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Sample records for neurite mechanical tension

  1. Mechanisms of developmental neurite pruning

    PubMed Central

    Schuldiner, Oren; Yaron, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    The precise wiring of the nervous system is a combined outcome of progressive and regressive events during development. Axon guidance and synapse formation intertwined with cell death and neurite pruning sculpt the mature circuitry. It is now well recognized that pruning of dendrites and axons as means to refine neuronal networks, is a wide spread phenomena required for the normal development of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Here we will review the arising principles of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurite pruning. We will discuss these principles in light of studies in multiple neuronal systems, and speculate on potential explanations for the emergence of neurite pruning as a mechanism to sculpt the nervous system. PMID:25213356

  2. Molecular mechanisms of neurite extension.

    PubMed Central

    Valtorta, F; Leoni, C

    1999-01-01

    The extension of neurites is a major task of developing neurons, requiring a significant metabolic effort to sustain the increase in molecular synthesis necessary for plasma membrane expansion. In addition, neurite extension involves changes in the subsets of expressed proteins and reorganization of the cytomatrix. These phenomena are driven by environmental cues which activate signal transduction processes as well as by the intrinsic genetic program of the cell. The present review summarizes some of the most recent progress made in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:10212488

  3. Dynamic peripheral traction forces balance stable neurite tension in regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Callen; Mertz, Aaron F; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric

    2014-05-14

    Growth cones of elongating neurites exert force against the external environment, but little is known about the role of force in outgrowth or its relationship to the mechanical organization of neurons. We used traction force microscopy to examine patterns of force in growth cones of regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons. We find that traction is highest in the peripheral actin-rich domain and internal stress reaches a plateau near the transition between peripheral and central microtubule-rich domains. Integrating stress over the area of the growth cone reveals that total scalar force increases with area but net tension on the neurite does not. Tensions fall within a limited range while a substantial fraction of the total force can be balanced locally within the growth cone. Although traction continuously redistributes during extension and retraction of the peripheral domain, tension is stable over time, suggesting that tension is a tightly regulated property of the neurite independent of growth cone dynamics. We observe that redistribution of traction in the peripheral domain can reorient the end of the neurite shaft. This suggests a role for off-axis force in growth cone turning and neuronal guidance.

  4. Neurite, a finite difference large scale parallel program for the simulation of electrical signal propagation in neurites under mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    García-Grajales, Julián A; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite--explicit and implicit--were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  5. Neurite, a Finite Difference Large Scale Parallel Program for the Simulation of Electrical Signal Propagation in Neurites under Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    García-Grajales, Julián A.; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite—explicit and implicit—were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  6. Snapping mechanical metamaterials under tension.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Akbarzadeh, Abdolhamid; Pasini, Damiano

    2015-10-21

    A snapping mechanical metamaterial is designed, which exhibits a sequential snap-through behavior under tension. The tensile response of this mechanical metamaterial can be altered by tuning the architecture of the snapping segments to achieve a range of nonlinear mechanical responses, including monotonic, S-shaped, plateau, and non-monotonic snap-through behavior.

  7. Time-resolved neurite mechanics by thermal fluctuation assessments.

    PubMed

    Gárate, Fernanda; Betz, Timo; Pertusa, María; Bernal, Roberto

    2015-12-30

    In the absence of simple noninvasive measurements, the knowledge of temporal and spatial variations of axons mechanics remains scarce. By extending thermal fluctuation spectroscopy (TFS) to long protrusions, we determine the transverse amplitude thermal fluctuation spectra that allow direct and simultaneous access to three key mechanics parameters: axial tension, bending flexural rigidity and plasma membrane tension. To test our model, we use PC12 cell protrusions-a well-know biophysical model of axons-in order to simplify the biological system under scope. For instance, axial and plasma membrane tension are found in the range of nano Newton and tens of pico Newtons per micron respectively. Furthermore, our results shows that the TFS technique is capable to distinguish quasi-identical protrusions. Another advantage of our approach is the time resolved nature of the measurements. Indeed, in the case of long term experiments on PC12 protrusions, TFS has revealed large temporal, correlated variations of the protrusion mechanics, displaying extraordinary feedback control over the axial tension in order to maintain a constant tension value.

  8. Active transport of vesicles in neurons is modulated by mechanical tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Wylie W.; Saif, Taher A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective intracellular transport of proteins and organelles is critical in cells, and is especially important for ensuring proper neuron functionality. In neurons, most proteins are synthesized in the cell body and must be transported through thin structures over long distances where normal diffusion is insufficient. Neurons transport subcellular cargo along axons and neurites through a stochastic interplay of active and passive transport. Mechanical tension is critical in maintaining proper function in neurons, but its role in transport is not well understood. To this end, we investigate the active and passive transport of vesicles in Aplysia neurons while changing neurite tension via applied strain, and quantify the resulting dynamics. We found that tension in neurons modulates active transport of vesicles by increasing the probability of active motion, effective diffusivity, and induces a retrograde bias. We show that mechanical tension modulates active transport processes in neurons and that external forces can couple to internal (subcellular) forces and change the overall transport dynamics.

  9. Growth, collapse, and stalling in a mechanical model for neurite motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Jerusalem, Antoine; Goriely, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Neurites, the long cellular protrusions that form the routes of the neuronal network, are capable of actively extending during early morphogenesis or regenerating after trauma. To perform this task, they rely on their cytoskeleton for mechanical support. In this paper, we present a three-component active gel model that describes neurites in the three robust mechanical states observed experimentally: collapsed, static, and motile. These states arise from an interplay between the physical forces driven by growth of the microtubule-rich inner core of the neurite and the acto-myosin contractility of its surrounding cortical membrane. In particular, static states appear as a mechanical traction or compression balance of these two parallel structures. The model predicts how the response of a neurite to a towing force depends on the force magnitude and recovers the response of neurites to several drug treatments that modulate the cytoskeleton active and passive properties.

  10. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1 ± 0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80 ± 0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine.

  11. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1±0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80±0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  12. Sonic hedgehog stimulates neurite outgrowth in a mechanical stretch model of reactive-astrogliosis.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Antonio; Gowing, Emma K; Jasoni, Christine L; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2016-02-23

    Although recovery following a stroke is limited, undamaged neurons under the right conditions can establish new connections and take on-board lost functions. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is integral for developmental axon growth, but its role after injury has not been fully examined. To investigate the effects of Shh on neuronal sprouting after injury, we used an in vitro model of glial scar, whereby cortical astrocytes were mechanically traumatized to mimic reactive astrogliosis observed after stroke. This mechanical trauma impaired neurite outgrowth from post-natal cortical neurons plated on top of reactive astrocytes. Addition of Shh to the media, however, resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth. This response was inhibited by cyclopamine and activated by oxysterol 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol, both of which modulate the activity of the Shh co-receptor Smoothened (Smo), demonstrating that Shh-mediated neurite outgrowth is Smo-dependent. In addition, neurite outgrowth was not associated with an increase in Gli-1 transcription, but could be inhibited by PP2, a selective inhibitor of Src family kinases. These results demonstrate that neurons exposed to the neurite growth inhibitory environment associated with a glial scar can be stimulated by Shh, with signaling occurring through a non-canonical pathway, to overcome this suppression and stimulate neurite outgrowth.

  13. Elastic properties and mechanical tension of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, R.; Herrero, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Room-temperature simulations of graphene have been performed as a function of the mechanical tension of the layer. Finite-size effects are accurately reproduced by an acoustic dispersion law for the out-of-plane vibrations that, in the long-wave limit, behaves as ρ ω2=σ k2+κ k4 . The fluctuation tension σ is finite (˜0.1 N/m) even when the external mechanical tension vanishes. Transverse vibrations imply a duplicity in the definition of the elastic constants of the layer, as observables related to the real area of the surface may differ from those related to the in-plane projected area. This duplicity explains the variability of experimental data on the Young modulus of graphene based on electron spectroscopy, interferometric profilometry, and indentation experiments.

  14. Modelling RNA folding under mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    VIEREGG, JEFFREY R.; TINOCO, IGNACIO

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA unfolding and refolding under mechanical tension. The hierarchical nature of RNA structure and the existence of thermodynamic parameters for base pair formation based on nearest-neighbour interactions allows modelling of sequence-dependent folding dynamics for any secondary structure. We calculate experimental observables such as the transition force for unfolding, the end-to-end distribution function and its variance, as well as kinetic information, for a representative RNA sequence and for a sequence containing two homopolymer segments: A.U and G.C. PMID:16969426

  15. Mechanical tension drives cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ren, Yixin; Ng, Win Pin; Li, Shuo; Son, Sungmin; Kee, Yee-Seir; Zhang, Shiliang; Zhang, Guofeng; Fletcher, Daniel A; Robinson, Douglas N; Chen, Elizabeth H

    2015-03-09

    Membrane fusion is an energy-consuming process that requires tight juxtaposition of two lipid bilayers. Little is known about how cells overcome energy barriers to bring their membranes together for fusion. Previously, we have shown that cell-cell fusion is an asymmetric process in which an "attacking" cell drills finger-like protrusions into the "receiving" cell to promote cell fusion. Here, we show that the receiving cell mounts a Myosin II (MyoII)-mediated mechanosensory response to its invasive fusion partner. MyoII acts as a mechanosensor, which directs its force-induced recruitment to the fusion site, and the mechanosensory response of MyoII is amplified by chemical signaling initiated by cell adhesion molecules. The accumulated MyoII, in turn, increases cortical tension and promotes fusion pore formation. We propose that the protrusive and resisting forces from fusion partners put the fusogenic synapse under high mechanical tension, which helps to overcome energy barriers for membrane apposition and drives cell membrane fusion.

  16. Effect of wire tension on stiffness of tensioned fine wires in external fixation: a mechanical study.

    PubMed

    Antoci, Valentin; Voor, Michael J; Antoci, Valentin; Roberts, Craig S

    2007-09-01

    To determine the effect of changes in magnitude of transfixion wire tension on stiffness of fine-wire external-fixation load deformation, we compared results obtained with different wire tensions (50-140 kg) under identical conditions of central axial compression, medial compression-bending, posterior compression-bending, posteromedial compression-bending, and torsion. Stiffness values were calculated from the load-deformation and torque-angle curves. Tension of 140 kg provided the most stiffness, and there was a trend toward increasing overall stiffness with increasing wire tension. The 1.8-mm wires should be tensioned to at least 110 kg in most cases of fine-wire external fixation; compared with all tensions less than 110 kg, this tension provides significantly more mechanical stability in all loading modes.

  17. Space Station Freedom Solar Array tension mechanism development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allmon, Curtis; Haugen, Bert

    1994-01-01

    A tension mechanism is used to apply a tension force to the Space Station Freedom Solar Array Blanket. This tension is necessary to meet the deployed frequency requirement of the array as well as maintain the flatness of the flexible substrate solar cell blanket. The mechanism underwent a series of design iterations before arriving at the final design. This paper discusses the design and testing of the mechanism.

  18. Mechanisms controlling neurite outgrowth in a pheochromocytoma cell line: the role of TRPC channels.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Chakraborty, Saikat; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2012-04-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Canonical (TRPC) channels are implicated in modulating neurite outgrowth. The expression pattern of TRPCs changes significantly during brain development, suggesting that fine-tuning TRPC expression may be important for orchestrating neuritogenesis. To study how alterations in the TRPC expression pattern affect neurite outgrowth, we used nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells, a model system for neuritogenesis. In PC12 cells, NGF markedly up-regulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression, but down-regulated TRPC5 expression while promoting neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of TRPC1 augmented, whereas TRPC5 overexpression decelerated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPC1 decreased, whereas shRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPC5 increased NGF-induced neurite extension. Endogenous TRPC1 attenuated the anti-neuritogenic effect of overexpressed TRPC5 in part by forming the heteromeric TRPC1-TRPC5 channels. Previous reports suggested that TRPC6 may facilitate neurite outgrowth. However, we found that TRPC6 overexpression slowed down neuritogenesis, whereas dominant negative TRPC6 (DN-TRPC6) facilitated neurite outgrowth in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Consistent with these findings, hyperforin, a neurite outgrowth promoting factor, decreased TRPC6 expression in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Using pharmacological and molecular biological approaches, we determined that NGF up-regulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression via a p75(NTR)-IKK(2)-dependent pathway that did not involve TrkA receptor signaling in PC12 cells. Similarly, NGF up-regulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 via an IKK(2) dependent pathway in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, our data suggest that a balance of TRPC1, TRPC5, and TRPC6 expression determines neurite extension rate in neural cells, with TRPC6 emerging as an NGF-dependent "molecular damper" maintaining a submaximal velocity of neurite extension.

  19. Potential Mechanism of Neurite Outgrowth Enhanced by Electrical Stimulation: Involvement of MicroRNA-363-5p Targeting DCLK1 Expression in Rat.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xin; Huang, Liangliang; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Liu, Zhongyang; Ge, Jun; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2017-02-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) promotes neurite outgrowth and nerve regeneration, but the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated the role of micro RNAs (miRNAs) in ES-mediated neurite outgrowth. First, we performed microarray analyses to identify changes in the miRNAs profile of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) following ES. The expression of 16 known miRNAs was altered by ES. Bioinformatics showed that the potential targets of these differentially expressed miRNAs were involved in neurite outgrowth. We focused on miRNA-363-5p (miR-363-5p), because its expression was consistently altered by ES in the present study. Silencing miR-363-5p promoted neurite outgrowth, while miR-363-5p mimic reduced neurite outgrowth. Downregulation of miR-363-5p indicated that double cortin-like kinase (DCLK) 1, a major microtubule-associated protein, was a direct target of miR-363-5p in DRGNs. Knockdown of DCLK1 recapitulated the beneficial effect of a miR-363-5p inhibitor on DRG neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, our data has indicated that miR-363-5p is involved in ES-promoted neurite outgrowth by targeting DCLK1. These findings provide new insights into the roles of miRNAs in ES-enhanced neurite outgrowth and regeneration.

  20. Effects of DS-modified agarose gels on neurite extension in 3D scaffold through mechanisms other than changing the pore radius of the gels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hao; Zhou, Xue; Jiang, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Dermatan sulfate is widely distributed as glycosaminoglycan side chains of proteoglycans, which are the main components of glial scar and inhibit neurite regeneration after nerve injury. However its role in the inhibiting process is not clear. Understanding neurite extension in three-dimensional scaffolds is critical for neural tissue engineering. This study used agarose gels modified with dermatan sulfate as the three-dimensional culture scaffold. We explored structure-function relationship between the three-dimensional scaffold and neurite extension and examined the role of dermatan sulfate on neurite extension in the three-dimensional scaffold. A range of agarose concentrations was used to generate varied gel physical structures and the corresponding neurite extension of embryonic day (E9) chick dorsal root ganglia was examined. We measured gel stiffness and gel pore size to determine whether dermatan sulfate changed the gels' conformation. As gel concentration increased, neurite length and gel pore size decreased, and gel stiffness increased. At 1.00 and 1.25% (wt/vol) concentrations, dermatan sulfates both immobilized with agarose gels and dissolved in culture medium inhibit neurite extension. While at 1.50 and 1.75% (wt/vol) concentrations, only immobilized dermatan sulfate worked. Immobilized dermatan sulfate could modify molecular shape of agarose gels, decrease gel pore size statistically, but did not influence gel stiffness. We have proved that the decrease of gel pore size is insufficient to inhibit neurite extension. These results indicate that dermatan sulfate inhibits neurite extension not through forming a mechanical barrier. Maybe its interaction with neuron membrane is the key factor in neurite extension.

  1. Bioassay, isolation and studies on the mechanism of action of neurite extension factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kligman, D.

    1984-01-01

    The identification and purification of molecules active in promoting neurite outgrowth requires a sensitive reproducible bioassay. A quantitative bioassay was utilized to purify a neurite extension factor (NEF) based on counting the number of phase bright neurons with processes at least equal to one cell body diameter after 20 hrs. in culture is defined, serum free medium. Using a combination of heat treatment DEAE cellulose chromatography and gel filtration, an acidic protein of M sub r = 75,000 was highly purified. Upon reduction, it yields subunits of M sub r = 37,000. Purified fractions are active half maximally at 100 ng/ml in inducing neurite outgrowth in this bioassay. Currently, monoclonal antibodies to NEF are being produced. Female Balb C mice were immunized with the antigen and fusions with mouse myeloma cells will be performed to yield hybridoma cells.

  2. Panaxynol induces neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Nie, Bao-Ming; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Lu, Yang

    2006-01-05

    Panaxynol, a polyacetylene ((3R)-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diyn-3-ol; syn. falcarinol), was isolated from the lipophilic fractions of Panax notoginseng, a Chinese traditional medicinal plant. In the present study, we reported the neurotrophic effects of panaxynol on PC12D cells and mechanism involved in neurite outgrowth of the cells. Panaxynol could morphologically promote neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells, concentration-dependently reduce cell division and up-regulate molecular marker (MAP1B) expression in PC12D cells. Panaxynol induces the elevation of intracellular cAMP in PC12D cells. The neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells induced by panaxynol could be inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor RpcAMPS and by MAP kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor U0126. These observations reveal that panaxynol could induce the differentiation of PC12D cells in a process similar to but distinct from that of NGF and the panaxynol's effects were via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

  3. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  4. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  5. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  6. The death receptor antagonist FAIM promotes neurite outgrowth by a mechanism that depends on ERK and NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sole, Carme; Dolcet, Xavier; Segura, Miguel F.; Gutierrez, Humberto; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Teresa; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Sanchis, Daniel; Bayascas, Jose R.; Gallego, Carme; Moscat, Jorge; Davies, Alun M.; Comella, Joan X.

    2004-01-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) is a protein identified as an antagonist of Fas-induced cell death. We show that FAIM overexpression fails to rescue neurons from trophic factor deprivation, but exerts a marked neurite growth–promoting action in different neuronal systems. Whereas FAIM overexpression greatly enhanced neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons grown with nerve growth factor (NGF), reduction of endogenous FAIM levels by RNAi decreased neurite outgrowth in these cells. FAIM overexpression promoted NF-κB activation, and blocking this activation by using a super-repressor IκBα or by carrying out experiments using cortical neurons from mice that lack the p65 NF-κB subunit prevented FAIM-induced neurite outgrowth. The effect of FAIM on neurite outgrowth was also blocked by inhibition of the Ras–ERK pathway. Finally, we show that FAIM interacts with both Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptor NGF receptors in a ligand-dependent manner. These results reveal a new function of FAIM in promoting neurite outgrowth by a mechanism involving activation of the Ras–ERK pathway and NF-κB. PMID:15520226

  7. Mechanical tension and electrical conductivity of liquid crystal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Oliver H.

    During the NSF funded IRES internship at the Otto-von-Geuricke Univeristy in Magdeburg, Germany, I studied the optical properties and mechanical behavior in the form of line tension of bent-core liquid crystal fiber bundles and verified previously published tension values and temperature dependent behavior. Then, carbon nanotubes were added and it as found that the tension in the fibers decreased by a factor of two instead of increasing as was hoped. A new device for pulling fibers and measuring tension by deflection due to the adhesion of glass beads was built at the LCI. The device was meant to improve upon the device used at O.v.G. Improvements included a smaller heating chamber with better insulation, temperature control, large viewing windows, more stable mounting interface, easier disassembly and the option to quickly modify the device in order to perform a variety of other experiments such as observing behavior due to acoustic driving (based on previous literature), observing optical behavior under a polarizing microscope and introducing probes to measure the electrical properties of fibers. The platform remains modular and makes the addition of new components for carrying out new experiments very simple and straightforward. The addition of carbon nanotubes has scattered results regarding the modulation of fiber tension. It seems that the addition of CNTs to BLC1571 may slightly be decreasing tension while the addition to BLC1688 may be increasing it. In both mesogens, 10wt% CNT yielded the highest tension value above the theoretical surface tension contribution. A reversal of temperature dependence was observed for fibers containing CNT; their tension increased with temperature instead of decreased. A driving rod attached to a speaker was used to acoustically drive a filament of pure BLC1571 in an attempt to replicate the tension values in a different way. The movement of the fiber and the driving rod were captured using a high-speed camera and MATLAB code

  8. Sensing bilayer tension: bacterial mechanosensitive channels and their gating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Booth, Ian R; Rasmussen, Tim; Edwards, Michelle D; Black, Susan; Rasmussen, Akiko; Bartlett, Wendy; Miller, Samantha

    2011-06-01

    Mechanosensitive channels sense and respond to changes in bilayer tension. In many respects, this is a unique property: the changes in membrane tension gate the channel, leading to the transient formation of open non-selective pores. Pore diameter is also high for the bacterial channels studied, MscS and MscL. Consequently, in cells, gating has severe consequences for energetics and homoeostasis, since membrane depolarization and modification of cytoplasmic ionic composition is an immediate consequence. Protection against disruption of cellular integrity, which is the function of the major channels, provides a strong evolutionary rationale for possession of such disruptive channels. The elegant crystal structures for these channels has opened the way to detailed investigations that combine molecular genetics with electrophysiology and studies of cellular behaviour. In the present article, the focus is primarily on the structure of MscS, the small mechanosensitive channel. The description of the structure is accompanied by discussion of the major sites of channel-lipid interaction and reasoned, but limited, speculation on the potential mechanisms of tension sensing leading to gating.

  9. Liquid drops and surface tension with smoothed particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, S.; Posch, H. A.

    2000-10-01

    Smoothed particle applied mechanics (SPAM), also referred to as smoothed particle hydrodynamics, is a Lagrangian particle method for the simulation of continuous flows. Here we apply it to the formation of a liquid drop, surrounded by its vapor, for a van der Waals (vdW) fluid in two dimensions. The cohesive pressure of the vdW equation of state gives rise to an attractive, central force between the particles with an interaction range which is assumed to exceed the interaction range of all the other smoothed forces in the SPAM equations of motion. With this assumption, stable drops are formed, and the vdW phase diagram is well reproduced by the simulations. Below the critical temperature, the surface tension for equilibrated drops may be computed from the pressure excess in their centers. It agrees very well with the surface tension independently determined from the vibrational frequency of weakly excited drops. We also study strongly deformed drops performing large-amplitude oscillations, which are reminiscent of the oscillations of a large ball of water under microgravity conditions. In an appendix we comment on the limitations of SPAM by studying the violation of angular momentum conservation, which is a consequence of noncentral forces contributed by the full Newtonian viscous stress tensor.

  10. Nano-mechanical characterization of tension-sensitive helix bundles in talin rod.

    PubMed

    Maki, Koichiro; Nakao, Nobuhiko; Adachi, Taiji

    2017-03-04

    Tension-induced exposure of a cryptic signaling binding site is one of the most fundamental mechanisms in molecular mechanotransduction. Helix bundles in rod domains of talin, a tension-sensing protein at focal adhesions, unfurl under tension to expose cryptic vinculin binding sites. Although the difference in their mechanical stabilities would determine which helix bundle is tension-sensitive, their respective mechanical behaviors under tension have not been characterized. In this study, we evaluated the mechanical behaviors of residues 486-654 and 754-889 of talin, which form helix bundles with low and high tension-sensitivity, by employing AFM nano-tensile testing. As a result, residues 754-889 exhibited lower unfolding energy for complete unfolding than residues 486-654. In addition, we found that residues 754-889 transition into intermediate conformations under lower tension than residues 486-654. Furthermore, residues 754-889 showed shorter persistence length in the intermediate conformation than residues 486-654, suggesting that residues 754-889 under tension exhibit separated α-helices, while residues 486-654 assume a compact conformation with inter-helix interactions. Therefore, we suggest that residues 754-889 of talin work as a tension-sensitive domain to recruit vinculin at the early stage of focal adhesion development, while residues 486-654 contribute to rather robust tension-sensitivity by recruiting vinculin under high tension.

  11. Rapid cable tension estimation using dynamic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Castro, Rosana E.; Jang, Shinae; Christenson, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Main tension elements are critical to the overall stability of cable-supported bridges. A dependable and rapid determination of cable tension is desired to assess the state of a cable-supported bridge and evaluate its operability. A portable smart sensor setup is presented to reduce post-processing time and deployment complexity while reliably determining cable tension using dynamic characteristics extracted from spectral analysis. A self-recording accelerometer is coupled with a single-board microcomputer that communicates wirelessly with a remote host computer. The portable smart sensing device is designed such that additional algorithms, sensors and controlling devices for various monitoring applications can be installed and operated for additional structural assessment. The tension-estimating algorithms are based on taut string theory and expand to consider bending stiffness. The successful combination of cable properties allows the use of a cable's dynamic behavior to determine tension force. The tension-estimating algorithms are experimentally validated on a through-arch steel bridge subject to ambient vibration induced by passing traffic. The tension estimation is determined in well agreement with previously determined tension values for the structure.

  12. Molecular mechanism for cavitation in water under tension.

    PubMed

    Menzl, Georg; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frédéric; Abascal, José L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-11-29

    Despite its relevance in biology and engineering, the molecular mechanism driving cavitation in water remains unknown. Using computer simulations, we investigate the structure and dynamics of vapor bubbles emerging from metastable water at negative pressures. We find that in the early stages of cavitation, bubbles are irregularly shaped and become more spherical as they grow. Nevertheless, the free energy of bubble formation can be perfectly reproduced in the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT) if the curvature dependence of the surface tension is taken into account. Comparison of the observed bubble dynamics to the predictions of the macroscopic Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation, augmented with thermal fluctuations, demonstrates that the growth of nanoscale bubbles is governed by viscous forces. Combining the dynamical prefactor determined from the RP equation with CNT based on the Kramers formalism yields an analytical expression for the cavitation rate that reproduces the simulation results very well over a wide range of pressures. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with cavitation rates obtained from inclusion experiments. This suggests that homogeneous nucleation is observed in inclusions, whereas only heterogeneous nucleation on impurities or defects occurs in other experiments.

  13. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Kieu, Quang Minh N.; Iandoli, Jason A.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Daniel J; Kieu, Quang Minh N; Iandoli, Jason A; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-02-23

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Mechanical considerations in using tensioned wires in a transosseous external fixation system.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J; Harp, J H

    1992-07-01

    Factors that affect wire tension were examined using external mechanical testing units as well as in-line load cells. The circular external fixator with wires supported at each end exhibits a self-stiffening effect such that wire stiffness increases with wire deflection. Mechanical slippage between wire and fixation bolt is the primary reason for loss of wire tension. Slippage can be avoided by adequate torque on the fixation nut (20 N.m). Guidelines are presented for proper and safe tensioning techniques to achieve clinically indicated tensions without risk of breakage.

  16. Mechanical tension contributes to clustering of neurotransmitter vesicles at presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    Siechen, Scott; Yang, Shengyuan; Chiba, Akira; Saif, Taher

    2009-01-01

    Memory and learning in animals are mediated by neurotransmitters that are released from vesicles clustered at the synapse. As a synapse is used more frequently, its neurotransmission efficiency increases, partly because of increased vesicle clustering in the presynaptic neuron. Vesicle clustering has been believed to result primarily from biochemical signaling processes that require the connectivity of the presynaptic terminal with the cell body, the central nervous system, and the postsynaptic cell. Our in vivo experiments on the embryonic Drosophila nervous system show that vesicle clustering at the neuromuscular presynaptic terminal depends on mechanical tension within the axons. Vesicle clustering vanishes upon severing the axon from the cell body, but is restored when mechanical tension is applied to the severed end of the axon. Clustering increases when intact axons are stretched mechanically by pulling the postsynaptic muscle. Using micro mechanical force sensors, we find that embryonic axons that have formed neuromuscular junctions maintain a rest tension of ≈1 nanonewton. If the rest tension is perturbed mechanically, axons restore the rest tension either by relaxing or by contracting over a period of ≈15 min. Our results suggest that neuromuscular synapses employ mechanical tension as a signal to modulate vesicle accumulation and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19620718

  17. Conducting-polymer nanotubes improve electrical properties, mechanical adhesion, neural attachment, and neurite outgrowth of neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Corey, Joseph M; Kipke, Daryl R; Martin, David C

    2010-02-05

    An in vitro comparison of conducting-polymer nanotubes of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly(pyrrole) (PPy) and to their film counterparts is reported. Impedance, charge-capacity density (CCD), tendency towards delamination, and neurite outgrowth are compared. For the same deposition charge density, PPy films and nanotubes grow relatively faster vertically, while PEDOT films and nanotubes grow more laterally. For the same deposition charge density (1.44 C cm(-2)), PPy nanotubes and PEDOT nanotubes have lower impedance (19.5 +/- 2.1 kOmega for PPy nanotubes and 2.5 +/- 1.4 kOmega for PEDOT nanotubes at 1 kHz) and higher CCD (184 +/- 5.3 mC cm(-2) for PPy nanotubes and 392 +/- 6.2 mC cm(-2) for PEDOT nanotubes) compared to their film counterparts. However, PEDOT nanotubes decrease the impedance of neural-electrode sites by about two orders of magnitude (bare iridium 468.8 +/- 13.3 kOmega at 1 kHz) and increase capacity of charge density by about three orders of magnitude (bare iridium 0.1 +/- 0.5 mC cm(-2)). During cyclic voltammetry measurements, both PPy and PEDOT nanotubes remain adherent on the surface of the silicon dioxide while PPy and PEDOT films delaminate. In experiments of primary neurons with conducting-polymer nanotubes, cultured dorsal root ganglion explants remain more intact and exhibit longer neurites (1400 +/- 95 microm for PPy nanotubes and 2100 +/- 150 microm for PEDOT nanotubes) than their film counterparts. These findings suggest that conducting-polymer nanotubes may improve the long-term function of neural microelectrodes.

  18. Lighting Up the Force: Investigating Mechanisms of Mechanotransduction Using Fluorescent Tension Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jurchenko, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense the physical nature of their surroundings is critical to the survival of multicellular organisms. Cellular response to physical cues from adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix leads to a dynamic cycle in which cells respond by remodeling their local microenvironment, fine-tuning cell stiffness, polarity, and shape. Mechanical regulation is important in cellular development, normal morphogenesis, and wound healing. The mechanisms by which these finely balanced mechanotransduction events occur, however, are not well understood. In large part, this is due to the limited availability of tools to study molecular mechanotransduction events in live cells. Several classes of molecular tension probes have been recently developed which are rapidly transforming the study of mechanotransduction. Molecular tension probes are primarily based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and report on piconewton scale tension events in live cells. In this minireview, we describe the two main classes of tension probes, genetically encoded tension sensors and immobilized tension sensors, and discuss the advantages and limitations of each type. We discuss future opportunities to address major biological questions and outline the challenges facing the next generation of molecular tension probes. PMID:26031334

  19. Joining mechanism with stem tension and interlocked compression ring

    DOEpatents

    James, Allister W.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-09-04

    A stem (34) extends from a second part (30) through a hole (28) in a first part (22). A groove (38) around the stem provides a non-threaded contact surface (42) for a ring element (44) around the stem. The ring element exerts an inward force against the non-threaded contact surface at an angle that creates axial tension (T) in the stem, pulling the second part against the first part. The ring element is formed of a material that shrinks relative to the stem by sintering. The ring element may include a split collet (44C) that fits partly into the groove, and a compression ring (44E) around the collet. The non-threaded contact surface and a mating distal surface (48) of the ring element may have conic geometries (64). After shrinkage, the ring element is locked onto the stem.

  20. Influence of Tension Leveling Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhou, C. L.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, X. C.; Li, M.

    2017-02-01

    We describe the effect of varying tension leveling parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of steel strips. We found that, when the tension leveling elongation was constant, an increase in the screw-down value resulted in an initial decrease in the cross-sectional grain size of the strip, which was followed by an increase. However, the longitudinal grain size remained constant, and the yield strength and tensile strength increased gradually. In addition, with a constant screw-down value, an increase in tension leveling elongation resulted in refining of the cross-sectional grain size, elongation of the longitudinal grain size, and small increases in both yield and tensile strength. This study therefore provides an insight into the optimal configuration of tension leveling parameters to improve steel strip properties.

  1. Skeletal muscle is sensitive to the tension-time integral but not to the rate of change of tension, as assessed by mechanically induced signaling.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Louis C; Gardiner, Phillip F

    2002-05-01

    Mechanical forces regulate many cellular processes. Mechanotransduction, however, is poorly understood. In skeletal muscle, mechanical forces have a major impact on the regulation of cellular volume, yet the nature of the mechanical stimulation to which muscle is most sensitive is unknown. It was recently demonstrated that activation of the mechanically-sensitive kinase p54 jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK), is a quantitative marker of mechanical stimulation in skeletal muscle. This marker was shown to be more sensitive to peak tension than to other tension-related parameters such as the tension-time integral (TTI) and the rate of change of tension (dT/dt). The purpose of the present study was to parcel out the contribution of TTI and dT/dt to mechanical stimulation of muscle under conditions of constant peak tension. The rat medial gastrocnemius in situ was subjected to one of four 5-min passive stretch protocols consisting of equal length excursions, but differing in displacement-time integral (4%, 40%, or 100%) and/or rate of stretch (0, 3, or 30 mm/s), and the resulting p54-JNK phosphorylation was assessed. A linear relationship between TTI and p54-JNK signaling was observed. However, no effect of dT/dt was observed. It is concluded that peak tension and TTI are necessary parameters for modeling the mechanical stimulus-response of muscle. Additionally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction is sensitive to peak tension and TTI, but not to dT/dt, and thus exhibits spring-like behavior. These findings may contribute to the refinement of disuse atrophy countermeasures.

  2. Mechano-adaptive sensory mechanism of α-catenin under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Koichiro; Han, Sung-Woong; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hakoshima, Toshio; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The contractile forces in individual cells drive the tissue processes, such as morphogenesis and wound healing, and maintain tissue integrity. In these processes, α-catenin molecule acts as a tension sensor at cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs), accelerating the positive feedback of intercellular tension. Under tension, α-catenin is activated to recruit vinculin, which recruits actin filaments to AJs. In this study, we revealed how α-catenin retains its activated state while avoiding unfolding under tension. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy employing atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that mechanically activated α-catenin fragment had higher mechanical stability than a non-activated fragment. The results of our experiments using mutated and segmented fragments showed that the key intramolecular interactions acted as a conformational switch. We also found that the conformation of α-catenin was reinforced by vinculin binding. We demonstrate that α-catenin adaptively changes its conformation under tension to a stable intermediate state, binds to vinculin, and finally settles into a more stable state reinforced by vinculin binding. Our data suggest that the plastic characteristics of α-catenin, revealed in response to both mechanical and biochemical cues, enable the functional-structural dynamics at the cellular and tissue levels.

  3. Mechano-adaptive sensory mechanism of α-catenin under tension

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Koichiro; Han, Sung-Woong; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hakoshima, Toshio; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-01-01

    The contractile forces in individual cells drive the tissue processes, such as morphogenesis and wound healing, and maintain tissue integrity. In these processes, α-catenin molecule acts as a tension sensor at cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs), accelerating the positive feedback of intercellular tension. Under tension, α-catenin is activated to recruit vinculin, which recruits actin filaments to AJs. In this study, we revealed how α-catenin retains its activated state while avoiding unfolding under tension. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy employing atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that mechanically activated α-catenin fragment had higher mechanical stability than a non-activated fragment. The results of our experiments using mutated and segmented fragments showed that the key intramolecular interactions acted as a conformational switch. We also found that the conformation of α-catenin was reinforced by vinculin binding. We demonstrate that α-catenin adaptively changes its conformation under tension to a stable intermediate state, binds to vinculin, and finally settles into a more stable state reinforced by vinculin binding. Our data suggest that the plastic characteristics of α-catenin, revealed in response to both mechanical and biochemical cues, enable the functional-structural dynamics at the cellular and tissue levels. PMID:27109499

  4. Sensing Viruses by Mechanical Tension of DNA in Responsive Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The rapid worldwide spread of severe viral infections, often involving novel mutations of viruses, poses major challenges to our health-care systems. This means that tools that can efficiently and specifically diagnose viruses are much needed. To be relevant for broad applications in local health-care centers, such tools should be relatively cheap and easy to use. In this paper, we discuss the biophysical potential for the macroscopic detection of viruses based on the induction of a mechanical stress in a bundle of prestretched DNA molecules upon binding of viruses to the DNA. We show that the affinity of the DNA to the charged virus surface induces a local melting of the double helix into two single-stranded DNA. This process effects a mechanical stress along the DNA chains leading to an overall contraction of the DNA. Our results suggest that when such DNA bundles are incorporated in a supporting matrix such as a responsive hydrogel, the presence of viruses may indeed lead to a significant, macroscopic mechanical deformation of the matrix. We discuss the biophysical basis for this effect and characterize the physical properties of the associated DNA melting transition. In particular, we reveal several scaling relations between the relevant physical parameters of the system. We promote this DNA-based assay as a possible tool for efficient and specific virus screening.

  5. Laminar stream of detergents for subcellular neurite damage in a microfluidic device: a simple tool for the study of neuroregeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Young; Romanova, Elena V.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The regeneration and repair of damaged neuronal networks is a difficult process to study in vivo, leading to the development of multiple in vitro models and techniques for studying nerve injury. Here we describe an approach for generating a well-defined subcellular neurite injury in a microfluidic device. Approach. A defined laminar stream of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to damage selected portions of neurites of individual neurons. The somata and neurites unaffected by the SDS stream remained viable, thereby enabling the study of neuronal regeneration. Main results. By using well-characterized neurons from Aplysia californica cultured in vitro, we demonstrate that our approach is useful in creating neurite damage, investigating neurotrophic factors, and monitoring somata migration during regeneration. Supplementing the culture medium with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or Aplysia hemolymph facilitated the regeneration of the peptidergic Aplysia neurons within 72 h, with longer (p < 0.05) and more branched (p < 0.05) neurites than in the control medium. After the neurons were transected, their somata migrated; intriguingly, for the control cultures, the migration direction was always away from the injury site (7/7). In the supplemented cultures, the number decreased to 6/8 in AChE and 4/8 in hemolymph, with reduced migration distances in both cases. Significance. The SDS transection approach is simple and inexpensive, yet provides flexibility in studying neuroregeneration, particularly when it is important to make sure there are no retrograde signals from the distal segments affecting regeneration. Neurons are known to not only be under tension but also balanced in terms of force, and the balance is obviously disrupted by transection. Our experimental platform, verified with Aplysia, can be extended to mammalian systems, and help us gain insight into the role that neurotrophic factors and mechanical tension play during neuronal regeneration.

  6. The role of calsyntenin-3 in dystrophic neurite formation in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya

    2016-03-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomers may play an important role in the early pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: cognitive impairment caused by synaptic dysfunction. Dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques, another pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease, are plaque-associated neuritic alterations preceding the appearance of synaptic loss. In the present review, we focus on the mechanism of dystrophic neurite formation by Aß oligomers, and discuss the neurotoxic role of Aβ-induced calsyntenin-3 in mediating dystrophic neurite formation.

  7. Mechanisms underlying rhythmic locomotion: interactions between activation, tension and body curvature waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Friesen, W Otto; Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    2012-01-15

    Undulatory animal locomotion arises from three closely related propagating waves that sweep rostrocaudally along the body: activation of segmental muscles by motoneurons (MNs), strain of the body wall, and muscle tension induced by activation and strain. Neuromechanical models that predict the relative propagation speeds of neural/muscle activation, muscle tension and body curvature can reveal crucial underlying control features of the central nervous system and the power-generating mechanisms of the muscle. We provide an analytical explanation of the relative speeds of these three waves based on a model of neuromuscular activation and a model of the body-fluid interactions for leech anguilliform-like swimming. First, we deduced the motoneuron spike frequencies that activate the muscle and the resulting muscle tension during swimming in intact leeches from muscle bending moments. Muscle bending moments were derived from our video-recorded kinematic motion data by our body-fluid interaction model. The phase relationships of neural activation and muscle tension in the strain cycle were then calculated. Our study predicts that the MN activation and body curvature waves have roughly the same speed (the ratio of curvature to MN activation speed ≈0.84), whereas the tension wave travels about twice as fast. The high speed of the tension wave resulting from slow MN activation is explained by the multiplicative effects of MN activation and muscle strain on tension development. That is, the product of two slower waves (activation and strain) with appropriate amplitude, bias and phase can generate a tension wave with twice the propagation speed of the factors. Our study predicts that (1) the bending moment required for swimming is achieved by minimal MN spike frequency, rather than by minimal muscle tension; (2) MN activity is greater in the mid-body than in the head and tail regions; (3) inhibitory MNs not only accelerate the muscle relaxation but also reduce the intrinsic

  8. Control of cytoskeletal mechanics by extracellular matrix, cell shape, and mechanical tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated how extracellular matrix (ECM) alters the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton (CSK). Mechanical stresses were applied to integrin receptors on the apical surfaces of adherent endothelial cells using RGD-coated ferromagnetic microbeads (5.5-microns diameter) in conjunction with a magnetic twisting device. Increasing the number of basal cell-ECM contacts by raising the fibronectin (FN) coating density from 10 to 500 ng/cm2 promoted cell spreading by fivefold and increased CSK stiffness, apparent viscosity, and permanent deformation all by more than twofold, as measured in response to maximal stress (40 dyne/cm2). When the applied stress was increased from 7 to 40 dyne/cm2, the stiffness and apparent viscosity of the CSK increased in parallel, although cell shape, ECM contacts, nor permanent deformation was altered. Application of the same stresses over a lower number ECM contacts using smaller beads (1.4-microns diameter) resulted in decreased CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity, confirming that this technique probes into the depth of the CSK and not just the cortical membrane. When magnetic measurements were carried out using cells whose membranes were disrupted and ATP stores depleted using saponin, CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity were found to rise by approximately 20%, whereas permanent deformation decreased by more than half. Addition of ATP (250 microM) under conditions that promote CSK tension generation in membrane-permeabilized cells resulted in decreases in CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity that could be detected within 2 min after ATP addition, before any measurable change in cell size.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 ion channels can be tuned by cellular membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Grandl, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels mediate the conversion of mechanical forces into electrical signals and are critical for responsiveness to touch in metazoans. The apparent mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 varies substantially across cellular environments, stimulating methods and protocols, raising the fundamental questions of what precise physical stimulus activates the channel and how its stimulus sensitivity is regulated. Here, we measured Piezo1 currents evoked by membrane stretch in three patch configurations, while simultaneously visualizing and measuring membrane geometry. Building on this approach, we developed protocols to minimize resting membrane curvature and tension prior to probing Piezo1 activity. We find that Piezo1 responds to lateral membrane tension with exquisite sensitivity as compared to other mechanically activated channels and that resting tension can drive channel inactivation, thereby tuning overall mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1. Our results explain how Piezo1 can function efficiently and with adaptable sensitivity as a sensor of mechanical stimulation in diverse cellular contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12088.001 PMID:26646186

  10. Mechanical tension as a driver of connective tissue growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cameron J; Pearcy, Mark J; Epari, Devakara R

    2014-07-01

    We propose the progressive mechanical expansion of cell-derived tissue analogues as a novel, growth-based approach to in vitro tissue engineering. The prevailing approach to producing tissue in vitro is to culture cells in an exogenous "scaffold" that provides a basic structure and mechanical support. This necessarily pre-defines the final size of the implantable material, and specific signals must be provided to stimulate appropriate cell growth, differentiation and matrix formation. In contrast, surgical skin expansion, driven by increments of stretch, produces increasing quantities of tissue without trauma or inflammation. This suggests that connective tissue cells have the innate ability to produce growth in response to elevated tension. We posit that this capacity is maintained in vitro, and that order-of-magnitude growth may be similarly attained in self-assembling cultures of cells and their own extracellular matrix. The hypothesis that growth of connective tissue analogues can be induced by mechanical expansion in vitro may be divided into three components: (1) tension stimulates cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis; (2) the corresponding volume increase will relax the tension imparted by a fixed displacement; (3) the repeated application of static stretch will produce sustained growth and a tissue structure adapted to the tensile loading. Connective tissues exist in a state of residual tension, which is actively maintained by resident cells such as fibroblasts. Studies in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that cellular survival, reproduction, and matrix synthesis and degradation are regulated by the mechanical environment. Order-of-magnitude increases in both bone and skin volume have been achieved clinically through staged expansion protocols, demonstrating that tension-driven growth can be sustained over prolonged periods. Furthermore, cell-derived tissue analogues have demonstrated mechanically advantageous structural adaptation in

  11. Measurement of Mechanical Tension at Cell-cell Junctions Using Two-photon Laser Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Michael, Magdalene; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    The cortical actomyosin cytoskeleton is found in all non-muscle cells where a key function is to control mechanical force (Salbreux et al., 2012). When coupled to E-cadherin cell-cell adhesion, cortical actomyosin generates junctional tension that influences many aspects of tissue function, organization and morphogenesis (Lecuit and Yap, 2015). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of junctional tension requires tools for measuring it in live cells with a high spatio-temporal resolution. For this, we have set up a technique of laser ablation, in which we use the high power output of a two-photon laser to physically cut the actin cortex at the sites of cell-cell adhesion labeled with E-cadherin-GFP. Tension, thus is visualized as the outwards recoil of the vertices that define a junction after this was ablated/cut. Analysis of recoil versus time allows extracting parameters related to the amount of contractile force that is applied to the junction before ablation (initial recoil) and the ratio between elasticity of the junction and viscosity of the media (cytoplasm) in which the junctional cortex is immersed. Using this approach we have discovered how Src protein-tyrosine kinase (Gomez et al., 2015); actin-binding proteins such as tropomyosins (Caldwell et al., 2014) and N-WASP (Wu et al., 2014); Myosin II (Priya et al., 2015) and coronin-1B (Michael et al., 2016) contribute to the molecular apparatus responsible for generating tension at the cell-cell junctions. This protocol describes the experimental procedure for setting up laser ablation experiments and how to optimize ablation and acquisition conditions for optimal measurements of junctional tension. It also provides a full description, step by step, of the post-acquisition analysis required to evaluate changes in contractile force as well as cell elasticity and/or cytoplasm viscosity. PMID:28191488

  12. From membrane tension to channel gating: A principal energy transfer mechanism for mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejun C; Liu, Zhenfeng; Li, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins that play essential roles in multiple cellular processes, including sensing mechanical forces and regulating osmotic pressure. Bacterial MscL and MscS are two prototypes of MS channels. Numerous structural studies, in combination with biochemical and cellular data, provide valuable insights into the mechanism of energy transfer from membrane tension to gating of the channel. We discuss these data in a unified two-state model of thermodynamics. In addition, we propose a lipid diffusion-mediated mechanism to explain the adaptation phenomenon of MscS.

  13. Extracellular matrix allows PC12 neurite elongation in the absence of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, P; Steel, V L; Regal, C; Adgate, L; Buxbaum, R E; Heidemann, S R

    1990-01-01

    results by postulating that growth on ECM relieves the need for MTs to serve as compressive supports for neurite tension (Dennerll, T. J., H. C. Joshi, U. L. Steel, R. E. Buxbaum, and S. R. Heidemann. 1988. J. Cell Biol. 107:665). Because compression destabilizes MTs and favors disassembly, this would tend to increase MT assembly relative to other conditions, as we found. Additionally, if MTs are not needed as compressive supports, neurites could grow out in their absence, as we also observed.

  14. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  15. Arf6 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cytohesin-2 Binds to CCDC120 and Is Transported Along Neurites to Mediate Neurite Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tago, Kenji; Sango, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Sanbe, Atsushi; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of neurite growth is complicated, involving continuous cytoskeletal rearrangement and vesicular trafficking. Cytohesin-2 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6, an Arf family molecular switch protein, controlling cell morphological changes such as neuritogenesis. Here, we show that cytohesin-2 binds to a protein with a previously unknown function, CCDC120, which contains three coiled-coil domains, and is transported along neurites in differentiating N1E-115 cells. Transfection of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for CCDC120 into cells inhibits neurite growth and Arf6 activation. When neurites start to extend, vesicles containing CCDC120 and cytohesin-2 are transported in an anterograde manner rather than a retrograde one. As neurites continue extension, anterograde vesicle transport decreases. CCDC120 knockdown inhibits cytohesin-2 localization into vesicles containing CCDC120 and diffuses cytohesin-2 in cytoplasmic regions, illustrating that CCDC120 determines cytohesin-2 localization in growing neurites. Reintroduction of the wild type CCDC120 construct into cells transfected with CCDC120 siRNA reverses blunted neurite growth and Arf6 activity, whereas the cytohesin-2-binding CC1 region-deficient CCDC120 construct does not. Thus, cytohesin-2 is transported along neurites by vesicles containing CCDC120, and it mediates neurite growth. These results suggest a mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6 is transported to mediate neurite growth. PMID:25326380

  16. Mechanical response and failure of High Performance Propellant (HPP) subject to uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Thompson, D. G.

    2015-05-01

    As part of a program to characterize and understand the mechanical response and failure behavior of the High Performance Propellant (HPP), uniaxial tensile tests were conducted. The mechanical properties of the HPP solid propellant subject to tension are investigated as a function of both the loading (strain) rate and the temperature. The nominal strain rate varies from 10-6 to 10-2 s-1 and the temperature varies from -50 to 50 °C. Digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to obtain the full field deformation measurement over the sample surface, from which both the axial strain and the circumferential strain were determined, and as a result, volume changes during the uniaxial tension were studied. Some of the material parameters, e.g., Young's modulus E, the tensile strength σ max, and uniaxial tensile strain at the maximum tensile stress ɛ max, were found to be extremely sensitive to both the strain rate and the temperature. It was also observed that during the linear portion of the uniaxial tension, the HPP is close to incompressible. But when deformation enters the nonlinear regime, volume change of the sample accelerates and such a significant volume increase during the nonlinear portion of the deformation can be attributed to the formation and extension of damage within the gage section, which lead to the macroscopic tearing failure of the material.

  17. Fabrication of Open-Cell Al Foams and Evaluation of their Mechanical Response under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailidis, N.; Stergioudi, F.; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D. N.

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper a novel procedure for describing the solid geometry of open cell foams is introduced, facilitating the establishment of a corresponding FEM model for simulating the material behaviour in micro-tension. Open-cell Al-foams were fabricated using the polymer impregnating method. A serial sectioning image-based process is described to capture, reproduce and visualize the exact three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the examined foam. The generated 3D geometry of the Al-foam, derived from the synthesis of digital cross sectional images of the foam, was appropriately adjusted to build a FE model simulating the deformation conditions of the Al-foam under micro-tension loads. The obtained results enabled the visualisation of the stress fields in the Al-foam, allowing for a full investigation of its mechanical behaviour.

  18. Myths and Truths of Nitinol Mechanics: Elasticity and Tension-Compression Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucsek, Ashley N.; Paranjape, Harshad M.; Stebner, Aaron P.

    2016-09-01

    Two prevalent myths of Nitinol mechanics are examined: (1) Martensite is more compliant than austenite; (2) Texture-free Nitinol polycrystals do not exhibit tension-compression asymmetry. By reviewing existing literature, the following truths are revealed: (1) Martensite crystals may be more compliant, equally stiff, or stiffer than austenite crystals, depending on the orientation of the applied load. The Young's Modulus of polycrystalline Nitinol is not a fixed number—it changes with both processing and in operando deformations. Nitinol martensite prefers to behave stiffer under compressive loads and more compliant under tensile loads. (2) Inelastic Nitinol martensite deformation in and of itself is asymmetric, even for texture-free polycrystals. Texture-free Nitinol polycrystals also exhibit tension-compression transformation asymmetry.

  19. Static model of a violin bow: influence of camber and hair tension on mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Ablitzer, Frédéric; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Dauchez, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Experienced bow makers empirically know the influence of wood, tapering, and camber on the playing and tonal qualities of a bow. However, the way each parameter affects the bow mechanical behavior is not clearly established. An in-plane finite element model is developed to highlight the link between the adjustable design parameters and the mechanical behavior of a bow. This model takes into account geometric nonlinearity as well as compliance of the hair. Its validity is discussed from measurements on a bow. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from previous studies. The consequences of adjusting hair tension and camber are then investigated.

  20. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of Primary Cortical Neurons Through Up-Regulating BDNF Expression.

    PubMed

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao

    2016-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, can activate the Shh pathway, which has been implicated in neuronal polarization involving neurite outgrowth. However, little evidence is available about the effect of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons and its potential mechanism. Here, we revealed that Shh increased neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons, while the Shh pathway inhibitor (cyclopamine, CPM) partially suppressed Shh-induced neurite outgrowth. Similar results were found for the expressions of Shh and Patched genes in Shh-induced primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh increased the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) not only in lysates and in culture medium but also in the longest neurites of primary cortical neurons, which was partially blocked by CPM. In addition, blocking of BDNF action suppressed Shh-mediated neurite elongation in primary cortical neurons. In conclusion, these findings suggest that Shh promotes neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons at least partially through modulating BDNF expression.

  1. Reactive oxygen species induce neurite degeneration before induction of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce neuronal cell death in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of cultured cells with a low concentration of hydrogen peroxide induces neurite degeneration, but not cell death. Neurites (axons and dendrites) are vulnerable to ROS. Neurite degeneration (shrinkage, accumulation, and fragmentation) has been found in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. However, the mechanism of ROS-related neurite degeneration is not fully understood. Many studies have demonstrated the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and microtubule destabilization. These dysfunctions are deeply related to changes in calcium homeostasis and ROS production in neurites. Treatment with antioxidant substances, such as vitamin E, prevents neurite degeneration in cultured cells. This review describes the possibility that ROS induces neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. PMID:27895381

  2. Reducing Mechanical Formation Damage by Minimizing Interfacial Tension and Capillary Pressure in Tight Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Arshad; Talib Shuker, Muhannad; Rehman, Khalil; Bahrami, Hassan; Memon, Muhammad Khan

    2013-12-01

    Tight gas reservoirs incur problems and significant damage caused by low permeability during drilling, completion, stimulation and production. They require advanced improvement techniques to achieve flow gas at optimum rates. Water blocking damage (phase Trapping/retention of fluids) is a form of mechanical formation damage mechanism, which is caused by filtrate invasion in drilling operations mostly in fracturing. Water blocking has a noticeable impact on formation damage in gas reservoirs which tends to decrease relative permeability near the wellbore. Proper evaluation of damage and the factors which influence its severity is essential to optimize well productivity. Reliable data regarding interfacial tension between gas and water is required in order to minimize mechanical formation damage potential and to optimize gas production. This study was based on the laboratory experiments of interfacial tension by rising drop method between gas-brine, gas-condensate and gas-brine. The results showed gas condensate has low interfacial tension value 6 - 11 dynes/cm when compared to gas-brine and gas- diesel which were 44 - 58 dynes/cm and 14 - 19 dynes/cm respectively. In this way, the capillary pressure of brine-gas system was estimated as 0.488 psi, therefore diesel-gas system was noticed about 0.164 psi and 0.098 psi for condensate-gas system. A forecast model was used by using IFT values to predict the phase trapping which shows less severe phase trapping damage in case of condensate than diesel and brine. A reservoir simulation study was also carried out in order to better understand the effect of hysteresis on well productivity and flow efficiency affected due to water blocking damage in tight gas reservoirs.

  3. Device for Investigation of Mechanical Tension of Isolated Smooth Muscle Vessels and Airway Segments of Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinik, A.; Karpovich, N.; Turgunova, N.; Nosarev, A.

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of testing and the search for new drug compounds, designed to heal many human diseases, it is necessary to investigate the deformation of experimental tissue samples under influence of these drugs. For this task a precision force sensor for measuring the mechanical tension, produced by isolated ring segments of blood vessels and airways was created. The hardware and software systems for the study of changes in contractile responses of the airway smooth muscles and blood vessels of experimental animals was developed.

  4. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals.

  5. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals. PMID:25958335

  6. Micro-mechanical model for the tension-stabilized enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thao; Ruberti, Jeffery

    We present a study of how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. Experiments of collagen fibrils and tissues show that mechanical tension can slow and halt enzymatic degradation. Tissue-level experiments also show that degradation rate is minimum at a stretch level coincident with the onset of strain-stiffening in the stress response. To understand these phenomena, we developed a micro-mechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation. Collagen fibers are described as sinusoidal elastica beams, and the tissue is described as a distribution of fibers. We assumed that the degradation reaction is inhibited by the axial strain energy of the crimped collagen fibers. The degradation rate law was calibrated to experiments on isolated single fibrils from bovine sclera. The fiber crimp and properties were fit to uniaxial tension tests of tissue strips. The fibril-level kinetic and tissue-level structural parameters were used to predict tissue-level degradation-induced creep rate under a constant applied force. We showed that we could accurately predict the degradation-induce creep rate of the pericardium and cornea once we accounted for differences in the fiber crimp structure and properties.

  7. Neurite outgrowth is driven by actin polymerization even in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jonathan X.; Efimova, Nadia; Svitkina, Tatyana M.

