predict the future power system dynamic load behavior for arbitrary inputs. In particular, a third-order induction motor load neural network model is developed to verify the methodology. Neural network simulation results are illustrated and compared with the induction motor load response.

  20. Covalent bonding of YIGSR and RGD to PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-COOH composite material to improve the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Tang, Rong-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Li, Jun-Jie; Lang, Yi-Ran; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Sun, Hong-Ji; Lin, Qiu-Xia; Wang, Chang-Yong

    2015-11-01

    The development of coating materials for neural interfaces has been a pursued to improve the electrical, mechanical and biological performances. For these goals, a bioactive coating was developed in this work featuring a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite and covalently bonded YIGSR and RGD. Its biological effect and electrical characteristics were assessed in vivo on microwire arrays (MWA). The coated electrodes exhibited a significantly higher charge storage capacity (CSC) and lower electrochemical impedance at 1 kHz which are desired to improve the stimulating and recording performances, respectively. Acute neural recording experiments revealed that coated MWA possess a higher signal/noise ratio capturing spikes undetected by uncoated electrodes. Moreover, coated MWA possessed more active sites and single units, and the noise floor of coated electrodes was lower than that of uncoated electrodes. There is little information in the literature concerning the chronic performance of bioactively modified neural interfaces in vivo. Therefore in this work, chronic in vivo tests were conducted and the PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-polypeptide coated arrays exhibited excellent performances with the highest mean maximal amplitude from day 4 to day 12 during which the acute response severely compromised the performance of the electrodes. In brief, we developed a simple method of covalently bonding YIGSR and RGD to a PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-COOH composite improving both the biocompatibility and electrical performance of the neural interface. Our findings suggest that YIGSR and RGD modified PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT is a promising bioactivated composite coating for neural recording and stimulating.

  1. Covalent bonding of YIGSR and RGD to PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-COOH composite material to improve the neural interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Tang, Rong-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Li, Jun-Jie; Lang, Yi-Ran; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Sun, Hong-Ji; Lin, Qiu-Xia; Wang, Chang-Yong

    2015-11-28

    The development of coating materials for neural interfaces has been a pursued to improve the electrical, mechanical and biological performances. For these goals, a bioactive coating was developed in this work featuring a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite and covalently bonded YIGSR and RGD. Its biological effect and electrical characteristics were assessed in vivo on microwire arrays (MWA). The coated electrodes exhibited a significantly higher charge storage capacity (CSC) and lower electrochemical impedance at 1 kHz which are desired to improve the stimulating and recording performances, respectively. Acute neural recording experiments revealed that coated MWA possess a higher signal/noise ratio capturing spikes undetected by uncoated electrodes. Moreover, coated MWA possessed more active sites and single units, and the noise floor of coated electrodes was lower than that of uncoated electrodes. There is little information in the literature concerning the chronic performance of bioactively modified neural interfaces in vivo. Therefore in this work, chronic in vivo tests were conducted and the PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-polypeptide coated arrays exhibited excellent performances with the highest mean maximal amplitude from day 4 to day 12 during which the acute response severely compromised the performance of the electrodes. In brief, we developed a simple method of covalently bonding YIGSR and RGD to a PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-COOH composite improving both the biocompatibility and electrical performance of the neural interface. Our findings suggest that YIGSR and RGD modified PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT is a promising bioactivated composite coating for neural recording and stimulating.

  2. Manufacturing, assembling and packaging of miniaturized implants for neural prostheses and brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Implantable medical devices to interface with muscles, peripheral nerves, and the brain have been developed for many applications over the last decades. They have been applied in fundamental neuroscientific studies as well as in diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation in clinical practice. Success stories of these implants have been written with help of precision mechanics manufacturing techniques. Latest cutting edge research approaches to restore vision in blind persons and to develop an interface with the human brain as motor control interface, however, need more complex systems and larger scales of integration and higher degrees of miniaturization. Microsystems engineering offers adequate tools, methods, and materials but so far, no MEMS based active medical device has been transferred into clinical practice. Silicone rubber, polyimide, parylene as flexible materials and silicon and alumina (aluminum dioxide ceramics) as substrates and insulation or packaging materials, respectively, and precious metals as electrodes have to be combined to systems that do not harm the biological target structure and have to work reliably in a wet environment with ions and proteins. Here, different design, manufacturing and packaging paradigms will be presented and strengths and drawbacks will be discussed in close relation to the envisioned biological and medical applications.

  3. Neural Network Based Intelligent Sootblowing System

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Rhode

    2005-04-01

    , particulate matter is also a by-product of coal combustion. Modern day utility boilers are usually fitted with electrostatic precipitators to aid in the collection of particulate matter. Although extremely efficient, these devices are sensitive to rapid changes in inlet mass concentration as well as total mass loading. Traditionally, utility boilers are equipped with devices known as sootblowers, which use, steam, water or air to dislodge and clean the surfaces within the boiler and are operated based upon established rule or operator's judgment. Poor sootblowing regimes can influence particulate mass loading to the electrostatic precipitators. The project applied a neural network intelligent sootblowing system in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instruments to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler slagging/fouling. This optimization process targeted reduction of NOx of 30%, improved efficiency of 2% and a reduction in opacity of 5%. The neural network system proved to be a non-invasive system which can readily be adapted to virtually any utility boiler. Specific conclusions from this neural network application are listed below. These conclusions should be used in conjunction with the specific details provided in the technical discussions of this report to develop a thorough understanding of the process.

  4. Analog neural network-based helicopter gearbox health monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Monsen, P T; Dzwonczyk, M; Manolakos, E S

    1995-12-01

    The development of a reliable helicopter gearbox health monitoring system (HMS) has been the subject of considerable research over the past 15 years. The deployment of such a system could lead to a significant saving in lives and vehicles as well as dramatically reduce the cost of helicopter maintenance. Recent research results indicate that a neural network-based system could provide a viable solution to the problem. This paper presents two neural network-based realizations of an HMS system. A hybrid (digital/analog) neural system is proposed as an extremely accurate off-line monitoring tool used to reduce helicopter gearbox maintenance costs. In addition, an all analog neural network is proposed as a real-time helicopter gearbox fault monitor that can exploit the ability of an analog neural network to directly compute the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) as a sum of weighted samples. Hardware performance results are obtained using the Integrated Neural Computing Architecture (INCA/1) analog neural network platform that was designed and developed at The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory. The results indicate that it is possible to achieve a 100% fault detection rate with 0% false alarm rate by performing a DFT directly on the first layer of INCA/1 followed by a small-size two-layer feed-forward neural network and a simple post-processing majority voting stage.

  5. Ocular attention-sensing interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaklad, Allen; Glenn, Floyd A., III; Iavecchia, Helene P.; Stokes, James M.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to develop an innovative human-computer interface based on eye movement and voice control. By eliminating a manual interface (keyboard, joystick, etc.), OASIS provides a control mechanism that is natural, efficient, accurate, and low in workload.

  6. Neural fuzzy modeling of anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.H.; Zhang, X.

    1999-12-01

    Anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems are difficult to model because their performance is complex and varies significantly with different reactor configurations, influent characteristics, and operational conditions. Instead of conventional kinetic modeling, advanced neural fuzzy technology was employed to develop a conceptual adaptive model for anaerobic treatment systems. The conceptual neural fuzzy model contains the robustness of fuzzy systems, the learning ability of neural networks, and can adapt to various situations. The conceptual model was used to simulate the daily performance of two high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment systems with satisfactory results obtained.

  7. Neural Systems for Speech and Song in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Grace; Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Schneider, Harry; Hirsch, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Despite language disabilities in autism, music abilities are frequently preserved. Paradoxically, brain regions associated with these functions typically overlap, enabling investigation of neural organization supporting speech and song in autism. Neural systems sensitive to speech and song were compared in low-functioning autistic and age-matched…

  8. Neural Control of a Tracking Task via Attention-Gated Reinforcement Learning for Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Wang, Fang; Xu, Kai; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-05-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL)-based brain machine interfaces (BMIs) enable the user to learn from the environment through interactions to complete the task without desired signals, which is promising for clinical applications. Previous studies exploited Q-learning techniques to discriminate neural states into simple directional actions providing the trial initial timing. However, the movements in BMI applications can be quite complicated, and the action timing explicitly shows the intention when to move. The rich actions and the corresponding neural states form a large state-action space, imposing generalization difficulty on Q-learning. In this paper, we propose to adopt attention-gated reinforcement learning (AGREL) as a new learning scheme for BMIs to adaptively decode high-dimensional neural activities into seven distinct movements (directional moves, holdings and resting) due to the efficient weight-updating. We apply AGREL on neural data recorded from M1 of a monkey to directly predict a seven-action set in a time sequence to reconstruct the trajectory of a center-out task. Compared to Q-learning techniques, AGREL could improve the target acquisition rate to 90.16% in average with faster convergence and more stability to follow neural activity over multiple days, indicating the potential to achieve better online decoding performance for more complicated BMI tasks.

  9. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method.

  10. System Identification of X-33 Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Shiv

    2003-01-01

    present attempt, as a start, focuses only on the entry phase. Since the main engine remains cut off in this phase, there is no thrust acting on the system. This considerably simplifies the equations of motion. We introduce another simplification by assuming the system to be linear after some non-linearities are removed analytically from our consideration. Under these assumptions, the problem could be solved by Classical Statistics by employing the least sum of squares approach. Instead we chose to use the Neural Network method. This method has many advantages. It is modern, more efficient, can be adapted to work even when the assumptions are diluted. In fact, Neural Networks try to model the human brain and are capable of pattern recognition.

  11. Neural network classification of autoregressive features from electroencephalogram signals for brain computer interface design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Nai-Jen; Palaniappan, Ramaswamy

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we have designed a two-state brain-computer interface (BCI) using neural network (NN) classification of autoregressive (AR) features from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals extracted during mental tasks. The main purpose of the study is to use Keirn and Aunon's data to investigate the performance of different mental task combinations and different AR features for BCI design for individual subjects. In the experimental study, EEG signals from five mental tasks were recorded from four subjects. Different combinations of two mental tasks were studied for each subject. Six different feature extraction methods were used to extract the features from the EEG signals: AR coefficients computed with Burg's algorithm, AR coefficients computed with a least-squares (LS) algorithm and adaptive autoregressive (AAR) coefficients computed with a least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. All the methods used order six applied to 125 data points and these three methods were repeated with the same data but with segmentation into five segments in increments of 25 data points. The multilayer perceptron NN trained by the back-propagation algorithm (MLP-BP) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to classify the computed features into different categories that represent the mental tasks. We compared the classification performances among the six different feature extraction methods. The results showed that sixth-order AR coefficients with the LS algorithm without segmentation gave the best performance (93.10%) using MLP-BP and (97.00%) using LDA. The results also showed that the segmentation and AAR methods are not suitable for this set of EEG signals. We conclude that, for different subjects, the best mental task combinations are different and proper selection of mental tasks and feature extraction methods are essential for the BCI design.

  12. Short-term synaptic plasticity and heterogeneity in neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejias, J. F.; Kappen, H. J.; Longtin, A.; Torres, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We review some recent results on neural dynamics and information processing which arise when considering several biophysical factors of interest, in particular, short-term synaptic plasticity and neural heterogeneity. The inclusion of short-term synaptic plasticity leads to enhanced long-term memory capacities, a higher robustness of memory to noise, and irregularity in the duration of the so-called up cortical states. On the other hand, considering some level of neural heterogeneity in neuron models allows neural systems to optimize information transmission in rate coding and temporal coding, two strategies commonly used by neurons to codify information in many brain areas. In all these studies, analytical approximations can be made to explain the underlying dynamics of these neural systems.

  13. Interface management for the Mined Geologic Disposal System

    SciTech Connect

    Ashlock, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the interface management process that is to be used for Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) development. As part of the systems engineering and integration performed on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), interface management is critical in the development of the potential MGDS. The application of interface management on the YMP directly addresses integration between physical elements of the MGDS and the organizations responsible for their development.

  14. Exchange bias of the interface spin system at the Fe/MgO interface.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Smith, K J; Lüpke, G; Hanbicki, A T; Goswami, R; Li, C H; Zhao, H B; Jonker, B T

    2013-06-01

    The ferromagnet/oxide interface is key to developing emerging multiferroic and spintronic technologies with new functionality. Here we probe the Fe/MgO interface magnetization, and identify a new exchange bias phenomenon manifested only in the interface spin system, and not in the bulk. The interface magnetization exhibits a pronounced exchange bias, and the hysteresis loop is shifted entirely to one side of the zero field axis. However, the bulk magnetization does not, in marked contrast to typical systems where exchange bias is manifested in the net magnetization. This reveals the existence of an antiferromagnetic exchange pinning layer at the interface, identified here as FeO patches that exist even for a nominally 'clean' interface. These results demonstrate that atomic moments at the interface are non-collinear with the bulk magnetization, and therefore may affect the net anisotropy or serve as spin scattering sites. We control the exchange bias magnitude by varying the interface oxygen concentration and Fe-O bonding.

  15. Neural network simulations of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, J L

    1990-01-01

    Present knowledge of brain mechanisms is mainly based on anatomical and physiological studies. Such studies are however insufficient to understand the information processing of the brain. The present new focus on neural network studies is the most likely candidate to fill this gap. The present paper reviews some of the history and current status of neural network studies. It signals some of the essential problems for which answers have to be found before substantial progress in the field can be made. PMID:2245130

  16. Docosahexaenoic acid in neural signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid has been conserved in neural signalling systems in the cephalopods, fish, amphibian, reptiles, birds, mammals, primates and humans. This extreme conservation, despite wide genomic changes over 500 million years, testifies to a uniqueness of this molecule in the brain. The brain selectively incorporates docosahexaenoic acid and its rate of incorporation into the developing brain has been shown to be greater than ten times more efficient than its synthesis from the omega 3 fatty acids of land plant origin. Data has now been published demonstrating a significant influence of dietary omega 3 fatty acids on neural gene expression. As docosahexaenoic acid is the only omega 3 fatty acid in the brain, it is likely that it is the ligand involved. The selective uptake, requirement for function and stimulation of gene expression would have conferred an advantage to a primate which separated from the chimpanzees in the forests and woodlands and sought a different ecological niche. In view of the paucity of docosahexaenoic acid in the land food chain it is likely that the advantage would have been gained from a lacustrine or marine coastal habitat with access to food rich in docosahexaenoic acid and the accessory micronutrients, such as iodine, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium, of importance in brain development and protection against peroxidation. Land agricultural development has, in recent time, come to dominate the human food chain. The decline in use and availability of aquatic resources is not considered important by Langdon (2006) as he considers the resource was not needed for human evolution and can be replaced from the terrestrial food chain. This notion is not supported by the biochemistry nor the molecular biology. He misses the point that the shoreline hypothesis is not just dependent on docosahexaenoic acid but also on the other accessory nutrients specifically required by the brain. Moreover he neglects the basic principle of Darwinian

  17. Verification and Validation of Neural Networks for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; Nelson, Stacy; Schumann, Johann

    2002-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center V&V working group and NASA Ames Research Center Automated Software Engineering (ASE) group collaborated to prepare this report. The purpose is to describe V&V processes and methods for certification of neural networks for aerospace applications, particularly adaptive flight control systems like Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS) that use neural networks. This report is divided into the following two sections: Overview of Adaptive Systems and V&V Processes/Methods.

  18. Verification and Validation of Neural Networks for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; Nelson, Stacy; Schumman, Johann; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center V&V working group and NASA Ames Research Center Automated Software Engineering (ASE) group collaborated to prepare this report. The purpose is to describe V&V processes and methods for certification of neural networks for aerospace applications, particularly adaptive flight control systems like Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS) that use neural networks. This report is divided into the following two sections: 1) Overview of Adaptive Systems; and 2) V&V Processes/Methods.

  19. Systems Engineering Interfaces: A Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fosse, Elyse; Delp, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Currently: Ops Rev developed and maintains a framework that includes interface-specific language, patterns, and Viewpoints. Ops Rev implements the framework to design MOS 2.0 and its 5 Mission Services. Implementation de-couples interfaces and instances of interaction Future: A Mission MOSE implements the approach and uses the model based artifacts for reviews. The framework extends further into the ground data layers and provides a unified methodology.

  20. An Intelligent System Approach for Graphical User Interface Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Hulya; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents an approach to manage a decision support system (DSS) user interface called Expert System Interface Manager (ESIM). The importance of integrating research findings in the framework is noted; an architecture for ESIM is developed; and the prototype of the ESIM implementation is presented. (Contains 37 references.) (JLB)

  1. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Philips, John; Hartenstein, Ray; Bassman, Mitchell; Ruskin, Leslie; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1991-01-01

    A set of procedural and functional requirements are presented for the interface between software development environments and software integration and test systems used for space station ground systems software. The requirements focus on the need for centralized configuration management of software as it is transitioned from development to formal, target based testing. This concludes the GSDE Interface Requirements study. A summary is presented of findings concerning the interface itself, possible interface and prototyping directions for further study, and results of the investigation of the Cronus distributed applications environment.

  2. Man-systems integration and the man-machine interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on man-systems integration and the man-machine interface are presented. Man-systems integration applies the systems' approach to the integration of the user and the machine to form an effective, symbiotic Man-Machine System (MMS). A MMS is a combination of one or more human beings and one or more physical components that are integrated through the common purpose of achieving some objective. The human operator interacts with the system through the Man-Machine Interface (MMI).

  3. Implantable Graphene-based Neural Electrode Interfaces for Electrophysiology and Neurochemistry in In Vivo Hyperacute Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ta-Chung; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Chu, Chao-Yi; Huang, Wei-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Chao-Ting; Chu, Wei-Lin; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-13

    Implantable microelectrode arrays have attracted considerable interest due to their high temporal and spatial resolution recording of neuronal activity in tissues. We herein presented an implantable multichannel neural probe with multiple real-time monitoring of neural-chemical and neural-electrical signals by a nonenzymatic neural-chemical interface, which was designed by creating the newly developed reduced graphene oxide-gold oxide (rGO/Au2O3) nanocomposite electrode. The modified electrode on the neural probe was prepared by a facile one-step cyclic voltammetry (CV) electrochemical method with simultaneous occurrence of gold oxidation and GOs reduction to induce the intimate attachment by electrostatic interaction using chloride ions (Cl(-)). The rGO/Au2O3-modified electrode at a low deposition scan rate of 10 mVs(-1) displayed significantly improved electrocatalytic activity due to large active areas and well-dispersive attached rGO sheets. The in vitro amperometric response to H2O2 demonstrated a fast response of less than 5 s and a very low detection limit of 0.63 μM. In in vivo hyperacute stroke model, the concentration of H2O2 was measured as 100.48 ± 4.52 μM for rGO/Au2O3 electrode within 1 h photothrombotic stroke, which was much higher than that (71.92 μM ± 2.52 μM) for noncoated electrode via in vitro calibration. Simultaneously, the somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) test provided reliable and precise validation for detecting functional changes of neuronal activities. This newly developed implantable probe with localized rGO/Au2O3 nanocomposite electrode can serve as a rapid and reliable sensing platform for practical H2O2 detection in the brain or for other neural-chemical molecules in vivo. PMID:26653098

  4. Dopamine system: manager of neural pathways.

    PubMed

    Hong, Simon

    2013-01-01

    There are a growing number of roles that midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons assume, such as, reward, aversion, alerting and vigor. Here I propose a theory that may be able to explain why the suggested functions of DA came about. It has been suggested that largely parallel cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortico loops exist to control different aspects of behavior. I propose that (1) the midbrain DA system is organized in a similar manner, with different groups of DA neurons corresponding to these parallel neural pathways (NPs). The DA system can be viewed as the "manager" of these parallel NPs in that it recruits and activates only the task-relevant NPs when they are needed. It is likely that the functions of those NPs that have been consistently activated by the corresponding DA groups are facilitated. I also propose that (2) there are two levels of DA roles: the How and What roles. The How role is encoded in tonic and phasic DA neuron firing patterns and gives a directive to its target NP: how vigorously its function needs to be carried out. The tonic DA firing is to provide the needed level of DA in the target NPs to support their expected behavioral and mental functions; it is only when a sudden unexpected boost or suppression of activity is required by the relevant target NP that DA neurons in the corresponding NP act in a phasic manner. The What role is the implementational aspect of the role of DA in the target NP, such as binding to D1 receptors to boost working memory. This What aspect of DA explains why DA seems to assume different functions depending on the region of the brain in which it is involved. In terms of the role of the lateral habenula (LHb), the LHb is expected to suppress maladaptive behaviors and mental processes by controlling the DA system. The demand-based smart management by the DA system may have given animals an edge in evolution with adaptive behaviors and a better survival rate in resource-scarce situations. PMID:24367324

  5. Space transportation system payload interface verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everline, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper considers STS payload-interface verification requirements and the capability provided by STS to support verification. The intent is to standardize as many interfaces as possible, not only through the design, development, test and evaluation (DDT and E) phase of the major payload carriers but also into the operational phase. The verification process is discussed in terms of its various elements, such as the Space Shuttle DDT and E (including the orbital flight test program) and the major payload carriers DDT and E (including the first flights). Five tools derived from the Space Shuttle DDT and E are available to support the verification process: mathematical (structural and thermal) models, the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the Shuttle Manipulator Development Facility, and interface-verification equipment (cargo-integration test equipment).

  6. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  7. Neural networks for self-learning control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Derrick H.; Widrow, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how a neural network can learn of its own accord to control a nonlinear dynamic system. An emulator, a multilayered neural network, learns to identify the system's dynamic characteristics. The controller, another multilayered neural network, next learns to control the emulator. The self-trained controller is then used to control the actual dynamic system. The learning process continues as the emulator and controller improve and track the physical process. An example is given to illustrate these ideas. The 'truck backer-upper,' a neural network controller that steers a trailer truck while the truck is backing up to a loading dock, is demonstrated. The controller is able to guide the truck to the dock from almost any initial position. The technique explored should be applicable to a wide variety of nonlinear control problems.

  8. Genetic learning in rule-based and neural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The design of neural networks and fuzzy systems can involve complex, nonlinear, and ill-conditioned optimization problems. Often, traditional optimization schemes are inadequate or inapplicable for such tasks. Genetic Algorithms (GA's) are a class of optimization procedures whose mechanics are based on those of natural genetics. Mathematical arguments show how GAs bring substantial computational leverage to search problems, without requiring the mathematical characteristics often necessary for traditional optimization schemes (e.g., modality, continuity, availability of derivative information, etc.). GA's have proven effective in a variety of search tasks that arise in neural networks and fuzzy systems. This presentation begins by introducing the mechanism and theoretical underpinnings of GA's. GA's are then related to a class of rule-based machine learning systems called learning classifier systems (LCS's). An LCS implements a low-level production-system that uses a GA as its primary rule discovery mechanism. This presentation illustrates how, despite its rule-based framework, an LCS can be thought of as a competitive neural network. Neural network simulator code for an LCS is presented. In this context, the GA is doing more than optimizing and objective function. It is searching for an ecology of hidden nodes with limited connectivity. The GA attempts to evolve this ecology such that effective neural network performance results. The GA is particularly well adapted to this task, given its naturally-inspired basis. The LCS/neural network analogy extends itself to other, more traditional neural networks. Conclusions to the presentation discuss the implications of using GA's in ecological search problems that arise in neural and fuzzy systems.

  9. A Graphical User-Interface for Propulsion System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.; Ryall, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    NASA LeRC uses a series of computer codes to calculate installed propulsion system performance and weight. The need to evaluate more advanced engine concepts with a greater degree of accuracy has resulted in an increase in complexity of this analysis system. Therefore, a graphical user interface was developed to allow the analyst to more quickly and easily apply these codes. The development of this interface and the rationale for the approach taken are described. The interface consists of a method of pictorially representing and editing the propulsion system configuration, forms for entering numerical data, on-line help and documentation, post processing of data, and a menu system to control execution.

  10. Novel 3D plasmonic nano-electrodes for cellular investigations and neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malerba, Mario; Dipalo, Michele; Messina, Gabriele C.; Amin, Hayder; La Rocca, Rosanna; Shalabaeva, Victoria; Simi, Alessandro; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; De Angelis, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    We propose the development of an innovative plasmonic-electronic multifunctional platform, capable at the same time of performing chemical analysis and electronic recordings from a cellular interface. The system, based on 3D hollow metallic nanotubes, integrated on customized multi-electrode-arrays, allows the study of neuronal signaling over different lengths, spanning from the molecular, to the cellular, to the network scale. Here we show that the same structures are efficient electric field enhancers, despite the continuous metal layer at the base, which connects them to the electric components of the integrated circuits. The methodology we propose, due to its simplicity and high throughput, has the potential for further improvements both in the field of plasmonics, and in the integration on large areas of commercial active electronic devices.

  11. Hybrid neural network and rule-based pattern recognition system capable of self-modification

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.W.; Silliman, M.; Walker, M.; Spelt, P.F. ); Rao, N.S.V. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid neural network and rule-based pattern recognition system architecture which is capable of self-modification or learning. The central research issue to be addressed for a multiclassifier hybrid system is whether such a system can perform better than the two classifiers taken by themselves. The hybrid system employs a hierarchical architecture, and it can be interfaced with one or more sensors. Feature extraction routines operating on raw sensor data produce feature vectors which serve as inputs to neural network classifiers at the next level in the hierarchy. These low-level neural networks are trained to provide further discrimination of the sensor data. A set of feature vectors is formed from a concatenation of information from the feature extraction routines and the low-level neural network results. A rule-based classifier system uses this feature set to determine if certain expected environmental states, conditions, or objects are present in the sensors' current data stream. The rule-based system has been given an a priori set of models of the expected environmental states, conditions, or objects which it is expected to identify. The rule-based system forms many candidate directed graphs of various combinations of incoming features vectors, and it uses a suitably chosen metric to measure the similarity between candidate and model directed graphs. The rule-based system must decide if there is a match between one of the candidate graphs and a model graph. If a match is found, then the rule-based system invokes a routine to create and train a new high-level neural network from the appropriate feature vector data to recognize when this model state is present in future sensor data streams. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Multiple neural network approaches to clinical expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Derek F.

    1990-08-01

    We briefly review the concept of computer aided medical diagnosis and more extensively review the the existing literature on neural network applications in the field. Neural networks can function as simple expert systems for diagnosis or prognosis. Using a public database we develop a neural network for the diagnosis of a major presenting symptom while discussing the development process and possible approaches. MEDICAL EXPERTS SYSTEMS COMPUTER AIDED DIAGNOSIS Biomedicine is an incredibly diverse and multidisciplinary field and it is not surprising that neural networks with their many applications are finding more and more applications in the highly non-linear field of biomedicine. I want to concentrate on neural networks as medical expert systems for clinical diagnosis or prognosis. Expert Systems started out as a set of computerized " ifthen" rules. Everything was reduced to boolean logic and the promised land of computer experts was said to be in sight. It never came. Why? First the computer code explodes as the number of " ifs" increases. All the " ifs" have to interact. Second experts are not very good at reducing expertise to language. It turns out that experts recognize patterns and have non-verbal left-brain intuition decision processes. Third learning by example rather than learning by rule is the way natural brains works and making computers work by rule-learning is hideously labor intensive. Neural networks can learn from example. They learn the results

  13. Design of speaker recognition system based on artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanhong; Wang, Li; Lin, Han; Li, Jinlong

    2012-10-01

    Speaker recognition is to recognize speaker's identity from its voice which contains physiological and behavioral characteristics unique to each individual. In this paper, the artificial neural network model, which has very good capacity of non-linear division in characteristic space, is used for pattern matching. The speaker's sample characteristic domain is built for his mixed voice characteristic signals based on Kmeanlbg algorithm. Then the dimension of the inputting eigenvector is reduced, and the redundant information is got rid of. On this basis, BP neural network is used to divide capacity area for characteristic space nonlinearly, and the BP neural network acts as a classifier for the speaker. Finally, a speaker recognition system based on the neural network is realized and the experiment results validate the recognition performance and robustness of the system.

  14. Microfluidic on-chip fluorescence-activated interface control system

    PubMed Central

    Haiwang, Li; Nguyen, N. T.; Wong, T. N.; Ng, S. L.

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic dynamic fluorescence-activated interface control system was developed for lab-on-a-chip applications. The system consists of a straight rectangular microchannel, a fluorescence excitation source, a detection sensor, a signal conversion circuit, and a high-voltage feedback system. Aqueous NaCl as conducting fluid and aqueous glycerol as nonconducting fluid were introduced to flow side by side into the straight rectangular microchannel. Fluorescent dye was added to the aqueous NaCl to work as a signal representing the interface position. Automatic control of the liquid interface was achieved by controlling the electroosmotic effect that exists only in the conducting fluid using a high-voltage feedback system. A LABVIEW program was developed to control the output of high-voltage power supply according the actual interface position, and then the interface position is modified as the output of high-voltage power supply. At last, the interface can be moved to the desired position automatically using this feedback system. The results show that the system presented in this paper can control an arbitrary interface location in real time. The effects of viscosity ratio, flow rates, and polarity of electric field were discussed. This technique can be extended to switch the sample flow and droplets automatically. PMID:21173886

  15. The intelligent user interface for NASA's advanced information management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas, Jr.; Rolofs, Larry H.; Wattawa, Scott L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Intelligent Data Management Project to design and develop advanced information management systems. The project's primary goal is to formulate, design and develop advanced information systems that are capable of supporting the agency's future space research and operational information management needs. The first effort of the project was the development of a prototype Intelligent User Interface to an operational scientific database, using expert systems and natural language processing technologies. An overview of Intelligent User Interface formulation and development is given.