    2016-01-01

    Actin polymerization is a universal mechanism to drive plasma membrane protrusion in motile cells. One apparent exception to this rule is continuing or even accelerated outgrowth of neuronal processes in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors. This fact, together with the key role of microtubule dynamics in neurite outgrowth, led to the concept that microtubules directly drive plasma membrane protrusion either in the course of polymerization or by motor-driven sliding. The possibility that unextinguished actin polymerization drives neurite outgrowth in the presence of actin drugs was not explored. We show that cultured hippocampal neurons treated with cytochalasin D or latrunculin B contained dense accumulations of branched actin filaments at ∼50% of neurite tips at all tested drug concentrations (1–10 μM). Actin polymerization is required for neurite outgrowth because only low concentrations of either inhibitor increased the length and/or number of neurites, whereas high concentrations inhibited neurite outgrowth. Of importance, neurites undergoing active elongation invariably contained a bright F-actin patch at the tip, whereas actin-depleted neurites never elongated, even though they still contained dynamic microtubules. Stabilization of microtubules by Taxol treatment did not stop elongation of cytochalasin–treated neurites. We conclude that actin polymerization is indispensable for neurite elongation. PMID:27682586

  8. Novel Roles and Mechanism for Krüppel-like Factor 16 (KLF16) Regulation of Neurite Outgrowth and Ephrin Receptor A5 (EphA5) Expression in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Galvao, Joana; Beach, Krista M; Luo, Weijia; Urrutia, Raul A; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Otteson, Deborah C

    2016-08-26

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise for the treatment of degenerative retinal disorders. Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are transcription factors that have recently emerged as key tools in regenerative medicine because some of them can function as epigenetic reprogrammers in stem cell biology. Here, we show that KLF16, one of the least understood members of this family, is a POU4F2 independent transcription factor in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) as early as embryonic day 15. When overexpressed, KLF16 inhibits RGC neurite outgrowth and enhances RGC growth cone collapse in response to exogenous ephrinA5 ligands. Ephrin/EPH signaling regulates RGC connectivity. The EphA5 promoter contains multiple GC- and GT-rich KLF-binding sites, which, as shown by ChIP-assays, bind KLF16 in vivo In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, KLF16 binds specifically to a single KLF site near the EphA5 transcription start site that is required for KLF16 transactivation. Interestingly, methylation of only six of 98 CpG dinucleotides within the EphA5 promoter blocks its transactivation by KLF16 but enables transactivation by KLF2 and KLF15. These data demonstrate a role for KLF16 in regulation of RGC neurite outgrowth and as a methylation-sensitive transcriptional regulator of EphA5 expression. Together, these data identify differential low level methylation as a novel mechanism for regulating KLF16-mediated EphA5 expression across the retina. Because of the critical role of ephrin/EPH signaling in patterning RGC connectivity, understanding the role of KLFs in regulating neurite outgrowth and Eph receptor expression will be vital for successful restoration of functional vision through optic nerve regenerative therapies.

  9. Strain rate effects on mechanical properties in tension of aluminium alloys used in armour applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Bianchi, S.; Kaufmann, H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical properties in tension of two aluminium alloys (AA5059-H131 and AA7039-T651) used in armour applications were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experimental research was developed in the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The target strain rates were set at the following four levels: 10-3, 30, 300 and 1000s-1. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electromechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. The required parameters by the Johnson-Cook constitutive law were also determined.

  10. Pressure and tension effects on mechanical properties of ZrAl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pinliang; Tang, Xiuzhang; Meng, Fanchen; Gong, Zizheng; Ji, Guangfu; Yang, Jinke

    2014-11-15

    Structural, elastic, thermodynamic of ZrAl{sub 2} under pressure, ideal strength and deformation mode under tension are investigated by the first-principles method. The calculated structural parameters at zero pressure are in consistent with experiments. Under pressure, elastic constants and their pressure dependence are obtained using the static finite strain technique. ZrAl{sub 2} exhibits lower elastic anisotropy. The linear thermal expansion coefficient shows greater effects of temperature at lower pressure. The ideal tensile have been investigated by stress–strain calculations. Finally, the microscopic mechanism that determines the structural stability is studied using the results of electronic structure calculations. We propose that the weakening of Zr-Zr leads to the significant change of stress–strain curve at strain ∼0.27, and the breaking of Zr{sub 2}-Zr{sub 3} leads to the structural instability of ZrAl{sub 2} under large tensile strains.

  11. Local pressure components and surface tension of spherical interfaces. Thermodynamic versus mechanical definitions. I. A mesoscale modeling of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    We report mesoscale simulations of spherical drops to investigate the surface tension and mechanical properties. The Monte Carlo simulations are performed with the multibody potential commonly used in the many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulations. We establish here the calculation of the local normal and transverse components of the pressure tensor via the perturbation volume within the thermodynamic route. The different profiles of these components are compared to those calculated using the mechanical approach. To complete the mesoscale modeling of drops, we investigate the curvature dependence of the surface tension in order to calculate the Tolman's length, which is found to be negative.

  12. Using magnets and magnetic beads to dissect signaling pathways activated by mechanical tension applied to cells.

    PubMed

    Marjoram, R J; Guilluy, C; Burridge, K

    2016-02-01

    Cellular tension has implications in normal biology and pathology. Membrane adhesion receptors serve as conduits for mechanotransduction that lead to cellular responses. Ligand-conjugated magnetic beads are a useful tool in the study of how cells sense and respond to tension. Here we detail methods for their use in applying tension to cells and strategies for analyzing the results. We demonstrate the methods by analyzing mechanotransduction through VE-cadherin on endothelial cells using both permanent magnets and magnetic tweezers.

  13. Effect of surface tension and surfactant administration on Eustachian tube mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ghadiali, Samir N; Banks, Julie; Swarts, J Douglas

    2002-09-01

    Development of otitis media has been related to abnormal Eustachian tube (ET) mechanics. ET is a collapsible tube that is periodically opened to regulate middle ear pressure and to clear middle ear fluid into the nasopharynx. The ability to perform these physiological functions depends on several mechanical properties, including the ET's opening pressure (P(open)), compliance (ETC), and hysteresis (eta). In this study, a previously developed modified force-response protocol was used to determine ET mechanical properties after experimental manipulation of the mucosal surface condition. Specifically, these properties were measured in the right ear of six cynomologous monkeys under baseline conditions after "washing out" the normal ET mucous layer and after instillation of a pulmonary surfactant, Infasurf. Removal of the normal mucosa did not significantly alter P(open) but did result in a decrease in ETC and eta (P < 0.05). Treatment of the mucosa with Infasurf was effective in reducing P(open) and increasing both ETC and eta to baseline values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the mucosa-air surface tension can affect the overall ETC and eta properties of the ET. In addition, this study indicates that surfactant therapy may only be beneficial in patients with rigid or inelastic ETs (large P(open) and low ETC and eta).

  14. Evaluation of Bulk Mechanical Properties of Selected Lead-Free Solders in Tension and in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaki Rani, S.; Murthy, G. S.

    2013-08-01

    Lead-free solders are fast emerging as better alternatives to Sn-Pb solders. The reliability of a soldered joint to withstand imposed stresses in an assembly is decided by its mechanical properties. The present work is about the investigation of tensile and shear properties of four binary eutectic alloys Sn-3.5Ag, Sn-58Bi, Sn-0.7Cu, Sn-9Zn and a ternary alloy Sn-57Bi-1.3Zn in comparison with conventional Sn-38Pb alloy. It is observed that the lead-free solders have better mechanical properties than the latter. SEM studies of tensile and shear fracture show ductile dimples circular in tension and parabolic in shear modes supporting the mechanical behavior of the alloys investigated. Eutectic alloys Sn-Ag, Sn-Zn, and Sn-Cu form potential substitutes for Sn-Pb for electronic interconnects exposed to high temperatures, while Sn-Bi and Sn-Bi-Zn are attractive alternatives in addressing the need of lower processing temperatures in printed circuit boards and other applications.

  15. Defect induced plasticity and failure mechanism of boron nitride nanotubes under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-07-28

    The effects of Stone-Wales (SW) and vacancy defects on the failure behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under tension are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to model the atomic interaction and the temperature is maintained close to 300 K. The effect of a SW defect is studied by determining the failure strength and failure mechanism of nanotubes with different radii. In the case of a vacancy defect, the effect of an N-vacancy and a B-vacancy is studied separately. Nanotubes with different chiralities but similar diameter is considered first to evaluate the chirality dependence. The variation of failure strength with the radius is then studied by considering nanotubes of different diameters but same chirality. It is observed that the armchair BNNTs are extremely sensitive to defects, whereas the zigzag configurations are the least sensitive. In the case of pristine BNNTs, both armchair and zigzag nanotubes undergo brittle failure, whereas in the case of defective BNNTs, only the zigzag ones undergo brittle failure. An interesting defect induced plastic behavior is observed in defective armchair BNNTs. For this nanotube, the presence of a defect triggers mechanical relaxation by bond breaking along the closest zigzag helical path, with the defect as the nucleus. This mechanism results in a plastic failure.

  16. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  17. Growth cone-like waves transport actin and promote axonogenesis and neurite branching

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C.; Pak, Chi W.; Shaw, Alisa E.; Bradke, Frank; Bamburg, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Axonogenesis involves a shift from uniform delivery of materials to all neurites to preferential delivery to the putative axon, supporting its more rapid extension. Waves, growth cone-like structures that propagate down the length of neurites, were shown previously to correlate with neurite growth in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Waves are similar to growth cones in their structure, composition and dynamics. Here, we report that waves form in all undifferentiated neurites, but occur more frequently in the future axon during initial neuronal polarization. Moreover, wave frequency and their impact on neurite growth are altered in neurons treated with stimuli that enhance axonogenesis. Coincident with wave arrival, growth cones enlarge and undergo a marked increase in dynamics. Through their engorgement of filopodia along the neurite shaft, waves can induce de novo neurite branching. Actin in waves maintains much of its cohesiveness during transport whereas actin in non-wave regions of the neurite rapidly diffuses as measured by live cell imaging of photoactivated GFP-actin and photoconversion of Dendra-actin. Thus, waves represent an alternative axonal transport mechanism for actin. Waves also occur in neurons in organotypic hippocampal slices where they propagate along neurites in the dentate gyrus and the CA regions and induce branching. Taken together, our results indicate that waves are physiologically relevant and contribute to axon growth and branching via the transport of actin and by increasing growth cone dynamics. PMID:19513994

  18. Organic and inorganic lead inhibit neurite growth in vertebrate and invertebrate neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Shugarts, D; Nelson, G; Przekwas, J

    1989-12-01

    Neurons from brains of chick embryos and pond snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) were cultured for 3 to 4 d in the presence of no toxins, inorganic lead (PbCl2), or organic lead (triethyl lead chloride). In chick neurons, inorganic lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 270 microM total lead, approximately 70 nM free Pb2+) but did not reduce the number of neurites per cell or the mean neurite length. Triethyl lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 0.24 microM) and the mean neurite length (extrapolated IC50 = 3.6 microM) but did not reduce the number of neurites per cell. In Lymnaea neurons, inorganic lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 13 microM total lead; approximately 10 nM free Pb2+). Triethyl lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 0.4 microM) and exerted significant toxicity at 0.2 microM. The two forms of lead affected neurite growth in qualitatively different ways, which suggests that their mechanisms of action are different.

  19. Tension headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... headache; Muscle contraction headache; Headache - benign; Headache - tension; Chronic headaches - tension; Rebound headaches - tension ... headaches can occur when you also have a migraine. Tension headaches are not associated with brain diseases.

  20. Mechanical behavior of twinned SiC nanowires under combined tension-torsion and compression-torsion strain

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhijie; Wang, Shengjie; Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2010-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of twinned silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires under combined tension-torsion and compression-torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations with an empirical potential. The simulation results show that both the tensile failure stress and buckling stress decrease under combined tension-torsional and combined compression-torsional strain, and they decrease with increasing torsional rate under combined loading. The torsion rate has no effect on the elastic properties of the twinned SiC nanowires. The collapse of the twinned nanowires takes place in a twin stacking fault of the nanowires.

  1. CRMP-5 interacts with actin to regulate neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIAOBING; TAN, MINGHUI; GAO, YUAN; CHEN, KEEN; GUO, GUOQING

    2016-01-01

    CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are abundantly expressed in the developing nervous system mediating growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity and axon elongation. CRMP-5 has been indicated to serve a critical role in neurite outgrowth. However, the detailed mechanisms of how CRMP-5 regulates neurite outgrowth remain unclear. In the current study, co-immunoprecipitation was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 interacted with the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton networks in the growth cones of developing hippocampal neurons. CRMP-5 exhibited increased affinity towards actin when compared with microtubules. Immunocytochemistry was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 colocalized with actin predominantly in the C-domain and T-zone in growth cones. In addition, genetic inhibition of CRMP-5 by siRNA suppressed the expression of actin, growth cone development and neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of CRMP-5 promoted the interaction with actin, growth cone development and hippocampal neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these data suggest that CRMP-5 is able to interact with the actin cytoskeleton network in the growth cone and affect growth cone development and neurite outgrowth via this interaction in developing hippocampal neurons. PMID:26677106

  2. Influence of Tension-Compression Asymmetry on the Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheets in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for lightweight design in the automotive industry due to their high strength-to-mass ratio. This study aims to study the influence of tension-compression asymmetry on the radius of curvature and energy absorption capacity of AZ31B-O magnesium alloy sheets in bending. The mechanical properties were characterized using tension, compression, and three-point bending tests. The material exhibits significant tension-compression asymmetry in terms of strength and strain hardening rate due to extension twinning in compression. The compressive yield strength is much lower than the tensile yield strength, while the strain hardening rate is much higher in compression. Furthermore, the tension-compression asymmetry in terms of r value (Lankford value) was also observed. The r value in tension is much higher than that in compression. The bending results indicate that the AZ31B-O sheet can outperform steel and aluminum sheets in terms of specific energy absorption in bending mainly due to its low density. In addition, the AZ31B-O sheet was deformed with a larger radius of curvature than the steel and aluminum sheets, which brings a benefit to energy absorption capacity. Finally, finite element simulation for three-point bending was performed using LS-DYNA and the results confirmed that the larger radius of curvature of a magnesium specimen is mainly attributed to the high strain hardening rate in compression.

  3. Overexpression of the Monocyte Chemokine CCL2 in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Causes a Conditioning-Like Increase in Neurite Outgrowth and Does So via a STAT3 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Jon P.; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Cregg, Jared; Howarth, Madeline; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the regeneration of peripheral nerves following axotomy. An injury to the sciatic nerve leads to significant macrophage accumulation in the L5 DRG, an effect not seen when the dorsal root is injured. We recently demonstrated that this accumulation around axotomized cell bodies is necessary for a peripheral conditioning lesion response to occur. Here we asked whether overexpression of the monocyte chemokine CCL2 specifically in DRG neurons of uninjured mice is sufficient to cause macrophage accumulation and to enhance regeneration or whether other injury-derived signals are required. AAV5-EF1α-CCL2 was injected intrathecally, and this injection led to a time-dependent increase in CCL2 mRNA expression and macrophage accumulation in L5 DRG, with a maximal response at 3 wk post-injection. These changes led to a conditioning-like increase in neurite outgrowth in DRG explant and dissociated cell cultures. This increase in regeneration was dependent upon CCL2 acting through its primary receptor CCR2. When CCL2 was overexpressed in CCR2 −/− mice, macrophage accumulation and enhanced regeneration were not observed. To address the mechanism by which CCL2 overexpression enhances regeneration, we tested for elevated expression of regeneration-associated genes in these animals. Surprisingly, we found that CCL2 overexpression led to a selective increase in LIF mRNA and neuronal phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) in L5 DRGs, with no change in expression seen in other RAGs such as GAP-43. Blockade of STAT3 phosphorylation by each of two different inhibitors prevented the increase in neurite outgrowth. Thus, CCL2 overexpression is sufficient to induce macrophage accumulation in uninjured L5 DRGs and increase the regenerative capacity of DRG neurons via a STAT3-dependent mechanism. PMID:26431741

  4. Myosin IC generates power over a range of loads via a new tension-sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Lin, Tianming; Goldman, Yale E; Shuman, Henry; Ostap, E Michael

    2012-09-11

    Myosin IC (myo1c), a widely expressed motor protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to cell membranes, has been associated with numerous cellular processes, including insulin-stimulated transport of GLUT4, mechanosensation in sensory hair cells, endocytosis, transcription of DNA in the nucleus, exocytosis, and membrane trafficking. The molecular role of myo1c in these processes has not been defined, so to better understand myo1c function, we utilized ensemble kinetic and single-molecule techniques to probe myo1c's biochemical and mechanical properties. Utilizing a myo1c construct containing the motor and regulatory domains, we found the force dependence of the actin-attachment lifetime to have two distinct regimes: a force-independent regime at forces < 1 pN, and a highly force-dependent regime at higher loads. In this force-dependent regime, forces that resist the working stroke increase the actin-attachment lifetime. Unexpectedly, the primary force-sensitive transition is the isomerization that follows ATP binding, not ADP release as in other slow myosins. This force-sensing behavior is unique amongst characterized myosins and clearly demonstrates mechanochemical diversity within the myosin family. Based on these results, we propose that myo1c functions as a slow transporter rather than a tension-sensitive anchor.

  5. Staurosporin induces neurite outgrowth through ROS generation in HN33 hippocampal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Min, J Y; Park, M H; Park, M K; Park, K W; Lee, N W; Kim, T; Kim, H J; Lee, D H

    2006-11-01

    Staurosporin, a specific inhibitor of PKC, is widely used in studies of signal transduction pathways. Previous studies have shown that staurosporin induces neurite outgrowth, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that staurosporin induces neurite outgrowth in HN33 hippocampal cells. Two other PKC inhibitors, Go 6976 (specific for alpha- and beta-isoforms) and rotterlin (a selective inhibitor of PKC delta), have no neuritogenic effect. In addition, staurosporin specifically increases ROS generation. NAC, which inhibits the generation of ROS, suppresses the staurosporin-induced neurite outgrowth in HN33 cells. Further, H(2)O(2) causes neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these results confirm a neuritogenic effect of staurosporin and point to ROS as the signal mediator of staurosporin-induced neurite outgrowth in HN33 hippocampal cells. Theme: Development and regeneration Topic: Neurotrophic factors: receptors and cellular mechanisms.

  6. The effect of high oxygen tensions on the mechanical properties of rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, R. M.; Rosenberg, Edith

    1970-01-01

    1. The average mechanical properties of groups of lungs or lung—thorax systems from pathogen-free rats weighing approximately 200 g were determined. Static pressure—volume curves and resistances to air-flow were obtained. 2. Six series, each of sixteen rats, were studied. Eight experimental rats in each series were exposed to 4 atm O2 (OHP) in a transparent pressure chamber; the other eight rats, which served as controls, were obtained from the breeder at the same time and studied at the same time. 3. In four series, the experimental animals were killed 10 min after gasping due to OHP had been definitely established. One series was a control in which experimental animals were exposed to 4 atm of pressure in an atmosphere containing oxygen at a tension of 150 mm Hg for 190 min. The experimental animals in the sixth series were exposed to 4 atm O2 for 2 hr and none of them gasped. 4. Gross and histological examination of sixteen rats, eight of which were killed after 10 min of gasping at 4 atm O2, showed that at this stage of intoxication there was no evidence of pulmonary pathology. 5. In none of the series studied were the static pressure—volume curves for deflation shifted, i.e. OHP did not affect the elastic properties of the lungs or the alveolar surfactant. 6. In two series studied 10 min after gasping behaviour had been established there was a significant decrease of resistance to air-flow and a shift to the left of the static pressure—volume curve for inflation with air. The rats in both these series were sedated with pentobarbitone and then killed with pentobarbitone injected into the jugular vein. 7. The decrease in resistance to air-flow was interpreted as broncho-dilatation and a possible mechanism whereby OHP produces broncho-dilatation is discussed. PMID:5503886

  7. Neuroprotective copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes promote neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Donnelly, Paul S; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, Cu(II)(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that Cu(II)(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, Cu(II)(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by Cu(II)(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75-99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM Cu(II)(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM Cu(II)(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between Cu(II)(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes.

  8. Neuroprotective Copper Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes Promote Neurite Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M.; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J.; White, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, CuII(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that CuII(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, CuII(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by CuII(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75–99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM CuII(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that CuII(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM CuII(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between CuII(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes. PMID:24587210

  9. Quercetin promotes neurite growth through enhancing intracellular cAMP level and GAP-43 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Liao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of quercetin on neurite growth in N1E-115 cells and the underlying mechanisms. Quercetin was evaluated for its effects on cell numbers of neurites, neurite length, intracellular cAMP content, and Gap-43 expression in N1E-115 cells in vitro by use of microscopy, LANCE(tm) cAMP 384 kit, and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that quercetin could increase the neurite length in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no effect on the numbers of cells. Quercetin significantly increased the expression of cellular cAMP in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The Gap-43 expression was up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, quercetin could promote neurite growth through increasing the intracellular cAMP level and Gap-43 expression.

  10. Material Stiffness Effects on Neurite Alignment to Photopolymerized Micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to direct neurite growth into a close proximity of stimulating elements of a neural prosthesis, such as a retinal or cochlear implant (CI), may enhance device performance and overcome current spatial signal resolution barriers. In this work, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), which are the target neurons to be stimulated by CIs, were cultured on photopolymerized micropatterns with varied matrix stiffnesses to determine the effect of rigidity on neurite alignment to physical cues. Micropatterns were generated on methacrylate thin film surfaces in a simple, rapid photopolymerization step by photomasking the prepolymer formulation with parallel line–space gratings. Two methacrylate series, a nonpolar HMA-co-HDDMA series and a polar PEGDMA-co-EGDMA series, with significantly different surface wetting properties were evaluated. Equivalent pattern periodicity was maintained across each methacrylate series based on photomask band spacing, and the feature amplitude was tuned to a depth of 2 μm amplitude for all compositions using the temporal control afforded by the UV curing methodology. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. All micropatterned films adsorb similar amounts of laminin from solution, and no significant difference in SGN survival was observed when the substrate compositions were compared. SGN neurite alignment significantly increases with increasing material modulus for both methacrylate series. Interestingly, SGN neurites respond to material stiffness cues that are orders of magnitude higher (GPa) than what is typically ascribed to neural environments (kPa). The ability to understand neurite response to engineered physical cues and mechanical properties such as matrix stiffness will allow the development of advanced biomaterials that direct de novo neurite growth to address the spatial signal resolution limitations of current neural prosthetics. PMID:25211120

  11. Tensional stress generation in gelatinous fibres: a review and possible mechanism based on cell-wall structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Gorshkova, Tatyana A

    2012-01-01

    Gelatinous fibres are specialized fibres, distinguished by the presence of an inner, gelatinous cell-wall layer. In recent years, they have attracted increasing interest since their walls have a desirable chemical composition (low lignin, low pentosan, and high cellulose contents) for applications such as saccharification and biofuel production, and they have interesting mechanical properties, being capable of generating high tensional stress. However, the unique character of gelatinous layer has not yet been widely recognized. The first part of this review presents a model of gelatinous-fibre organization and stresses the unique character of the gelatinous layer as a separate type of cell-wall layer, different from either primary or secondary wall layers. The second part discusses major current models of tensional stress generation by these fibres and presents a novel unifying model based on recent advances in knowledge of gelatinous wall structure. Understanding this mechanism could potentially lead to novel biomimetic developments in material sciences.

  12. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline metals, intermetalics and multiphase materials determined by tension, compression and disk-bend techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.A.; Thompson, L.J.; DiMelfi, R.J.; Choudry, M. Dollar, M.; Weertman, J.R.; Rittner, M.N.; Youngdahl, C.J. /

    1997-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metallic, intermetallic, and multiphase materials was investigated using tension, compression, and disk-bend techniques. Nanocrystalline NiAl, Al-Al{sub 3}Zr, and Cu were synthesized by gas condensation and either resistive or electron beam heating followed by high temperature vacuum compaction. Disk- bend tests of nanocrystalline NiAl show evidence of improved ductility at room temperature in this normally extremely brittle material. In contrast, tension tests of multiphase nanocrystalline Al- Al{sub 3}Zr samples show significant increases in strength by substantial reductions in ductility with decreasing grain size. Compression tests of nanocrystalline copper result in substantially higher yield stress and total elongation values than those measured in tensile tests. Implications for operative deformation mechanisms in these materials are discussed.

  13. A local difference in Hedgehog signal transduction increases mechanical cell bond tension and biases cell intercalations along the Drosophila anteroposterior compartment boundary.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Katrin; Umetsu, Daiki; Aliee, Maryam; Sui, Liyuan; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian

    2015-11-15

    Tissue organization requires the interplay between biochemical signaling and cellular force generation. The formation of straight boundaries separating cells with different fates into compartments is important for growth and patterning during tissue development. In the developing Drosophila wing disc, maintenance of the straight anteroposterior (AP) compartment boundary involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell bonds along the boundary. The biochemical signals that regulate mechanical tension along the AP boundary, however, remain unknown. Here, we show that a local difference in Hedgehog signal transduction activity between anterior and posterior cells is necessary and sufficient to increase mechanical tension along the AP boundary. This difference in Hedgehog signal transduction is also required to bias cell rearrangements during cell intercalations to keep the characteristic straight shape of the AP boundary. Moreover, severing cell bonds along the AP boundary does not reduce tension at neighboring bonds, implying that active mechanical tension is upregulated, cell bond by cell bond. Finally, differences in the expression of the homeodomain-containing protein Engrailed also contribute to the straight shape of the AP boundary, independently of Hedgehog signal transduction and without modulating cell bond tension. Our data reveal a novel link between local differences in Hedgehog signal transduction and a local increase in active mechanical tension of cell bonds that biases junctional rearrangements. The large-scale shape of the AP boundary thus emerges from biochemical signals inducing patterns of active tension on cell bonds.

  14. Effect of mechanical stimulation by tooth brushing on oxygen tension in dog gingiva.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Hanioka, T; Ojima, M; Hori, T; Shizukuishi, S

    1994-11-01

    To determine oxygen tension (pO2) in gingival tissue, an oxygen micro-electrode with a membrane-coated Pt needle was inserted into the gingiva of 12 dogs. Teeth were brushed using a modified Bass technique for 10 s under 200 g pressure. pO2 increased and reached a maximum 15 min after brushing, then gradually returned to the baseline. A significant increase in pO2 persisted for approx. 1 h. These findings suggest that short-term stimulation by tooth brushing increases oxygen tension in the gingiva.

  15. Change Mechanisms in EMG Biofeedback Training: Cognitive Changes Underlying Improvements in Tension Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Subjects (N=43) suffering from tension headache were assigned to one of four electromyograph (EMG) biofeedback conditions and were led to believe they were achieving high or moderate success in decreasing EMG activity. Regardless of actual EMG changes, subjects receiving high-success feedback showed greater improvement for headaches than…

  16. The influence of binder film thickness on the mechanical properties of binder films in tension.

    PubMed

    Ononokpono, O E; Spring, M S

    1988-02-01

    The physicomechanical properties of films of different thicknesses, made from methylcellulose and gelatinized maize starch, have been studied in tension. There was a linear relation between film thickness and tensile strength, toughness, elastic resilence and elongation at fracture. Young's modulus increased with decreasing film thickness particularly with films with a thickness of less than 15 micron.

  17. Mechanical Analyses of Real Time Warp Yarn Tensions in Size-Free Weaving

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 100% cotton, size-less common warp was used to study the real-time tensions of single strands of the warp during weaving on a high-speed weaving machine. The machine was operated under almost mill-like conditions. In order to investigate the independent effects of the weaving speed and fabric cons...

  18. Calsyntenin-3 C-terminal fragment accumulates in dystrophic neurites surrounding aβ plaques in tg2576 mouse and Alzheimer disease brains: its neurotoxic role in mediating dystrophic neurite formation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya; Murayama, Shigeo; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Dystrophic neurites surrounding β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques precede neuronal death in Alzheimer disease. These neuritic alterations may be one of the initial stages for synaptic loss and dysfunction. However, intracellular pathways that cause local disruption of neuronal processes by Aβ remain to be fully elucidated. The identification of Aβ-induced genes that mediate neuritic pathology would provide considerable insight into the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Previously, we reported that selective up-regulation of calsyntenin-3 (Cst-3) by Aβ and accumulation of neurotoxic Cst-3 in dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques may lead to local disruption of these neurites. Like amyloid precursor protein, Cst-3 undergoes two-step proteolytic processing: the primary cleavage with α-secretase generates an N-terminal ectodomain and a C-terminal fragment (CTF). The CTF is subsequently cleaved into p3 peptide and an intracellular domain via γ-secretase. It would be interesting to know whether accumulated Cst-3 in dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques is the full-length version or a CTF. Herein, we show that the CTF but not full-length Cst-3 accumulated in dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques in Tg2576 mouse and Alzheimer disease brains. In vitro experiments with Cst-3 fragments have revealed that only the CTF resulted in acceleration of neuronal death. These results indicate that accumulation of the neurotoxic CTF in neurites surrounding Aβ plaques may lead to local disruption of neuronal processes and development of dystrophic neurites.

  19. Contribution of human skin topography to the characterization of dynamic skin tension during senescence: morpho-mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahouani, H.; Djaghloul, M.; Vargiolu, R.; Mezghani, S.; Mansori, M. E. L.

    2014-03-01

    The structuring of the dermis with a network of collagen and elastic fibres gives a three-dimensional structure to the skin network with directions perpendicular and parallel to the skin surface. This three-dimensional morphology prints on the surface of the stratum corneum a three dimensional network of lines which express the mechanical tension of the skin at rest. To evaluate the changes of skin morphology, we used a three-dimensional confocal microscopy and characterization of skin imaging of volar forearm microrelief. We have accurately characterize the role of skin line network during chronological aging with the identification of depth scales on the network of lines (z <= 60μm) and the network of lines covering Langer's lines (z > 60 microns). During aging has been highlighted lower rows for elastic fibres, the decrease weakened the tension and results in enlargement of the plates of the microrelief, which gives us a geometric pertinent indicator to quantify the loss of skin tension and assess the stage of aging. The study of 120 Caucasian women shows that ageing in the volar forearm zone results in changes in the morphology of the line network organisation. The decrease in secondary lines (z <= 60 μm) is counterbalanced by an increase in the depth of the primary lines (z > 60 μm) and an accentuation of the anisotropy index.

  20. Lignification and tension wood.

    PubMed

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  1. Mouse Acetylcholinesterase Enhances Neurite Outgrowth of Rat R28 Cells Through Interaction With Laminin-1

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Laura E.; Klaczinski, Janine; Schütz, Corina; Rudolph, Lydia; Layer, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) terminates synaptic transmission at cholinergic synapses by hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, but can also exert ‘non-classical’, morpho-regulatory effects on developing neurons such as stimulation of neurite outgrowth. Here, we investigated the role of AChE binding to laminin-1 on the regulation of neurite outgrowth by using cell culture, immunocytochemistry, and molecular biological approaches. To explore the role of AChE, we examined fiber growth of cells overexpressing different forms of AChE, and/or during their growth on laminin-1. A significant increase of neuritic growth as compared with controls was observed for neurons over-expressing AChE. Accordingly, addition of globular AChE to the medium increased total length of neurites. Co-transfection with PRIMA, a membrane anchor of AChE, led to an increase in fiber length similar to AChE overexpressing cells. Transfection with an AChE mutant that leads to the retention of AChE within cells had no stimulatory effect on neurite length. Noticeably, the longest neurites were produced by neurons overexpressing AChE and growing on laminin-1, suggesting that the AChE/laminin interaction is involved in regulating neurite outgrowth. Our findings demonstrate that binding of AChE to laminin-1 alters AChE activity and leads to increased neurite growth in culture. A possible mechanism of the AChE effect on neurite outgrowth is proposed due to the interaction of AChE with laminin-1. PMID:22570738

  2. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  3. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  4. Comparison of rheological, mechanical, electrical properties of HDPE filled with BaTiO3 with different polar surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    In this work, three types of coupling agents: isopropyl trioleic titanate (NDZ105), vinyltriethoxysilane (SG-Si151), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH550) were applied to modify the surface tension of Barium titanate (BaTiO3) particles. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra confirm the chemical adherence of coupling agents to the particle surface. The long hydrocarbon chains in NDZ105 can cover the particle surface and reduce the polar surface tension of BaTiO3 from 37.53 mJ/m2 to 7.51 mJ/m2, turning it from hydrophilic to oleophilic properties. The short and non-polar vinyl groups in SG-Si151 does not influence the surface tension of BaTiO3, but make BaTiO3 have both hydrophilic and oleophilic properties. The polar amino in KH550 can keep BaTiO3 still with hydrophilic properties. It is found that SG-Si151 modified BaTiO3 has the lowest interaction with HDPE matrix, lowering the storage modulus of HDPE composites to the greatest extent. As for mechanical properties, the polar amino groups in KH550 on BaTiO3 surface can improve the adhesion of BaTiO3 with HDPE matrix, which increases the elongation at break of HDPE composites to the greatest extent. In terms of electrical properties, the polar amino groups on surface of BaTiO3 can boost the dielectric properties of HDPE/BaTiO3 composites and decrease the volume resistivity of HDPE/BaTiO3 composites. The aim of this study is to investigate how functional groups affect the rheological, mechanical and electrical properties of HDPE composites and to select a coupling agent to produce HDPE/BaTiO3 composites with low dielectric loss, high dielectric constant and elongation at break.

  5. Characterization of BASP1-mediated neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Korshunova, Irina; Caroni, Pico; Kolkova, Kateryna; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Walmod, Peter S

    2008-08-01

    The brain acid-soluble protein BASP1 (CAP-23, NAP-22) belongs to the family of growth-associated proteins, which also includes GAP-43, a protein recently shown to regulate neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, the effects of BASP1 overexpression were investigated in PC12E2 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. BASP1 overexpression stimulated neurite outgrowth in both cell types. The effects of BASP1 and trans-homophilic NCAM interactions were additive, and BASP1-induced neurite outgrowth was not inhibited by ectopic expression of cytoplasmic NCAM domains. Furthermore, inhibition of signaling via the fibroblast growth factor receptor, Src-family nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or GSK3beta, and expression of constructs of the cytoskeletal proteins spectrin and tau inhibited NCAM- but not BASP1-induced neurite outgrowth. Expression of BASP1 mutated at the serine-5 phosphorylation site stimulated neurite outgrowth to a degree comparable to that observed in response to overexpression of wild-type BASP1, whereas expression of BASP1 mutated at the myristoylation site at glycine-1 completely abrogated the stimulatory effects of the protein on neurite outgrowth. Finally, coexpression experiments with dominant negative and wild-type versions of GAP-43 and BASP1 demonstrated that the two proteins could substitute for each other with respect to induction of NCAM-independent neurite outgrowth, whereas BASP1 was unable to replace the stimulatory effect of GAP-43 on NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth. These observations demonstrate that BASP1 and GAP-43 have overlapping, but not identical, functions in relation to neurite outgrowth and indicate that the main function of BASP1 is to regulate the organization and morphology of the plasma membrane.

  6. Prediction of plastic instabilities under thermo-mechanical loadings in tension and simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manach, P. Y.; Mansouri, L. F.; Thuillier, S.

    2016-08-01

    Plastic instabilities like Portevin-Le Châtelier were quite thoroughly investigated experimentally in tension, under a large range of strain rates and temperatures. Such instabilities are characterized both by a jerky flow and a localization of the strain in bands. Similar phenomena were also recorded for example in simple shear [1]. Modelling of this phenomenon is mainly performed at room temperature, taking into account the strain rate sensitivity, though an extension of the classical Estrin-Kubin-McCormick was proposed in the literature, by making some of the material parameters dependent on temperature. A similar approach is considered in this study, furthermore extended for anisotropic plasticity with Hill's 1948 yield criterion. Material parameters are identified at 4 different temperatures, ranging from room temperature up to 250°C. The identification procedure is split in 3 steps, related to the elasticity, the average stress level and the magnitude of the stress drops. The anisotropy is considered constant in this temperature range, as evidenced by experimental results [2]. The model is then used to investigate the temperature dependence of the critical strain, as well as its capability to represent the propagation of the bands. Numerical predictions of the instabilities in tension and simple shear at room temperature and up to 250°C are compared with experimental results [3]. In the case of simple shear, a monotonic loading followed by unloading and reloading in the reverse direction (“Bauschinger-type” test) is also considered, showing that (i) kinematic hardening should be taken into account to fully describe the transition at re-yielding (ii) the modelling of the critical strain has to be improved.

  7. A dynamical approach toward understanding mechanisms of team science: change, kinship, tension, and heritage in a transdisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R

    2013-08-01

    Since the concept of team science gained recognition among biomedical researchers, social scientists have been challenged with investigating evidence of team mechanisms and functional dynamics within transdisciplinary teams. Identification of these mechanisms has lacked substantial research using grounded theory models to adequately describe their dynamical qualities. Research trends continue to favor the measurement of teams by isolating occurrences of production over relational mechanistic team tendencies. This study uses a social constructionist-grounded multilevel mixed methods approach to identify social dynamics and mechanisms within a transdisciplinary team. A National Institutes of Health-funded research team served as a sample. Data from observations, interviews, and focus groups were qualitatively coded to generate micro/meso level analyses. Social mechanisms operative within this biomedical scientific team were identified. Dynamics that support such mechanisms were documented and explored. Through theoretical and emergent coding, four social mechanisms dominated in the analysis-change, kinship, tension, and heritage. Each contains relational social dynamics. This micro/meso level study suggests such mechanisms and dynamics are key features of team science and as such can inform problems of integration, praxis, and engagement in teams.

  8. Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the passive mechanical properties of infarcted tissue at different healing stages is essential to explore the emerging biomaterial injection-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). Although rats have been widely used as animal models in such investigations, the data in literature that quantify the passive mechanical properties of rat heart infarcts is very limited. MI was induced in rats and hearts were harvested immediately (0 day), 7, 14 and 28 days after infarction onset. Left ventricle anterioapical samples were cut and underwent equibiaxial and non equibiaxial tension followed by uniaxial compression mechanical tests. Histological analysis was conducted to confirm MI and to quantify the size of the induced infarcts. Infarcts maintained anisotropy and the nonlinear biaxial and compressive mechanical behaviour throughout the healing phases with the circumferential direction being stiffer than the longitudinal direction. Mechanical coupling was observed between the two axes in all infarct groups. The 0, 7, 14 and 28 days infarcts showed 438, 693, 1048 and 1218kPa circumferential tensile moduli. The 28 day infarct group showed a significantly higher compressive modulus compared to the other infarct groups (p=0.0060, 0.0293, and 0.0268 for 0, 7 and 14 days groups). Collagen fibres were found to align in a preferred direction for all infarct groups supporting the observed mechanical anisotropy. The presented data are useful for developing material models for healing infarcts and for setting a baseline for future assessment of emerging mechanical-based MI therapies.

  9. Quantitative analysis of surface tension of liquid nano-film with thickness: Two stage stability mechanism, molecular dynamics and thermodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Li, Qibin; Chen, Jie; Gao, Xuechao

    2016-11-01

    The effects of thickness on surface tension of aqueous nano-films under the same lateral size were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The surface tension was found to decrease with decreasing thickness when film thickness is below 1.5 nm. Between 4 and 1.5 nm, the trend is for the surface tension to decrease but this is not as significant as between 1.5 and 1.2 nm. For the surface tension of salt nano-films, with low temperatures resulting in monotonous decreasing with thickness, while high temperature (e.g. 479 K) exhibited a first increase then decrease for surface tension with thickness. Filippini et al. (2014) suggested that surface tension is constant with the thickness as long as the sheet remains in one piece, also the decrease observed and as proposed by Werth et al. (2013) is not due to a confinement effect on Lennard-Jones systems. However, in this study for aqueous nano-films, a two stage mechanism was proposed to interpret this effect, for which the stability was classified according to thickness range and validated by disjoining pressure. The results are important in describing the role of surface tension in determining the behaviour of disjoining pressure.

  10. Tension-induced tunable corrugation in bio-inspired two-phase soft composite materials: mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, Ahmed; Chen, Qianli

    We numerically investigate the elastic deformation response of a two-phase bio-inspired soft composite material under externally applied concentric tension using the finite element method. We show that by carefully designing the inclusion pattern it is possible to induce corrugations normal to the direction of stretch. By stacking 1D composite fibers to form 2D membranes, these corrugations collectively lead to the formation of membrane channels with shapes and sizes that are tunable by the level of stretch. Furthermore, we show that by using specific inclusion patterns in laminated plates, it is possible to create pop-ups and troughs enabling the development of complex 3D geometries from planar construction. We have found that the corrugation amplitude increases with the stiffness of inclusion and its eccentricity from the tension axis. We discuss the mechanisms leading to the development of corrugations as well as its different implications. We discuss applications for this design in a variety of fields including tunable band gap formation, surface roughness controllability, auxetic materials and toughness enhancement via programmable evolving geometrical effects..

  11. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  12. Design of an adaptive-passive dynamic vibration absorber composed of a string-mass system equipped with negative stiffness tension adjusting mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, M. A.; Yilmaz, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a new adaptive-passive dynamic vibration absorber design is discussed. The proposed design is composed of a string under variable tension with a central mass attachment as an undamped dynamic vibration absorber (DVA), a negative stiffness mechanism as a string tension adjustment aid and a tuning controller to make it adaptive. The dependency of the natural frequencies of this system on the string tension is determined analytically and verified using the finite element method. It is analytically shown that with the help of a negative stiffness element, the tuning force requirement is almost zero throughout the whole operation range. A string tension adjustment algorithm is proposed, which tunes the DVA system depending on the magnitude and frequency of the most dominant component of the vibration signal. Finally, a prototype of the system is built and a series of experiments are conducted on the prototype that validate the analytical and numerical calculations.

  13. Mechanical and structural contribution of non-fibrillar matrix in uniaxial tension: a collagen-agarose co-gel model.

    PubMed

    Lake, Spencer P; Barocas, Victor H

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical role of non-fibrillar matrix and the nature of its interaction with the collagen network in soft tissues remain poorly understood, in part because of the lack of a simple experimental model system to quantify these interactions. This study's objective was to examine mechanical and structural properties of collagen-agarose co-gels, utilized as a simplified model system, to understand better the relationships between the collagen network and non-fibrillar matrix. We hypothesized that the presence of agarose would have a pronounced effect on microstructural reorganization and mechanical behavior. Samples fabricated from gel solutions containing 1.0 mg/mL collagen and 0, 0.125, or 0.25% w/v agarose were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy, incremental tensile stress-relaxation tests, and polarized light imaging. While the incorporation of agarose did not dramatically alter collagen network morphology, agarose led to concentration-dependent changes in mechanical and structural properties. Specifically, resistance of co-gels to volume change corresponded with differences in fiber reorientation and elastic/viscoelastic mechanics. Results demonstrate strong relationships between tissue properties and offer insight into behavior of tissues of varying Poisson's ratio and fiber kinematics. Results also suggest that non-fibrillar material may have significant effects on properties of artificial and native tissues even in tension, which is generally assumed to be collagen dominated.

  14. CB1 cannabinoid receptor-mediated neurite remodeling in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Song, Z H

    2001-08-15

    The morphological remodeling of neuronal cells influences neurogenesis and brain functions. We hypothesize that psychoactive and neurotoxic effects of cannabinoids may be mediated, at least in part, by their morphoregulatory activities. In the present study, mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were used as an in vitro model to investigate cannabinoid-induced neurite remodeling effects and to identify the involvement of cannabinoid receptors in this neurite remodeling process. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence microscopy, the endogenously expressed CB1, but not CB2, cannabinoid receptors were detected in morphologically differentiated N1E-115 cells. Activation of these natively expressed CB1 cannabinoid receptors by cannabinoid agonist HU-210 led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. Importantly, HU-210 treatment induced neurite retraction in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of N1E-115 cells with a CB1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) suppressed HU-210-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, indicating that the knocking down of functional CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression was achieved. Antisense ODN pretreatment also abolished HU-210-induced neurite retraction, demonstrating the involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in mediating the neurite remodeling effects of HU-210. In addition, reversing HU-210-induced intracellular cAMP declination by 8-Br-cAMP partially prevented HU-210-induced neurite retraction, indicating the involvement of cAMP-dependent signaling pathways in mediating the neurite remodeling function of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in N1E-115 cells. These data demonstrate that neurite remodeling is a newly discovered function of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. This morphoregulatory function of CB1 cannabinoid receptors might be a new mechanism that mediates the psychoactive and neurotoxic effects of cannabinoids in developing and adult brain.

  15. Design of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels to Promote Neurite Outgrowth in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Dominte; Hamard, Lauriane; Caraguel, Flavien; Wion, Didier; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2016-09-28

    A hyaluronic acid (HA)-based extracellular matrix (ECM) platform with independently tunable stiffness and density of cell-adhesive peptide (RGD, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) that mimics key biochemical and mechanical features of brain matrix has been designed. We demonstrated here its utility in elucidating ECM regulation of neural progenitor cell behavior and neurite outgrowth. The analysis of neurite outgrowth in 3-D by two-photon microscopy showed several important results in the development of these hydrogels. First, the ability of neurites to extend deeply into these soft HA-based matrices even in the absence of cell-adhesive ligand further confirms the potential of HA hydrogels for central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Second, the behavior of hippocampal neural progenitor cells differed markedly between the hydrogels with a storage modulus of 400 Pa and those with a modulus of 800 Pa. We observed an increased outgrowth and density of neurites in the softest hydrogels (G' = 400 Pa). Interestingly, cells seeded on the surface of the hydrogels functionalized with the RGD ligand experienced an optimum in neurite outgrowth as a function of ligand density. Surprinsingly, neurites preferentially progressed inside the gels in a vertical direction, suggesting that outgrowth is directed by the hydrogel structure. This work may provide design principles for the development of hydrogels to facilitate neuronal regeneration in the adult brain.

  16. SRRM4-dependent neuron-specific alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts regulates neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takafumi; Shirane, Michiko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing gives rise to diversity of the proteome, and it is especially prevalent in the mammalian nervous system. Indeed, many factors that control the splicing process govern nervous system development. Among such factors, SRRM4 is an important regulator of aspects of neural differentiation including neurite outgrowth. The mechanism by which SRRM4 regulates neurite outgrowth has remained poorly understood, however. We now show that SRRM4 regulates the splicing of protrudin gene (Zfyve27) transcripts in neuronal cells. SRRM4 was found to promote splicing of protrudin pre-mRNA so as to include a microexon (exon L) encoding seven amino acids in a neuron-specific manner. The resulting protein (protrudin-L) promotes neurite outgrowth during neurogenesis. Depletion of SRRM4 in Neuro2A cells impaired inclusion of exon L in protrudin mRNA, resulting in the generation of a shorter protein isoform (protrudin-S) that is less effective at promoting neurite extension. SRRM4 was found to recognize a UGC motif that is located immediately upstream of exon L and is necessary for inclusion of exon L in the mature transcript. Deletion of exon L in Neuro2A or embryonic stem cells inhibited neurite outgrowth. Our results suggest that SRRM4 controls neurite outgrowth through regulation of alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts. PMID:28106138

  17. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  18. Pullout problem and fracture mechanism of quasi-brittle material reinforced with discontinous aligned fibers subjected to uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng-Jang

    The objective of this research is to characterize the postpeak pseudo strain-hardening behavior of the discontinuous aligned fiber composites subjected to uniaxial tension. In order to fully understand the fiber axial force-debonding relationship, fiber pullout problem was first investigated. Unlike most models this theory assumes a triangularly distributed interface shear stress. Besides, R-curve approach was adopted to evaluate the maximum pullout load. In quasi-brittle materials when the value of energy release rate G increases with the applied load, the value of crack resistance R also increases. As a result, the equality of G and R can only serve as the necessary condition for crack propagation. In order to further distinguish stable and unstable crack propagation, a second condition must be included. Namely, the first derivatives of G and R must also equal to each other for the onset of unstable crack propagation. The applied load corresponding to this status is assumed to be the maximum pullout load the fiber can sustain. The corresponding debond length is referred to critical debond length ldc. It was found that ldc increases with embedment length le. This model reproduced the experimental results pretty well. The same concept of R-curve was adopted to investigate the fracture mechanism of the uniaxial tension problem. While determining strain energy of the fiber reinforced composite, equivalent inclusion method and Mori-Tanaka theory was utilized. Again, whenever the above two conditions are satisfied simultaneously, unstable crack propagation initiates. However, are the fibers being pulled out or is there another unstable crack propagation? The comparison of the force sustained by all the fibers in the entire cross section with its allowable value sets the criterion. Besides, unlike most models, this model takes account of the impact of fiber distribution. Thus a model distinguishing single cracking from multiple cracking fracture mechanism has been

  19. Can hippocampal neurites and growth cones climb over obstacles?

    PubMed

    Lien, Thuy Linh; Ban, Jelena; Tormen, Massimo; Migliorini, Elisa; Grenci, Gianluca; Pozzato, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Guidance molecules, such as Sema3A or Netrin-1, can induce growth cone (GC) repulsion or attraction in the presence of a flat surface, but very little is known of the action of guidance molecules in the presence of obstacles. Therefore we combined chemical and mechanical cues by applying a steady Netrin-1 stream to the GCs of dissociated hippocampal neurons plated on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces patterned with lines 2 µm wide, with 4 µm period and with a height varying from 100 to 600 nm. GC turning experiments performed 24 hours after plating showed that filopodia crawl over these lines within minutes. These filopodia do not show staining for the adhesion marker Paxillin. GCs and neurites crawl over lines 100 nm high, but less frequently and on a longer time scale over lines higher than 300 nm; neurites never crawl over lines 600 nm high. When neurons are grown for 3 days over patterned surfaces, also neurites can cross lines 300 nm and 600 nm high, grow parallel to and on top of these lines and express Paxillin. Axons - selectively stained with SMI 312 - do not differ from dendrites in their ability to cross these lines. Our results show that highly motile structures such as filopodia climb over high obstacle in response to chemical cues, but larger neuronal structures are less prompt and require hours or days to climb similar obstacles.

  20. Fracture Mechanics of Thin, Cracked Plates Under Tension, Bending and Out-of-Plane Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehnder, Alan T.; Hui, C. Y.; Potdar, Yogesh; Zucchini, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Cracks in the skin of aircraft fuselages or other shell structures can be subjected to very complex stress states, resulting in mixed-mode fracture conditions. For example, a crack running along a stringer in a pressurized fuselage will be subject to the usual in-plane tension stresses (Mode-I) along with out-of-plane tearing stresses (Mode-III like). Crack growth and initiation in this case is correlated not only with the tensile or Mode-I stress intensity factor, K(sub I), but depends on a combination of parameters and on the history of crack growth. The stresses at the tip of a crack in a plate or shell are typically described in terms of either the small deflection Kirchhoff plate theory. However, real applications involve large deflections. We show, using the von-Karman theory, that the crack tip stress field derived on the basis of the small deflection theory is still valid for large deflections. We then give examples demonstrating the exact calculation of energy release rates and stress intensity factors for cracked plates loaded to large deflections. The crack tip fields calculated using the plate theories are an approximation to the actual three dimensional fields. Using three dimensional finite element analyses we have explored the relationship between the three dimensional elasticity theory and two dimensional plate theory results. The results show that for out-of-plane shear loading the three dimensional and Kirchhoff theory results coincide at distance greater than h/2 from the crack tip, where h/2 is the plate thickness. Inside this region, the distribution of stresses through the thickness can be very different from the plate theory predictions. We have also explored how the energy release rate varies as a function of crack length to plate thickness using the different theories. This is important in the implementation of fracture prediction methods using finite element analysis. Our experiments show that under certain conditions, during fatigue crack

  1. Mechanical Characterization of Immature Porcine Brainstem in Tension at Dynamic Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Yin, Zhiyong; Li, Kui; Liao, Zhikang; Xiang, Hongyi; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Many brain injury cases involve pediatric road traffic accidents, and among these, brainstem injury causes disastrous outcomes. A thorough understanding of the tensile characterization of immature brainstem tissue is crucial in modeling traumatic brain injury sustained by children, but limited experimental data in tension is available for the immature brain tissue at dynamic strain rates. Material/Methods We harvested brainstem tissue from immature pigs (about 4 weeks old, and at a developmental stage similar to that of human toddlers) as a byproduct from a local slaughter house and very carefully prepared the samples. Tensile tests were performed on specimens at dynamic strain rates of 2/s, 20/s, and 100/s using a biological material instrument. The constitutive models, Fung, Ogden, Gent, and exponential function, for immature brainstem tissue material property were developed for the recorded experimental data using OriginPro® 8.0 software. The t test was performed for infinitesimal shear modules. Results The curves of stress-versus-stretch ratio were convex in shape, and inflection points were found in all the test groups at the strain of about 2.5%. The average Lagrange stress of the immature brainstem specimen at the 30% strain at the strain rates of 2, 20, and 100/s was 273±114, 515±107, and 1121±197 Pa, respectively. The adjusted R-Square (R2) of Fung, Ogden, Gent, and exponential model was 0.820≤R2≤0.933, 0.774≤R2≤0.940, 0.650≤R2≤0.922, and 0.852≤R2≤0.981, respectively. The infinitesimal shear modulus of the strain energy functions showed a significant association with the strain rate (p<0.01). Conclusions The immature brainstem is a rate-dependent material in dynamic tensile tests, and the tissue becomes stiffer with increased strain rate. The reported results may be useful in the study of brain injuries in children who sustain injuries in road traffic accidents. Further research in more detail should be performed in the

  2. Contact force and mechanical loss of multistage cable under tension and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Yanyun; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical model for calculating the stress and strain states of cabling structures with different loadings has been developed in this paper. We solve the problem for the first- and second-stage cable with tensile or bending strain. The contact and friction forces between the strands are presented by two-dimensional contact model. Several theoretical models have been proposed to verify the results when the triplet subjected to the tensile strain, including contact force, contact stresses, and mechanical loss. It is found that loadings will affect the friction force and the mechanical loss of the triplet. The results show that the contact force and mechanical loss are dependent on the twist pitch. A shorter twist pitch can lead to higher contact force, while the trend of mechanical loss with twist pitch is complicated. The mechanical loss may be reduced by adjusting the twist pitch reasonably. The present model provides a simple analysis method to investigate the mechanical behaviors in multistage-structures under different loads.

  3. PROGRESSIVE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE IN TENSION FOR TWO AGE GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Roy, Anuradha; Reyes, Michael J.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of bone for post-yield energy dissipation decreases with age. To gain information on the cause of such changes, we examined the mechanical behavior of human cadaveric bone as a function of progressive deformation. In this study, tensile specimens from tibiae of 9 middle aged and 8 elderly donors were loaded till failure in an incremental and cyclic (load-dwell-unload-dwell-reload) scheme. The elastic modulus, maximum stress, permanent strain, stress relaxation, viscoelastic time constant, plastic strain energy, elastic release strain energy, and hysteresis energy were determined at incremental strains of each loading cycle. Experimental results showed that elderly bone failed at much lower strains compared to middle aged bone, but little age-related differences were observed in the mechanical behavior of bone until the premature failure of elderly bone. Energy dissipation and permanent strain appeared to linearly increase with increasing strain, while non-linear changes occurred in the modulus loss and stress relaxation/time constant with increasing strain. Such changes suggest that two distinct stages may exist in the progressive deformation of bone. In Stage I, rapid damage accumulation and increased involvement of collagen in load bearing appeared to dominate the mechanical behavior of bone with limited energy dissipation (<20% of total energy dissipated), whereas Stage II is dominated by continuous plastic deformation, accompanied by major energy dissipation through all three pathways till failure. This study suggests that damaging mechanisms in bone vary with deformation and age affects the post-yield mechanisms causing a significant decline in the capacity of aged bone to dissipate energy. PMID:18437693

  4. Mechanics of Composite Materials with Different Moduli in Tension and Compression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    Dynamics, and Materials Conference, Bethesda, Maryland, 3-5 April 1978, by Robert M. Jones and Jose C . F. Henneman . To appear in AIAA Journal. (24) "Biaxial...Canada, 16-20 April 1978, by Robert M. Jones and Jose C . F. Henneman . (25) "Analysis of Nonlinear Deformation Behavior of Laminated Fiber- Reinforced...CIVIL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPA~I, T SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE C .2 _SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVEfttr DALLAS, TEXAS 75275 /FINAL

  5. Mechanical Properties of Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Roberto; Pullarkat, Pramod A.; Melo, Francisco

    2007-07-01

    The mechanical response of PC12 neurites under tension is investigated using a microneedle technique. Elastic response, viscoelastic relaxation, and active contraction are observed. The mechanical model proposed by Dennerll et al. [J. Cell Biol. 109, 3073 (1989).JCLBA30021-952510.1083/jcb.109.6.3073], which involves three mechanical devices—a stiff spring κ coupled with a Voigt element that includes a less stiff spring k and a dashpot γ—has been improved by adding a new element to describe the main features of the contraction of axons. This element, which represents the action of molecular motors, acts in parallel with viscous forces defining a global tension response of axons T against elongation rates δ˙k. Under certain conditions, axons show a transition from a viscoelastic elongation to active contraction, suggesting the presence of a negative elongation rate sensitivity in the curve T vs δ˙k.

  6. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  7. Echinococcal tension pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Farhan; Al-Omeri, Muayyad M.

    1969-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is rarely mentioned among the causes of pneumothorax in text-books or monographs, especially those written in English. Five examples of tension pneumothorax secondary to ruptured hydatid cyst of the lung are reported: the mechanism of this tension effect and helpful diagnostic points are discussed. We think that surgical correction is the only satisfactory treatment of tension pneumothorax due to ruptured hydatid cyst: surgery is advocated in any suspected cyst as soon as it is discovered so as to avoid any such serious complication. Images PMID:5348321

  8. chemo-mechanical coupling in water unsaturated domains: capillary tension and crystallization pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulin, Claudie; Mercury, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    Unsaturated zones are widely present in natural systems, such as soils, deep aquifers and building stones under wetting-drying cycles. Such porous media contains the three phases liquid, gas and solid and present specific physico-chemical processes or properties - as soluble salts precipitation or capillary water properties rise - have important impact on environmental issues since they are coupled with mechanical effects. The driving force of both phase transitions and capillarization is the decreasing relative humidity below the saturated value in the atmospheric air contacting the unsaturated materials. - Decreasing relative humidity leads to evaporation, creating local supersaturation and then driving crystallization. According to the usual theory of crystallization pressure, a confined growing crystal can exert a constraint against the pore wall, leading to its rupture if it exceeds the tensile strength of the pore material. This coupled chemo-mechanical process requires a nano-scale film of solution to hold between the crystal and the pore, which allows the solutes to diffuse and the solution not to precipitate despite increasing supersaturation. The repulsive effect between growing and host solids, ultimately increases the local pressure and may induce the host rupture - Capillarity has a large occurrence in unsaturated porous media and depends on pore radius and relative humidity of air. The capillary state makes the internal pressure of capillary water can drop down to negative values, meaning it is under tensile state and potentially exert traction on pore wall. These effects of chemo-mechanical coupling are observed using an experimental approach on three simplified natural analogues: porous membrane, borosilicate microcapillaries, and synthetic fluid inclusions. In the two former samples, sodium sulfates precipitates are induced through wetting-drying cycles and the role of both the capillarity and the crystallization pressure are observed. In the

  9. On the mechanical behavior of WS2 nanotubes under axial tension and compression.

    PubMed

    Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Cohen, Sidney R; Gartsman, Konstantin; Ivanovskaya, Viktoria; Heine, Thomas; Seifert, Gotthard; Wiesel, Inna; Wagner, H Daniel; Tenne, Reshef

    2006-01-17

    The mechanical properties of materials and particularly the strength are greatly affected by the presence of defects; therefore, the theoretical strength ( approximately 10% of the Young's modulus) is not generally achievable for macroscopic objects. On the contrary, nanotubes, which are almost defect-free, should achieve the theoretical strength that would be reflected in superior mechanical properties. In this study, both tensile tests and buckling experiments of individual WS(2) nanotubes were carried out in a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. Tensile tests of MoS(2) nanotubes were simulated by means of a density-functional tight-binding-based molecular dynamics scheme as well. The combination of these studies provides a microscopic picture of the nature of the fracture process, giving insight to the strength and flexibility of the WS(2) nanotubes (tensile strength of approximately 16 GPa). Fracture analysis with recently proposed models indicates that the strength of such nanotubes is governed by a small number of defects. A fraction of the nanotubes attained the theoretical strength indicating absence of defects.

  10. Tension Strength, Failure Prediction and Damage Mechanisms in 2D Triaxial Braided Composites with Notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Anglin, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unnotched and notched (open hole) tensile strength and failure mechanisms of two-dimensional (2D) triaxial braided composites were examined. The effect of notch size and notch position were investigated. Damage initiation and propagation in notched and unnotched coupons were also examined. Theory developed to predict the normal stress distribution near an open hole and failure for tape laminated composites was evaluated for its applicability to 2D triaxial braided textile composite materials. Four different fiber architectures were considered; braid angle, yarn and braider size, percentage of longitudinal yarns and braider angle varied. Tape laminates equivalent to textile composites were also constructed for comparison. Unnotched tape equivalents were stronger than braided textiles but exhibited greater notch sensitivity. Notched textiles and tape equivalents have roughly the same strength at large notch sizes. Two common damage mechanisms were found: braider yarn cracking and near notch longitudinal yarn splitting. Cracking was found to initiate in braider yarns in unnotched and notched coupons, and propagate in the direction of the braider yarns until failure. Damage initiation stress decreased with increasing braid angle. No significant differences in prediction of near notch strain between textile and tape equivalents could be detected for small braid angle, but the correlations were weak for textiles with large braid angle. Notch strength could not be predicted using existing anisotropic theory for braided textiles due to their insensitivity to notch.

  11. Flow in porous media, phase and ultralow interfacial tensions: Mechanisms of enhanced petroleum recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1991-07-01

    A major program of university research, longer-ranged and more fundamental in approach than industrial research, into basic mechanisms of enhancing petroleum recovery and into underlying physics, chemistry, geology, applied mathematics, computation, and engineering science has been built at Minnesota. The original focus was surfactant-based chemical flooding, but the approach taken was sufficiently fundamental that the research, longer-ranged than industrial efforts, has become quite multidirectional. Topics discussed are volume controlled porosimetry; fluid distribution and transport in porous media at low wetting phase saturation; molecular dynamics of fluids in ultranarrow pores; molecular dynamics and molecular theory of wetting and adsorption; new numerical methods to handle initial and boundary conditions in immiscible displacement; electron microscopy of surfactant fluid microstructure; low cost system for animating liquid crystallites viewed with polarized light; surfaces of constant mean curvature with prescribed contact angle.

  12. A Reduced Order Model of Force Displacement Curves for the Failure of Mechanical Bolts in Tension.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Keegan J.; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2015-12-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry causes issues when generating a mesh of the model. This report will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  13. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  14. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  15. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial-neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, a most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. PMID:24342266

  16. Mechanisms and Modeling of Bake-Hardening Steels: Part I. Uniaxial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarin, V.; Soler, M.; Perlade, A.; Lemoine, X.; Forest, S.

    2009-06-01

    A physically based model for bake-hardening (BH) steels is developed suitable to predict the BH as well as the macroscopic behavior of strain-aged steels in tensile tests, such as the lower yield stress and the yield point elongation or Lüders strain. A description of the strain aging kinetics is given by considering two aging steps: Cottrell atmospheres formation and precipitation of coherent carbides. The modeling includes the effect of solute carbon content, aging time, temperature, and prestrain. Then, a numerical approach of Lüders phenomenon using finite element (FE) method codes is conducted. The strain aging model is eventually coupled with the previous numerical study thanks to a local mechanical behavior that schematically describes the local dislocation behavior. Simulations of tensile tests are performed and agree well with experiments carried out on aluminum-killed (AlK) and ULC BH steels, in terms of lower yield stress and yield point elongation. Effects of aging treatment, grain size, and strain rate on the macroscopic behavior are particularly enlightened.

  17. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  18. The Influence of Short-Chain Alcohols on Interfacial Tension, Mechanical Properties, Area/Molecule, and Permeability of Fluid Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Hung V.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2004-01-01

    We used micropipette aspiration to directly measure the area compressibility modulus, bending modulus, lysis tension, lysis strain, and area expansion of fluid phase 1-stearoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) lipid bilayers exposed to aqueous solutions of short-chain alcohols at alcohol concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 9.8 M. The order of effectiveness in decreasing mechanical properties and increasing area per molecule was butanol>propanol>ethanol>methanol, although the lysis strain was invariant to alcohol chain-length. Quantitatively, the trend in area compressibility modulus follows Traube's rule of interfacial tension reduction, i.e., for each additional alcohol CH2 group, the concentration required to reach the same area compressibility modulus was reduced roughly by a factor of 3. We convert our area compressibility data into interfacial tension values to: confirm that Traube's rule is followed for bilayers; show that alcohols decrease the interfacial tension of bilayer-water interfaces less effectively than oil-water interfaces; determine the partition coefficients and standard Gibbs adsorption energy per CH2 group for adsorption of alcohol into the lipid headgroup region; and predict the increase in area per headgroup as well as the critical radius and line tension of a membrane pore for each concentration and chain-length of alcohol. The area expansion predictions were confirmed by direct measurements of the area expansion of vesicles exposed to flowing alcohol solutions. These measurements were fitted to a membrane kinetic model to find membrane permeability coefficients of short-chain alcohols. Taken together, the evidence presented here supports a view that alcohol partitioning into the bilayer headgroup region, with enhanced partitioning as the chain-length of the alcohol increases, results in chain-length-dependent interfacial tension reduction with concomitant chain-length-dependent reduction in mechanical moduli and membrane thickness. PMID

  19. Synergistic Effects of 3D ECM and Chemogradients on Neurite Outgrowth and Guidance: A Simple Modeling and Microfluidic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2014-01-01

    During nervous system development, numerous cues within the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) guide the growing neurites along specific pathways to reach their intended targets. Neurite motility is controlled by extracellular signal sensing through the growth cone at the neurite tip, including chemoattractive and repulsive cues. However, it is difficult to regenerate and restore neurite tracts, lost or degraded due to an injury or disease, in the adult central nervous system. Thus, it is important to evaluate the dynamic interplay between ECM and the concentration gradients of these cues, which would elicit robust neuritogenesis. Such information is critical in understanding the processes involved in developmental biology, and in developing high-fidelity neurite regenerative strategies post-injury, and in drug discovery and targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we quantitatively investigated this relationship using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, and determined the synergistic role of guidance cues and ECM on neurite outgrowth and turning. Using a biomimetic microfluidic system, we have shown that cortical neurite outgrowth and turning under chemogradients (IGF-1 or BDNF) within 3D scaffolds is highly regulated by the source concentration of the guidance cue and the physical characteristics of the scaffold. A mechanistic-driven partial differential equation model of neurite outgrowth has been proposed, which could also be used prospectively as a predictive tool. The parameters for the chemotaxis term in the model are determined from the experimental data using our microfluidic assay. Resulting model simulations demonstrate how neurite outgrowth was critically influenced by the experimental variables, which was further supported by experimental data on cell-surface-receptor expressions. The model results are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This integrated approach represents a

  20. Differential intensity-dependent effects of magnetic stimulation on the longest neurites and shorter dendrites in neuroscreen-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Whitney J.; Li, Kevin; Swanson, Roy; Cheung, Brian; Lin, Vernon W.; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Magnetic stimulation (MS) is a potential treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether MS-regulated neuronal activity can translate to specific changes in neuronal arborization and thus regulate synaptic activity and function. Approach. To test our hypotheses, we examined the effects of MS on neurite growth of neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells over the pulse frequencies of 1, 5 and 10 Hz at field intensities controlled via machine output (MO). Cells were treated with either 30% or 40% MO. Due to the nature of circular MS coils, the center region of the gridded coverslip (zone 1) received minimal (∼5%) electromagnetic current density while the remaining area (zone 2) received maximal (∼95%) current density. Plated NS-1 cells were exposed to MS twice per day for three days and then evaluated for length and number of neurites and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Main results. We show that MS dramatically affects the growth of the longest neurites (axon-like) but does not significantly affect the growth of shorter neurites (dendrite-like). Also, MS-induced changes in the longest neurite growth were most evident in zone 1, but not in zone 2. MS effects were intensity-dependent and were most evident in bolstering longest neurite outgrowth, best seen in the 10 Hz MS group. Furthermore, we found that MS-increased BDNF expression and secretion was also frequency-dependent. Taken together, our results show that MS exerts distinct effects when different frequencies and intensities are applied to the neuritic compartments (longest neurite versus shorter dendrite(s)) of NS-1 cells. Significance. These findings support the concept that MS increases BDNF expression and signaling, which sculpts longest neurite arborization and connectivity by which neuronal activity is regulated. Understanding the mechanisms underlying MS is crucial for efficiently incorporating its use into potential therapeutic strategies.

  1. Polyester with Pendent Acetylcholine-Mimicking Functionalities Promotes Neurite Growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaofei; Jeffries, Eric; Gao, Jin; Sun, Lijie; You, Zhengwei; Wang, Yadong

    2016-04-20

    Successful regeneration of nerves can benefit from biomaterials that provide a supportive biochemical and mechanical environment while also degrading with controlled inflammation and minimal scar formation. Herein, we report a neuroactive polymer functionalized by covalent attachment of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (Ach). The polymer was readily synthesized in two steps from poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD), which previously demonstrated biocompatibility and biodegradation in vivo. Distinct from prior acetylcholine-biomimetic polymers, PSeD-Ach contains both quaternary ammonium and free acetyl moieties, closely resembling native acetylcholine structure. The polymer structure was confirmed via (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Hydrophilicity, charge, and thermal properties of PSeD-Ach were determined by tensiometer, zetasizer, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. PC12 cells exhibited the greatest proliferation and neurite outgrowth on PSeD-Ach and laminin substrates, with no significant difference between these groups. PSeD-Ach yielded much longer neurite outgrowth than the control polymer containing ammonium but no the acetyl group, confirming the importance of the entire acetylcholine-like moiety. Furthermore, PSeD-Ach supports adhesion of primary rat dorsal root ganglions and subsequent neurite sprouting and extension. The sprouting rate is comparable to the best conditions from previous report. Our findings are significant in that they were obtained with acetylcholine-like functionalities in 100% repeating units, a condition shown to yield significant toxicity in prior publications. Moreover, PSeD-Ach exhibited favorable mechanical and degradation properties for nerve tissue engineering application. Humidified PSeD-Ach had an elastic modulus of 76.9 kPa, close to native neural tissue, and could well recover from cyclic dynamic compression. PSeD-Ach showed a gradual in

  2. Acetylcholinesterase modulates neurite outgrowth on fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Giordano, C; Poiana, G; Augusti-Tocco, G; Biagioni, S

    2007-05-04

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been reported to be involved in the modulation of neurite outgrowth. To understand the role played by different domains, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with three constructs containing the invariant region of AChE, differing in the exon encoding the C-terminus and therefore in AChE cellular fate and localization. All isoforms increased neurite extension, suggesting the involvement of the invariant domain [A. De Jaco, G. Augusti-Tocco, S. Biagioni, Alternative AChE molecular forms exhibit similar ability to induce neurite outgrowth, J. Neurosci. Res. 70 (2002) 756-765]. The peripheral anionic site (PAS) is encoded by invariant exons and represents the domain involved in non-cholinergic functions of AChE. Masking of PAS with fasciculin results in a significant decrease of neurite outgrowth in all clones overexpressing AChE. A strong reduction was also observed when clones were cultured on fibronectin. Treatment of clones with fasciculin, therefore masking PAS, abolished the fibronectin-induced reduction. The inhibition of the catalytic site cannot revert the fibronectin effect. Finally, when clones were cultured on fibronectin in the presence of heparin, a ligand of fibronectin, the inhibitory effect was completely reversed. Our results indicate that PAS could directly or indirectly mediate AChE/fibronectin interactions.

  3. NIF (neurite-inducing factor): a novel peptide inducing neurite formation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J A

    1986-01-01

    Neurite-inducing factor (NIF) is a novel protein that has been partially purified from mouse submaxillary glands. NIF induces neurite formation in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and the NIF-induced neurites are indistinguishable from NGF-induced neurites in both their morphology and the time course of their formation. Neurite-inducing activity can be recovered at a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 20,000 Da after fractionation of partially purified preparations via SDS-PAGE. Partially purified preparations of NIF are about half as potent as pure beta NGF, and since the neurite-inducing activity does not correspond to any of the major proteins in this fraction, specific activity of purified NIF will probably be significantly greater than the 60 ng/ml found for our partially purified material. NIF is distinct from beta NGF by four criteria: (1) antibodies to beta NGF can block the activity of beta NGF, but not the activity of NIF; (2) beta NGF can induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in PC12 cells at concentrations significantly below those required to induce neurites, while NIF induces ODC only at concentrations greatly in excess of those required to induce neurite formation; (3) by the criterion of SDS-PAGE, there is insufficient beta NGF in our partially purified preparations of NIF to explain the biological activity of this fraction; and (4) the biological activity of NIF has a molecular weight (20,000 Da) that is distinct from beta NGF (13,000 Da). We conclude that NIF is probably a novel peptide that is very active in promoting morphological differentiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Neurite outgrowth inhibitors in gliotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sampedro, M

    1999-01-01

    Gliotic tissue is the major obstacle to axon regeneration after CNS injury. We designed tissue culture assays to search for molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth inhibition in gliotic tissue. All the inhibitory activity in injured brain tissue was located in a plasma membrane heparan-sulphate and condroitin-sulphate type-proteoglycan of apparent molecular weight 200 kDalton. The proteoglycan core protein (apparent MW 48,000 kD) was biologically inactive, whereas the glycosamine-glycan (GAG) chains accounted for the inhibitory activity. Because of its cell location and mode of induction, the inhibitor was called injured membrane proteoglycan, IMP. IMP prevented neurite outgrowth initiation when attached to the culture substrate and caused growth cone collapse when added in solution to neurons with already growing neurites. We concluded that IMP was responsible for preventing injured CNS fibre regeneration. Double-staining immunohistochemistry of normal and gliotic tissue with anti-IMP monoclonal antibodies together with glial and neuronal markers, permitted the unequivocal definition of inhibitor presenting cells by confocal microscopy. IMP-immunostaining in normal CNS was observed exclusively on neurons. However, after a lesion, immunostaining occurred primarily on intensely GFAP-positive reactive astrocytes, but not on OX-42 positive microglia. The availability of antibodies permitted rapid affinity-purification of the neurite inhibitor and comparison with similar molecules possibly expressed during development. IMP itself or a highly related form, was expressed in embryonic brain, reaching maximal expression around postnatal day 3 and decreasing strongly in normal adult tissue. Perinatal rat brain proteoglycans inhibited neurite outgrowth similarly, though not identically, to IMP. Our data suggest that perinatal membrane and injured membrane proteoglycans may differ in GAG composition. IMP-like immunoreactivity was also found in developing brain

  5. Hydrogel Design for Supporting Neurite Outgrowth and Promoting Gene Delivery to Maximize Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha; Wang, Christine E.; Shikanov, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels capable of gene delivery provide a combinatorial approach for nerve regeneration, with the hydrogel supporting neurite outgrowth and gene delivery inducing the expression of inductive factors. This report investigates the design of hydrogels that balance the requirements for supporting neurite growth with those requirements for promoting gene delivery. Enzymatically-degradable PEG hydrogels encapsulating dorsal root ganglia explants, fibroblasts, and lipoplexes encoding nerve growth factor were gelled within channels that can physically guide neurite outgrowth. Transfection of fibroblasts increased with increasing concentration of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion sites and decreasing PEG content. The neurite length increased with increasing RGD concentration within 10% PEG hydrogels, yet was maximal within 7.5% PEG hydrogels at intermediate RGD levels. Delivering lipoplexes within the gel produced longer neurites than culture in NGF-supplemented media or co-culture with cells exposed to DNA prior to encapsulation. Hydrogels designed to support neurite outgrowth and deliver gene therapy vectors locally may ultimately be employed to address multiple barriers that limit regeneration. PMID:22038654

  6. Transient neurites of retinal horizontal cells exhibit columnar tiling via homotypic interactions.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Rachel M; Schubert, Timm; Morgan, Josh L; Godinho, Leanne; Di Cristo, Graziella; Huang, Z Josh; Wong, Rachel O L

    2009-01-01

    Sensory neurons with common functions are often nonrandomly arranged and form dendritic territories that show little overlap, or tiling. Repulsive homotypic interactions underlie such patterns in cell organization in invertebrate neurons. It is unclear how dendro-dendritic repulsive interactions can produce a nonrandom distribution of cells and their spatial territories in mammalian retinal horizontal cells, as mature horizontal cell dendrites overlap substantially. By imaging developing mouse horizontal cells, we found that these cells transiently elaborate vertical neurites that form nonoverlapping columnar territories on reaching their final laminar positions. Targeted cell ablation revealed that the vertical neurites engage in homotypic interactions that result in tiling of neighboring cells before the establishment of their dendritic fields. This developmental tiling of transient neurites correlates with the emergence of a nonrandom distribution of the cells and could represent a mechanism that organizes neighbor relationships and territories of neurons before circuit assembly.

  7. Arylsulfatase B modulates neurite outgrowth via astrocyte chondroitin-4-sulfate: dysregulation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Kusumo, Handojo; Goodlett, Charles R; Tobacman, Joanne K; Guizzetti, Marina

    2014-02-01

    In utero ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, associated with reduced brain plasticity; the mechanisms of these effects are not well understood, particularly with respect to glial involvement. Astrocytes release factors that modulate neurite outgrowth. We explored the hypothesis that ethanol inhibits neurite outgrowth by increasing the levels of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in astrocytes. Astrocyte treatment with ethanol inhibited the activity of arylsulfatase B (ARSB), the enzyme that removes sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) and triggers the degradation of C4S, increased total sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), C4S, and neurocan core-protein content and inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons cocultured with ethanol-treated astrocytes in vitro, effects reversed by treatment with recombinant ARSB. Ethanol also inhibited ARSB activity and increased sulfate GAG and neurocan levels in the developing hippocampus after in vivo ethanol exposure. ARSB silencing increased the levels of sulfated GAGs, C4S, and neurocan in astrocytes and inhibited neurite outgrowth in cocultured neurons, indicating that ARSB activity directly regulates C4S and affects neurocan expression. In summary, this study reports two major findings: ARSB modulates sulfated GAG and neurocan levels in astrocytes and astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in cocultured neurons; and ethanol inhibits the activity of ARSB, increases sulfated GAG, C4S, and neurocan levels, and thereby inhibits astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth. An unscheduled increase in CSPGs in the developing brain may lead to altered brain connectivity and to premature decrease in neuronal plasticity and therefore represents a novel mechanism by which ethanol can exert its neurodevelopmental effects.

  8. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes from different sources selectively promote neuritic outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Verrilli, M A; Caviedes, A; Cabrera, A; Sandoval, S; Wyneken, U; Khoury, M

    2016-04-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow (BM) have been shown to promote neuronal growth and survival. However, the comparative effects of MSCs of different sources, including menstrual MSCs (MenSCs), BM, umbilical cord and chorion stem cells on neurite outgrowth have not yet been explored. Moreover, the modulatory effects of MSCs may be mediated by paracrine mechanisms, i.e. by molecules contained in the MSC secretome that includes soluble factors and extracellular vesicles such as microvesicles and/or exosomes. The biogenesis of microvesicles, characterized by a vesicle diameter of 50 to 1000 nm, involves membrane shedding while exosomes, of 30 to 100 nm in diameter, originate in the multivesicular bodies within cells. Both vesicle types, which can be harvested from the conditioned media of cell cultures by differential centrifugation steps, regulate the function of target cells due to their molecular content of microRNA, mRNA, proteins and lipids. Here, we compared the effect of human menstrual MSCs (MenSCs) mediated by cell-cell contact, by their total secretome or by secretome-derived extracellular vesicles on neuritic outgrowth in primary neuronal cultures. The contact of MenSCs with cortical neurons inhibited neurite outgrowth while their total secretome enhanced it. The extracellular vesicle fractions showed a distinctive effect: while the exosome-enriched fraction enhanced neurite outgrowth, the microvesicle-enriched fraction displayed an inhibitory effect. When we compared exosome fractions of different human MSC sources, MenSC exosomes showed superior effects on the growth of the longest neurite in cortical neurons and had a comparable effect to BM-SC exosomes on neurite outgrowth in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Thus, the growth-stimulating effects of exosomes derived from MenSCs as well as the opposing effects of both extracellular vesicle fractions provide important information regarding the potential use of MenSCs as therapeutic

  10. Optimizing neurotrophic factor combinations for neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deister, C.; Schmidt, C. E.

    2006-06-01

    Most neurotrophic factors are members of one of three families: the neurotrophins, the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs) and the neuropoietic cytokines. Each family activates distinct but overlapping cellular pathways. Several studies have shown additive or synergistic interactions between neurotrophic factors from different families, though generally only a single combination has been studied. Because of possible interactions between the neurotrophic factors, the optimum concentration of a factor in a mixture may differ from the optimum when applied individually. Additionally, the effect of combinations of neurotrophic factors from each of the three families on neurite extension is unclear. This study examines the effects of several combinations of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), the GFL glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neuropoietic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on neurite outgrowth from young rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. The combination of 50 ng ml-1 NGF and 10 ng ml-1 of each GDNF and CNTF induced the highest level of neurite outgrowth at a 752 ± 53% increase over untreated DRGs and increased the longest neurite length to 2031 ± 97 µm compared to 916 ± 64 µm for untreated DRGs. The optimum concentrations of the three factors applied in combination corresponded to the optimum concentration of each factor when applied individually. These results indicate that the efficacy of future therapies for nerve repair would be enhanced by the controlled release of a combination of neurotrophins, GFLs and neuropoietic cytokines at higher concentrations than used in previous conduit designs.

  11. Detailed finite element analysis and preliminary study of the effects of friction and fastener pre-tension on the mechanical behavior of fastened built-up members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonachera Martin, Francisco Javier

    The characterization of fatigue resistance is one of the main concerns in structural engineering, a concern that is particularly important in the evaluation of existing bridge members designed or erected before the development of fatigue design provisions. The ability of a structural member to develop alternate load paths after the failure of a component is known as member-level or internal redundancy. In fastened built-up members, these alternate load paths are affected by the combination of fastener pre-tension and friction between the structural member components in contact. In this study, a finite element methodology to model and analyze riveted and bolted built-up members was developed in ABAQUS and validated with experimental results. This methodology was used to created finite element models of three fastened plates subjected to tension, in which the middle plate had failed, in order to investigate the fundamental effects of combined fastener pre-tension and friction on their mechanical behavior. Detailed finite element models of riveted and bolted built-up flexural members were created and analyze to understand the effect of fastener pre-tension in member-level redundancy and resistance to fatigue and fracture. The obtained results showed that bolted members are able to re-distribute a larger portion of the load away from the failing component into the rest of the member than riveted members, and that this transfer of load also took place over a smaller length. Superior pre-tension of bolts, in comparison to rivets, results in larger frictional forces that develop at the contact interfaces between components and constitute additional alternate load paths that increase member-level redundancy which increase the fatigue and fracture resistance of the structural member during the failure of one of its components. Although fatigue and fracture potential may be mitigated by compressive stresses developing around the fastener hole due to fastener pre-tension, it

  12. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  13. Integrin α5β1 expression on dopaminergic neurons is involved in dopaminergic neurite outgrowth on striatal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Wakita, Seiko; Kanbara, Chisato; Nakai, Toshie; Akaike, Akinori; Kume, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    During development, dopaminergic neurons born in the substantia nigra extend their axons toward the striatum. However, the mechanisms by which the dopaminergic axons extend the striatum to innervate their targets remain unclear. We previously showed that paired-cultivation of mesencephalic cells containing dopaminergic neurons with striatal cells leads to the extension of dopaminergic neurites from the mesencephalic cell region to the striatal cell region. The present study shows that dopaminergic neurites extended along striatal neurons in the paired-cultures of mesencephalic cells with striatal cells. The extension of dopaminergic neurites was suppressed by the pharmacological inhibition of integrin α5β1. Using lentiviral vectors, short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of integrin α5 in dopaminergic neurons suppressed the neurite outgrowth to the striatal cell region. In contrast, the knockdown of integrin α5 in non-dopaminergic mesencephalic and striatal cells had no effect. Furthermore, overexpression of integrin α5 in dopaminergic neurons differentiated from embryonic stem cells enhanced their neurite outgrowth on striatal cells. These results indicate that integrin α5β1 expression on dopaminergic neurons plays an important role in the dopaminergic neurite outgrowth on striatal neurons. PMID:28176845

  14. Surface Tension of Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry and more specifically surface tension are introduced to spacetime. Lagrangian equations of motion for membranes of curved spacetime manifold are derived. The equations of motion in spatial directions are dispersion equations and can be rearranged to Schrodinger's equation where Plank's constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. The equation of motion in the time-direction has two immediately recognizable solutions: electromagnetic waves and corpuscles. The corpuscular membrane solution can assume different genus depending on quantized amounts of surface energy. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found that satisfies general relativity. Application of the surface tension to quantum electrodynamics and implications for quantum chromodynamics are discussed. Although much work remains, it is suggested that spacetime surface tension may provide a classical explanation that combines general relativity with field theories in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  15. Tension Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  16. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by papaverine: role played by PLC-γ, IP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kanako; Ishima, Tamaki; Kehler, Jan; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-03-04

    Papaverine, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 10A, is gaining attention for its potential in the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the putative neuroprotective/neurotrophic actions of papaverine remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the effects of papaverine on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Papaverine potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10 had no effect on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. The potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by papaverine was blocked by the PLC-γ inhibitor U73122. Furthermore, papaverine's potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth was also blocked by the co-administration of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonists (xestospongin C and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB)) and by reduced expression of IP(3) receptor gene (i.e., itpr1 and itpr3) by siRNA. Our findings suggest that papaverine could potentiate NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, and that activation of PLC-γ and IP(3) receptors might be involved in the mechanism underlying papaverine's potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

  17. White matter microstructure pathology in classic galactosemia revealed by neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; Zhang, Hui; Bastiani, Matteo; Jansma, Bernadette M; Roebroeck, Alard; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-03-01

    White matter abnormalities have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected in the past were generally qualitative in nature. Our objective was to investigate white matter microstructure pathology and examine correlations with outcome and behaviour in this disease, by using multi-shell diffusion weighted imaging. In addition to standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) was used to estimate density and orientation dispersion of neurites in a group of eight patients (aged 16-21 years) and eight healthy controls (aged 15-20 years). Extensive white matter abnormalities were found: neurite density index (NDI) was lower in the patient group in bilateral anterior areas, and orientation dispersion index (ODI) was increased mainly in the left hemisphere. These specific regional profiles are in agreement with the cognitive profile observed in galactosemia, showing higher order cognitive impairments, and language and motor impairments, respectively. Less favourable white matter properties correlated positively with age and age at onset of diet, and negatively with behavioural outcome (e.g. visual working memory). To conclude, this study provides evidence of white matter pathology regarding density and dispersion of neurites in these patients. The results are discussed in light of suggested pathophysiological mechanisms.

  18. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  19. μ2-Dependent endocytosis of N-cadherin is regulated by β-catenin to facilitate neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Tai, Chin-Yin

    2017-02-22

    Circuit formation in the brain requires neurite outgrowth throughout development to establish synaptic contacts with target cells. Active endocytosis of several adhesion molecules facilitates the dynamic exchange of these molecules at the surface and promotes neurite outgrowth in developing neurons. The endocytosis of N-cadherin, a calcium-dependent adhesion molecule, has been implicated in the regulation of neurite outgrowth, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we identified that a fraction of N-cadherin internalizes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Two tyrosine-based motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin recognized by the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 adaptor complex are responsible for CME of N-cadherin. Moreover, β-catenin, a core component of the N-cadherin adhesion complex, inhibits N-cadherin endocytosis by masking the 2 tyrosine-based motifs. Removal of β-catenin facilitates μ2 binding to N-cadherin, thereby increasing clathrin-mediated N-cadherin endocytosis and neurite outgrowth without affecting the steady-state level of surface N-cadherin. These results identify and characterize the mechanism controlling N-cadherin endocytosis through β-catenin-regulated μ2 binding to modulate neurite outgrowth.

  20. Reelin Prevents Apical Neurite Retraction during Terminal Translocation and Dendrite Initiation

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Ryan S.; Cameron, David A.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling cortical dendrite initiation and targeting are poorly understood. Multiphoton imaging of developing mouse cortex reveals that apical dendrites emerge by direct transformation of the neuron's leading process during the terminal phase of neuronal migration. During this ∼110 min period, the dendritic arbor increases ∼2.5-fold in size and migration arrest occurs below the first stable branch point in the developing arbor. This dendritic outgrowth is triggered at the time of leading process contact with the marginal zone (MZ) and occurs primarily by neurite extension into the extracellular matrix of the MZ. In reeler cortices that lack the secreted glycoprotein Reelin, a subset of neurons completed migration but then retracted and reorganized their arbor in a tangential direction away from the MZ soon after migration arrest. For these reeler neurons, the tangential oriented primary neurites were longer lived than the radially oriented primary neurites, whereas the opposite was true of wild-type (WT) neurons. Application of Reelin protein to reeler cortices destabilized tangential neurites while stabilizing radial neurites and stimulating dendritic growth in the MZ. Therefore, Reelin functions as part of a polarity signaling system that links dendritogenesis in the MZ with cellular positioning and cortical lamination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whether the apical dendrite emerges by transformation of the leading process of the migrating neuron or emerges de novo after migration is completed is unclear. Similarly, it is not clear whether the secreted glycoprotein Reelin controls migration and dendritic growth as related or separate processes. Here, multiphoton microscopy reveals the direct transformation of the leading process into the apical dendrite. This transformation is coupled to the successful completion of migration and neuronal soma arrest occurs below the first stable branch point of the nascent dendrite. Deficiency in Reelin causes

  1. Serum-induced neurite retraction in CAD cells--involvement of an ATP-actin retractile system and the lack of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Chesta, María E; Carbajal, Agustín; Arce, Carlos A; Bisig, Carlos G

    2014-11-01

    Cultured catecholamine-differentiated cells [which lack the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs): MAP1B, MAP2, Tau, STOP, and Doublecortin] proliferate in the presence of fetal bovine serum, and, in its absence, cease dividing and generate processes similar to the neurites of normal neurons. The reintroduction of serum induces neurite retraction, and proliferation resumes. The neurite retraction process in catecholamine-differentiated cells was partially characterized in this study. Microtubules in the cells were found to be in a highly dynamic state, and tubulin in the microtubules consisted primarily of the tyrosinated and deacetylated isotypes. Increased levels of acetylated or Δ2-tubulin (which are normally absent) did not prevent serum-induced neurite retraction. Treatment of differentiated cells with lysophosphatidic acid or adenosine deaminase induced neurite retraction. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase, ATP depletion and microfilament disruption each (individually) blocked serum-induced neurite retraction, suggesting that an ATP-dependent actomyosin system underlies the mechanism of neurite retraction. Nocodazole treatment induced neurite retraction, but this effect was blocked by pretreatment with the microtubule-stabilizing drug paclitaxel (Taxol). Paclitaxel did not prevent serum-induced or lysophosphatidic acid-induced retraction, suggesting that integrity of microtubules (despite their dynamic state) is necessary to maintain neurite elongation, and that paclitaxel-induced stabilization alone is not sufficient to resist the retraction force induced by serum. Transfection with green fluorescent protein-Tau conferred resistance to retraction caused by serum. We hypothesize that, in normal neurons (cultured or in vivo), MAPs are necessary not only to stabilize microtubules, but also to establish interactions with other cytoskeletal or membrane components to form a stable structure capable of resisting the retraction force.

  2. C. elegans fmi-1/flamingo and Wnt pathway components interact genetically to control the anteroposterior neurite growth of the VD GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Huarcaya Najarro, Elvis; Ackley, Brian D

    2013-05-01

    Directed axonal growth is essential to establish neuronal networks. During the early development of the VD neurons, an anterior neurite that will become the VD axon extends along the anteroposterior (A/P) axis in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) in Caenorhabditis elegans. Little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are important for correct neurite growth in the VNC. In fmi-1/flamingo mutant animals, we observed that some postembryonically born VD neurons had a posterior neurite instead of a normal anterior neurite, which caused aberrant VD commissure patterning along the A/P axis. In addition, VD anterior neurites had underextension defects in the VNC in fmi-1 animals, whereas VD commissure growth along the dorsoventral (D/V) axis occurred normally in these animals, suggesting that fmi-1 is important for neurite growth along the A/P axis but not the D/V axis. We also uncovered unknown details of the early development of the VD neurons, indicating that the neurite defects arose during their early development. Interestingly, though fmi-1 is present at this time in the VNC, we did not observe FMI-1 in the VD neurons themselves, suggesting that fmi-1 might be working in a cell non-autonomous fashion. Furthermore, fmi-1 appears to be working in a novel pathway, independently from the planar cell polarity pathway and in parallel to lin-17/frizzled and dsh-1/dishevelled, to determine the direction of neurite growth. Our findings indicate that redundant developmental pathways regulate neurite growth in the VNC in C. elegans.

  3. GSK-3β activation mediates Nogo-66-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian-ying; Yi, Xu-xia; Xiong, Nan-xiang; Wang, Hai-jun; Duan, Xiao-wei; Zhao, Hong-yang

    2011-11-14

    The axons of the adult mammalian brain and spinal cord fail to regenerate after injury, and it has been suggested that Nogo-66 could prevent CNS axon repair. However, the mechanism of Nogo-66 inhibiting neurite outgrowth remains unknown. Our previous results indicated that protein kinase B (PKB) is involved in the inhibition of the neurite outgrowth by Nogo-66. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is implicated in many processes in the nervous system, including differentiation, specification, polarity, plasticity and axon growth. In addition, GSK-3β is one of the most important molecules downstream of PKB. In the present study, we report on the role of GSK-3β signaling on Nogo-66-treated mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Nogo-66 reduced the phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9 in N2a cells. In contrast, pretreatment with SB216763, a specific inhibitor of GSK-3β, resulted in an amelioration of neurite outgrowth by Nogo-66, compared with the Nogo-66 alone group (P<0.05). Moreover, we performed RNA interference experiments to knock down GSK-3β expression levels in N2a cells via transient transfection of shRNA plasmids. The inhibition of neurite outgrowth by Nogo-66 was subdued in shRNA cells, compared to the non-RNAi cells (P<0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that GSK-3β is involved in the inhibition by Nogo-66 of neurite outgrowth in N2a cells.

  4. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuronal-like cells following boron nitride nanotube-mediated stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni; Danti, Serena; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ricotti, Leonardo; Moscato, Stefania; Bertoni, Giovanni; Falqui, Andrea; Berrettini, Stefano; Petrini, Mario; Mattoli, Virgilio; Menciassi, Arianna

    2010-10-26

    In this paper, we propose an absolutely innovative technique for the electrical stimulation of cells, based on piezoelectric nanoparticles. Ultrasounds are used to impart mechanical stress to boron nitride nanotubes incubated with neuronal-like PC12 cells. By virtue of their piezoelectric properties, these nanotubes can polarize and convey electrical stimuli to the cells. PC12 stimulated with the present method exhibit neurite sprout 30% greater than the control cultures after 9 days of treatment.

  5. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  6. Mechanical characterization of thin film, water-based polymer gels through simple tension testing of laminated bilayers.

    PubMed

    Krone, Ryan; Havenstrite, Karen; Shafi, Bilal

    2013-11-01

    We present a method of characterizing the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of thin films of extremely soft, water-based polymer gels using uniaxial tension testing of bilayer laminates, in conjunction with methods of membrane nonlinear elasticity. A custom tensile testing apparatus is used to conduct quasi-static, uniaxial extension tests of narrow strips of thin, laminated sheets of bonded hydrogel and silicone rubber, submerged in a saline bath. The tensile load is measured via sensitive load cell and the position of material markers, at a central test-section of the sample, is optically tracked via digital image tracking methods. Stress-strain relationships are calculated for the hydrogel component of the bilayer, considered hyperelastic, homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible, using membrane theories of finite hyperelasticity. We present the stress response for strains up to about 35% for poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels (>90% water) with polymer concentrations by weight of 5% to 10%. Polynomial functions are fit to the data for each formulation, whereby the one-dimensional strain-energy function for each formulation is determined by taking the indefinite integral.

  7. Enterobacter cloacae as biosurfactant producing bacterium: differentiating its effects on interfacial tension and wettability alteration Mechanisms for oil recovery during MEOR process.

    PubMed

    Sarafzadeh, Pegah; Hezave, Ali Zeinolabedini; Ravanbakhsh, Moosa; Niazi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-05-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process utilizes microorganisms or their metabolites to mobilize the trapped oil in the oil formation after primary and secondary oil recovery stages. MEOR technique is considered as more environmentally friendly and low cost process. There are several identified mechanisms for more oil recovery using MEOR processes however; wettability alteration and interfacial tension (IFT) reduction are the important ones. Enterobacter Cloacae, a facultative bio-surfactant producer bacterium, was selected as a bacterial formulation due to its known performance on IFT reduction and wettability alteration. To quantify the effects of these two mechanisms, different tests including oil spreading, in situ and ex situ core flooding, wettability measurement (Amott), IFT, viscosity and pH measurements were performed. The obtained results revealed that the experimental procedure used in this study was able to quantitatively identify the individual effects of both mechanisms on the ultimate microbial oil recovery. The results demonstrated considerable effects of both mechanisms on the tertiary oil recovery; however after a proper shut in time period, more tertiary oil was recovered because of wettability alteration mechanism. Finally, SEM images taken from the treated cores showed biofilm formation on the rock pore surfaces, which is responsible for rock surface wettability alteration.

  8. Fracture mechanics evaluation of progressive fatigue damage in a circular-hole-notched GRP composite under combined tension/torsion loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kenichi; Fujii, Toru

    Progressive failure from a circular hole in glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GRP) under combined tension/torsion cyclic loading has been investigated. Thin-walled tubular specimens were used. The composition of the specimens was the same as in previous work. As pseudo-crack growth was observed under fatigue loading leading to the final failure, fracture mechanics methods were applied to characterize the fatigue failure process. The energy release rate was used as a parameter for progressive failure. Fatigue life under combined cyclic loading was estimated on the basis of the relationship between pseudo-crack-growth rate and energy release rate. The prediced S/N lines agree with the experimental results in all except a few cases.

  9. Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells Stimulated by Components from Dendranthema × grandiflorum cv. “Mottenohoka” Is Enhanced by Suppressing Phosphorylation of p38MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Koketsu, Mamoru; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Furukawa, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Components from Dendranthema × grandiflorum cv. “Mottenohoka” that promote neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells were identified and the mechanism of neurite outgrowth stimulated by isolated components was studied. Components that promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) of PC12 cells were isolated. From various structural analyses, the active components were identified as acacetin and luteolin. The effects of acacetin or luteolin on PC12 cells were evaluated by electro-blotting and immunostaining. Slight neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells was observed within 2 days of culture after stimulation by luteolin or acacetin. However, NGF-stimulation induced remarkable neurite outgrowth in comparison. Neurite outgrowth by luteolin or acacetin was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with SB203580 (a p38MAPK inhibitor). The results of this study into the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and p38MAPK by flavonoids suggest that the inhibition of p38MAPK phosphorylation may effectively enhance neurite outgrowth. PMID:23554829

  10. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model of brain white matter in biaxial tension and structural-mechanical relationships.

    PubMed

    Labus, Kevin M; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2016-09-01

    Computational models of the brain require accurate and robust constitutive models to characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The anisotropy of white matter has been previously demonstrated; however, there is a lack of data describing the effects of multi-axial loading, even though brain tissue experiences multi-axial stress states. Therefore, a biaxial tensile experiment was designed to more fully characterize the anisotropic behavior of white matter in a quasi-static loading state, and the mechanical data were modeled with an anisotropic hyperelastic continuum model. A probabilistic analysis was used to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions because the mechanical data of brain tissue can show a high degree of variability, and computational studies can benefit from reporting the probability distribution of model responses. The axonal structure in white matter can be heterogeneous and regionally dependent, which can affect computational model predictions. Therefore, corona radiata and corpus callosum regions were tested, and histology and transmission electron microscopy were performed on tested specimens to relate the distribution of axon orientations and the axon volume fraction to the mechanical behavior. These measured properties were implemented into a structural constitutive model. Results demonstrated a significant, but relatively low anisotropic behavior, yet there were no conclusive mechanical differences between the two regions tested. The inclusion of both biaxial and uniaxial tests in model fits improved the accuracy of model predictions. The mechanical anisotropy of individual specimens positively correlated with the measured axon volume fraction, and, accordingly, the structural model exhibited slightly decreased uncertainty in model predictions compared to the model without structural properties.

  11. SH2B1 orchestrates signaling events to filopodium formation during neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis during development is fundamental to the differentiation of several cell types. As neurite outgrowth marks neuritogenesis, formation of filopodia precede the formation of dendrites and axons. While the structure of filopodia is well-known, the initiation of filopodia during neurite outgrowth is not clear. SH2B1 is known to promote neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells, hippocampal and cortical neurons. As a signaling adaptor protein, SH2B1 interacts with several neurotrophin receptors, and regulates signaling as well as gene expression. Our recent findings suggest that SH2B1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane and F-actin fractions by IRSp53. IRSp53 bends plasma membrane and facilitates actin bundling to set the stage for filopodium formation. We further demonstrate that SH2B1-IRSp53 complexes enhance the formation of filopodia, dendrites and dendritic branches of hippocampal and cortical neurons. While the molecular mechanism underlying filopodium initiation is not clear, we propose that SH2B1-neurotrophin interacting sites may mark the putative sites of filopodium initiation.

  12. SH2B1 orchestrates signaling events to filopodium formation during neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis during development is fundamental to the differentiation of several cell types. As neurite outgrowth marks neuritogenesis, formation of filopodia precede the formation of dendrites and axons. While the structure of filopodia is well-known, the initiation of filopodia during neurite outgrowth is not clear. SH2B1 is known to promote neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells, hippocampal and cortical neurons. As a signaling adaptor protein, SH2B1 interacts with several neurotrophin receptors, and regulates signaling as well as gene expression. Our recent findings suggest that SH2B1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane and F-actin fractions by IRSp53. IRSp53 bends plasma membrane and facilitates actin bundling to set the stage for filopodium formation. We further demonstrate that SH2B1-IRSp53 complexes enhance the formation of filopodia, dendrites and dendritic branches of hippocampal and cortical neurons. While the molecular mechanism underlying filopodium initiation is not clear, we propose that SH2B1-neurotrophin interacting sites may mark the putative sites of filopodium initiation. PMID:26479731

  13. Schwann cell migration and neurite outgrowth are influenced by media conditioned by epineurial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    van Neerven, S G A; Pannaye, P; Bozkurt, A; Van Nieuwenhoven, F; Joosten, E; Hermans, E; Taccola, G; Deumens, R

    2013-11-12

    The regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system is largely related to Schwann cells undergoing proliferation and migration after injury and forming growth-supporting substrates for severed axons. Novel data show that fibroblasts to a certain extent regulate the pro-regenerative behavior of Schwann cells. In the setting of peripheral nerve injury, the fibroblasts that form the epineurium come into close contact with both Schwann cells and peripheral axons, but the potential influence on these latter two cell types has not been studied yet. In the present study we explored whether culture media, conditioned by epineurial fibroblasts can influence Schwann cells and/or neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro. Our data indicate that epineurial fibroblast-conditioned culture media substantially increase Schwann cell migration and the outgrowth of neurites. Schwann cell proliferation remained largely unaffected. These same read-out parameters were assayed in a condition where epineurial fibroblasts were subjected to stretch-cell-stress, a mechanical stressor that plays an important role in traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. Stretch-cell-stress of epineurial fibroblasts did not further change the positive effects of conditioned media on Schwann cell migration and neurite outgrowth. From these data we conclude that an as yet unknown pro-regenerative role can be attributed to epineurial fibroblasts, implying that such cells may affect the outcome of severe peripheral nerve injury.

  14. Liraglutide Promotes Cortical Neurite Outgrowth via the MEK-ERK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Li, Shilun; Li, Yukun

    2015-10-01

    Liraglutide is the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) synthetic form which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to be released onto the market. The metabolic benefits of incretin hormone as an anti-diabetic agent are widely recognized, but its potential extra-pancreatic effects of GLP-1 analog (liraglutide) in the central nerve system are less well known. To this purpose, we used immunofluorescence method to examine the effect of liraglutide on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neuron culture by measuring neurite length and confirmed the promotion effect. Then, we investigated the potential mechanisms and found that liraglutide promoted neurite outgrowth in a dose-dependant manner, and this effect could be partially inhibited by MEK-ERK inhibitor U0126. Besides, liraglutide induced an increase of p-ERK/ERK expression, which could be blocked in the presence of U0126. Similarly, phosphorylated transcription factor (p-CREB) level shared the same trend with p-ERK/ERK ratio after liraglutide treatment. Collectively, our data illustrated that that liraglutide exerts neurotrophin-like activity partly via MEK-ERK pathway, which might offer a novel idea for treatment of axon-associated neurological diseases.

  15. GGGGCC microsatellite RNA is neuritically localized, induces branching defects, and perturbs transport granule function.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Alondra Schweizer; Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fen-Biao; Kalb, Robert; Akins, Michael R; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-12-09

    Microsatellite expansions are the leading cause of numerous neurodegenerative disorders. Here we demonstrate that GGGGCC and CAG microsatellite repeat RNAs associated with C9orf72 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia and with polyglutamine diseases, respectively, localize to neuritic granules that undergo active transport into distal neuritic segments. In cultured mammalian spinal cord neurons, the presence of neuritic GGGGCC repeat RNA correlates with neuronal branching defects, and the repeat RNA localizes to granules that label with fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a transport granule component. Using a Drosophila GGGGCC expansion disease model, we characterize dendritic branching defects that are modulated by FMRP and Orb2. The human orthologs of these modifiers are misregulated in induced pluripotent stem cell-differentiated neurons (iPSNs) from GGGGCC expansion carriers. These data suggest that expanded repeat RNAs interact with the messenger RNA transport and translation machinery, causing transport granule dysfunction. This could be a novel mechanism contributing to the neuronal defects associated with C9orf72 and other microsatellite expansion diseases.

  16. GGGGCC microsatellite RNA is neuritically localized, induces branching defects, and perturbs transport granule function

    PubMed Central

    Burguete, Alondra Schweizer; Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fen-Biao; Kalb, Robert; Akins, Michael R; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite expansions are the leading cause of numerous neurodegenerative disorders. Here we demonstrate that GGGGCC and CAG microsatellite repeat RNAs associated with C9orf72 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia and with polyglutamine diseases, respectively, localize to neuritic granules that undergo active transport into distal neuritic segments. In cultured mammalian spinal cord neurons, the presence of neuritic GGGGCC repeat RNA correlates with neuronal branching defects, and the repeat RNA localizes to granules that label with fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a transport granule component. Using a Drosophila GGGGCC expansion disease model, we characterize dendritic branching defects that are modulated by FMRP and Orb2. The human orthologs of these modifiers are misregulated in induced pluripotent stem cell-differentiated neurons (iPSNs) from GGGGCC expansion carriers. These data suggest that expanded repeat RNAs interact with the messenger RNA transport and translation machinery, causing transport granule dysfunction. This could be a novel mechanism contributing to the neuronal defects associated with C9orf72 and other microsatellite expansion diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08881.001 PMID:26650351

  17. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: I. Derivation and interpretation of neurite equations.

    PubMed

    Meffin, Hamish; Tahayori, Bahman; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N

    2012-12-01

    Neuroprosthetic devices, such as cochlear and retinal implants, work by directly stimulating neurons with extracellular electrodes. This is commonly modeled using the cable equation with an applied extracellular voltage. In this paper a framework for modeling extracellular electrical stimulation is presented. To this end, a cylindrical neurite with confined extracellular space in the subthreshold regime is modeled in three-dimensional space. Through cylindrical harmonic expansion of Laplace's equation, we derive the spatio-temporal equations governing different modes of stimulation, referred to as longitudinal and transverse modes, under types of boundary conditions. The longitudinal mode is described by the well-known cable equation, however, the transverse modes are described by a novel ordinary differential equation. For the longitudinal mode, we find that different electrotonic length constants apply under the two different boundary conditions. Equations connecting current density to voltage boundary conditions are derived that are used to calculate the trans-impedance of the neurite-plus-thin-extracellular-sheath. A detailed explanation on depolarization mechanisms and the dominant current pathway under different modes of stimulation is provided. The analytic results derived here enable the estimation of a neurite's membrane potential under extracellular stimulation, hence bypassing the heavy computational cost of using numerical methods.

  18. Neurite beading is sufficient to decrease the apparent diffusion coefficient after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Frank, Joseph A

    2010-08-10

    Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is a sensitive and reliable marker of cerebral ischemia. Within minutes of an ischemic event in the brain, the microscopic motion of water molecules measured with DWI, termed the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), decreases within the infarcted region. However, although the change is related to cell swelling, the precise pathological mechanism remains elusive. We show that focal enlargement and constriction, or beading, in axons and dendrites are sufficient to substantially decrease ADC. We first derived a biophysical model of neurite beading, and we show that the beaded morphology allows a larger volume to be encompassed within an equivalent surface area and is, therefore, a consequence of osmotic imbalance after ischemia. The DWI experiment simulated within the model revealed that intracellular ADC decreased by 79% in beaded neurites compared with the unbeaded form. To validate the model experimentally, excised rat sciatic nerves were subjected to stretching, which induced beading but did not cause a bulk shift of water into the axon (i.e., swelling). Beading-induced changes in cell-membrane morphology were sufficient to significantly hinder water mobility and thereby decrease ADC, and the experimental measurements were in excellent agreement with the simulated values. This is a demonstration that neurite beading accurately captures the diffusion changes measured in vivo. The results significantly advance the specificity of DWI in ischemia and other acute neurological injuries and will greatly aid the development of treatment strategies to monitor and repair damaged brain in both clinical and experimental settings.

  19. Contact-associated neurite outgrowth and branching of immature cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sang, Qian; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2003-06-01

    When juvenile interneurons arrive at the cortical environment following tangential migration, they are faced with the task of positioning themselves in cortical space in preparation for local circuit wiring. This includes integration into different cortical layers and cessation of migration at various positions to ensure adequate coverage. Little is known about the signals or mechanisms that initiate a conversion from the migratory phenotype to the arborization phenotype. This study looks at the immediate changes in interneuron morphology after culturing for 24 h in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Immature interneurons taken from different stages of corticogenesis showed increased neurite branching and outgrowth after interneuronal contacts were made. These responses were suppressed in the presence of Slit and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) if the interneurons were sourced from early to mid-stages of corticogenesis. However, interneurons taken from the late period of corticogenesis responded to Slit and BDNF by increasing branching and neurite outgrowth. These results suggest an initial interneuronal cell contact as a stimulus for propagating neuronal arborization that may lead to the formation of inhibitory neuronal circuits. In addition, we have identified the late corticogenetic period when interneurons are most sensitive to the neurite promoting effects of Slit and BDNF.

  20. Changing growth of neurites of sensory ganglion by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurkan, M. V.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.; Bespalov, V. G.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Kipenko, A. V.; Lopatina, E. V.; Krylov, B. V.

    2012-02-01

    Application of terahertz radiation for the creation of medical equipment and solving of biological problems has become widely spread. From this point of view, the influence of THz radiation on the nerve fibers is of primary concern. In addition, several studies indicated both stimulating and depressive effects on nerve cells. However, the mechanism of this effect has not yet been studied, including the dose and exposure time. Our research was devoted to the impact of broadband pulsed THz radiation in the frequency range of 0.05 to 2 THz on the neurite growth in the sensory ganglia of 10-12-day chicken embryos. Dependence of changes in functional responses of cells on the average output power has been found. An increase in the stimulating effect was observed at the lowest power density used (0.5 μW/cm2). Through non-destructive process and choosing the correct parameters of THz radiation, potential control of neural response becomes possible, which can subsequently lead to new medical treatments.

  1. Contact inhibition of locomotion and mechanical cross-talk between cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion determine the pattern of junctional tension in epithelial cell aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Luke; Lopez, Hender; Caldwell, Benjamin J.; Moussa, Elliott; Yap, Chloe; Priya, Rashmi; Noppe, Adrian; Roberts, Anthony P.; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Yap, Alpha S.; Neufeld, Zoltan; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational approach to analyze the biomechanics of epithelial cell aggregates—islands, stripes, or entire monolayers—that combines both vertex and contact-inhibition-of-locomotion models to include cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion. Examination of the distribution of cell protrusions (adhesion to the substrate) in the model predicted high-order profiles of cell organization that agree with those previously seen experimentally. Cells acquired an asymmetric distribution of basal protrusions, traction forces, and apical aspect ratios that decreased when moving from the edge to the island center. Our in silico analysis also showed that tension on cell–cell junctions and apical stress is not homogeneous across the island. Instead, these parameters are higher at the island center and scale up with island size, which we confirmed experimentally using laser ablation assays and immunofluorescence. Without formally being a three-dimensional model, our approach has the minimal elements necessary to reproduce the distribution of cellular forces and mechanical cross-talk, as well as the distribution of principal stress in cells within epithelial cell aggregates. By making experimentally testable predictions, our approach can aid in mechanical analysis of epithelial tissues, especially when local changes in cell–cell and/or cell–substrate adhesion drive collective cell behavior. PMID:27605701

  2. Mechanical analysis of the strains generated by water tension in plant stems. Part I: stress transmission from the water to the cell walls.