  16. Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) functional description and interface document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, R. C.; Shank, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a functional description of the Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) and of interfaces between FEDS and external hardware and software. FEDS is a modification of the Automated Orbit Determination System (AODS). FEDS has been developed to support a ground demonstration of microprocessor-based onboard orbit determination. This document provides an overview of the structure and logic of FEDS and details the various operational procedures to build and execute FEDS. It also documents a microprocessor interface between FEDS and a TDRSS user transponder and describes a software simulator of the interface used in the development and system testing of FEDS.

  17. The Criticality Hypothesis in Neural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipanah, Yahya

    There is mounting evidence that neural networks of the cerebral cortex exhibit scale invariant dynamics. At the larger scale, fMRI recordings have shown evidence for spatiotemporal long range correlations. On the other hand, at the smaller scales this scale invariance is marked by the power law distribution of the size and duration of spontaneous bursts of activity, which are referred as neuronal avalanches. The existence of such avalanches has been confirmed by several studies in vitro and in vivo, among different species and across multiple scales, from spatial scale of MEG and EEG down to single cell resolution. This prevalent scale free nature of cortical activity suggests the hypothesis that the cortex resides at a critical state between two phases of order (short-lasting activity) and disorder (long-lasting activity). In addition, it has been shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that being at criticality brings about certain functional advantages for information processing. However, despite the plenty of evidence and plausibility of the neural criticality hypothesis, still very little is known on how the brain may leverage such criticality to facilitate neural coding. Moreover, the emergent functions that may arise from critical dynamics is poorly understood. In the first part of this thesis, we review several pieces of evidence for the neural criticality hypothesis at different scales, as well as some of the most popular theories of self-organized criticality (SOC). Thereafter, we will focus on the most prominent evidence from small scales, namely neuronal avalanches. We will explore the effect of adaptation and how it can maintain scale free dynamics even at the presence of external stimuli. Using calcium imaging we also experimentally demonstrate the existence of scale free activity at the cellular resolution in vivo. Moreover, by exploring the subsampling issue in neural data, we will find some fundamental constraints of the conventional methods

  18. An implantable 64-channel neural interface with reconfigurable recording and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jesse J; Baldwin, Keith; Kindle, Alex; Guyon, Daniel; Nugent, Brian; Segura, Carlos; Rodriguez, John; Czarnecki, Andrew; Dispirito, Hailey J; Lachapelle, John; Parks, Philip D; Moran, James; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    Next generation implantable medical devices will have the potential to provide more precise and effective therapies through adaptive closed-loop controllers that combine sensing and stimulation across larger numbers of electrode channels. A major challenge in the design of such devices is balancing increased functionality and channel counts with the miniaturization required for implantation within small anatomical spaces. Customized therapies will require adaptive systems capable of tuning which channels are sensed and stimulated to overcome variability in patient-specific needs, surgical placement of electrodes, and chronic physiological responses. In order to address these challenges, we have designed a miniaturized implantable fully-reconfigurable front-end system that is integrated into the distal end of an 8-wire lead, enabling up to 64 electrodes to be dynamically configured for sensing and stimulation. Full reconfigurability is enabled by two custom 32×2 cross-point switch (CPS) matrix ASICs which can route any electrode to either an amplifier with reprogrammable bandwidth and integrated ADC or to one of two independent stimulation channels that can be driven through the lead. The 8-wire circuit includes a digital interface for robust communication as well as a charge-balanced powering scheme for enhanced safety. The system is encased in a hermetic package designed to fit within a 14 mm bur-hole in the skull for neuromodulation of the brain, but could easily be adapted to enhance therapies across a broad spectrum of applications. PMID:26738108

  19. A board system for high-speed image analysis and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sackinger, E; Graf, H P

    1996-01-01

    Two ANNA neural-network chips are integrated on a 6U VME board, to serve as a high-speed platform for a wide variety of algorithms used in neural-network applications as well as in image analysis. The system can implement neural networks of variable sizes and architectures, but can also be used for filtering and feature extraction tasks that are based on convolutions. The board contains a controller implemented with field programmable gate arrays (FPGA's), memory, and bus interfaces, all designed to support the high compute power of the ANNA chips. This new system is designed for maximum speed and is roughly 10 times faster than a previous board. The system has been tested for such tasks as text location, character recognition, and noise removal as well as for emulating cellular neural networks (CNN's). A sustained speed of up to two billion connections per second (GC/s) and a recognition speed of 1000 characters per second has been measured. PMID:18255573

  20. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  1. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis: Operations scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Phillips, John

    1991-01-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the functional and data interface requirements to the link between the GSDE GS/SPF (Amdahl) and the Space Station Control Center (SSCC) and Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) Integration, Verification, and Test Environments (IVTE's). These interfaces will be involved in ground software development of both the control center and the simulation and training systems. Our understanding of the configuration management (CM) interface and the expected functional characteristics of the Amdahl-IVTE interface is described. A set of assumptions and questions that need to be considered and resolved in order to complete the interface functional and data requirements definitions are presented. A listing of information items defined to describe software configuration items in the GSDE CM system is included. It also includes listings of standard reports of CM information and of CM-related tools in the GSDE.

  2. On neural networks in identification and control of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the applicability of neural networks in the identification and control of dynamic systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of how the neural networks handle linear systems and how the new approach is related to conventional system identification and control methods. Extensions of the approach to nonlinear systems are then made. The paper explains the fundamental concepts of neural networks in their simplest terms. Among the topics discussed are feed forward and recurrent networks in relation to the standard state-space and observer models, linear and nonlinear auto-regressive models, linear, predictors, one-step ahead control, and model reference adaptive control for linear and nonlinear systems. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of these important concepts.

  3. Representation of neural networks as Lotka-Volterra systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Yves; Vandewalle, Joos; Louies, Stephane; Brenig, Leon

    1999-03-22

    We study changes of coordinates that allow the representation of the ordinary differential equations describing continuous-time recurrent neural networks into differential equations describing predator-prey models--also called Lotka-Volterra systems. We transform the equations for the neural network first into quasi-monomial form, where we express the vector field of the dynamical system as a linear combination of products of powers of the variables. In practice, this transformation is possible only if the activation function is the hyperbolic tangent or the logistic sigmoied. From this quasi-monomial form, we can directly transform the system further into Lotka-Volterra equations. The resulting Lotka-Volterra system is of higher dimension than the original system, but the behavior of its first variables is equivalent to the behavior of the original neural network.

  4. OCT detection of neural activity in American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyńska, Iwona; Wyszkowska, Joanna; Bukowska, Danuta; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2013-03-01

    We show results of a project which focuses on detection of activity in neural tissue with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) methods. Experiments were performed in neural cords dissected from the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.). Functional OCT imaging was performed with ultrahigh resolution spectral / Fourier domain OCT system (axial resolution 2.5 μm). Electrical stimulation (voltage pulses) was applied to the sensory cercal nerve of the neural cord. Optical detection of functional activation of the sample was performed in the connective between the terminal abdominal ganglion and the fifth abdominal ganglion. Functional OCT data were collected over time with the OCT beam illuminating selected single point in the connectives (i.e. OCT M-scans were acquired). Phase changes of the OCT signal were analyzed to visualize occurrence of activation in the neural cord. Electrophysiology recordings (microelectrode method) were also performed as a reference method to demonstrate electrical response of the sample to stimulation.

  5. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, N. D.; Evrard, R.; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs–Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  6. ScienceOrganizer System and Interface Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    ScienceOrganizer is a specialized knowledge management tool designed to enhance the information storage, organization, and access capabilities of distributed NASA science teams. Users access ScienceOrganizer through an intuitive Web-based interface that enables them to upload, download, and organize project information - including data, documents, images, and scientific records associated with laboratory and field experiments. Information in ScienceOrganizer is "threaded", or interlinked, to enable users to locate, track, and organize interrelated pieces of scientific data. Linkages capture important semantic relationships among information resources in the repository, and these assist users in navigating through the information related to their projects.

  7. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  8. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, N. D.; Evrard, R.; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  9. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus. PMID:27357246

  10. Transport and Metabolism at Blood–Brain Interfaces and in Neural Cells: Relevance to Bilirubin-Induced Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gazzin, Silvia; Strazielle, Nathalie; Tiribelli, Claudio; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Bilirubin, the end-product of heme catabolism, circulates in non-pathological plasma mostly as a protein-bound species. When bilirubin concentration builds up, the free fraction of the molecule increases. Unbound bilirubin then diffuses across blood–brain interfaces (BBIs) into the brain, where it accumulates and exerts neurotoxic effects. In this classical view of bilirubin neurotoxicity, BBIs act merely as structural barriers impeding the penetration of the pigment-bound carrier protein, and neural cells are considered as passive targets of its toxicity. Yet, the role of BBIs in the occurrence of bilirubin encephalopathy appears more complex than being simple barriers to the diffusion of bilirubin, and neural cells such as astrocytes and neurons can play an active role in controlling the balance between the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of bilirubin. This article reviews the emerging in vivo and in vitro data showing that transport and metabolic detoxification mechanisms at the blood–brain and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barriers may modulate bilirubin flux across both cellular interfaces, and that these protective functions can be affected in chronic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Then the in vivo and in vitro arguments in favor of the physiological antioxidant function of intracerebral bilirubin are presented, as well as the potential role of transporters such as ABCC1 and metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P-450 in setting the cerebral cell- and structure-specific toxicity of bilirubin following hyperbilirubinemia. The relevance of these data to the pathophysiology of bilirubin-induced neurological diseases is discussed. PMID:22629246

  11. Nonlinear signal processing using neural networks: Prediction and system modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1987-06-01

    The backpropagation learning algorithm for neural networks is developed into a formalism for nonlinear signal processing. We illustrate the method by selecting two common topics in signal processing, prediction and system modelling, and show that nonlinear applications can be handled extremely well by using neural networks. The formalism is a natural, nonlinear extension of the linear Least Mean Squares algorithm commonly used in adaptive signal processing. Simulations are presented that document the additional performance achieved by using nonlinear neural networks. First, we demonstrate that the formalism may be used to predict points in a highly chaotic time series with orders of magnitude increase in accuracy over conventional methods including the Linear Predictive Method and the Gabor-Volterra-Weiner Polynomial Method. Deterministic chaos is thought to be involved in many physical situations including the onset of turbulence in fluids, chemical reactions and plasma physics. Secondly, we demonstrate the use of the formalism in nonlinear system modelling by providing a graphic example in which it is clear that the neural network has accurately modelled the nonlinear transfer function. It is interesting to note that the formalism provides explicit, analytic, global, approximations to the nonlinear maps underlying the various time series. Furthermore, the neural net seems to be extremely parsimonious in its requirements for data points from the time series. We show that the neural net is able to perform well because it globally approximates the relevant maps by performing a kind of generalized mode decomposition of the maps. 24 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Abnormal Neural Connectivity in Schizophrenia and fMRI-Brain-Computer Interface as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2012-01-01

    Considering that single locations of structural and functional abnormalities are insufficient to explain the diverse psychopathology of schizophrenia, new models have postulated that the impairments associated with the disease arise from a failure to integrate the activity of local and distributed neural circuits: the “abnormal neural connectivity hypothesis.” In the last years, new evidence coming from neuroimaging have supported and expanded this theory. However, despite the increasing evidence that schizophrenia is a disorder of neural connectivity, so far there are no treatments that have shown to produce a significant change in brain connectivity, or that have been specifically designed to alleviate this problem. Brain-Computer Interfaces based on real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI-BCI) are novel techniques that have allowed subjects to achieve self-regulation of circumscribed brain regions. In recent studies, experiments with this technology have resulted in new findings suggesting that this methodology could be used to train subjects to enhance brain connectivity, and therefore could potentially be used as a therapeutic tool in mental disorders including schizophrenia. The present article summarizes the findings coming from hemodynamics-based neuroimaging that support the abnormal connectivity hypothesis in schizophrenia, and discusses a new approach that could address this problem. PMID:23525496

  13. Microfluidic systems for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Bahrami, Sajad; Mirshekari, Hamed; Basri, Seyed Masoud Moosavi; Nik, Amirala Bakhshian; Aref, Amir R; Akbari, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Neural tissue engineering aims at developing novel approaches for the treatment of diseases of the nervous system, by providing a permissive environment for the growth and differentiation of neural cells. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems provide a closer biomimetic environment, and promote better cell differentiation and improved cell function, than could be achieved by conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. With the recent advances in the discovery and introduction of different types of stem cells for tissue engineering, microfluidic platforms have provided an improved microenvironment for the 3D-culture of stem cells. Microfluidic systems can provide more precise control over the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical and physical cues at the cellular level compared to traditional systems. Various microsystems have been designed and fabricated for the purpose of neural tissue engineering. Enhanced neural migration and differentiation, and monitoring of these processes, as well as understanding the behavior of stem cells and their microenvironment have been obtained through application of different microfluidic-based stem cell culture and tissue engineering techniques. As the technology advances it may be possible to construct a "brain-on-a-chip". In this review, we describe the basics of stem cells and tissue engineering as well as microfluidics-based tissue engineering approaches. We review recent testing of various microfluidic approaches for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

  14. Two Serial Data to Pulse Code Modulation System Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Phil

    2006-01-01

    Two pulse code modulation (PCM) system interfaces for asynchronous serial data are described. One interface is for global positioning system (GPS) data on the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) F-15B (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, St. Louis, Missouri) airplane, tail number 836 (F-15B/836). The other is for flight control computer data on the duPont Aerospace (La Jolla, California) DP-1, a 53-percent scale model of the duPont Aerospace DP-2.

  15. Microfabrication of 3D neural probes with combined electrical and chemical interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Jessin; Li, Yuefa; Zhang, Jinsheng; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Yong

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports a novel neural probe technology for the manufacture of 3D arrays of electrodes with integrated microchannels. This new technology is based on a silicon island structure and a simple folding procedure. This method simplifies the assembly or packaging process of 3D neural probes, leading to higher yield and lower cost. Prototypes with 3D arrays of electrodes have been successfully developed. Microchannels have been successfully integrated into the 3D neural probes via isotropic XeF2 gas phase etching and a parylene resealing process. The probes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy imaging, optical imaging, impedance analysis, and atomic force microscopy characterization of the electrode surface. Preliminary animal tests have been carried out to demonstrate the recording functionality of the probes. Flow characteristics of the microchannels were also preliminarily measured.

  16. Evolving artificial neural networks to control chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Eric R.; Burgess, John M.

    1997-08-01

    We develop a genetic algorithm that produces neural network feedback controllers for chaotic systems. The algorithm was tested on the logistic and Hénon maps, for which it stabilizes an unstable fixed point using small perturbations, even in the presence of significant noise. The network training method [D. E. Moriarty and R. Miikkulainen, Mach. Learn. 22, 11 (1996)] requires no previous knowledge about the system to be controlled, including the dimensionality of the system and the location of unstable fixed points. This is the first dimension-independent algorithm that produces neural network controllers using time-series data. A software implementation of this algorithm is available via the World Wide Web.

  17. Self-Organizing Neural Network Models for State Anticipatory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöllä, Matti; Honkela, Timo

    2006-06-01

    A vital mechanism of high-level natural cognitive systems is the anticipatory capability of making decisions based on predicted events in the future. While in some cases the performance of computational cognitive systems can be improved by modeling anticipatory behavior, it has been shown that for many cognitive tasks anticipation is mandatory. In this paper, we review the use of self-organizing artificial neural networks in constructing the state-space model of an anticipatory system. The biologically inspired self-organizing map (SOM) and its topologically dynamic variants such as the growing neural gas (GNG) are discussed using illustrative examples of their performance.

  18. A closed-loop compressive-sensing-based neural recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Mitra, Srinjoy; Suo, Yuanming; Cheng, Andrew; Xiong, Tao; Michon, Frederic; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Kloosterman, Fabian; Chin, Peter S.; Hsiao, Steven; Tran, Trac D.; Yazicioglu, Firat; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Objective. This paper describes a low power closed-loop compressive sensing (CS) based neural recording system. This system provides an efficient method to reduce data transmission bandwidth for implantable neural recording devices. By doing so, this technique reduces a majority of system power consumption which is dissipated at data readout interface. The design of the system is scalable and is a viable option for large scale integration of electrodes or recording sites onto a single device. Approach. The entire system consists of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with 4 recording readout channels with CS circuits, a real time off-chip CS recovery block and a recovery quality evaluation block that provides a closed feedback to adaptively adjust compression rate. Since CS performance is strongly signal dependent, the ASIC has been tested in vivo and with standard public neural databases. Main results. Implemented using efficient digital circuit, this system is able to achieve >10 times data compression on the entire neural spike band (500-6KHz) while consuming only 0.83uW (0.53 V voltage supply) additional digital power per electrode. When only the spikes are desired, the system is able to further compress the detected spikes by around 16 times. Unlike other similar systems, the characteristic spikes and inter-spike data can both be recovered which guarantes a >95% spike classification success rate. The compression circuit occupied 0.11mm2/electrode in a 180nm CMOS process. The complete signal processing circuit consumes <16uW/electrode. Significance. Power and area efficiency demonstrated by the system make it an ideal candidate for integration into large recording arrays containing thousands of electrode. Closed-loop recording and reconstruction performance evaluation further improves the robustness of the compression method, thus making the system more practical for long term recording.

  19. Observer's Interface for Solar System Target Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Anthony; Link, Miranda; Moriarty, Christopher; Stansberry, John A.

    2016-10-01

    When observing an asteroid or comet with HST, it has been necessary for the observer to manually enter the target's orbital elements into the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT). This allowed possible copy/paste transcription errors from the observer's source of orbital elements data. In order to address this issue, APT has now been improved with the capability to identify targets in and then download orbital elements from JPL Horizons. The observer will first use a target name resolver to choose the intended target from the Horizons database, and then download the orbital elements from Horizons directly into APT. A manual entry option is also still retained if the observer does not wish to use elements from Horizons. This new capability is available for HST observing, and it will also be supported for JWST observing. The poster shows examples of this new interface.

  20. Observer's Interface for Solar System Target Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Anthony; Link, Miranda; Moriarty, Christopher; Stansberry, John A.

    2016-01-01

    When observing an asteroid or comet with HST, it has been necessary for the observer to manually enter the target's orbital elements into the Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT). This allowed possible copy/paste transcription errors from the observer's source of orbital elements data. In order to address this issue, APT has now been improved with the capability to identify targets in and then download orbital elements from JPL Horizons. The observer will first use a target name resolver to choose the intended target from the Horizons database, and then download the orbital elements from Horizons directly into APT. A manual entry option is also still retained if the observer does not wish to use elements from Horizons. This new capability is available for HST observing, and it will also be supported for JWST observing. The poster shows examples of this new interface.

  1. Neural systems underlying approach and avoidance in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Aupperle, Robin L; Paulus, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    Approach-avoidance conflict is an important psychological concept that has been used extensively to better understand cognition and emotion. This review focuses on neural systems involved in approach, avoidance, and conflict decision making, and how these systems overlap with implicated neural substrates of anxiety disorders. In particular, the role of amygdala, insula, ventral striatal, and prefrontal regions are discussed with respect to approach and avoidance behaviors. Three specific hypotheses underlying the dysfunction in anxiety disorders are proposed, including: (i) over-representation of avoidance valuation related to limbic overactivation; (ii) under- or over-representation of approach valuation related to attenuated or exaggerated striatal activation respectively; and (iii) insufficient integration and arbitration of approach and avoidance valuations related to attenuated orbitofrontal cortex activation. These dysfunctions can be examined experimentally using versions of existing decision-making paradigms, but may also require new translational and innovative approaches to probe approach-avoidance conflict and related neural systems in anxiety disorders. PMID:21319496

  2. An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J.

    1996-04-01

    An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

  3. Neural systems underlying approach and avoidance in anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robin L., Aupperle; Martin, P. Paulus

    2010-01-01

    Approach-avoidance conflict is an important psychological concept that has been used extensively to better understand cognition and emotion. This review focuses on neural systems involved in approach, avoidance, and conflict decision making, and how these systems overlap with implicated neural substrates of anxiety disorders. In particular, the role of amygdala, insula, ventral striatal, and prefrontal regions are discussed with respect to approach and avoidance behaviors. Three specific hypotheses underlying the dysfunction in anxiety disorders are proposed, including: (i) over-representation of avoidance valuation related to limbic overactivation; (ii) under- or over-representation of approach valuation related to attenuated or exaggerated striatal activation respectively; and (iii) insufficient integration and arbitration of approach and avoidance valuations related to attenuated orbitofrontal cortex activation. These dysfunctions can be examined experimentally using versions of existing decision-making paradigms, but may also require new translational and innovative approaches to probe approach-avoidance conflict and related neural systems in anxiety disorders. PMID:21319496

  4. [Design and Implementation of a Programmable Wireless Neural Stimulation System].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Wencheng; Tan, Ye; Zeng, Jianmin; Xie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes and realizes a programmable wireless neural stimulation system which can be used as a solution of functional electrical stimulation to treat neural diseases. The system is composed of two parts: controller and neural stimulator. The controller can transmit pulse parameters to the stimulator wirelessly, and the stimulator can generate bidirectional pulses with charge balance. The simulator takes use of ADCs to sample on the bidirectional pulse output, which compared with preset amplitude to the DAC output voltage to realize the voltage calibration. Through the test, the whole system works stably and the output of the biphasic charge balanced circuit is definite. The stimulator output ranges from 0 to 5 V ajustably, and the frequency ranges from 1 Hz to 200 Hz ajustably, while the pulse width ranges from 500 μs to 1500 μs ajustably. The duration of the stimulation can be set from 10 s to 10 min. PMID:27197493

  5. Neural signal sampling via the low power wireless pico system.

    PubMed

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz; Cheney, David; Gugel, Karl; Sanchez, Justin C; Principe, Jose C

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a powerful new low power wireless system for sampling multiple channels of neural activity based on Texas Instruments MSP430 microprocessors and Nordic Semiconductor's ultra low power high bandwidth RF transmitters and receivers. The system's development process, component selection, features and test methodology are presented. PMID:17946727

  6. Applications of neural networks in chemical engineering: Hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. ); Grizzaffi, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Expert systems are known to be useful in capturing expertise and applying knowledge to chemical engineering problems such as diagnosis, process control, process simulation, and process advisory. However, expert system applications are traditionally limited to knowledge domains that are heuristic and involve only simple mathematics. Neural networks, on the other hand, represent an emerging technology capable of rapid recognition of patterned behavior without regard to mathematical complexity. Although useful in problem identification, neural networks are not very efficient in providing in-depth solutions and typically do not promote full understanding of the problem or the reasoning behind its solutions. Hence, applications of neural networks have certain limitations. This paper explores the potential for expanding the scope of chemical engineering areas where neural networks might be utilized by incorporating expert systems and neural networks into the same application, a process called hybridization. In addition, hybrid applications are compared with those using more traditional approaches, the results of the different applications are analyzed, and the feasibility of converting the preliminary prototypes described herein into useful final products is evaluated. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Reliability Modeling of Microelectromechanical Systems Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera. J. Sebastian

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are a broad and rapidly expanding field that is currently receiving a great deal of attention because of the potential to significantly improve the ability to sense, analyze, and control a variety of processes, such as heating and ventilation systems, automobiles, medicine, aeronautical flight, military surveillance, weather forecasting, and space exploration. MEMS are very small and are a blend of electrical and mechanical components, with electrical and mechanical systems on one chip. This research establishes reliability estimation and prediction for MEMS devices at the conceptual design phase using neural networks. At the conceptual design phase, before devices are built and tested, traditional methods of quantifying reliability are inadequate because the device is not in existence and cannot be tested to establish the reliability distributions. A novel approach using neural networks is created to predict the overall reliability of a MEMS device based on its components and each component's attributes. The methodology begins with collecting attribute data (fabrication process, physical specifications, operating environment, property characteristics, packaging, etc.) and reliability data for many types of microengines. The data are partitioned into training data (the majority) and validation data (the remainder). A neural network is applied to the training data (both attribute and reliability); the attributes become the system inputs and reliability data (cycles to failure), the system output. After the neural network is trained with sufficient data. the validation data are used to verify the neural networks provided accurate reliability estimates. Now, the reliability of a new proposed MEMS device can be estimated by using the appropriate trained neural networks developed in this work.

  8. Application of neural network to hybrid systems with binary inputs.

    PubMed

    Holderbaum, William

    2007-07-01

    Boolean input systems are in common used in the electric industry. Power supplies include such systems and the power converter represents these. For instance, in power electronics, the control variable are the switching ON and OFF of components as thyristors or transistors. The purpose of this paper is to use neural network (NN) to control continuous systems with Boolean inputs. This method is based on classification of system variations associated with input configurations. The classical supervised backpropagation algorithm is used to train the networks. The training of the artificial neural network and the control of Boolean input systems are presented. The design procedure of control systems is implemented on a nonlinear system. We apply those results to control an electrical system composed of an induction machine and its power converter.

  9. Development and testing of the Automated Fluid Interface System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, Martha E.; Tyler, Tony R.

    1993-01-01

    The Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) is an advanced development program aimed at becoming the standard interface for satellite servicing for years to come. The AFIS will be capable of transferring propellants, fluids, gasses, power, and cryogens from a tanker to an orbiting satellite. The AFIS program currently under consideration is a joint venture between the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and Moog, Inc. An engineering model has been built and is undergoing development testing to investigate the mechanism's abilities.

  10. Development and testing of the Automated Fluid Interface System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Martha E.; Tyler, Tony R.

    1993-05-01

    The Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) is an advanced development program aimed at becoming the standard interface for satellite servicing for years to come. The AFIS will be capable of transferring propellants, fluids, gasses, power, and cryogens from a tanker to an orbiting satellite. The AFIS program currently under consideration is a joint venture between the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and Moog, Inc. An engineering model has been built and is undergoing development testing to investigate the mechanism's abilities.

  11. Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

  12. Optical neural network system for pose determination of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Andrew; Casasent, David

    1990-01-01

    An optical neural network architecture and algorithm based on a Hopfield optimization network are presented for multitarget tracking. This tracker utilizes a neuron for every possible target track, and a quadratic energy function of neural activities which is minimized using gradient descent neural evolution. The neural net tracker is demonstrated as part of a system for determining position and orientation (pose) of spinning satellites with respect to a robotic spacecraft. The input to the system is time sequence video from a single camera. Novelty detection and filtering are utilized to locate and segment novel regions from the input images. The neural net multitarget tracker determines the correspondences (or tracks) of the novel regions as a function of time, and hence the paths of object (satellite) parts. The path traced out by a given part or region is approximately elliptical in image space, and the position, shape and orientation of the ellipse are functions of the satellite geometry and its pose. Having a geometric model of the satellite, and the elliptical path of a part in image space, the three-dimensional pose of the satellite is determined. Digital simulation results using this algorithm are presented for various satellite poses and lighting conditions.

  13. Spatiotemporal stochastic resonance and its consequences in neural model systems.

    PubMed

    Balazsi, Gabor; Kish, Laszlo B.; Moss, Frank E.

    2001-09-01

    The realization of spatiotemporal stochastic resonance is studied in a two-dimensional FitzHugh-Nagumo system, and in a one-dimensional system of integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that spatiotemporal stochastic resonance occurs in these neural model systems, independent of the method of modeling. Moreover, the ways of realization are analogous in the two model systems. The biological implications and open questions are discussed. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779493

  14. A Universal Intelligent System-on-Chip Based Sensor Interface

    PubMed Central

    Mattoli, Virgilio; Mondini, Alessio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Ferri, Gabriele; Dario, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The need for real-time/reliable/low-maintenance distributed monitoring systems, e.g., wireless sensor networks, has been becoming more and more evident in many applications in the environmental, agro-alimentary, medical, and industrial fields. The growing interest in technologies related to sensors is an important indicator of these new needs. The design and the realization of complex and/or distributed monitoring systems is often difficult due to the multitude of different electronic interfaces presented by the sensors available on the market. To address these issues the authors propose the concept of a Universal Intelligent Sensor Interface (UISI), a new low-cost system based on a single commercial chip able to convert a generic transducer into an intelligent sensor with multiple standardized interfaces. The device presented offers a flexible analog and/or digital front-end, able to interface different transducer typologies (such as conditioned, unconditioned, resistive, current output, capacitive and digital transducers). The device also provides enhanced processing and storage capabilities, as well as a configurable multi-standard output interface (including plug-and-play interface based on IEEE 1451.3). In this work the general concept of UISI and the design of reconfigurable hardware are presented, together with experimental test results validating the proposed device. PMID:22163624

  15. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P.