    PubMed

    Alméras, Tancrède; Gril, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Plant tissues shrink and swell in response to changes in water pressure. These strains can be easily measured, e.g., at the surface of tree stems, to obtain indirect information about plant water status and other physiological parameters. We developed a mechanical model to clarify how water pressure is transmitted to cell walls and causes shrinkage of plant tissues, particularly in the case of thick-walled cells such as wood fibers. Our analysis shows that the stress inside the fiber cell walls is lower than the water tension. The difference is accounted for by a stress transmission factor that depends on two main effects. The first effect is the dilution of the stress through the cell wall, because water acts at the lumen border and is transmitted to the outer border of the cell, which has a larger circumference. The second effect is the partial conversion of radial stress into tangential stress. Both effects are quantified as functions of parameters of the cell wall structure and its mechanical properties.

  3. Experimental observations on mechanical response of three-phase NiTi shape memory alloy under uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yao; Zeng, Pan; Lei, Liping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the mechanical behavior of three-phase NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) is examined in a wide temperature range using in situ digital image correlation. By varying the temperature and the cooling/heating history, we get the specimens with initial austenite (A), initial R-phase (R), initial martensite (M), initial mixture of A and R, initial mixture of R and M and initial mixture of A and M. It is observed in the experiments that NiTi SMA exhibits localized A → M transformation and R → M transformation while homogenous R-reorientation and martensitic reorientation. Moreover, the influence of the initial mixed states, i.e. mixture of A and M, mixture of R and M and mixture of A and R, on the mechanical response of NiTi SMA is discussed. Interestingly, we find that the specimens with initial mixture of R and M demonstrate homogenous deformation manner and the emergence of R in M facilitates the transformation of NiTi SMA greatly. The three-phase phase diagram is also established. The thermal dependences of the critical transformation stresses associated with various transformation processes are calculated for further theoretical investigation and simulation.

  4. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures.

  5. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  6. Flow in porous media, phase behavior and ultralow interfacial tensions: mechanisms of enhanced petroleum recovery. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    A major program of university research, longer-ranged and more fundamental in approach than industrial research, into basic mechanisms of enhancing petroleum recovery and into underlying physics, chemistry, geology, applied mathematics, computation, and engineering science has been built at Minnesota. The 1982 outputs of the interdisciplinary team of investigators were again ideas, instruments, techniques, data, understanding and skilled people: forty-one scientific and engineering papers in leading journals; four pioneering Ph.D. theses; numerous presentations to scientific and technical meetings, and to industrial, governmental and university laboratories; vigorous program of research visits to and from Minnesota; and two outstanding Ph.D.'s to research positions in the petroleum industry, one to a university faculty position, one to research leadership in a governmental institute. This report summarizes the 1982 papers and theses and features sixteen major accomplishments of the program during that year. Abstracts of all forty-five publications in the permanent literature are appended. Further details of information transfer and personnel exchange with industrial, governmental and university laboratories appear in 1982 Quarterly Reports available from the Department of Energy and are not reproduced here. The Minnesota program continues in 1983, notwithstanding earlier uncertainty about the DOE funding which finally materialized and is the bulk of support. Supplemental grants-in-aid from nine companies in the petroleum industry are important, as are the limited University and departmental contributions. 839 references, 172 figures, 29 tables.

  7. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  8. ENDOCHONDRAL GROWTH IN GROWTH PLATES OF THREE SPECIES AT TWO ANATOMICAL LOCATIONS MODULATED BY MECHANICAL COMPRESSION AND TENSION

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.F.; Aronsson, David D.; Dimock, Abigail N.; Cortright, Valerie; Beck., Samantha

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose Sustained mechanical loading alters longitudinal growth of bones, and this growth sensitivity to load has been implicated in progression of skeletal deformities during growth. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between altered growth and different magnitudes of sustained altered stress in a diverse set of non-human growth plates. Methods The sensitivity of endochondral growth to differing magnitudes of sustained compression or distraction stress was measured in growth plates of three species of immature animals (rats, rabbits, calves) at two anatomical locations (caudal vertebra and proximal tibia) with two different ages of rats and rabbits. An external loading apparatus was applied for eight days and growth was measured as the distance between fluorescent markers administered 24 and 48 hours prior to euthanasia. Results An apparently linear relationship between stress and percentage growth modulation (percent difference between loaded and control growth plates) was found, with distraction accelerating growth and compression slowing growth. The growth-rate sensitivity to stress was between 9.2 and 23.9% per 0.1 MPa for different growth plates, and averaged 17.1% per 0.1 MPa. The growth-rate sensitivity to stress differed between vertebrae and the proximal tibia (15 and 18.6 percent per 0.1 MPa respectively). The range of control growth rates of different growth plates was large (30 microns/day for rat vertebrae to 366 microns/day for rabbit proximal tibia). Conclusions The relatively small differences in growth-rate sensitivity to stress for a diverse set of growth plates suggests that these results might be generalized to other growth plates, including human. These data may be applicable to planning the management of progressive deformities in patients having residual growth. PMID:16705695

  9. Endochondral growth in growth plates of three species at two anatomical locations modulated by mechanical compression and tension.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Ian A F; Aronsson, David D; Dimock, Abigail N; Cortright, Valerie; Beck, Samantha

    2006-06-01

    Sustained mechanical loading alters longitudinal growth of bones, and this growth sensitivity to load has been implicated in progression of skeletal deformities during growth. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between altered growth and different magnitudes of sustained altered stress in a diverse set of nonhuman growth plates. The sensitivity of endochondral growth to differing magnitudes of sustained compression or distraction stress was measured in growth plates of three species of immature animals (rats, rabbits, calves) at two anatomical locations (caudal vertebra and proximal tibia) with two different ages of rats and rabbits. An external loading apparatus was applied for 8 days, and growth was measured as the distance between fluorescent markers administered 24 and 48 h prior to euthanasia. An apparently linear relationship between stress and percentage growth modulation (percent difference between loaded and control growth plates) was found, with distraction accelerating growth and compression slowing growth. The growth-rate sensitivity to stress was between 9.2 and 23.9% per 0.1 MPa for different growth plates and averaged 17.1% per 0.1 MPa. The growth-rate sensitivity to stress differed between vertebrae and the proximal tibia (15 and 18.6% per 0.1 MPa, respectively). The range of control growth rates of different growth plates was large (30 microns/day for rat vertebrae to 366 microns/day for rabbit proximal tibia). The relatively small differences in growth-rate sensitivity to stress for a diverse set of growth plates suggest that these results might be generalized to other growth plates, including human. These data may be applicable to planning the management of progressive deformities in patients having residual growth.

  10. Integrin-mediated neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells depends on the activation of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Electrical signals elicited by integrin interaction with ECM components and their role in neurite outgrowth were studied in two clones (N1 and N7) isolated from 41A3 murine neuroblastoma cell line. Although the two clones similarly adhered to fibronectin (FN) and vitronectin (VN), this adhesion induced neurite outgrowth in N1 but not in N7 cells. Patch clamp recordings in whole cell configuration showed that, upon adhesion to FN or VN but not to platelet factor 4 (PF4), N1 cells undergo a marked (approximately equal to 20 mV) hyperpolarization of the resting potential (Vrest) that occurred within the first 20 min after cell contact with ECM, and persisted for approximately 1 h before reverting to the time zero values. This hyperpolarization was totally absent in N7 cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in N1 and N7 cell adhesion to ECM substrata was performed by using antibodies raised against the FN receptor and synthetic peptides variously competing with the FN or VN binding to integrin receptor (GRGDSP and GRGESP). Antibodies, as well as GRGDSP, abolished adhesion of N1 and N7 clones to FN and VN, revealing a similar implication of integrins in the adhesion of these clones to the ECM proteins. However, these anti-adhesive treatments, while ineffective on Vrest of N7 cells, abolished in N1 cells the FN- or VN-induced hyperpolarization and neurite outgrowth, that appeared therefore strictly associated and integrin-mediated phenomena. The nature of this association was deepened through a comparative analysis of the integrin profiles and the ion channels of N1 and N7 cells. The integrin immunoprecipitation profile resulted very similarly in the two clones, with only minor differences concerning the alpha V containing complexes. Both clones possessed Ca2+ and K+ delayed rectifier (KDR) channels, while only N1 cells were endowed with inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels. The latter governed the Vrest, and, unlike KDR channels, were blocked by

  11. Alpha-Synuclein affects neurite morphology, autophagy, vesicle transport and axonal degeneration in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koch, J C; Bitow, F; Haack, J; d'Hedouville, Z; Zhang, J-N; Tönges, L; Michel, U; Oliveira, L M A; Jovin, T M; Liman, J; Tatenhorst, L; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropathological and experimental studies suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and axons precedes the demise of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which finally results in the clinical symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying this early axonal degeneration are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein (αSyn-WT), a protein associated with PD, and its mutant variants αSyn-A30P and -A53T on neurite morphology and functional parameters in rat primary midbrain neurons (PMN). Moreover, axonal degeneration after overexpression of αSyn-WT and -A30P was analyzed by live imaging in the rat optic nerve in vivo. We found that overexpression of αSyn-WT and of its mutants A30P and A53T impaired neurite outgrowth of PMN and affected neurite branching assessed by Sholl analysis in a variant-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the number of primary neurites per neuron was increased in neurons transfected with αSyn. Axonal vesicle transport was examined by live imaging of PMN co-transfected with EGFP-labeled synaptophysin. Overexpression of all αSyn variants significantly decreased the number of motile vesicles and decelerated vesicle transport compared with control. Macroautophagic flux in PMN was enhanced by αSyn-WT and -A53T but not by αSyn-A30P. Correspondingly, colocalization of αSyn and the autophagy marker LC3 was reduced for αSyn-A30P compared with the other αSyn variants. The number of mitochondria colocalizing with LC3 as a marker for mitophagy did not differ among the groups. In the rat optic nerve, both αSyn-WT and -A30P accelerated kinetics of acute axonal degeneration following crush lesion as analyzed by in vivo live imaging. We conclude that αSyn overexpression impairs neurite outgrowth and augments axonal degeneration, whereas axonal vesicle transport and autophagy are severely altered. PMID:26158517

  12. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in Diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bipin; Pradhan, Anju

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection affecting mainly the skin and peripheral nerve. Pure neuritic form of this disease manifests by involvement of the nerve in the absence of skin lesions. Therefore, it can sometimes create a diagnostic problem. It often requires a nerve biopsy for diagnosis, which is an invasive procedure and may lead to neural deficit. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of an affected nerve can be a valuable and less invasive procedure for the diagnosis of such cases. We report five suspected cases of pure neuritic Hansen's disease involving the common and superficial peroneal, ulnar, and median nerve, who underwent FNAC. Smears revealed nerve fibers infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells in all cases, presence of epithelioid cells granulomas, and Langhans giant cells in three cases, and acid fast bacilli in two cases. In conclusion, FNAC is a safe, less invasive, and time saving procedure for the diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy. PMID:21660285

  13. Shoc2/Sur8 protein regulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Leon, Gonzalo; Sanchez-Ruiloba, Lucia; Perez-Rodriguez, Andrea; Gragera, Teresa; Martinez, Natalia; Hernandez, Silvia; Anta, Berta; Calero, Olga; Garcia-Dominguez, Carlota A; Dura, Lara M; Peña-Jimenez, Daniel; Castro, Judit; Zarich, Natasha; Sanchez-Gomez, Pilar; Calero, Miguel; Iglesias, Teresa; Oliva, Jose L; Rojas, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth.

  14. Pleurotus giganteus (Berk.) Karunarathna & K.D. Hyde: Nutritional value and in vitro neurite outgrowth activity in rat pheochromocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs dedicated to alleviate neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s have always been associated with debilitating side effects. Medicinal mushrooms which harness neuropharmacological compounds offer a potential possibility for protection against such diseases. Pleurotus giganteus (formerly known as Panus giganteus) has been consumed by the indigenous people in Peninsular Malaysia for many years. Domestication of this wild mushroom is gaining popularity but to our knowledge, medicinal properties reported for this culinary mushroom are minimal. Methods The fruiting bodies P. giganteus were analysed for its nutritional values. Cytotoxicity of the mushroom’s aqueous and ethanolic extracts towards PC12, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line was assessed by using 3-[4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Neurite outgrowth stimulation assay was carried out with nerve growth factor (NGF) as control. To elucidate signaling mechanisms involved by mushroom extract-induced neurite outgrowth, treatment of specific inhibitor for MEK/ERK and PI3K signalling pathway was carried out. Results The fruiting bodies of P. giganteus were found to have high carbohydrate, dietary fibre, potassium, phenolic compounds and triterpenoids. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in a dose- and time-dependant manner with no detectable cytotoxic effect. At day 3, 25 μg/ml of aqueous extract and 15 μg/ml of ethanolic extract showed the highest percentage of neurite-bearing cells, i.e. 31.7 ± 1.1% and 33.3 ± 0.9%; respectively. Inhibition treatment results suggested that MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt are responsible for neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells stimulated by P. giganteus extract. The high potassium content (1345.7 mg/100 g) may be responsible for promoting neurite extension, too. Conclusions P. giganteus contains bioactive compounds that mimic NGF and are responsible for neurite

  15. Long non-coding RNA Malat1 promotes neurite outgrowth through activation of ERK/MAPK signalling pathway in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Peimin; Zhu, Xi; He, Shixu; Duan, Jialan; Zhou, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are playing critical roles in neurogenesis, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. Neurite outgrowth is an early step in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. Using in vitro differentiation of neuroblastoma-derived Neuro-2a (N2a) cell as a model, we performed expression profiling to identify lncRNAs putatively relevant for neurite outgrowth. We identified that Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1) was one of the most significantly up-regulated lncRNAs during N2a cell differentiation. Malat1 knockdown resulted in defects in neurite outgrowth as well as enhanced cell death. To pinpoint signalling pathways perturbed by Malat1 depletion, we then performed a reporter-based screening to examine the activities of 50 signalling pathways in Malat1 knockdown cells. We found that Malat1 knockdown resulted in conspicuous inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway as well as abnormal activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and P53 signalling pathway. Inhibition of ERK/MAPK pathway with PD98059 potently blocked N2a cell neurite outgrowth, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced ERK activation rescued defects in neurite outgrowth and cell death induced by Malat1 depletion. Together, our results established a critical role of Malat1 in the early step of neuronal differentiation through activating ERK/MAPK signalling pathway.

  16. CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhengxu; Huang, Jinghui; He, Fei; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:27611779

  17. c-Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase is Involved in Valproic Acid-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic NSCs and Neurite Outgrowth of NSC-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhou, Hengxing; Pan, Bin; Li, Xueying; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Chu, Tianci; Wei, Zhijian; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug, can induce neuronal differentiation, promote neurite extension and exert a neuroprotective effect in central nervous system (CNS) injuries; however, comparatively little is known regarding its action on mouse embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism. Recent studies suggested that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is required for neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation during neuronal development. In the present study, we cultured mouse embryonic NSCs and treated the cells with 1 mM VPA for up to 7 days. The results indicate that VPA promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons; moreover, VPA induces the phosphorylation of c-Jun by JNK. In contrast, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 decreased the VPA-stimulated increase in neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that VPA promotes neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Moreover, JNK activation is involved in the effects of VPA stimulation.

  18. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ya-Yun; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates production and apoptotic damage induced by high glucose are major causes of neuronal damage in diabetic neuropathy. Berberine (BBR), a natural antidiabetes drug with PI3K-activating activity, holds promise for diabetes because of its dual antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities. We have previously reported that BBR attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} neurotoxicity via activating the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway. In this study, we further explored the novel protective mechanism of BBR on high glucose-induced apoptotic death and neurite damage of SH-SY5Y cells. Results indicated BBR (0.1–10 nM) significantly attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nucleus condensation, and apoptotic death in high glucose-treated cells. However, AG1024, an inhibitor of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, significantly abolished BBR protection against high glucose-induced neuronal death. BBR also increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased cytochrome c release. High glucose down-regulated IGF-1 receptor and phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β, the effects of which were attenuated by BBR treatment. BBR also activated nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key antioxidative transcription factor, which is accompanied with up-regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, BBR markedly enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF) expression and promoted neurite outgrowth in high glucose-treated cells. To further determine the role of the Nrf2 in BBR neuroprotection, RNA interference directed against Nrf2 was used. Results indicated Nrf2 siRNA abolished BBR-induced HO-1, NGF, neurite outgrowth and ROS decrease. In conclusion, BBR attenuated high glucose-induced neurotoxicity, and we are the first to reveal this novel mechanism of BBR as an Nrf2 activator against glucose neurotoxicity, providing another potential therapeutic use of BBR on the treatment of diabetic complications. - Highlights: • BBR attenuates high glucose-induced ROS

  19. Calcineurin-dependent cofilin activation and increased retrograde actin flow drive 5-HT-dependent neurite outgrowth in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Hyland, Callen; Van Goor, David; Forscher, Paul

    2012-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth in response to soluble growth factors often involves changes in intracellular Ca(2+); however, mechanistic roles for Ca(2+) in controlling the underlying dynamic cytoskeletal processes have remained enigmatic. Bag cell neurons exposed to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) respond with a threefold increase in neurite outgrowth rates. Outgrowth depends on phospholipase C (PLC) → inositol trisphosphate → Ca(2+) → calcineurin signaling and is accompanied by increased rates of retrograde actin network flow in the growth cone P domain. Calcineurin inhibitors had no effect on Ca(2+) release or basal levels of retrograde actin flow; however, they completely suppressed 5-HT-dependent outgrowth and F-actin flow acceleration. 5-HT treatments were accompanied by calcineurin-dependent increases in cofilin activity in the growth cone P domain. 5-HT effects were mimicked by direct activation of PLC, suggesting that increased actin network treadmilling may be a widespread mechanism for promoting neurite outgrowth in response to neurotrophic factors.

  20. Induction of Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells Treated with Temperature-Controlled Repeated Thermal Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Tada-aki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Tominami, Kanako; Nunome, Shoko; Abe, Genji; Kosukegawa, Hiroyuki; Abe, Toshihiko; Mori, Hitoshi; Mori, Kazumi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Izumi, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    To promote the functional restoration of the nervous system following injury, it is necessary to provide optimal extracellular signals that can induce neuronal regenerative activities, particularly neurite formation. This study aimed to examine the regulation of neuritogenesis by temperature-controlled repeated thermal stimulation (TRTS) in rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, which can be induced by neurotrophic factors to differentiate into neuron-like cells with elongated neurites. A heating plate was used to apply thermal stimulation, and the correlation of culture medium temperature with varying surface temperature of the heating plate was monitored. Plated PC12 cells were exposed to TRTS at two different temperatures via heating plate (preset surface temperature of the heating plate, 39.5°C or 42°C) in growth or differentiating medium for up to 18 h per day. We then measured the extent of growth, neuritogenesis, or acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity (a neuronal marker). To analyze the mechanisms underlying the effects of TRTS on these cells, we examined changes in intracellular signaling using the following: tropomyosin-related kinase A inhibitor GW441756; p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB203580; and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 with its inactive analog, U0124, as a control. While a TRTS of 39.5°C did not decrease the growth rate of cells in the cell growth assay, it did increase the number of neurite-bearing PC12 cells and AChE activity without the addition of other neuritogenesis inducers. Furthermore, U0126, and SB203580, but not U0124 and GW441756, considerably inhibited TRTS-induced neuritogenesis. These results suggest that TRTS can induce neuritogenesis and that participation of both the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways is required for TRTS-dependent neuritogenesis in PC12 cells. Thus, TRTS may be an effective technique for regenerative neuromedicine. PMID:25879210

  1. Chroman-like cyclic prenylflavonoids promote neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth and are neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Oberbauer, Eleni; Urmann, Corinna; Steffenhagen, Carolin; Bieler, Lara; Brunner, Doris; Furtner, Tanja; Humpel, Christian; Bäumer, Bastian; Bandtlow, Christine; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Rivera, Francisco J; Riepl, Herbert; Aigner, Ludwig

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids target a variety of pathophysiological mechanisms and are therefore increasingly considered as compounds encompassed with therapeutic potentials in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases and mood disorders. Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) is rich in flavonoids such as the flavanone 8-prenylnaringenin, which is the most potent phytoestrogen identified so far, and the prenylchalcone xanthohumol, which has potent tumor-preventive, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities. In the present study, we questioned whether hops-derived prenylflavonoids and synthetic derivatives thereof act on neuronal precursor cells and neuronal cell lines to induce neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection. Therefore, mouse embryonic forebrain-derived neural precursors and Neuro2a neuroblastoma-derived cells were stimulated with the prenylflavonoids of interest, and their potential to activate the promoter of the neuronal fate-specific doublecortin gene and to stimulate neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth was analyzed. In this screening, we identified highly "neuroactive" compounds, which we termed "enhancement of neuronal differentiation factors" (ENDFs). The most potent molecule, ENDF1, was demonstrated to promote neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells and neurite outgrowth of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons and protected neuronal PC12 cells from cobalt chloride-induced as well as cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert from deafferentation-induced cell death. The results indicate that hops-derived prenylflavonoids such as ENDFs might be powerful molecules to promote neurogenesis, neuroregeneration and neuroprotection in cases of chronic neurodegenerative diseases, acute brain and spinal cord lesion and age-associated cognitive impairments.

  2. Ionomycin-induced calcium influx induces neurite degeneration in mouse neuroblastoma cells: analysis of a time-lapse live cell imaging system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Saki; Nakanishi, Ayumi; Takazawa, Minami; Okihiro, Shunsuke; Urano, Shiro; Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce neuronal cell death. However, the detailed mechanisms of cell death have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we reported neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanisms of neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death using the neuroblastoma N1E-115 cell line and a time-lapse live cell imaging system. Treatment with the calcium ionophore ionomycin induced cell death and neurite degeneration in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with a low concentration of ionomycin immediately produced a significant calcium influx into the intracellular region in N1E-115 cells. After 1-h incubation with ionomycin, the fluorescence emission of MitoSOX(TM) increased significantly compared to the control. Finally, analysis using a new mitochondrial specific fluorescence dye, MitoPeDPP, indicated that treatment with ionomycin significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid hydroperoxide production in N1E-115 cells. The fluorescence emissions of Fluo-4 AM and MitoPeDPP were detected in the cell soma and neurite regions in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. However, the emissions of neurites were much lower than those of the cell soma. TBARS values of ionomycin-treated cells significantly increased compared to the control. These results indicate that ionomycin induces calcium influx into the intracellular region and reactive oxygen species production in N1E-115 cells. Lipid hydroperoxide production was induced in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. Calcium influx into the intracellular region is a possible activator of neurite degeneration.

  3. Study of laser uncaging induced morphological alteration of rat cortical neurites using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Tu, Chunlong; Liang, Yitao; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-09-30

    Activity-dependent structural remodeling is an important aspect of neuronal plasticity. In the previous researches, neuronal structure variations resulting from external interventions were detected by the imaging instruments such as the fluorescence microscopy, the scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and the laser confocal microscopy. In this article, a new platform which combined the photochemical stimulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) was set up to detect the activity-dependent structural remodeling. In the experiments, the cortical neurites on the glass coverslips were stimulated by locally uncaged glutamate under the ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses, and a calcium-related structural collapse of neurites (about 250 nm height decrease) was observed by an AFM. This was the first attempt to combine the laser uncaging with AFM in living cell researches. With the advantages of highly localized stimulation (<5 μm), super resolution imaging (<3.8 nm), and convenient platform building, this system was suitable for the quantitative observation of the neuron mechanical property variations and morphological alterations modified by neural activities under different photochemical stimulations, which would be helpful for studying physiological and pathological mechanisms of structural and functional changes induced by the biomolecule acting.

  4. Perspectives on Campus Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, David C., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to provide background information and insight on campus tensions, and suggest ideas on how to go about reducing these tensions. The papers are divided into 5 parts. Part I, The New Situation, includes papers by Kenneth E. Boulding, William M. Birenbaum, Marcus G. Raskin, and Peter Schrag. Part II, Where the Students…

  5. Tension generation by threads of contractile proteins

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Threads of contractile proteins were formed via extrusion and their isometric tensions and isotonic contraction velocities were measured. We obtained reproducible data by using a new and sensitive tensiometer. The force-velocity curves of actomyosin threads were similar to those of muscle, with isometric tensions of the order of 10g/cm2 and maximum contraction velocites of the order of 10(-2) lengths/s. The data could be fitted by Hill's equation. Addition of tropomyosin and troponin to the threads increased isometric tension and maximum contraction velocity. Threads which contained troponin and tropomyosin required Ca++ for contraction and the dependence of their isometric tension on the level of free Ca++ was like that of muscle. The dependence of tension or of contraction velocity upon temperature or upon ionic strength is similar for actomyosin threads and muscle fibers. In contrast, the dependence of most parameters which are characteristic of the actomyosin interaction in solution (or suspension) upon these variables is not similar to the dependence of the muscle fiber parameters. The conclusion we have drawn from these results is that the mechanism of tension generation in the threads is similar to the mechanism that exists in muscle. Because the protein composition of the thread system can be manipulated readily and because the tensions and velocities of the threads can be related directly to the physiological parameters of muscle fibers, the threads provide a powerful method for studying contractile proteins. PMID:137958

  6. Androgen regulation of axon growth and neurite extension in motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Keith N.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Foecking, Eileen M.; Poletti, Angelo; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2008-01-01

    Androgens act on the CNS to affect motor function through interaction with a widespread distribution of intracellular androgen receptors (AR). This review highlights our work on androgens and process outgrowth in motoneurons, both in vitro and in vivo. The actions of androgens on motoneurons involve the generation of novel neuronal interactions that are mediated by the induction of androgen-dependent neurite or axonal outgrowth. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for the androgenic regulation of the extension and regeneration of motoneuron neurites in vitro using cultured immortalized motoneurons, and axons in vivo using the hamster facial nerve crush paradigm. We place particular emphasis on the relevance of these effects to SBMA and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:18387610

  7. Studies of Schwann cell proliferation. III. Evidence for the surface localization of the neurite mitogen

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Salzer et al., 1980, J. Cell Biol. 84:753-- 766), evidence was presented that a neurite membrane fraction could be used to stimulate Schwann cell proliferation in culture. In this study, we present evidence that the mitogenic signal by which intact neurites or neurite membranes stimulate Schwann cell proliferation is located at the neurite surface. This conclusion is based on the following observations: (a) stimulation of Schwann cell proliferation by neurons requires direct contact between neurites and Schwann cells, separation of the two cells by a permeable collagen diaphragm 6 microns thick prevents Schwann cell proliferation; (b) treatment of intact neurites with trypsin before preparation of neurite membranes abolishes the ability of these membranes to be mitogenic for Schwann cells; and (c) the mitogenic activity of neurite homogenates is exclusively localized in the particulate rather than the soluble fraction of the homogenate. The mitogenic component on the neurite surface is heat labile, and is inactivated by aldehyde fixation. Preliminary data suggest that the mitogenic effect of neurite on Schwann cells is not mediated by 3',5'- cyclic AMP. PMID:6153659

  8. Rho kinase regulates neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via calcium dependent cytoskeleton regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhisheng; Cai, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Nannuan; Chen, Jing; Tan, Minghui; Lin, Hongsheng; Guo, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether calcium is involved in downstream signal transduction in neurite outgrowth regulated by Rho kinase. Methods: In vitro primary hippocampal neurons were cultured and treated with Rho kinase agonist (LPA) or antagonist (Y-27632). Then, the cytoskeleton and neurite outgrowth were observed. After addition of calcium antagonist BAPTA/AM to reduce intracellular calcium, the cytoskeleton distribution and neurite outgrowth were observed. Results: The activation or inhibition of Rho kinase could significantly alter the number and length of neurites of hippocampal neurons. Rho kinase regulated the cytoskeleton to regulate the neurite outgrowth, and LPA could significantly increase intracellular calcium. After BAPTA/AM treatment, the length and branch number of neurites of neurons reduced markedly. BAPTA/AM was able to reduce intracellular calcium and decrease neuronal cytoskeleton. Treatment with both BAPTA/AM and LPA could stop the retraction of neurites, but the length and branch number of neurites remained unchanged after treatment with Y-27632 and LPA. Conclusion: Calcium may affect the cytoskeleton arrangement to regulate neurite outgrowth, and calcium is involved in the downstream signal transduction of Rho kinase regulated neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:28337305

  9. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  10. Neurite outgrowth in human iPSC-derived neurons

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data on morphology of rat and human neurons in cell cultureThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Druwe, I., T. Freudenrich , K. Wallace , T. Shafer , and W. Mundy. Comparison of Human Induced PluripotentStem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth. Applied In vitro Toxicology. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Larchmont, NY, USA, 2(1): 26-36, (2016).

  11. Non-cytotoxic Concentration of Cisplatin Decreases Neuroplasticity-Related Proteins and Neurite Outgrowth Without Affecting the Expression of NGF in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; Dos Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin is the most effective and neurotoxic platinum chemotherapeutic agent. It induces a peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal axonal degeneration that might progress to degeneration of cell bodies and apoptosis. Most symptoms occur nearby distal axonal branches and axonal degeneration might induce peripheral neuropathy regardless neuronal apoptosis. The toxic mechanism of cisplatin has been mainly associated with DNA damage, but cisplatin might also affect neurite outgrowth. Nevertheless, the neurotoxic mechanism of cisplatin remains unclear. We investigated the early effects of cisplatin on axonal plasticity by using non-cytotoxic concentrations of cisplatin and PC12 cells as a model of neurite outgrowth and differentiation. PC12 cells express NGF-receptors (trkA) and respond to NGF by forming neurites, branches and synaptic vesicles. For comparison, we used a neuronal model (SH-SY5Y cells) that does not express trkA nor responds to NGF. Cisplatin did not change NGF expression in PC12 cells and decreased neurite outgrowth in both models, suggesting a NGF/trkA independent mechanism. It also reduced axonal growth (GAP-43) and synaptic (synapsin I and synaptophysin) proteins in PC12 cells, without inducing mitochondrial damage or apoptosis. Therefore, cisplatin might affect axonal plasticity before DNA damage, NGF/trkA down-regulation, mitochondrial damage or neuronal apoptosis. This is the first study to show that neuroplasticity-related proteins might be early targets of the neurotoxic action of cisplatin and their role on cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy should be investigated in vivo.

  12. Plexin B3 promotes neurite outgrowth, interacts homophilically, and interacts with Rin

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Christine; Veske, Andres; Krejcova, Sarka; Rosenberger, Georg; Finckh, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Background Plexins, known to date as receptors of semaphorins, are implicated in semaphorin-mediated axon repulsion and growth cone collapse. However, subtype-specific functions of the majority of the nine members of the mammalian plexin family are largely unknown. In order to investigate functional properties of B-plexins, we analyzed the expression of human and murine plexin B3 and expressed full-length human plexins B2 (B2) and B3 (B3) in NIH-3T3 cells. Results Unexpectedly, B3 strongly and B2 moderately stimulate neurite outgrowth of primary murine cerebellar neurons. Both plexins mediate Ca2+/Mg2+-dependent cell aggregation due to homophilic trans-interaction, which is strong in the case of B3 and moderate for B2. Using different deletion constructs we show that the sema domain of B3 is essential for homophilic interaction. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis, we identified the neuron-specific and calmodulin-binding Ras-related GTPase Rin as an interaction partner of the intracellular part of B3, but not of B2. Rin, also known for its neurite outgrowth-inducing characteristics, co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with B3 in co-transfected COS-7 cells. Conclusion Our data suggest an involvement of homophilic interaction of B3 in semaphorin-independent signaling mechanisms positively influencing neuronal morphogenesis or function. Furthermore the neuron-specific small GTPase Rin is involved in downstream signaling of plexin B3. PMID:16122393

  13. Neurite outgrowth on cultured spiral ganglion neurons induced by erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Berkingali, Nurdanat; Warnecke, Athanasia; Gomes, Priya; Paasche, Gerrit; Tack, Jan; Lenarz, Thomas; Stöver, Timo

    2008-09-01

    The morphological correlate of deafness is the loss of hair cells with subsequent degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). Neurotrophic factors have a neuroprotective effect, and especially brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been demonstrated to protect SGN in vitro and after ototoxic trauma in vivo. Erythropoietin (EPO) attenuates hair cell loss in rat cochlea explants that were treated with gentamycin. Recently, it has also been shown that EPO reduces the apoptose rate in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the effects of EPO on SGN in vitro. Spiral ganglion cells were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium supplemented with EPO and/or BDNF. Results showed that survival rates of SGN were not significantly improved when cultivated with EPO alone. Also, EPO did not further increase BDNF-induced survival of SGN. However, significant elongation of neurites was determined when SGN were cultivated with EPO alone. Even though a less than additive effect was observed, combined treatment with BDNF and EPO led to a significant elongation of neurites when compared to individual treatment with BDNF or EPO. It can be concluded that EPO induces neurite outgrowth rather than promoting survival. Thus, EPO presents as an interesting candidate to enhance and modulate the regenerative effect of BDNF on SGN.

  14. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  15. A miniature tension sensor to measure surgical suture tension of deformable musculoskeletal tissues during joint motion.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new suture tension sensor for musculoskeletal soft tissue that shows deformation or movements. The suture tension sensor was 10 mm in size, which was small enough to avoid conflicting with the adjacent sensor. Furthermore, the sensor had good linearity up to a tension of 50 N, which is equivalent to the breaking strength of a size 1 absorbable suture defined by the United States Pharmacopeia. The design and mechanism were analyzed using a finite element model prior to developing the actual sensor. Based on the analysis, adequate material was selected, and the output linearity was confirmed and compared with the simulated result. To evaluate practical application, the incision of the skin and capsule were sutured during simulated total knee arthroplasty. When conventional surgery and minimally invasive surgery were performed, suture tensions were compared. In minimally invasive surgery, the distal portion of the knee was dissected, and the proximal portion of the knee was dissected additionally in conventional surgery. In the skin suturing, the maximum tension was 4.4 N, and this tension was independent of the sensor location. In contrast, the sensor suturing the capsule in the distal portion had a tension of 4.4 N in minimally invasive surgery, while the proximal sensor had a tension of 44 N in conventional surgery. The suture tensions increased nonlinearly and were dependent on the knee flexion angle. Furthermore, the tension changes showed hysteresis. This miniature tension sensor may help establish the optimal suturing method with adequate tension to ensure wound healing and early recovery.

  16. The soma and neurites of primary afferent neurons in the guinea-pig intestine respond differentially to deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, W A A; Clerc, N; Furness, J B; Gola, M

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic primary afferent neurons in the small intestine are exposed to distortion of their processes and of their cell bodies. Recordings of mechanosensitivity have previously been made from these neurons using intracellular microelectrodes, but this form of recording has not permitted detection of generator potentials from the processes, or of responses to cell body distortion.We have developed a technique to record from enteric neurons in situ using patch electrodes. The mechanical stability of the patch recordings has allowed recording in cell-attached and whole cell configuration during imposed movement of the neurons.Pressing with a fine probe initiated generator potentials (14 ± 9 mV) from circumscribed regions of the neuron processes within the same myenteric ganglion, at distances from 100 to 500 μm from the cell body that was patched. Generator potentials persisted when synaptic transmission was blocked with high Mg2+, low Ca2+ solution.Soma distortion, by pressing down with the whole cell recording electrode, inhibited action potential firing. Consistent with this, moderate intra-electrode pressure (10 mbar; 1 kPa) increased the opening probability of large-conductance (BK) potassium channels, recorded in cell-attached mode, but suction was not effective. In outside-out patches, suction, but not pressure, increased channel opening probability. Mechanosensitive BK channels have not been identified on other neurons.The BK channels had conductances of 195 ± 25 pS. Open probability was increased by depolarization, with a half-maximum activation at a patch potential of 20 mV and a slope factor of 10 mV. Channel activity was blocked by charybdotoxin (20 nM).Stretch that increased membrane area under the electrode by 15 % was sufficient to double open probability. Similar changes in membrane area occur when the intestine changes diameter and wall tension under physiological conditions. Thus, the intestinal intrinsic primary afferent neurons are detectors of

  17. Antillatoxin, a novel lipopeptide, enhances neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons through activation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Jabba, S V; Prakash, A; Dravid, S M; Gerwick, W H; Murray, T F

    2010-03-01

    Antillatoxin (ATX) is a structurally novel lipopeptide that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) leading to sodium influx in cerebellar granule neurons and cerebrocortical neurons 8 to 9 days in vitro (Li et al., 2001; Cao et al., 2008). However, the precise recognition site for ATX on the VGSC remains to be defined. Inasmuch as elevation of intracellular sodium ([Na(+)](i)) may increase N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated Ca(2+) influx, Na(+) may function as a signaling molecule. We hypothesized that ATX may enhance neurite outgrowth in cerebrocortical neurons by elevating [Na(+)](i) and augmenting NMDAR function. ATX (30-100 nM) robustly stimulated neurite outgrowth, and this enhancement was sensitive to the VGSC antagonist, tetrodotoxin. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by ATX, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. ATX was found to increase the open probability of NMDA receptors. Na(+)-dependent up-regulation of NMDAR function has been shown to be regulated by Src family kinase (SFK) (Yu and Salter, 1998). The Src kinase inhibitor PP2 abrogated ATX-enhanced neurite outgrowth, suggesting a SFK involvement in this response. ATX-enhanced neurite outgrowth was also inhibited by the NMDAR antagonist, (5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801), and the calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor, 1,8-naphthoylene benzimidazole-3-carboxylic acid (STO-609), demonstrating the requirement for NMDAR activation with subsequent downstream engagement of the Ca(2+)-dependent CaMKK pathway. These results with the structurally and mechanistically novel natural product, ATX, confirm and generalize our earlier results with a neurotoxin site 5 ligand. These data suggest that VGSC activators may represent a novel pharmacological strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through NMDAR-dependent mechanisms.

  18. Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibitors inhibit neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Oda, Toru; Kume, Toshiaki; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Kumatoshi; Sugmimoto, Hachiro; Akaike, Akinori

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the role of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in neurite outgrowth, we investigated the effects of NCX inhibitors on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. KB-R7943 and 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil, NCX inhibitors, inhibited the neurite outgrowth caused by nerve growth factor (NGF). NCX inhibitors inhibited the neurite outgrowth caused by dibutylyl cAMP, which rapidly reorganizes the cytoskeleton. KB-R7943 inhibited the neurite outgrowth caused by Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho kinase (ROCK) that regulates actin. However, NCX inhibitors did not inhibit NGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. These results suggest that NCX inhibitor affects downstream of the Rho-ROCK signal transduction pathways in neurite outgrowth.

  19. Film tension of liquid nano-film from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Yang, Siyuan; Xiang, Fan; Liang, Yunpei; Li, Qibin; Gao, Xuechao; Liu, Sanjun

    2017-02-01

    Due to its geometry simplicity, the forces of thin liquid film are widely investigated and equivalently employed to explore the phys-chemical properties and mechanical stability of many other surfaces or colloid ensembles. The surface tension of bulk liquid (σ∞) and film tension (γ) are the most important parameters. Considering the insufficiency of detailed interpretation of film tension under micro-scale circumstances, a method for film tension was proposed based on numerical modeling. Assuming surface tension at different slab thicknesses being identical to the surface tension of film, the surface tension and disjoining pressure were subsequently used to evaluate the film tension based on the derivation of film thermodynamics, and a decreasing tendency was discovered for low temperature regions. The influence of saline concentration on nano-films was also investigated, and the comparison of film tensions suggested that higher concentration yielded larger film tension, with stronger decreasing intensity as a function of film thickness. Meanwhile, at thick film range (15-20 nm), film tension of higher concentration film continued to decrease as thickness increase, however it arrived to constant value for that of lower concentration. Finally, it was found that the film tension was almost independent on the film curvature, but varied with the thickness. The approach is applicable to symmetric emulsion films containing surfactants and bi-layer lipid films.

  20. IPP5 inhibits neurite growth in primary sensory neurons by maintaining TGF-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing-Jian; Gao, Nan-Nan; Guo-QiangMa; Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Yu, Wen-Hui; Pan, Jing; Wang, Qiong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2013-01-15

    During nerve regeneration, neurite growth is regulated by both intrinsic molecules and extracellular factors. Here, we found that inhibitor 5 of protein phosphatase 1 (IPP5), a newly identified inhibitory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), inhibited neurite growth in primary sensory neurons as an intrinsic regulator. IPP5 was highly expressed in the primary sensory neurons of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and was downregulated after sciatic nerve axotomy. Knocking down IPP5 with specific shRNA increased the length of the longest neurite, the total neurite length and the number of neurite ends in cultured rat DRG neurons. Mutation of the PP1-docking motif K(8)IQF(11) or the PP1-inhibiting motif at Thr(34) eliminated the IPP5-induced inhibition of neurite growth. Furthermore, biochemical experiments showed that IPP5 interacted with type I transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRI) and PP1 and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling in a PP1-dependent manner. Overexpressing IPP5 in DRG neurons aggravated TGF-β-induced inhibition of neurite growth, which was abolished by blocking PP1 or IPP5 binding to PP1. Blockage of TGF-β signaling with the TβRI inhibitor SB431542 or Smad2 shRNA attenuated the IPP5-induced inhibition of neurite growth. Thus, these data indicate that selectively expressed IPP5 inhibits neurite growth by maintaining TGF-β signaling in primary sensory neurons.

  1. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Moritz; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life). The omnipresence of tension and suspense suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie) build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying tension and suspense. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena. PMID:25717309

  2. Managing the right tension.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Dominic; Favaro, Ken

    2006-12-01

    Of all the competing objectives every company faces, three pairs stand out: profitability versus growth, the short term versus the long term, and the whole organization versus the units. In each case, progress on one front usually comes at the expense of progress on the other. The authors researched the performance of more than 1000 companies worldwide over the past two decades and found that most struggle to succeed across the three tensions. From 1983 to 2003, for example, only 32% of these companies more often than not achieved positive profitability and revenue growth at the same time. The problem, the authors discovered, is not so much that managers don't recognize the tensions--those are all too familiar to anyone who has ever run a business. Rather, it is that managers frequently don't focus on the tension that matters most to their company. Even when they do identify the right tension, they usually make the mistake of prioritizing a "lead" objective within it-for example, profitability over growth. As a result, companies often end up moving first in this direction, then in that, and then back again, never quite resolving the tension. The companies that performed best adopted a very different approach. Instead of setting a lead objective, they looked at how best to strengthen what the two sides of each tension have in common: For profitability and growth,the common bond is customer benefit; for the short term and the long, it is sustainable earnings; and for the whole and its parts, it is particular organizational resources and capabilities. The authors describe how companies can select the right tension, what traps they may fall into when they focus on one side over the other, and how to escape these traps by managing to the bonds between objectives.

  3. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  4. The Effects of Hole-size and Environment on the Mechanical Behaviour of a Quasi-isotropic AS4/3501-6 Laminate in Tension, Compression and Bending

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    results of open-hole-tension ( OHT ), open-hole-compression (OHC) and open-hole-four-point-bend (OHB) tests conducted on AS4/3501-6 quasi-isotropic [45...through-holes ranging in diameter from 0.00 (unnotched) to 9.55 mm. The strain distribution near the hole in an OHT specimen was measured and found to...the strains near the hole on the tensile face of OHB specimens. OHT and OHC strength fell rapidly as hole size increased for small holes and less so

  5. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  6. Surface Tension Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Burkhard; Engel, Horst; Schleifenbaum, Bernd

    1989-12-01

    A new microscopic technique will be presented for imaging surface topography and the locally varying surface tension of the object. With this technique it is possible to image the locally varying chemical composition of the specimen surface on a microscopic scale because the surface tension depends on the chemical composition. The imaging technique can be described as follows: By a simple preparation technique a thin (thickness several microns) liquid layer (e.g. immersion oil), is placed on the surface of the specimen. The resulting surface tension forces the boundary of the liquid layer to move. As the surface tension is a function of the location the boundary is modulated according to the magnitude of the surface tension at each place. Thus registering the shape of the moving boundary of the liquid layer at equidistant time intervals yields information on the specimen surface. The shape of the moving boundary is detected by a light microscope with differential interference contrast in combination with an image analysis system suited for real-time processing of image sequences in a threshold detection mode.

  7. Stimulation of Neurite Outgrowth Using an Electrically Conducting Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christine E.; Shastri, Venkatram R.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Langer, Robert

    1997-08-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves often cannot be repaired by the juxtaposition of the severed nerve ends. Surgeons have typically used autologous nerve grafts, which have several drawbacks including the need for multiple surgical procedures and loss of function at the donor site. As an alternative, the use of nerve guidance channels to bridge the gap between severed nerve ends is being explored. In this paper, the electrically conductive polymer--oxidized polypyrrole (PP)--has been evaluated for use as a substrate to enhance nerve cell interactions in culture as a first step toward potentially using such polymers to stimulate in vivo nerve regeneration. Image analysis demonstrates that PC-12 cells and primary chicken sciatic nerve explants attached and extended neurites equally well on both PP films and tissue culture polystyrene in the absence of electrical stimulation. In contrast, PC-12 cells interacted poorly with indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid) surfaces. However, PC-12 cells cultured on PP films and subjected to an electrical stimulus through the film showed a significant increase in neurite lengths compared with ones that were not subjected to electrical stimulation through the film and tissue culture polystyrene controls. The median neurite length for PC-12 cells grown on PP and subjected to an electrical stimulus was 18.14 μ m (n = 5643) compared with 9.5 μ m (n = 4440) for controls. Furthermore, animal implantation studies reveal that PP invokes little adverse tissue response compared with poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid).

  8. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth using an electrically conducting polymer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christine E.; Shastri, Venkatram R.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Langer, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves often cannot be repaired by the juxtaposition of the severed nerve ends. Surgeons have typically used autologous nerve grafts, which have several drawbacks including the need for multiple surgical procedures and loss of function at the donor site. As an alternative, the use of nerve guidance channels to bridge the gap between severed nerve ends is being explored. In this paper, the electrically conductive polymer—oxidized polypyrrole (PP)—has been evaluated for use as a substrate to enhance nerve cell interactions in culture as a first step toward potentially using such polymers to stimulate in vivo nerve regeneration. Image analysis demonstrates that PC-12 cells and primary chicken sciatic nerve explants attached and extended neurites equally well on both PP films and tissue culture polystyrene in the absence of electrical stimulation. In contrast, PC-12 cells interacted poorly with indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(l-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) surfaces. However, PC-12 cells cultured on PP films and subjected to an electrical stimulus through the film showed a significant increase in neurite lengths compared with ones that were not subjected to electrical stimulation through the film and tissue culture polystyrene controls. The median neurite length for PC-12 cells grown on PP and subjected to an electrical stimulus was 18.14 μm (n = 5643) compared with 9.5 μm (n = 4440) for controls. Furthermore, animal implantation studies reveal that PP invokes little adverse tissue response compared with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid). PMID:9256415

  9. Impaired neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth in an HIV-gp120 transgenic model is reversed by exercise via BDNF production and Cdk5 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Amin, Niranjana D.; Venkatesan, Arun; Wang, Tongguang; Tyagi, Richa; Pant, Harish C.; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is accompanied with brain atrophy. In these patients, impairment of adult neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth in the hippocampus may contribute to the cognitive dysfunction. Although running exercises can enhance neurogenesis and normalize neurite outgrowth, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The HIV envelope protein, gp120, has been shown to impair neurogenesis. Using a gp120 transgenic mouse model, we demonstrate that exercise stimulated neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and increased the survival rate and generation of newborn cells. However sustained exercise activity was necessary since the effects were reversed by detraining. Exercise also normalized dendritic outgrowth of neurons. Furthermore, it also increased the expression of hippocampal brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and normalized hyperactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). Hyper-activated Cdk5 or gp120 treatment led to aberrant neurite outgrowth and BDNF treatment normalized the neurite outgrowth in NPC cultures. These results suggest that sustained exercise has trophic activity on the neuronal lineage which is mediated by Cdk5 modulation of the BDNF pathway. PMID:23982957

  10. The adhesion molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1 regulates neurite branching through a SAX-7/L1CAM–EGL-15/FGFR receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Lázaro-Peña, María I.; Ramos-Ortiz, Gibram A.; Bülow, Hannes E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neurite branching is essential for correct assembly of neural circuits, yet remains a poorly understood process. For example, the neural cell adhesion molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1, which is mutated in Kallmann Syndrome regulates neurite branching through mechanisms largely unknown. Here we show that KAL-1/anosmin-1 mediates neurite branching as an autocrine co-factor with EGL-17/FGF through a receptor complex consisting of the conserved cell adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM and the fibroblast growth factor receptor EGL-15/FGFR. This protein complex, which appears conserved in humans, requires the immunoglobulin (Ig) domains of SAX-7/L1CAM and the FN(III) domains of KAL-1/anosmin-1 for formation in vitro as well as function in vivo. The kinase domain of the EGL-15/FGFR is required for branching, and genetic evidence suggests that ras-mediated signaling downstream of EGL-15/FGFR is necessary to effect branching. Our studies establish a molecular pathway that regulates neurite branching during development of the nervous system. PMID:26004184

  11. Minocycline Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of PC12 Cells Exposed to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation and Reoxygenation Through Regulation of MLCP/MLC Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Feng, Jin-Zhou; Xu, Guang-Hui; Fu, Jie; Li, Xiao-Gang; Qin, Xin-Yue

    2017-04-01

    Minocycline, a semi-synthetic second-generation derivative of tetracycline, has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects both in animal models and in clinic trials of neurological diseases. In the present study, we first investigated the protective effects of minocycline on oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation-induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and its potential mechanism in the neuronal cell line, PC12 cells. We found that minocycline significantly increased cell viability, promoted neurite outgrowth and enhanced the expression of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in PC12 cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation injury. In addition, immunoblots revealed that minocycline reversed the overexpression of phosphorylated myosin light chain (MLC) and the suppression of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation injury. Moreover, the minocycline-induced neurite outgrowth was significantly blocked by Calyculin A (1 nM), an inhibitor of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), but not by an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126; 10 μM). These findings suggested that minocycline activated the MLCP/MLC signaling pathway in PC12 cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation injury, which resulted in the promotion of neurite outgrowth.

  12. Axelrod's model with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Bruno; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we propose a subtle change in Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The mechanism consists of excluding from the set of potentially interacting neighbors those that would never possibly exchange. Although the alteration proposed does not alter the state space topologically, it yields significant qualitative changes, specifically the emergence of surface tension, driving the system in some cases to metastable states. The transient behavior is considerably richer, and cultural regions become stable leading to the formation of different spatiotemporal patterns. A metastable "glassy" phase emerges between the globalized phase and the disordered, multicultural phase.

  13. [Treatment of tension headache].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, J

    2000-01-01

    The scientific basis of tension- type headache suffers from the lack of precise pathophysiological knowledge and the heterogenecity of this disorder. Treatment of acute tension-type headache episodes is more effective with an NSAIDs (ibuprofen 400-800mg, naproxen 550-825mg, ketoprofen 50-75mg) than with aspirin or paracetamol. Caffein containing preparations of NSAIDs are slightly superior, but should not be taken frequently to avoid headache chronification. For chronic tension-type headache, relaxation therapies with EMG biofeedback and tricyclics have about the same efficacy rate of 40-50p.100. Physical therapy and acupuncture are in general less effective. There is thus clearly a need for better strategies, e.g. combination of available therapies and novel approaches.

  14. Tension solar mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, W.P.

    1986-09-02

    A solar collector is described comprising a central tower having a solar receiver thereon; tension towers positioned concentrically about the central tower;a rigid inner ring disposed about the central tower and sized to permit vertical movement relative to the central tower; cables extending between the inner ring and the tops of each of the tension towers; and a reflectively-coated sheet of flexible material attached to the upper surface of the cables; whereby the action of gravity on the cables and the sheet form a concave reflector for focusing solar energy onto the solar receiver.

  15. [Association between the frequency and duration, but not the intensity, of headache with mechanical hypersensitivity and the health of patients with tension-type headache].

    PubMed

    Palacios-Cena, M; Fernandez-Munoz, J J; Cigaran-Mendez, M; Moron-Verdasco, A; Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, C

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. La asociacion entre las variables clinicas de la cefalea y otras variables neurofisiologicas o de salud es controvertida. Objetivo. Determinar la asociacion de la frecuencia, duracion e intensidad del dolor con la sensibilidad mecanica craneocervical, considerando el efecto de otras variables de salud y fisicas. Pacientes y metodos. Se incluyeron 72 pacientes con cefalea de tension. Se mantuvo un diario mensual para determinar la frecuencia, duracion e intensidad del dolor. Se calcularon los umbrales de dolor a la presion (UDP) y la sensibilidad a la palpacion sobre la region craneocervical, calidad de vida (Short Form-36), discapacidad, depresion y movilidad cervical. Se introdujeron todas las variables en modelos de regresion logistica jerarquica para determinar las interacciones. Resultados. Se encontraron correlaciones entre la frecuencia y duracion de la cefalea, pero no la intensidad, con el resto de variables. El analisis de regresion mostro que la combinacion del UDP sobre el temporal, dolor corporal, edad y rol fisico explicaba el 22,3% de la varianza de la frecuencia, mientras que la combinacion de salud general, UDP sobre el trapecio superior y frecuencia del dolor explicaba el 20% de la varianza de la duracion (p < 0,001). Conclusiones. Este estudio ha encontrado que la frecuencia y la duracion de la cefalea, pero no la intensidad, se encuentran asociadas con variables neurofisiologicas, como el UDP sobre el cuello/cabeza o la percepcion de dolor generalizado en la cefalea tensional. Otras variables, como la edad, el rol fisico y la salud general tambien mostraron una asociacion con la frecuencia y la duracion de la cefalea.

  16. Munc18 and Munc13 regulate early neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Broeke, Jurjen H.P.; Roelandse, Martijn; Luteijn, Maartje J.; Boiko, Tatiana; Matus, Andrew; Toonen, Ruud F.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    Background information. During development, growth cones of outgrowing neurons express proteins involved in vesicular secretion, such as SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) proteins, Munc13 and Munc18. Vesicles are known to fuse in growth cones prior to synapse formation, which may contribute to outgrowth. Results. We tested this possibility in dissociated cell cultures and organotypic slice cultures of two release-deficient mice (Munc18-1 null and Munc13-1/2 double null). Both types of release-deficient neurons have a decreased outgrowth speed and therefore have a smaller total neurite length during early development [DIV1–4 (day in vitro 1–4)]. In addition, more filopodia per growth cone were observed in Munc18-1 null, but not WT (wild-type) or Munc13-1/2 double null neurons. The smaller total neurite length during early development was no longer observed after synaptogenesis (DIV14–23). Conclusion. These data suggest that the inability of vesicle fusion in the growth cone affects outgrowth during the initial phases when outgrowth speed is high, but not during/after synaptogenesis. Overall, the outgrowth speed is probably not rate-limiting during neuronal network formation, at least in vitro. In addition, Munc18, but not Munc13, regulates growth cone filopodia, potentially via its previously observed effect on filamentous actin. PMID:20497124

  17. Neurite outgrowth of NG108-15 cells induced by heat shock protein 90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Erika; Sano, Mamoru

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported that radicicol (Rad) and geldanamycin (Geld), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, potentiate neurite growth of cultured sensory neurons from chick embryo. We now show that the antibiotics induce neurite growth in NG108-15 cells. Treatment of the cells with these drugs caused transient decrease in protein levels of Raf1, ERK1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, Akt1, and CDK4. The neurite growth of NG108-15 induced by the inhibitors was blocked by actynomycin D, but the neurite growth stimulated by dbcAMP in the cells was not affected. The neurite growth could be due to a change in the synthesis of some specific protein(s) and is speculated to be due to the transient downregulation of particular-signaling molecules stabilized by Hsp90.