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time. PMID:27013949

  16. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time. PMID:27013949

  17. Benefits of Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; DeBlasio, R.; Thomas, H.; Simoes, M.; Sen, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization of overall electrical system performance is important for the long-term economic viability of distributed energy (DE) systems. With the increasing use of DE systems in industry and its technological advancement, it is becoming more important to understand the integration of these systems with the electric power systems. New markets and benefits for distributed energy applications include the ability to provide ancillary services, improve energy efficiency, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice. Advanced power electronic (PE) interfaces will allow DE systems to provide increased functionality through improved power quality and voltage/VAR support, increase electrical system compatibility by reducing the fault contributions, and flexibility in operations with various other DE sources, while reducing overall interconnection costs. This paper examines the system integration and optimization issues associated with DE systems and show the benefits of using PE interfaces for such applications.

  18. Ultra-low-power and robust digital-signal-processing hardware for implantable neural interface microsystems.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, S; Chiel, H J; Bhunia, S

    2011-04-01

    Implantable microsystems for monitoring or manipulating brain activity typically require on-chip real-time processing of multichannel neural data using ultra low-power, miniaturized electronics. In this paper, we propose an integrated-circuit/architecture-level hardware design framework for neural signal processing that exploits the nature of the signal-processing algorithm. First, we consider different power reduction techniques and compare the energy efficiency between the ultra-low frequency subthreshold and conventional superthreshold design. We show that the superthreshold design operating at a much higher frequency can achieve comparable energy dissipation by taking advantage of extensive power gating. It also provides significantly higher robustness of operation and yield under large process variations. Next, we propose an architecture level preferential design approach for further energy reduction by isolating the critical computation blocks (with respect to the quality of the output signal) and assigning them higher delay margins compared to the noncritical ones. Possible delay failures under parameter variations are confined to the noncritical components, allowing graceful degradation in quality under voltage scaling. Simulation results using prerecorded neural data from the sea-slug (Aplysia californica) show that the application of the proposed design approach can lead to significant improvement in total energy, without compromising the output signal quality under process variations, compared to conventional design approaches. PMID:23851205

  19. Ultra-low-power and robust digital-signal-processing hardware for implantable neural interface microsystems.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, S; Chiel, H J; Bhunia, S

    2011-04-01

    Implantable microsystems for monitoring or manipulating brain activity typically require on-chip real-time processing of multichannel neural data using ultra low-power, miniaturized electronics. In this paper, we propose an integrated-circuit/architecture-level hardware design framework for neural signal processing that exploits the nature of the signal-processing algorithm. First, we consider different power reduction techniques and compare the energy efficiency between the ultra-low frequency subthreshold and conventional superthreshold design. We show that the superthreshold design operating at a much higher frequency can achieve comparable energy dissipation by taking advantage of extensive power gating. It also provides significantly higher robustness of operation and yield under large process variations. Next, we propose an architecture level preferential design approach for further energy reduction by isolating the critical computation blocks (with respect to the quality of the output signal) and assigning them higher delay margins compared to the noncritical ones. Possible delay failures under parameter variations are confined to the noncritical components, allowing graceful degradation in quality under voltage scaling. Simulation results using prerecorded neural data from the sea-slug (Aplysia californica) show that the application of the proposed design approach can lead to significant improvement in total energy, without compromising the output signal quality under process variations, compared to conventional design approaches.

  20. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 1: Systems and Topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes power electronic interfaces for DE applications and the topologies needed for advanced power electronic interfaces. It focuses on photovoltaic, wind, microturbine, fuel cell, internal combustion engine, battery storage, and flywheel storage systems.

  1. Emergent latent symbol systems in recurrent neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monner, Derek; Reggia, James A.

    2012-12-01

    Fodor and Pylyshyn [(1988). Connectionism and cognitive architecture: A critical analysis. Cognition, 28(1-2), 3-71] famously argued that neural networks cannot behave systematically short of implementing a combinatorial symbol system. A recent response from Frank et al. [(2009). Connectionist semantic systematicity. Cognition, 110(3), 358-379] claimed to have trained a neural network to behave systematically without implementing a symbol system and without any in-built predisposition towards combinatorial representations. We believe systems like theirs may in fact implement a symbol system on a deeper and more interesting level: one where the symbols are latent - not visible at the level of network structure. In order to illustrate this possibility, we demonstrate our own recurrent neural network that learns to understand sentence-level language in terms of a scene. We demonstrate our model's learned understanding by testing it on novel sentences and scenes. By paring down our model into an architecturally minimal version, we demonstrate how it supports combinatorial computation over distributed representations by using the associative memory operations of Vector Symbolic Architectures. Knowledge of the model's memory scheme gives us tools to explain its errors and construct superior future models. We show how the model designs and manipulates a latent symbol system in which the combinatorial symbols are patterns of activation distributed across the layers of a neural network, instantiating a hybrid of classical symbolic and connectionist representations that combines advantages of both.

  2. Digital interface of electronic transformers based on embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Qiufeng; Qi, Yincheng

    2008-10-01

    Benefited from digital interface of electronic transformers, information sharing and system integration in substation can be realized. An embedded system-based digital output scheme of electronic transformers is proposed. The digital interface is designed with S3C44B0X 32bit RISC microprocessor as the hardware platform. The μCLinux operation system (OS) is transplanted on ARM7 (S3C44B0X). Applying Ethernet technology as the communication mode in the substation automation system is a new trend. The network interface chip RTL8019AS is adopted. Data transmission is realized through the in-line TCP/IP protocol of uClinux embedded OS. The application result and character analysis show that the design can meet the real-time and reliability requirements of IEC60044-7/8 electronic voltage/current instrument transformer standards.

  3. Using fuzzy logic to integrate neural networks and knowledge-based systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, John

    1991-01-01

    Outlined here is a novel hybrid architecture that uses fuzzy logic to integrate neural networks and knowledge-based systems. The author's approach offers important synergistic benefits to neural nets, approximate reasoning, and symbolic processing. Fuzzy inference rules extend symbolic systems with approximate reasoning capabilities, which are used for integrating and interpreting the outputs of neural networks. The symbolic system captures meta-level information about neural networks and defines its interaction with neural networks through a set of control tasks. Fuzzy action rules provide a robust mechanism for recognizing the situations in which neural networks require certain control actions. The neural nets, on the other hand, offer flexible classification and adaptive learning capabilities, which are crucial for dynamic and noisy environments. By combining neural nets and symbolic systems at their system levels through the use of fuzzy logic, the author's approach alleviates current difficulties in reconciling differences between low-level data processing mechanisms of neural nets and artificial intelligence systems.

  4. Interface requirements in nuclear medicine devices and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, G.Q. Jr.; Brill, A.B.; Noz, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Interface designs for three nuclear medicine imaging systems, and computer networking strategies proposed for medical imaging departments are presented. Configurations for two positron-emission-tomography devices (PET III and ECAT) and a general-purpose tomography instrument (the UNICON) are analyzed in terms of specific performance parameters. Interface designs for these machines are contrasted in terms of utilization of standard versus custom modules, cost, and ease of modification, upgrade, and support. The requirements of general purpose systems for medical image analysis, display, and archiving, are considered, and a realizable state-of-the-art system is specfied, including a suggested timetable.

  5. Engineering neural systems for high-level problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Jared; Reggia, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a long-standing, sometimes contentious debate in AI concerning the relative merits of a symbolic, top-down approach vs. a neural, bottom-up approach to engineering intelligent machine behaviors. While neurocomputational methods excel at lower-level cognitive tasks (incremental learning for pattern classification, low-level sensorimotor control, fault tolerance and processing of noisy data, etc.), they are largely non-competitive with top-down symbolic methods for tasks involving high-level cognitive problem solving (goal-directed reasoning, metacognition, planning, etc.). Here we take a step towards addressing this limitation by developing a purely neural framework named galis. Our goal in this work is to integrate top-down (non-symbolic) control of a neural network system with more traditional bottom-up neural computations. galis is based on attractor networks that can be "programmed" with temporal sequences of hand-crafted instructions that control problem solving by gating the activity retention of, communication between, and learning done by other neural networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by showing that it can be applied successfully to solve sequential card matching problems, using both human performance and a top-down symbolic algorithm as experimental controls. Solving this kind of problem makes use of top-down attention control and the binding together of visual features in ways that are easy for symbolic AI systems but not for neural networks to achieve. Our model can not only be instructed on how to solve card matching problems successfully, but its performance also qualitatively (and sometimes quantitatively) matches the performance of both human subjects that we had perform the same task and the top-down symbolic algorithm that we used as an experimental control. We conclude that the core principles underlying the galis framework provide a promising approach to engineering purely neurocomputational systems for problem

  6. Engineering neural systems for high-level problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Jared; Reggia, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a long-standing, sometimes contentious debate in AI concerning the relative merits of a symbolic, top-down approach vs. a neural, bottom-up approach to engineering intelligent machine behaviors. While neurocomputational methods excel at lower-level cognitive tasks (incremental learning for pattern classification, low-level sensorimotor control, fault tolerance and processing of noisy data, etc.), they are largely non-competitive with top-down symbolic methods for tasks involving high-level cognitive problem solving (goal-directed reasoning, metacognition, planning, etc.). Here we take a step towards addressing this limitation by developing a purely neural framework named galis. Our goal in this work is to integrate top-down (non-symbolic) control of a neural network system with more traditional bottom-up neural computations. galis is based on attractor networks that can be "programmed" with temporal sequences of hand-crafted instructions that control problem solving by gating the activity retention of, communication between, and learning done by other neural networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by showing that it can be applied successfully to solve sequential card matching problems, using both human performance and a top-down symbolic algorithm as experimental controls. Solving this kind of problem makes use of top-down attention control and the binding together of visual features in ways that are easy for symbolic AI systems but not for neural networks to achieve. Our model can not only be instructed on how to solve card matching problems successfully, but its performance also qualitatively (and sometimes quantitatively) matches the performance of both human subjects that we had perform the same task and the top-down symbolic algorithm that we used as an experimental control. We conclude that the core principles underlying the galis framework provide a promising approach to engineering purely neurocomputational systems for problem

  7. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  8. A rule-based neural controller for inverted pendulum system.

    PubMed

    Hao, J; Vandewalle, J; Tan, S

    1993-03-01

    This paper tries to demonstrate how a heuristic neural control approach can be used to solve a complex nonlinear control problem. The control task is to swing up a pendulum mounted on a cart from its stable position (vertically down) to the zero state (up right) and keep it there by applying a sequence of two opposing constant forces of equal magnitude to the mass center of the cart. In addition, the displacement of the cart itself is confined to within a preset limit during the swinging up action and it will eventually be brought to the origin of the track. This is truly a nontrivial nonlinear regulation problem and is considerably difficult compared to the pendulum balancing problem (and its variations) widely adopted as a benchmarking test system for neural controllers. Through the solution of this specific control problem, we try to illustrate a heuristic neural control approach with task decomposition, control rule extraction and neural net rule implementation as its basic elements. Specializing to the pendulum problem, the global control task is decomposed into subtasks namely pendulum positioning and cart positioning. Accordingly, three separate neural subcontrollers are designed to cater to the subtasks and their coordination, i.e., pendulum subcontroller (PSC), cart subcontroller (CSC) and the switching subcontroller (SSC). Each of the subcontrollers is designed based on the rules and guidelines obtained from the experiences of a human operator. The simulation result is included to show the actual performance of the controller.

  9. Neural Network Based System for Equipment Startup Surveillance

    1996-12-18

    NEBSESS is a system for equipment surveillance and fault detection which relies on a neural-network based means for diagnosing disturbances during startup and for automatically actuating the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) as a signal validation means during steady-state operation.

  10. Neural networks for local structure detection in polymorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-10-28

    The accurate identification and classification of local ordered and disordered structures is an important task in atomistic computer simulations. Here, we demonstrate that properly trained artificial neural networks can be used for this purpose. Based on a neural network approach recently developed for the calculation of energies and forces, the proposed method recognizes local atomic arrangements from a set of symmetry functions that characterize the environment around a given atom. The algorithm is simple and flexible and it does not rely on the definition of a reference frame. Using the Lennard-Jones system as well as liquid water and ice as illustrative examples, we show that the neural networks developed here detect amorphous and crystalline structures with high accuracy even in the case of complex atomic arrangements, for which conventional structure detection approaches are unreliable.

  11. Automation and Accountability in Decision Support System Interface Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Mary L.

    2006-01-01

    When the human element is introduced into decision support system design, entirely new layers of social and ethical issues emerge but are not always recognized as such. This paper discusses those ethical and social impact issues specific to decision support systems and highlights areas that interface designers should consider during design with an…

  12. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  13. Dissipative rendering and neural network control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.

    1995-01-01

    Model-based control system designs are limited by the accuracy of the models of the plant, plant uncertainty, and exogenous signals. Although better models can be obtained with system identification, the models and control designs still have limitations. One approach to reduce the dependency on particular models is to design a set of compensators that will guarantee robust stability to a set of plants. Optimization over the compensator parameters can then be used to get the desired performance. Conservativeness of this approach can be reduced by integrating fundamental properties of the plant models. This is the approach of dissipative control design. Dissipative control designs are based on several variations of the Passivity Theorem, which have been proven for nonlinear/linear and continuous-time/discrete-time systems. These theorems depend not on a specific model of a plant, but on its general dissipative properties. Dissipative control design has found wide applicability in flexible space structures and robotic systems that can be configured to be dissipative. Currently, there is ongoing research to improve the performance of dissipative control designs. For aircraft systems that are not dissipative active control may be used to make them dissipative and then a dissipative control design technique can be used. It is also possible that rendering a system dissipative and dissipative control design may be combined into one step. Furthermore, the transformation of a non-dissipative system to dissipative can be done robustly. One sequential design procedure for finite dimensional linear time-invariant systems has been developed. For nonlinear plants that cannot be controlled adequately with a single linear controller, model-based techniques have additional problems. Nonlinear system identification is still a research topic. Lacking analytical models for model-based design, artificial neural network algorithms have recently received considerable attention. Using

  14. Neural transduction in Xenopus laevis lateral line system.

    PubMed

    Strelioff, D; Honrubia, V

    1978-03-01

    1. The process of neural excitation in hair cell systems was studied in an in vitro preparation of the Xenopus laevis (African clawed toad) lateral line organ. A specially designed stimulus chamber was used to apply accurately controlled pressure, water movement, or electrical stimuli, and to record the neural responses of the two afferent fibers innervating each organ or stitch. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of the neural responses to these stimuli, and thus gain insight into the transduction process. 2. A sustained deflection of the hair cell cilia due to a constant flow of water past the capula resulted in a maintained change in the mean firing rate (MFR) of the afferent fibers. The data also demonstrated that the neural response was proportional to the velocity of the water flow and indicated that both deflection and movement of the cilia were the effective physiological stimuli for this hair cell system. 3. The preparations responded to sinusoidal water movements (past the capula) over the entire frequency range of the stimulus chamber, 0.1-130 Hz, and were most sensitive between 10 and 40 Hz. The variation of the MFR and the percent modulation indicated that the average dynamic range of each organ was 23.5 dB. 4. The thresholds, if any, for sustained pressure changes and for sinusoidal pressure variations in the absence of water movements were very high. Due to the limitations of the stimulus chamber it was not possible to generate pressure stimuli of sufficient magnitude to elicit a neural response without also generating suprathreshold water-movement stimuli. Sustained pressures had no detectable effect on the neural response to water-movement stimuli. 5. The preparations were very sensitive to electrical potentials applied across the toad skin on which the hair cells were located. Potentials which made the ciliated surfaces of the hair cells positive with respect to their bases increased the MFR of the fibers, whereas

  15. Neural mechanisms of selective attention in the somatosensory system.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Hysaj, Kristjana; Niebur, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    Selective attention allows organisms to extract behaviorally relevant information while ignoring distracting stimuli that compete for the limited resources of their central nervous systems. Attention is highly flexible, and it can be harnessed to select information based on sensory modality, within-modality feature(s), spatial location, object identity, and/or temporal properties. In this review, we discuss the body of work devoted to understanding mechanisms of selective attention in the somatosensory system. In particular, we describe the effects of attention on tactile behavior and corresponding neural activity in somatosensory cortex. Our focus is on neural mechanisms that select tactile stimuli based on their location on the body (somatotopic-based attention) or their sensory feature (feature-based attention). We highlight parallels between selection mechanisms in touch and other sensory systems and discuss several putative neural coding schemes employed by cortical populations to signal the behavioral relevance of sensory inputs. Specifically, we contrast the advantages and disadvantages of using a gain vs. spike-spike correlation code for representing attended sensory stimuli. We favor a neural network model of tactile attention that is composed of frontal, parietal, and subcortical areas that controls somatosensory cells encoding the relevant stimulus features to enable preferential processing throughout the somatosensory hierarchy. Our review is based on data from noninvasive electrophysiological and imaging data in humans as well as single-unit recordings in nonhuman primates. PMID:27334956

  16. Real-time data acquisition and control system for the measurement of motor and neural data

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Christopher L.; Gandhi, Neeraj J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a powerful, yet flexible real-time data acquisition and control system for use in the triggering and measurement of both analog and digital events. Built using the LabVIEW development architecture (version 7.1) and freely available, this system provides precisely timed auditory and visual stimuli to a subject while recording analog data and timestamps of neural activity retrieved from a window discriminator. The system utilizes the most recent real-time (RT) technology in order to provide not only a guaranteed data acquisition rate of 1 kHz, but a much more difficult to achieve guaranteed system response time of 1 ms. The system interface is windows-based and easy to use, providing a host of configurable options for end-user customization. PMID:15698659

  17. Guidance for human interface with artificial intelligence systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Scott S.; Woods, David D.

    1991-01-01

    The beginning of a research effort to collect and integrate existing research findings about how to combine computer power and people is discussed, including problems and pitfalls as well as desirable features. The goal of the research is to develop guidance for the design of human interfaces with intelligent systems. Fault management tasks in NASA domains are the focus of the investigation. Research is being conducted to support the development of guidance for designers that will enable them to make human interface considerations into account during the creation of intelligent systems.

  18. Dosimeter Corporation's computer interfacing automatic dosimeter (CID) system

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, A.S.

    1985-07-01

    This paper reports that the weakest links in most large-scale quartz-fiber direct-reading dosimeter (DRD) programs are the devices used to read the DRD's; that is, the people who are assigned the DRDs and the technicians who log results, rezero dosimeters, and test dosimeters. These reading devices cannot be programmed for consistent interpretation of DRD readings, and they are notoriously slow at performing readings. They also cannot be easily interfaced to computer-based systems. Ideally, these devices should be replaced or supplemented with machines that can offer better precision, speed, and software. Dosimeter Corporation's Computer Interfaced Automatic Dosimetry (CID) system is one such machine.

  19. Wireless Recording in the Peripheral Nervous System with Ultrasonic Neural Dust.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongjin; Neely, Ryan M; Shen, Konlin; Singhal, Utkarsh; Alon, Elad; Rabaey, Jan M; Carmena, Jose M; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2016-08-01

    The emerging field of bioelectronic medicine seeks methods for deciphering and modulating electrophysiological activity in the body to attain therapeutic effects at target organs. Current approaches to interfacing with peripheral nerves and muscles rely heavily on wires, creating problems for chronic use, while emerging wireless approaches lack the size scalability necessary to interrogate small-diameter nerves. Furthermore, conventional electrode-based technologies lack the capability to record from nerves with high spatial resolution or to record independently from many discrete sites within a nerve bundle. Here, we demonstrate neural dust, a wireless and scalable ultrasonic backscatter system for powering and communicating with implanted bioelectronics. We show that ultrasound is effective at delivering power to mm-scale devices in tissue; likewise, passive, battery-less communication using backscatter enables high-fidelity transmission of electromyogram (EMG) and electroneurogram (ENG) signals from anesthetized rats. These results highlight the potential for an ultrasound-based neural interface system for advancing future bioelectronics-based therapies. PMID:27497221

  20. Robust nonlinear system identification using neural-network models.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Basar, T

    1998-01-01

    We study the problem of identification for nonlinear systems in the presence of unknown driving noise, using both feedforward multilayer neural network and radial basis function network models. Our objective is to resolve the difficulty associated with the persistency of excitation condition inherent to the standard schemes in the neural identification literature. This difficulty is circumvented here by a novel formulation and by using a new class of identification algorithms recently obtained by Didinsky et al. We show how these algorithms can be exploited to successfully identify the nonlinearity in the system using neural-network models. By embedding the original problem in one with noise-perturbed state measurements, we present a class of identifiers (under L1 and L2 cost criteria) which secure a good approximant for the system nonlinearity provided that some global optimization technique is used. In this respect, many available learning algorithms in the current neural-network literature, e.g., the backpropagation scheme and the genetic algorithms-based scheme, with slight modifications, can ensure the identification of the system nonlinearity. Subsequently, we address the same problem under a third, worst case L(infinity) criterion for an RBF modeling. We present a neural-network version of an H(infinity)-based identification algorithm from Didinsky et al and show how, along with an appropriate choice of control input to enhance excitation, under both full-state-derivative information (FSDI) and noise-perturbed full-state-information (NPFSI), it leads to satisfaction of a relevant persistency of excitation condition, and thereby to robust identification of the nonlinearity. Results from several simulation studies have been included to demonstrate the effectiveness of these algorithms.

  1. Cognitive Training for Impaired Neural Systems in Neuropsychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Sophia; Fisher, Melissa; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric illnesses are associated with dysfunction in distributed prefrontal neural systems that underlie perception, cognition, social interactions, emotion regulation, and motivation. The high degree of learning-dependent plasticity in these networks—combined with the availability of advanced computerized technology—suggests that we should be able to engineer very specific training programs that drive meaningful and enduring improvements in impaired neural systems relevant to neuropsychiatric illness. However, cognitive training approaches for mental and addictive disorders must take into account possible inherent limitations in the underlying brain ‘learning machinery' due to pathophysiology, must grapple with the presence of complex overlearned maladaptive patterns of neural functioning, and must find a way to ally with developmental and psychosocial factors that influence response to illness and to treatment. In this review, we briefly examine the current state of knowledge from studies of cognitive remediation in psychiatry and we highlight open questions. We then present a systems neuroscience rationale for successful cognitive training for neuropsychiatric illnesses, one that emphasizes the distributed nature of neural assemblies that support cognitive and affective processing, as well as their plasticity. It is based on the notion that, during successful learning, the brain represents the relevant perceptual and cognitive/affective inputs and action outputs with disproportionately larger and more coordinated populations of neurons that are distributed (and that are interacting) across multiple levels of processing and throughout multiple brain regions. This approach allows us to address limitations found in earlier research and to introduce important principles for the design and evaluation of the next generation of cognitive training for impaired neural systems. We summarize work to date using such neuroscience-informed methods and indicate

  2. Design of natural user interface of indoor surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lili; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Mu-Jin; Cao, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Conventional optical video surveillance systems usually just record what they view, but they can't make sense of what they are viewing. With lots of useless video information stored and transmitted, waste of memory space and increasing the bandwidth are produced every day. In order to reduce the overall cost of the system, and improve the application value of the monitoring system, we use the Kinect sensor with CMOS infrared sensor, as a supplement to the traditional video surveillance system, to establish the natural user interface system for indoor surveillance. In this paper, the architecture of the natural user interface system, complex background monitoring object separation, user behavior analysis algorithms are discussed. By the analysis of the monitoring object, instead of the command language grammar, when the monitored object need instant help, the system with the natural user interface sends help information. We introduce the method of combining the new system and traditional monitoring system. In conclusion, theoretical analysis and experimental results in this paper show that the proposed system is reasonable and efficient. It can satisfy the system requirements of non-contact, online, real time, higher precision and rapid speed to control the state of affairs at the scene.

  3. Synthesis of recurrent neural networks for dynamical system simulation.

    PubMed

    Trischler, Adam P; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M T

    2016-08-01

    We review several of the most widely used techniques for training recurrent neural networks to approximate dynamical systems, then describe a novel algorithm for this task. The algorithm is based on an earlier theoretical result that guarantees the quality of the network approximation. We show that a feedforward neural network can be trained on the vector-field representation of a given dynamical system using backpropagation, then recast it as a recurrent network that replicates the original system's dynamics. After detailing this algorithm and its relation to earlier approaches, we present numerical examples that demonstrate its capabilities. One of the distinguishing features of our approach is that both the original dynamical systems and the recurrent networks that simulate them operate in continuous time.

  4. Variable Neural Adaptive Robust Control: A Switched System Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Zak, Stanislaw H.

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. The variable-structure RBF network solves the problem of structure determination associated with fixed-structure RBF networks. It can determine the network structure on-line dynamically by adding or removing radial basis functions according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is taken into account in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the aid of the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  5. Neural Network Control of a Magnetically Suspended Rotor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic bearings offer significant advantages because they do not come into contact with other parts during operation, which can reduce maintenance. Higher speeds, no friction, no lubrication, weight reduction, precise position control, and active damping make them far superior to conventional contact bearings. However, there are technical barriers that limit the application of this technology in industry. One of them is the need for a nonlinear controller that can overcome the system nonlinearity and uncertainty inherent in magnetic bearings. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a neural network was selected as a nonlinear controller because it generates a neural model without any detailed information regarding the internal working of the magnetic bearing system. It can be used even for systems that are too complex for an accurate system model to be derived. A feed-forward architecture with a back-propagation learning algorithm was selected because of its proven performance, accuracy, and relatively easy implementation.

  6. Three neural network based sensor systems for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1994-05-01

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. One of the missions of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is to examine and develop new technologies for environmental restoration and waste management at the Hanford Site. In this paper, three prototype sensing systems are discussed. These prototypes are composed of sensing elements, data acquisition system, computer, and neural network implemented in software, and are capable of automatically identifying contaminants. The first system employs an array of tin-oxide gas sensors and is used to identify chemical vapors. The second system employs an array of optical sensors and is used to identify the composition of chemical dyes in liquids. The third system contains a portable gamma-ray spectrometer and is used to identify radioactive isotopes. In these systems, the neural network is used to identify the composition of the sensed contaminant. With a neural network, the intense computation takes place during the training process. Once the network is trained, operation consists of propagating the data through the network. Since the computation involved during operation consists of vector-matrix multiplication and application of look-up tables unknown samples can be rapidly identified in the field.

  7. Database interfaces on NASA's heterogeneous distributed database system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shou-Hsuan Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) interface module (Module 9: Resident Primitive Processing Package) is to provide data transfer between local DAVID systems and resident Data Base Management Systems (DBMSs). The result of current research is summarized. A detailed description of the interface module is provided. Several Pascal templates were constructed. The Resident Processor program was also developed. Even though it is designed for the Pascal templates, it can be modified for templates in other languages, such as C, without much difficulty. The Resident Processor itself can be written in any programming language. Since Module 5 routines are not ready yet, there is no way to test the interface module. However, simulation shows that the data base access programs produced by the Resident Processor do work according to the specifications.

  8. Advanced human-system interface design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced, computer-based, human-system interface designs are emerging in nuclear power plant (NPP) control rooms. These developments may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will greatly affect the ways in which operators interact with systems. At present, however, the only guidance available to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the review of control room-operator interfaces, NUREG-0700, was written prior to these technological changes and is thus not designed to address them. The objective of the project reported in this paper is to develop an Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline for use in performing human factors reviews of advanced operator interfaces. This guideline will be implemented, in part, as a portable, computer-based, interactive document for field use. The paper describes the overall guideline development methodology, the present status of the document, and the plans for further guideline testing and development. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Establishing a Novel Modeling Tool: A Python-Based Interface for a Neuromorphic Hardware System

    PubMed Central

    Brüderle, Daniel; Müller, Eric; Davison, Andrew; Muller, Eilif; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    Neuromorphic hardware systems provide new possibilities for the neuroscience modeling community. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of the micro-electronic emulation of neural computation, such models are highly scalable without a loss of speed. However, the communities of software simulator users and neuromorphic engineering in neuroscience are rather disjoint. We present a software concept that provides the possibility to establish such hardware devices as valuable modeling tools. It is based on the integration of the hardware interface into a simulator-independent language which allows for unified experiment descriptions that can be run on various simulation platforms without modification, implying experiment portability and a huge simplification of the quantitative comparison of hardware and simulator results. We introduce an accelerated neuromorphic hardware device and describe the implementation of the proposed concept for this system. An example setup and results acquired by utilizing both the hardware system and a software simulator are demonstrated. PMID:19562085

  10. Establishing a novel modeling tool: a python-based interface for a neuromorphic hardware system.

    PubMed

    Brüderle, Daniel; Müller, Eric; Davison, Andrew; Muller, Eilif; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2009-01-01

    Neuromorphic hardware systems provide new possibilities for the neuroscience modeling community. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of the micro-electronic emulation of neural computation, such models are highly scalable without a loss of speed. However, the communities of software simulator users and neuromorphic engineering in neuroscience are rather disjoint. We present a software concept that provides the possibility to establish such hardware devices as valuable modeling tools. It is based on the integration of the hardware interface into a simulator-independent language which allows for unified experiment descriptions that can be run on various simulation platforms without modification, implying experiment portability and a huge simplification of the quantitative comparison of hardware and simulator results. We introduce an accelerated neuromorphic hardware device and describe the implementation of the proposed concept for this system. An example setup and results acquired by utilizing both the hardware system and a software simulator are demonstrated. PMID:19562085

  11. A Flexible Behavioral Learning System with Modular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Johane; Shouno, Osamu; Tsujino, Hiroshi

    Future robots/agents will perform situated behaviors for each user. Flexible behavioral learning is required for coping with diverse and unexpected users' situations. Unexpected situations are usually not tractable for machine learning systems that are designed for pre-defined problems. In order to realize such a flexible learning system, we were trying to create a learning model that can function in several different kinds of state transitions without specific adjustments for each transition as a first step. We constructed a modular neural network model based on reinforcement learning. We expected that combining a modular architecture with neural networks could accelerate the learning speed of neural networks. The inputs of our neural network model always include not only observed states but also memory information for any transition. In pure Markov decision processes, memory information is not necessary, rather it can lead to lower performance. On the other hand, partially observable conditions require memory information to select proper actions. We demonstrated that the new learning model could actually learn those multiple kinds of state transitions with the same architectures and parameters, and without pre-designed models of environments. This paper describes the performances of constructed models using probabilistically fluctuated Markov decision processes including partially observable conditions. In the test transitions, the observed state probabilistically fluctuated. The new learning model could function in those complex transitions. In addition, the learning speeds of our model are comparable to a reinforcement learning algorithm implemented with a pre-defined and optimized table-representation of states.