  18. P2X1 Receptor-Mediated Ca(2+) Influx Triggered by DA-9801 Potentiates Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Back, Moon Jung; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Joo Hyun; Fu, Zhicheng; Son, Mi Won; Choi, Sang Zin; Go, Hyo Sang; Yoo, Sungjae; Hwang, Sun Wook; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2016-11-16

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal regeneration has emerged as a strategy to treat neuronal degeneration-associated disorders. However, direct NGF administration is limited by the occurrence of adverse effects at high doses of NGF. Therefore, development of a therapeutic strategy to promote the NGF trophic effect is required. In view of the lack of understanding of the mechanism for potentiating the NGF effect, this study investigated molecular targets of DA-9801, a well-standardized Dioscorea rhizome extract, which has a promoting effect on NGF. An increase in intracellular calcium ion level was induced by DA-9801, and chelation of extracellular calcium ions with ethylene-bis(oxyethylenenitrilo)tetraacetic acid (EGTA) suppressed the potentiating effect of DA-9801 on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. In addition, EGTA treatment reduced the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), the major mediators of neurite outgrowth. To find which calcium ion-permeable channel contributes to the calcium ion influx induced by DA-9801, we treated PC12 cells with various inhibitors of calcium ion-permeable channels. NF449, a P2X1 receptor selective antagonist, significantly abolished the potentiating effect of DA-9801 on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and abrogated the DA-9801-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, transfection with siRNA of P2X1 receptor significantly reduced the DA-9801-enhanced neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, calcium ion influx through P2X1 receptor mediated the promoting effect of DA-9801 on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  19. The Akt-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway contributes to nerve growth factor-mediated neurite outgrowth in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Hashikawa, Naoya; Yutani, Chikao; Zamami, Yoshito; Jin, Xin; Takatori, Shingo; Mio, Mitsunobu; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2011-08-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apo)-deficient [apoE(-/-)] mice have peripheral sensory nerve defects and a reduced and delayed response to noxious thermal stimuli. However, to date, no report has focused on the influence of apoE deficiency on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerve fiber extensions. We have shown that the density of CGRP-containing nerve fibers decreases in mesenteric arteries of apoE(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Here, we investigated whether apoE deficiency is involved in nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced CGRP-containing nerve regeneration using apoE(-/-) mice. NGF-mediated CGRP-like immunoreactivity (LI)-neurite outgrowth in apoE(-/-) cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells was significantly lower than that in wild-type cultures. However, the level of NGF receptor mRNA in apoE(-/-) DRG cells was similar to that in wild-type mice. To clarify the mechanism of the impaired ability of NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth, we focused on the Akt-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway. Expression of phosphorylated Akt was significantly reduced in apoE(-/-) DRG. The NO donor, sodium nitroprusside or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, did not affect NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth in apoE(-/-) cultured DRG cells. However, 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate sodium salt n-hydrate, a cGMP analog, induced NGF-mediated nerve facilitation similar to wild-type NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth levels. Furthermore, in apoE(-/-) DRG, soluble guanylate cyclase expression was significantly lower than that in wild-type DRG. These results suggest that in apoE(-/-) mice the Akt-NO-cGMP pathway is impaired, which may be caused by NGF-mediated CGRP-LI-neurite outgrowth defects.

  20. Sodium channel activation augments NMDA receptor function and promotes neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Dravid, Shashank M.; Prakash, Anand; Xie, Jun; Peterson, Jennifer; Jabba, Sairam V.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    A range of extrinsic signals, including afferent activity, affect neuronal growth and plasticity. Neuronal activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ and activity-dependent calcium signaling has been shown to regulate dendritic growth and branching (Konur and Ghosh, 2005). NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling cascades has moreover been demonstrated to regulate neurite/axonal outgrowth (Wayman et al., 2004). We used a sodium channel activator, brevetoxin (PbTx-2), to explore the relationship between intracellular [Na+] and NMDAR-dependent development. PbTx-2 alone, at a concentration of 30 nM, did not affect Ca2+ dynamics in DIV-2 cerebrocortical neurons; however, this treatment robustly potentiated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. The 30 nM PbTx-2 treatment produced a maximum [Na+]i of 16.9 ± 1.5 mM representing an increment of 8.8 ± 1.8 mM over basal. The corresponding membrane potential change produced by 30 nM PbTx-2 was modest and therefore insufficient to relieve the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block of NMDARs. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by PbTx-2, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. PbTx-2 treatment was found to increase both the mean open time and open probability of NMDA receptors. These effects of PbTx-2 on NMDA receptor function were dependent on extracellular Na+ and activation of Src kinase. The functional consequences of PbTx-2-induced enhancement of NMDAR function were evaluated in immature cerebrocortical neurons. PbTx-2 concentrations between 3 and 300 nM enhanced neurite outgrowth. Voltage-gated sodium channel activators may accordingly represent a novel pharmacologic strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through an NMDA receptor and Src family kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:19279266

  1. Orientation and temperature dependence of some mechanical properties of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4. 3: Tension-compression anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gaab, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Hemker, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy specimens with various crystallographic directions along their axes were tested in compression at room temperature, 650, 760, 870, and 980 deg C. These results are compared with the tensile behavior studied previously. The alloy, Rene N4, was developed for gas turbine engine blades and has the nominal composition 3.7 Al, 4.2 Ti, 4 Ta, 0.5 Nb, 6 W, 1.5 Mo 9 Cr. 7.5 Co, balance Ni, in weight percent. Slip trace analysis showed that primary cube slip occurred even at room temperature for the 111 specimens. With increasing test temperature more orientations exhibited primary cube slip, until at 870 deg C only the 100 and 011 specimens exhibited normal octahedral slip. The yield strength for octahedral slip was numerically analysed using a model proposed by Lall, Chin, and Pope to explain deviations from Schmid's Law in the yielding behavior of a single phase Gamma prime alloy, Ni3(Al, Nb). The Schmid's Law deviations in Rene N4 were found to be largely due to a tension-compression anisotropy. A second effect, which increases trength for orientations away from 001, was found to be small in Rene N4. Analysis of recently published data on the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 yielded the same result.

  2. Respective roles of neurofilaments, microtubules, MAP1B, and tau in neurite outgrowth and stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, T B; Beermann, M L

    1994-01-01

    The respective roles of neurofilaments (NFs), microtubules (MTs), and the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) MAP 1B and tau on neurite outgrowth and stabilization were probed by the intracellular delivery of specific antisera into transiently permeabilized NB2a/d1 cells during treatment with dbcAMP. Intracellular delivery of antisera specific for the low (NF-L), middle (NF-M), or extensively phosphorylated high (NF-H) molecular weight subunits did not prevent initial neurite elaboration, nor did it induce retraction of existing neurites elaborated by cells that had been previously treated for 1 d with dbcAMP. By contrast, intracellular delivery of antisera directed against tubulin reduced the percentage of cells with neurites at both these time points. Intracellular delivery of anti-NF-L and anti-NF-M antisera did not induce retraction in cells treated with dbcAMP for 3 d. However, intracellular delivery of antisera directed against extensively phosphorylated NF-H, MAP1B, tau, or tubulin induced similar levels of neurite retraction at this time. Intracellular delivery of monoclonal antibodies (RT97 or SMI-31) directed against phosphorylated NF-H induced neurite retraction in cell treated with dbcAMP for 3 d; a monoclonal antibody (SMI-32) directed against nonphosphorylated NF-H did not induce neurite retraction at this time. By contrast, none of the above antisera induced retraction of neurites in cells treated with dbcAMP for 7 d. Neurites develop resistance to retraction by colchicine, first detectable in some neurites after 3 d and in the majority of neurites after 7 d of dbcAMP treatment. We therefore examined whether or not colchicine resistance was compromised by intracellular delivery of the above antisera. Colchicine treatment resulted in rapid neurite retraction after intracellular delivery of antisera directed against extensively phosphorylated NF-H, MAP1B, or tau into cells that had previously been treated with dbcAMP for 7 d. By contrast, colchicine

  3. Modification of Upper Thread Tensioner of Sewing Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klouček, P.; Škop, P.

    Standard mechanical upper thread tensioner of sewing machines is more and more limited in use for industrial sewing machines due to increasing requests for quality and raising velocity of machines. If we omit mostly manual settings of force made only by sense, the most problematic things are influence of different friction coefficient of the different batch of threads and strong relation between thread tension and sewing machine velocity. The article describes the development focused to the elimination of the most significant disadvantages of a standard tensioner and mainly finding of new conception of the tensioner with electromagnetic brake, development and testing of its prototype.

  4. Tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S

    1999-01-01

    Tension-type headaches, the most prevalent form of headache, are differentiated as being either episodic or chronic. The episodic form is a physiologic response to stress, anxiety, depression, emotional conflicts, fatigue, or repressed hostility. Treatment focuses on the use of over-the-counter or prescribed simple analgesics for pain relief. Successful treatment of the chronic form depends on recognition of depression or persistent anxiety states. Primary care physicians can effectively manage most of these patients with nonhabituating anxiolytic or antidepressant medications; however, referrals for psychotherapy may be required in some cases. When tension-type headaches occur in children and adolescents, the physician must explore the patient's family and social relationships as well as school performance. In addition to nonhabituating drug therapies, family counseling and biofeedback may be helpful. In coexisting migraine and tension-type headaches, nonhabituating analgesics may be used for the relief of acute pain; the use of ergotamine and triptans should be restricted to relief of the hard or sick headache. Tricyclic antidepressants or monoamine oxidase inhibitors are the gold standards for prophylaxis, although the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be indicated in less severe cases. Several forms of biofeedback have also proved effective. Nonetheless, some patients with this form of headache may require psychiatric treatment for severe depression.

  5. Surface tension and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, J.; Sanz-Andrés, A.; Pérez-Grande, I.; Pindado, S.; Franchini, S.; Alonso, G.

    2014-09-01

    The behaviour of confined liquids on board an orbiting spacecraft is mainly driven by surface tension phenomena, which cause an apparently anomalous response of the liquid when compared with the behaviour that can be observed on an Earth laboratory provided that the amount of liquid is high enough. The reason is that in an orbiting spacecraft the different inertial forces acting on the bulk of the liquid are almost zero, causing thus capillary forces to be the dominant ones. Of course, since gravity forces are proportional to the liquid volume, whereas surface tension forces are proportional to the liquid surface, there are situations on Earth where capillarity can be the dominant effect, as it happens when very small volume liquid samples are considered. However, work with small size samples may require the use of sophisticated optical devices. Leaving aside the neutral buoyancy technique, a way of handling large liquid interfaces is by using drop towers, where the sample falls subjected to the action of Earth’s gravity. This approach is suitable when the characteristic time of the problem under consideration is much smaller than the drop time. In this work the transformation of an out-of-use chimney into a drop tower is presented. Because of the miniaturization, hardiness and low cost of current electronic devices, a drop tower can be used as an inexpensive tool for undergraduate students to experimentally analyse a large variety of surface tension driven phenomena.

  6. Entropic Tension in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Sens, Pierre; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Unlike their model membrane counterparts, biological membranes are richly decorated with a heterogeneous assembly of membrane proteins. These proteins are so tightly packed that their excluded area interactions can alter the free energy landscape controlling the conformational transitions suffered by such proteins. For membrane channels, this effect can alter the critical membrane tension at which they undergo a transition from a closed to an open state, and therefore influence protein function in vivo. Despite their obvious importance, crowding phenomena in membranes are much less well studied than in the cytoplasm. Using statistical mechanics results for hard disk liquids, we show that crowding induces an entropic tension in the membrane, which influences transitions that alter the projected area and circumference of a membrane protein. As a specific case study in this effect, we consider the impact of crowding on the gating properties of bacterial mechanosensitive membrane channels, which are thought to confer osmoprotection when these cells are subjected to osmotic shock. We find that crowding can alter the gating energies by more than in physiological conditions, a substantial fraction of the total gating energies in some cases. Given the ubiquity of membrane crowding, the nonspecific nature of excluded volume interactions, and the fact that the function of many membrane proteins involve significant conformational changes, this specific case study highlights a general aspect in the function of membrane proteins. PMID:22438801

  7. Students' difficulties with tension in massless strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-García, S.; Alfaro-Avena, L. L.; Chávez-Pierce, J. E.; Luna-González, J.; González-Quezada, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Many students enrolled in introductory mechanics courses have difficulties with understanding the concept of static equilibrium. Some of these difficulties are related to the concept of force in the context of tension in massless strings. We identify three kinds of misconceptions: Students' beliefs that the angle of the string and proximity to the object are related to the tension. Students also use incorrect compensation arguments to reason about situations where both the angle and proximity change simultaneously. These difficulties were identified during investigations conducted in laboratory and lecture sessions at three universities in the United States and Mexico.

  8. Rabies virus neuritic paralysis: immunopathogenesis of nonfatal paralytic rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, F; Cox, J H; Meyer, S; Dahme, E; Reddehase, M J

    1992-01-01

    Two pathogenetically distinct disease manifestations are distinguished in a murine model of primary rabies virus infection with the Evelyn-Rokitnicky-Abelseth strain, rabies virus neuritic paralysis (RVNP) and fatal encephalopathogenic rabies. RVNP develops with high incidence in immunocompetent mice after intraplantar infection as a flaccid paralysis restricted to the infected limb. The histopathologic correlate of this monoplegia is a degeneration of the myelinated motor neurons of the peripheral nerve involved. While, in this model, fatal encephalopathogenic rabies develops only after depletion of the CD4 subset of T lymphocytes and without contribution of the CD8 subset, RVNP is identified as an immunopathological process in which both the CD4 and CD8 subsets of T lymphocytes are critically implicated. Images PMID:1629964

  9. Positive and negative cues for modulating neurite dynamics and receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Melissa R; Sundararaghavan, Harini G

    2017-03-27

    Many current peripheral nerve repair strategies focus on delivering positive, growth promoting cues (e.g. extracellular matrix, ECM) while eliminating negative, growth inhibiting cues (e.g. chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, CSPGs) at the injury site. We hypothesized that recapitulating the positive and negative cues of the peripheral nerve injury microenvironment would improve regeneration. First, we tested the effects of a characteristic CSPG, chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) on neurite dynamics of dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using time lapse video microscopy. DRG growth was recorded on different adhesive substrates, including a novel, porcine-derived spinal cord matrix (SCM). The SCM significantly increased frequency of neurite extension coordinated by a significant reduction in the neurites' time spent stalled. The SCM also mitigated inhibitory effects of CSA, producing longer neurites than the controls without CSA treatment. Next we aimed to elucidate receptors involved in mediating this behavior by testing the ability of CSA to upregulate cell-substrate binding receptors using flow cytometry. Our results showed a significant increase in syndecan-3 receptor expression in neurons treated with CSA. Furthermore, syndecans would most likely bind to the sulfated glycosaminoglycans measured in the SCM. Finally, we evaluated neurite growth on biomaterial scaffolds featuring CSA and SCM cues. Our results showed significantly increased neurite outgrowth on electrospun hyaluronic acid fibers with SCM and low levels of CSA. Higher incorporation of CSA maintained its inhibitory properties. Future work will evaluate coupling CSPGs with growth-permissive ECM to assess the combined effect on neurite outgrowth.

  10. Triggering of high-speed neurite outgrowth using an optical microheater.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kotaro; Zeeb, Vadim; Kawamura, Yuki; Arai, Tomomi; Gotoh, Mizuho; Itoh, Hideki; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2015-11-16

    Optical microheating is a powerful non-invasive method for manipulating biological functions such as gene expression, muscle contraction, and cell excitation. Here, we demonstrate its potential usage for regulating neurite outgrowth. We found that optical microheating with a water-absorbable 1,455-nm laser beam triggers directional and explosive neurite outgrowth and branching in rat hippocampal neurons. The focused laser beam under a microscope rapidly increases the local temperature from 36 °C to 41 °C (stabilized within 2 s), resulting in the elongation of neurites by more than 10 μm within 1 min. This high-speed, persistent elongation of neurites was suppressed by inhibitors of both microtubule and actin polymerization, indicating that the thermosensitive dynamics of these cytoskeletons play crucial roles in this heat-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we showed that microheating induced the regrowth of injured neurites and the interconnection of neurites. These results demonstrate the efficacy of optical microheating methods for the construction of arbitrary neural networks.

  11. Long-term neurite orientation on astrocyte monolayers aligned by microtopography.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Annette; Alekseeva, Tijna; Katechia, Kashyap; Robertson, Mary; Riehle, Mathis O; Barnett, Susan C

    2007-12-01

    After spinal cord injury neuronal connections are not easily re-established. Success has been hampered by the lack of orientation of neurites inside scar tissue and a lack of neurites crossing out of the site of injury. Oriented scaffolds in biodegradable polymers could be an excellent way to support both the orientation of neurites within the injury site as well as aiding their crossing out of the lesion. To establish the validity of using grooved micro-topography in polycaprolactone in combination with glia we have studied the long-term (3 weeks) orientation of neuronal cells on monolayers of astrocytes on the top of grooved topographies of various dimensions. We find that neurites are significantly aligned by groove/ridge type topographies which are "buried" under a monolayer of astrocytes for up to 3 weeks. This alignment is significantly lower than that of neurites growing directly on the topography, but these neurons do not survive on the poly-l-lysine coated polymer for more than a week. The alignment of neurites on the astrocyte layer to the underlying topography decreases over time, and with groove width. Topographies with 12.5 or 25 microm lateral dimension appear optimal for the long-term alignment and can support myelination. We have shown for the first time that micro-topography can act through an overlaid astrocyte layer and results in aligned neurites in long-term culture and that these can be myelinated by endogenous oligodendrocytes.

  12. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  13. Effects of selective inhibition of protein kinase C, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase on neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    1993-06-01

    parameter that was measured (including viability). These results suggest that these three protein kinases selectively modulate different aspects of neurite development. The university of effects caused by calmodulin inhibition make it impossible to determine if there are specific targets of calmodulin action involved in neurite development. Finally, our data indicate that some superficially similar characteristics of neuronal differentiation, such as neurite initiation and branching, may be controlled by quite different molecular mechanisms.

  14. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  15. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  16. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  17. Genetic Analysis of a Novel Tubulin Mutation That Redirects Synaptic Vesicle Targeting and Causes Neurite Degeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L.; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress. PMID:25392990

  18. Genetic analysis of a novel tubulin mutation that redirects synaptic vesicle targeting and causes neurite degeneration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jiun-Min; Chen, Chun-Hao; Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-11-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress.

  19. Dynamic film and interfacial tensions in emulsion and foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Koczo, K.; Wasan, D.T.

    1997-03-01

    In concentrated fluid dispersions the liquid films are under dynamic conditions during film rupture or drainage. Aqueous foam films stabilized with sodium decylsulfonate and aqueous emulsion films stabilized with the nonionic Brij 58 surfactant were formed at the tip of a capillary and the film tension was measured under static and dynamic conditions. In the stress relaxation experiments the response of the film tension to a sudden film area expansion was studied. These experiments also allowed the direct measurement of the Gibbs film elasticity. In the dynamic film tension experiments, the film area was continuously increased by a constant rate and the dynamic film tension was monitored. The measured film tensions were compared with the interfacial tensions of the respective single air/water and oil/water interfaces, which were measured using the same radius of curvature, relative expansion, and expansion rate as in the film studies. It was found that under dynamic conditions the film tension is higher than twice the single interfacial tension (IFT) and a mechanism was suggested to explain the difference. When the film, initially at equilibrium, is expanded and the interfacial area increases, a substantial surfactant depletion occurs inside the film. As a result, the surfactant can be supplied only from the adjoining meniscus (Plateau border) by surface diffusion, and the film tension is controlled by the diffusion and adsorption of surfactant in the meniscus. The results have important implications for the stability and rheology of foams and emulsions with high dispersed phase ratios (polyhedral structure).

  20. Epac and the high affinity rolipram binding conformer of PDE4 modulate neurite outgrowth and myelination using an in vitro spinal cord injury model

    PubMed Central

    Boomkamp, S D; McGrath, M A; Houslay, M D; Barnett, S C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose cAMP and pharmacological inhibition of PDE4, which degrades it, are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Using our previously described in vitro SCI model, we studied the mechanisms by which cAMP modulators promote neurite outgrowth and myelination using enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram and other modulators of downstream signalling effectors. Experimental Approach Rat mixed neural cell myelinating cultures were cut with a scalpel and treated with enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram, Epac agonists and PKA antagonists. Neurite outgrowth, density and myelination were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cytokine levels analysed by qPCR. Key Results Inhibition of the high-affinity rolipram-binding state (HARBS), rather than the low-affinity rolipram binding state (LARBS) PDE4 conformer promoted neurite outgrowth and myelination. These effects were mediated through the activation of Epac and not through PKA. Expression of the chemokine CXCL10, known to inhibit myelination, was markedly elevated in astrocytes after Rho inhibition and this was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase or PDE4. Conclusions and Implications PDE4 inhibitors targeted at the HARBS conformer or Epac agonists may provide promising novel targets for the treatment of SCI. Our study demonstrates the differential mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as the benefit of a combined pharmacological approach and highlighting potential promising targets for the treatment of SCI. These findings need to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:24467222

  1. NGF induces the expression of group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 in PC12 cells: the newly synthesized enzyme is addressed to growing neurites.

    PubMed

    Nardicchi, Vincenza; Ferrini, Monica; Pilolli, Francesca; Angeli, Emanuela Biagioni; Persichetti, Emanuele; Beccari, Tommaso; Mannucci, Roberta; Arcuri, Cataldo; Donato, Rosario; Dorman, Robert V; Goracci, Gianfrancesco

    2014-08-01

    We proposed that group IIA secretory phospholipase A(2) (GIIA) participates in neuritogenesis based on our observations that the enzyme migrates to growth cones and neurite tips when PC12 cells are induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor (NGF) (Ferrini et al., Neurochem Res 35:2168-2174, 2010). The involvement of other secretory PLA(2) isoforms in neuronal development has been suggested by others but through different mechanisms. In the present study, we compared the subcellular distribution of GIIA and group X sPLA(2) (GX) after stimulation of PC12 cells with NGF. We found that GIIA, but not GX, localized at the neuritic tips after treatment with NGF, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analysis. We also found that NGF stimulated the expression and the activity of GIIA. In addition, NGF induced the expressed myc-tagged GIIA protein to migrate to neurite tips in its active form. We propose that GIIA expression, activity, and subcellular localization is regulated by NGF and that the enzyme may participate in neuritogenesis through intracellular mechanisms, most likely by facilitating the remodelling of glycerophospholipid molecular species by deacylation-reacylation reactions necessary for the incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  2. Tension in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Löffek, Stefanie; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Helfrich, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Integrins represent a large family of cell receptors that mediate adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), thereby modulating a variety of cellular functions that are required for proliferation, migration, malignant conversion and invasiveness. During tumorigenesis the conversion of a tumor cell from sessile, stationary phenotype to an invasive phenotype requires the ability of tumor cells to interact with their environment in order to transduce signals from the ECM into the cells. Hence, there is increasing evidence that changes in the composition, topography and tension of tumor matrix can be sensed by integrin receptors, leading to the regulation of intracellular signalling events which subsequently help to fuel cancer progression. The fact that intracellular signals perceived from integrin ligand binding impact on almost all steps of tumor progression, including tumor cell proliferation, survival, metastatic dissemination and colonization of a metastatic niche, renders integrins as ideal candidates for the development of therapeutic agents. In this review we summarize the role of integrins in cancer with the special focus on cancer therapies and the recent progress that has been made in the understanding of “integrin-induced tension in cancer”. Finally, we conclude with clinical evidence for the role of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in the development of therapy-resistant tumors. PMID:27854331

  3. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE PAGES

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  5. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  6. Separation anxiety: Stress, tension and cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Krithika; Iglesias, Pablo A.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2012-07-15

    Cytokinesis, the physical separation of a mother cell into two daughter cells, progresses through a series of well-defined changes in morphology. These changes involve distinct biochemical and mechanical processes. Here, we review the mechanical features of cells during cytokinesis, discussing both the material properties as well as sources of stresses, both active and passive, which lead to the observed changes in morphology. We also describe a mechanosensory feedback control system that regulates protein localization and shape progression during cytokinesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytokinesis progresses through three distinct mechanical phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cortical tension initially resists deformation of mother cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late in cytokinesis, cortical tension provides stress, enabling furrow ingression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanosensory feedback control system regulates cytokinesis.

  7. Design of 3D engineered protein hydrogels for tailored control of neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Kyle J.; Antaris, Alexander L.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    The design of bioactive materials allows for tailored studies probing cell-biomaterial interactions; however, relatively few studies have examined effects of ligand density and material stiffness on neurite growth in 3D. Elastin-like proteins (ELPs) have been designed with modular bioactive and structural regions to enable the systematic characterization of design parameters within 3D materials. To promote neurite outgrowth and better understand the effects of common biomaterial design parameters on neuronal cultures, we here focused on cell-adhesive ligand density and hydrogel stiffness as design variables for ELP hydrogels. With the inherent design freedom of engineered proteins, these 3D ELP hydrogels enabled decoupled investigation into the effects of biomechanics and biochemistry on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Increasing the cell-adhesive RGD ligand density from 0 to 1.9 × 107 ligands/μm3 led to a significant increase in the rate, length, and density of neurite outgrowth, as quantified by a high-throughput algorithm developed for dense neurite analysis. An approximately two-fold improvement in total neurite outgrowth was observed in materials with the higher ligand density at all time-points through 7 days. ELP hydrogels with initial elastic moduli of 0.5, 1.5, or 2.1 kPa and identical RGD ligand densities revealed that the most compliant materials led to the greatest outgrowth, with some neurites extending over 1800 μm by day 7. Given the ability of ELP hydrogels to efficiently promote neurite outgrowth within defined and tunable 3D microenvironments, these materials may be useful in developing therapeutic nerve guides and the further study of basic neuron-biomaterial interactions. PMID:23128159

  8. Analysis of the action of euxanthone, a plant-derived compound that stimulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Naidu, M; Kuan, C-Y K; Lo, W-L; Raza, M; Tolkovsky, A; Mak, N-K; Wong, R N-S; Keynes, R

    2007-09-21

    We have investigated the neurite growth-stimulating properties of euxanthone, a xanthone derivative isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Polygala caudata. Euxanthone was shown to exert a marked stimulatory action on neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia explanted in collagen gels, in the absence of added neurotrophins. It was also shown to promote cell survival in explanted chick embryo ganglia, and to stimulate neurite outgrowth from isolated adult rat primary sensory neurons in vitro. The further finding that euxanthone stimulates neurite outgrowth from explants of chick embryo retina and ventral spinal cord suggests an action on signaling pathways downstream of neuronal receptors for specific neurotrophic factors. Consistent with this, euxanthone did not promote neurite outgrowth from non-transfected PC12 cells, or from PC12 cells transfected with TrkB or TrkC, under conditions in which these cells extended neurites in response to, respectively, the neurotrophins nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3. Western blot analysis of euxanthone-stimulated dorsal root ganglion explants showed that expression of phospho-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was up-regulated after 1 h of euxanthone-treatment. Inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway using PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase, blocked all euxanthone-stimulated neurite outgrowth. However, analysis of phospho-Akt expression indicated that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway, another major signaling pathway engaged by neurotrophins, is not significantly activated by euxanthone. These results suggest that euxanthone promotes neurite outgrowth by selectively activating the MAP kinase pathway.

  9. Soluble cpg15 from Astrocytes Ameliorates Neurite Outgrowth Recovery of Hippocampal Neurons after Mouse Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jing; Hu, Jie-Xian; Lu, De-Xin; Ji, Chun-Xia; Qi, Yao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Feng-Yan; Huang, Fang; Xu, Ping; Chen, Xian-Hua

    2017-02-08

    The present study focuses on the function of cpg15, a neurotrophic factor, in ischemic neuronal recovery using transient global cerebral ischemic (TGI) mouse model and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated primary cultured cells. The results showed that expression of cpg15 proteins in astrocytes, predominantly the soluble form, was significantly increased in mouse hippocampus after TGI and in the cultured astrocytes after OGD. Addition of the medium from the cpg15-overexpressed astrocytic culture into the OGD-treated hippocampal neuronal cultures reduces the neuronal injury, whereas the recovery of neurite outgrowths of OGD-injured neurons was prevented when cpg15 in the OGD-treated astrocytes was knocked down, or the OGD-treated-astrocytic medium was immunoadsorbed by cpg15 antibody. Furthermore, lentivirus-delivered knockdown of cpg15 expression in mouse hippocampal astrocytes diminishes the dendritic branches and exacerbates injury of neurons in CA1 region after TGI. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of MEK1/2, PI3K, and TrkA decreases, whereas overexpression of p-CREB, but not dp-CREB, increases the expression of cpg15 in U118 or primary cultured astrocytes. Also, it is observed that the Flag-tagged soluble cpg15 from the astrocytes transfected with Flag-tagged cpg15-expressing plasmids adheres to the surface of neuronal bodies and the neurites. In conclusion, our results suggest that the soluble cpg15 from astrocytes induced by ischemia could ameliorate the recovery of the ischemic-injured hippocampal neurons via adhering to the surface of neurons. The upregulated expression of cpg15 in astrocytes may be activated via MAPK and PI3K signal pathways, and regulation of CREB phosphorylation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal plasticity plays a crucial role in the amelioration of neurological recovery of ischemic injured brain, which remains a challenge for clinic treatment of cerebral ischemia. cpg15 as a synaptic plasticity-related factor may participate in

  10. Oxytocin Increases Neurite Length and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins Associated with Neuronal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Kiss, A; Havranek, T; Strbak, V; Bakos, J

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin acts as a growth and differentiation factor; however, its effects on neurite growth are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate time effects of oxytocin on expression of nestin and MAP2; (2) to measure the effect of oxytocin on gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, cofilin, and drebrin; and (3) to measure changes in neurite length and number in response to oxytocin/oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 1 μM oxytocin resulted in a significant increase in gene expression and protein levels of nestin after 12, 24, and 48 h. Oxytocin treatment induced no changes in gene expression of MAP2; however, a decrease of protein levels was observed in all time intervals. Gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, and drebrin increased in response to oxytocin. Oxytocin induced significant elongation of neurites after 12, 24, and 48 h. No change in neurite length was observed in the presence of the combination of retinoic acid and oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Oxytocin treatment for 12 h increased the number of neurites. Overall, the present data suggest that oxytocin contributes to the regulation of expression of cytoskeletal proteins associated with growth of neuronal cones and induces neurite elongation mediated by oxytocin receptors at least in certain types of neuronal cells.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor enhances neurite elongation of cerebellar granule neurons via TrkB signaling.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuriko; Fujita, Yuki; Shibata, Kumi; Mori, Megumi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an integral membrane protein predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Sig-1R demonstrates a high affinity to various synthetic compounds including well-known psychotherapeutic drugs in the central nervous system (CNS). For that, it is considered as an alternative target for psychotherapeutic drugs. On the cellular level, when Sig-1R is activated, it is known to play a role in neuroprotection and neurite elongation. These effects are suggested to be mediated by its ligand-operated molecular chaperone activity, and/or upregulation of various Ca(2+) signaling. In addition, recent studies show that Sig-1R activation induces neurite outgrowth via neurotrophin signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite elongation through activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk), a family of neurotrophin receptors. We found that 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084), a selective Sig-1R agonist, significantly promoted neurite outgrowth, and K252a, a Trk inhibitor, attenuated Sig-1R-mediated neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Moreover, we revealed that Sig-1R interacts with TrkB, and PRE-084 treatment enhances phosphorylation of Y515, but not Y706. Thus, our results indicate that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite outgrowth in CGNs through Y515 phosphorylation of TrkB.

  12. VANG-1 and PRKL-1 Cooperate to Negatively Regulate Neurite Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Su, Anna; Imai, Janice H.; Colavita, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Neuritogenesis is a critical early step in the development and maturation of neurons and neuronal circuits. While extracellular directional cues are known to specify the site and orientation of nascent neurite formation in vivo, little is known about the genetic pathways that block inappropriate neurite emergence in order to maintain proper neuronal polarity. Here we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of Van Gogh (vang-1), Prickle (prkl-1), and Dishevelled (dsh-1), core components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, are required in a subset of peripheral motor neurons to restrict neurite emergence to a specific organ axis. In loss-of-function mutants, neurons display supernumerary neurites that extend inappropriately along the orthogonal anteroposterior (A/P) body axis. We show that autonomous and non-autonomous gene activities are required early and persistently to inhibit the formation or consolidation of growth cone protrusions directed away from organ precursor cells. Furthermore, prkl-1 overexpression is sufficient to suppress neurite formation and reorient neuronal polarity in a vang-1– and dsh-1–dependent manner. Our findings suggest a novel role for a PCP–like pathway in maintaining polarized neuronal morphology by inhibiting neuronal responses to extrinsic or intrinsic cues that would otherwise promote extraneous neurite formation. PMID:21912529

  13. Sensitivity of Neural Stem Cell Survival, Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth within 3D Hydrogels to Environmental Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Tasneem, Sameera; Farrell, Kurt; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of embryonic murine neural stem cells exposed to 10 pM – 10 μM concentrations of three heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), continuously for 14 days within 3D collagen hydrogels. Critical endpoints for neurogenesis such as survival, differentiation and neurite outgrowth were assessed. Results suggest significant compromise in cell viability within the first four days at concentrations ≥ 10 nM, while lower concentrations induced a more delayed effect. Mercury and lead suppressed neural differentiation at as low as 10 pM concentration within 7 days, while all three metals inhibited neural and glial differentiation by day 14. Neurite outgrowth remained unaffected at lower cadmium or mercury concentrations (≤ 100 pM), but was completely repressed beyond day 1 at higher concentrations. Higher metal concentrations (≥ 100 pM) suppressed NSC differentiation to motor or dopaminergic neurons. Cytokines and chemokines released by NSCs, and the sub-cellular mechanisms by which metals induce damage to NSCs have been quantified and correlated to phenotypic data. The observed degree of toxicity in NSC cultures is in the order: lead > mercury > cadmium. Results point to the use of biomimetic 3D culture models to screen the toxic effects of heavy metals during developmental stages, and investigate their underlying mechanistic pathways. PMID:26621541

  14. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  15. Sensitivity of neural stem cell survival, differentiation and neurite outgrowth within 3D hydrogels to environmental heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Tasneem, Sameera; Farrell, Kurt; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R

    2016-02-03

    We investigated the sensitivity of embryonic murine neural stem cells exposed to 10 pM-10 μM concentrations of three heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), continuously for 14 days within 3D collagen hydrogels. Critical endpoints for neurogenesis such as survival, differentiation and neurite outgrowth were assessed. Results suggest significant compromise in cell viability within the first four days at concentrations ≥10 nM, while lower concentrations induced a more delayed effect. Mercury and lead suppressed neural differentiation at as low as 10 pM concentration within 7 days, while all three metals inhibited neural and glial differentiation by day 14. Neurite outgrowth remained unaffected at lower cadmium or mercury concentrations (≤100 pM), but was completely repressed beyond day 1 at higher concentrations. Higher metal concentrations (≥100 pM) suppressed NSC differentiation to motor or dopaminergic neurons. Cytokines and chemokines released by NSCs, and the sub-cellular mechanisms by which metals induce damage to NSCs have been quantified and correlated to phenotypic data. The observed degree of toxicity in NSC cultures is in the order: lead>mercury>cadmium. Results point to the use of biomimetic 3D culture models to screen the toxic effects of heavy metals during developmental stages, and investigate their underlying mechanistic pathways.

  16. Sonic hedgehog promotes neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons under oxidative stress: Involving of mitochondria and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao; Chen, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to be involved in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders. Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, has been implicated in promoting several aspects of brain remodeling process. Mitochondria may play an important role in controlling fundamental processes in neuroplasticity. However, little evidence is available about the effect and the potential mechanism of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons under oxidative stress. Here, we revealed that Shh treatment significantly increased the viability of cortical neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which was damaged by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Shh alleviated the apoptosis rate of H2O2-induced neurons. Shh also increased neuritogenesis injuried by H2O2 in primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased the activities of SOD and and decreased the productions of MDA. In addition, Shh protected mitochondrial functions, elevated the cellular ATP levels and amelioratesd the impairment of mitochondrial complex II activities of cortical neurons induced by H2O2. In conclusion, all these results suggest that Shh acts as a prosurvival factor playing an essential role to neurite outgrowth of cortical neuron under H2O2 -induced oxidative stress, possibly through counteracting ROS release and preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP as well as mitochondrial complex II activities against oxidative stress.

  17. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  18. Neuritic regeneration and synaptic reconstruction induced by withanolide A

    PubMed Central

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Tohda, Chihiro; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether withanolide A (WL-A), isolated from the Indian herbal drug Ashwagandha (root of Withania somnifera), could regenerate neurites and reconstruct synapses in severely damaged neurons. We also investigated the effect of WL-A on memory-deficient mice showing neuronal atrophy and synaptic loss in the brain. Axons, dendrites, presynapses, and postsynapses were visualized by immunostaining for phosphorylated neurofilament-H (NF-H), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), respectively. Treatment with Aβ(25–35) (10 μM) induced axonal and dendritic atrophy, and pre- and postsynaptic loss in cultured rat cortical neurons. Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 μM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 μmol kg−1 day−1, for 13 days, p.o.) recovered Aβ(25–35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks. PMID:15711595

  19. Surface tension and the dodecahedron model for lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, E; Budiansky, B

    1990-05-01

    Macroscopic elastic moduli governing the incremental deformations of lung parenchyma are calculated on the basis of a model for an individual lung element in the shape of a regular dodecahedron. Elastic stiffness within the element is provided by pin-jointed tension members along the edges of the dodecahedron, surface tension is incorporated into its pentagonal faces, and the influence of transpulmonary pressure is simulated by an externally applied hydrostatic tension. The analysis is based on a variational statement of nonlinear structural mechanics, and the results show how the moduli depend on the effective inflation pressure, the constitutive behavior of the idealized truss members, and the surface-area dependent surface tension. The theory is discussed in the light of available experimental information. A more general analysis is needed to account for the effects of structural as well as surface-tension hysteresis.

  20. Membrane tension controls the assembly of curvature-generating proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, Mijo; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-05-01

    Proteins containing a Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain regulate membrane curvature in the cell. Recent simulations have revealed that BAR proteins assemble into linear aggregates, strongly affecting membrane curvature and its in-plane stress profile. Here, we explore the opposite question: do mechanical properties of the membrane impact protein association? By using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that increased surface tension significantly impacts the dynamics of protein assembly. While tensionless membranes promote a rapid formation of long-living linear aggregates of N-BAR proteins, increase in tension alters the geometry of protein association. At high tension, protein interactions are strongly inhibited. Increasing surface density of proteins leads to a wider range of protein association geometries, promoting the formation of meshes, which can be broken apart with membrane tension. Our work indicates that surface tension may play a key role in recruiting proteins to membrane-remodelling sites in the cell.

  1. Effects of DDT and permethrin on neurite growth in cultured neurons of chick embryo brain and Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Audesirk, G

    1990-01-01

    The pesticides permethrin and 1,1-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT), dissolved in either ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), were studied to determine their effect on neurite growth from cultured neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis and embryonic chicks. Both of these toxins decreased the percentage of neurons growing neurites, mean neurite length, and number of neurites/cell in a dose-dependent manner. DMSO increased the toxicity of permethrin and DDT in L. stagnalis neurons. EtOH was not used as a solvent with the embryonic chick cultures. Pre-existing neurites of L. stagnalis neurons exposed to permethrin regressed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These two toxins may affect neurite outgrowth through interference with intracellular calcium regulation.

  2. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  3. Neuronal PINCH is Regulated by TNF-α and is Required for Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Jatiani, Asavari; Pannizzo, Paola; Gualco, Elisa; Del-Valle, Luis

    2011-01-01

    During HIV infection of the CNS, neurons are damaged by viral proteins, such as Tat and gp120, or by inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α, that are released from infected and/or activated glial cells. Host responses to this damage may include the induction of survival or repair mechanisms. In this context, previous studies report robust expression of a protein called particularly interesting new cysteine histidine-rich protein (PINCH), in the neurons of HIV patients’ brains, compared with nearly undetectable levels in HIV-negative individuals (Rearden et al., J Neurosci Res 86:2535–2542, 2008), suggesting PINCH’s involvement in neuronal signaling during HIV infection of the brain. To address potential triggers for PINCH induction in HIV patients’ brains, an in vitro system mimicking some aspects of HIV infection of the CNS was utilized. We investigated neuronal PINCH expression, subcellular distribution, and biological consequences of PINCH sequestration upon challenge with Tat, gp120, and TNF-α. Our results indicate that in neurons, TNF-α stimulation increases PINCH expression and changes its subcellular localization. Furthermore, PINCH mobility is required to maintain neurite extension upon challenge with TNF-α. PINCH may function as a neuron-specific host-mediated response to challenge by HIV-related factors in the CNS. PMID:20689998

  4. Novel High Content Screen Detects Compounds That Promote Neurite Regeneration from Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Whitlon, Donna S.; Grover, Mary; Dunne, Sara F.; Richter, Sonja; Luan, Chi-Hao; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) carry sound information from cochlear hair cells to the brain. After noise, antibiotic or toxic insult to the cochlea, damage to SGN and/or hair cells causes hearing impairment. Damage ranges from fiber and synapse degeneration to dysfunction and loss of cells. New interventions to regenerate peripheral nerve fibers could help reestablish transfer of auditory information from surviving or regenerated hair cells or improve results from cochlear implants, but the biochemical mechanisms to target are largely unknown. Presently, no drugs exist that are FDA approved to stimulate the regeneration of SGN nerve fibers. We designed an original phenotypic assay to screen 440 compounds of the NIH Clinical Collection directly on dissociated mouse spiral ganglia. The assay detected one compound, cerivastatin, that increased the length of regenerating neurites. The effect, mimicked by other statins at different optimal concentrations, was blocked by geranylgeraniol. These results demonstrate the utility of screening small compound libraries on mixed cultures of dissociated primary ganglia. The success of this screen narrows down a moderately sized library to a single compound which can be elevated to in-depth in vivo studies, and highlights a potential new molecular pathway for targeting of hearing loss drugs. PMID:26521685

  5. Regulation of early neurite morphogenesis by the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wun-Chey; Moniz, David M; Ozog, Mark A; Tyler, Jessica E; Numata, Masayuki; Church, John

    2009-07-15

    The ubiquitously expressed Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 plays an important role in regulating polarized membrane protrusion and directional motility in non-neuronal cells. Using NGF-differentiated PC12 cells and murine neocortical neurons in vitro, we now show that NHE1 plays a role in regulating early neurite morphogenesis. NHE1 was expressed in growth cones in which it gave rise to an elevated intracellular pH in actively extending neurites. The NHE1 inhibitor cariporide reversibly reduced growth cone filopodia number and the formation and elongation of neurites, especially branches, whereas the transient overexpression of full-length NHE1, but not NHE1 mutants deficient in either ion translocation activity or actin cytoskeletal anchoring, elicited opposite effects. In addition, compared with neocortical neurons obtained from wild-type littermates, neurons isolated from NHE1-null mice exhibited reductions in early neurite outgrowth, an effect that was rescued by overexpression of full-length NHE1 but not NHE1 mutants. Finally, the growth-promoting effects of netrin-1, but not BDNF or IGF-1, were markedly reduced by cariporide in wild-type neocortical neurons and were not observed in NHE1-null neurons. Although netrin-1 failed to increase growth cone intracellular pH or Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity, netrin-1-induced increases in early neurite outgrowth were restored in NHE1-null neurons transfected with full-length NHE1 but not an ion translocation-deficient mutant. Collectively, the results indicate that NHE1 participates in the regulation of early neurite morphogenesis and identify a novel role for NHE1 in the promotion of early neurite outgrowth by netrin-1.

  6. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients’ neurons

    PubMed Central

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K.; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W.; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H.; Winner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients. PMID:24381312

  7. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients' neurons.

    PubMed

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C N; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H; Winner, Beate

    2014-05-15

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients.

  8. Micropatterned coumarin polyester thin films direct neurite orientation.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Aleesha M; Maddipatla, Murthy V S N; Shi, Shuojia; Chamsaz, Elaheh A; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Joy, Abraham; Leipzig, Nic D

    2014-11-26

    Guidance and migration of cells in the nervous system is imperative for proper development, maturation, and regeneration. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), it is challenging for axons to bridge critical-sized injury defects to achieve repair and the central nervous system (CNS) has a very limited ability to regenerate after injury because of its innate injury response. The photoreactivity of the coumarin polyester used in this study enables efficient micropatterning using a custom digital micromirror device (DMD) and has been previously shown to be biodegradable, making these thin films ideal for cell guidance substrates with potential for future in vivo applications. With DMD, we fabricated coumarin polyester thin films into 10×20 μm and 15×50 μm micropatterns with depths ranging from 15 to 20 nm to enhance nervous system cell alignment. Adult primary neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes were isolated from rat brain tissue and seeded onto the polymer surfaces. After 24 h, cell type and neurite alignment were analyzed using phase contrast and fluorescence imaging. There was a significant difference (p<0.0001) in cell process distribution for both emergence angle (from the body of the cell) and orientation angle (at the tip of the growth cone) confirming alignment on patterned surfaces compared to control substrates (unpatterned polymer and glass surfaces). The expected frequency distribution for parallel alignment (≤15°) is 14% and the two micropatterned groups ranged from 42 to 49% alignment for emergence and orientation angle measurements, where the control groups range from 12 to 22% for parallel alignment. Despite depths being 15 to 20 nm, cell processes could sense these topographical changes and preferred to align to certain features of the micropatterns like the plateau/channel interface. As a result this initial study in utilizing these new DMD micropatterned coumarin polyester thin films has proven beneficial as an axon guidance platform

  9. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6.

  10. Bingham-NODDI: Mapping anisotropic orientation dispersion of neurites using diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Maira; Schneider, Torben; Alexander, Daniel C; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents Bingham-NODDI, a clinically-feasible technique for estimating the anisotropic orientation dispersion of neurites. Direct quantification of neurite morphology on clinical scanners was recently realised by a diffusion MRI technique known as neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI). However in its current form NODDI cannot estimate anisotropic orientation dispersion, which is widespread in the brain due to common fanning and bending of neurites. This work proposes Bingham-NODDI that extends the NODDI formalism to address this limitation. Bingham-NODDI characterises anisotropic orientation dispersion by utilising the Bingham distribution to model neurite orientation distribution. The new model estimates the extent of dispersion about the dominant orientation, separately along the primary and secondary dispersion orientations. These estimates are subsequently used to estimate the overall dispersion about the dominant orientation and the dispersion anisotropy. We systematically evaluate the ability of the new model to recover these key parameters of anisotropic orientation dispersion with standard NODDI protocol, both in silico and in vivo. The results demonstrate that the parameters of the proposed model can be estimated without additional acquisition requirements over the standard NODDI protocol. Thus anisotropic dispersion can be determined and has the potential to be used as a marker for normal brain development and ageing or in pathology. We additionally find that the original NODDI model is robust to the effects of anisotropic orientation dispersion, when the quantification of anisotropic dispersion is not of interest.

  11. Enhanced Neurite Growth from Mammalian Neurons in Three-Dimensional Salmon Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El; Janmey, Paul A.; McCormick, Margaret; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional fibrin matrices have been used as cellular substrates in vitro and as bridging materials for central nervous system repair. Cells can be embedded within fibrin gels since the polymerization process is non-toxic, making fibrin an attractive scaffold for transplanted cells. Most studies have utilized fibrin prepared from human or bovine blood proteins. However, fish fibrin may be well suited for neuronal growth since fish undergo remarkable central nervous system regeneration and molecules implicated in this process are present in fibrin. We assessed the growth of mammalian central nervous system neurons in bovine, human, and salmon fibrin and found that salmon fibrin gels encouraged the greatest degree of neurite (dendrite and axon) growth and were the most resistant to degradation by cellular proteases. The neurite growth-promoting effect was not due to the thrombin used to polymerize the gels or to any copurifying plasminogen. Co-purified fibronectin partially accounted for the effect on neurites, and blockade of fibrinogen/fibrin-binding integrins markedly decreased neurite growth. Anion exchange chromatography revealed different elution profiles for salmon and mammalian fibrinogens. These data demonstrate that salmon fibrin encourages the growth of neurites from mammalian neurons and suggest that salmon fibrin may be a beneficial scaffold for neuronal regrowth after CNS injury. PMID:17258313

  12. Rosiglitazone promotes neurite outgrowth and mitochondrial function in N2A cells via PPARgamma pathway.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Han-Min; Liang, Yao-Jen; Yen, Chia-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Several pieces of evidence indicate that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) stimulation promotes neuronal differentiation. However, to date, the effects of a synthetic PPARγ agonist (Rosiglitazone, Rosi) on neurite outgrowth have not yet been well described. Here we have evaluated the effects of Rosi on neurite outgrowth and mitochondrial function in the mouse neuroblastoma Neuro 2a (N2A) cell line. Our results show that Rosi promotes neurite outgrowth of N2A cells and significantly increases the population of neurite-bearing cells, with apparent increase of intracellular calcium and the expression of calmodulin-dependent kinase I (CaMKI). Rosi also increases the intracellular cAMP and expression of both protein kinase A (PKA) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Phosphorylation of CREB was also detected in the Rosi treated N2A cells. Moreover, Rosi significantly increases the transcription of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Besides, the expression of PPAR coactivator 1α (PGC1α), as well as the mRNA level its downstream genes, including nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF1 and NRF2) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) were induced by Rosi treatments. Furthermore, Rosi increases the level of ATP, D-loop, and mitochondrial mass in N2A cells. Collectively, these findings provide an array of evidence that PPARγ activation provides beneficial neuronal networks within neurite outgrowth.

  13. A Facile Method for Simultaneously Measuring Neuronal Cell Viability and Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    K. Hancock, Michael; Kopp, Leisha; Kaur, Navjot; Hanson, Bonnie J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is an important morphological phenotype of neuronal cells that correlates with their function and cell health, yet there are limited methods available for measuring this phenomenon. Current approaches to measuring neurite outgrowth are laborious and time-consuming, relying largely upon immunocytochemical staining of neuronal markers (e.g., beta-III tubulin or MAP2) followed by manual or automated microscopy for image acquisition and analysis. Here we report the development of a quick and simple dual-color fluorescent dye-based staining method that allows for the simultaneous measurement of neuronal cell health and relative neurite outgrowth from the same sample. An orangered fluorescent dye that stains cell membrane surfaces is used as an indirect reporter of changes in relative neurite outgrowth due to alterations in the number or length of membrane projections emanating from neuronal cell bodies. Cell viability is assessed simultaneously via the use of a cell-permeant dye that is converted by intracellular esterase activity from a non-fluorescent substrate to a green-fluorescent product. Using Neuroscreen-1 cells (a PC-12 subclone), primary rat cortex neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons, we demonstrate that this multiplex assay allows for rapid visualization and unbiased, quantitative plate reader analysis of neuronal cell health and neurite outgrowth. PMID:25853055

  14. Detection of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by magnetic resonance microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, Helene; Einstein, Gillian; Kim, Katie R.; Hulette, Christine; Johnson, G. Allan

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) theoretically provides the spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio needed to resolve neuritic plaques, the neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Two previously unexplored MR contrast parameters, T2* and diffusion, are tested for plaque-specific contrast to noise. Autopsy specimens from nondemented controls (n = 3) and patients with AD (n = 5) were used. Three-dimensional T2* and diffusion MR images with voxel sizes ranging from 3 × 10−3 mm3 to 5.9 × 10−5 mm3 were acquired. After imaging, specimens were cut and stained with a microwave king silver stain to demonstrate neuritic plaques. From controls, the alveus, fimbria, pyramidal cell layer, hippocampal sulcus, and granule cell layer were detected by either T2* or diffusion contrast. These structures were used as landmarks when correlating MRMs with histological sections. At a voxel resolution of 5.9 × 10−5 mm3, neuritic plaques could be detected by T2*. The neuritic plaques emerged as black, spherical elements on T2* MRMs and could be distinguished from vessels only in cross-section when presented in three dimension. Here we provide MR images of neuritic plaques in vitro. The MRM results reported provide a new direction for applying this technology in vivo. Clearly, the ability to detect and follow the early progression of amyloid-positive brain lesions will greatly aid and simplify the many possibilities to intervene pharmacologically in AD. PMID:10570201

  15. The role of bioactive compounds on the promotion of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Koppula, Sushruta; Kim, In-Su; Kumar, Hemant; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2012-06-04

    Neurite loss is one of the cardinal features of neuronal injury. Apart from neuroprotection, reorganization of the lost neuronal network in the injured brain is necessary for the restoration of normal physiological functions. Neuritogenic activity of endogenous molecules in the brain such as nerve growth factor is well documented and supported by scientific studies which show innumerable compounds having neurite outgrowth activity from natural sources. Since the damaged brain lacks the reconstructive capacity, more efforts in research are focused on the identification of compounds that promote the reformation of neuronal networks. An abundancy of natural resources along with the corresponding activity profiles have shown promising results in the field of neuroscience. Recently, importance has also been placed on understanding neurite formation by natural products in relation to neuronal injury. Arrays of natural herbal products having plentiful active constituents have been found to enhance neurite outgrowth. They act synergistically with neurotrophic factors to promote neuritogenesis in the diseased brain. Therefore use of natural products for neuroregeneration provides new insights in drug development for treating neuronal injury. In this study, various compounds from natural sources with potential neurite outgrowth activity are reviewed in experimental models.

  16. IL-1{beta} promotes neurite outgrowth by deactivating RhoA via p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Temporin, Ko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki Kuroda, Yusuke; Okada, Kiyoshi; Yachi, Koji; Moritomo, Hisao; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2008-01-11

    Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1{beta}) is increased following the nervous system injury. Generally IL-1{beta} induces inflammation, leading to neural degeneration, while several neuropoietic effects have also been reported. Although neurite outgrowth is an important step in nerve regeneration, whether IL-1{beta} takes advantages on it is unclear. Now we examine how it affects neurite outgrowth. Following sciatic nerve injury, expression of IL-1{beta} is increased in Schwann cells around the site of injury, peaking 1 day after injury. In dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), neurite outgrowth is inhibited by the addition of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), activating RhoA. IL-1{beta} overcomes MAG-induced neurite outgrowth inhibition, by deactivating RhoA. Intracellular signaling experiments reveal that p38 MAPK, and not nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), mediated this effect. These findings suggest that IL-1{beta} may contribute to nerve regeneration by promoting neurite outgrowth following nerve injury.

  17. Retinoic acid induces neurite outgrowth and growth cone turning in invertebrate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dmetrichuk, Jennifer M; Carlone, Robert L; Spencer, Gaynor E

    2006-06-01

    Identification of molecules involved in neurite outgrowth during development and/or regeneration is a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Retinoic acid (RA) is a biologically important metabolite of vitamin A that acts as a trophic factor and has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and regeneration in many vertebrate species. Although abundant in the CNS of many vertebrates, the precise role of RA in neural regeneration has yet to be determined. Moreover, very little information is available regarding the role of RA in invertebrate nervous systems. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that RA induces neurite outgrowth from invertebrate neurons. Using individually identified neurons isolated from the CNS of Lymnaea stagnalis, we demonstrated that a significantly greater proportion of cells produced neurite outgrowth in RA. RA also extended the duration of time that cells remained electrically excitable in vitro, and we showed that exogenously applied RA acted as a chemoattractive factor and induced growth cone turning toward the source of RA. This is the first demonstration that RA can induce turning of an individual growth cone. These data strongly suggest that the actions of RA on neurite outgrowth and cell survival are highly conserved across species.

  18. Rab22 controls NGF signaling and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liang, Zhimin; Li, Guangpu

    2011-10-01

    Rab22 is a small GTPase that is localized on early endosomes and regulates early endosomal sorting. This study reports that Rab22 promotes nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling-dependent neurite outgrowth and gene expression in PC12 cells by sorting NGF and the activated/phosphorylated receptor (pTrkA) into signaling endosomes to sustain signal transduction in the cell. NGF binding induces the endocytosis of pTrkA into Rab22-containing endosomes. Knockdown of Rab22 via small hairpin RNA (shRNA) blocks NGF-induced pTrkA endocytosis into the endosomes and gene expression (VGF) and neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of human Rab22 can rescue the inhibitory effects of the Rab22 shRNA, suggesting a specific Rab22 function in NGF signal transduction, rather than off-target effects. Furthermore, the Rab22 effector, Rabex-5, is necessary for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and gene expression, as evidenced by the inhibitory effect of shRNA-mediated knockdown of Rabex-5. Disruption of the Rab22-Rabex-5 interaction via overexpression of the Rab22-binding domain of Rabex-5 in the cell also blocks NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, suggesting a critical role of Rab22-Rabex-5 interaction in the biogenesis of NGF-signaling endosomes to sustain the signal for neurite outgrowth. These data provide the first evidence for an early endosomal Rab GTPase as a positive regulator of NGF signal transduction and cell differentiation.

  19. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  20. Inhibition of Nischarin Expression Promotes Neurite Outgrowth through Regulation of PAK Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuemin; Li, Yuying; Lu, Lingchao; Zhang, Ruyi; Zeng, Linghui; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Nischarin is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in various organs that plays an inhibitory role in cell migration and invasion and the carcinogenesis of breast cancer cells. We previously reported that Nischarin is highly expressed in neuronal cell lines and is differentially expressed in the brain tissue of adult rats. However, the physiological function of Nischarin in neural cells remains unknown. Here, we show that Nischarin is expressed in rat primary cortical neurons but not in astrocytes. Nischarin is localized around the nucleus and dendrites. Using shRNA to knockdown the expression of endogenous Nischarin significantly increases the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, remarkably increases neurite length, and accelerates neurite extension in neuronal cells. Silencing Nischarin expression also promotes dendrite elongation in rat cortical neurons where Nischarin interacts with p21-activated kinase 1/2 (PAK1/2) and negatively regulates phosphorylation of both PAK1 and PAK2. The stimulation of neurite growth observed in cells with decreased levels of Nischarin is partially abolished by IPA3-mediated inhibition of PAK1 activity. Our findings indicate that endogenous Nischarin inhibits neurite outgrowth by blocking PAK1 activation in neurons. PMID:26670864

  1. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  2. A comparative first-principles study on electronic structures and mechanical properties of ternary intermetallic compounds Al8Cr4Y and Al8Cu4Y: Pressure and tension effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Pang, Mingjun; Tan, Yong; Zhan, Yongzhong

    2016-11-01

    An investigation into the bulk properties, elastic properties and Debye temperature under pressure, and deformation mode under tension of Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y compounds was investigated by using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The calculated lattice constants for the ternary compounds (Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y) are in good agreement with the experimental data. It can be seen from interatomic distances that the bonding between Al1 atom and Cr, Y, and Al2 atoms in Al8Cr4Y are stronger than Al8Cu4Y. The results of cohesive energy show that Al8Cr4Y should be easier to be formed and much stronger chemical bonds than Al8Cu4Y. The bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν can be obtained by using the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme. From the results of elastic properties, Al8Cr4Y has the stronger mechanical behavior than Al8Cu4Y. Our calculations also show that pressure has a greater effect on mechanical behavior for both compounds. The ideal tensile strength are obtained by stress-strain relationships under [001](001) uniaxial tensile deformation, which are 15.4 and 23.4 GPa for Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y, respectively. The total and partial density of states and electron charge density under uniaxial tensile deformations for Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y compounds are also calculated and discussed in this work.

  3. DNA loops generate intracentromere tension in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrimore, Josh; Vasquez, Paula A.; Falvo, Michael R.; Taylor, Russell M.; Vicci, Leandra; Yeh, Elaine; Forest, M. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is the DNA locus that dictates kinetochore formation and is visibly apparent as heterochromatin that bridges sister kinetochores in metaphase. Sister centromeres are compacted and held together by cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase-mediated entanglements until all sister chromosomes bi-orient along the spindle apparatus. The establishment of tension between sister chromatids is essential for quenching a checkpoint kinase signal generated from kinetochores lacking microtubule attachment or tension. How the centromere chromatin spring is organized and functions as a tensiometer is largely unexplored. We have discovered that centromere chromatin loops generate an extensional/poleward force sufficient to release nucleosomes proximal to the spindle axis. This study describes how the physical consequences of DNA looping directly underlie the biological mechanism for sister centromere separation and the spring-like properties of the centromere in mitosis. PMID:26283798

  4. Quantifying Spiral Ganglion Neurite and Schwann Behavior on Micropatterned polymer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Elise L.; Leigh, Braden; Guymon, C. Allan; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2017-01-01

    The first successful in vitro experiments on the cochlea were conducted in 1928 by Honor Fell [1]. Since then, techniques for culture of this tissue have been refined, and dissociated primary culture of the spiral ganglion has become a widely accepted in vitro model for studying nerve damage and regeneration in the cochlea. Additionally, patterned substrates have been developed that facilitate and direct neural outgrowth. A number of automated and semi-automated methods for quantifying this neurite outgrowth has been utilized in recent years [2,3]. We describe a method to study the effect of topographical cues on spiral ganglion neurite and Schwann cell alignment. We discuss our microfabrication process, characterization of pattern features, cell culture techniques for both spiral ganglion neurons and spiral ganglion Schwann cells. In addition, we describe protocols for reducing fibroblast count, immunocytochemistry, and methods for quantifying neurite and Schwann cell alignment. PMID:27259935

  5. GEFs and Rac GTPases control directional specificity of neurite extension along the anterior–posterior axis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chaogu; Diaz-Cuadros, Margarete; Chalfie, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have identified many extracellular guidance molecules and intracellular signaling proteins that regulate axonal outgrowth and extension, most were conducted in the context of unidirectional neurite growth, in which the guidance cues either attract or repel growth cones. Very few studies addressed how intracellular signaling molecules differentially specify bidirectional outgrowth. Here, using the bipolar PLM neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that the guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) UNC-73/Trio and TIAM-1 promote anterior and posterior neurite extension, respectively. The Rac subfamily GTPases act downstream of the GEFs; CED-10/Rac1 is activated by TIAM-1, whereas CED-10 and MIG-2/RhoG act redundantly downstream of UNC-73. Moreover, these two pathways antagonize each other and thus regulate the directional bias of neuritogenesis. Our study suggests that directional specificity of neurite extension is conferred through the intracellular activation of distinct GEFs and Rac GTPases. PMID:27274054

  6. Posttraumatic delayed tension pneumocephalus: Rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kankane, Vivek Kumar; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Gupta, Tarun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is commonly seen after head and facial trauma, ear infections, and tumors of the skull base or neurosurgical interventions. In tension pneumocephalus, the continuous accumulation of intracranial air is thought to be caused by a “ball valve” mechanism. In turn, this may lead to a mass effect on the brain, with subsequent neurological deterioration and signs of herniation. Tension pneumocephalus is considered a life-threatening, neurosurgical emergency burr-hole evacuation was performed and he experienced a full recovery. However, more invasive surgery was needed to resolve the condition. Delayed tension pneumocephalus is extremely rare and considered a neurosurgical emergency. Pneumocephalus is a complication of head injury in 3.9–9.7% of the cases. The accumulation of intracranial air can be acute (<72 h) or delayed (≥72 h). When intracranial air causes intracranial hypertension and has a mass effect with neurological deterioration, it is called tension pneumocephalus. We represent a clinical case of a 30-year-old male patient with involved in a road traffic accident, complicated by tension pneumocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea on 1 month after trauma and underwent urgent surgical intervention. Burr-hole placement in the right frontal region, evacuation of tension pneumocephalus. Tension pneumocephalus is a life-threatening neurosurgical emergency case, which needs to undergo immediate surgical intervention. PMID:27695534

  7. Phospholipase Cdelta3 regulates RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Kouchi, Zen; Igarashi, Takahiro; Shibayama, Nami; Inanobe, Shunichi; Sakurai, Kazuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Fukuda, Toshifumi; Yanagi, Shigeru; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-03-11

    Phospholipase Cδ3 (PLCδ3) is a key enzyme regulating phosphoinositide metabolism; however, its physiological function remains unknown. Because PLCδ3 is highly enriched in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex, we examined the role of PLCδ3 in neuronal migration and outgrowth. PLCδ3 knockdown (KD) inhibits neurite formation of cerebellar granule cells, and application of PLCδ3KD using in utero electroporation in the developing brain results in the retardation of the radial migration of neurons in the cerebral cortex. In addition, PLCδ3KD inhibits axon and dendrite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons. PLCδ3KD also suppresses neurite formation of Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells induced by serum withdrawal or treatment with retinoic acid. This inhibition is released by the reintroduction of wild-type PLCδ3. Interestingly, the H393A mutant lacking phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolyzing activity generates supernumerary protrusions, and a constitutively active mutant promotes extensive neurite outgrowth, indicating that PLC activity is important for normal neurite outgrowth. The introduction of dominant negative RhoA (RhoA-DN) or treatment with Y-27632, a Rho kinase-specific inhibitor, rescues the neurite extension in PLCδ3KD Neuro2a cells. Similar effects were also detected in primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, the RhoA expression level was significantly decreased by serum withdrawal or retinoic acid in control cells, although this decrease was not observed in PLCδ3KD cells. We also found that exogenous expression of PLCδ3 down-regulated RhoA protein, and constitutively active PLCδ3 promotes the RhoA down-regulation more significantly than PLCδ3 upon differentiation. These results indicate that PLCδ3 negatively regulates RhoA expression, inhibits RhoA/Rho kinase signaling, and thereby promotes neurite extension.

  8. Secretory phospholipases A2 induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Satoru; Ikeno, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Kuwana, Masakazu; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Arioka, Manabu

    2003-01-01

    sPLA(2)s (secretory phospholipases A(2)) belong to a broad and structurally diverse family of enzymes that hydrolyse the sn -2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids. We previously showed that a secreted fungal 15 kDa protein, named p15, as well as its orthologue from Streptomyces coelicolor (named Scp15) induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells at nanomolar concentrations. We report here that both p15 and Scp15 are members of a newly identified group of fungal/bacterial sPLA(2)s. The phospholipid-hydrolysing activity of p15 is absolutely required for neurite outgrowth induction. Mutants with a reduced PLA(2) activity exhibited a comparable reduction in neurite-inducing activity, and the ability to induce neurites closely matched the capacity of various p15 forms to promote fatty acid release from live PC12 cells. A structurally divergent member of the sPLA(2) family, bee venom sPLA(2), also induced neurites in a phospholipase activity-dependent manner, and the same effect was elicited by mouse group V and X sPLA(2)s, but not by group IB and IIA sPLA(2)s. Lysophosphatidylcholine, but not other lysophospholipids, nor arachidonic acid, elicited neurite outgrowth in an L-type Ca(2+) channel activity-dependent manner. In addition, p15-induced neuritogenesis was unaffected by various inhibitors that block arachidonic acid conversion into bioactive eicosanoids. Altogether, these results delineate a novel, Ca(2+)- and lysophosphatidylcholine-dependent neurotrophin-like role of sPLA(2)s in the nervous system. PMID:12967323

  9. Neurite outgrowth on electrospun PLLA fibers is enhanced by exogenous electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach. To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide films or electrospun fibers (2 µm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Main Results. Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurites, indicating topographical cues are responsible for guiding neurite extension. Significance. Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury.

  10. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  11. GAP-43 overexpression in adult mouse Purkinje cells overrides myelin-derived inhibition of neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Gianola, Sara; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2004-02-01

    Up-regulation of growth-associated proteins in adult neurons promotes axon regeneration and neuritic elongation onto nonpermissive substrates. To investigate the interaction between these molecules and myelin-related inhibitory factors, we examined transgenic mice in which overexpression of the growth-associated protein GAP-43 is driven by the Purkinje cell-specific promoter L7. Contrary to their wild-type counterparts, which have extremely poor regenerative capabilities, axotomized transgenic Purkinje cells exhibit profuse sprouting along the intracortical neurite and at the severed stump [Buffo et al. (1997) J. Neurosci., 17, 8778-8791]. Here, we investigated the relationship between such sprouting axons and oligodendroglia to ask whether GAP-43 overexpression enables Purkinje neurites to overcome myelin-derived inhibition. Intact transgenic Purkinje axons display normal morphology and myelination. Following injury, however, many GAP-43-overexpressing neurite stumps are devoid of myelin cover and sprout into white matter regions containing densely packed myelin and Nogo-A- or MAG-immunopositive oligodendrocytes. The intracortical segments of these neurites show focal accumulations of GAP-43, which are associated with disrupted or retracted myelin sheaths. Numerous sprouts originate from such demyelinated segments and spread into the granular layer. Some myelin loss, though not axon sprouting, is also evident in wild-type mice, but this phenomenon is definitely more rapid and extensive in transgenic cerebella. Thus, GAP-43-overexpressing Purkinje axons are endowed with enhanced capabilities for growing into nonpermissive territories and show a pronounced tendency to lose myelin. Our observations suggest that accumulation of GAP-43 along precise axon segments disrupts the normal axon-glia interaction and enhances the retraction of oligodendrocytic processes to facilitate the outgrowth of neuritic sprouts.

  12. Progesterone Antagonism of Neurite Outgrowth Depends on Microglial Activation via Pgrmc1/S2R

    PubMed Central

    Bali, N; Arimoto, J. M.; Morgan, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity is regulated by the ovarian steroids estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) in many normal brain functions, as well as in acute response to injury and chronic neurodegenerative disease. In a female rat model of axotomy, the E2-dependent compensatory neuronal sprouting is antagonized by P4. To resolve complex glial-neuronal cell interactions, we used the “wounding-in-a-dish” model of neurons cocultured with astrocytes or mixed glia (microglia to astrocytes, 1:3). Although both astrocytes and mixed glia supported E2-enhanced neurite outgrowth, P4 antagonized E2-induced neurite outgrowth only with mixed glia, but not astrocytes alone. We now show that P4-E2 antagonism of neurite outgrowth is mediated by microglial expression of progesterone receptor (Pgr) membrane component 1 (Pgrmc1)/S2R, a putative nonclassical Pgr mediator with multiple functions. The P4-E2 antagonism of neurite outgrowth was restored by add-back of microglia to astrocyte-neuron cocultures. Because microglia do not express the classical Pgr, we examined the role of Pgrmc1, which is expressed in microglia in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown by siRNA-Pgrmc1 in microglia before add-back to astrocyte-neuron cocultures suppressed the P4-E2 antagonism of neurite outgrowth. Conditioned media from microglia restored the P4-E2 activity, but only if microglia were activated by lipopolysaccharide or by wounding. Moreover, the microglial activation was blocked by Pgmrc1-siRNA knockdown. These findings explain why nonwounded cultures without microglial activation lack P4 antagonism of E2-induced neurite outgrowth. We suggest that microglial activation may influence brain responses to exogenous P4, which is a prospective therapy in traumatic brain injury. PMID:23653459

  13. Bcl-xL Is Necessary for Neurite Outgrowth in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han-A; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Shanabrough, Marya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) protects survival in dividing cells and developing neurons, but was not known to regulate growth. Growth and synapse formation are indispensable for neuronal survival in development, inextricably linking these processes. We have previously shown that, during synaptic plasticity, Bcl-xL produces changes in synapse number, size, activity, and mitochondrial metabolism. In this study, we determine whether Bcl-xL is required for healthy neurite outgrowth and whether neurite outgrowth is necessary for survival in developing neurons in the presence or absence of stress. Results: Depletion of endogenous Bcl-xL impairs neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons followed by delayed cell death which is dependent on upregulation of death receptor 6 (DR6), a molecule that regulates axonal pruning. Under hypoxic conditions, Bcl-xL-depleted neurons demonstrate increased vulnerability to neuronal process loss and to death compared with hypoxic controls. Endogenous DR6 expression and upregulation during hypoxia are associated with worsened neurite damage; depletion of DR6 partially rescues neuronal process loss, placing DR6 downstream of the effects of Bcl-xL on neuronal process outgrowth and protection. In vivo ischemia produces early increases in DR6, suggesting a role for DR6 in brain injury. Innovation: We suggest that DR6 levels are usually suppressed by Bcl-xL; Bcl-xL depletion leads to upregulation of DR6, failure of neuronal outgrowth in nonstressed cells, and exacerbation of hypoxia-induced neuronal injury. Conclusion: Bcl-xL regulates neuronal outgrowth during development and protects neurites from hypoxic insult, as opposed by DR6. Factors that enhance neurite formation may protect neurons against hypoxic injury or neurodegenerative stimuli. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 93–108. PMID:24787232

  14. Microfluidic Gradients Reveal Enhanced Neurite Outgrowth but Impaired Guidance within 3D Matrices with High Integrin Ligand Densities

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Nicole H.; Lampe, Kyle J.; Xu, Hui; Ferreira, Meghaan M.

    2015-01-01

    The density of integrin-binding ligands in an extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to regulate cell migration speed by imposing a balance of traction forces between the leading and trailing edges of the cell, but the effect of cell-adhesive ligands on neurite chemoattraction is not well understood. We present a platform that combines gradient-generating microfluidic devices with three-dimensional (3D) protein-engineered hydrogels to study the effect of RGD ligand density on neurite pathfinding from chick dorsal root ganglia-derived spheroids. Spheroids are encapsulated in elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) hydrogels presenting either 3.2 or 1.6 mM RGD ligands and exposed to a microfluidic gradient of nerve growth factor (NGF). While the higher ligand density matrix enhanced neurite initiation and persistence of neurite outgrowth, the lower ligand density matrix significantly improved neurite pathfinding and increased the frequency of growth cone turning up the NGF gradient. The apparent trade-off between neurite extension and neurite guidance is reminiscent of the well-known parabolic relationship between cell adhesion and migration speed, implying that a similar matrix-mediated balance of forces regulate neurite elongation and growth cone turning. These results have implications in the design of engineered materials for in vitro models of neural tissue and in vivo nerve guidance channels. PMID:25315156

  15. Neurite outgrowth and branching of PC12 cells on very soft substrates sharply decreases below a threshold of substrate rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Jennie B.; Brown, Xin Q.; Jacot, Jeffrey G.; Di Milla, Paul A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2007-06-01

    Rationally designed matrices for nerve tissue engineering and encapsulated cell therapies critically rely on a comprehensive understanding of neural response to biochemical as well as biophysical cues. Whereas biochemical cues are established mediators of neuronal behavior (e.g., outgrowth), physical cues such as substrate stiffness have only recently been recognized to influence cell behavior. In this work, we examine the response of PC12 neurites to substrate stiffness. We quantified and controlled fibronectin density on the substrates and measured multiple neurite behaviors (e.g., growth, branching, neurites per cell, per cent cells expressing neurites) in a large sample population. We found that PC12 neurons display a threshold response to substrate stiffness. On the softest substrates tested (shear modulus ~10 Pa), neurites were relatively few, short in length and unbranched. On stiffer substrates (shear modulus ~102-104 Pa), neurites were longer and more branched and a greater percentage of cells expressed neurites; significant differences in these measures were not found on substrates with a shear modulus >102 Pa. Based on these data and comparisons with published neurobiology and neuroengineering reports of neurite mechanotransduction, we hypothesize that results from studies of neuronal response to compliant substrates are cell-type dependent and sensitive to ligand density, sample size and the range of stiffness investigated.

  16. Preparation of primary neurons for visualizing neurites in a frozen-hydrated state using cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradian, Sarah H; Galiano, Mauricio R; Wu, Chengbiao; Chen, Shurui; Rasband, Matthew N; Mobley, William C; Chiu, Wah

    2014-02-12

    Neurites, both dendrites and axons, are neuronal cellular processes that enable the conduction of electrical impulses between neurons. Defining the structure of neurites is critical to understanding how these processes move materials and signals that support synaptic communication. Electron microscopy (EM) has been traditionally used to assess the ultrastructural features within neurites; however, the exposure to organic solvent during dehydration and resin embedding can distort structures. An important unmet goal is the formulation of procedures that allow for structural evaluations not impacted by such artifacts. Here, we have established a detailed and reproducible protocol for growing and flash-freezing whole neurites of different primary neurons on electron microscopy grids followed by their examination with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). This technique allows for 3-D visualization of frozen, hydrated neurites at nanometer resolution, facilitating assessment of their morphological differences. Our protocol yields an unprecedented view of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurites, and a visualization of hippocampal neurites in their near-native state. As such, these methods create a foundation for future studies on neurites of both normal neurons and those impacted by neurological disorders.

  17. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  18. Hyperelastic tension of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra Flores, E. I.; Ajaj, R. M.; Adhikari, S.; Dayyani, I.; Friswell, M. I.; Castro-Triguero, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the hyperelastic tensile behaviour of single layer graphene sheets (SLGSs). A one-term incompressible Ogden-type hyperelastic model is chosen to describe the mechanical response of C-C bonds. By establishing equality between the Ogden strain-energy and the variation of the Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential, three different geometries of SLGSs are studied under tensile loading. We compute the Young's modulus, the finite-deformation Poisson's ratio, ultimate strains, total reactions, and the variation of the potential energy per carbon atom for large strains. Numerical simulations are compared with results obtained by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, finite elements, continuum mechanics theory, and experiments. Our predictions are validated, revealing the potential predictive capabilities of the present hyperelastic framework for the analysis of graphene in the context of infinitesimal and large deformations. The good agreement found between our calculations and the published data suggests that graphene may be described as a hyperelastic material.

  19. Hyperelastic tension of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra Flores, E. I.; Ajaj, R. M.; Adhikari, S.; Dayyani, I.; Friswell, M. I.; Castro-Triguero, Rafael

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the hyperelastic tensile behaviour of single layer graphene sheets (SLGSs). A one-term incompressible Ogden-type hyperelastic model is chosen to describe the mechanical response of C-C bonds. By establishing equality between the Ogden strain-energy and the variation of the Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential, three different geometries of SLGSs are studied under tensile loading. We compute the Young's modulus, the finite-deformation Poisson's ratio, ultimate strains, total reactions, and the variation of the potential energy per carbon atom for large strains. Numerical simulations are compared with results obtained by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, finite elements, continuum mechanics theory, and experiments. Our predictions are validated, revealing the potential predictive capabilities of the present hyperelastic framework for the analysis of graphene in the context of infinitesimal and large deformations. The good agreement found between our calculations and the published data suggests that graphene may be described as a hyperelastic material.

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and neurite outgrowth via non-classical retinoic acid receptor signaling in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Tatsuya; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that retinoic acid receptor (RAR) stimulation by an agonist Am80 recruits nitric oxide-dependent signaling via increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in rat midbrain slice cultures. Using neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, here we investigated the mechanisms of RAR-induced nNOS expression, together with relationship between nNOS expression and neurite outgrowth. Am80 promoted neurite outgrowth, which was attenuated by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK; SP600125) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK; SB203580). A selective nNOS inhibitor 3-bromo-nitroindazole also suppressed Am80-induced neurite outgrowth. Am80-induced increase in nNOS protein expression was attenuated by LY294002, SP600125 and SB203580, whereas increase in nNOS mRNA expression was attenuated only by LY294002. Am80-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAPK was blocked by LY294002, suggesting that these kinases acted downstream of PI3K. We also confirmed that DAX1, a nuclear receptor reported to regulate nNOS expression, was up-regulated in response to Am80. siRNA-mediated knockdown of DAX1 abrogated Am80-induced nNOS expression and neurite outgrowth. These results reveal for the first time that nNOS expression is crucial for RAR-mediated neurite outgrowth, and that non-genomic signaling such as JNK and p38 MAPK is involved in RAR-mediated nNOS expression.

  1. Stress distribution and fracture behavior of beryllium compact tension specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ruiwen Dong Ping; Wang Xiaolin

    2008-02-15

    Compact tension specimens of beryllium (Be) were designed to study fracture behavior and mechanical properties. The local stress distribution near a notch in a compact tension specimen was measured in situ by the combination of an X-ray stress analysis and a custom-designed load device. The fracture morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The result showed that the local stresses near the notch tip are much higher than in other areas, and cracking occurs first in that area. The load-crack opening displacement curve of the Be compact tension specimen was obtained, and used to calculate the fracture toughness as 15.7 MPa{radical}m. The compact tension specimen fracture surfaces were mainly characterized by cleavage fracture over three different areas. Cleavage micro-cracks along the basal slip plane were formed at the crack tip, and their growth was controlled by the primary stress after reaching a critical length.

  2. The adaptor protein SH2B3 (Lnk) negatively regulates neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tien-Cheng; Chiu, Hsun; Chang, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Tai-Yu; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Chen, Linyi

    2011-01-01

    SH2B adaptor protein family members (SH2B1-3) regulate various physiological responses through affecting signaling, gene expression, and cell adhesion. SH2B1 and SH2B2 were reported to enhance nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation in PC12 cells, a well-established neuronal model system. In contrast, SH2B3 was reported to inhibit cell proliferation during the development of immune system. No study so far addresses the role of SH2B3 in the nervous system. In this study, we provide evidence suggesting that SH2B3 is expressed in the cortex of embryonic rat brain. Overexpression of SH2B3 not only inhibits NGF-induced differentiation of PC12 cells but also reduces neurite outgrowth of primary cortical neurons. SH2B3 does so by repressing NGF-induced activation of PLCγ, MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT pathways and the expression of Egr-1. SH2B3 is capable of binding to phosphorylated NGF receptor, TrkA, as well as SH2B1β. Our data further demonstrate that overexpression of SH2B3 reduces the interaction between SH2B1β and TrkA. Consistent with this finding, overexpressing the SH2 domain of SH2B3 is sufficient to inhibit NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Together, our data demonstrate that SH2B3, unlike the other two family members, inhibits neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons. Its inhibitory mechanism is likely through the competition of TrkA binding with the positive-acting SH2B1 and SH2B2.

  3. Neurites outgrowth and amino acids levels in goldfish retina under hypo-osmotic or hyper-osmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cubillán, Lisbeth; Obregón, Francisco; Lima, Lucimey

    2012-02-01

    Amino acids are known to play relevant roles as osmolytes in various tissues, including the retina. Taurine is one of these active molecules. In addition, taurine stimulates outgrowth from the goldfish retina by mechanisms that include extracellular matrix, calcium fluxes and protein phosphorylation. The present report aims to explore the effect of medium osmolarity on goldfish retinal outgrowth and the possible modifications produced by changing eye osmolarity on amino acid levels in the retina. Goldfish retinal explants were obtained 10 days after crush of the optic nerve and cultured under iso-, hypo- or hyper-osmotic conditions. Hypo-osmotic medium was prepared by diluting the solutions 10% twice, preserving fetal calf serum concentration. Hyper-osmotic medium was done by adding 50 or 100 mM urea or mannitol. Evaluation of length and density of neurites was performed 5 days after plating. Outgrowth was reduced in hypo- and in hyper-osmotic conditions. Taurine, 4 mM, increased length and density of neurites in iso-osmotic, and produced stimulatory effects under both hyper-osmotic conditions. The in vivo modification of osmolarity by intraocular injection of water or 100 mM urea modified levels of free amino acids in the retina. Taurine and aspartate retinal levels increased in a time-dependent manner after hypo- and hyper-osmotic solution injections. Serine, threonine, arginine, γ-aminobutyric acid, alanine and tyrosine were elevated in hyper-osmotic conditions. Outgrowth in vitro, after in vivo osmolarity changes, was higher in the absence of taurine, but did not increase in the presence of the amino acid. The fact that certain outgrowth took place in these conditions support that the impairment was not due to tissue damage. Rather, the effects might be related to the cascade of kinase events described during osmolarity variations. The time course under these conditions produced adjustments in ganglion cells probably related to taurine transporter, and

  4. Complement protein C1q modulates neurite outgrowth in vitro and spinal cord axon regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sheri L; Nguyen, Hal X; Mendez, Oscar A; Anderson, Aileen J

    2015-03-11

    Traumatic injury to CNS fiber tracts is accompanied by failure of severed axons to regenerate and results in lifelong functional deficits. The inflammatory response to CNS trauma is mediated by a diverse set of cells and proteins with varied, overlapping, and opposing effects on histological and behavioral recovery. Importantly, the contribution of individual inflammatory complement proteins to spinal cord injury (SCI) pathology is not well understood. Although the presence of complement components increases after SCI in association with axons and myelin, it is unknown whether complement proteins affect axon growth or regeneration. We report a novel role for complement C1q in neurite outgrowth in vitro and axon regrowth after SCI. In culture, C1q increased neurite length on myelin. Protein and molecular assays revealed that C1q interacts directly with myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in myelin, resulting in reduced activation of growth inhibitory signaling in neurons. In agreement with a C1q-outgrowth-enhancing mechanism in which C1q binding to MAG reduces MAG signaling to neurons, complement C1q blocked both the growth inhibitory and repulsive turning effects of MAG in vitro. Furthermore, C1q KO mice demonstrated increased sensory axon turning within the spinal cord lesion after SCI with peripheral conditioning injury, consistent with C1q-mediated neutralization of MAG. Finally, we present data that extend the role for C1q in axon growth and guidance to include the sprouting patterns of descending corticospinal tract axons into spinal gray matter after dorsal column transection SCI.

  5. Neurite guidance and three-dimensional confinement via compliant semiconductor scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Francesca; Huang, Yu; Dent, Erik W; Williams, Justin C; Lagally, Max G

    2014-12-23

    Neurons are often cultured in vitro on a flat, open, and rigid substrate, a platform that does not reflect well the native microenvironment of the brain. To address this concern, we have developed a culturing platform containing arrays of microchannels, formed in a crystalline-silicon nanomembrane (NM) resting on polydimethylsiloxane; this platform will additionally enable active sensing and stimulation at the local scale, via devices fabricated in the silicon. The mechanical properties of the composite Si/compliant substrate nanomaterial approximate those of neural tissue. The microchannels, created in the NM by strain engineering, demonstrate strong guidance of neurite outgrowth. Using plasma techniques, we developed a means to coat just the inside surface of these channels with an adhesion promoter (poly-d-lysine). For NM channels with openings larger than the cross-sectional area of a single axon, strong physical confinement and guidance of axons through the channels are observed. Imaging of axons that grow in channels with openings that approximate the size of an axon suggests that a tight seal exists between the cell membrane and the inner surface of the channel, mimicking a myelin sheath. Such a tight seal of the cell membrane with the channel surface would make this platform an attractive candidate for future neuronal repair. Results of measurements of impedance and photoluminescence of bare NM channels are comparable to those on a flat NM, demonstrating electrical and optical modalities of our platform and suggesting that this scaffold can be expanded for active sensing and monitoring of neuron cellular processes in conditions in which they exist naturally.

  6. Flavonoids isolated from Rumex aquaticus exhibit neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties by enhancing neurite outgrowth and synaptophysin.

    PubMed

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Raghavan, Aparna; Vasas, Andrea; Forgo, Peter; Hohmann, Judit; Shah, Zahoor A

    2014-01-01

    There is heightened interest in the field of stroke recovery as there is need for agents that would prevent the debilitating effects of the disorder, thereby tremendously reducing the societal and economic costs associated with it. In this study, the isolation of two flavonoids--quercetin-3-O-galactoside (1) and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside (2)--from Rumex aquaticus (western dock) and their neuroprotective effects were reported in the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of in vitro ischemia using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell line. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the ethyl-acetate extract of Rumex aquaticus L. afforded the isolation of compounds 1 and 2. The structures of compounds were established on the basis of spectroscopic analyses (UV, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Both compounds were isolated for the first time from this species. In the course of the pharmacological experiments it was detected that these flavonoids at 10 µM concentration significantly improved cell survival in the oxygen-glucose deprivation model of ischemia. Moreover, they also increased neurite outgrowth in differentiated PC12 cells subjected to ischemic insult. Investigations on the cellular mechanism for the observed effect revealed that compound 1 (10 µM) enhances the expression of synaptophysin - a marker of synapses, and an indicator of synaptic plasticity. Rapid restoration of neurological function following injury is paramount to the prevention of debilitating consequences of ischemic stroke. This combination of neuroprotection and neuritogenic potential could be particularly useful in the recovery phase of stroke.

  7. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-06-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability.

  8. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-06-06

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability.

  9. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-01-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability. PMID:27264106

  10. Patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds in three-dimensional hydrogel constructs enhance neurite outgrowth and directional control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, Richard J.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural tissue engineering holds incredible potential to restore functional capabilities to damaged neural tissue. It was hypothesized that patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds could control neurite direction and enhance neurite outgrowth. Approach. A method of creating aligned electrospun nanofibers was implemented and fiber characteristics were analyzed using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Nanofibers were composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer, PCL mixed with gelatin, or PCL with a laminin coating. Three-dimensional hydrogels were then integrated with embedded aligned nanofibers to support neuronal cell cultures. Microscopic images were captured at high-resolution in single and multi-focal planes with eGFP-expressing neuronal SH-SY5Y cells in a fluorescent channel and nanofiber scaffolding in another channel. Neuronal morphology and neurite tracking of nanofibers were then analyzed in detail. Main results. Aligned nanofibers were shown to enable significant control over the direction of neurite outgrowth in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) neuronal cultures. Laminin-functionalized nanofibers in 3D hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels enabled significant alignment of neurites with nanofibers, enabled significant neurite tracking of nanofibers, and significantly increased the distance over which neurites could extend. Specifically, the average length of neurites per cell in 3D HA constructs with laminin-functionalized nanofibers increased by 66% compared to the same laminin fibers on 2D laminin surfaces, increased by 59% compared to 2D laminin-coated surface without fibers, and increased by 1052% compared to HA constructs without fibers. Laminin functionalization of fibers also doubled average neurite length over plain PCL fibers in the same 3D HA constructs. In addition, neurites also demonstrated tracking directly along the fibers, with 66% of neurite lengths directly tracking laminin-coated fibers in 3D HA

  11. APP independent and dependent effects on neurite outgrowth are modulated by the receptor associated protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    Billnitzer, Andrew J; Barskaya, Irina; Yin, Cailing; Perez, Ruth G

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its secreted form, sAPP, contribute to the development of neurons in hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Full-length APP binds the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), which stimulates APP endocytosis. LRP also contributes to neurite growth. Furthermore, the receptor associated protein (RAP) binds LRP in a manner that blocks APP-LRP interactions. To elucidate APP contributions to neurite growth for full-length APP and sAPP, we cultured wild type (WT) and APP knockout (KO) neurons in sAPPα and/or RAP and measured neurite outgrowth at 1 day in vitro. Our data reveal that WT neurons had less axonal outgrowth including less axon branching. RAP treatment potentiated the inhibitory effects of APP. KO neurons had significantly more outgrowth and branching, especially in response to RAP, effects which were also associated with ERK2 activation. Our results affirm a major inhibitory role by full-length APP on all aspects of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and show that RAP-LRP binding stimulated axon growth independently of APP. These findings support a major role for APP as an inhibitor of neurite growth and reveal novel signaling functions for LRP that may be disrupted by Alzheimer's pathology or therapies aimed at APP processing.

  12. Notch activation induces neurite remodeling and functional modifications in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara Anna; Uberti, Daniela; Napolitano, Francesco; Stante, Maria; Santoro, Federica; Minopoli, Giuseppina; Zambrano, Nicola; Russo, Tommaso; Memo, Maurizio

    2009-05-01

    Notch proteins are definitely recognized as key regulators of the neuronal fate during embryo development, but their function in the adult brain is still largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that Notch pathway stimulation increases microtubules stability followed by the remodeling of neuronal morphology with neurite varicosities loss, thicker neuritis, and enlarged growth cones. Here we show that the neurite remodeling is a dynamic event, dependent on transcription and translation, and with functional implications. Exposure of differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to the Notch ligand Jagged1 induces varicosities loss all along the neurites, accompanied by the redistribution of presynaptic vesicles and the decrease in neurotransmitters release. As evaluated by time lapse digital imaging, dynamic changes in neurite morphology were rapidly reversible and dependent on the activation of the Notch signaling pathway. In fact, it was prevented by the inhibition of the proteolytic gamma-secretase enzyme or the transcription machinery, and was mimicked by the transfection of the intracellular domain of Notch. One hour after treatment with Jagged1, several genes were downregulated. Many of these genes encode proteins that are known to be involved in protein synthesis. These data suggest that in adult neurons, Notch pathway activates a transcriptional program that regulates the equilibrium between varicosities formation and varicosities loss in the neuronal presynaptic compartment involving the expression and redistribution of both structural and functional proteins.

  13. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be...

  14. Controlled neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on micropatterned nanofiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkoc, Veysi; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nelson, Tyler; Lannutti, John J.; Hansford, Derek J.

    2015-12-01

    Patterning neuronal cells and guiding neurite growth are important for applications such as prosthetics, cell based biosensors, and tissue engineering. In this paper, a microdevice is presented that provides neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on a collagen coated gelatin/PCL nanofiber mat. The pattern consisted of a grid of polystyrene microwells/nodes to confine the cell bodies and orthogonal grooves to guide neurite growth from each node. Vacuum assisted cell seeding was used to localize cell bodies in the microwells and physically separate the cells during seeding. The electrospun nanofiber mats under the polystyrene microstructures were coated with collagen to enhance the cellular attachment and enhance differentiation. We evaluated the performance of our device using adhesion, viability, and differentiation assays of neuron-like PC12 cells compared to controls for vacuum seeding, spatial isolation and guidance, and collagen coating of the fibers. The device provided PC12 cell patterning with increased adhesion, differentiation, and guided neurite outgrowth compared to controls, demonstrating its potential for in vitro neuronal cell patterning studies.

  15. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins.

  16. Control of neurite outgrowth and growth cone motility by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Tornieri, Karine; Welshhans, Kristy; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) has been reported to affect neurite outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro. Here we investigated the signaling pathways by which PI-3K affects neurite outgrowth and growth cone motility in identified snail neurons in vitro. Inhibition of PI-3K with wortmannin (2 microM) or LY 294002 (25 microM) resulted in a significant elongation of filopodia and in a slow-down of neurite outgrowth. Experiments using cytochalasin and blebbistatin, drugs that interfere with actin polymerization and myosin II activity, respectively, demonstrated that filopodial elongation resulting from PI-3K inhibition was dependent on actin polymerization. Inhibition of strategic kinases located downstream of PI-3K, such as Akt, ROCK, and MEK, also caused significant filopodial elongation and a slow-down in neurite outgrowth. Another growth cone parameter, filopodial number, was not affected by inhibition of PI-3K, Akt, ROCK, or MEK. A detailed study of growth cone behavior showed that the filopodial elongation induced by inhibiting PI-3K, Akt, ROCK, and MEK was achieved by increasing two motility parameters: the rate with which filopodia extend (extension rate) and the time that filopodia spend elongating. Whereas the inhibition of ROCK or Akt (both activated by the lipid kinase activity of PI-3K) and MEK (activated by the protein kinase activity of PI-3K) had additive effects, simultaneous inhibition of Akt and ROCK showed no additive effect. We further demonstrate that the effects on filopodial dynamics investigated were calcium-independent. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of PI-3K signaling results in filopodial elongation and a slow-down of neurite advance, reminiscent of growth cone searching behavior.

  17. A New Role for TIMP-1 in Modulating Neurite Outgrowth and Morphology of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ould-yahoui, Adlane; Tremblay, Evelyne; Sbai, Oualid; Ferhat, Lotfi; Bernard, Anne; Charrat, Eliane; Gueye, Yatma; Lim, Ngee Han; Brew, Keith; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Dive, Vincent; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Background Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) displays pleiotropic activities, both dependent and independent of its inhibitory activity on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In the central nervous system (CNS), TIMP-1 is strongly upregulated in reactive astrocytes and cortical neurons following excitotoxic/inflammatory stimuli, but no information exists on its effects on growth and morphology of cortical neurons. Principal Findings We found that 24 h incubation with recombinant TIMP-1 induced a 35% reduction in neurite length and significantly increased growth cones size and the number of F-actin rich microprocesses. TIMP-1 mediated reduction in neurite length affected both dendrites and axons after 48 h treatment. The effects on neurite length and morphology were not elicited by a mutated form of TIMP-1 inactive against MMP-1, -2 and -3, and still inhibitory for MMP-9, but were mimicked by a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. MMP-9 was poorly expressed in developing cortical neurons, unlike MMP-2 which was present in growth cones and whose selective inhibition caused neurite length reductions similar to those induced by TIMP-1. Moreover, TIMP-1 mediated changes in cytoskeleton reorganisation were not accompanied by modifications in the expression levels of actin, βIII-tubulin, or microtubule assembly regulatory protein MAP2c. Transfection-mediated overexpression of TIMP-1 dramatically reduced neuritic arbour extension in the absence of detectable levels of released extracellular TIMP-1. Conclusions Altogether, TIMP-1 emerges as a modulator of neuronal outgrowth and morphology in a paracrine and autrocrine manner through the inhibition, at least in part, of MMP-2 and not MMP-9. These findings may help us understand the role of the MMP/TIMP system in post-lesion pre-scarring conditions. PMID:20011518

  18. Hydrocortisone Stimulates Neurite Outgrowth from Mouse Retinal Explants by Modulating Macroglial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Berlinicke, Cynthia; Zack, Donald J.; Nickells, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is mounting evidence that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) require a complex milieu of trophic factors to enhance cell survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. The authors' goal was to examine the contribution of components of a combination of hormones, growth factors, steroids, and small molecules to creating a regenerative environment and to determine if any of these components modulated macroglial behavior to aid in regeneration. Methods Postnatal day 7 mouse retinal explants embedded in collagen were used as an in vitro model of neurite regeneration. Explants were treated with the culture supplements fetal bovine serum, N2, and G5 and a mixture of G5 and N2 components, designated enhanced N2 (EN2). Explants were evaluated for neurite outgrowth over 7 days in culture. The effects of each treatment were also evaluated on cultured RGCs purified by Thy1 immunopanning. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR analysis were used to evaluate differences in gene expression in the explants due to different treatments. Results EN2 stimulated significant neurite outgrowth from explants but not from purified RGCs. Elimination of hydrocortisone (HC) from EN2 reduced the mean neurites per explant by 37%. EN2-treated explants demonstrated increased expression of Gfap, Glul, Glt1, Cntf, Pedf, and VegfA compared with explants treated with EN2 without HC. Subsequent experiments showed that increased expression of Cntf and Glul was critical to the trophic effect of HC. Conclusions These data suggest that the HC in EN2 indirectly contributed to neurite outgrowth by activating macroglia to produce neurotrophic and neuroprotective molecules. PMID:22395888

  19. The p75 neurotrophin receptor promotes Aβ-induced neuritic dystrophy in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Juliet; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V.; Yang, Tao; LeMieux, Melburne C.; Griend, Lilith Vander; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Massa, Stephen M.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Longo, Frank M.

    2009-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of amyloid-β(1–42) (Aβ) are thought to play a causal role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has been implicated in Aβ-induced neurodegeneration. To further define the functions of p75NTR in AD, we examined the interaction of oligomeric Aβ with p75NTR, and the effects of that interaction on neurite integrity in neuron cultures and in a chronic AD mouse model. Atomic force microscopy was used to ascertain the aggregated state of Aβ, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis revealed that Aβ oligomers interact with the extracellular domain of p75NTR. In vitro studies of Aβ-induced death in neuron cultures isolated from wildtype and p75NTR −/− mice, in which the p75NTR extracellular domain is deleted, showed reduced sensitivity of mutant cells to Aβ-induced cell death. Interestingly, Aβ-induced neuritic dystrophy and activation of c-Jun, a known mediator of Aβ-induced deleterious signaling, were completely prevented in p75NTR −/− neuron cultures. Thy1-hAPPLond/Swe X p75NTR−/− mice exhibited significantly diminished hippocampal neuritic dystrophy and complete reversal of basal forebrain cholinergic neurite degeneration relative to those expressing wild type p75NTR. Aβ levels were not affected, suggesting that removal of p75NTR extracellular domain reduced the ability of excess Aβ to promote neuritic degeneration. These findings indicate that while p75NTR likely does not mediate all Aβ effects, it does play a significant role in enabling Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo, establishing p75NTR as an important therapeutic target for AD. PMID:19710315

  20. Synergistic effects of cyclic AMP and nerve growth factor on neurite outgrowth and microtubule stability of PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The outgrowth of neurites from rat PC12 cells stimulated by combined treatment of nerve growth factor (NGF) with cAMP is significantly more rapid and extensive than the outgrowth induced by either factor alone. We have compared the responses of PC12 cells under three different growth conditions, NGF alone, cAMP alone, and combined treatment, with respect to surface morphology, rapidity of neurite outgrowth, and stability of neurite microtubules, to understand the synergistic action of NGF and cAMP on PC12. Surface events at early times in these growth conditions varied, suggesting divergent pathways of action of NGF and cAMP. This suggestion is strongly supported by the finding that cells exposed to saturating levels of dibutyryl cAMP without substantial neurite outgrowth initiated neurites within 5 min of NGF. This response has been adopted as a convenient assay for NGF. Neurites that regenerated in the three growth conditions showed marked differences in stability to treatments that depolymerize microtubules. The results indicate that microtubules in cells treated with both NGF and cAMP are significantly more stable than in either growth factor alone. We suggest that a shift of the assembly equilibrium favoring tubulin assembly is a necessary prerequisite for the initiation of neurites by PC12. PMID:2982887

  1. Cytochalasin inhibition of slow tension increase in rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Wright, G; Hurn, E

    1994-10-01

    We separated the K(+)-induced contraction of rat aortic rings into its initial (fast) and secondary (slow) components. It was found that temperature sensitivity, K+ depolarization, and Ca2+ dependency could each be utilized to differentiate between these two components of the contractile response. Increasing the passive tension preload of the tissue increased the fast response but had no significant effect on the secondary slow rise in tension. Cytochalasins, which inhibit actin polymerization, reversibly inhibited tension development by rat aortic rings with the effect selectively confined to the slow component of the K(+)-induced contraction. In a similar fashion, cytochalasin was shown to attenuate the slow tension increase caused by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. Finally, it was found that low concentrations of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor staurosporine (8 x 10(-9) M) selectively attenuated the slow component of the K(+)-induced contraction. The results suggest that distinctly different mechanisms regulate the initial fast and secondary slow contractile responses induced by elevation of extracellular K+. Both mechanisms are voltage sensitive and use extracellular Ca2+. The fast but not the slow component was altered by changing the passive tension preload in a fashion consistent with a sliding filament mechanism of force development. The specific nature of the slow component is not certain but may involve low-level PKC activity and require the integrity and capability for remodeling of a specific portion of the actin-containing cytoskeleton.

  2. Ca2+ transients are not required as signals for long-term neurite outgrowth from cultured sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A method for clamping cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in cultures of rat sympathetic neurons at or below resting levels for several days was devised to determine whether Ca2+ signals are required for neurite outgrowth from neurons that depend on Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) for their growth and survival. To control [Ca2+]i, normal Ca2+ influx was eliminated by titration of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA and reinstated through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. The rate of neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites thus became dependent on the extent of depolarization by KCl, and withdrawal of KCl caused an immediate cessation of growth. Neurite outgrowth was completely blocked by the L type Ca2+ channel antagonists nifedipine, nitrendipine, D600, or diltiazem at sub- or micromolar concentrations. Measurement of [Ca2+]i in cell bodies using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura-2 established that optimal growth, similar to that seen in normal medium, was obtained when [Ca2+]i was clamped at resting levels. These levels of [Ca2+]i were set by serum, which elevated [Ca2+]i by integral of 30 nM, whereas the addition of NGF had no effect on [Ca2+]i. The reduction of [Ca2+]o prevented neurite fasciculation but this had no effect on the rate of neurite elongation or on the number of extending neurites. These results show that neurite outgrowth from NGF-dependent neurons occurs over long periods in the complete absence of Ca2+ signals, suggesting that Ca2+ signals are not necessary for operating the basic machinery of neurite outgrowth. PMID:2324199

  3. Researching with Children: Ethical Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Einarsdottir, Johanna; Perry, Bob

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to reflect on both the processes and outcomes of the range of approaches aimed at promoting children's engagement in research, with the specific intent of listening to children's voices. This article considers some of the ethical tensions we have experienced when engaging children in research about their prior-to-school and school…

  4. DNA Looping, Supercoiling and Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura

    2007-11-01

    In complex organisms, activation or repression of gene expression by proteins bound to enhancer or silencer elements located several kilobases away from the promoter is a well recognized phenomenon. However, a mechanistic understanding of any of these multiprotein interactions is still incomplete. Part of the difficulty in characterizing long-range interactions is the complexity of the regulatory systems and also an underestimation of the effect of DNA supercoiling and tension. Supercoiling is expected to promote interactions between DNA sites because it winds the DNA into compact plectonemes in which distant DNA segments more frequently draw close. The idea that DNA is also under various levels of tension is becoming more widely accepted. Forces that stretch the double helix in vivo are the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone, the action of motor enzymes perhaps acting upon a topologically constrained sequence of DNA or chromosome segregation during cell mitosis following DNA replication. Presently, little is known about the tension acting on DNA in vivo, but characterization of how physiological regulatory processes, such as loop formation, depend on DNA tension in vitro will indicate the stretching force regimes likely to exist in vivo. In this light, the well studied CI protein of bacteriophage l, which was recently found to cause a of 3.8 kbp loop in DNA, is an ideal system in which to characterize long-range gene regulation. The large size of the loop lends itself to single-molecule techniques, which allow characterization of the dynamics of CI-mediated l DNA looping under controlled levels of supercoiling and tension. Such experiments are being used to discover the principles of long-range interactions in l and in more complex systems.

  5. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)-1 and (-)-1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)-1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (-)-1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)-1 and (-)-1.

  6. HMGB1, a pathogenic molecule that induces neurite degeneration via TLR4-MARCKS, is a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Hama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Matsumi, Chiemi; Kajikawa, Masunori; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Sobue, Gen; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, but it remains an intractable condition. Its pathogenesis is predominantly attributed to the aggregation and transmission of two molecules, Aβ and tau; however, other pathological mechanisms are possible. Here, we reveal that phosphorylation of MARCKS, a submembrane protein that regulates the stability of the actin network, occurs at Ser46 prior to aggregation of Aβ and is sustained throughout the course of AD in human and mouse brains. Furthermore, HMGB1 released from necrotic or hyperexcitatory neurons binds to TLR4, triggers the specific phosphorylation of MARCKS via MAP kinases, and induces neurite degeneration, the classical hallmark of AD pathology. Subcutaneous injection of a newly developed monoclonal antibody against HMGB1 strongly inhibits neurite degeneration even in the presence of Aβ plaques and completely recovers cognitive impairment in a mouse model. HMGB1 and Aβ mutually affect polymerization of the other molecule, and the therapeutic effects of the anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody are mediated by Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent mechanisms. We propose that HMGB1 is a critical pathogenic molecule promoting AD pathology in parallel with Aβ and tau and a new key molecular target of preclinical antibody therapy to delay the onset of AD. PMID:27557632

  7. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)−1 and (−)−1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)−1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (−)−1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)−1 and (−)−1. PMID:26585042

  8. Variable-Tension-Cord Suspension/Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villemarette, Mark L.; Boston, Joshua; RInks, Judith; Felice, Pat; Stein, Tim; Payne, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A system for mechanical suspension and vibration isolation of a machine or instrument is based on the use of Kevlar (or equivalent aromatic polyamide) cord held in variable tension between the machine or instrument and a surrounding frame. The basic concept of such a tensioned-cord suspension system (including one in which the cords are made of aromatic polyamide fibers) is not new by itself; what is new here is the additional provision for adjusting the tension during operation to optimize vibration- isolation properties. In the original application for which this system was conceived, the objective is to suspend a reciprocating cryocooler aboard a space shuttle and to prevent both (1) transmission of launch vibrations to the cryocooler and (2) transmission of vibrations from the cryocooler to samples in a chamber cooled by the cryocooler. The basic mechanical principle of this system can also be expected to be applicable to a variety of other systems in which there are requirements for cord suspension and vibration isolation. The reciprocating cryocooler of the original application is a generally axisymmetric object, and the surrounding frame is a generally axisymmetric object with windows (see figure). Two cords are threaded into a spoke-like pattern between attachment rings on the cryocooler, holes in the cage, and cord-tension- adjusting assemblies. Initially, the cord tensions are adjusted to at least the level necessary to suspend the cryocooler against gravitation. Accelerometers for measuring vibrations are mounted (1) on the cold tip of the cryocooler and (2) adjacent to the cage, on a structure that supports the cage. During operation, a technician observes the accelerometer outputs on an oscilloscope while manually adjusting the cord tensions in an effort to minimize the amount of vibration transmitted to and/or from the cryocooler. A contemplated future version of the system would include a microprocessor-based control subsystem that would include cord-tension

  9. Intracellular control of axial shape in non-uniform neurites: a serial electron microscopic analysis of organelles and microtubules in AI and AII retinal amacrine neurites

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    AI and AII cat retinal amacrine cells have highly varicose non-uniform, neuritic processes. Processes of both types were reconstructed via a computer system using serial electron micrographs. These reconstructions were analyzed for (a) varicosity volume, surface area, and length, (b) "neck" volume, surface area, and length, (c) number of microtubules within the varicosity, (d) number of microtubules within the "neck," and (e) volume and surface area of mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and large smooth vesicular bodies within the processes. Correlation of these parameters revealed a linear relationship between the number of microtubules in the necks and mean neck cross-sectional area (rs = 0.780, P less than 0.001), while microtubule number within the varicosities showed no correlation with varicosity volume (rs = 0.239, P greater than 0.2). Varicosity volume did, however, correlate strongly with the summed volume of mitochondria and smooth vesicular bodies contained within the varicosity for both cell types examined. The ratio between membranous organelle volume and varicosity volume for AI amacrine processes of 1:6.97 (rs = 0.927), differed from the ratio of 1:1.80 for the AII amacrine processes (rs = 0.987). Similar relationships were observed in other nonvaricose neurites such as optic tract axons. Membranous organelles appear to contribute an additional obligatory volume to the cytosol that can be as much as seven times the organelles' direct volume. These observations suggest that both the cytoskeletal components, and the membrane organelles play a direct role in determining neurite shape. PMID:6538879

  10. How do mechanosensitive channels sense membrane tension?

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Tim

    2016-08-15

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels provide protection against hypo-osmotic shock in bacteria whereas eukaryotic MS channels fulfil a multitude of important functions beside osmoregulation. Interactions with the membrane lipids are responsible for the sensing of mechanical force for most known MS channels. It emerged recently that not only prokaryotic, but also eukaryotic, MS channels are able to directly sense the tension in the membrane bilayer without any additional cofactor. If the membrane is solely viewed as a continuous medium with specific anisotropic physical properties, the sensitivity towards tension changes can be explained as result of the hydrophobic coupling between membrane and transmembrane (TM) regions of the channel. The increased cross-sectional area of the MS channel in the active conformation and elastic deformations of the membrane close to the channel have been described as important factors. However, recent studies suggest that molecular interactions of lipids with the channels could play an important role in mechanosensation. Pockets in between TM helices were identified in the MS channel of small conductance (MscS) and YnaI that are filled with lipids. Less lipids are present in the open state of MscS than the closed according to MD simulations. Thus it was suggested that exclusion of lipid fatty acyl chains from these pockets, as a consequence of increased tension, would trigger gating. Similarly, in the eukaryotic MS channel TRAAK it was found that a lipid chain blocks the conducting path in the closed state. The role of these specific lipid interactions in mechanosensation are highlighted in this review.

  11. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2012-12-01

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 105 cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m-1) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip.

  12. Biaxial tension on polymer in thermoforming range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Combeaud, C.; Fournier, F.; Rodriguez, J.; Billon, N.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental characterization of mechanical properties of a polyethylene terephtalate (PET) resin classically used in stretch blow moulding process. We have applied on such a material a well established experimental protocol at CEMEF, including new and relevant biaxial tensile tests. The experimental set-up relative to biaxial tension will be presented and described in a first part of the paper. Furthermore, we will focus on the experimental DMTA preliminary tests which are required to estimate the resin sensibility to temperature and strain rate in linear viscoelasticity domain. Finally, we will be interested in the material large strain behaviour: biaxial tensile results are presented and discussed. Finally, such an experimental approach should allow a relevant modelling of polymer physics and mechanics; this point will not be discussed here because of a lack of time.

  13. Neurite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements at ultrahigh field: comparison with light microscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Sune N; Bjarkam, Carsten R; Nyengaard, Jens R; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Hansen, Brian; Vosegaard, Thomas; Østergaard, Leif; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Due to its unique sensitivity to tissue microstructure, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has found many applications in clinical and fundamental science. With few exceptions, a more precise correspondence between physiological or biophysical properties and the obtained diffusion parameters remain uncertain due to lack of specificity. In this work, we address this problem by comparing diffusion parameters of a recently introduced model for water diffusion in brain matter to light microscopy and quantitative electron microscopy. Specifically, we compare diffusion model predictions of neurite density in rats to optical myelin staining intensity and stereological estimation of neurite volume fraction using electron microscopy. We find that the diffusion model describes data better and that its parameters show stronger correlation with optical and electron microscopy, and thus reflect myelinated neurite density better than the more frequently used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cumulant expansion methods. Furthermore, the estimated neurite orientations capture dendritic architecture more faithfully than DTI diffusion ellipsoids.

  14. Quantitative assessment of neurite outgrowth in human embryonic stem-cell derived neurons using automated high-content image analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    During development neurons undergo a number of morphological changes including neurite outgrowth from the cell body. Exposure to neurotoxicants that interfere with this process may cause in permanent deficits in nervous system function. While many studies have used rodent primary...

  15. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  16. Multiscale surface roughening of commercial purity titanium during uniaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina Kozelskaya, Anna Sinyakova, Elena; Lider, Andrey Sklyarova, Elena

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of the surface roughening of the titanium specimens during uniaxial tension were demonstrated. By means of optical profilometry and electron backscattered diffraction it was shown that the formation of surface roughening is a multilevel process. The correlation between the density of slip in some grains, and grain rotation, and their displacement towards the free surface was investigated.