  12. Communications and control for electric power systems: Power system stability applications of artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, N.; Kirkham, Harold

    1994-01-01

    This report investigates the application of artificial neural networks to the problem of power system stability. The field of artificial intelligence, expert systems, and neural networks is reviewed. Power system operation is discussed with emphasis on stability considerations. Real-time system control has only recently been considered as applicable to stability, using conventional control methods. The report considers the use of artificial neural networks to improve the stability of the power system. The networks are considered as adjuncts and as replacements for existing controllers. The optimal kind of network to use as an adjunct to a generator exciter is discussed.

  13. Communications and control for electric power systems: Power system stability applications of artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Toomarian, N.; Kirkham, H.

    1993-12-01

    This report investigates the application of artificial neural networks to the problem of power system stability. The field of artificial intelligence, expert systems and neural networks is reviewed. Power system operation is discussed with emphasis on stability considerations. Real-time system control has only recently been considered as applicable to stability, using conventional control methods. The report considers the use of artificial neural networks to improve the stability of the power system. The networks are considered as adjuncts and as replacements for existing controllers. The optimal kind of network to use as an adjunct to a generator exciter is discussed.

  14. Dynamical system modeling via signal reduction and neural network simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Hunter, N.F.

    1997-11-01

    Many dynamical systems tested in the field and the laboratory display significant nonlinear behavior. Accurate characterization of such systems requires modeling in a nonlinear framework. One construct forming a basis for nonlinear modeling is that of the artificial neural network (ANN). However, when system behavior is complex, the amount of data required to perform training can become unreasonable. The authors reduce the complexity of information present in system response measurements using decomposition via canonical variate analysis. They describe a method for decomposing system responses, then modeling the components with ANNs. A numerical example is presented, along with conclusions and recommendations.

  15. Conservative motor systems, behavioral modulation and neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Sergio M

    2010-12-01

    Neural plasticity is a term that encompasses a vast array of changes in the nervous system in response to a wide range of environmental disturbances. The conservative manner in which nervous systems produce behavior is explored in the act of scratching the head. Whether the scratching is done with the hind leg (flamingos and axis deer) or the hand (spider monkey), it is shown that, when scratching their heads, animals follow a simple rule to avoid making multiple movements simultaneously with different parts of their bodies. Closer inspection of such a computational cost-saving scheme reveals that neural plasticity may best enhance motor performance when it occurs at higher levels of brain organization. The example of how complex social behavior, play fighting, is organized in rats shows that cortical systems can modify the contextual use of species-typical, or well-learned, behavior patterns, rather than producing new behavior patterns.

  16. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  17. Space Shuttle program communication and tracking systems interface analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, J. G.; Holmes, J. K.; Huth, G. K.; Iwasaki, R. S.; Nilsen, P. W.; Polydoros, A.; Sampaio, D. R.; Udalov, S.

    1984-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program Communications and Tracking Systems Interface Analysis began April 18, 1983. During this time, the shuttle communication and tracking systems began flight testing. Two areas of analysis documented were a result of observations made during flight tests. These analyses involved the Ku-band communication system. First, there was a detailed analysis of the interface between the solar max data format and the Ku-band communication system including the TDRSS ground station. The second analysis involving the Ku-band communication system was an analysis of the frequency lock loop of the Gunn oscillator used to generate the transmit frequency. The stability of the frequency lock loop was investigated and changes to the design were reviewed to alleviate the potential loss of data due the loop losing lock and entering the reacquisition mode. Other areas of investigation were the S-band antenna analysis and RF coverage analysis.

  18. Parameter estimation in space systems using recurrent neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Atiya, Amir F.; Sunkel, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of time-varying parameters encountered in space systems is addressed, using artificial neural systems. A hybrid feedforward/feedback neural network, namely a recurrent multilayer perception, is used as the model structure in the nonlinear system identification. The feedforward portion of the network architecture provides its well-known interpolation property, while through recurrency and cross-talk, the local information feedback enables representation of temporal variations in the system nonlinearities. The standard back-propagation-learning algorithm is modified and it is used for both the off-line and on-line supervised training of the proposed hybrid network. The performance of recurrent multilayer perceptron networks in identifying parameters of nonlinear dynamic systems is investigated by estimating the mass properties of a representative large spacecraft. The changes in the spacecraft inertia are predicted using a trained neural network, during two configurations corresponding to the early and late stages of the spacecraft on-orbit assembly sequence. The proposed on-line mass properties estimation capability offers encouraging results, though, further research is warranted for training and testing the predictive capabilities of these networks beyond nominal spacecraft operations.

  19. Serotonin-immunoreactive neural system and contractile system in the hydroid Cladonema (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Mayorova, T D; Kosevich, I A

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin is a widespread neurotransmitter which is present in almost all animal phyla including lower metazoans such as Cnidaria. Serotonin detected in the polyps of several cnidarian species participates in the functioning of a neural system. It was suggested that serotonin coordinates polyp behavior. For example, serotonin may be involved in muscle contraction and/or cnidocyte discharge. However, the role of serotonin in cnidarians is not revealed completely yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural system of Cladonema radiatum polyps. We detected the net of serotonin-positive processes within the whole hydranth body using anti-serotonin antibodies. The hypostome and tentacles had denser neural net in comparison with the gastric region. Electron microscopy revealed muscle processes throughout the hydranth body. Neural processes with specific vesicles and neurotubules in their cytoplasm were also shown at an ultrastructural level. This work demonstrates the structure of serotonin-positive neural system and smooth muscle layer in C. radiatum hydranths.

  20. SRS browser: a visual interface to the sequence retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, Ketan K.; Börner, Katy

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to the visual exploration and navigation of complex association networks of biological data sets, e.g., published papers, gene or protein information. The generic approach was implemented in the SRS Browser as an alternative visual interface to the highly used Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) [1]. SRS supports keyword-based search of about 400 biomedical databases. While the SRS presents search results as rank-ordered lists of matching entities, the SRS Browser displays entities and their relations for interactive exploration. A formal usability study was conducted to examine the SRS Browser interface's capabilities to support knowledge discovery and management.

  1. User Interface Technology Transfer to NASA's Virtual Wind Tunnel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, Andries

    1998-01-01

    Funded by NASA grants for four years, the Brown Computer Graphics Group has developed novel 3D user interfaces for desktop and immersive scientific visualization applications. This past grant period supported the design and development of a software library, the 3D Widget Library, which supports the construction and run-time management of 3D widgets. The 3D Widget Library is a mechanism for transferring user interface technology from the Brown Graphics Group to the Virtual Wind Tunnel system at NASA Ames as well as the public domain.

  2. Functional Interface Considerations within an Exploration Life Support System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    As notional life support system (LSS) architectures are developed and evaluated, myriad options must be considered pertaining to process technologies, components, and equipment assemblies. Each option must be evaluated relative to its impact on key functional interfaces within the LSS architecture. A leading notional architecture has been developed to guide the path toward realizing future crewed space exploration goals. This architecture includes atmosphere revitalization, water recovery and management, and environmental monitoring subsystems. Guiding requirements for developing this architecture are summarized and important interfaces within the architecture are discussed. The role of environmental monitoring within the architecture is described.

  3. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  4. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions.

  5. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  6. Application of Hierarchical Dissociated Neural Network in Closed-Loop Hybrid System Integrating Biological and Mechanical Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including ‘random’ and ‘4Q’ (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the ‘4Q’ cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the ‘4Q’ network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems. PMID:25992579

  7. A Nanoscale Interface Promoting Molecular and Functional Differentiation of Neural Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posati, Tamara; Pistone, Assunta; Saracino, Emanuela; Formaggio, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Troni, Elisabetta; Sagnella, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Bonetti, Simone; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele; Benfenati, Valentina

    2016-08-01

    Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant resource to control the cellular behaviour and functionalities at micro and nanoscale as well as to generate novel and more reliable models to study astrocytes in vitro. However, the potential of nanotechnologies in the manipulation of astrocytes ion channels and aquaporins has never been previously reported. Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) are layered materials with increasing potential as biocompatible nanoscale interface. Here, we evaluate the effect of the interaction of HTlc nanoparticles films with primary rat neocortical astrocytes. We show that HTlc films are biocompatible and do not promote gliotic reaction, while favouring astrocytes differentiation by induction of F-actin fibre alignment and vinculin polarization. Western Blot, Immunofluorescence and patch-clamp revealed that differentiation was accompanied by molecular and functional up-regulation of both inward rectifying potassium channel Kir 4.1 and aquaporin 4, AQP4. The reported results pave the way to engineering novel in vitro models to study astrocytes in a in vivo like condition.

  8. A Nanoscale Interface Promoting Molecular and Functional Differentiation of Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Posati, Tamara; Pistone, Assunta; Saracino, Emanuela; Formaggio, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Troni, Elisabetta; Sagnella, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Bonetti, Simone; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele; Benfenati, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant resource to control the cellular behaviour and functionalities at micro and nanoscale as well as to generate novel and more reliable models to study astrocytes in vitro. However, the potential of nanotechnologies in the manipulation of astrocytes ion channels and aquaporins has never been previously reported. Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) are layered materials with increasing potential as biocompatible nanoscale interface. Here, we evaluate the effect of the interaction of HTlc nanoparticles films with primary rat neocortical astrocytes. We show that HTlc films are biocompatible and do not promote gliotic reaction, while favouring astrocytes differentiation by induction of F-actin fibre alignment and vinculin polarization. Western Blot, Immunofluorescence and patch-clamp revealed that differentiation was accompanied by molecular and functional up-regulation of both inward rectifying potassium channel Kir 4.1 and aquaporin 4, AQP4. The reported results pave the way to engineering novel in vitro models to study astrocytes in a in vivo like condition. PMID:27503424

  9. A Nanoscale Interface Promoting Molecular and Functional Differentiation of Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Posati, Tamara; Pistone, Assunta; Saracino, Emanuela; Formaggio, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Troni, Elisabetta; Sagnella, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Bonetti, Simone; Caprini, Marco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele; Benfenati, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant resource to control the cellular behaviour and functionalities at micro and nanoscale as well as to generate novel and more reliable models to study astrocytes in vitro. However, the potential of nanotechnologies in the manipulation of astrocytes ion channels and aquaporins has never been previously reported. Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) are layered materials with increasing potential as biocompatible nanoscale interface. Here, we evaluate the effect of the interaction of HTlc nanoparticles films with primary rat neocortical astrocytes. We show that HTlc films are biocompatible and do not promote gliotic reaction, while favouring astrocytes differentiation by induction of F-actin fibre alignment and vinculin polarization. Western Blot, Immunofluorescence and patch-clamp revealed that differentiation was accompanied by molecular and functional up-regulation of both inward rectifying potassium channel Kir 4.1 and aquaporin 4, AQP4. The reported results pave the way to engineering novel in vitro models to study astrocytes in a in vivo like condition. PMID:27503424

  10. Optical mass memory system (AMM-13). AMM/DBMS interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The baseline for external interfaces of a 10 to the 13th power bit, optical archival mass memory system (AMM-13) is established. The types of interfaces addressed include data transfer; AMM-13, Data Base Management System, NASA End-to-End Data System computer interconnect; data/control input and output interfaces; test input data source; file management; and facilities interface.

  11. Novel conjugates of peptides and conjugated polymers for optoelectronics and neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Nandita

    Peptide-polymer conjugates are a novel class of hybrid materials that take advantage of each individual component giving the opportunity to generate materials with unique physical, chemical, mechanical, optical, and electronic properties. In this dissertation peptide-polymer conjugates for two different applications are discussed. The first set of peptide-polymer conjugates were developed as templates to study the intermolecular interactions between electroactive molecules by manipulating the intermolecular distances at nano-scale level. A PEGylated, alpha-helical peptide template was employed to effectively display an array of organic chromophores (oxadiazole containing phenylenevinylene oligomers, Oxa-PPV). Three Oxa-PPV chromophores were strategically positioned on each template, at distances ranging from 6 to 17 A from each other, as dictated by the chemical and structural properties of the peptide. The Oxa-PPV modified PEGylated helical peptides (produced via Heck coupling strategies) were characterized by a variety of spectroscopic methods. Electronic contributions from multiple pairs of chromophores on a scaffold were detectable; the number and relative positioning of the chromophores dictated the absorbance and emission maxima, thus confirming the utility of these polymer--peptide templates for complex presentation of organic chromophores. The rest of the thesis is focused on using poly(3,4-alkylenedioxythiophene) based conjugated polymers as coatings for neural electrodes. This thiophene derivative is of considerable current interest for functionalizing the surfaces of a wide variety of devices including implantable biomedical electronics, specifically neural bio-electrodes. Toward these ends, copolymer films of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) with a carboxylic acid functional EDOT (EDOTacid) were electrochemically deposited and characterized as a systematic function of the EDOTacid content (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%). The chemical surface characterization

  12. Cross interaction of melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems in neural modulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Bao-Wen; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems are widely distributed in the CNS and have been established as a crucial regulatory component in diverse physiological functions. The pharmacology of both melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems including their individual receptors, signaling mechanisms, agonists and antagonists has been extensively studied. Several lines of evidence showed that there existed a cross interaction between the receptors of melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems. The data available at present had expanded our understanding of melanocortinergic and dopaminergic system interaction in neural modulation, which will be main discussed in this paper. PMID:26823964

  13. Modeling a Nonlinear Liquid Level System by Cellular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Romero, Norberto; Seck-Tuoh-Mora, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Manuel; Medina-Marin, Joselito; Flores-Romero, Juan Jose

    This paper presents the analogue simulation of a nonlinear liquid level system composed by two tanks; the system is controlled using the methodology of exact linearization via state feedback by cellular neural networks (CNNs). The relevance of this manuscript is to show how a block diagram representing the analogue modeling and control of a nonlinear dynamical system, can be implemented and regulated by CNNs, whose cells may contain numerical values or arithmetic and control operations. In this way the dynamical system is modeled by a set of local-interacting elements without need of a central supervisor.

  14. Neural Mechanisms and Information Processing in Recognition Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Mamiko; Hefetz, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Nestmate recognition is a hallmark of social insects. It is based on the match/mismatch of an identity signal carried by members of the society with that of the perceiving individual. While the behavioral response, amicable or aggressive, is very clear, the neural systems underlying recognition are not fully understood. Here we contrast two alternative hypotheses for the neural mechanisms that are responsible for the perception and information processing in recognition. We focus on recognition via chemical signals, as the common modality in social insects. The first, classical, hypothesis states that upon perception of recognition cues by the sensory system the information is passed as is to the antennal lobes and to higher brain centers where the information is deciphered and compared to a neural template. Match or mismatch information is then transferred to some behavior-generating centers where the appropriate response is elicited. An alternative hypothesis, that of “pre-filter mechanism”, posits that the decision as to whether to pass on the information to the central nervous system takes place in the peripheral sensory system. We suggest that, through sensory adaptation, only alien signals are passed on to the brain, specifically to an “aggressive-behavior-switching center”, where the response is generated if the signal is above a certain threshold. PMID:26462936

  15. Automated neural network-based instrument validation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao

    2000-10-01

    In a complex control process, instrument calibration is periodically performed to maintain the instruments within the calibration range, which assures proper control and minimizes down time. Instruments are usually calibrated under out-of-service conditions using manual calibration methods, which may cause incorrect calibration or equipment damage. Continuous in-service calibration monitoring of sensors and instruments will reduce unnecessary instrument calibrations, give operators more confidence in instrument measurements, increase plant efficiency or product quality, and minimize the possibility of equipment damage during unnecessary manual calibrations. In this dissertation, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based instrument calibration verification system is designed to achieve the on-line monitoring and verification goal for scheduling maintenance. Since an ANN is a data-driven model, it can learn the relationships among signals without prior knowledge of the physical model or process, which is usually difficult to establish for the complex non-linear systems. Furthermore, the ANNs provide a noise-reduced estimate of the signal measurement. More importantly, since a neural network learns the relationships among signals, it can give an unfaulted estimate of a faulty signal based on information provided by other unfaulted signals; that is, provide a correct estimate of a faulty signal. This ANN-based instrument verification system is capable of detecting small degradations or drifts occurring in instrumentation, and preclude false control actions or system damage caused by instrument degradation. In this dissertation, an automated scheme of neural network construction is developed. Previously, the neural network structure design required extensive knowledge of neural networks. An automated design methodology was developed so that a network structure can be created without expert interaction. This validation system was designed to monitor process sensors plant

  16. Spiking Neural P Systems with Neuron Division and Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyu; Wang, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Spiking neural P systems are a new candidate in spiking neural network models. By using neuron division and budding, such systems can generate/produce exponential working space in linear computational steps, thus provide a way to solve computational hard problems in feasible (linear or polynomial) time with a “time-space trade-off” strategy. In this work, a new mechanism called neuron dissolution is introduced, by which redundant neurons produced during the computation can be removed. As applications, uniform solutions to two NP-hard problems: SAT problem and Subset Sum problem are constructed in linear time, working in a deterministic way. The neuron dissolution strategy is used to eliminate invalid solutions, and all answers to these two problems are encoded as indices of output neurons. Our results improve the one obtained in Science China Information Sciences, 2011, 1596-1607 by Pan et al. PMID:27627104

  17. Spiking Neural P Systems with Neuron Division and Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzhen; Liu, Xiyu; Wang, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Spiking neural P systems are a new candidate in spiking neural network models. By using neuron division and budding, such systems can generate/produce exponential working space in linear computational steps, thus provide a way to solve computational hard problems in feasible (linear or polynomial) time with a "time-space trade-off" strategy. In this work, a new mechanism called neuron dissolution is introduced, by which redundant neurons produced during the computation can be removed. As applications, uniform solutions to two NP-hard problems: SAT problem and Subset Sum problem are constructed in linear time, working in a deterministic way. The neuron dissolution strategy is used to eliminate invalid solutions, and all answers to these two problems are encoded as indices of output neurons. Our results improve the one obtained in Science China Information Sciences, 2011, 1596-1607 by Pan et al. PMID:27627104

  18. Neural correlates of learning in an electrocorticographic motor-imagery brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Tim M.; Miller, Kai J.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    Human subjects can learn to control a one-dimensional electrocorticographic (ECoG) brain-computer interface (BCI) using modulation of primary motor (M1) high-gamma activity (signal power in the 75–200 Hz range). However, the stability and dynamics of the signals over the course of new BCI skill acquisition have not been investigated. In this study, we report 3 characteristic periods in evolution of the high-gamma control signal during BCI training: initial, low task accuracy with corresponding low power modulation in the gamma spectrum, followed by a second period of improved task accuracy with increasing average power separation between activity and rest, and a final period of high task accuracy with stable (or decreasing) power separation and decreasing trial-to-trial variance. These findings may have implications in the design and implementation of BCI control algorithms. PMID:25599079

  19. A wireless power interface for rechargeable battery operated neural recording implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Principe, Jose C; Bashirullah, Rizwan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated analog front-end for wireless powering and recharging of miniature Li-ion batteries used in implantable neural recording microsystems. DC signal extraction from a wireless carrier is accomplished using Schottky barrier contact diodes with lower forward voltage drop for improved efficiency. The battery charger employs a new control loop that relaxes comparator resolution requirements, provides simultaneous operation of constant-current and constant-voltage loops, and eliminates the external current sense resistor from the charging path. The accuracy of the end-of-charge detection is primarily determined by the voltage drop across matched resistors and current-sources and the offset voltage of the sense comparator. Experimental results in 0.6 mum bulk CMOS technology indicate that +/- 1.3% (or +/-20 microA) end-of-charge accuracy can be obtained under worst-case conditions for a comparator offset voltage of +/-5mV. The circuits occupy 1.735 mm(2) with a power dissipation of 8.4 mW when delivering a load current of 1.5 mA at 4.1 V (or 6.15 mW) for an efficiency of 73%

  20. Mimicking the biological neural system using electronic logic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirikera, Goutham R.; Shinde, Vishal; Kang, Inpil; Schulz, Mark J.; Shanov, Vesselin; Datta, Saurabh; Hurd, Doug; Westheider, Bo; Sundaresan, Mannur; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2004-07-01

    Detecting and locating cracks in structural components and joints that have high feature densities is a challenging problem in the field of Structural Health Monitoring. There have been advances in piezoelectric sensors, actuators, wave propagation, MEMS, and optical fiber sensors. However, few sensor-signal processing techniques have been applied to the monitoring of joints and complex structural geometries. This is in part because maintaining and analyzing a large amount of data obtained from a large number of sensors that may be needed to monitor joints for cracks is difficult. Reliable low cost assessment of the health of structures is crucial to maintain operational availability and productivity, reduce maintenance cost, and prevent catastrophic failure of large structures such as wind turbines, aircraft, and civil infrastructure. Recently, there have also been advances in development of simple passive techniques for health monitoring including a technique based on mimicking the biological neural system using electronic logic circuits. This technique aids in reducing the required number of data acquisition channels by a factor of ten or more and is able to predict the location of a crack within a rectangular grid or within an arbitrarily arranged network of continuous sensors or neurons. The current paper shows results obtained by implementing this method on an aluminum plate and joint. The plates were tested using simulated acoustic emissions and also loading via an MTS machine. The testing indicates that the neural system can monitor complex joints and detect acoustic emissions due to propagating cracks. High sensitivity of the neural system is needed, and further sensor development and testing on different types of joints is required. Also indicated is that sensor geometry, sensor location, signal filtering, and logic parameters of the neural system will be specific to the particular type of joint (material, thickness, geometry) being monitored. Also, a

  1. Generalized Predictive and Neural Generalized Predictive Control of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.

    2000-01-01

    The research work presented in this thesis addresses the problem of robust control of uncertain linear and nonlinear systems using Neural network-based Generalized Predictive Control (NGPC) methodology. A brief overview of predictive control and its comparison with Linear Quadratic (LQ) control is given to emphasize advantages and drawbacks of predictive control methods. It is shown that the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) methodology overcomes the drawbacks associated with traditional LQ control as well as conventional predictive control methods. It is shown that in spite of the model-based nature of GPC it has good robustness properties being special case of receding horizon control. The conditions for choosing tuning parameters for GPC to ensure closed-loop stability are derived. A neural network-based GPC architecture is proposed for the control of linear and nonlinear uncertain systems. A methodology to account for parametric uncertainty in the system is proposed using on-line training capability of multi-layer neural network. Several simulation examples and results from real-time experiments are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  2. Nonlinear dynamical system approaches towards neural prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Torikai, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Sho

    2011-04-19

    An asynchronous discrete-state spiking neurons is a wired system of shift registers that can mimic nonlinear dynamics of an ODE-based neuron model. The control parameter of the neuron is the wiring pattern among the registers and thus they are suitable for on-chip learning. In this paper an asynchronous discrete-state spiking neuron is introduced and its typical nonlinear phenomena are demonstrated. Also, a learning algorithm for a set of neurons is presented and it is demonstrated that the algorithm enables the set of neurons to reconstruct nonlinear dynamics of another set of neurons with unknown parameter values. The learning function is validated by FPGA experiments.

  3. Risk Interfaces to Support Integrated Systems Analysis and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Shelhamer, Mark; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives for systems analysis capability: Develop integrated understanding of how a complex human physiological-socio-technical mission system behaves in spaceflight. Why? Support development of integrated solutions that prevent unwanted outcomes (Implementable approaches to minimize mission resources(mass, power, crew time, etc.)); Support development of tools for autonomy (need for exploration) (Assess and maintain resilience -individuals, teams, integrated system). Output of this exercise: -Representation of interfaces based on Human System Risk Board (HSRB) Risk Summary information and simple status based on Human Research Roadmap; Consolidated HSRB information applied to support communication; Point-of-Departure for HRP Element planning; Ability to track and communicate status of collaborations. 4

  4. A neural interface provides long-term stable natural touch perception.

    PubMed

    Tan, Daniel W; Schiefer, Matthew A; Keith, Michael W; Anderson, James Robert; Tyler, Joyce; Tyler, Dustin J

    2014-10-01

    Touch perception on the fingers and hand is essential for fine motor control, contributes to our sense of self, allows for effective communication, and aids in our fundamental perception of the world. Despite increasingly sophisticated mechatronics, prosthetic devices still do not directly convey sensation back to their wearers. We show that implanted peripheral nerve interfaces in two human subjects with upper limb amputation provided stable, natural touch sensation in their hands for more than 1 year. Electrical stimulation using implanted peripheral nerve cuff electrodes that did not penetrate the nerve produced touch perceptions at many locations on the phantom hand with repeatable, stable responses in the two subjects for 16 and 24 months. Patterned stimulation intensity produced a sensation that the subjects described as natural and without "tingling," or paresthesia. Different patterns produced different types of sensory perception at the same location on the phantom hand. The two subjects reported tactile perceptions they described as natural tapping, constant pressure, light moving touch, and vibration. Changing average stimulation intensity controlled the size of the percept area; changing stimulation frequency controlled sensation strength. Artificial touch sensation improved the subjects' ability to control grasping strength of the prosthesis and enabled them to better manipulate delicate objects. Thus, electrical stimulation through peripheral nerve electrodes produced long-term sensory restoration after limb loss.

  5. Neural Systems for Reading Aloud: A Multiparametric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Rutvik; Humphries, Colin; Seidenberg, Mark S.; Binder, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Reading aloud involves computing the sound of a word from its visual form. This may be accomplished 1) by direct associations between spellings and phonology and 2) by computation from orthography to meaning to phonology. These components have been studied in behavioral experiments examining lexical properties such as word frequency; length in letters or phonemes; spelling–sound consistency; semantic factors such as imageability, measures of orthographic, or phonological complexity; and others. Effects of these lexical properties on specific neural systems, however, are poorly understood, partially because high intercorrelations among lexical factors make it difficult to determine if they have independent effects. We addressed this problem by decorrelating several important lexical properties through careful stimulus selection. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data revealed distributed neural systems for mapping orthography directly to phonology, involving left supramarginal, posterior middle temporal, and fusiform gyri. Distinct from these were areas reflecting semantic processing, including left middle temporal gyrus/inferior-temporal sulcus, bilateral angular gyrus, and precuneus/posterior cingulate. Left inferior frontal regions generally showed increased activation with greater task load, suggesting a more general role in attention, working memory, and executive processes. These data offer the first clear evidence, in a single study, for the separate neural correlates of orthography–phonology mapping and semantic access during reading aloud. PMID:19920057

  6. Predictive and Neural Predictive Control of Uncertain Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.

    2000-01-01

    Accomplishments and future work are:(1) Stability analysis: the work completed includes characterization of stability of receding horizon-based MPC in the setting of LQ paradigm. The current work-in-progress includes analyzing local as well as global stability of the closed-loop system under various nonlinearities; for example, actuator nonlinearities; sensor nonlinearities, and other plant nonlinearities. Actuator nonlinearities include three major types of nonlineaxities: saturation, dead-zone, and (0, 00) sector. (2) Robustness analysis: It is shown that receding horizon parameters such as input and output horizon lengths have direct effect on the robustness of the system. (3) Code development: A matlab code has been developed which can simulate various MPC formulations. The current effort is to generalize the code to include ability to handle all plant types and all MPC types. (4) Improved predictor: It is shown that MPC design using better predictors that can minimize prediction errors. It is shown analytically and numerically that Smith predictor can provide closed-loop stability under GPC operation for plants with dead times where standard optimal predictor fails. (5) Neural network predictors: When neural network is used as predictor it can be shown that neural network predicts the plant output within some finite error bound under certain conditions. Our preliminary study shows that with proper choice of update laws and network architectures such bound can be obtained. However, much work needs to be done to obtain a similar result in general case.