  17. An astrocytic binding site for neuronal Thy-1 and its effect on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, E B; Leifer, D; Heng, J E; McConnell, J E; Gorla, M; Levin, L A; Barnstable, C J; Lipton, S A

    1995-01-01

    Thy-1, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is one of the most abundant glycoproteins on mammalian neurons. Nevertheless, its role in the peripheral or central nervous system is poorly understood. Certain monoclonal antibodies to Thy-1 promote neurite outgrowth by rodent central nervous system neurons in vitro, suggesting that Thy-1 functions, in part, by modulating neurite outgrowth. We describe a binding site for Thy-1 on astrocytes. This Thy-1-binding protein has been characterized by immunofluroesence with specific anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies and by three competitive binding assays using (i) anti-idiotype antibodies, (ii) purified Thy-1, and (iii) Thy-1-transfected cells. The Thy-1-binding protein may participate in axonal or dendritic development in the nervous system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7479964

  18. Neurite outgrowth-promoting active constituents of the Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa).

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Masanori; Ikeda, Ryuya; Gao, Hui Yuan; Muto, Norio; Otaki, Keisuke; Sano, Toshikazu; Kawahara, Nobuo; Nakane, Takahisa

    2008-01-01

    In the screening of biologically active constituents from woody plants, the methanol extract of leaves of Chamaecyparis obtusa showed potent neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in neuronal PC12 cells. The ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of the methanol extract showed potent activity and was separated by means of various chromatographic methods to give the two new compounds 1 and 2, as well as 11 known lignan and sesquiterpene derivatives. The structures of the new compounds were determined to be 9-O-acetyldihydrosesamin (1) and 9-O-(11-hydroxyeudesman-4-yl)dihydrosesamin (2), respectively, in NMR studies including 2D-NMR experiments. Of the 13 compounds, the known compound hinokinin (5) and the new compound 2 showed potent neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in PC 12 cells.

  19. Terpenoids with neurite outgrowth-promoting activity from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin-Hui; Yue, Rong-Cai; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guo-Wei; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Shen, Yun-Heng

    2016-05-01

    Eighteen terpenoids (1-18) were isolated from Illicium merrillianum. Compound 1 was identified as new compound, and its structure was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All compounds were evaluated for nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neurite outgrowth activity using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as a model system of neuronal differentiation. Compounds 1, 3, 18 showed significant neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in the presence of 20 ng/ml NGF in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of 1-100 μM after 24-h treatment. Subtle difference of functional groups at C-2 position in hopane-type triterpene resulted in enormous bioactivity difference, compound 1 was neurotrophic but 2 was cytotoxic.

  20. Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bo; Luo, Shyh-Chyang; Zhao, Haichao; Lin, Hsing-An; Sekine, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Chen, Chi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it.

  1. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  2. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  3. Cyclic AMP stimulates neurite outgrowth of lamprey reticulospinal neurons without substantially altering their biophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Pale, T; Frisch, E B; McClellan, A D

    2013-08-15

    Reticulospinal (RS) neurons are critical for initiation of locomotor behavior, and following spinal cord injury (SCI) in the lamprey, the axons of these neurons regenerate and restore locomotor behavior within a few weeks. For lamprey RS neurons in culture, experimental induction of calcium influx, either in the growth cone or cell body, is inhibitory for neurite outgrowth. Following SCI, these neurons partially downregulate calcium channel expression, which would be expected to reduce calcium influx and possibly provide supportive conditions for axonal regeneration. In the present study, it was tested whether activation of second messenger signaling pathways stimulates neurite outgrowth of lamprey RS neurons without altering their electrical properties (e.g. spike broadening) so as to possibly increase calcium influx and compromise axonal growth. First, activation of cAMP pathways with forskolin or dbcAMP stimulated neurite outgrowth of RS neurons in culture in a PKA-dependent manner, while activation of cGMP signaling pathways with dbcGMP inhibited outgrowth. Second, neurophysiological recordings from uninjured RS neurons in isolated lamprey brain-spinal cord preparations indicated that dbcAMP or dbcGMP did not significantly affect any of the measured electrical properties. In contrast, for uninjured RS neurons, forskolin increased action potential duration, which might have increased calcium influx, but did not significantly affect most other electrical properties. Importantly, for injured RS neurons during the period of axonal regeneration, forskolin did not significantly alter their electrical properties. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of cAMP signaling by dbcAMP stimulates neurite outgrowth, but does not alter the electrical properties of lamprey RS neurons in such a way that would be expected to induce calcium influx. In conclusion, our results suggest that activation of cAMP pathways alone, without compensation for possible

  4. Active learning of neuron morphology for accurate automated tracing of neurites

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Rohan; Chapeton, Julio; Jitesh, Jayant; Bhavsar, Chintan; Stepanyants, Armen

    2014-01-01

    Automating the process of neurite tracing from light microscopy stacks of images is essential for large-scale or high-throughput quantitative studies of neural circuits. While the general layout of labeled neurites can be captured by many automated tracing algorithms, it is often not possible to differentiate reliably between the processes belonging to different cells. The reason is that some neurites in the stack may appear broken due to imperfect labeling, while others may appear fused due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy. Trained neuroanatomists routinely resolve such topological ambiguities during manual tracing tasks by combining information about distances between branches, branch orientations, intensities, calibers, tortuosities, colors, as well as the presence of spines or boutons. Likewise, to evaluate different topological scenarios automatically, we developed a machine learning approach that combines many of the above mentioned features. A specifically designed confidence measure was used to actively train the algorithm during user-assisted tracing procedure. Active learning significantly reduces the training time and makes it possible to obtain less than 1% generalization error rates by providing few training examples. To evaluate the overall performance of the algorithm a number of image stacks were reconstructed automatically, as well as manually by several trained users, making it possible to compare the automated traces to the baseline inter-user variability. Several geometrical and topological features of the traces were selected for the comparisons. These features include the total trace length, the total numbers of branch and terminal points, the affinity of corresponding traces, and the distances between corresponding branch and terminal points. Our results show that when the density of labeled neurites is sufficiently low, automated traces are not significantly different from manual reconstructions obtained by trained users. PMID

  5. Neurulation and neurite extension require the zinc transporter ZIP12 (slc39a12)

    PubMed Central

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Graham, David M.; Keen, Carl L.; Rucker, Robert B.; Messerli, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Zn2+ is required for many aspects of neuronal structure and function. However, the regulation of Zn2+ in the nervous system remains poorly understood. Systematic analysis of tissue-profiling microarray data showed that the zinc transporter ZIP12 (slc39a12) is highly expressed in the human brain. In the work reported here, we confirmed that ZIP12 is a Zn2+ uptake transporter with a conserved pattern of high expression in the mouse and Xenopus nervous system. Mouse neurons and Neuro-2a cells produce fewer and shorter neurites after ZIP12 knockdown without affecting cell viability. Zn2+ chelation or loading in cells to alter Zn2+ availability respectively mimicked or reduced the effects of ZIP12 knockdown on neurite outgrowth. ZIP12 knockdown reduces cAMP response element-binding protein activation and phosphorylation at serine 133, which is a critical pathway for neuronal differentiation. Constitutive cAMP response element-binding protein activation restores impairments in neurite outgrowth caused by Zn2+ chelation or ZIP12 knockdown. ZIP12 knockdown also reduces tubulin polymerization and increases sensitivity to nocodazole following neurite outgrowth. We find that ZIP12 is expressed during neurulation and early nervous system development in Xenopus tropicalis, where ZIP12 antisense morpholino knockdown impairs neural tube closure and arrests development during neurulation with concomitant reduction in tubulin polymerization in the neural plate. This study identifies a Zn2+ transporter that is specifically required for nervous system development and provides tangible links between Zn2+, neurulation, and neuronal differentiation. PMID:23716681

  6. Methylmercury decreases NGF-induced TrkA autophosphorylation and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Parran, Damani K; Barone, Stanley; Mundy, William R

    2003-03-14

    Neurotrophin signaling through Trk receptors is important for differentiation and survival in the developing nervous system. The present study examined the effects of CH(3)Hg on (125)I-nerve growth factor (NGF) binding to the TrkA receptor, NGF-induced activation of the TrkA receptor, and neurite outgrowth in an in vitro model of differentiation using PC12 cells. Whole-cell binding assays using (125)I-NGF revealed a single binding site with a K(d) of approximately 1 nM. Methylmercury (CH(3)Hg) at 30 nM (EC(50) for neurite outgrowth inhibition) did not affect NGF binding to TrkA. TrkA autophosphorylation was measured by immunoblotting with a phospho-specific antibody. TrkA autophosphorylation peaked between 2.5 and 5 min of exposure and then decreased but was still detectable at 60 min. Concurrent exposure to CH(3)Hg and NGF for 2.5 min resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in TrkA autophosphorylation, which was significant at 100 nM CH(3)Hg. To determine whether the observed inhibition of TrkA was sufficient to alter cell differentiation, NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth was examined in PC12 cells after exposure to 30 nM CH(3)Hg, a concentration that inhibited TrkA autophosphorylation by approximately 50%. For comparison, a separate group of PC12 cells were exposed to a concentration of the selective Trk inhibitor K252a (30 nM), which had been shown to produce significant inhibition of TrkA autophosphorylation. Twenty-four hour exposure to either CH(3)Hg or K252a reduced neurite outgrowth to a similar degree. Our results suggest that CH(3)Hg may inhibit differentiation of PC12 cells by interfering with NGF-stimulated TrkA autophosphorylation.

  7. Inorganic lead may inhibit neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons through hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    1995-09-01

    Inorganic lead inhibits neurite initiation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons at concentrations as low as 100 nM. Conflicting reports suggest that Pb2+ may stimulate or inhibit protein kinase C, adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase, and calmodulin, or increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations. Therefore, Pb2+ may alter the activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) or protein kinases C or A. We cultured rat hippocampal neurons in 100 nM PbCI2 alone or in combination with kinase or calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibiting protein kinase C with calphostin C exacerbated the inhibition of neurite initiation caused by PbCI2, but inhibiting protein kinase A with KT5720, CaM kinase with KN62, or calmodulin with calmidazolium completely reversed the effects of PbCI2. These results indicate that Pb2+ may inhibit neurite initiation by inappropriately stimulating protein phosphorylation by CaM kinase or cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), possibly by stimulating calmodulin. This hypothesis is supported by findings that other treatments that should increase protein phosphorylation (okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, and Sp-cAMPS, a PKA activator) also reduced neurite initiation. Whole-cell intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentrations were not significantly altered by 100 nM PbCI2 at 4, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Therefore, the hypothesized stimulatory effects of Pb2+ exposure on calmodulin, CaM kinase, or PKA are probably not caused by increases in whole-cell intracellular free Ca2+, but may be attributable either to intracellular Pb2+ or to localized increases in [Ca2+]in that are not reflected in whole-cell measurements.

  8. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3 Prime ends. Because 3 Prime -UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits-CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  9. Nitric oxide acts as a slow-down and search signal in developing neurites.

    PubMed

    Trimm, Kevin R; Rehder, Vincent

    2004-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been demonstrated to act as a signaling molecule during neuronal development, but its precise function is unclear. Here we investigate whether NO might function at the neuronal growth cone to affect growth cone motility. We have previously demonstrated that growth cones of identified neurons from the snail Helisoma trivolvis show a rapid and transient increase in filopodial length in response to NO, which was regulated by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) [S. Van Wagenen and V. Rehder (1999) J. Neurobiol., 39, 168-185]. Because in vivo studies have demonstrated that growth cones have longer filopodia and advance more slowly in regions where pathfinding decisions are being made, this study aimed to establish whether NO could function as a combined 'slow-down and search signal' for growth cones by decreasing neurite outgrowth. In the presence of the NO donor NOC-7, neurites of B5 neurons showed a concentration-dependent effect on neurite outgrowth, ranging from slowing at low, stopping at intermediate and collapsing at high concentrations. The effects of the NO donor were mimicked by directly activating sGC with YC-1, or by increasing its product with 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, blocking sGC in the presence of NO with NS2028 blocked the effect of NO, suggesting that NO affected outgrowth via sGC. Ca2+ imaging of growth cones with Fura-2 indicated that [Ca2+]i increased transiently in the presence of NOC-7. These results support the hypothesis that NO can function as a potent slow/stop signal for developing neurites. When coupled with transient filopodia elongation, this phenomenon emulates growth cone searching behavior.

  10. Binding of Cdc42 to phospholipase D1 is important in neurite outgrowth of neural stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Cho, Chan Ho; Lee, Ki Sung; Han, Joong-Soo . E-mail: jshan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that phospholipase D (PLD) expression and PLD activity are upregulated during neuronal differentiation. In the present study, employing neural stem cells from the brain cortex of E14 rat embryos, we investigated the role of Rho family GTPases in PLD activation and in neurite outgrowth of neural stem cells during differentiation. As neuronal differentiation progressed, the expression levels of Cdc42 and RhoA increased. Furthermore, Cdc42 and PLD1 were mainly localized in neurite, whereas RhoA was localized in cytosol. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that Cdc42 was bound to PLD1 during differentiation, whereas RhoA was associated with PLD1 during both proliferation and differentiation. These results indicate that the association between Cdc42 and PLD1 is related to neuronal differentiation. To examine the effect of Cdc42 on PLD activation and neurite outgrowth, we transfected dominant negative Cdc42 (Cdc42N17) and constitutively active Cdc42 (Cdc42V12) into neural stem cells, respectively. Overexpression of Cdc42N17 decreased both PLD activity and neurite outgrowth, whereas co-transfection with Cdc42N17 and PLD1 restored them. On the other hand, Cdc42V12 increased both PLD activity and neurite outgrowth, suggesting that active state of Cdc42 is important in upregulation of PLD activity which is responsible for the increase of neurite outgrowth.

  11. Screening of natural medicines that efficiently activate neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in C2C12-cultured medium.

    PubMed

    Uezato, Tadayoshi; Sato, Eiji; Miura, Naoyuki

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the effects of natural medicines on neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells in a cultured medium of C2C12 cells. Derived from mouse myoblasts, the C2C12 cells secrete neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). The secretion of these neurotrophins from C2C12 cells stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells. We have screened a total of 120 samples and found five natural medicines: Trichosanthes Root, Asiasarum Root, Lycium Bark, Sinomenium Stem, and Dictamni radicis Cortex, that enhance the activity of C2C12-cultured medium to stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells. These natural medicines promoted not only neurite outgrowth but also stabilized the neurite formation in PC12D cells for several days. RT-PCR analysis showed that NGF was significantly increased with Trichosanthes and Lycium Bark. However, BDNF was slightly decreased with Lycium Bark, Sinomenium Stem, and Dictamni radicis Cortex. NT-3 was increased slightly by all of these natural medicines except Sinomenium Stem. All these five natural medicines significantly increased the number and length of neurites in PC12D cells in co-culture with C2C12 cells.

  12. Olanzapine Prevents the PCP-induced Reduction in the Neurite Outgrowth of Prefrontal Cortical Neurons via NRG1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingsheng; Yu, Yinghua; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-19

    Accumulating evidence suggests that reducing neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity plays a critical role in the pathology of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) can induce symptoms of schizophrenia as well as reduce dendritic spine density and neurite growth. The antipsychotic drug olanzapine may improve these deficits. This study aimed to investigate: (1) if olanzapine prevents PCP-induced suppression of neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression; (2) if olanzapine affects the Akt-GSK3 signaling pathway; and (3) the role of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) in this process. Immunofluorescence revealed that PCP treatment for 24 hours reduces both neurite length (28.5%) and the number of neurite branches (35.6%) in primary prefrontal cortical neuron cultures. PCP reduced protein and mRNA expressions of synaptophysin (24.9% and 23.2%, respectively) and PSD95 (31.5% and 21.4%, respectively), and the protein expression of p-Akt (26.7%) and p-GSK3β (35.2%). Olanzapine co-treatment prevented these PCP-induced effects in normal neurons but not in neurons from NRG1-knockout mice. These results indicate that NRG1 mediates the preventive effects of olanzapine on the PCP-induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression. This study provides potential targets for interventions on improving the efficacy of olanzapine on preventing cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  13. Outgrowth of Neurites from NIE-115 Neuroblastoma Cells Is Prevented on Repulsive Substrates through the Action of PAK

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Katharine J. M.; Kozma, Robert; Ahmed, Sohail; Dong, Jing-Ming; Hall, Christine; Lim, Louis

    2005-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), damaged axons are inhibited from regeneration by glial scars, where secreted chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and tenascin repulse outgrowth of neurites, the forerunners of axons and dendrites. During differentiation, these molecules are thought to form boundaries for guiding neurons to their correct targets. In neuroblastoma NIE-115 cells, outgrowth of neurites on laminin could be induced by serum starvation or inhibition of RhoA by Clostridium botulinum C3 toxin. The outgrowing neurites avoided crossing onto the repulsive substrate CSPG or tenascin. This avoidance response was partially overcome on expression of membrane-targeted and kinase-inactive forms of PAK. In these cells, the endogenous PAK isoforms colocalized with actin in distinctive sites, αPAK in the cell center as small clusters and along the neurite shaft and βPAK and γPAK in areas with membrane ruffles and filopodia, respectively. When isoform-specific N-terminal PAK sequences were introduced to interfere with PAK function, substantially more neurites crossed onto CSPG when cells contained a γPAK-derived peptide but not the corresponding αPAK- or βPAK-derived peptide. Thus, while neurite outgrowth can be promoted by RhoA inhibition, overcoming the accompanying repulsive guidance response will require modulation of PAK activity. These results have therapeutic implications for CNS repair processes. PMID:15923637

  14. Role of Tetanus Neurotoxin Insensitive Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein (Ti-Vamp) in Vesicular Transport Mediating Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Alberts, Philipp; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Louvard, Daniel; Galli, Thierry

    2000-01-01

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH2-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH2-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH2-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process. PMID:10811829

  15. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  16. Ethanol-induced disruption of Golgi apparatus morphology, primary neurite number and cellular orientation in developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Powrozek, Teresa A; Olson, Eric C

    2012-11-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts cortical neurite initiation and outgrowth, but prior studies have reported both ethanol-dependent growth promotion and inhibition. To resolve this ambiguity and better approximate in vivo conditions, we quantitatively analyzed neuronal morphology using a new, whole hemisphere explant model. In this model, Layer 6 (L6) cortical neurons migrate, laminate and extend neurites in an organotypic fashion. To selectively label L6 neurons, we performed ex utero electroporation of a GFP expression construct at embryonic day 13 and allowed the explants to develop for 2 days in vitro. Explants were exposed to (400 mg/dL) ethanol for either 4 or 24 h prior to fixation. Complete 3-D reconstructions were made of >80 GFP-positive neurons in each experimental condition. Acute responses to ethanol exposure included compaction of the Golgi apparatus accompanied by elaboration of supernumerary primary apical neurites, as well as a modest (∼15%) increase in higher order apical neurite length. With longer exposure time, ethanol exposure leads to a consistent, significant disorientation of the cell (cell body, primary apical neurite, and Golgi) with respect to the pial surface. The effects on cellular orientation were accompanied by decreased expression of cytoskeletal elements, microtubule-associated protein 2 and F-actin. These findings indicate that upon exposure to ethanol, developing L6 neurons manifest disruptions in Golgi apparatus and cytoskeletal elements which may in turn trigger selective and significant perturbations to primary neurite formation and neuronal polarity.

  17. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss, Reduced Neurite Complexity and Autophagic Abnormalities in Transgenic Mice Expressing G2019S Mutant LRRK2

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Brian M.; Stafa, Klodjan; Kim, Jaekwang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Westerlund, Marie; Pletnikova, Olga; Glauser, Liliane; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Ying; Swing, Deborah A.; Beal, M. Flint; Troncoso, Juan C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Galter, Dagmar; Thomas, Bobby; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s) through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD. PMID:21494637

  18. MicroRNA-127 targeting of mitoNEET inhibits neurite outgrowth, induces cell apoptosis and contributes to physiological dysfunction after spinal cord transection

    PubMed Central

    He, Qin-Qin; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Liu, Fei; He, Xiang; Feng, Guo-Ying; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Wang, You-Cui; Qiu, De-Lu; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Liu, Jia; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroregeneration and apoptosis are two important pathophysiologic changes after spinal cord injury (SCI), but their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in the regulation of neuroregeneration and neuronal apoptosis, research areas that have been greatly expanded in recent years. Here, using miRNA arrays to profile miRNA transcriptomes, we demonstrated that miR-127-3p was significantly down-regulated after spinal cord transection (SCT). Then, bioinformatics analyses and experimental detection showed that miR-127-3p exhibited specific effects on the regulation of neurite outgrowth and the induction of neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein mitoNEET. Moreover, knockdown of MitoNEET leaded to neuronal loss and apoptosis in primary cultured spinal neurons. This study therefore revealed that miR-127-3p, which targets mitoNEET, plays a vital role in regulating neurite outgrowth and neuronal apoptosis after SCT. Thus, modificatioin of the mitoNEET expression, such as mitoNEET activition may provide a new strategy for the treatment of SCI in preclinical trials. PMID:27748416

  19. C. elegans fmi-1/flamingo and Wnt pathway components interact genetically to control the anteroposterior neurite growth of the VD GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ackley, Brian D

    2013-07-01

    During development, multiple environmental cues, e.g., growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, etc., interact to influence the pattern of outgrowth of axons and dendrites in a cell-specific fashion. As a result, individual neurons may receive similar signals, but make unique choices, leading to distinct wiring within the nervous system. C. elegans has been useful in identifying molecular cues that influence neuronal development, as well as the downstream mechanisms that allow individual neurons to make cell-specific responses. Recently, we described a role for the conserved cadherin domain-containing protein, FMI-1/flamingo, in multiple stages of neural development in C. elegans. During the initial phase of neurite outgrowth, FMI-1 seems to have a relatively cell-specific effect on the VD neurons to promote the initial neurite formed to grow toward the anterior. In this capacity, FMI-1 appears to work coordinately with at least two Wnt ligands, EGL-20 and LIN-44, and multiple downstream Wnt signaling components (including LIN-17/Frizzled, DSH-1/Disheveled, and BAR-1/β-catenin). Here I will discuss some of the ideas we considered about how FMI-1 could affect neurons as they acquire their morphology during development.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ameliorates the suppression of thyroid hormone-induced granule cell neurite extension by hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

    PubMed

    Ibhazehiebo, Kingsley; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Xu, Ming; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2011-04-08

    Thyroid hormone (TH) plays an essential role in growth and differentiation of the central nervous system. Deficiency of TH during perinatal period results in abnormal brain development known as cretinism in human. We recently reported that an environmental chemical 1,2,5,6,9,10-α-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) suppressed TH receptor (TR)-mediated transcription. To examine the effect of HBCD on cerebellar granule cells, we used purified rat cerebellar granule cells in reaggregate culture. Low dose HBCD (10(-10)M) significantly suppressed TH-induced neurite extension of granule cell aggregate. To clarify further the mechanisms of such suppression, we added brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) into culture medium, since BDNF plays a critical role in promoting granule cell development and is regulated by TH. BDNF completely rescued HBCD-induced suppression of granule cell neurite extension in the presence of T3. These results indicate that HBCD may disrupt TH-mediated brain development at least in part due to a disruption of the T3 stimulated increase in BDNF and BDNF may possess ability to ameliorate the effect of HBCD in granule cells.

  1. Surface tension mediated conversion of light to work

    DOEpatents

    Okawa, David; Pastine, Stefan J; Zettl, Alexander K; Frechet, Jean M. J

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for converting light energy to mechanical energy by modification of surface tension on a supporting fluid. The apparatus comprises an object which may be formed as a composite object comprising a support matrix and a highly light absorptive material. The support matrix may comprise a silicon polymer. The highly light absorptive material may comprise vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VANTs) embedded in the support matrix. The composite object is supported on a fluid. By exposing the highly light absorptive material to light, heat is generated, which changes the surface tension of the composite object, causing it to move physically within the fluid.

  2. Effects of borate-based bioactive glass on neuron viability and neurite extension.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Laura M; Day, Delbert; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E; Harkins, Amy B

    2014-08-01

    Bioactive glasses have recently been shown to promote regeneration of soft tissues by positively influencing tissue remodeling during wound healing. We were interested to determine whether bioactive glasses have the potential for use in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. In these experiments, degradable bioactive borate glass was fabricated into rods and microfibers. To study the compatibility with neurons, embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were cultured with different forms of bioactive borate glass. Cell viability was measured with no media exchange (static condition) or routine media exchange (transient condition). Neurite extension was measured within fibrin scaffolds with embedded glass microfibers or aligned rod sheets. Mixed cultures of neurons, glia, and fibroblasts growing in static conditions with glass rods and microfibers resulted in decreased cell viability. However, the percentage of neurons compared with all cell types increased by the end of the culture protocol compared with culture without glass. Furthermore, bioactive glass and fibrin composite scaffolds promoted neurite extension similar to that of control fibrin scaffolds, suggesting that glass does not have a significant detrimental effect on neuronal health. Aligned glass scaffolds guided neurite extension in an oriented manner. Together these findings suggest that bioactive glass can provide alignment to support directed axon growth.

  3. Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Woehrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Augustin, Marco; Mitter, Christian; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2017-03-01

    One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the deposition of extracellular senile plaques and vessel wall deposits composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ). In AD, degeneration of neurons is preceded by the formation of Aβ plaques, which show different morphological forms. Most of them are birefringent owing to the parallel arrangement of amyloid fibrils. Here, we present polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy (PS-OCM) for imaging mature neuritic Aβ plaques based on their birefringent properties. Formalin-fixed, post-mortem brain samples of advanced stage AD patients were investigated. In several cortical brain regions, neuritic Aβ plaques were successfully visualized in tomographic and three-dimensional (3D) images. Cortical grey matter appeared polarization preserving, whereas neuritic plaques caused increased phase retardation. Consistent with the results from PS-OCM imaging, the 3D structure of senile Aβ plaques was computationally modelled for different illumination settings and plaque sizes. Furthermore, the birefringent properties of cortical and meningeal vessel walls in CAA were investigated in selected samples. Significantly increased birefringence was found in smaller vessels. Overall, these results provide evidence that PS-OCM is able to assess amyloidosis based on intrinsic birefringent properties.

  4. Effects of avermectins on neurite outgrowth in differentiating mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Jian; Long, Ding-Xin; Li, Wei; Hou, Wei-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Jun; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2010-02-01

    Avermectins (AVMs) are macrocyclic lactone compounds that have been widely used as parasiticides in veterinary and human medicine and as pesticides in agriculture and horticulture. The multidrug resistance transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is associated with the efflux transport of AVMs and other drugs across the blood-brain and placental barrier, and plays an important role in attenuating the neurotoxicity and developmental toxicity of AVMs. In this study, the mouse neuroblastoma N2a cell line was used to investigate the neurotoxicity of two AVM derivatives: abamectin (ABM) and doramectin (DOR). We found that both these compounds caused significant dose-dependent inhibition of neurite growth in differentiating N2a cells. In addition, Western blotting analysis showed that ABM and DOR significantly inhibited the expression of not only P-gp but also the cytoskeletal proteins, beta-actin and beta-tubulin. This suggests ABM and DOR may inhibit neurite growth by down-regulating the expression of P-gp and cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, knockdown of P-gp expression by RNA interference in N2a cells reduced neurite growth even in the absence of ABM and DOR, and reduced it even more in the presence of low levels of these compounds. These results suggest that even subcytotoxic levels of ABM and DOR can be neurotoxic in differentiating cells and that this neurotoxicity may, at least in part, be the result of the down-regulation of P-gp and cytoskeletal proteins.

  5. Automatic Robust Neurite Detection and Morphological Analysis of Neuronal Cell Cultures in High-content Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chaohong; Schulte, Joost; Sepp, Katharine J.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based high content screening (HCS) is becoming an important and increasingly favored approach in therapeutic drug discovery and functional genomics. In HCS, changes in cellular morphology and biomarker distributions provide an information-rich profile of cellular responses to experimental treatments such as small molecules or gene knockdown probes. One obstacle that currently exists with such cell-based assays is the availability of image processing algorithms that are capable of reliably and automatically analyzing large HCS image sets. HCS images of primary neuronal cell cultures are particularly challenging to analyze due to complex cellular morphology. Here we present a robust method for quantifying and statistically analyzing the morphology of neuronal cells in HCS images. The major advantages of our method over existing software lie in its capability to correct non-uniform illumination using the contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization method; segment neuromeres using Gabor-wavelet texture analysis; and detect faint neurites by a novel phase-based neurite extraction algorithm that is invariant to changes in illumination and contrast and can accurately localize neurites. Our method was successfully applied to analyze a large HCS image set generated in a morphology screen for polyglutamine-mediated neuronal toxicity using primary neuronal cell cultures derived from embryos of a Drosophila Huntington’s Disease (HD) model. PMID:20405243

  6. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  7. LINGO-1 interacts with WNK1 to regulate nogo-induced inhibition of neurite extension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Yu, Zhongwang; He, Cheng

    2009-06-05

    LINGO-1 is a component of the tripartite receptor complexes, which act as a convergent mediator of the intracellular signaling in response to myelin-associated inhibitors and lead to collapse of growth cone and inhibition of neurite extension. Although the function of LINGO-1 has been intensively studied, its downstream signaling remains elusive. In the present study, a novel interaction between LINGO-1 and a serine-threonine kinase WNK1 was identified by yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction was further validated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation, and this interaction was intensified by Nogo66 treatment. Morphological evidences showed that WNK1 and LINGO-1 were co-localized in cortical neurons. Furthermore, either suppressing WNK1 expression by RNA interference or overexpression of WNK1-(123-510) attenuated Nogo66-induced inhibition of neurite extension and inhibited the activation of RhoA. Moreover, WNK1 was identified to interact with Rho-GDI1, and this interaction was attenuated by Nogo66 treatment, further indicating its regulatory effect on RhoA activation. Taken together, our results suggest that WNK1 is a novel signaling molecule involved in regulation of LINGO-1 mediated inhibition of neurite extension.

  8. Protein Kinase MARK/PAR-1 Is Required for Neurite Outgrowth and Establishment of Neuronal Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Biernat, Jacek; Wu, Yong-Zhong; Timm, Thomas; Zheng-Fischhöfer, Qingyi; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Meijer, Laurent; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinases of the microtubule affinity-regulating kinase (MARK) family were originally discovered because of their ability to phosphorylate certain sites in tau protein (KXGS motifs in the repeat domain). This type of phosphorylation is enhanced in abnormal tau from Alzheimer brain tissue and causes the detachment of tau from microtubules. MARK-related kinases (PAR-1 and KIN1) occur in various organisms and are involved in establishing and maintaining cell polarity. Herein, we report the ability of MARK2 to affect the differentiation and outgrowth of cell processes from neuroblastoma and other cell models. MARK2 phosphorylates tau protein at the KXGS motifs; this results in the detachment of tau from microtubules and their destabilization. The formation of neurites in N2a cells is blocked if MARK2 is inactivated, either by transfecting a dominant negative mutant, or by MARK2 inhibitors such as hymenialdisine. Alternatively, neurites are blocked if the target KXGS motifs on tau are rendered nonphosphorylatable by point mutations. The results suggest that MARK2 contributes to the plasticity of microtubules needed for neuronal polarity and the growth of neurites. PMID:12429843

  9. Gab1 mediates neurite outgrowth, DNA synthesis, and survival in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, J M; Saïd, F A; Wong, A J; Kaplan, D R

    1999-12-24

    The Gab1-docking protein has been shown to regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase PI3K activity and potentiate nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced survival in PC12 cells. Here, we investigated the potential of Gab1 to induce neurite outgrowth and DNA synthesis, two other important aspects of NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells and NGF-independent survival. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding hemagglutinin (HA)-epitope-tagged Gab1 and expressed this protein in PC12 cells. HA-Gab1 was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in PC12 cells and induced the phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase. HA-Gab1-stimulated a 10-fold increase in neurite outgrowth in the absence of NGF and a 5-fold increase in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. HA-Gab1 also stimulated DNA synthesis and caused NGF-independent survival in PC12 cells. Finally, we found that HA-Gab1-induced neuritogenesis was completely suppressed by pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) activity and 50% suppressed by inhibition of PI3K activity. In contrast, HA-Gab1-stimulated cell survival was efficiently suppressed only by inhibition of both PI3K and MEK activities. These results indicate that Gab1 is capable of mediating differentiation, DNA synthesis, and cell survival and uses both PI3K and MEK signaling pathways to achieve its effects.

  10. Heterophilic interactions of DM-GRASP: GRASP-NgCAM interactions involved in neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    DM-GRASP is an immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule that is expressed in both the developing nervous and immune system. Specific populations of neurons respond to DM-GRASP substrates appears to require homophilic interactions between DM-GRASP molecules. We were interested in determining whether DM-GRASP interacts heterophilically with other ligands as well. We have found that eleven proteins from embryonic chick brain membranes consistently bind to and elute from a DM-GRASP-Sepharose affinity column. One of these proteins is DM-GRASP itself, consistent with its known homophilic binding. Another protein, at 130 kD, is immunoreactive with monoclonal antibodies to NgCAM. Other neural cell adhesion molecules were not detected in the eluate. The DM- GRASP-Sepharose eluate also contains a potent neurite stimulating activity, which cannot be accounted for by either DM-GRASP or NgCAM. To investigate the interaction of DM-GRASP and NgCAM, antibodies against DM-GRASP were added to neuronal cultures extending neurites on an NgCAM substrate. The presence of antibodies to DM-GRASP decreased neurite extension on laminin, suggesting that the antibody is not toxic or generally inhibiting motility. We present two possible models for the DM-GRASP-NgCAM association and a hypothesis for neural cell adhesion function that features the dimerization of cell adhesion molecules. PMID:8636239

  11. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  12. Secretin induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 through cAMP-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Soo; Yumkham, Sanatombi; Kim, Sun-Hee; Yea, Kyungmoo; Shin, You Chan; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-02-28

    The gastrointestinal functions of secretin have been fairly well established. However, its function and mode of action within the nervous system remain largely unclear. To gain insight into this area, we have attempted to determine the effects of secretin on neuronal differentiation. Here, we report that secretin induces the generation of neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. The expressions of Tau and beta-tubulin, neuronal differentiation markers, are increased upon secretin stimulation. In addition, secretin induces sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and also stimulates the cAMP secretion. Moreover, the neurite outgrowth elicited by secretin is suppressed to a marked degree in the presence of either PD98059, a specific MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor, or H89, a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that secretin induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells through cAMP- MAPK pathway, and provide a novel insight into the manner in which secretin participates in neuritogenesis.

  13. Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Bernhard; Woehrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Augustin, Marco; Mitter, Christian; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2017-01-01

    One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the deposition of extracellular senile plaques and vessel wall deposits composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ). In AD, degeneration of neurons is preceded by the formation of Aβ plaques, which show different morphological forms. Most of them are birefringent owing to the parallel arrangement of amyloid fibrils. Here, we present polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy (PS-OCM) for imaging mature neuritic Aβ plaques based on their birefringent properties. Formalin-fixed, post-mortem brain samples of advanced stage AD patients were investigated. In several cortical brain regions, neuritic Aβ plaques were successfully visualized in tomographic and three-dimensional (3D) images. Cortical grey matter appeared polarization preserving, whereas neuritic plaques caused increased phase retardation. Consistent with the results from PS-OCM imaging, the 3D structure of senile Aβ plaques was computationally modelled for different illumination settings and plaque sizes. Furthermore, the birefringent properties of cortical and meningeal vessel walls in CAA were investigated in selected samples. Significantly increased birefringence was found in smaller vessels. Overall, these results provide evidence that PS-OCM is able to assess amyloidosis based on intrinsic birefringent properties. PMID:28262719

  14. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  15. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  16. Surface tension regularizes the crack singularity of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; van Wijngaarden, Leen; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-05-11

    The elastic and adhesive properties of a solid surface can be quantified by indenting it with a rigid sphere. Indentation tests are classically described by the JKR-law when the solid is very stiff, while recent work highlights the importance of surface tension for exceedingly soft materials. Here we show that surface tension plays a crucial role even in stiff solids: Young's wetting angle emerges as a boundary condition and this regularizes the crack-like singularity at the edge of adhesive contacts. We find that the edge region exhibits a universal, self-similar structure that emerges from the balance of surface tension and elasticity. The similarity theory is solved analytically and provides a complete description of adhesive contacts, by which we reconcile global adhesion laws and local contact mechanics.

  17. The Stabilizing Effect of Bending-Under-Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Emmens, W. C.; Boogaard, A. H. van den

    2011-05-04

    A well know effect is that work hardening can stabilize tension processes, as can be shown by the so-called maximum force condition. It is not well known that bending-under-tension can have a similar effect, namely that it can create a situation where the tension force increases with elongation therefore stabilizing the process. This happens in situations where the bending is so severe that the fibers at the inner side are in compression. This mechanism is explained. In cases where the bending radius is constant, for example determined by a tool, the created stable elongation is proportional to the thickness of the material. In cases where the radius is not constant but results from an equilibrium between pulling force and bending moment the situation is more complex. The situations are analyzed by a simple model and successfully verified with experimental results.

  18. Surface energy and surface tension at holes and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajapakse, Y. D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of surface tension and surface energy of solids was used by Griffith to obtain a criterion for the extension of cracks in brittle materials. Griffith, however, neglected the stresses due to the normal traction at the crack implied by the surface tension. A complete solution to the problem of an elliptic hole in an infinite plate with surface tension loading at the hole is given. Complex potentials are given in closed form in terms of elliptic integrals of the first, second, and third kinds. Stress distributions are studied. For a flat crack, the nature of the singularity at the tip is shown to be radically different from that usually encountered in fracture mechanics. The implications of our analysis for theories of fracture in brittle materials are discussed.

  19. Surface tension of the Widom-Rowlinson model.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, E; Almarza, N G; Jackson, G

    2007-07-21

    We consider the computation of the surface tension of the fluid-fluid interface for the Widom-Rowlinson [J. Chem. Phys. 52, 1670 (1970)] binary mixture from direct simulation of the inhomogeneous system. We make use of the standard mechanical route, in which the surface tension follows from the computation of the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor of the system. In addition to the usual approach, which involves simulations of the inhomogeneous system in the canonical ensemble, we also consider the computation of the surface tension in an ensemble where the pressure perpendicular (normal) to the planar interface is kept fixed. Both approaches are seen to provide consistent values of the interfacial tension. The issue of the system-size dependence of the surface tension is addressed. In addition, simulations of the fluid-fluid coexistence properties of the mixture are performed in the semigrand canonical ensemble. Our results are compared with existing data of the Widom-Rowlinson mixture and are also examined in the light of the vapor-liquid equilibrium of the thermodynamically equivalent one-component penetrable sphere model.

  20. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; ...

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow formore » determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.« less

  1. Mycolactone-mediated neurite degeneration and functional effects in cultured human and rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sinisi, M; Fox, M; MacQuillan, A; Quick, T; Korchev, Y; Bountra, C; McCarthy, T; Anand, P

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone is a polyketide toxin secreted by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, responsible for the extensive hypoalgesic skin lesions characteristic of patients with Buruli ulcer. A recent pre-clinical study proposed that mycolactone may produce analgesia via activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In contrast, AT2R antagonist EMA401 has shown analgesic efficacy in animal models and clinical trials for neuropathic pain. We therefore investigated the morphological and functional effects of mycolactone in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the role of AT2R using EMA401. Primary sensory neurons were prepared from avulsed cervical human DRG and rat DRG; 24 h after plating, neurons were incubated for 24 to 96 h with synthetic mycolactone A/B, followed by immunostaining with antibodies to PGP9.5, Gap43, β tubulin, or Mitotracker dye staining. Acute functional effects were examined by measuring capsaicin responses with calcium imaging in DRG neuronal cultures treated with mycolactone. Results Morphological effects: Mycolactone-treated cultures showed dramatically reduced numbers of surviving neurons and non-neuronal cells, reduced Gap43 and β tubulin expression, degenerating neurites and reduced cell body diameter, compared with controls. Dose-related reduction of neurite length was observed in mycolactone-treated cultures. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the length of neurites and soma of control neurons, but clustered in the neurites and soma of mycolactone-treated neurons. Functional effects: Mycolactone-treated human and rat DRG neurons showed dose-related inhibition of capsaicin responses, which were reversed by calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-Methylxanthine, indicating involvement of cAMP/ATP reduction. The morphological and functional effects of mycolactone were not altered by Angiotensin II or AT2R antagonist EMA401. Conclusion Mycolactone

  2. Sequestration of PRMT1 and Nd1-L mRNA into ALS-linked FUS mutant R521C-positive aggregates contributes to neurite degeneration upon oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Mi-Hee; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Yong-Woo; Liu, Tongtong; Li, Yan; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in fused in sarcoma (FUS), a DNA/RNA binding protein, are associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, little is known about how ALS-causing mutations alter protein-protein and protein-RNA complexes and contribute to neurodegeneration. In this study, we identified protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a protein that more avidly associates with ALS-linked FUS-R521C than with FUS-WT (wild type) or FUS-P525L using co-immunoprecipitation and LC-MS analysis. Abnormal association between FUS-R521C and PRMT1 requires RNA, but not methyltransferase activity. PRMT1 was sequestered into cytosolic FUS-R521C-positive stress granule aggregates. Overexpression of PRMT1 rescued neurite degeneration caused by FUS-R521C upon oxidative stress, while loss of PRMT1 further accumulated FUS-positive aggregates and enhanced neurite degeneration. Furthermore, the mRNA of Nd1-L, an actin-stabilizing protein, was sequestered into the FUS-R521C/PRMT1 complex. Nd1-L overexpression rescued neurite shortening caused by FUS-R521C upon oxidative stress, while loss of Nd1-L further exacerbated neurite shortening. Altogether, these data suggest that the abnormal stable complex of FUS-R521C/PRMT1/Nd1-L mRNA could contribute to neurodegeneration upon oxidative stress. Overall, our study provides a novel pathogenic mechanism of the FUS mutation associated with abnormal protein-RNA complexes upon oxidative stress in ALS and provides insight into possible therapeutic targets for this pathology. PMID:28094300

  3. Mental health and group tensions

    PubMed Central

    Koekebakker, J.

    1955-01-01

    The author points out that, with the development of technology in industry and the resultant more-technical roles demanded of workers, communication between them and between all persons in an industrial organization becomes of primary importance. This is particularly so because of the constant demands for change within an industrial organization. Any change, however minor, will inevitably involve a wide area of the organization, and special attention will therefore have to be paid to communication between persons. The author goes on to describe some of the investigations which have been made by the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Leyden, and indicates the extreme difficulty of obtaining accurate information. He shows also how the different attitudes of persons within a factory can lead to completely different perceptions of the field and of the attitudes of others within the same organization. He concludes that the main task of the mental health workers in industry lies in the prevention of tensions within it. One of the means of preventing tensions is to aim at a concept of “productive collaboration” within a factory. This task is seen as a special kind of therapy which must concern all levels of the factory. The author describes a procedure of investigation—diagnostic and therapeutic—within a factory, commencing with a phase of introduction, a pilot study, extensive individual interviewing, group interviewing, and a more specifically therapeutic phase, in which groups or specific individuals are enabled to talk their problems out. Finally, the investigating team must take steps to prevent situations of tension recurring, and, before leaving, must be certain that the plant is capable of maintaining a healthy equilibrium by itself. PMID:13276808

  4. Solute clustering and interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, M. A.; Garside, John

    1986-07-01

    The effect of surface curvature on surface tension has been included in the theory of homogeneous nucleation to show that, under certain conditions, cluster formation results in a decrease in Gibb's free energy. This cluster formation is thus a spontaneous event and a quasi-equilibrium concentration of clusters of narrow size range may then exist in supersaturated solutions. Previous experimental work suggests the existence of solute clusters in a variety of aqueous solutions. The implications for crystal nucleation and growth theory are discussed.

  5. Tension-compression asymmetry and twin boundaries spacings effects in polycrystalline Ni nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Jianqiu

    2016-07-01

    Tension-compression asymmetry could be a notable feature in many nanocrystalline (NC) materials. The scientific and practical research on the tension-compression asymmetry may play an important role of improving the mechanical behavior of NC materials. Using large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the strain rate of 109 s-1, both tension and compression tests are complemented in twin-structural polycrystalline Ni nanowires (NWs). The MD simulation suggests that twin boundaries spacing (TBS) has an interesting effect on the tension-compression asymmetry. For NW (radius = 9 nm) with different TBSs, the flow stresses are totally higher under compression than under tension. The asymmetry gets a minimum value at a particular TBS. Such results can be explained by the interplay of the work of dislocations mechanism under various TBSs and the free surface in NWs.

  6. Direct Measurement of the Cortical Tension during the Growth of Membrane Blebs

    PubMed Central

    Peukes, Julia; Betz, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Mechanics is at the heart of many cellular processes and its importance has received considerable attention during the last two decades. In particular, the tension of cell membranes, and more specifically of the cell cortex, is a key parameter that determines the mechanical behavior of the cell periphery. However, the measurement of tension remains challenging due to its dynamic nature. Here we show that a noninvasive interferometric technique can reveal time-resolved effective tension measurements by a high-accuracy determination of edge fluctuations in expanding cell blebs of filamin-deficient melanoma cells. The introduced technique shows that the bleb tension is ∼10–100 pN/μm and increases during bleb growth. Our results directly confirm that the subsequent stop of bleb growth is induced by an increase of measured tension, possibly mediated by the repolymerized actin cytoskeleton. PMID:25418162

  7. Disassembly of microtubules and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, neuroblastoma cell proliferation, and MAP kinase tyrosine dephosphorylation by dibenzyl trisulphide.

    PubMed

    Rösner, H; Williams, L A; Jung, A; Kraus, W

    2001-08-22

    Dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), a main lipophilic compound in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae), was identified as one of the active immunomodulatory compounds in extracts of the plant. To learn more about its biological activities and molecular mechanisms, we conducted one-dimensional NMR interaction studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tested DTS and related compounds in two well-established neuronal cell-and-tissue culture systems. We found that DTS preferentially binds to an aromatic region of BSA which is rich in tyrosyl residues. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, DTS attenuates the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of MAP kinase (erk1/erk2). In the same neuroblastoma cell line and in Wistar 38 human lung fibroblasts, DTS causes a reversible disassembly of microtubules, but it did not affect actin dynamics. Probably due to the disruption of the microtubule dynamics, DTS also inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth from spinal cord explants. Related dibenzyl compounds with none, one, or two sulphur atoms were found to be significantly less effective. These data confirmed that the natural compound DTS has a diverse spectrum of biological properties, including cytostatic and neurotoxic actions in addition to immunomodulatory activities.

  8. Synapsin knockdown is associated with decreased neurite outgrowth, functional synaptogenesis impairment, and fast high-frequency neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Oscar; Giachello, Carlo Natale Giuseppe; Corradi, Anna Margherita; Ghirardi, Mirella; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    Synapsins (Syns) are an evolutionarily conserved family of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins related to fine tuning of synaptic transmission. Studies with mammals have partially clarified the different roles of Syns; however, the presence of different genes and isoforms and the development of compensatory mechanisms hinder accurate data interpretation. Here, we use a simple in vitro monosynaptic Helix neuron connection, reproducing an in vivo physiological connection as a reliable experimental model to investigate the effects of Syn knockdown. Cells overexpressing an antisense construct against Helix Syn showed a time-dependent decrease of Syn immunostaining, confirming protein loss. At the morphological level, Syn-silenced cells showed a reduction in neurite linear outgrowth and branching and in the size and number of synaptic varicosities. Functionally, Syn-silenced cells presented a reduced ability to form synaptic connections; however, functional chemical synapses showed similar basal excitatory postsynaptic potentials and similar short-term plasticity paradigms. In addition, Syn-silenced cells presented faster neurotransmitter release and decreased postsynaptic response toward the end of long tetanic presynaptic stimulations, probably related to an impairment of the synaptic vesicle trafficking resulting from a different vesicle handling, with an increased readily releasable pool and a compromised reserve pool.

  9. Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors in the Nervous System: Novel players in neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Darcie L.; Apara, Akintomide; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    The Krüppel-like family of transcription factors (KLFs) have been widely studied in proliferating cells, though very little is known about their role in post-mitotic cells, such as neurons. We have recently found that the KLFs play a role in regulating intrinsic axon growth ability in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a type of central nervous system (CNS) neuron. Previous KLF studies in other cell types suggest that there may be cell-type specific KLF expression patterns, and that their relative expression allows them to compete for binding sites, or to act redundantly to compensate for another’s function. With at least 15 of 17 KLF family members expressed in neurons, it will be important for us to determine how this complex family functions to regulate the intricate gene programs of axon growth and regeneration. By further characterizing the mechanisms of the KLF family in the nervous system, we may better understand how they regulate neurite growth and axon regeneration. PMID:21635952

  10. Nerve growth factor-induced neurite sprouting in PC12 cells involves sigma-1 receptors: implications for antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Minoru; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2002-12-01

    One theory concerning the action of antidepressants relates to the drugs' ability to induce an adaptive plasticity in neurons such as neurite sprouting. Certain antidepressants are known to bind to sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R) with high affinity. Sig-1R are dynamic endoplasmic reticulum proteins that are highly concentrated at the tip of growth cones in cultured cells. We therefore tested the hypotheses that Sig-1R might participate in the neurite sprouting and that antidepressants with Sig-1R affinity may promote the neuronal sprouting via Sig-1R. The prototypic Sig-1R agonist (+)-pentazocine [(+)PTZ], as well as the Sig-1R-active antidepressants imipramine and fluvoxamine, although ineffective by themselves, were found to enhance the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite sprouting in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. A Sig-1R antagonist N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]-ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE100) blocked the enhancements caused by these Sig-1R agonists. In separate experiments, we found that NGF dose and time dependently increased Sig-1R in PC12 cells. Chronic treatment of cells with (+)PTZ, imipramine, or fluvoxamine also increased Sig-1R. These latter results suggested that NGF induces the neurite sprouting by increasing Sig-1R. Indeed, the overexpression of Sig-1R per se in PC12 cells enhanced the NGF-induced neurite sprouting. Furthermore, antisense deoxyoligonucleotides directed against Sig-1R attenuated the NGF-induced neurite sprouting. Thus, when taken together, our results indicate that Sig-1R play an important role in the NGF-induced neurite sprouting and that certain antidepressants may facilitate neuronal sprouting in the brain via Sig-1R.

  11. Identification of a Peripheral Nerve Neurite Growth-Promoting Activity by Development and Use of an in vitro Bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrock, Alfred W.; Matthew, William D.

    1987-10-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay.

  12. Ginsenoside-Rd Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of PC12 Cells through MAPK/ERK- and PI3K/AKT-Dependent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Song-Di; Xia, Feng; Lin, Xue-Mei; Duan, Kang-Li; Wang, Fang; Lu, Qing-Li; Cao, Huan; Qian, Yi-Hua; Shi, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng is a famous herbal medicine widely used in Asia. Ginsenosides have been identified as the principle active ingredients for Panax ginseng’s biological activity, among which ginsenoside Rd (Rd) attracts extensive attention for its obvious neuroprotective activities. Here we investigated the effect of Rd on neurite outgrowth, a crucial process associated with neuronal repair. PC12 cells, which respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) and serve as a model for neuronal cells, were treated with different concentrations of Rd, and then their neurite outgrowth was evaluated. Our results showed that 10 μM Rd significantly increased the percentages of long neurite- and branching neurite-bearing cells, compared with respective controls. The length of the longest neurites and the total length of neurites in Rd-treated PC12 cells were much longer than that of respective controls. We also showed that Rd activated ERK1/2 and AKT but not PKC signalings, and inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059 or/and AKT by LY294002 effectively attenuated Rd-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, Rd upregulated the expression of GAP-43, a neuron-specific protein involved in neurite outgrowth, while PD98059 or/and LY294002 decreased Rd-induced increased GAP-43 expression. Taken together, our results provided the first evidence that Rd may promote the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells by upregulating GAP-43 expression via ERK- and ARK-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26840295

  13. Thrombin enhances NGF-mediated neurite extension via increased and sustained activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Rania E; Sarker, Krishna; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Rapid neurite remodeling is fundamental to nervous system development and plasticity. It involves neurite extension that is regulated by NGF through PI3K/AKT, p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. It also involves neurite retraction that is regulated by the serine protease, thrombin. However, the intracellular signaling pathway by which thrombin causes neurite retraction is unknown. Using the PC12 neuronal cell model, we demonstrate that thrombin utilizes the PI3K/AKT pathway for neurite retraction in NGF-differentiated cells. Interestingly, however, we found that thrombin enhances NGF-induced neurite extension in differentiating cells. This is achieved through increased and sustained activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. Thus, thrombin elicits opposing effects in differentiated and differentiating cells through activation of distinct signaling pathways: neurite retraction in differentiated cells via PI3K/AKT, and neurite extension in differentiating cells via p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. These findings, which also point to a novel cooperative role between thrombin and NGF, have significant implications in the development of the nervous system and the disease processes that afflicts it as well as in the potential of combined thrombin and NGF therapy for impaired learning and memory, and spinal cord injury which all require neurite extension and remodeling.

  14. Update on Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Jyotiranjan; Devi, Lily; Malik, Pradeep K.; Mallick, Jogamaya

    2016-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP) constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases), systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine) and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG. PMID:27413503

  15. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  16. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  17. SCG10, a microtubule destabilizing factor, stimulates the neurite outgrowth by modulating microtubule dynamics in rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroshi; Shiraishi-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Mori, Nozomu

    2006-09-01

    Microtubule dynamics, one of the key elements in neurite outgrowth, is regulated by various regulatory factors to determine the behavior of the neuronal growth cone and to form the specialized neuronal shape. SCG10 is a neuron-specific stathmin protein with a potent microtubule destabilizing factor and is enriched in the growth cones of the developing neurons. We investigated the functional role of SCG10 in neurite outgrowth using rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons. Genetic manipulation of SCG10 using a short-interfering RNA duplex markedly decreased the SCG10 expression level and significantly suppressed neurite outgrowth. This result was confirmed by immunodepletion experiments. On the other hand, the protein transduction of SCG10 using a polyarginine tag stimulated neurite outgrowth. Such manipulation of the SCG10 expression level affected microtubule morphology within the growth cones. A decrease in the SCG10 level converted the morphology to a more stable state, while an increase converted the morphology to a more dynamic state. However, an excess of SCG10 induced neurite retraction due to an excess of microtubule disassembly. These results suggest that SCG10 serves as an important regulatory factor of growth cone motility by enhancing microtubule dynamics, possibly through increasing the catastrophe frequency.

  18. Distinct domains of the limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) mediate discrete effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Eagleson, Kathie L; Pimenta, Aurea F; Burns, Mary M; Fairfull, Liane D; Cornuet, Pamela K; Zhang, Li; Levitt, Pat

    2003-11-01

    The limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein with three immunoglobulin (Ig) domains that can either enhance or inhibit neurite outgrowth depending upon the neuronal population examined. In the present study, we investigate the domains responsible for these activities. Domain deletion revealed that the N-terminal IgI domain is necessary and sufficient for the neurite-promoting activity observed in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in SCG neurons, which is mediated by heterophilic interactions, requires full-length LAMP, although selective inhibition of the second Ig domain, but not the first or third domains, prevented the inhibitory effect. This indicates that the IgII domain of LAMP harbors the neurite-inhibiting activity, but only in the context of the full-length configuration. Covasphere-binding analyses demonstrate IgI/IgI interactions, but no interaction between IgII and any other domain, consistent with the biological activities that each domain mediates. The data suggest that LAMP may serve as a bifunctional guidance molecule, with distinct structural domains contributing to the promotion and inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

  19. Sialylation of neurites inhibits complement-mediated macrophage removal in a human macrophage-neuron Co-Culture System.

    PubMed

    Linnartz-Gerlach, Bettina; Schuy, Christine; Shahraz, Anahita; Tenner, Andrea J; Neumann, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The complement system has been implicated in the removal of dysfunctional synapses and neurites during development and in disease processes in the mouse, but it is unclear how far the mouse data can be transferred to humans. Here, we co-cultured macrophages derived from human THP1 monocytes and neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, to study the role of the complement system in a human model. Components of the complement system were expressed by the human macrophages and human neuronal culture, while receptors of the complement cascade were expressed by human macrophages as shown via gene transcript analysis and flow cytometry. We mimicked pathological conditions leading to an altered glycocalyx by treatment of human neurons with sialidases. Desialylated human neurites were opsonized by the complement component C1q. Furthermore, human neurites with an intact sialic acid cap remained untouched, while desialylated human neurites were removed and ingested by human macrophages. While blockage of the complement receptor 1 (CD35) had no effect, blockage of CD11b as part of the complement receptor 3 (CR3) reversed the effect on macrophage phagocytosis of desialylated human neurites. Data demonstrate that in the human system sialylation of the neuronal glycocalyx serves as an inhibitory flag for complement binding and CR3-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages.