  7. Optimization of neural networks using variable structure systems.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Seyed Alireza; Tan, Ai Hui

    2012-12-01

    This paper proposes a new mixed training algorithm consisting of error backpropagation (EBP) and variable structure systems (VSSs) to optimize parameter updating of neural networks. For the optimization of the number of neurons in the hidden layer, a new term based on the output of the hidden layer is added to the cost function as a penalty term to make optimal use of hidden units related to weights corresponding to each unit in the hidden layer. VSS is used to control the dynamic model of the training process, whereas EBP attempts to minimize the cost function. In addition to the analysis of the imposed dynamics of the EBP technique, the global stability of the mixed training methodology and constraints on the design parameters are considered. The advantages of the proposed technique are guaranteed convergence, improved robustness, and lower sensitivity to initial weights of the neural network.

  8. Artificial Neural Network for Location Estimation in Wireless Communication Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    In a wireless communication system, wireless location is the technique used to estimate the location of a mobile station (MS). To enhance the accuracy of MS location prediction, we propose a novel algorithm that utilizes time of arrival (TOA) measurements and the angle of arrival (AOA) information to locate MS when three base stations (BSs) are available. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are widely used techniques in various areas to overcome the problem of exclusive and nonlinear relationships. When the MS is heard by only three BSs, the proposed algorithm utilizes the intersections of three TOA circles (and the AOA line), based on various neural networks, to estimate the MS location in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) environments. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the algorithm for different NLOS error distributions. The numerical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithms can obtain more precise location estimation under different NLOS environments. PMID:22736978

  9. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaga, Karlo A.; Schroeder, Karen E.; Patel, Paras R.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Thompson, David E.; Bentley, J. Nicole; Lempka, Scott F.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Patil, Parag G.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. Approach. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. Main results. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. Significance. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the

  10. CNN: a speaker recognition system using a cascaded neural network.

    PubMed

    Zaki, M; Ghalwash, A; Elkouny, A A

    1996-05-01

    The main emphasis of this paper is to present an approach for combining supervised and unsupervised neural network models to the issue of speaker recognition. To enhance the overall operation and performance of recognition, the proposed strategy integrates the two techniques, forming one global model called the cascaded model. We first present a simple conventional technique based on the distance measured between a test vector and a reference vector for different speakers in the population. This particular distance metric has the property of weighting down the components in those directions along which the intraspeaker variance is large. The reason for presenting this method is to clarify the discrepancy in performance between the conventional and neural network approach. We then introduce the idea of using unsupervised learning technique, presented by the winner-take-all model, as a means of recognition. Due to several tests that have been conducted and in order to enhance the performance of this model, dealing with noisy patterns, we have preceded it with a supervised learning model--the pattern association model--which acts as a filtration stage. This work includes both the design and implementation of both conventional and neural network approaches to recognize the speakers templates--which are introduced to the system via a voice master card and preprocessed before extracting the features used in the recognition. The conclusion indicates that the system performance in case of neural network is better than that of the conventional one, achieving a smooth degradation in respect of noisy patterns, and higher performance in respect of noise-free patterns.

  11. Design of an adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh K; Wunsch, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    Power system stabilizers (PSS) are used to generate supplementary control signals for the excitation system in order to damp the low frequency power system oscillations. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional PSS (CPSS), numerous techniques have been proposed in the literature. Based on the analysis of existing techniques, this paper presents an indirect adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer (IDNC) design. The proposed IDNC consists of a neuro-controller, which is used to generate a supplementary control signal to the excitation system, and a neuro-identifier, which is used to model the dynamics of the power system and to adapt the neuro-controller parameters. The proposed method has the features of a simple structure, adaptivity and fast response. The proposed IDNC is evaluated on a single machine infinite bus power system under different operating conditions and disturbances to demonstrate its effectiveness and robustness. PMID:12850048

  12. Field Deployable Tritium Assay System Host Graphical User Interface Software

    1998-05-12

    The FDTASHOST software is a Graphical User Interface for the Field Deployable Tritium Assay System (FDTAS - Invention Disclosure SRS-96-09-091 has been submitted). The program runs on the Host computer which is located in the Laboratory and connected to the FDTAS remote field system via a modem over a phone line. The operator receives status information and messages from the Remote system. The operator can enter in commands to be executed by the remote systemmore » using the mouse and a pull down menu.« less

  13. Neural triggering system operating on high resolution calorimetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos, A.; Torres, R. C.; Seixas, J. M.; Ferreira, B. C.; Xavier, T. C.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an electron/jet discriminator system for operating at the Second Level Trigger of ATLAS. The system processes calorimetry data and organizes the regions of interest in the calorimeter in the form of concentric ring sums of energy deposition, so that both signal compaction and high performance can be achieved. The ring information is fed into a feed forward neural discriminator. This implementation resulted on a 97% electron detection efficiency for a false alarm of 3%. The full discrimination chain could still be executed in less than 500 μs.

  14. Neural network application to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using artificial neural networks as control systems for modern, complex aerospace vehicles is investigated via an example aircraft control design study. The problem considered is that of designing a controller for an integrated airframe/propulsion longitudinal dynamics model of a modern fighter aircraft to provide independent control of pitch rate and airspeed responses to pilot command inputs. An explicit model following controller using H infinity control design techniques is first designed to gain insight into the control problem as well as to provide a baseline for evaluation of the neurocontroller. Using the model of the desired dynamics as a command generator, a multilayer feedforward neural network is trained to control the vehicle model within the physical limitations of the actuator dynamics. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is a weighted sum of tracking errors and control input commands and rates. To gain insight in the neurocontrol, linearized representations of the nonlinear neurocontroller are analyzed along a commanded trajectory. Linear robustness analysis tools are then applied to the linearized neurocontroller models and to the baseline H infinity based controller. Future areas of research are identified to enhance the practical applicability of neural networks to flight control design.

  15. Radiologist's clinical information review workstation interfaced with digital dictation system.

    PubMed

    McEnery, K W; Suitor, C T; Hildebrand, S; Downs, R L

    2000-05-01

    Efficient access to information systems integrated into the radiologist's interpretation workflow will result in a more informed radiologist, with an enhanced capability to render an accurate interpretation. We describe our implementation of radStation, a radiologist's clinical information review workstation that combines a digital dictation station with a clinical information display. radStation uses client software distributed to the radiologist's workstation and central server software, both running Windows NT (Microsoft, Redmond, WA). The client system has integrated digital dictation software. The bar-code microphone (Boomerang, Dictaphone Corp, Stratford, CT) also serves as a computer input device forwarding the procedure's accession number to the server software. This initiates multiple queries to available legacy databases, including the radiology information system (RIS), laboratory information system, clinic notes, hospital discharge, and operative report system. The three-tier architecture then returns the clinical results to the radStation client for display. At the conclusion of the dictation, the digital voice file is transferred to the dictation server and the client notifies the RIS to update the examination status. The system is efficient in its information retrieval, with queries displayed in about 1 second. The radStation client requires less than 5 minutes of radiologist training in its operation, given that its control interface integrates with the well-learned dictation process. The telephone-based dictation system, which this new system replaced, remains available as a back-up system in the event of an unexpected digital dictation system failure. This system is well accepted and valued by the radiologists. The system interface is quickly mastered. The system does not interrupt dictation workflow with the display of all information initiated with examination bar-coding. This system's features could become an accepted model as a standard tool

  16. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  17. Neural Network Based Intrusion Detection System for Critical Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic

    2009-07-01

    Resiliency and security in control systems such as SCADA and Nuclear plant’s in today’s world of hackers and malware are a relevant concern. Computer systems used within critical infrastructures to control physical functions are not immune to the threat of cyber attacks and may be potentially vulnerable. Tailoring an intrusion detection system to the specifics of critical infrastructures can significantly improve the security of such systems. The IDS-NNM – Intrusion Detection System using Neural Network based Modeling, is presented in this paper. The main contributions of this work are: 1) the use and analyses of real network data (data recorded from an existing critical infrastructure); 2) the development of a specific window based feature extraction technique; 3) the construction of training dataset using randomly generated intrusion vectors; 4) the use of a combination of two neural network learning algorithms – the Error-Back Propagation and Levenberg-Marquardt, for normal behavior modeling. The presented algorithm was evaluated on previously unseen network data. The IDS-NNM algorithm proved to be capable of capturing all intrusion attempts presented in the network communication while not generating any false alerts.

  18. Neural Network Target Identification System for False Alarm Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, David; Edens, Weston; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    A multi-stage automated target recognition (ATR) system has been designed to perform computer vision tasks with adequate proficiency in mimicking human vision. The system is able to detect, identify, and track targets of interest. Potential regions of interest (ROIs) are first identified by the detection stage using an Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter combined with a wavelet transform. False positives are then eliminated by the verification stage using feature extraction methods in conjunction with neural networks. Feature extraction transforms the ROIs using filtering and binning algorithms to create feature vectors. A feed forward back propagation neural network (NN) is then trained to classify each feature vector and remove false positives. This paper discusses the test of the system performance and parameter optimizations process which adapts the system to various targets and datasets. The test results show that the system was successful in substantially reducing the false positive rate when tested on a sonar image dataset.

  19. Neural network target identification system for false alarm reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, David; Edens, Weston; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2009-04-01

    A multi-stage automated target recognition (ATR) system has been designed to perform computer vision tasks with adequate proficiency in mimicking human vision. The system is able to detect, identify, and track targets of interest. Potential regions of interest (ROIs) are first identified by the detection stage using an Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter combined with a wavelet transform. False positives are then eliminated by the verification stage using feature extraction methods in conjunction with neural networks. Feature extraction transforms the ROIs using filtering and binning algorithms to create feature vectors. A feed forward back propagation neural network (NN) is then trained to classify each feature vector and remove false positives. This paper discusses the test of the system performance and parameter optimizations process which adapts the system to various targets and datasets. The test results show that the system was successful in substantially reducing the false positive rate when tested on a sonar image dataset.

  20. Hybrid fault diagnosis of nonlinear systems using neural parameter estimators.

    PubMed

    Sobhani-Tehrani, E; Talebi, H A; Khorasani, K

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a novel integrated hybrid approach for fault diagnosis (FD) of nonlinear systems taking advantage of both the system's mathematical model and the adaptive nonlinear approximation capability of computational intelligence techniques. Unlike most FD techniques, the proposed solution simultaneously accomplishes fault detection, isolation, and identification (FDII) within a unified diagnostic module. At the core of this solution is a bank of adaptive neural parameter estimators (NPEs) associated with a set of single-parameter fault models. The NPEs continuously estimate unknown fault parameters (FPs) that are indicators of faults in the system. Two NPE structures, series-parallel and parallel, are developed with their exclusive set of desirable attributes. The parallel scheme is extremely robust to measurement noise and possesses a simpler, yet more solid, fault isolation logic. In contrast, the series-parallel scheme displays short FD delays and is robust to closed-loop system transients due to changes in control commands. Finally, a fault tolerant observer (FTO) is designed to extend the capability of the two NPEs that originally assumes full state measurements for systems that have only partial state measurements. The proposed FTO is a neural state estimator that can estimate unmeasured states even in the presence of faults. The estimated and the measured states then comprise the inputs to the two proposed FDII schemes. Simulation results for FDII of reaction wheels of a three-axis stabilized satellite in the presence of disturbances and noise demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed FDII solutions under partial state measurements.

  1. General-purpose interface bus for multiuser, multitasking computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.; Roth, Don J.; Stang, David B.

    1990-01-01

    The architecture of a multiuser, multitasking, virtual-memory computer system intended for the use by a medium-size research group is described. There are three central processing units (CPU) in the configuration, each with 16 MB memory, and two 474 MB hard disks attached. CPU 1 is designed for data analysis and contains an array processor for fast-Fourier transformations. In addition, CPU 1 shares display images viewed with the image processor. CPU 2 is designed for image analysis and display. CPU 3 is designed for data acquisition and contains 8 GPIB channels and an analog-to-digital conversion input/output interface with 16 channels. Up to 9 users can access the third CPU simultaneously for data acquisition. Focus is placed on the optimization of hardware interfaces and software, facilitating instrument control, data acquisition, and processing.

  2. Three-channel telemetry system with optical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesho, Jeffrey C.; Eaton, Harry A.

    1994-10-01

    An optical interface was incorporated into a three channel telemetry device to allow for communication to a packaged telemeter. Information transmitted on the optical link includes calibration parameters and commands to program the operation of the telemeter. The optical ink allows calibration information to be programmed into a telemeter, without the need for a bio-compatible electrical connection. The optical link was designed to completely reside on an integrated circuit chip. One of the three channels of the telemeter is dedicated to temperature measurement, while the other two channels are generic. The generic channels carry information from transducers that are interfaced to the system through on-chip general purpose operational amplifiers. The calibration information that is programmed into the telemeter is retrieved by time division multiplexing it with one of the generic channels.

  3. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-01

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  4. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-23

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  5. Bringing Control System User Interfaces to the Web

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xihui; Kasemir, Kay

    2013-01-01

    With the evolution of web based technologies, especially HTML5 [1], it becomes possible to create web-based control system user interfaces (UI) that are cross-browser and cross-device compatible. This article describes two technologies that facilitate this goal. The first one is the WebOPI [2], which can seamlessly display CSS BOY [3] Operator Interfaces (OPI) in web browsers without modification to the original OPI file. The WebOPI leverages the powerful graphical editing capabilities of BOY and provides the convenience of re-using existing OPI files. On the other hand, it uses generic JavaScript and a generic communication mechanism between the web browser and web server. It is not optimized for a control system, which results in unnecessary network traffic and resource usage. Our second technology is the WebSocket-based Process Data Access (WebPDA) [4]. It is a protocol that provides efficient control system data communication using WebSocket [5], so that users can create web-based control system UIs using standard web page technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript. WebPDA is control system independent, potentially supporting any type of control system.

  6. Enhancing the human-computer interface of power system applications

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, G.P. de; Souza, C.S. de; Feijo, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper examines a topic of increasing importance: the interpretation of the massive amount of data available to power system engineers. The solutions currently adopted in the presentation of data in graphical interfaces are discussed. It is demonstrated that the representations of electric diagrams can be considerably enhanced through the adequate exploitation of resources available in full-graphics screens and the use of basic concepts from human-factors research. Enhanced representations of electric diagrams are proposed and tested. The objective is to let the user see the behavior of the system, allowing for better interpretation of program data and results and improving user`s productivity.

  7. Enhancing the human-computer interface of power system applications

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, G.P. de; Souza, C.S. de; Feijo, B.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines a topic of increasing importance: the interpretation of the massive amount of data available to power system engineers. The solutions currently adopted in the presentation of data in graphical interfaces are discussed. It is demonstrated that the representations of electric diagrams can be considerably enhanced through the adequate exploitation of resources available in full-graphics screens and the use of basic concepts from human-factors research. Enhanced representations of electric diagrams are proposed and tested. The objective is to let the user ``see`` the behavior of the system, allowing for better interpretation of program data and results and improving user`s productivity.

  8. Impact of mental representational systems on design interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1998-02-25

    The purpose of the studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory is to understand the impact mental representational systems have in identifying how user comfort parameters influence how information is to best be presented. By understanding how each individual perceives information based on the three representational systems (visual, auditory and kinesthetic modalities), it has been found that a different approach must be taken in the design of interfaces resulting in an outcome that is much more effective and representative of the users mental model. This paper will present current findings and future theories to be explored.

  9. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornat, Rémi; CALICE Colaboration

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  10. The ctenophore genome and the evolutionary origins of neural systems.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L; Kocot, Kevin M; Citarella, Mathew R; Dosung, Sohn; Norekian, Tigran P; Povolotskaya, Inna S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Dailey, Christopher; Berezikov, Eugene; Buckley, Katherine M; Ptitsyn, Andrey; Reshetov, Denis; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Moroz, Tatiana P; Bobkova, Yelena; Yu, Fahong; Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Jurka, Jerzy; Bobkov, Yuri V; Swore, Joshua J; Girardo, David O; Fodor, Alexander; Gusev, Fedor; Sanford, Rachel; Bruders, Rebecca; Kittler, Ellen; Mills, Claudia E; Rast, Jonathan P; Derelle, Romain; Solovyev, Victor V; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Swalla, Billie J; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rogaev, Evgeny I; Halanych, Kenneth M; Kohn, Andrea B

    2014-06-01

    The origins of neural systems remain unresolved. In contrast to other basal metazoans, ctenophores (comb jellies) have both complex nervous and mesoderm-derived muscular systems. These holoplanktonic predators also have sophisticated ciliated locomotion, behaviour and distinct development. Here we present the draft genome of Pleurobrachia bachei, Pacific sea gooseberry, together with ten other ctenophore transcriptomes, and show that they are remarkably distinct from other animal genomes in their content of neurogenic, immune and developmental genes. Our integrative analyses place Ctenophora as the earliest lineage within Metazoa. This hypothesis is supported by comparative analysis of multiple gene families, including the apparent absence of HOX genes, canonical microRNA machinery, and reduced immune complement in ctenophores. Although two distinct nervous systems are well recognized in ctenophores, many bilaterian neuron-specific genes and genes of 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways either are absent or, if present, are not expressed in neurons. Our metabolomic and physiological data are consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems, and possibly muscle specification, evolved independently from those in other animals. PMID:24847885

  11. The ctenophore genome and the evolutionary origins of neural systems.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L; Kocot, Kevin M; Citarella, Mathew R; Dosung, Sohn; Norekian, Tigran P; Povolotskaya, Inna S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Dailey, Christopher; Berezikov, Eugene; Buckley, Katherine M; Ptitsyn, Andrey; Reshetov, Denis; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Moroz, Tatiana P; Bobkova, Yelena; Yu, Fahong; Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Jurka, Jerzy; Bobkov, Yuri V; Swore, Joshua J; Girardo, David O; Fodor, Alexander; Gusev, Fedor; Sanford, Rachel; Bruders, Rebecca; Kittler, Ellen; Mills, Claudia E; Rast, Jonathan P; Derelle, Romain; Solovyev, Victor V; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Swalla, Billie J; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rogaev, Evgeny I; Halanych, Kenneth M; Kohn, Andrea B

    2014-06-01

    The origins of neural systems remain unresolved. In contrast to other basal metazoans, ctenophores (comb jellies) have both complex nervous and mesoderm-derived muscular systems. These holoplanktonic predators also have sophisticated ciliated locomotion, behaviour and distinct development. Here we present the draft genome of Pleurobrachia bachei, Pacific sea gooseberry, together with ten other ctenophore transcriptomes, and show that they are remarkably distinct from other animal genomes in their content of neurogenic, immune and developmental genes. Our integrative analyses place Ctenophora as the earliest lineage within Metazoa. This hypothesis is supported by comparative analysis of multiple gene families, including the apparent absence of HOX genes, canonical microRNA machinery, and reduced immune complement in ctenophores. Although two distinct nervous systems are well recognized in ctenophores, many bilaterian neuron-specific genes and genes of 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways either are absent or, if present, are not expressed in neurons. Our metabolomic and physiological data are consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems, and possibly muscle specification, evolved independently from those in other animals.

  12. Adaptive conventional power system stabilizer based on artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Segal, R.; Ghodki, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with an artificial neural network (ANN) based adaptive conventional power system stabilizer (PSS). The ANN comprises an input layer, a hidden layer and an output layer. The input vector to the ANN comprises real power (P) and reactive power (Q), while the output vector comprises optimum PSS parameters. A systematic approach for generating training set covering wide range of operating conditions, is presented. The ANN has been trained using back-propagation training algorithm. Investigations reveal that the dynamic performance of ANN based adaptive conventional PSS is quite insensitive to wide variations in loading conditions.

  13. Covert visual spatial orienting and saccades: overlapping neural systems.

    PubMed

    Nobre, A C; Gitelman, D R; Dias, E C; Mesulam, M M

    2000-03-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the functional anatomical relationship between covert orienting of visual spatial attention and execution of saccadic eye movements. Brain areas engaged by shifting spatial attention covertly and by moving the eyes repetitively toward visual targets were compared and contrasted directly within the same subjects. The two tasks activated highly overlapping neural systems and showed that common parietal and frontal regions are more activated during the covert task than the overt oculomotor condition. The possible nature of the relationship between these two operations is discussed.

  14. Development of wrist rehabilitation robot and interface system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Matsui, Miki; Inagawa, Naohiro; Hachisuka, Kenji; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Akiko; Saeki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a practical wrist rehabilitation robot for hemiplegic patients. It consists of a mechanical rotation unit, sensor, grip, and computer system. A myoelectric sensor is used to monitor the extensor carpi radialis longus/brevis muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle activity during training. The training robot can provoke training through myoelectric sensors, a biological signal detector and processor in advance, so that patients can undergo effective training of extention and flexion in an excited condition. In addition, both-wrist system has been developed for mirror effect training, which is the most effective function of the system, so that autonomous training using both wrists is possible. Furthermore, a user-friendly screen interface with easily recognizable touch panels has been developed to give effective training for patients. The developed robot is small size and easy to carry. The developed aspiring interface system is effective to motivate the training of patients. The effectiveness of the robot system has been verified in hospital trails. PMID:26409544

  15. SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-09

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

  16. Molecular tailoring of interfaces for thin film on substrate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Martha Elizabeth

    Thin film on substrate systems appear most prevalently within the microelectronics industry, which demands that devices operate in smaller and smaller packages with greater reliability. The reliability of these multilayer film systems is strongly influenced by the adhesion of each of the bimaterial interfaces. During use, microelectronic components undergo thermo-mechanical cycling, which induces interfacial delaminations leading to failure of the overall device. The ability to tailor interfacial properties at the molecular level provides a mechanism to improve thin film adhesion, reliability and performance. This dissertation presents the investigation of molecular level control of interface properties in three thin film-substrate systems: photodefinable polyimide films on passivated silicon substrates, self-assembled monolayers at the interface of Au films and dielectric substrates, and mechanochemically active materials on rigid substrates. For all three materials systems, the effect of interfacial modifications on adhesion is assessed using a laser-spallation technique. Laser-induced stress waves are chosen because they dynamically load the thin film interface in a precise, noncontacting manner at high strain rates and are suitable for both weak and strong interfaces. Photodefinable polyimide films are used as dielectrics in flip chip integrated circuit packages to reduce the stress between silicon passivation layers and mold compound. The influence of processing parameters on adhesion is examined for photodefinable polyimide films on silicon (Si) substrates with three different passivation layers: silicon nitride (SiNx), silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy), and the native silicon oxide (SiO2). Interfacial strength increases when films are processed with an exposure step as well as a longer cure cycle. Additionally, the interfacial fracture energy is assessed using a dynamic delamination protocol. The high toughness of this interface (ca. 100 J/m2) makes it difficult

  17. Workshop on neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.; Emrich, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics covered in this report are: Learning, Memory, and Artificial Neural Systems; Emerging Neural Network Technology; Neural Networks; Digital Signal Processing and Neural Networks; Application of Neural Networks to In-Core Fuel Management; Neural Networks in Process Control; Neural Network Applications in Image Processing; Neural Networks for Multi-Sensor Information Fusion; Neural Network Research in Instruments Controls Division; Neural Networks Research in the ORNL Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division; Neural Network Applications for Linear Programming; Neural Network Applications to Signal Processing and Diagnostics; Neural Networks in Filtering and Control; Neural Network Research at Tennessee Technological University; and Global Minima within the Hopfield Hypercube.

  18. Universal conditions for exact path integration in neural systems.

    PubMed

    Issa, John B; Zhang, Kechen

    2012-04-24

    Animals are capable of navigation even in the absence of prominent landmark cues. This behavioral demonstration of path integration is supported by the discovery of place cells and other neurons that show path-invariant response properties even in the dark. That is, under suitable conditions, the activity of these neurons depends primarily on the spatial location of the animal regardless of which trajectory it followed to reach that position. Although many models of path integration have been proposed, no known single theoretical framework can formally accommodate their diverse computational mechanisms. Here we derive a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for a general class of systems that performs exact path integration. These conditions include multiplicative modulation by velocity inputs and a path-invariance condition that limits the structure of connections in the underlying neural network. In particular, for a linear system to satisfy the path-invariance condition, the effective synaptic weight matrices under different velocities must commute. Our theory subsumes several existing exact path integration models as special cases. We use entorhinal grid cells as an example to demonstrate that our framework can provide useful guidance for finding unexpected solutions to the path integration problem. This framework may help constrain future experimental and modeling studies pertaining to a broad class of neural integration systems.

  19. Cycles of insanity and creativity within contemplative neural systems.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Stephen L

    2016-09-01

    Random connection weight disturbances within an assembly of artificial neural networks (ANN) drive a progression of activation patterns that are tantamount to the memories and ideas nucleating within the brain's cortex. The numerical evaluation of these pattern-based notions by another, more placid system of ANNs governs the magnitude of weight disturbances administered to the former assembly, that perturbative intensity in turn controlling the novelty of the resulting ideational stream as well as the retention of newly formed concepts. In search of solution patterns to posed problems, such collaborating neural systems autonomously cycle between two extremes in mean synaptic perturbation level. The higher limit, characterized by chaos and inattentiveness to exogenous input patterns, is the regime in which ideas first form and incubate. The lower bound, marked by relative synaptic tranquility, is favorable to the reactivation and reinforcement of concepts first seeded during heightened perturbation. When considering this synthetic neural architecture as a cognitive model, the proposed source of such synaptic fluctuations is volume neurotransmitter release within cortex where both ideational and critic nets are commingled. As a result of their overlap, not only are the generative cortical networks suffused with neurotransmitters, but also those functioning in a critic role, leading to altered 'opinions' about the perturbation-driven stream of consciousness that then govern the injection of neurotransmitters into cortex. The likely effect of such chemical feedback is that the brain constantly cycles between states of idea generating chaos and perception stabilizing tranquility in much the same way that creative artificial neural systems do. Postulating that ideas are potentially useful or interesting false memories born within such turmoil, creativity appears to take place through a cyclic process consisting of alternating phases of (1) cognitive incapacitation

  20. Cycles of insanity and creativity within contemplative neural systems.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Stephen L

    2016-09-01

    Random connection weight disturbances within an assembly of artificial neural networks (ANN) drive a progression of activation patterns that are tantamount to the memories and ideas nucleating within the brain's cortex. The numerical evaluation of these pattern-based notions by another, more placid system of ANNs governs the magnitude of weight disturbances administered to the former assembly, that perturbative intensity in turn controlling the novelty of the resulting ideational stream as well as the retention of newly formed concepts. In search of solution patterns to posed problems, such collaborating neural systems autonomously cycle between two extremes in mean synaptic perturbation level. The higher limit, characterized by chaos and inattentiveness to exogenous input patterns, is the regime in which ideas first form and incubate. The lower bound, marked by relative synaptic tranquility, is favorable to the reactivation and reinforcement of concepts first seeded during heightened perturbation. When considering this synthetic neural architecture as a cognitive model, the proposed source of such synaptic fluctuations is volume neurotransmitter release within cortex where both ideational and critic nets are commingled. As a result of their overlap, not only are the generative cortical networks suffused with neurotransmitters, but also those functioning in a critic role, leading to altered 'opinions' about the perturbation-driven stream of consciousness that then govern the injection of neurotransmitters into cortex. The likely effect of such chemical feedback is that the brain constantly cycles between states of idea generating chaos and perception stabilizing tranquility in much the same way that creative artificial neural systems do. Postulating that ideas are potentially useful or interesting false memories born within such turmoil, creativity appears to take place through a cyclic process consisting of alternating phases of (1) cognitive incapacitation

  1. Distributed photovoltaic systems - Addressing the utility interface issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firstman, S. I.; Vachtsevanos, G. J.

    This paper reviews work conducted in the United States on the impact of dispersed photovoltaic sources upon utility operations. The photovoltaic (PV) arrays are roof-mounted on residential houses and connected, via appropriate power conditioning equipment, to the utility grid. The presence of such small (4-6 Kw) dispersed generators on the distribution network raises questions of a technical, economic and institutional nature. After a brief identification of utility interface issues, the paper addresses such technical concerns as protection of equipment and personnel safety, power quality and utility operational stability. A combination of experimental and analytical approaches has been adopted to arrive at solutions to these problems. Problem areas, under various PV system penetration scenarios, are identified and conceptual designs of protection and control equipment and operating policies are developed so that system reliability is maintained while minimizing capital costs. It is hoped that the resolution of balance-of-system and grid interface questions will ascertain the economic viability of photovoltaic systems and assist in their widespread utilization in the future.

  2. Design of video interface conversion system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Heng; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a FPGA based video interface conversion system that enables the inter-conversion between digital and analog video. Cyclone IV series EP4CE22F17C chip from Altera Corporation is used as the main video processing chip, and single-chip is used as the information interaction control unit between FPGA and PC. The system is able to encode/decode messages from the PC. Technologies including video decoding/encoding circuits, bus communication protocol, data stream de-interleaving and de-interlacing, color space conversion and the Camera Link timing generator module of FPGA are introduced. The system converts Composite Video Broadcast Signal (CVBS) from the CCD camera into Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS), which will be collected by the video processing unit with Camera Link interface. The processed video signals will then be inputted to system output board and displayed on the monitor.The current experiment shows that it can achieve high-quality video conversion with minimum board size.