  20. 7, 8, 3'-Trihydroxyflavone Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Protects Against Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haohong; Luo, Xingjing

    2016-07-02

    BACKGROUND 7, 8, 3'-trihydroxyflavone (THF) is a novel pro-neuronal small molecule that acts as a TrkB agonist. In this study, we examined the effect of THF on promoting neuronal growth and protecting anesthetics-induced neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS Neonatal mouse DRG neurons were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of THF. The effect of THF on neuronal growth was investigated by neurite outgrowth assay and Western blot. In addition, the protective effects of THF on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity were investigated by apoptosis TUNEL assay, neurite outgrowth assay, and Western blot, respectively. RESULTS THF promoted neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons in dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 concentration of 67.4 nM. Western blot analysis showed THF activated TrkB signaling pathway by inducing TrkB phosphorylation. THF also rescued bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity by reducing apoptosis and protecting neurite retraction in DRG neurons. Furthermore, the protection of THF in bupivacaine-injured neurotoxicity was directly associated with TrkB phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner in DRG neurons. CONCLUSIONS THF has pro-neuronal effect on DRG neurons by promoting neurite growth and protecting against bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, likely through TrkB activation.

  1. Signal transduction pathway regulating prostaglandin EP3 receptor-induced neurite retraction: requirement for two different tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, J; Katoh, H; Yasui, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Nakamura, K; Hasegawa, H; Ichikawa, A; Negishi, M

    1999-01-01

    We reported previously that activation of the prostaglandin E receptor EP3 subtype triggered neurite retraction through the small GTPase Rho-, and its target, RhoA-binding kinase alpha (ROKalpha)-, dependent pathway in EP3 receptor-expressing PC12 cells. Here we examined the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this pathway in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells. Tyrphostin A25, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by activation of the EP3 receptor, however, it failed to block neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by microinjection of constitutively active RhoA, RhoAV14, indicating that a tyrphostin-sensitive tyrosine kinase was involved in the pathway from the EP3 receptor to Rho activation. On the other hand, genistein, another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by both activation of the EP3 receptor and microinjection of RhoAV14. However, genistein did not block neuronal morphological changes induced by microinjection of a constitutively active mutant of ROKalpha. These results indicate that two different tyrosine kinases, tyrphostin A25-sensitive and genistein-sensitive kinases, are involved in the EP3 receptor-mediated neurite retraction acting upstream and downstream of Rho, respectively. PMID:10333476

  2. β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) Promotes Neurite Outgrowth in Neuro2a Cells

    PubMed Central

    Girón, María D.; Cabrera, Elena; Campos, Nefertiti; Manzano, Manuel; Rueda, Ricardo; López-Pedrosa, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) has been shown to enhance cell survival, differentiation and protein turnover in muscle, mainly activating phosphoinositide-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases/ extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways. Since these two pathways are related to neuronal survival and differentiation, in this study, we have investigated the neurotrophic effects of HMB in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells. In Neuro2a cells, HMB promotes differentiation to neurites independent from any effects on proliferation. These effects are mediated by activation of both the PI3K/Akt and the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) signaling as demonstrated by the use of specific inhibitors of these two pathways. As myocyte-enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors are involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, the transcriptional activity and protein levels of MEF2 were also evaluated. HMB promoted MEF2-dependent transcriptional activity mediated by the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. Furthermore, HMB increases the expression of brain glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), and mTOR phosphorylation, which translates in a higher protein synthesis in Neuro2a cells. Furthermore, Torin1 and rapamycin effects on MEF2 transcriptional activity and HMB-dependent neurite outgrowth support that HMB acts through mTORC2. Together, these findings provide clear evidence to support an important role of HMB in neurite outgrowth. PMID:26267903

  3. β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) Promotes Neurite Outgrowth in Neuro2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Salto, Rafael; Vílchez, Jose D; Girón, María D; Cabrera, Elena; Campos, Nefertiti; Manzano, Manuel; Rueda, Ricardo; López-Pedrosa, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) has been shown to enhance cell survival, differentiation and protein turnover in muscle, mainly activating phosphoinositide-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases/ extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways. Since these two pathways are related to neuronal survival and differentiation, in this study, we have investigated the neurotrophic effects of HMB in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells. In Neuro2a cells, HMB promotes differentiation to neurites independent from any effects on proliferation. These effects are mediated by activation of both the PI3K/Akt and the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) signaling as demonstrated by the use of specific inhibitors of these two pathways. As myocyte-enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors are involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, the transcriptional activity and protein levels of MEF2 were also evaluated. HMB promoted MEF2-dependent transcriptional activity mediated by the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. Furthermore, HMB increases the expression of brain glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), and mTOR phosphorylation, which translates in a higher protein synthesis in Neuro2a cells. Furthermore, Torin1 and rapamycin effects on MEF2 transcriptional activity and HMB-dependent neurite outgrowth support that HMB acts through mTORC2. Together, these findings provide clear evidence to support an important role of HMB in neurite outgrowth.

  4. The network formation assay: a spatially standardized neurite outgrowth analytical display for neurotoxicity screening.

    PubMed

    Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Sisnaiske, Julia; Subbiah, Subanatarajan; Menne, Heike; Godoy, Patricio; Lampen, Peter; Leist, Marcel; Franzke, Joachim; Hengstler, Jan G; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2010-03-21

    We present a rapid, reproducible and sensitive neurotoxicity testing platform that combines the benefits of neurite outgrowth analysis with cell patterning. This approach involves patterning neuronal cells within a hexagonal array to standardize the distance between neighbouring cellular nodes, and thereby standardize the length of the neurite interconnections. This feature coupled with defined assay coordinates provides a streamlined display for rapid and sensitive analysis. We have termed this the network formation assay (NFA). To demonstrate the assay we have used a novel cell patterning technique involving thin film poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microcontact printing. Differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells colonized the array with high efficiency, reliably producing pattern occupancies above 70%. The neuronal array surface supported neurite outgrowth, resulting in the formation of an interconnected neuronal network. Exposure to acrylamide, a neurotoxic reference compound, inhibited network formation. A dose-response curve from the NFA was used to determine a 20% network inhibition (NI(20)) value of 260 microM. This concentration was approximately 10-fold lower than the value produced by a routine cell viability assay, and demonstrates that the NFA can distinguish network formation inhibitory effects from gross cytotoxic effects. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2 and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling pathways also produced a dose-dependent reduction in network formation at non-cytotoxic concentrations. To further refine the assay a simulation was developed to manage the impact of pattern occupancy variations on network formation probability. Together these developments and demonstrations highlight the potential of the NFA to meet the demands of high-throughput applications in neurotoxicology and neurodevelopmental biology.

  5. Tenascin-C contains distinct adhesive, anti-adhesive, and neurite outgrowth promoting sites for neurons

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The glia-derived extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TN-C) is transiently expressed in the developing CNS and may mediate neuron-glia interactions. Perturbation experiments with specific monoclonal antibodies suggested that TN-C functions for neural cells are encoded by distinct sites of the glycoprotein (Faissner, A., A. Scholze, and B. Gotz. 1994. Tenascin glycoproteins in developing neural tissues--only decoration? Persp. Dev. Neurobiol. 2:53-66). To characterize these further, bacterially expressed recombinant domains were generated and used for functional studies. Several short-term-binding sites for mouse CNS neurons could be assigned to the fibronectin type III (FNIII) domains. Of these, the alternatively spliced insert TNfnA1,2,4,B,D supported initial attachment for both embryonic day 18 (E18) rat and postnatal day 6 (P6) mouse neurons. Only TNfn1-3 supported binding and growth of P6 mouse cerebellar neurons after 24 h, whereas attachment to the other domains proved reversible and resulted in cell detachment or aggregation. In choice assays on patterned substrates, repulsive properties could be attributed to the EGF-type repeats TNegf, and to TNfnA1,2,4. Finally, neurite outgrowth promoting properties for E18 rat hippocampal neurons and P0 mouse DRG explants could be assigned to TNfnB,D, TNfnD,6, and TNfn6. The epitope of mAb J1/tn2 which abolishes the neurite outgrowth inducing effect of intact TN-C could be allocated to TNfnD. These observations suggest that TN-C harbors distinct cell- binding, repulsive, and neurite outgrowth promoting sites for neurons. Furthermore, the properties of isoform-specific TN-C domains suggest functional significance of the alternative splicing of TN-C glycoproteins. PMID:8647898

  6. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation impairs neurite outgrowth of embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhai; Ma, Qinlong; Liu, Chuan; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Duan, Weixia; Pei, Liping; Li, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-05-29

    A radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) of 1800 MHz is widely used in mobile communications. However, the effects of RF-EMFs on cell biology are unclear. Embryonic neural stem cells (eNSCs) play a critical role in brain development. Thus, detecting the effects of RF-EMF on eNSCs is important for exploring the effects of RF-EMF on brain development. Here, we exposed eNSCs to 1800 MHz RF-EMF at specific absorption rate (SAR) values of 1, 2, and 4 W/kg for 1, 2, and 3 days. We found that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure did not influence eNSC apoptosis, proliferation, cell cycle or the mRNA expressions of related genes. RF-EMF exposure also did not alter the ratio of eNSC differentiated neurons and astrocytes. However, neurite outgrowth of eNSC differentiated neurons was inhibited after 4 W/kg RF-EMF exposure for 3 days. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of the proneural genes Ngn1 and NeuroD, which are crucial for neurite outgrowth, were decreased after RF-EMF exposure. The expression of their inhibitor Hes1 was upregulated by RF-EMF exposure. These results together suggested that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure impairs neurite outgrowth of eNSCs. More attention should be given to the potential adverse effects of RF-EMF exposure on brain development.

  7. Transthyretin provides trophic support via megalin by promoting neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, J R; Nogueira, RS; Vieira, M; Santos, SD; Ferraz-Nogueira, J P; Relvas, J B; Saraiva, M J

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a protein whose function has been associated to binding and distribution of thyroid hormones in the body and brain. However, little is known regarding the downstream signaling pathways triggered by wild-type TTR in the CNS either in neuroprotection of cerebral ischemia or in physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated how TTR affects hippocampal neurons in physiologic/pathologic conditions. Recombinant TTR significantly boosted neurite outgrowth in mice hippocampal neurons, both in number and length, independently of its ligands. This TTR neuritogenic activity is mediated by the megalin receptor and is lost in megalin-deficient neurons. We also found that TTR activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (ERK1/2) and Akt through Src, leading to the phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB. In addition, TTR promoted a transient rise in intracellular calcium through NMDA receptors, in a Src/megalin-dependent manner. Moreover, under excitotoxic conditions, TTR stimulation rescued cell death and neurite loss in TTR KO hippocampal neurons, which are more sensitive to excitotoxic degeneration than WT neurons, in a megalin-dependent manner. CREB was also activated by TTR under excitotoxic conditions, contributing to changes in the balance between Bcl2 protein family members, toward anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2/BclXL versus Bax). Finally, we clarify that TTR KO mice subjected to pMCAO have larger infarcts than WT mice, because of TTR and megalin neuronal downregulation. Our results indicate that TTR might be regarded as a neurotrophic factor, because it stimulates neurite outgrowth under physiological conditions, and promotes neuroprotection in ischemic conditions. PMID:27518433

  8. Organic Photovoltaics and Bioelectrodes Providing Electrical Stimulation for PC12 Cell Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Sheng; Liao, Yan-Hao; Chen, Huan-Lin; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2016-04-13

    Current bioelectronic medicines for neurological therapies generally involve treatment with a bioelectronic system comprising a power supply unit and a bioelectrode device. Further integration of wireless and self-powered units is of practical importance for implantable bioelectronics. In this study, we developed biocompatible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for serving as wireless electrical power supply units that can be operated under illumination with near-infrared (NIR) light, and organic bioelectronic interface (OBEI) electrode devices as neural stimulation electrodes. The OPV/OBEI integrated system is capable to provide electrical stimulation (ES) as a means of enhancing neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. For the OPV design, we prepared devices incorporating two photoactive material systems--β-carotene/N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (β-carotene/PTCDI-C8) and poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM)--that exhibited open circuit voltages of 0.11 and 0.49 V, respectively, under NIR light LED (NLED) illumination. Then, we connected OBEI devices with different electrode gaps, incorporating biocompatible poly(hydroxymethylated-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), to OPVs to precisely tailor the direct current electric field conditions during the culturing of PC12 cells. This NIR light-driven OPV/OBEI system could be engineered to provide tunable control over the electric field (from 220 to 980 mV mm(-1)) to promote 64% enhancement in the neurite length, direct the neurite orientation on chips, or both. The OPV/OBEI integrated systems under NIR illumination appear to function as effective power delivery platforms that should meet the requirements for wirelessly offering medical ES to a portion of the nervous system; they might also be a key technology for the development of next-generation implantable bioelectronics.

  9. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion of brain tissue due to electrically long neurites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monai, Hiromu; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Aonishi, Toru

    2012-12-01

    The dielectric properties of brain tissue are important for understanding how neural activity is related to local field potentials and electroencephalograms. It is known that the permittivity of brain tissue exhibits strong frequency dependence (dispersion) and that the permittivity is very large in the low-frequency region. However, little is known with regard to the cause of the large permittivity in the low-frequency region. Here, we postulate that the dielectric properties of brain tissue can be partially accounted for by assuming that neurites are of sufficient length to be “electrically long.” To test this idea, we consider a model in which a neurite is treated as a long, narrow body, and it is subjected to a stimulus created by electrodes situated in the region external to it. With regard to this electric stimulus, the neurite can be treated as a passive cable. Assuming adequate symmetry so that the tissue packed with multiple cables is equivalent to an isolated system consisting of a single cable and a surrounding extracellular resistive medium, we analytically calculate the extracellular potential of the tissue in response to such an externally created alternating-current electric field using a Green's function that we obtained previously. Our results show that brain tissue modeled by such a cable existing within a purely resistive extracellular medium exhibits a large effective permittivity in the low-frequency region. Moreover, we obtain results suggesting that an extremely large low-frequency permittivity can coexist with weak low-pass filter characteristics in brain tissue.

  10. Tension experiments on diaphragm metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henrickson, H B

    1927-01-01

    Strips of german silver, steel, copper, duralumin, nickel and brass were tested in tension in an apparatus in which the change in deflection with time was measured by means of an interferometer. This change in deflection with time caused by the application and removal of a load is defined as "drift" and "recovery," respectively. It was measured in the time interval from approximately 5 seconds to 5 hours after loading. The data are given in a series of graphs in which the drift and recovery are plotted against time. The proportional drift and recovery in five hours are given for a number of the tests, and in addition are shown graphically for nickel and steel.

  11. Cryogenic fatigue behavior of plain weave glass/epoxy composite laminates under tension tension cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Yasuhide; Takano, Satoru; Horiguchi, Katsumi; Sato, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    This paper focuses on understanding the tension-tension fatigue behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer laminates at cryogenic temperatures. Tension-tension fatigue tests at frequencies of 4 and 10 Hz with a stress ratio of 0.1 were conducted at room temperature, 77 and 4 K. The fatigue stress versus cycles to failure ( S- N) relationships and fatigue limits for 10 6 cycles were obtained. Fractured specimens tested under fatigue tests were also examined with optical microscope.

  12. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements.

  13. Theoretical Studies of the Surface Tension of Liquid Metal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, D. G.; Shih, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to understand the surface tension and other thermophysical properties of liquid metals and alloys from a fundamental viewpoint. The approach is to calculate these quantities by a first principles technique which combines the statistical-mechanical theory of the liquid state with an electronic pseudopotential theory of electrons in metals. The inhomogeneity of the surface is treated using an ionic-density-functional formalism developed with the support of NASA. Of particular interest are the variation of surface tension with temperature and impurity concentration: such variations strongly influence the types of convection which make take place in a low-gravity environment. Some progress has already been achieved in computing the reduction of surface tension due to the presence of low-surface-tension impurities, and the corresponding surface segregation of such impurities. In the coming year, it is planned to concentrate on the surface properties of materials of particular interest to the MSA program: Si, Ga and GaSn alloys. An additional goal is to gain some theoretical understanding of the high temperature thermophysical properties of liquid metals, particularly high melting point materials which have not been studied extensively from a theoretical viewpoint.

  14. Tension-dependent nucleosome remodeling at the pericentromere in yeast.

    PubMed

    Verdaasdonk, Jolien S; Gardner, Ryan; Stephens, Andrew D; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry

    2012-07-01

    Nucleosome positioning is important for the structural integrity of chromosomes. During metaphase the mitotic spindle exerts physical force on pericentromeric chromatin. The cell must adjust the pericentromeric chromatin to accommodate the changing tension resulting from microtubule dynamics to maintain a stable metaphase spindle. Here we examine the effects of spindle-based tension on nucleosome dynamics by measuring the histone turnover of the chromosome arm and the pericentromere during metaphase in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that both histones H2B and H4 exhibit greater turnover in the pericentromere during metaphase. Loss of spindle-based tension by treatment with the microtubule-depolymerizing drug nocodazole or compromising kinetochore function results in reduced histone turnover in the pericentromere. Pericentromeric histone dynamics are influenced by the chromatin-remodeling activities of STH1/NPS1 and ISW2. Sth1p is the ATPase component of the Remodels the Structure of Chromatin (RSC) complex, and Isw2p is an ATP-dependent DNA translocase member of the Imitation Switch (ISWI) subfamily of chromatin-remodeling factors. The balance between displacement and insertion of pericentromeric histones provides a mechanism to accommodate spindle-based tension while maintaining proper chromatin packaging during mitosis.

  15. Tension regulates myosin dynamics during Drosophila embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Kobb, Anna B; Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2017-02-15

    Embryos repair epithelial wounds rapidly in a process driven by collective cell movements. Upon wounding, actin and the molecular motor non-muscle myosin II are redistributed in the cells adjacent to the wound, forming a supracellular purse string around the lesion. Purse string contraction coordinates cell movements and drives rapid wound closure. By using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in Drosophila embryos, we found that myosin turns over as the purse string contracts. Myosin turnover at the purse string was slower than in other actomyosin networks that had a lower level of contractility. Mathematical modelling suggested that myosin assembly and disassembly rates were both reduced by tension at the wound edge. We used laser ablation to show that tension at the purse string increased as wound closure progressed, and that the increase in tension was associated with reduced myosin turnover. Reducing purse string tension by laser-mediated severing resulted in increased turnover and loss of myosin. Finally, myosin motor activity was necessary for its stabilization around the wound and for rapid wound closure. Our results indicate that mechanical forces regulate myosin dynamics during embryonic wound repair.

  16. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow for determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.

  17. New function of the adaptor protein SH2B1 in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chien-Hung; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2013-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is an essential process for the establishment of the nervous system. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) binds to its receptor TrkB and regulates axonal and dendritic morphology of neurons through signal transduction and gene expression. SH2B1 is a signaling adaptor protein that regulates cellular signaling in various physiological processes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of SH2B1 in the development of the central nervous system. In this study, we show that knocking down SH2B1 reduces neurite formation of cortical neurons whereas overexpression of SH2B1β promotes the development of hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrate that SH2B1β promotes BDNF-induced neurite outgrowth and signaling using the established PC12 cells stably expressing TrkB, SH2B1β or SH2B1β mutants. Our data indicate that overexpressing SH2B1β enhances BDNF-induced MEK-ERK1/2, and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways. Inhibition of MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT pathways by specific inhibitors suggest that these two pathways are required for SH2B1β-promoted BDNF-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, SH2B1β enhances BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 at serine 727. Finally, our data indicate that the SH2 domain and tyrosine phosphorylation of SH2B1β contribute to BDNF-induced signaling pathways and neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that SH2B1β promotes BDNF-induced neurite outgrowth through enhancing pathways involved MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT.

  18. The Effect of Surface Modification of Aligned Poly-L-Lactic Acid Electrospun Fibers on Fiber Degradation and Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Le Beux, Clémentine; Miao, Jianjun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Alauzun, Johan G.; Laurencin, Danielle; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface of aligned, electrospun poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers was chemically modified to determine if surface chemistry and hydrophilicity could improve neurite extension from chick dorsal root ganglia. Specifically, diethylenetriamine (DTA, for amine functionalization), 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol (AEO, for alcohol functionalization), or GRGDS (cell adhesion peptide) were covalently attached to the surface of electrospun fibers. Water contact angle measurements revealed that surface modification of electrospun fibers significantly improved fiber hydrophilicity compared to unmodified fibers (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fibers revealed that surface modification changed fiber topography modestly, with DTA modified fibers displaying the roughest surface structure. Degradation of chemically modified fibers revealed no change in fiber diameter in any group over a period of seven days. Unexpectedly, neurites from chick DRG were longest on fibers without surface modification (1651 ± 488 μm) and fibers containing GRGDS (1560 ± 107 μm). Fibers modified with oxygen plasma (1240 ± 143 μm) or DTA (1118 ± 82 μm) produced shorter neurites than the GRGDS or unmodified fibers, but were not statistically shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers. Fibers modified with AEO (844 ± 151 μm) were significantly shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers (p<0.05). Based on these results, we conclude that fiber hydrophilic enhancement alone on electrospun PLLA fibers does not enhance neurite outgrowth. Further work must be conducted to better understand why neurite extension was not improved on more hydrophilic fibers, but the results presented here do not recommend hydrophilic surface modification for the purpose of improving neurite extension unless a bioactive ligand is used. PMID:26340351

  19. Serotonin (5-HT) regulates neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Paulina S; Neira, David; Muñoz, Mauricio; Lavandero, Sergio; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2014-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) production and expression of 5-HT receptors (5-HTRs) occur early during prenatal development. Recent evidence suggests that, in addition to its classical role as a neurotransmitter, 5-HT regulates neuronal connectivity during mammalian development by modulating cell migration and neuronal cytoarchitecture. Given the variety of 5-HTRs, researchers have had difficulty clarifying the specific role of each receptor subtype in brain development. Signalling mediated by the G-protein-coupled 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R, however, has been associated with neuronal plasticity. Thus, we hypothesized that 5-HT promotes neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R. The involvement of 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R in the morphology of rat hippocampal neurons was evaluated by treating primary cultures at 2 days in vitro with 5-HT and specific antagonists for 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R (WAY-100635 and SB269970, respectively). The stimulation of hippocampal neurons with 100 nM 5-HT for 24 hr produced no effect on either the number or the length of primary neurites. Nonetheless, after 5HT7 R was blocked, the addition of 5-HT increased the number of primary neurites, suggesting that 5HT7 R could inhibit neuritogenesis. In contrast, 5-HT induced secondary neurite outgrowth, an effect inhibited by 1 μM WAY-100635 or SB269970. These results suggest that both serotonergic receptors participate in secondary neurite outgrowth. We conclude that 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R regulate neuronal morphology in primary hippocampal cultures by promoting secondary neurite outgrowth.

  20. Effect of Gravity on Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Azzam, M. O. J.; Mann, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of liquid-vapor interfaces are made in +/- 1-g environments to note the effect of gravity on surface tension. A slight increase is detected at -1-g0, but is arguably within the uncertainty of the measurement technique. An increased dependence of surface tension on the orientation and magnitude of the gravitational vector is anticipated as the critical point is approached.

  1. Achieving tunable surface tension in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Luo, K. H.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we aim to address an important issue about the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model, which has attracted much attention as a mesoscopic model for simulating interfacial dynamics of complex fluids, but suffers from the problem that the surface tension cannot be tuned independently of the density ratio. In the literature, a multirange potential was devised to adjust the surface tension [Sbragaglia , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.75.026702 75, 026702 (2007)]. However, it was recently found that the density ratio of the system will be changed when the multirange potential is employed to adjust the surface tension. An alternative approach is therefore proposed in the present work. The basic strategy is to add a source term to the LB equation so as to tune the surface tension of the pseudopotential LB model. The proposed approach can guarantee that the adjustment of the surface tension does not affect the mechanical stability condition of the pseudopotential LB model, and thus provides a separate control of the surface tension and the density ratio. Meanwhile, it still retains the mesoscopic feature and the computational simplicity of the pseudopotential LB model. Numerical simulations are carried out for stationary droplets, capillary waves, and droplet splashing on a thin liquid film. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed approach is capable of achieving a tunable surface tension over a very wide range and can keep the density ratio unchanged when adjusting the surface tension.

  2. The current research status of normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Yuan, Ti-Fei; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is a progressive optic neuropathy that mimics primary open-angle glaucoma, but lacks the findings of elevated intraocular pressure or other mitigating factors that can lead to optic neuropathy. The present review summarized the causes, genetics, and mechanisms underlying NTG in both animal models and human patients. We also proposed that the neurovascular unit is a therapeutic target for NTG management. PMID:25258525

  3. Electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composite for nerve regeneration: electricity-stimulated neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Wang, Zhaoxu; Roberge, Christophe; Shi, Guixin; Roche, Phillippe; Li, Jiangming; Dao, Lê H

    2007-01-01

    Normal and electrically stimulated PC12 cell cultures and the implantation of nerve guidance channels were performed to evaluate newly developed electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composites. Polypyrrole (PPy) doped by butane sulfonic acid showed a significantly higher number of viable cells compared with PPy doped by polystyrenesulfonate after a 6-day culture. The PC12 cells were left to proliferate for 6 days, and the PPy-coated membranes, showing less initial cell adherence, recorded the same proliferation rate as did the noncoated membranes. Direct current electricity at various intensities was applied to the PC12 cell-cultured conductive membranes. After 7 days, the greatest number of neurites appeared on the membranes with a current intensity approximating 1.7-8.4 microA/cm. Nerve guidance channels made of conductive biodegradable composite were implanted into rats to replace 8 mm of sciatic nerve. The implants were harvested after 2 months and analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The regenerated nerve tissue displayed myelinated axons and Schwann cells that were similar to those in the native nerve. Electrical stimulation applied through the electrically conductive biodegradable polymers therefore enhanced neurite outgrowth in a current-dependent fashion. The conductive polymers also supported sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

  4. Enhanced neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth on graphene-based biomimetic substrates.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suck Won; Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Han, Dong-Wook; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine.

  5. A patterned recombinant human IgM guides neurite outgrowth of CNS neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Jordan, Luke R.; Kumar, Shailabh; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-07-01

    Matrix molecules convey biochemical and physical guiding signals to neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and shape the trajectory of neuronal fibers that constitute neural networks. We have developed recombinant human IgMs that bind to epitopes on neural cells, with the aim of treating neurological diseases. Here we test the hypothesis that recombinant human IgMs (rHIgM) can guide neurite outgrowth of CNS neurons. Microcontact printing was employed to pattern rHIgM12 and rHIgM22, antibodies that were bioengineered to have variable regions capable of binding to neurons or oligodendrocytes, respectively. rHIgM12 promoted neuronal attachment and guided outgrowth of neurites from hippocampal neurons. Processes from spinal neurons followed grid patterns of rHIgM12 and formed a physical network. Comparison between rHIgM12 and rHIgM22 suggested the biochemistry that facilitates anchoring the neuronal surfaces is a prerequisite for the function of IgM, and spatial properties cooperate in guiding the assembly of neuronal networks.

  6. Atlastin regulates store-operated calcium entry for nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yan, Bing; Si, Hongjiang; Peng, Xu; Zhang, Shenyuan L.; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a class of dynamin-like GTPases known as atlastin (ATL). Depletion of or mutations in ATL cause an unbranched ER morphology and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by axon shortening in corticospinal motor neurons and progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. How ER shaping is linked to neuronal defects is poorly understood. Here, we show that dominant-negative mutants of ATL1 in PC-12 cells inhibit nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of wild-type or mutant ATL1 or depletion of ATLs alters ER morphology and affects store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by decreasing STIM1 puncta formation near the plasma membrane upon calcium depletion of the ER. In addition, blockage of the STIM1-Orai pathway effectively abolishes neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells stimulated by NGF. These results suggest that SOCE plays an important role in neuronal regeneration, and mutations in ATL1 may cause HSP, partly by undermining SOCE. PMID:28240257

  7. Nerve growth factor-immobilized polypyrrole: Bioactive electrically conducting polymer for enhanced neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Natalia; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials that present multiple stimuli are attractive for a number of biomedical applications. In particular, electrical and biological cues are important factors to include in interfaces with neurons for applications such as nerve conduits and neural probes. Here, we report the combination of these two stimuli, by immobilizing nerve growth factor (NGF) on the surface of the electrically conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy). NGF was immobilized using an intermediate linker provided by a layer of polyallylamine conjugated to an arylazido functional group. Upon exposure to UV light and activation of the azido groups, NGF was fixed to the substrate. Three different surface concentrations were obtained (0.21–0.98 ng/mm2) and similar levels of neurite extension were observed on immobilized NGF as with soluble NGF. Additionally, electrical stimulation experiments were conducted with the modified polymer and revealed a 50% increase in neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells compared to experiments without electrical stimulation. This novel modification of PPy provides both electrical and biological stimulation, by presenting tethered growth factors and only producing a small decrease in the material's properties (conductivity ~10 S cm−1) when compared to other modification techniques (conductivity ~10−3–10−6 S cm−1. PMID:17111407

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Transmembrane Protein Dpy19L1 Is Required for Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Bizen, Norihisa; Sato, Noboru; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), including the nuclear envelope, is a continuous and intricate membrane-bound organelle responsible for various cellular functions. In neurons, the ER network is found in cell bodies, axons, and dendrites. Recent studies indicate the involvement of the ER network in neuronal development, such as neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. However, the regulation of neural development by ER-localized proteins is not fully understood. We previously reported that the multi-transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is required for neuronal migration in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. A Dpy19L family member, Dpy19L2, which is a causative gene for human Globozoospermia, is suggested to act as an anchor of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope. In this study, we found that the patterns of exogenous Dpy19L1 were partially coincident with the ER, including the nuclear envelope in COS-7 cells at the level of the light microscope. The reticular distribution of Dpy19L1 was disrupted by microtubule depolymerization that induces retraction of the ER. Furthermore, Dpy19L1 showed a similar distribution pattern with a ER marker protein in embryonic mouse cortical neurons. Finally, we showed that Dpy19L1 knockdown mediated by siRNA resulted in decreased neurite outgrowth in cultured neurons. These results indicate that transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is localized to the ER membrane and regulates neurite extension during development. PMID:27959946

  9. RA-RAR-β counteracts myelin-dependent inhibition of neurite outgrowth via Lingo-1 repression.

    PubMed

    Puttagunta, Radhika; Schmandke, André; Floriddia, Elisa; Gaub, Perrine; Fomin, Natalie; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2011-06-27

    After an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration is limited as the result of a lack of neuronal intrinsic competence and the presence of extrinsic inhibitory signals. The injury fragments the myelin neuronal insulating layer, releasing extrinsic inhibitory molecules to signal through the neuronal membrane-bound Nogo receptor (NgR) complex. In this paper, we show that a neuronal transcriptional pathway can interfere with extrinsic inhibitory myelin-dependent signaling, thereby promoting neurite outgrowth. Specifically, retinoic acid (RA), acting through the RA receptor β (RAR-β), inhibited myelin-activated NgR signaling through the transcriptional repression of the NgR complex member Lingo-1. We show that suppression of Lingo-1 was required for RA-RAR-β to counteract extrinsic inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we confirm in vivo that RA treatment after a dorsal column overhemisection injury inhibited Lingo-1 expression, specifically through RAR-β. Our findings identify a novel link between RA-RAR-β-dependent proaxonal outgrowth and inhibitory NgR complex-dependent signaling, potentially allowing for the development of molecular strategies to enhance axonal regeneration after a central nervous system injury.

  10. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  11. Spatial gene's (Tbata) implication in neurite outgrowth and dendrite patterning in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Miriam; Saade, Murielle; Chauvet, Sophie; Nguyen, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    The unique architecture of neurons requires the establishment and maintenance of polarity, which relies in part on microtubule-based kinesin motor transport to deliver essential cargo into axons and dendrites. In developing neurons, kinesin trafficking is essential for delivering organelles and molecules that are crucial for elongation and guidance of the growing axonal and dendritic termini. In mature neurons, kinesin cargo delivery is essential for neuron dynamic physiological functions which are critical in brain development. In this work, we followed Spatial (Tbata) gene expression during primary hippocampal neuron development and showed that it is highly expressed during dendrite formation. Spatial protein exhibits a somatodendritic distribution and we show that the kinesin motor Kif17, among other dendrite specific kinesins, is crucial for Spatial localization to dendrites of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, Spatial down regulation in primary hippocampal cells revealed a role for Spatial in maintaining neurons' polarity by ensuring proper neurite outgrowth. This polarity is specified by intrinsic and extracellular signals that allow neurons to determine axon and dendrite fate during development. Neurotrophic factors, such as the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), are candidate extracellular polarity-regulating cues which are proposed to accelerate neuronal polarization by enhancing dendrite growth. Here, we show that NGF treatment increases Spatial expression in hippocampal neurons. Altogether, these data suggest that Spatial, in response to NGF and through its transport by Kif17, is crucial for neuronal polarization and can be a key regulator of neurite outgrowth.

  12. Extensive neurite outgrowth and active synapse formation on self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Holmes, T C; de Lacalle, S; Su, X; Liu, G; Rich, A; Zhang, S

    2000-06-06

    A new type of self-assembling peptide (sapeptide) scaffolds that serve as substrates for neurite outgrowth and synapse formation is described. These peptide-based scaffolds are amenable to molecular design by using chemical or biotechnological syntheses. They can be tailored to a variety of applications. The sapeptide scaffolds are formed through the spontaneous assembly of ionic self-complementary beta-sheet oligopeptides under physiological conditions, producing a hydrogel material. The scaffolds can support neuronal cell attachment and differentiation as well as extensive neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, they are permissive substrates for functional synapse formation between the attached neurons. That primary rat neurons form active synapses on such scaffold surfaces in situ suggests these scaffolds could be useful for tissue engineering applications. The buoyant sapeptide scaffolds with attached cells in culture can be transported readily from one environment to another. Furthermore, these peptides did not elicit a measurable immune response or tissue inflammation when introduced into animals. These biological materials created through molecular design and self assembly may be developed as a biologically compatible scaffold for tissue repair and tissue engineering.

  13. Integrin alpha 8 beta 1 promotes attachment, cell spreading, and neurite outgrowth on fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, U; Bossy, B; Venstrom, K; Reichardt, L F

    1995-01-01

    The integrin alpha 8 subunit, isolated by low stringency hybridization, is a novel integrin subunit that associates with beta 1. To identify ligands, we have prepared a function-blocking antiserum to the extracellular domain of alpha 8, and we have established by transfection K562 cell lines that stably express alpha 8 beta 1 heterodimers on the cell surface. We demonstrate here by cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth assays that alpha 8 beta 1 is a fibronectin receptor. Studies on fibronectin fragments using RGD peptides as inhibitors show that alpha 8 beta 1 binds to the RGD site of fibronectin. In contrast to the endogenous alpha 5 beta 1 fibronectin receptor in K562 cells, alpha 8 beta 1 not only promotes cell attachment but also extensive cell spreading, suggesting functional differences between the two receptors. In chick embryo fibroblasts, alpha 8 beta 1 is localized to focal adhesions. We conclude that alpha 8 beta 1 is a receptor for fibronectin and can promote attachment, cell spreading, and neurite outgrowth on fibronectin. Images PMID:7626807

  14. Hierarchical Disabled-1 Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Src family Kinase Activation and Neurite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Zhihua; Monckton, Elizabeth; Glubrecht, Darryl; Godbout, Roseline

    2013-01-01

    There are two developmentally regulated alternatively spliced forms of Disabled-1 (Dab1) in the chick retina: an early form (Dab1-E) expressed in retinal precursor cells and a late form (Dab1-L) expressed in neuronal cells. The main difference between these two isoforms is the absence of two Src family kinase (SFK) recognition sites in Dab1-E. Both forms retain two Abl/Crk/Nck recognition sites implicated in the recruitment of SH2 domain-containing signaling proteins. One of the Dab1-L-specific SFK recognition sites, at tyrosine(Y)-198, has been shown to be phosphorylated in Reelin-stimulated neurons. Here, we use Reelin-expressing primary retinal cultures to investigate the role of the four Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites on overall tyrosine phosphorylation, Dab1 phosphorylation, SFK activation and neurite formation. We show that Y198 is essential but not sufficient for maximal Dab1 phosphorylation, SFK activation and neurite formation, with Y232 and Y220 playing particularly important roles in SFK activation and neuritogenesis, and Y185 having modifying effects secondary to Y232 and Y220. Our data support a role for all four Dab1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites in mediating the spectrum of activities associated with Reelin-Dab1 signaling in neurons. PMID:17350651

  15. Molecular dynamics computations of brine-CO2 interfacial tensions and brine-CO2-quartz contact angles and their effects on structural and residual trapping mechanisms in carbon geo-sequestration.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, S; Mathew, M S; Bresme, F

    2012-11-15

    In the context of carbon geo-sequestration projects, brine-CO(2) interfacial tension γ and brine-CO(2)-rock surface water contact angles θ directly impact structural and residual trapping capacities. While γ is fairly well understood there is still large uncertainty associated with θ. We present here an investigation of γ and θ using a molecular approach based on molecular dynamics computer simulations. We consider a system consisting of CO(2)/water/NaCl and an α-quartz surface, covering a brine salinity range between 0 and 4 molal. The simulation models accurately reproduce the dependence of γ on pressure below the CO(2) saturation pressure at 300 K, and over predict γ by ~20% at higher pressures. In addition, in agreement with experimental observations, the simulations predict that γ increases slightly with temperature or salinity. We also demonstrate that for non-hydroxylated quartz surfaces, θ strongly increases with pressure at subcritical and supercritical conditions. An increase in temperature significantly reduces the contact angle, especially at low-intermediate pressures (1-10 MPa), this effect is mitigated at higher pressures, 20 MPa. We also found that θ only weakly depends on salinity for the systems investigated in this work.

  16. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duka, M. V.; Dvoretskaya, L. N.; Babelkin, N. S.; Khodzitskii, M. K.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 - 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth.

  17. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duka, M V; Dvoretskaya, L N; Babelkin, N S; Khodzitskii, M K; Chivilikhin, S A; Smolyanskaya, O A

    2014-08-31

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 – 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth. (laser biophotonics)

  18. A study of the effects of flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jun; Duan, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pulsed electromagnetic fields with various flux densities and frequencies on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. We have studied the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, average length of neurites and directivity of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells cultured for 96 hours in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells were exposed to 50 Hz pulsed electromagnetic fields with a flux density of 1.37 mT, 0.19 mT and 0.016 mT respectively. The field was generated through a Helmholtz coil pair housed in one incubator and the control samples were placed in another identical incubator. It was found that exposure to both a relatively high flux density (1.37 mT) and a medium flux density (0.19 mT) inhibited the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and promoted neurite length significantly. Exposure to high flux density (1.37 mT) also resulted in nearly 20% enhancement of neurite directivity along the field direction. However, exposure to low flux density field (0.016 mT) had no detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. We also studied the effect of frequency at the constant flux density of 1.37 mT. In the range from 1 approximately 100 Hz, only 50 and 70 Hz pulse frequencies had significant effects on neurite outgrowth. Our study has shown that neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells is sensitive to flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field.

  19. Dynamical Modeling of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, Jeremiah U.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows 'represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics'. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF formulation might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin (1996). This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated. For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin (1996), are discussed.

  20. TRPC6 channel-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons involves activation of RAS/MEK/ERK, PI3K, and CAMKIV signaling.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Jeanine H; Schuwald, Anita M; Sillani, Giacomo; Ye, Lian; Müller, Walter E; Leuner, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    The non-selective cationic transient receptor canonical 6 (TRPC6) channels are involved in synaptic plasticity changes ranging from dendritic growth, spine morphology changes and increase in excitatory synapses. We previously showed that the TRPC6 activator hyperforin, the active antidepressant component of St. John's wort, induces neuritic outgrowth and spine morphology changes in PC12 cells and hippocampal CA1 neurons. However, the signaling cascade that transmits the hyperforin-induced transient rise in intracellular calcium into neuritic outgrowth is not yet fully understood. Several signaling pathways are involved in calcium transient-mediated changes in synaptic plasticity, ranging from calmodulin-mediated Ras-induced signaling cascades comprising the mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K signal transduction pathways as well as Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) and CAMKIV. We show that several mechanisms are involved in TRPC6-mediated synaptic plasticity changes in PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. Influx of calcium via TRPC6 channels activates different pathways including Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and CAMKIV in both cell types, leading to cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation. These findings are interesting not only in terms of the downstream targets of TRPC6 channels but also because of their potential to facilitate further understanding of St. John's wort extract-mediated antidepressant activity. Alterations in synaptic plasticity are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. Beside several other proteins, TRPC6 channels regulate synaptic plasticity. This study demonstrates that different pathways including Ras/MEK/ERK, PI3K/Akt, and CAMKIV are involved in the improvement of synaptic plasticity by the TRPC6 activator hyperforin, the antidepressant active constituent of St. John

  1. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  3. APP with Kunitz type protease inhibitor domain (KPI) correlates with neuritic plaque density but not with cortical synaptophysin immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease and non-demented aged subjects: a multifactorial analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, S S; Sandbrink, R; Beyreuther, K; Schmitt, H P

    1995-01-01

    The formation of beta A4 amyloid protein in neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and advanced age is a complex process that involves a number of both cellular and molecular mechanisms, the interrelations of which are not yet completely understood. We have examined quantitatively, in AD and aged controls an extended spectrum of amyloid plaque-related cellular and molecular factors and the cortical synaptophysin immunoreactivity (synaptic density) in order to check for interrelations between them by multifactorial analysis. In 3 cases of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) aged 72, 80 and 82 years, and 9 controls aged 43-88 (mean age 65) years, the cortical synaptophysin immunoreactivity was assessed, together with the numbers of neurons, astrocytes and microglial cells, senile plaques, of tangle-bearing neurons, and the amount of beta A4 amyloid precursor protein (APP) with and without the Kunitz type serine protease inhibitor (KPI) domain. The main results were: APP including the KPI domain (KPI-APP) correlated with the number of neuritic plaques, regardless of whether they occurred in SDAT or non-demented controls. There was no significant difference in the amount of KPI-APP between SDAT and controls. Conversely, APP695 (without KPI) was significantly reduced in SDAT. KPI-APP did not correlate with the synaptophysin immunoreactivity (RGVA), while APP695 showed a significant correlation with the latter in all evaluations. It also correlated with the neuron counts, which was not true for KPI-APP. These results support previous findings indicating that KPI-APP is an important local factor for amyloid deposition in the neuritic plaques, both in AD and in non-demented aged people. On the contrary, KPI-APP does not seem to be significantly involved in the mechanisms of synaptic change outside of the plaques.

  4. Effect of ZnO nanoparticle and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide on the dynamic and equilibrium oil-water interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Tahereh Fereidooni; Azizian, Saeid

    2014-02-13

    The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the dynamic and equilibrium interfacial tension in the presence and absence of cationic surfactant CTAB was investigated. The results show that nanoparticles solely have no effect on interfacial tension. However, in the presence of CTAB, both particles and surfactants are adsorbed at the interface, and by a synergistic effect decrease the interfacial tension more. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the contact angle and stability of emulsions was studied too. The dynamic interfacial tension data were fitted with two different models. The results show that the adsorption mechanism of surfactant from bulk to interface was controlled by the mixed diffusion-kinetic model.

  5. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  6. Handheld magnetic sensor for measurement of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, K.; Rajamani, R.

    2012-04-01

    This letter develops an analytical formulation for measurement of tension in a string using a handheld sensor. By gently pushing the sensor against the string, the tension in the string can be obtained. An experimental sensor prototype is constructed to verify the analytical formulation. The centimeter-sized prototype utilizes three moving pistons and magnetic field based measurements of their positions. Experimental data show that the sensor can accurately measure tension on a bench top rig. The developed sensor could be useful in a variety of orthopedic surgical procedures, including knee replacement, hip replacement, ligament repair, shoulder stabilization, and tendon repair.

  7. Neurotrophin Promotes Neurite Outgrowth by Inhibiting Rif GTPase Activation Downstream of MAPKs and PI3K Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoxia; Yan, Huijuan; Li, Jiayi; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Junyu; Fan, Lifei

    2017-01-01

    Members of the well-known semaphorin family of proteins can induce both repulsive and attractive signaling in neural network formation and their cytoskeletal effects are mediated in part by small guanosine 5’-triphosphatase (GTPases). The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular role of Rif GTPase in the neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth. By using PC12 cells which are known to cease dividing and begin to show neurite outgrowth responding to nerve growth factor (NGF), we found that semaphorin 6A was as effective as nerve growth factor at stimulating neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and that its neurotrophic effect was transmitted through signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). We further found that neurotrophin-induced neurite formation in PC12 cells could be partially mediated by inhibition of Rif GTPase activity downstream of MAPKs and PI3K signaling. In conclusion, we newly identified Rif as a regulator of the cytoskeletal rearrangement mediated by semaphorins. PMID:28098758

  8. Comparison of PC12 and Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures for Evaluating Neurite Outgrowth Using High Content Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of high-throughput assays for chemical screening and hazard identification is a pressing priority worldwide. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which recapitulate biological events observed in vivo. Neurite outgrowth is one such critical cellular process un...

  9. Neurotrophin Promotes Neurite Outgrowth by Inhibiting Rif GTPase Activation Downstream of MAPKs and PI3K Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoxia; Yan, Huijuan; Li, Jiayi; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Junyu; Fan, Lifei

    2017-01-13

    Members of the well-known semaphorin family of proteins can induce both repulsive and attractive signaling in neural network formation and their cytoskeletal effects are mediated in part by small guanosine 5'-triphosphatase (GTPases). The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular role of Rif GTPase in the neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth. By using PC12 cells which are known to cease dividing and begin to show neurite outgrowth responding to nerve growth factor (NGF), we found that semaphorin 6A was as effective as nerve growth factor at stimulating neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and that its neurotrophic effect was transmitted through signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). We further found that neurotrophin-induced neurite formation in PC12 cells could be partially mediated by inhibition of Rif GTPase activity downstream of MAPKs and PI3K signaling. In conclusion, we newly identified Rif as a regulator of the cytoskeletal rearrangement mediated by semaphorins.

  10. MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES. C. F. Blackman1, D. E. House2*, S. G. Benane3*, A. Ubeda4, M.A. TrilIo4. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, EPA,
    Research Triangle Park, North Caro...

  11. Negletein as a neuroprotectant enhances the action of nerve growth factor and induces neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Bovicelli, Paolo; Righi, Giuliana; Saso, Luciano

    2016-11-12

    Negletein has been shown to have therapeutic potential for inflammation-associated diseases, but its effect on neurite outgrowth is still unknown. The present study showed that negletein alone did not trigger PC12 cells to differentiate and extend neurites. When compared with the cells in the untreated control, a significant (P < 0.05) induction and a higher neurite outgrowth activity was observed when the cells were cotreated with negletein (10 µM) and a low dose of nerve growth factor (NGF; 5 ng/mL). The neurite outgrowth process was blocked by the tyrosine kinase receptor (Trk) inhibitor, K252a, suggesting that the neuritogenic effect was NGF-dependent. Negletein (10 µM) together with NGF (5 ng/mL) enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), protein kinase B (Akt), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and the NGF level were also upregulated by negletein (10 µM) and a low dose of NGF (5 ng/mL). Negletein at nanomolar concentration also was found to be sufficient to mediate the survival of serum-deprived PC12 cells up to 72 h. Taken together, negletein might be useful as an efficient bioactive compound to protect neurons from cell death and promote neuritogenesis. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):591-599, 2016.

  12. Extracellularly Recorded Somatic and Neuritic Signal Shapes and Classification Algorithms for High-Density Microelectrode Array Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Frey, Urs

    2016-01-01

    High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEA) have been recently introduced to study principles of neural function at high spatial resolution. However, the exact nature of the experimentally observed extracellular action potentials (EAPs) is still incompletely understood. The soma, axon and dendrites of a neuron can all exhibit regenerative action potentials that could be sensed with HDMEA electrodes. Here, we investigate the contribution of distinct neuronal sources of activity in HDMEA recordings from low-density neuronal cultures. We recorded EAPs with HDMEAs having 11,011 electrodes and then fixed and immunostained the cultures with β3-tubulin for high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Immunofluorescence images overlaid with the activity maps showed EAPs both at neuronal somata and distal neurites. Neuritic EAPs had mostly narrow triphasic shapes, consisting of a positive, a pronounced negative peak and a second positive peak. EAPs near somata had wide monophasic or biphasic shapes with a main negative peak, and following optional positive peak. We show that about 86% of EAP recordings consist of somatic spikes, while the remaining 14% represent neuritic spikes. Furthermore, the adaptation of the waveform shape during bursts of these neuritic spikes suggested that they originate from axons, rather than from dendrites. Our study improves the understanding of HDMEA signals and can aid in the identification of the source of EAPs. PMID:27683541

  13. The Pseudophosphatase MK-STYX Induces Neurite-Like Outgrowths in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Brittany M.; Rusnak, Lauren E.; Wong, Kristen E.; Banks, Dallas A.; Munyikwa, Michelle R.; McFarland, Alexander G.; Hinton, Shantá D.

    2014-01-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line is a widely used system to study neuronal differentiation for which sustained activation of the extracellular signaling related kinase (ERK) pathway is required. Here, we investigate the function of MK-STYX [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphoserine/threonine/tyrosine-binding protein] in neuronal differentiation. MK-STYX is a member of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) family, which is generally responsible for dephosphorylating the ERKs. However, MK-STYX lacks catalytic activity due to the absence of the nucleophilic cysteine in the active site signature motif HC(X5)R that is essential for phosphatase activity. Despite being catalytically inactive, MK-STYX has been shown to play a role in important cellular pathways, including stress responses. Here we show that PC12 cells endogenously express MK-STYX. In addition, MK-STYX, but not its catalytically active mutant, induced neurite-like outgrowths in PC12 cells. Furthermore, MK-STYX dramatically increased the number of cells with neurite extensions in response to nerve growth factor (NGF), whereas the catalytically active mutant did not. MK-STYX continued to induce neurites in the presence of a MEK (MAP kinase kinase) inhibitor suggesting that MK-STYX does not act through the Ras-ERK/MAPK pathway but is involved in another pathway whose inactivation leads to neuronal differentiation. RhoA activity assays indicated that MK-STYX induced extensions through the Rho signaling pathway. MK-STYX decreased RhoA activation, whereas RhoA activation increased when MK-STYX was down-regulated. Furthermore, MK-STYX affected downstream players of RhoA such as the actin binding protein cofilin. The presence of MK-STYX decreased the phosphorylation of cofilin in non NGF stimulated cells, but increased its phosphorylation in NGF stimulated cells, whereas knocking down MK-STYX caused an opposite effect. Taken together our data suggest that MK-STYX may be a regulator of RhoA signaling, and

  14. Dynamic surface tension of surfactant TA: experiments and theory.

    PubMed

    Otis, D R; Ingenito, E P; Kamm, R D; Johnson, M

    1994-12-01

    A bubble surfactometer was used to measure the surface tension of an aqueous suspension of surfactant TA as a function of bubble area over a range of cycling rates and surfactant bulk concentrations. Results of the surface tension-interfacial area loops exhibited a rich variety of phenomena, the character of which varied systematically with frequency and bulk concentration. A model was developed to interpret and explain these data and for use in describing the dynamics of surface layers under more general circumstances. Surfactant was modeled as a single component with surface tension taken to depend on only the interfacial surfactant concentration. Two distinct mechanisms were considered for the exchange of surfactant between the bulk phase and interface. The first is described by a simple kinetic relationship for adsorption and desorption that pertains only when the interfacial concentration is below its maximum equilibrium value. The second mechanism is "squeeze-out" by which surfactant molecules are expelled from an interface compressed past a maximum packing state. The model provided good agreement with experimental measurements for cycling rates from 1 to 100 cycles/min and for bulk concentrations between 0.0073 and 7.3 mg/ml.

  15. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  16. Exploring chain tension in cold drawing of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2014-03-01

    Ductile polymer glasses can undergo large tensile extension (cold draw) to double its original length either homogeneously or through necking. The corresponding tensile stress is typically much higher than the rubbery elastic modulus. Apart from the plastic component, there is also an energetic contribution to the mechanical stress. The origin of this elastic stress appears to arise from the existence of a chain network. The elastic yielding phenomenon indicates that significant chain tension builds up during the cold drawing. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation is carried out to delineate the nature of the chain tension and explore the suggestion of bond distortion in deformation of polymeric glasses. In a simple model to mimic a polymer glass with sufficient chain networking, we found evidence for the bond distortion that grows with the degree of extension. This work is supported, in part, by NSF (CMMI-0926522 and DMR-1105135).

  17. Two-branes with variable tension model and the effective Newtonian constant

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff da Silva, J. M.

    2011-03-15

    It is shown that, in the two brane time variation model framework, if the hidden brane tension varies according to the phenomenological Eoetvoes law, the visible brane tension behavior is such that its time derivative is negative in the past and positive after a specific time of cosmological evolution. This behavior is interpreted in terms of a useful mechanical system analog and its relation with the variation of the Newtonian (effective) gravitational ''constant'' is explored.

  18. Tension-independent heat in rabbit papillary muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, N R; Blanchard, E M; Mulieri, L A

    1989-01-01

    1. Heat and force were measured from isometrically contracting (0.2 Hz) rabbit papillary muscles at 21 degrees C during a single contraction-relaxation cycle using antimony-bismuth thermopiles and a capacitance force transducer. 2. Tension-independent heat (TIH) associated with excitation-contraction coupling was isolated from the initial heat by eliminating tension and tension-dependent heat with a Krebs-Ringer solution containing 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) and mannitol. 3. A strategy for testing the validity of this new method for measuring TIH in heart muscle is described and the test confirms that the BDM-hypertonic solution partitioning method properly estimates the magnitude of the TIH component of initial heat. 4. TIH at the time of complete mechanical relaxation is 1.00 +/- 0.17 mJ/g wet weight and the data suggest that calcium cycling is complete by this time. Conversion of TIH to calcium cycled, assuming that 87% of TIH is due to calcium pumping by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, indicates that approximately 52 nmol calcium/g wet weight are required to support a single cycle of mechanical activity (0.2 Hz, 21 degrees C). 5. The length and frequency dependence of excitation-contraction coupling were demonstrated. TIH is reduced by shortening muscle length and by increasing the interval between stimuli. These steady-state data suggest that only a portion (approximately 40%) of TIH is directly related to activation of the contractile apparatus. 6. TIH in the first twitch following a 45 min rest period is significantly reduced by approximately 30%. 7. With subsequent twitches in the positive treppe following the rest period, TIH does not increase as steeply as expected suggesting that tension rise in twitches 1-10 may be modulated by competitive binding of calcium rather than increased calcium delivery. PMID:2607437

  19. Tension-independent heat in rabbit papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Alpert, N R; Blanchard, E M; Mulieri, L A

    1989-07-01

    1. Heat and force were measured from isometrically contracting (0.2 Hz) rabbit papillary muscles at 21 degrees C during a single contraction-relaxation cycle using antimony-bismuth thermopiles and a capacitance force transducer. 2. Tension-independent heat (TIH) associated with excitation-contraction coupling was isolated from the initial heat by eliminating tension and tension-dependent heat with a Krebs-Ringer solution containing 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) and mannitol. 3. A strategy for testing the validity of this new method for measuring TIH in heart muscle is described and the test confirms that the BDM-hypertonic solution partitioning method properly estimates the magnitude of the TIH component of initial heat. 4. TIH at the time of complete mechanical relaxation is 1.00 +/- 0.17 mJ/g wet weight and the data suggest that calcium cycling is complete by this time. Conversion of TIH to calcium cycled, assuming that 87% of TIH is due to calcium pumping by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, indicates that approximately 52 nmol calcium/g wet weight are required to support a single cycle of mechanical activity (0.2 Hz, 21 degrees C). 5. The length and frequency dependence of excitation-contraction coupling were demonstrated. TIH is reduced by shortening muscle length and by increasing the interval between stimuli. These steady-state data suggest that only a portion (approximately 40%) of TIH is directly related to activation of the contractile apparatus. 6. TIH in the first twitch following a 45 min rest period is significantly reduced by approximately 30%. 7. With subsequent twitches in the positive treppe following the rest period, TIH does not increase as steeply as expected suggesting that tension rise in twitches 1-10 may be modulated by competitive binding of calcium rather than increased calcium delivery.

  20. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect.

  1. Nuclear kinesis, neurite sprouting and abnormal axonal projections of cone photoreceptors in the aged and AMD-afflicted human retina.

    PubMed

    Pow, David V; Sullivan, Robert K P

    2007-05-01

    Tissues often respond to damage by recapitulating developmental programs. We have investigated whether anatomical signs of developmental recapitulation are evident in cone photoreceptors of the aged and AMD-afflicted human retina. Radial migration of cell nuclei mediated by microtubules is a characteristic feature of cells in the developing retina. Similarly, neurite outgrowth is a feature of developing neurons. We have examined whether nuclear kinesis and neurite outgrowth from cone photoreceptors is evident. Calbindin-positive cone photoreceptor nuclei are normally positioned as a single layer of somata at the outer border of the outer nuclear layer. In AMD-afflicted retinae, many nuclei are translocated, with s