  3. Effect of bias voltage and temperature on lifetime of wireless neural interfaces with Al ₂O₃ and parylene bilayer encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Caldwell, Ryan; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2015-02-01

    The lifetime of neural interfaces is a critical challenge for chronic implantations, as therapeutic devices (e.g., neural prosthetics) will require decades of lifetime. We evaluated the lifetime of wireless Utah electrode array (UEA) based neural interfaces with a bilayer encapsulation scheme utilizing a combination of alumina deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and parylene C. Wireless integrated neural interfaces (INIs), equipped with recording version 9 (INI-R9) ASIC chips, were used to monitor the encapsulation performance through radio-frequency (RF) power and telemetry. The wireless devices were encapsulated with 52 nm of ALD Al2O3 and 6 μm of parylene C, and tested by soaking in phosphate buffered solution (PBS) at 57 °C for 4× accelerated lifetime testing. The INIs were also powered continuously through 2.765 MHz inductive power and forward telemetry link at unregulated 5 V. The bilayer encapsulated INIs were fully functional for ∼35 days (140 days at 37 °C equivalent) with consistent power-up frequencies (∼910 MHz), stable RF signal (∼-75 dBm), and 100 % command reception rate. This is ∼10 times of equivalent lifetime of INIs with parylene-only encapsulation (13 days) under same power condition at 37 °C. The bilayer coated INIs without continuous powering lasted over 1860 equivalent days (still working) at 37 °C. Those results suggest that bias stress is a significant factor to accelerate the failure of the encapsulated devices. The INIs failed completely within 5 days of the initial frequency shift of RF signal at 57 °C, which implied that the RF frequency shift is an early indicator of encapsulation/device failure. PMID:25653054

  4. Effect of bias voltage and temperature on lifetime of wireless neural interfaces with Al ₂O₃ and parylene bilayer encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Caldwell, Ryan; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2015-02-01

    The lifetime of neural interfaces is a critical challenge for chronic implantations, as therapeutic devices (e.g., neural prosthetics) will require decades of lifetime. We evaluated the lifetime of wireless Utah electrode array (UEA) based neural interfaces with a bilayer encapsulation scheme utilizing a combination of alumina deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and parylene C. Wireless integrated neural interfaces (INIs), equipped with recording version 9 (INI-R9) ASIC chips, were used to monitor the encapsulation performance through radio-frequency (RF) power and telemetry. The wireless devices were encapsulated with 52 nm of ALD Al2O3 and 6 μm of parylene C, and tested by soaking in phosphate buffered solution (PBS) at 57 °C for 4× accelerated lifetime testing. The INIs were also powered continuously through 2.765 MHz inductive power and forward telemetry link at unregulated 5 V. The bilayer encapsulated INIs were fully functional for ∼35 days (140 days at 37 °C equivalent) with consistent power-up frequencies (∼910 MHz), stable RF signal (∼-75 dBm), and 100 % command reception rate. This is ∼10 times of equivalent lifetime of INIs with parylene-only encapsulation (13 days) under same power condition at 37 °C. The bilayer coated INIs without continuous powering lasted over 1860 equivalent days (still working) at 37 °C. Those results suggest that bias stress is a significant factor to accelerate the failure of the encapsulated devices. The INIs failed completely within 5 days of the initial frequency shift of RF signal at 57 °C, which implied that the RF frequency shift is an early indicator of encapsulation/device failure.

  5. A method for compression of intra-cortically-recorded neural signals dedicated to implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shaeri, Mohammad Ali; Sodagar, Amir M

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes an efficient data compression technique dedicated to implantable intra-cortical neural recording devices. The proposed technique benefits from processing neural signals in the Discrete Haar Wavelet Transform space, a new spike extraction approach, and a novel data framing scheme to telemeter the recorded neural information to the outside world. Based on the proposed technique, a 64-channel neural signal processor was designed and prototyped as a part of a wireless implantable extra-cellular neural recording microsystem. Designed in a 0.13- μ m standard CMOS process, the 64-channel neural signal processor reported in this paper occupies ∼ 0.206 mm(2) of silicon area, and consumes 94.18 μW when operating under a 1.2-V supply voltage at a master clock frequency of 1.28 MHz. PMID:25222949

  6. Incomplete fuzzy data processing systems using artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patyra, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of a fuzzy data processing system using an artificial neural network (ANN) is discussed. The binary representation of fuzzy data is assumed, where the universe of discourse is decartelized into n equal intervals. The value of a membership function is represented by a binary number. It is proposed that incomplete fuzzy data processing be performed in two stages. The first stage performs the 'retrieval' of incomplete fuzzy data, and the second stage performs the desired operation on the retrieval data. The method of incomplete fuzzy data retrieval is proposed based on the linear approximation of missing values of the membership function. The ANN implementation of the proposed system is presented. The system was computationally verified and showed a relatively small total error.

  7. Fast Stimulus Artifact Recovery in a Multichannel Neural Recording System

    PubMed Central

    Schoenecker, Matthew C.; Bonham, Ben H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 32-channel recording system and software artifact blanking technique for recording neuronal responses to high-rate electrical stimulation. Each recording channel recovers from biphasic full-scale-input pulses (1.5-V) in less than 80 μs. Artifacts are blanked online in software, allowing flexibility in the choice of blanking period and the possibility of recovering neural data occurring simultaneously with non-saturating artifacts. The system has been used in-vivo to record central neuronal responses to intracochlear electrical stimulation at 2000 pulses per second. Simplicity of the hardware design makes the technique well suited to an implantable multi-channel recording system. PMID:20559458

  8. A Gamma Memory Neural Network for System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; Principe, Jose C.

    1992-01-01

    A gamma neural network topology is investigated for a system identification application. A discrete gamma memory structure is used in the input layer, providing delayed values of both the control inputs and the network output to the input layer. The discrete gamma memory structure implements a tapped dispersive delay line, with the amount of dispersion regulated by a single, adaptable parameter. The network is trained using static back propagation, but captures significant features of the system dynamics. The system dynamics identified with the network are the Mach number dynamics of the 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The training data spans an operating range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.3.

  9. The Neural Mechanism of Encountering Misjudgment by the Justice System

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Although misjudgment is an issue of primary concern to the justice system and public safety, the response to misjudgment by the human brain remains unclear. We used fMRI to record neural activity in participants that encountered four possible judgments by the justice system with two basic components: whether the judgment was right or wrong [accuracy: right vs. wrong (misjudgment)] and whether the judgment was positive or negative [valence: positive vs. negative]. As hypothesized, the rostral ACC specifically processes the accuracy of judgment, being more active for misjudgment than for right judgment, while the striatum was uniquely responsible for the valence of judgment, being recruited to a larger extent by positive judgment compared to negative judgment. Furthermore, the activity in the rACC for positive misjudgments was positively correlated with that for negative misjudgments, which confirmed the misjudgment-specificity of the rACC. These results demonstrate that the brain can distinguish a misjudgment from a right judgment and regard a misjudgment as an emotionally arousing stimulus, independent of whether it is positive or negative, while positive judgment is considered as hedonic information, regardless of whether it is right or wrong. Our study is the first to reveal the neural mechanism that underlies judgment processing. This mechanism may constitute the basis of future studies to develop a novel marker for the detection of lies. PMID:24086531

  10. Development of sensitized pick coal interface detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchill, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    One approach for detection of the coal interface is measurement of the pick cutting hoads and shock through the use of pick strain gage load cells and accelerometers. The cutting drum of a long wall mining machine contains a number of cutting picks. In order to measure pick loads and shocks, one pick was instrumented and telementry used to transmit the signals from the drum to an instrument-type tape recorder. A data system using FM telemetry was designed to transfer cutting bit load and shock information from the drum of a longwall shearer coal mining machine to a chassis mounted data recorder.

  11. Human-System Interfaces (HSIs) in Small Modular Reactors (SMRs)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques V Hugo

    2014-10-01

    This book chapter describes the considerations for the selection of advanced human–system interfaces (HSIs) for the new generation of nuclear power plants. The chapter discusses the technologies that will be needed to support highly automated nuclear power plants, while minimising demands for numbers of operational staff, reducing human error and improving plant efficiency and safety. Special attention is paid to the selection and deployment of advanced technologies in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The chapter closes with an examination of how technologies are likely to develop over the next 10–15 years and how this will affect design choices for the nuclear industry.

  12. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G.; Clark, Roger F.; Kary, Tim

    2010-07-20

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material that is parallel with the liquid surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on.times. ##EQU00001## where g is the gravitational constant, w is the horizontal width of the liquid, and f is the at least one frequency.

  13. Operator interface design considerations for a PACS information management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, James E.; Nabijee, Kamal H.; Freeman, Rick H.; Prior, Fred W.

    1990-08-01

    As prototype PACS grow into fully digital departmental and hospital-wide systems, effective information storage and retrieval mechanisms become increasingly important. Thus far, designers of PACS workstations have concentrated on image communication and display functionality. The new challenge is to provide appropriate operator interface environments to facilitate information retrieval. The "Marburg Model" 1 provides a detailed analysis of the functions, control flows and data structures used in Radiology. It identifies a set of "actors" who perform information manipulation functions. Drawing on this model and its associated methodology it is possible to identify four modes of use of information systems in Radiology: Clinical Routine, Research, Consultation, and Administration. Each mode has its own specific access requirements and views of information. An operator interface strategy appropriate for each mode will be proposed. Clinical Routine mode is the principal concern of PACS primary diagnosis workstations. In a full PACS implementation, such workstations must provide a simple and consistent navigational aid for the on-line image database, a local work list of cases to be reviewed, and easy access to information from other hospital information systems. A hierarchical method of information access is preferred because it provides the ability to start at high-level entities and iteratively narrow the scope of information from which to select subsequent operations. An implementation using hierarchical, nested software windows which fulfills such requirements shall be examined.

  14. Development of sensitized pick coal interface detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchill, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    One approach for detection of the coal interface is measurement of pick cutting loads and shock through the use of pick strain gage load cells and accelerometers. The cutting drum of a long wall mining machine contains a number of cutting picks. In order to measure pick loads and shocks, one pick was instrumented and telemetry used to transmit the signals from the drum to an instrument-type tape recorder. A data system using FM telemetry was designed to transfer cutting bit load and shock information from the drum of a longwall shearer coal mining machine to a chassis mounted data recorder. The design of components in the test data system were finalized, the required instruments were assembled, the instrument system was evaluated in an above-ground simulation test, and an underground test series to obtain tape recorded sensor data was conducted.

  15. CSI computer system/remote interface unit acceptance test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The validation tests conducted on the Control/Structures Interaction (CSI) Computer System (CCS)/Remote Interface Unit (RIU) is discussed. The CCS/RIU consists of a commercially available, Langley Research Center (LaRC) programmed, space flight qualified computer and a flight data acquisition and filtering computer, developed at LaRC. The tests were performed in the Space Structures Research Laboratory (SSRL) and included open loop excitation, closed loop control, safing, RIU digital filtering, and RIU stand alone testing with the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-0 testbed. The test results indicated that the CCS/RIU system is comparable to ground based systems in performing real-time control-structure experiments.

  16. Dynamic output feedback stabilization for nonlinear systems based on standard neural network models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meiqin

    2006-08-01

    A neural-model-based control design for some nonlinear systems is addressed. The design approach is to approximate the nonlinear systems with neural networks of which the activation functions satisfy the sector conditions. A novel neural network model termed standard neural network model (SNNM) is advanced for describing this class of approximating neural networks. Full-order dynamic output feedback control laws are then designed for the SNNMs with inputs and outputs to stabilize the closed-loop systems. The control design equations are shown to be a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be easily solved by various convex optimization algorithms to determine the control signals. It is shown that most neural-network-based nonlinear systems can be transformed into input-output SNNMs to be stabilization synthesized in a unified way. Finally, some application examples are presented to illustrate the control design procedures.

  17. Advanced EVA system design requirements study: EVAS/space station system interface requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The definition of the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems interface requirements and accomodations for effective integration of a production EVA capability into the space station are contained. A description of the EVA systems for which the space station must provide the various interfaces and accomodations are provided. The discussion and analyses of the various space station areas in which the EVA interfaces are required and/or from which implications for EVA system design requirements are derived, are included. The rationale is provided for all EVAS mechanical, fluid, electrical, communications, and data system interfaces as well as exterior and interior requirements necessary to facilitate EVA operations. Results of the studies supporting these discussions are presented in the appendix.

  18. The Evolution of Neuroprosthetic Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Adewole, Dayo O; Serruya, Mijail D; Harris, James P; Burrell, Justin C; Petrov, Dmitriy; Chen, H Isaac; Wolf, John A; Cullen, D Kacy

    2016-01-01

    The ideal neuroprosthetic interface permits high-quality neural recording and stimulation of the nervous system while reliably providing clinical benefits over chronic periods. Although current technologies have made notable strides in this direction, significant improvements must be made to better achieve these design goals and satisfy clinical needs. This article provides an overview of the state of neuroprosthetic interfaces, starting with the design and placement of these interfaces before exploring the stimulation and recording platforms yielded from contemporary research. Finally, we outline emerging research trends in an effort to explore the potential next generation of neuroprosthetic interfaces. PMID:27652455

  19. Neural networks as a possible architecture for the distributed control of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiesler, E.; Choudry, A.

    1987-01-01

    Researchers attempted to identify the features essential for large, complex, multi-modular multi-functional systems possessing a high level of interconnectivity. These features were studied in the context of neural networks with the aim of arriving at a possible architecture of the distributed control system-specific features of the neural networks and their applicability in space systems.

  20. Parallel processing across neural systems: implications for a multiple memory system hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mizumori, Sheri J Y; Yeshenko, Oksana; Gill, Kathryn M; Davis, Denise M

    2004-11-01

    A common conceptualization of the organization of memory systems in brain is that different types of memory are mediated by distinct neural systems. Strong support for this view comes from studies that show double (or triple) dissociations between spatial, response, and emotional memories following selective lesions of hippocampus, striatum, and the amygdala. Here, we examine the extent to which hippocampal and striatal neural activity patterns support the multiple memory systems view. A comparison is made between hippocampal and striatal neural correlates with behavior during asymptotic performance of spatial and response maze tasks. Location- (or place), movement, and reward-specific firing patterns were found in both structures regardless of the task demands. Many, but not all, place fields of hippocampal and striatal neurons were similarly affected by changes in the visual and reward context regardless of the cognitive demands. Also, many, but not all, hippocampal and striatal movement-sensitive neurons showed significant changes in their behavioral correlates after a change in visual context, irrespective of cognitive strategy. Similar partial reorganization was observed following manipulations of the reward condition for cells recorded from both structures, again regardless of task. Assuming that representations that persist across context changes reflect learned information, we make the following conclusions. First, the consistent pattern of partial reorganization supports a view that the analysis of spatial, response, and reinforcement information is accomplished via an error-driven, or match-mismatch, algorithm across neural systems. Second, task-relevant processing occurs continuously within hippocampus and striatum regardless of the cognitive demands of the task. Third, given the high degree of parallel processing across allegedly different memory systems, we propose that different neural systems may effectively compete for control of a behavioral

  1. Artificial neural networks to model and diagnose cardiovascular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Allen, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and. the actual variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  2. A direct-to-drive neural data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Justin P; Bernstein, Jacob G; Meyer, Andrew J; Barber, Jessica B; Bolivar, Marti; Newbold, Bryan; Scholvin, Jorg; Moore-Kochlacs, Caroline; Wentz, Christian T; Kopell, Nancy J; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    Driven by the increasing channel count of neural probes, there is much effort being directed to creating increasingly scalable electrophysiology data acquisition (DAQ) systems. However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases. Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process. This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future.

  3. A direct-to-drive neural data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Justin P; Bernstein, Jacob G; Meyer, Andrew J; Barber, Jessica B; Bolivar, Marti; Newbold, Bryan; Scholvin, Jorg; Moore-Kochlacs, Caroline; Wentz, Christian T; Kopell, Nancy J; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    Driven by the increasing channel count of neural probes, there is much effort being directed to creating increasingly scalable electrophysiology data acquisition (DAQ) systems. However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases. Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process. This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future. PMID:26388740

  4. A direct-to-drive neural data acquisition system

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Justin P.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Meyer, Andrew J.; Barber, Jessica B.; Bolivar, Marti; Newbold, Bryan; Scholvin, Jorg; Moore-Kochlacs, Caroline; Wentz, Christian T.; Kopell, Nancy J.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Driven by the increasing channel count of neural probes, there is much effort being directed to creating increasingly scalable electrophysiology data acquisition (DAQ) systems. However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases. Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process. This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future. PMID:26388740

  5. Image exploitation using multi-sensor/neural network systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uberbacher, E.C.; Xu, Y.; Lee, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed and evaluated a tool for change detection and other analysis tasks relevant to image exploitation. The tool, visGRAIL, integrates three key elements: (1) the use of multiple algorithms to extract information from images - feature extractors or {open_quotes}sensors{close_quotes}, (2) an algorithm to fuse the information - presently a neural network, and (3) empirical estimation of the fusion parameters based on a representative set of images. The system was applied to test images in the RADIUS Common Development Environment (RCDE). In a task designed to distinguish natural scenes from those containing various amounts of human-made objects and structure, the system classified correctly 95% of 350 images in a test set. This paper describes details of the feature extractors, and presents analyses of the discriminatory characteristics of the features. visGRAIL has been integrated into the RCDE.

  6. A PET study of the neural systems of stuttering.

    PubMed

    Fox, P T; Ingham, R J; Ingham, J C; Hirsch, T B; Downs, J H; Martin, C; Jerabek, P; Glass, T; Lancaster, J L

    1996-07-11

    The cause of stuttering is unknown. Failure to develop left-hemispheric dominance for speech is a long-standing theory although others implicated the motor system more broadly, often postulating hyperactivity of the right (language nondominant) cerebral hemisphere. As knowledge of motor circuitry has advanced, theories of stuttering have become more anatomically specific, postulating hyperactivity of premotor cortex, either directly or through connectivity with the thalamus and basal ganglia. Alternative theories target the auditory and speech production systems. By contrasting stuttering with fluent speech using positron emission tomography combined with chorus reading to induce fluency, we found support for each of these hypotheses. Stuttering induced widespread overactivations of the motor system in both cerebrum and cerebellum, with right cerebral dominance. Stuttered reading lacked left-lateralized activations of the auditory system, which are thought to support the self-monitoring of speech, and selectively deactivated a frontal-temporal system implicated in speech production. Induced fluency decreased or eliminated the overactivity in most motor areas, and largely reversed the auditory-system underactivations and the deactivation of the speech production system. Thus stuttering is a disorder affecting the multiple neural systems used for speaking.

  7. Structure-unknown non-linear dynamic systems: identification through neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masri, S. F.; Chassiakos, A. G.; Caughey, T. K.

    1992-03-01

    Explores the potential of using parallel distributed processing (neural network) approaches to identify the internal forces of structure-unknown non-linear dynamic systems typically encountered in the field of applied mechanics. The relevant characteristics of neural networks, such as the processing elements, network topology, and learning algorithms, are discussed in the context of system identification. The analogy of the neural network procedure to a qualitatively similar non-parametric identification approach, which was previously developed by the authors for handling arbitrary non-linear systems, is discussed. The utility of the neural network approach is demonstrated by application to several illustrative problems.

  8. Effects of Fast Simple Numerical Calculation Training on Neural Systems.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nagase, Tomomi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training, including fast simple numerical calculation (FSNC), has been shown to improve performance on untrained processing speed and executive function tasks in the elderly. However, the effects of FSNC training on cognitive functions in the young and on neural mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of 1-week intensive FSNC training on cognitive function, regional gray matter volume (rGMV), and regional cerebral blood flow at rest (resting rCBF) in healthy young adults. FSNC training was associated with improvements in performance on simple processing speed, speeded executive functioning, and simple and complex arithmetic tasks. FSNC training was associated with a reduction in rGMV and an increase in resting rCBF in the frontopolar areas and a weak but widespread increase in resting rCBF in an anatomical cluster in the posterior region. These results provide direct evidence that FSNC training alone can improve performance on processing speed and executive function tasks as well as plasticity of brain structures and perfusion. Our results also indicate that changes in neural systems in the frontopolar areas may underlie these cognitive improvements.

  9. Neural-based nonimaging vision system for robotic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Timothy C.; Brown, Joe R.

    1994-03-01

    A multispectral, multiaperture, nonimaging sensor was simulated and constructed to show that the relative location of a robot arm and a specified target can be determined through Neural Network processing when the arm and target produce different spectral signatures. Data acquired from both computer simulation and actual hardware implementation was used to train an artificial Neural Network to yield the relative position in two dimensions of a robot arm and a target. The arm and target contained optical sources of different spectral characteristics which allows the sensor to discriminate between them. Simulation of the sensor gave an error distribution with a mean of zero and a standard deviation of 0.3 inches in each dimension across a work area of 6 by 10 inches. The actual sensor produced a standard deviation of approximately 0.8 inches using a limited number of training and test sets. No significant differences were found in the system performance where 9 or 18 apertures were used, indicating a minimum number of apertures required is equal to or less than nine.

  10. Effects of Fast Simple Numerical Calculation Training on Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nagase, Tomomi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training, including fast simple numerical calculation (FSNC), has been shown to improve performance on untrained processing speed and executive function tasks in the elderly. However, the effects of FSNC training on cognitive functions in the young and on neural mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of 1-week intensive FSNC training on cognitive function, regional gray matter volume (rGMV), and regional cerebral blood flow at rest (resting rCBF) in healthy young adults. FSNC training was associated with improvements in performance on simple processing speed, speeded executive functioning, and simple and complex arithmetic tasks. FSNC training was associated with a reduction in rGMV and an increase in resting rCBF in the frontopolar areas and a weak but widespread increase in resting rCBF in an anatomical cluster in the posterior region. These results provide direct evidence that FSNC training alone can improve performance on processing speed and executive function tasks as well as plasticity of brain structures and perfusion. Our results also indicate that changes in neural systems in the frontopolar areas may underlie these cognitive improvements. PMID:26881117

  11. Neural Systems Underlying the Reappraisal of Personally Craved Foods

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Nicole R.; Mann, Traci; Tomiyama, A. Janet; Berkman, Elliot T.

    2014-01-01

    Craving of unhealthy food is a common target of self-regulation, but the neural systems underlying this process are understudied. In this study, participants used cognitive reappraisal to regulate their desire to consume idiosyncratically craved or not craved energy-dense foods, and neural activity during regulation was compared with each other and with the activity during passive viewing of energy-dense foods. Regulation of both food types elicited activation in classic top–down self-regulation regions including the dorsolateral prefrontal, inferior frontal, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices. This main effect of regulation was qualified by an interaction, such that activation in these regions was significantly greater during reappraisal of craved (versus not craved) foods and several regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal, inferior frontal, medial frontal, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices, were uniquely active during regulation of personally craved foods. Body mass index significantly negatively correlated with regulation-related activation in the right dorsolateral PFC, thalamus, and bilateral dorsal ACC and with activity in nucleus accumbens during passive viewing of craved (vs. neutral, low-energy density) foods. These results suggest that several of the brain regions involved in the self-regulation of food craving are similar to other kinds of affective self-regulation and that others are sensitive to the self-relevance of the regulation target. PMID:24392892

  12. EDITORIAL: Deep brain stimulation, deontology and duty: the moral obligation of non-abandonment at the neural interface Deep brain stimulation, deontology and duty: the moral obligation of non-abandonment at the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fins, Joseph J.; MD; FACP

    2009-10-01

    intrusions on their bodies and their selves. Previously, I suggested that stimulation parameters for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders might be manipulated by patients one day. I envisioned a degree of patient discretion, within a pre-set safe range determined by physicians, much like patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps give patients control over the dosing of opioid analgesia [3]. I am glad that such an advance is evolving as a means to preserve batteries in the treatment of motor disorders [16]. I would encourage the neural engineers to embrace the ethical mandate to develop additional platforms that might enhance patient self-determination and foster a greater degree of functional independence. While the neuromodulation community has every reason to celebrate its accomplishments, it would be better served by appreciating that the insertion of a device into the human brain comes with, if not the penumbra of sacrilege, a moral obligation to step out of the shadows and remain clearly available to patients and families over the long haul. Although neuromodulation has liberated many patients from the shackles of disease, we need to appreciate that the hardware that has made this possible can remain tethering. The challenge for the next generation of innovators is to minimize these burdens at this neural interface. By reducing barriers to care that exist in an unprepared health care system and developing more user-friendly technology, the neuromodulation community can expand its reach and broaden the relief provided by these neuro-palliative interventions [17]. Acknowledgements and Disclosures Dr Fins is the recipient of an Investigator Award in Health Policy Research (Minds Apart: Severe Brain Injury and Health Policy) from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He also gratefully acknowledges grant support from the Buster Foundation (Neuroethics and Disorders of Consciousness). He is an unfunded co-investigator of a study of deep brain stimulation in the minimally

  13. RoboCon: Operator interface for robotic applications. Final report: RoboCon electrical interfacing -- system architecture, and Interfacing NDDS and LabView

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.

    1998-04-30

    The first appendix contains detailed specifications of the electrical interfacing employed in Robocon. This includes all electrical signals and power requirement descriptions up to and including the interface entry points for external robots and systems. The reader is first presented with an overview of the overall Robocon electrical system, followed by sub-sections describing each module in detail. The appendices contain listings of power requirements and the electrical connectors and cables used, followed by an overall electrical system diagram. Custom electronics employed are also described. The Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) is a real-time dissemination communications architecture which allows nodes on a network to publish data and subscribe to data published by other nodes while remaining anonymous. The second appendix explains how to facilitate a seamless interface between NDDS and LabView and provides sample source code used to implement an NDDS consumer which writes a string to a socket.

  14. Man-machine interface issues for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, William R.; Haugset, Kjell

    1991-01-01

    The deployment of nuclear reactors in space necessitates an entirely new set of guidelines for the design of the man-machine interface (MMI) when compared to earth-based applications such as commerical nuclear power plants. Although the design objectives of earth- and space-based nuclear power systems are the same, that is, to produce electrical power, the differences in the application environments mean that the operator's role will be significantly different for space-based systems. This paper explores the issues associated with establishing the necessary MMI guidelines for space nuclear power systems. The generic human performance requirements for space-based systems are described, and the operator roles that are utilized for the operation of current and advanced earth-based reactors are briefly summarized. The development of a prototype advanced control room, the Integrated Surveillance and Control System (ISACS) at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Halden Reactor Project is introduced. Finally, preliminary ideas for the use of the ISACS system as a test bed for establishing MMI guidelines for space nuclear systems are presented.

  15. Man--machine interface issues for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Haugset, K. )

    1991-01-10

    The deployment of nuclear reactors in space necessitates an entirely new set of guidelines for the design of the man--machine interface (MMI) when compared to earth-based applications such as commerical nuclear power plants. Although the design objectives of earth- and space-based nuclear power systems are the same, that is, to produce electrical power, the differences in the application environments mean that the operator's role will be significantly different for space-based systems. This paper explores the issues associated with establishing the necessary MMI guidelines for space nuclear power systems. The generic human performance requirements for space-based systems are described, and the operator roles that are utilized for the operation of current and advanced earth-based reactors are briefly summarized. The development of a prototype advanced control room, the Integrated Surveillance and Control System (ISACS) at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Halden Reactor Project is introduced. Finally, preliminary ideas for the use of the ISACS system as a test bed for establishing MMI guidelines for space nuclear systems are presented.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Theory of Neural Information Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias

    2006-04-01

    It is difficult not to be amazed by the ability of the human brain to process, to structure and to memorize information. Even by the toughest standards the behaviour of this network of about 1011 neurons qualifies as complex, and both the scientific community and the public take great interest in the growing field of neuroscience. The scientific endeavour to learn more about the function of the brain as an information processing system is here a truly interdisciplinary one, with important contributions from biology, computer science, physics, engineering and mathematics as the authors quite rightly point out in the introduction of their book. The role of the theoretical disciplines here is to provide mathematical models of information processing systems and the tools to study them. These models and tools are at the centre of the material covered in the book by Coolen, Kühn and Sollich. The book is divided into five parts, providing basic introductory material on neural network models as well as the details of advanced techniques to study them. A mathematical appendix complements the main text. The range of topics is extremely broad, still the presentation is concise and the book well arranged. To stress the breadth of the book let me just mention a few keywords here: the material ranges from the basics of perceptrons and recurrent network architectures to more advanced aspects such as Bayesian learning and support vector machines; Shannon's theory of information and the definition of entropy are discussed, and a chapter on Amari's information geometry is not missing either. Finally the statistical mechanics chapters cover Gardner theory and the replica analysis of the Hopfield model, not without being preceded by a brief introduction of the basic concepts of equilibrium statistical physics. The book also contains a part on effective theories of the macroscopic dynamics of neural networks. Many dynamical aspects of neural networks are usually hard to find in the

  17. Man-Machine Interface System for Neuromuscular Training and Evaluation Based on EMG and MMG Signals

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Ramon; Alonso, Alonso; Carrera, Albano; Durán, Ramon; Fernández, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System), a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES) and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals. PMID:22163515

  18. Man-machine interface system for neuromuscular training and evaluation based on EMG and MMG signals.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Ramon; Alonso, Alonso; Carrera, Albano; Durán, Ramon; Fernández, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System), a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES) and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  19. Interfacing with the computational brain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2011-10-01

    Neuroscience is just beginning to understand the neural computations that underlie our remarkable capacity to learn new motor tasks. Studies of natural movements have emphasized the importance of concepts such as dimensionality reduction within hierarchical levels of redundancy, optimization of behavior in the presence of sensorimotor noise and internal models for predictive control. These concepts also provide a framework for understanding the improvements in performance seen in myoelectric-controlled interface and brain-machine interface paradigms. Recent experiments reveal how volitional activity in the motor system combines with sensory feedback to shape neural representations and drives adaptation of behavior. By elucidating these mechanisms, a new generation of intelligent interfaces can be designed to exploit neural plasticity and restore function after neurological injury. PMID:21659037

  20. Interfacing with the Computational Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscience is just beginning to understand the neural computations that underlie our remarkable capacity to learn new motor tasks. Studies of natural movements have emphasized the importance of concepts such as dimensionality reduction within hierarchical levels of redundancy, optimization of behavior in the presence of sensorimotor noise and internal models for predictive control. These concepts also provide a framework for understanding the improvements in performance seen in myoelectric-controlled interface (MCI) and brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigms. Recent experiments reveal how volitional activity in the motor system combines with sensory feedback to shape neural representations and drives adaptation of behavior. By elucidating these mechanisms, a new generation of intelligent interfaces can be designed to exploit neural plasticity and restore function after neurological injury. PMID:21659037

  1. FY07 Summary of System Interface and Support Systems R&D and Technical Issues Map

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-09-01

    This document provides a summary of research and development activities in the System Interface and Support Systems area of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in FY 2007. Project cost and performance data obtained from the PICS system, at least up through July 2007, are presented and analyzed. Brief summaries of accomplishments and references are provided. A mapping of System Interface and Support Systems technical issues versus the work performed is updated and presented. Lastly, near-term research plans are described, and recommendatioins are provided for additional research.

  2. FY 06 Status of System Interface and Support Systems R&D Areas

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Sherman

    2006-09-01

    This document provides a summary of research and development activities performed in the Systems Interface and Support Systems area of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative during FY 2006. Project cost and performance data obtained from the PICS system are presented and analyzed. Brief summaries of accomplishments and references are provided. A mapping of System Interface and Support Systems technical issues versus the work performed is updated and presented. Lastly, near-term research plans are given, and a description of the new UNLV high temperature heat exchanger program structure is provided.

  3. Neural Systems Language: A Formal Modeling Language for the Systematic Description, Unambiguous Communication, and Automated Digital Curation of Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ramsay A.; Swanson, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic description and the unambiguous communication of findings and models remain among the unresolved fundamental challenges in systems neuroscience. No common descriptive frameworks exist to describe systematically the connective architecture of the nervous system, even at the grossest level of observation. Furthermore, the accelerating volume of novel data generated on neural connectivity outpaces the rate at which this data is curated into neuroinformatics databases to synthesize digitally systems-level insights from disjointed reports and observations. To help address these challenges, we propose the Neural Systems Language (NSyL). NSyL is a modeling language to be used by investigators to encode and communicate systematically reports of neural connectivity from neuroanatomy and brain imaging. NSyL engenders systematic description and communication of connectivity irrespective of the animal taxon described, experimental or observational technique implemented, or nomenclature referenced. As a language, NSyL is internally consistent, concise, and comprehensible to both humans and computers. NSyL is a promising development for systematizing the representation of neural architecture, effectively managing the increasing volume of data on neural connectivity and streamlining systems neuroscience research. Here we present similar precedent systems, how NSyL extends existing frameworks, and the reasoning behind NSyL’s development. We explore NSyL’s potential for balancing robustness and consistency in representation by encoding previously reported assertions of connectivity from the literature as examples. Finally, we propose and discuss the implications of a framework for how NSyL will be digitally implemented in the future to streamline curation of experimental results and bridge the gaps among anatomists, imagers, and neuroinformatics databases. PMID:23787962

  4. Neural systems language: a formal modeling language for the systematic description, unambiguous communication, and automated digital curation of neural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ramsay A; Swanson, Larry W

    2013-09-01

    Systematic description and the unambiguous communication of findings and models remain among the unresolved fundamental challenges in systems neuroscience. No common descriptive frameworks exist to describe systematically the connective architecture of the nervous system, even at the grossest level of observation. Furthermore, the accelerating volume of novel data generated on neural connectivity outpaces the rate at which this data is curated into neuroinformatics databases to synthesize digitally systems-level insights from disjointed reports and observations. To help address these challenges, we propose the Neural Systems Language (NSyL). NSyL is a modeling language to be used by investigators to encode and communicate systematically reports of neural connectivity from neuroanatomy and brain imaging. NSyL engenders systematic description and communication of connectivity irrespective of the animal taxon described, experimental or observational technique implemented, or nomenclature referenced. As a language, NSyL is internally consistent, concise, and comprehensible to both humans and computers. NSyL is a promising development for systematizing the representation of neural architecture, effectively managing the increasing volume of data on neural connectivity and streamlining systems neuroscience research. Here we present similar precedent systems, how NSyL extends existing frameworks, and the reasoning behind NSyL's development. We explore NSyL's potential for balancing robustness and consistency in representation by encoding previously reported assertions of connectivity from the literature as examples. Finally, we propose and discuss the implications of a framework for how NSyL will be digitally implemented in the future to streamline curation of experimental results and bridge the gaps among anatomists, imagers, and neuroinformatics databases.

  5. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of integrated circuit neural amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Elliot; Xu, Yong Ping; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural signal recording is critical in modern day neuroscience research and emerging neural prosthesis programs. Neural recording requires the use of precise, low-noise amplifier systems to acquire and condition the weak neural signals that are transduced through electrode interfaces. Neural amplifiers and amplifier-based systems are available commercially or can be designed in-house and fabricated using integrated circuit (IC) technologies, resulting in very large-scale integration or application-specific integrated circuit solutions. IC-based neural amplifiers are now used to acquire untethered/portable neural recordings, as they meet the requirements of a miniaturized form factor, light weight and low power consumption. Furthermore, such miniaturized and low-power IC neural amplifiers are now being used in emerging implantable neural prosthesis technologies. This review focuses on neural amplifier-based devices and is presented in two interrelated parts. First, neural signal recording is reviewed, and practical challenges are highlighted. Current amplifier designs with increased functionality and performance and without penalties in chip size and power are featured. Second, applications of IC-based neural amplifiers in basic science experiments (e.g., cortical studies using animal models), neural prostheses (e.g., brain/nerve machine interfaces) and treatment of neuronal diseases (e.g., DBS for treatment of epilepsy) are highlighted. The review concludes with future outlooks of this technology and important challenges with regard to neural signal amplification. PMID:26798055

  6. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of integrated circuit neural amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kian Ann; Greenwald, Elliot; Xu, Yong Ping; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    Neural signal recording is critical in modern day neuroscience research and emerging neural prosthesis programs. Neural recording requires the use of precise, low-noise amplifier systems to acquire and condition the weak neural signals that are transduced through electrode interfaces. Neural amplifiers and amplifier-based systems are available commercially or can be designed in-house and fabricated using integrated circuit (IC) technologies, resulting in very large-scale integration or application-specific integrated circuit solutions. IC-based neural amplifiers are now used to acquire untethered/portable neural recordings, as they meet the requirements of a miniaturized form factor, light weight and low power consumption. Furthermore, such miniaturized and low-power IC neural amplifiers are now being used in emerging implantable neural prosthesis technologies. This review focuses on neural amplifier-based devices and is presented in two interrelated parts. First, neural signal recording is reviewed, and practical challenges are highlighted. Current amplifier designs with increased functionality and performance and without penalties in chip size and power are featured. Second, applications of IC-based neural amplifiers in basic science experiments (e.g., cortical studies using animal models), neural prostheses (e.g., brain/nerve machine interfaces) and treatment of neuronal diseases (e.g., DBS for treatment of epilepsy) are highlighted. The review concludes with future outlooks of this technology and important challenges with regard to neural signal amplification.

  7. A neural network architecture for implementation of expert systems for real time monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramamoorthy, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Since neural networks have the advantages of massive parallelism and simple architecture, they are good tools for implementing real time expert systems. In a rule based expert system, the antecedents of rules are in the conjunctive or disjunctive form. We constructed a multilayer feedforward type network in which neurons represent AND or OR operations of rules. Further, we developed a translator which can automatically map a given rule base into the network. Also, we proposed a new and powerful yet flexible architecture that combines the advantages of both fuzzy expert systems and neural networks. This architecture uses the fuzzy logic concepts to separate input data domains into several smaller and overlapped regions. Rule-based expert systems for time critical applications using neural networks, the automated implementation of rule-based expert systems with neural nets, and fuzzy expert systems vs. neural nets are covered.

  8. Neural systems for landmark-based wayfinding in humans

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Russell A.; Vass, Lindsay K.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and animals use landmarks during wayfinding to determine where they are in the world and to guide their way to their destination. To implement this strategy, known as landmark-based piloting, a navigator must be able to: (i) identify individual landmarks, (ii) use these landmarks to determine their current position and heading, (iii) access long-term knowledge about the spatial relationships between locations and (iv) use this knowledge to plan a route to their navigational goal. Here, we review neuroimaging, neuropsychological and neurophysiological data that link the first three of these abilities to specific neural systems in the human brain. This evidence suggests that the parahippocampal place area is critical for landmark recognition, the retrosplenial/medial parietal region is centrally involved in localization and orientation, and both medial temporal lobe and retrosplenial/medial parietal lobe regions support long-term spatial knowledge. PMID:24366141

  9. Strawberry Maturity Neural Network Detectng System Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liming

    The quick and non-detective detection of agriculture product is one of the measures to increase the precision and productivity of harvesting and grading. Having analyzed H frequency of different maturities in different light intensities, the results show that H frequency for the same maturity has little influence in different light intensities; Under the same light intensity, three strawberry maturities are changing in order. After having confirmed the H frequency section to distinguish the different strawberry maturity, the triplelayer feed-forward neural network system to detect strawberry maturity was designed by using genetic algorithm. The test results show that the detecting precision ratio is 91.7%, it takes 160ms to distinguish one strawberry. Therefore, the online non-detective detecting the strawberry maturity could be realized.

  10. Chemosensory signals and their receptors in the olfactory neural system.

    PubMed

    Ihara, S; Yoshikawa, K; Touhara, K

    2013-12-19

    Chemical communication is widely used among various organisms to obtain essential information from their environment required for life. Although a large variety of molecules have been shown to act as chemical cues, the molecular and neural basis underlying the behaviors elicited by these molecules has been revealed for only a limited number of molecules. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the signaling molecules whose flow from receptor to specific behavior has been characterized. Discussing the molecules utilized by mice, insects, and the worm, we focus on how each organism has optimized its reception system to suit its living style. We also highlight how the production of these signaling molecules is regulated, an area in which considerable progress has been recently made.

  11. Early distinction system of mine fire in underground by using a neural-network system

    SciTech Connect

    Ohga, Kotaro; Higuchi, Kiyoshi

    1996-12-31

    In our laboratory, a new detection system using smell detectors was developed to detect the spontaneous combustion of coal and the combustion of other materials used underground. The results of experiments clearly the combustion of materials can be detected earlier by this detection system than by conventional detectors for gas and smoke, and there were significant differences between output data from each smell detector for coal, rubber, oil and wood. In order to discern the source of combustion gases, we have been developing a distinction system using a neural-network system. It has shown successful results in laboratory tests. This paper describes our detection system using smell detectors and our distinction system which uses a neural-network system, and presents results of experiments using both systems.

  12. An operator interface design for a telerobotic inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Tso, Kam S.; Hayati, Samad

    1993-01-01

    The operator interface has recently emerged as an important element for efficient and safe interactions between human operators and telerobotics. Advances in graphical user interface and graphics technologies enable us to produce very efficient operator interface designs. This paper describes an efficient graphical operator interface design newly developed for remote surface inspection at NASA-JPL. The interface, designed so that remote surface inspection can be performed by a single operator with an integrated robot control and image inspection capability, supports three inspection strategies of teleoperated human visual inspection, human visual inspection with automated scanning, and machine-vision-based automated inspection.

  13. Neural Circuit Recording from an Intact Cockroach Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Titlow, Josh S.; Majeed, Zana R.; Hartman, H. Bernard; Burns, Ellen; Cooper, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    The cockroach ventral nerve cord preparation is a tractable system for neuroethology experiments, neural network modeling, and testing the physiological effects of insecticides. This article describes the scope of cockroach sensory modalities that can be used to assay how an insect nervous system responds to environmental perturbations. Emphasis here is on the escape behavior mediated by cerci to giant fiber transmission in Periplaneta americana. This in situ preparation requires only moderate dissecting skill and electrophysiological expertise to generate reproducible recordings of neuronal activity. Peptides or other chemical reagents can then be applied directly to the nervous system in solution with the physiological saline. Insecticides could also be administered prior to dissection and the escape circuit can serve as a proxy for the excitable state of the central nervous system. In this context the assays described herein would also be useful to researchers interested in limb regeneration and the evolution of nervous system development for which P. americana is an established model organism. PMID:24300738

  14. An integrated architecture of adaptive neural network control for dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Liu; Tokar, R.; Mcvey, B.

    1994-07-01

    In this study, an integrated neural network control architecture for nonlinear dynamic systems is presented. Most of the recent emphasis in the neural network control field has no error feedback as the control input which rises the adaptation problem. The integrated architecture in this paper combines feed forward control and error feedback adaptive control using neural networks. The paper reveals the different internal functionality of these two kinds of neural network controllers for certain input styles, e.g., state feedback and error feedback. Feed forward neural network controllers with state feedback establish fixed control mappings which can not adapt when model uncertainties present. With error feedbacks, neural network controllers learn the slopes or the gains respecting to the error feedbacks, which are error driven adaptive control systems. The results demonstrate that the two kinds of control scheme can be combined to realize their individual advantages. Testing with disturbances added to the plant shows good tracking and adaptation.

  15. A Neural Network Architecture For Rapid Model Indexing In Computer Vision Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlicki, Ted

    1988-03-01

    Models of objects stored in memory have been shown to be useful for guiding the processing of computer vision systems. A major consideration in such systems, however, is how stored models are initially accessed and indexed by the system. As the number of stored models increases, the time required to search memory for the correct model becomes high. Parallel distributed, connectionist, neural networks' have been shown to have appealing content addressable memory properties. This paper discusses an architecture for efficient storage and reference of model memories stored as stable patterns of activity in a parallel, distributed, connectionist, neural network. The emergent properties of content addressability and resistance to noise are exploited to perform indexing of the appropriate object centered model from image centered primitives. The system consists of three network modules each of which represent information relative to a different frame of reference. The model memory network is a large state space vector where fields in the vector correspond to ordered component objects and relative, object based spatial relationships between the component objects. The component assertion network represents evidence about the existence of object primitives in the input image. It establishes local frames of reference for object primitives relative to the image based frame of reference. The spatial relationship constraint network is an intermediate representation which enables the association between the object based and the image based frames of reference. This intermediate level represents information about possible object orderings and establishes relative spatial relationships from the image based information in the component assertion network below. It is also constrained by the lawful object orderings in the model memory network above. The system design is consistent with current psychological theories of recognition by component. It also seems to support Marr's notions

  16. Method and systems for a radiation tolerant bus interface circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinstler, Gary A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A bus management tool that allows communication to be maintained between a group of nodes operatively connected on two busses in the presence of radiation by transmitting periodically a first message from one to another of the nodes on one of the busses, determining whether the first message was received by the other of the nodes on the first bus, and when it is determined that the first message was not received by the other of the nodes, transmitting a recovery command to the other of the nodes on a second of the of busses. Methods, systems, and articles of manufacture consistent with the present invention also provide for a bus recovery tool on the other node that re-initializes a bus interface circuit operatively connecting the other node to the first bus in response to the recovery command.

  17. Microstructure development and interface studies in thick film conductor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, V. K.

    1980-03-01

    A thick film conductor system which used acid treated (.01N HCl) lead borosilicate glass particles with chemically coated metal (silver) film was developed. Using only 40 wt percent metal (silver), sheet resistivities as low as 45 milliohms/sq were obtained. Microstructure was studied. Effect on the acid treatment of the glass particles prior to the metal coating was analyzed. X-ray photoelectron spectra studies showed preferential leaching of lead and boron from the surface of the glass. Good bonding between silver film and the glass was attributed to the oxidation of silver in the presence of oxygen and H+ ions on the glass surface (from acid treatment) and subsequent diffusion of Ag+ into the glass to form a continuous chemical interface. A model to predict sheet resistivities of the new thick film conductors was developed.

  18. NASA Access Mechanism - Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited by factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  19. NASA access mechanism: Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited to factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  20. Microfluidic hubs, systems, and methods for interface fluidic modules

    DOEpatents

    Bartsch, Michael S; Claudnic, Mark R; Kim, Hanyoup; Patel, Kamlesh D; Renzi, Ronald F; Van De Vreugde, James L

    2015-01-27

    Embodiments of microfluidic hubs and systems are described that may be used to connect fluidic modules. A space between surfaces may be set by fixtures described herein. In some examples a fixture may set substrate-to-substrate spacing based on a distance between registration surfaces on which the respective substrates rest. Fluidic interfaces are described, including examples where fluid conduits (e.g. capillaries) extend into the fixture to the space between surfaces. Droplets of fluid may be introduced to and/or removed from microfluidic hubs described herein, and fluid actuators may be used to move droplets within the space between surfaces. Continuous flow modules may be integrated with the hubs in some examples.

  1. Space station automation and robotics study. Operator-systems interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of a Space Station Automation and Robotics Planning Study, which was a joint project of the Boeing Aerospace Company, Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, and Boeing Computer Services Company. The study is in support of the Advanced Technology Advisory Committee established by NASA in accordance with a mandate by the U.S. Congress. Boeing support complements that provided to the NASA Contractor study team by four aerospace contractors, the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and the California Space Institute. This study identifies automation and robotics (A&R) technologies that can be advanced by requirements levied by the Space Station Program. The methodology used in the study is to establish functional requirements for the operator system interface (OSI), establish the technologies needed to meet these requirements, and to forecast the availability of these technologies. The OSI would perform path planning, tracking and control, object recognition, fault detection and correction, and plan modifications in connection with extravehicular (EV) robot operations.

  2. Shuttle/payload communications and data systems interface analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    The payload/orbiter functional command signal flow and telemetry signal flow are discussed. Functional descriptions of the various orbiter communication/avionic equipment involved in processing a command to a payload either from the ground through the orbiter by the payload specialist on the orbiter are included. Functional descriptions of the various orbiter communication/avionic equipment involved in processing telemetry data by the orbiter and transmitting the processed data to the ground are presented. The results of the attached payload/orbiter single processing and data handling system evaluation are described. The causes of the majority of attached payload/orbiter interface problems are delineated. A refined set of required flux density values for a detached payload to communicate with the orbiter is presented.

  3. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G.; Clark, Roger F.

    2011-10-04

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material; providing sound energy to the surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on L=(2m-1)v.sub.s/4f, where f is the frequency where the disturbance has an amplitude maximum, v.sub.s is the speed of sound in the material, and m is a positive integer (1, 2, 3, . . . ).

  4. Motor-related brain activity during action observation: a neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Collinger, Jennifer L; Vinjamuri, Ramana; Degenhart, Alan D; Weber, Douglas J; Sudre, Gustavo P; Boninger, Michael L; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), motor commands from the brain are unable to reach peripheral nerves and muscles below the level of the lesion. Action observation (AO), in which a person observes someone else performing an action, has been used to augment traditional rehabilitation paradigms. Similarly, AO can be used to derive the relationship between brain activity and movement kinematics for a motor-based brain-computer interface (BCI) even when the user cannot generate overt movements. BCIs use brain signals to control external devices to replace functions that have been lost due to SCI or other motor impairment. Previous studies have reported congruent motor cortical activity during observed and overt movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Recent single-unit studies using intracortical microelectrodes also demonstrated that a large number of motor cortical neurons had similar firing rate patterns between overt and observed movements. Given the increasing interest in electrocorticography (ECoG)-based BCIs, our goal was to identify whether action observation-related cortical activity could be recorded using ECoG during grasping tasks. Specifically, we aimed to identify congruent neural activity during observed and executed movements in both the sensorimotor rhythm (10-40 Hz) and the high-gamma band (65-115 Hz) which contains significant movement-related information. We observed significant motor-related high-gamma band activity during AO in both able-bodied individuals and one participant with a complete C4 SCI. Furthermore, in able-bodied participants, both the low and high frequency bands demonstrated congruent activity between action execution and observation. Our results suggest that AO could be an effective and critical procedure for deriving the mapping from ECoG signals to intended movement for an ECoG-based BCI system for individuals with paralysis.

  5. Motor-related brain activity during action observation: a neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Collinger, Jennifer L.; Vinjamuri, Ramana; Degenhart, Alan D.; Weber, Douglas J.; Sudre, Gustavo P.; Boninger, Michael L.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), motor commands from the brain are unable to reach peripheral nerves and muscles below the level of the lesion. Action observation (AO), in which a person observes someone else performing an action, has been used to augment traditional rehabilitation paradigms. Similarly, AO can be used to derive the relationship between brain activity and movement kinematics for a motor-based brain-computer interface (BCI) even when the user cannot generate overt movements. BCIs use brain signals to control external devices to replace functions that have been lost due to SCI or other motor impairment. Previous studies have reported congruent motor cortical activity during observed and overt movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Recent single-unit studies using intracortical microelectrodes also demonstrated that a large number of motor cortical neurons had similar firing rate patterns between overt and observed movements. Given the increasing interest in electrocorticography (ECoG)-based BCIs, our goal was to identify whether action observation-related cortical activity could be recorded using ECoG during grasping tasks. Specifically, we aimed to identify congruent neural activity during observed and executed movements in both the sensorimotor rhythm (10–40 Hz) and the high-gamma band (65–115 Hz) which contains significant movement-related information. We observed significant motor-related high-gamma band activity during AO in both able-bodied individuals and one participant with a complete C4 SCI. Furthermore, in able-bodied participants, both the low and high frequency bands demonstrated congruent activity between action execution and observation. Our results suggest that AO could be an effective and critical procedure for deriving the mapping from ECoG signals to intended movement for an ECoG-based BCI system for individuals with paralysis. PMID:24600359

  6. NNETS - NEURAL NETWORK ENVIRONMENT ON A TRANSPUTER SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of NNETS (Neural Network Environment on a Transputer System) is to provide users a high degree of flexibility in creating and manipulating a wide variety of neural network topologies at processing speeds not found in conventional computing environments. To accomplish this purpose, NNETS supports back propagation and back propagation related algorithms. The back propagation algorithm used is an implementation of Rumelhart's Generalized Delta Rule. NNETS was developed on the INMOS Transputer. NNETS predefines a Back Propagation Network, a Jordan Network, and a Reinforcement Network to assist users in learning and defining their own networks. The program also allows users to configure other neural network paradigms from the NNETS basic architecture. The Jordan network is basically a feed forward network that has the outputs connected to a pseudo input layer. The state of the network is dependent on the inputs from the environment plus the state of the network. The Reinforcement network learns via a scalar feedback signal called reinforcement. The network propagates forward randomly. The environment looks at the outputs of the network to produce a reinforcement signal that is fed back to the network. NNETS was written for the INMOS C compiler D711B version 1.3 or later (MS-DOS version). A small portion of the software was written in the OCCAM language to perform the communications routing between processors. NNETS is configured to operate on a 4 X 10 array of Transputers in sequence with a Transputer based graphics processor controlled by a master IBM PC 286 (or better) Transputer. A RGB monitor is required which must be capable of 512 X 512 resolution. It must be able to receive red, green, and blue signals via BNC connectors. NNETS is meant for experienced Transputer users only. The program is distributed on 5.25 inch 1.2Mb MS-DOS format diskettes. NNETS was developed in 1991. Transputer and OCCAM are registered trademarks of Inmos Corporation. MS

  7. Control of Complex Dynamic Systems by Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, James C.; Cristion, John A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the use of neural networks (NN's) in controlling a nonlinear, stochastic system with unknown process equations. The NN is used to model the resulting unknown control law. The approach here is based on using the output error of the system to train the NN controller without the need to construct a separate model (NN or other type) for the unknown process dynamics. To implement such a direct adaptive control approach, it is required that connection weights in the NN be estimated while the system is being controlled. As a result of the feedback of the unknown process dynamics, however, it is not possible to determine the gradient of the loss function for use in standard (back-propagation-type) weight estimation algorithms. Therefore, this paper considers the use of a new stochastic approximation algorithm for this weight estimation, which is based on a 'simultaneous perturbation' gradient approximation that only requires the system output error. It is shown that this algorithm can greatly enhance the efficiency over more standard stochastic approximation algorithms based on finite-difference gradient approximations.

  8. Medical Signal-Conditioning and Data-Interface System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Jeffrey; Jacobus, charles; Booth, Scott; Suarez, Michael; Smith, Derek; Hartnagle, Jeffrey; LePrell, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    A general-purpose portable, wearable electronic signal-conditioning and data-interface system is being developed for medical applications. The system can acquire multiple physiological signals (e.g., electrocardiographic, electroencephalographic, and electromyographic signals) from sensors on the wearer s body, digitize those signals that are received in analog form, preprocess the resulting data, and transmit the data to one or more remote location(s) via a radiocommunication link and/or the Internet. The system includes a computer running data-object-oriented software that can be programmed to configure the system to accept almost any analog or digital input signals from medical devices. The computing hardware and software implement a general-purpose data-routing-and-encapsulation architecture that supports tagging of input data and routing the data in a standardized way through the Internet and other modern packet-switching networks to one or more computer(s) for review by physicians. The architecture supports multiple-site buffering of data for redundancy and reliability, and supports both real-time and slower-than-real-time collection, routing, and viewing of signal data. Routing and viewing stations support insertion of automated analysis routines to aid in encoding, analysis, viewing, and diagnosis.

  9. On some classes of sequential spiking neural p systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyi; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Luo, Bin; Pan, Linqiang

    2014-05-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems) are a class of distributed parallel computing devices inspired by the way neurons communicate by means of spikes; neurons work in parallel in the sense that each neuron that can fire should fire, but the work in each neuron is sequential in the sense that at most one rule can be applied at each computation step. In this work, with biological inspiration, we consider SN P systems with the restriction that at each step, one of the neurons (i.e., sequential mode) or all neurons (i.e., pseudo-sequential mode) with the maximum (or minimum) number of spikes among the neurons that are active (can spike) will fire. If an active neuron has more than one enabled rule, it nondeterministically chooses one of the enabled rules to be applied, and the chosen rule is applied in an exhaustive manner (a kind of local parallelism): the rule is used as many times as possible. This strategy makes the system sequential or pseudo-sequential from the global view of the whole network and locally parallel at the level of neurons. We obtain four types of SN P systems: maximum/minimum spike number induced sequential/pseudo-sequential SN P systems with exhaustive use of rules. We prove that SN P systems of these four types are all Turing universal as number-generating computation devices. These results illustrate that the restriction of sequentiality may have little effect on the computation power of SN P systems. PMID:24555456

  10. Artificial neural-network based feeder reconfiguration for loss reduction in distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyong Kim; Yunseok Ko; Kyunghee Jung . Dept. of Distribution System)

    1993-07-01

    Neural networks have the capability to map the complex and extremely non-linear relationship between the load levels of zone and system topologies, which is required for feeder reconfiguration in distribution systems. This study is intended to propose the strategies to reconfigure the feeder, by using artificial neural networks with mapping ability. Artificial neural networks determine the appropriate system topology that reduces the power loss according to the variation of load pattern. The control strategy can be easily obtained from the system topology which is provided by artificial neural networks. Artificial neural networks are in groups. The first group estimates the proper load level from the load data of each zone, and the second determines the appropriate system topology from the input load level. In addition, several programs with the training set builder are developed for the design, the training and the accuracy test of artificial neural networks. The authors also evaluate the performance of neural networks designed here, on the test distribution system. Neural networks are implemented in FORTRAN language, and trained on the personal computer COMPAQ 386.

  11. Neural signal processing and closed-loop control algorithm design for an implanted neural recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Lei; McConley, Marc; Angermueller, Kai; Goldberg, David; Corba, Massimiliano; Kim, Louis; Moran, James; Parks, Philip D; Sang Chin; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    A fully autonomous intracranial device is built to continually record neural activities in different parts of the brain, process these sampled signals, decode features that correlate to behaviors and neuropsychiatric states, and use these features to deliver brain stimulation in a closed-loop fashion. In this paper, we describe the sampling and stimulation aspects of such a device. We first describe the signal processing algorithms of two unsupervised spike sorting methods. Next, we describe the LFP time-frequency analysis and feature derivation from the two spike sorting methods. Spike sorting includes a novel approach to constructing a dictionary learning algorithm in a Compressed Sensing (CS) framework. We present a joint prediction scheme to determine the class of neural spikes in the dictionary learning framework; and, the second approach is a modified OSort algorithm which is implemented in a distributed system optimized for power efficiency. Furthermore, sorted spikes and time-frequency analysis of LFP signals can be used to generate derived features (including cross-frequency coupling, spike-field coupling). We then show how these derived features can be used in the design and development of novel decode and closed-loop control algorithms that are optimized to apply deep brain stimulation based on a patient's neuropsychiatric state. For the control algorithm, we define the state vector as representative of a patient's impulsivity, avoidance, inhibition, etc. Controller parameters are optimized to apply stimulation based on the state vector's current state as well as its historical values. The overall algorithm and software design for our implantable neural recording and stimulation system uses an innovative, adaptable, and reprogrammable architecture that enables advancement of the state-of-the-art in closed-loop neural control while also meeting the challenges of system power constraints and concurrent development with ongoing scientific research designed

  12. Neural signal processing and closed-loop control algorithm design for an implanted neural recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Lei; McConley, Marc; Angermueller, Kai; Goldberg, David; Corba, Massimiliano; Kim, Louis; Moran, James; Parks, Philip D; Sang Chin; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    A fully autonomous intracranial device is built to continually record neural activities in different parts of the brain, process these sampled signals, decode features that correlate to behaviors and neuropsychiatric states, and use these features to deliver brain stimulation in a closed-loop fashion. In this paper, we describe the sampling and stimulation aspects of such a device. We first describe the signal processing algorithms of two unsupervised spike sorting methods. Next, we describe the LFP time-frequency analysis and feature derivation from the two spike sorting methods. Spike sorting includes a novel approach to constructing a dictionary learning algorithm in a Compressed Sensing (CS) framework. We present a joint prediction scheme to determine the class of neural spikes in the dictionary learning framework; and, the second approach is a modified OSort algorithm which is implemented in a distributed system optimized for power efficiency. Furthermore, sorted spikes and time-frequency analysis of LFP signals can be used to generate derived features (including cross-frequency coupling, spike-field coupling). We then show how these derived features can be used in the design and development of novel decode and closed-loop control algorithms that are optimized to apply deep brain stimulation based on a patient's neuropsychiatric state. For the control algorithm, we define the state vector as representative of a patient's impulsivity, avoidance, inhibition, etc. Controller parameters are optimized to apply stimulation based on the state vector's current state as well as its historical values. The overall algorithm and software design for our implantable neural recording and stimulation system uses an innovative, adaptable, and reprogrammable architecture that enables advancement of the state-of-the-art in closed-loop neural control while also meeting the challenges of system power constraints and concurrent development with ongoing scientific research designed

  13. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  14. The evaluation and extension of TAE in the development of a user interface management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, Brenda; Sugar, Ross

    1986-01-01

    The development of a user interface management system (UIMS) for an information gathering and display system is discussed. The system interface requirements are outlined along with the UIMS functional characteristics. Those systems requirements which are supported by the current Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) are listed and necessary modifications to the TAE are described.

  15. Visualization and Manipulation of Neural Activity in the Developing Vertebrate Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayi; Ackman, James B.; Dhande, Onkar S.; Crair, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Neural activity during vertebrate development has been unambiguously shown to play a critical role in sculpting circuit formation and function. Patterned neural activity in various parts of the developing nervous system is thought to modulate neurite outgrowth, axon targeting, and synapse refinement. The nature and role of patterned neural activity during development has been classically studied with in vitro preparations using pharmacological manipulations. In this review we discuss newly available and developing molecular–genetic tools for the visualization and manipulation of neural activity patterns specifically during development. PMID:22121343

  16. Use of Multiple Parallel Interface Strategies To Create a Seamless Accessible Interface for Next-Generation Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg C.

    Information systems in public places such as community centers and libraries require some means to provide access to individuals with physical, visual, and, if sound is involved, hearing impairments. This paper proposes a seamless adaptable human interface protocol that would allow users to incrementally modify the command and presentation aspects…

  17. On the Computational Power of Spiking Neural P Systems with Self-Organization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Song, Tao; Gong, Faming; Zheng, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Neural-like computing models are versatile computing mechanisms in the field of artificial intelligence. Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems for short) are one of the recently developed spiking neural network models inspired by the way neurons communicate. The communications among neurons are essentially achieved by spikes, i. e. short electrical pulses. In terms of motivation, SN P systems fall into the third generation of neural network models. In this study, a novel variant of SN P systems, namely SN P systems with self-organization, is introduced, and the computational power of the system is investigated and evaluated. It is proved that SN P systems with self-organization are capable of computing and accept the family of sets of Turing computable natural numbers. Moreover, with 87 neurons the system can compute any Turing computable recursive function, thus achieves Turing universality. These results demonstrate promising initiatives to solve an open problem arisen by Gh Păun. PMID:27283843

  18. Vulnerable Neural Systems and the Borderland of Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by considerable heterogeneity, including varying degrees of dysfunction in specific brain systems, notably a medial temporal lobe memory system, and a frontostriatal executive system. These same systems are also affected by neurodegenerative diseases of late life. Recent work using techniques for presymptomatic detection of disease in cognitively normal older people has shown that some of the late life alterations in cognition, neural structure and function attributed to aging probably reflects early neurodegeneration. However, it has become clear that these same brain systems are also vulnerable to aging itself in the absence of even subtle disease. Thus, fundamental systemic limitations appear to confer vulnerability of these neural systems to a variety of insults, including those recognized as typical disease and those that are attributed to age. By focusing on the fundamental causes of neural system vulnerability, the prevention or treatment of a wide range of late-life neural dysfunction might be possible. PMID:23352159

  19. On the Computational Power of Spiking Neural P Systems with Self-Organization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Song, Tao; Gong, Faming; Zheng, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Neural-like computing models are versatile computing mechanisms in the field of artificial intelligence. Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems for short) are one of the recently developed spiking neural network models inspired by the way neurons communicate. The communications among neurons are essentially achieved by spikes, i. e. short electrical pulses. In terms of motivation, SN P systems fall into the third generation of neural network models. In this study, a novel variant of SN P systems, namely SN P systems with self-organization, is introduced, and the computational power of the system is investigated and evaluated. It is proved that SN P systems with self-organization are capable of computing and accept the family of sets of Turing computable natural numbers. Moreover, with 87 neurons the system can compute any Turing computable recursive function, thus achieves Turing universality. These results demonstrate promising initiatives to solve an open problem arisen by Gh Păun. PMID:27283843

  20. On the Computational Power of Spiking Neural P Systems with Self-Organization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Song, Tao; Gong, Faming; Zheng, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Neural-like computing models are versatile computing mechanisms in the field of artificial intelligence. Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems for short) are one of the recently developed spiking neural network models inspired by the way neurons communicate. The communications among neurons are essentially achieved by spikes, i. e. short electrical pulses. In terms of motivation, SN P systems fall into the third generation of neural network models. In this study, a novel variant of SN P systems, namely SN P systems with self-organization, is introduced, and the computational power of the system is investigated and evaluated. It is proved that SN P systems with self-organization are capable of computing and accept the family of sets of Turing computable natural numbers. Moreover, with 87 neurons the system can compute any Turing computable recursive function, thus achieves Turing universality. These results demonstrate promising initiatives to solve an open problem arisen by Gh Păun.

  1. PRODIAG: Combined expert system/neural network for process fault diagnosis. Volume 2, Code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1995-09-01

    We recommend the reader first review Volume 1 of this document, Code Theory, before reading Volume 2. In this volume we make extensive use of terms and concepts described and defined in Volume 1 which are not redefined here to the same extent. To try to reduce the amount of redundant information, we have restricted this volume to the presentation of the expert system code and refer back to the theory described in Volume 1 when necessary. Verification and validation of the results are presented in Volume 3, Application, of this document. Volume 3 also presents the implementation of the component characteristics diagnostic approach through artificial neural networks discussed in Volume 1. We decided to present the component characteristics approach in Volume 3, as opposed to write a separate code manual for it, because the approach, although general, requires a case-by-case analysis. The purpose of this volume is to present the details of the expert system (ES) portion o the PRODIAG process diagnostic program. In addition, we present here the graphical diagnostics interface (GDI) and illustrate the combined use of the ES and GDI with a sample problem. For completeness, we provide the file names of all files, programs and major subroutines of these two systems, ES and GDI, and their corresponding location in the Reactor Analysis Division (RA) computer network and Reactor Engineering Division (RE) computer network as of 30 September 1995.

  2. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  3. Adaptive estimation of hand movement trajectory in an EEG based brain-computer interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Neethu; Guan, Cuntai; Vinod, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The various parameters that define a hand movement such as its trajectory, speed, etc, are encoded in distinct brain activities. Decoding this information from neurophysiological recordings is a less explored area of brain-computer interface (BCI) research. Applying non-invasive recordings such as electroencephalography (EEG) for decoding makes the problem more challenging, as the encoding is assumed to be deep within the brain and not easily accessible by scalp recordings. Approach. EEG based BCI systems can be developed to identify the neural features underlying movement parameters that can be further utilized to provide a detailed and well defined control command set to a BCI output device. A real-time continuous control is better suited for practical BCI systems, and can be achieved by continuous adaptive reconstruction of movement trajectory than discrete brain activity classifications. In this work, we adaptively reconstruct/estimate the parameters of two-dimensional hand movement trajectory, namely movement speed and position, from multi-channel EEG recordings. The data for analysis is collected by performing an experiment that involved center-out right-hand movement tasks in four different directions at two different speeds in random order. We estimate movement trajectory using a Kalman filter that models the relation between brain activity and recorded parameters based on a set of defined predictors. We propose a method to define these predictor variables that includes spatial, spectral and temporally localized neural information and to select optimally informative variables. Main results. The proposed method yielded correlation of (0.60 ± 0.07) between recorded and estimated data. Further, incorporating the proposed predictor subset selection, the correlation achieved is (0.57 ± 0.07, p {\\lt }0.004) with significant gain in stability of the system, as well as dramatic reduction in number of predictors (76%) for the savings of computational

  4. Neural systems in the visual control of steering.

    PubMed

    Field, David T; Wilkie, Richard M; Wann, John P

    2007-07-25

    Visual control of locomotion is essential for most mammals and requires coordination between perceptual processes and action systems. Previous research on the neural systems engaged by self-motion has focused on heading perception, which is only one perceptual subcomponent. For effective steering, it is necessary to perceive an appropriate future path and then bring about the required change to heading. Using function magnetic resonance imaging in humans, we reveal a role for the parietal eye fields (PEFs) in directing spatially selective processes relating to future path information. A parietal area close to PEFs appears to be specialized for processing the future path information itself. Furthermore, a separate parietal area responds to visual position error signals, which occur when steering adjustments are imprecise. A network of three areas, the cerebellum, the supplementary eye fields, and dorsal premotor cortex, was found to be involved in generating appropriate motor responses for steering adjustments. This may reflect the demands of integrating visual inputs with the output response for the control device.

  5. Interacting with a security system: The Argus user interface

    SciTech Connect

    Behrin, E.; Davis, G.E.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980s the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) developed the Argus Security System. Key requirements were to eliminate the telephone as a verification device for opening and closing alarm stations and to allow need-to-know access through local enrollment at alarm stations. Resulting from these requirements was an LLNL-designed user interface called the Remote Access Panel (RAP). The Argus RAP interacts with Argus field processors to allow secure station mode changes and local station enrollment, provides user direction and response, and assists station maintenance personnel. It consists of a tamper-detecting housing containing a badge reader, a keypad with sight screen, special-purpose push buttons and a liquid-crystal display. This paper discusses Argus system concepts, RAP design, functional characteristics and its physical configurations. The paper also describes the RAP`s use in access-control booths, it`s integration with biometrics and its operation for multi-person-rule stations and compartmented facilities.

  6. Pilot interface with fly by wire control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft designers are rapidly moving toward full fly by wire control systems for transport aircraft. Aside from pilot interface considerations such as location of the control input device and its basic design such as side stick, there appears to be a desire to change the fundamental way in which a pilot applies manual control. A typical design would have the lowest order of manual control be a control wheel steering mode in which the pilot is controlling an autopilot. This deprives the pilot of the tactile sense of angle of attack which is inherent in present aircraft by virtue of certification requirements for static longitudinal stability whereby a pilot must either force the aircraft away from its trim angle of attack or trim to a new angle of attack. Whether or not an aircraft actually has positive stability, it can be made to feel to a pilot as though it does by artificial feel. Artificial feel systems which interpret pilot input as pitch rate or G rate with automatic trim have proven useful in certain military combat maneuvers, but their transposition to other more normal types of manual control may not be justified.

  7. Lifetime assessment of atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3-Parylene C bilayer coating for neural interfaces using accelerated age testing and electrochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Minnikanti, Saugandhika; Diao, Guoqing; Pancrazio, Joseph J; Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Solzbacher, Florian; Peixoto, Nathalia

    2014-02-01

    The lifetime and stability of insulation are critical features for the reliable operation of an implantable neural interface device. A critical factor for an implanted insulation's performance is its barrier properties that limit access of biological fluids to the underlying device or metal electrode. Parylene C is a material that has been used in FDA-approved implantable devices. Considered a biocompatible polymer with barrier properties, it has been used as a substrate, insulation or an encapsulation for neural implant technology. Recently, it has been suggested that a bilayer coating of Parylene C on top of atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 would provide enhanced barrier properties. Here we report a comprehensive study to examine the mean time to failure of Parylene C and Al2O3-Parylene C coated devices using accelerated lifetime testing. Samples were tested at 60°C for up to 3 months while performing electrochemical measurements to characterize the integrity of the insulation. The mean time to failure for Al2O3-Parylene C was 4.6 times longer than Parylene C coated samples. In addition, based on modeling of the data using electrical circuit equivalents, we show here that there are two main modes of failure. Our results suggest that failure of the insulating layer is due to pore formation or blistering as well as thinning of the coating over time. The enhanced barrier properties of the bilayer Al2O3-Parylene C over Parylene C makes it a promising candidate as an encapsulating neural interface.

  8. Neural network models for biological waste-gas treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Estefanía López, M; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2011-12-15

    This paper outlines the procedure for developing artificial neural network (ANN) based models for three bioreactor configurations used for waste-gas treatment. The three bioreactor configurations chosen for this modelling work were: biofilter (BF), continuous stirred tank bioreactor (CSTB) and monolith bioreactor (MB). Using styrene as the model pollutant, this paper also serves as a general database of information pertaining to the bioreactor operation and important factors affecting gas-phase styrene removal in these biological systems. Biological waste-gas treatment systems are considered to be both advantageous and economically effective in treating a stream of polluted air containing low to moderate concentrations of the target contaminant, over a rather wide range of gas-flow rates. The bioreactors were inoculated with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus, and their performances were evaluated at different empty bed residence times (EBRT), and at different inlet styrene concentrations (C(i)). The experimental data from these bioreactors were modelled to predict the bioreactors performance in terms of their removal efficiency (RE, %), by adequate training and testing of a three-layered back propagation neural network (input layer-hidden layer-output layer). Two models (BIOF1 and BIOF2) were developed for the BF with different combinations of easily measurable BF parameters as the inputs, that is concentration (gm(-3)), unit flow (h(-1)) and pressure drop (cm of H(2)O). The model developed for the CSTB used two inputs (concentration and unit flow), while the model for the MB had three inputs (concentration, G/L (gas/liquid) ratio, and pressure drop). Sensitivity analysis in the form of absolute average sensitivity (AAS) was performed for all the developed ANN models to ascertain the importance of the different input parameters, and to assess their direct effect on the bioreactors performance. The performance of the models was estimated by the regression

  9. Hands-Free Manipulation Using Simple Bio-Potential Interface System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Nakauke, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masafumi

    This paper proposes a nonverbal interface system using bio-potential signals, such as EOG and EMG, measured by a brain-computer interface and investigates its possibility of application to control of a hands-free manipulation system. A simple gesture recognition algorithm is presented to estimate the user's thinking from the EOG and EMG signals. To evaluate the feasibility and the characteristics of the interface system for hands-free manipulation, moving control experiments in 3D virtual space are carried out and the effectiveness of the proposed interface system is confirmed.

  10. Neural network based optimal control of HVAC&R systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Min

    Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems have wide applications in providing a desired indoor environment for different types of buildings. It is well acknowledged that 30%-40% of the total energy generated is consumed by buildings and HVAC&R systems alone account for more than 50% of the building energy consumption. Low operational efficiency especially under partial load conditions and poor control are part of reasons for such high energy consumption. To improve energy efficiency, HVAC&R systems should be properly operated to maintain a comfortable and healthy indoor environment under dynamic ambient and indoor conditions with the least energy consumption. This research focuses on the optimal operation of HVAC&R systems. The optimization problem is formulated and solved to find the optimal set points for the chilled water supply temperature, discharge air temperature and AHU (air handling unit) fan static pressure such that the indoor environment is maintained with the least chiller and fan energy consumption. To achieve this objective, a dynamic system model is developed first to simulate the system behavior under different control schemes and operating conditions. The system model is modular in structure, which includes a water-cooled vapor compression chiller model and a two-zone VAV system model. A fuzzy-set based extended transformation approach is then applied to investigate the uncertainties of this model caused by uncertain parameters and the sensitivities of the control inputs with respect to the interested model outputs. A multi-layer feed forward neural network is constructed and trained in unsupervised mode to minimize the cost function which is comprised of overall energy cost and penalty cost when one or more constraints are violated. After training, the network is implemented as a supervisory controller to compute the optimal settings for the system. In order to implement the optimal set points predicted by the

  11. Functional fusion of living systems with synthetic electrode interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Staufer, Oskar; Weber, Sebastian; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar; Spatz, Joachim P

    2016-01-01

    Summary The functional fusion of “living” biomaterial (such as cells) with synthetic systems has developed into a principal ambition for various scientific disciplines. In particular, emerging fields such as bionics and nanomedicine integrate advanced nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells and organisms in order to develop novel strategies for applications, including energy production or real-time diagnostics utilizing biomolecular machineries “perfected” during billion years of evolution. To date, hardware–wetware interfaces that sample or modulate bioelectric potentials, such as neuroprostheses or implantable energy harvesters, are mostly based on microelectrodes brought into the closest possible contact with the targeted cells. Recently, the possibility of using electrochemical gradients of the inner ear for technical applications was demonstrated using implanted electrodes, where 1.12 nW of electrical power was harvested from the guinea pig endocochlear potential for up to 5 h (Mercier, P.; Lysaght, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chandrakasan, A.; Stankovic, K. Nat. Biotech. 2012, 30, 1240–1243). More recent approaches employ nanowires (NWs) able to penetrate the cellular membrane and to record extra- and intracellular electrical signals, in some cases with subcellular resolution (Spira, M.; Hai, A. Nat. Nano. 2013, 8, 83–94). Such techniques include nanoelectric scaffolds containing free-standing silicon NWs (Robinson, J. T.; Jorgolli, M.; Shalek, A. K.; Yoon, M. H.; Gertner, R. S.; Park, H. Nat Nanotechnol. 2012, 10, 180–184) or NW field-effect transistors (Qing, Q.; Jiang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gao, R.; Mai, L.; Lieber, C. Nat. Nano. 2013, 9, 142–147), vertically aligned gallium phosphide NWs (Hällström, W.; Mårtensson, T.; Prinz, C.; Gustavsson, P.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.; Kanje, M. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 2960–2965) or individually contacted, electrically active carbon nanofibers. The latter of these approaches is capable of recording electrical

  12. Functional fusion of living systems with synthetic electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Staufer, Oskar; Weber, Sebastian; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar; Spatz, Joachim P; Rustom, Amin

    2016-01-01

    The functional fusion of "living" biomaterial (such as cells) with synthetic systems has developed into a principal ambition for various scientific disciplines. In particular, emerging fields such as bionics and nanomedicine integrate advanced nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells and organisms in order to develop novel strategies for applications, including energy production or real-time diagnostics utilizing biomolecular machineries "perfected" during billion years of evolution. To date, hardware-wetware interfaces that sample or modulate bioelectric potentials, such as neuroprostheses or implantable energy harvesters, are mostly based on microelectrodes brought into the closest possible contact with the targeted cells. Recently, the possibility of using electrochemical gradients of the inner ear for technical applications was demonstrated using implanted electrodes, where 1.12 nW of electrical power was harvested from the guinea pig endocochlear potential for up to 5 h (Mercier, P.; Lysaght, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chandrakasan, A.; Stankovic, K. Nat. Biotech. 2012, 30, 1240-1243). More recent approaches employ nanowires (NWs) able to penetrate the cellular membrane and to record extra- and intracellular electrical signals, in some cases with subcellular resolution (Spira, M.; Hai, A. Nat. Nano. 2013, 8, 83-94). Such techniques include nanoelectric scaffolds containing free-standing silicon NWs (Robinson, J. T.; Jorgolli, M.; Shalek, A. K.; Yoon, M. H.; Gertner, R. S.; Park, H. Nat Nanotechnol. 2012, 10, 180-184) or NW field-effect transistors (Qing, Q.; Jiang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gao, R.; Mai, L.; Lieber, C. Nat. Nano. 2013, 9, 142-147), vertically aligned gallium phosphide NWs (Hällström, W.; Mårtensson, T.; Prinz, C.; Gustavsson, P.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.; Kanje, M. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 2960-2965) or individually contacted, electrically active carbon nanofibers. The latter of these approaches is capable of recording electrical responses from oxidative events

  13. Functional fusion of living systems with synthetic electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Staufer, Oskar; Weber, Sebastian; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar; Spatz, Joachim P; Rustom, Amin

    2016-01-01

    The functional fusion of "living" biomaterial (such as cells) with synthetic systems has developed into a principal ambition for various scientific disciplines. In particular, emerging fields such as bionics and nanomedicine integrate advanced nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells and organisms in order to develop novel strategies for applications, including energy production or real-time diagnostics utilizing biomolecular machineries "perfected" during billion years of evolution. To date, hardware-wetware interfaces that sample or modulate bioelectric potentials, such as neuroprostheses or implantable energy harvesters, are mostly based on microelectrodes brought into the closest possible contact with the targeted cells. Recently, the possibility of using electrochemical gradients of the inner ear for technical applications was demonstrated using implanted electrodes, where 1.12 nW of electrical power was harvested from the guinea pig endocochlear potential for up to 5 h (Mercier, P.; Lysaght, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chandrakasan, A.; Stankovic, K. Nat. Biotech. 2012, 30, 1240-1243). More recent approaches employ nanowires (NWs) able to penetrate the cellular membrane and to record extra- and intracellular electrical signals, in some cases with subcellular resolution (Spira, M.; Hai, A. Nat. Nano. 2013, 8, 83-94). Such techniques include nanoelectric scaffolds containing free-standing silicon NWs (Robinson, J. T.; Jorgolli, M.; Shalek, A. K.; Yoon, M. H.; Gertner, R. S.; Park, H. Nat Nanotechnol. 2012, 10, 180-184) or NW field-effect transistors (Qing, Q.; Jiang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gao, R.; Mai, L.; Lieber, C. Nat. Nano. 2013, 9, 142-147), vertically aligned gallium phosphide NWs (Hällström, W.; Mårtensson, T.; Prinz, C.; Gustavsson, P.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.; Kanje, M. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 2960-2965) or individually contacted, electrically active carbon nanofibers. The latter of these approaches is capable of recording electrical responses from oxidative events

  14. Computer Interfaces for User Access to Heterogeneous Information-Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Richard S.; Reintjes, J. Francis

    A translating-computer-interface approach to providing a common, or virtual-system, mode of access to a network of heterogeneous online bibliographic retrieval systems has been investigated. Enhanced access to such systems by end users has been demonstrated through test usage of an experimental interface. A table-driven, rule-based message…

  15. Determining geophysical properties from well log data using artificial neural networks and fuzzy inference systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsien-Cheng

    Two novel synergistic systems consisting of artificial neural networks and fuzzy inference systems are developed to determine geophysical properties by using well log data. These systems are employed to improve the determination accuracy in carbonate rocks, which are generally more complex than siliciclastic rocks. One system, consisting of a single adaptive resonance theory (ART) neural network and three fuzzy inference systems (FISs), is used to determine the permeability category. The other system, which is composed of three ART neural networks and a single FIS, is employed to determine the lithofacies. The geophysical properties studied in this research, permeability category and lithofacies, are treated as categorical data. The permeability values are transformed into a "permeability category" to account for the effects of scale differences between core analyses and well logs, and heterogeneity in the carbonate rocks. The ART neural networks dynamically cluster the input data sets into different groups. The FIS is used to incorporate geologic experts' knowledge, which is usually in linguistic forms, into systems. These synergistic systems thus provide viable alternative solutions to overcome the effects of heterogeneity, the uncertainties of carbonate rock depositional environments, and the scarcity of well log data. The results obtained in this research show promising improvements over backpropagation neural networks. For the permeability category, the prediction accuracies are 68.4% and 62.8% for the multiple-single ART neural network-FIS and a single backpropagation neural network, respectively. For lithofacies, the prediction accuracies are 87.6%, 79%, and 62.8% for the single-multiple ART neural network-FIS, a single ART neural network, and a single backpropagation neural network, respectively. The sensitivity analysis results show that the multiple-single ART neural networks-FIS and a single ART neural network possess the same matching trends in

  16. Multifunctional microelectrode array (mMEA) chip for neural-electrical and neural-chemical interfaces: characterization of comb interdigitated electrode towards dopamine detection.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Min-Chieh; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Annie Ho, Ja-An; Chen, You-Yin

    2013-03-15

    Microelectrode array platforms have attracted considerable interest owing to their ability to facilitate interactive communications between investigators and neuronal network. We herein present an integrated multifunctional microelectrode array (mMEA) chip harnessed with multiple measurement modalities of both neural-electrical and neural-chemical recordings to enable simultaneous monitoring of action potential and the level of the specific neurotransmitter. A dopamine sensor modality fabricated in interdigitated electrodes (IDE) fashion was realized and characterized, subsequently applied to trace dopamine exocytosis in PC12 cells cultured on such mMEA chip. Facile fabrication process leveraging electroplating technique to implement the regulation of gap width was investigated and resulted in preferred IDE configuration. Collection efficiency and amplification effect were systematically evaluated. The as-fabricated sensing device exhibited a favorable diffusion-determining behavior reflected by the steady state current output, and in virtue of this feature, to detect dopamine in connection with limit of detection at 0.62 μM. The current signal was observed linear against the level of dopamine over the investigated concentration range with a resulting sensitivity of 0.096 nA μM(-1).

  17. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Boninger, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning. PMID:26113812

  18. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning.

  19. Discrete-time neural inverse optimal control for nonlinear systems via passivation.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Tellez, Fernando; Sanchez, Edgar N; Loukianov, Alexander G

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a discrete-time inverse optimal neural controller, which is constituted by combination of two techniques: 1) inverse optimal control to avoid solving the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation associated with nonlinear system optimal control and 2) on-line neural identification, using a recurrent neural network trained with an extended Kalman filter, in order to build a model of the assumed unknown nonlinear system. The inverse optimal controller is based on passivity theory. The applicability of the proposed approach is illustrated via simulations for an unstable nonlinear system and a planar robot. PMID:24807528

  20. Modeling neural adaptation in the frog auditory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotton, Janine; McArthur, Kimberly; Bohara, Amit; Ferragamo, Michael; Megela Simmons, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain, Torus semicircularis, of the leopard frog reveal a wide diversity of tuning patterns. Some cells seem to be well suited for time-based coding of signal envelope, and others for rate-based coding of signal frequency. Adaptation for ongoing stimuli plays a significant role in shaping the frequency-dependent response rate at different levels of the frog auditory system. Anuran auditory-nerve fibers are unusual in that they reveal frequency-dependent adaptation [A. L. Megela, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 75, 1155-1162 (1984)], and therefore provide rate-based input. In order to examine the influence of these peripheral inputs on central responses, three layers of auditory neurons were modeled to examine short-term neural adaptation to pure tones and complex signals. The response of each neuron was simulated with a leaky integrate and fire model, and adaptation was implemented by means of an increasing threshold. Auditory-nerve fibers, dorsal medullary nucleus neurons, and toral cells were simulated and connected in three ascending layers. Modifying the adaptation properties of the peripheral fibers dramatically alters the response at the midbrain. [Work supported by NOHR to M.J.F.; Gustavus Presidential Scholarship to K.McA.; NIH DC05257 to A.M.S.