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Sample records for neurite mechanical tension

  1. Mechanical tension applied to substrate films specifies location of neuritogenesis and promotes major neurite growth at the expense of minor neurite development.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang-Qi; Franz, Eric W; Leach, Michelle K; Winterroth, Frank; White, Christina M; Rastogi, Arjun; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Corey, Joseph M

    2016-04-01

    One obstacle in neural repair is facilitating axon growth long enough to reach denervated targets. Recent studies show that axonal growth is accelerated by applying tension to bundles of neurites, and additional studies show that mechanical tension is critical to all neurite growth. However, no studies yet describe how individual neurons respond to tensile forces applied to cell bodies and neurites simultaneously; neither do any test motor neurons, a phenotype critical to neural repair. Here we examine the growth of dissociated motor neurons on stretchable substrates. E15 spinal motor neurons were cultured on poly-lactide-co-glycolide films stretched at 4.8, 9.6, or 14.3 mm day(-1). Morphological analysis revealed that substrate stretching has profound effects on developing motor neurons. Stretching increases major neurite length; it also forces neuritogenesis to occur nearest poles of the cell closest to the sources of tension. Stretching also reduces the number of neurites per neuron. These data show that substrate stretching affects neuronal morphology by specifying locations on the cell where neuritogenesis occurs and favoring major neurite growth at the expense of minor neurites. These results serve as a building block for development of new techniques to control and improve the growth of neurons for nerve repair purposes.

  2. Drag force as a tool to test the active mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Roberto; Melo, Francisco; Pullarkat, Pramod A

    2010-02-17

    We investigate the mechanical response of PC12 neurites subjected to a drag force imposed by a laminar flow perpendicular to the neurite axis. The curvature of the catenary shape acquired by an initially straight neurite under the action of the drag force provides information on both elongation and tension of the neurite. This method allows us to measure the rest tension and viscoelastic parameters of PC12 neurites and active behavior of neurites. Measurement of oscillations in the strain rate of neurites at constant flow rate provides insight on the response of molecular motors and additional support for the presence of a negative strain-rate sensitivity region in the global mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

  3. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Eva M.; Michel, Klaus; Zeller, Florian; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Schemann, Michael; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs) responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs) responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN), slowly (SAMEN), or ultra-slowly (USAMEN). The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut. PMID:26441520

  4. Neurite, a finite difference large scale parallel program for the simulation of electrical signal propagation in neurites under mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    García-Grajales, Julián A; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite--explicit and implicit--were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  5. Neurite, a Finite Difference Large Scale Parallel Program for the Simulation of Electrical Signal Propagation in Neurites under Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    García-Grajales, Julián A.; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite—explicit and implicit—were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  6. Time-resolved neurite mechanics by thermal fluctuation assessments.

    PubMed

    Gárate, Fernanda; Betz, Timo; Pertusa, María; Bernal, Roberto

    2015-12-30

    In the absence of simple noninvasive measurements, the knowledge of temporal and spatial variations of axons mechanics remains scarce. By extending thermal fluctuation spectroscopy (TFS) to long protrusions, we determine the transverse amplitude thermal fluctuation spectra that allow direct and simultaneous access to three key mechanics parameters: axial tension, bending flexural rigidity and plasma membrane tension. To test our model, we use PC12 cell protrusions-a well-know biophysical model of axons-in order to simplify the biological system under scope. For instance, axial and plasma membrane tension are found in the range of nano Newton and tens of pico Newtons per micron respectively. Furthermore, our results shows that the TFS technique is capable to distinguish quasi-identical protrusions. Another advantage of our approach is the time resolved nature of the measurements. Indeed, in the case of long term experiments on PC12 protrusions, TFS has revealed large temporal, correlated variations of the protrusion mechanics, displaying extraordinary feedback control over the axial tension in order to maintain a constant tension value.

  7. Growth, collapse, and stalling in a mechanical model for neurite motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Jerusalem, Antoine; Goriely, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Neurites, the long cellular protrusions that form the routes of the neuronal network, are capable of actively extending during early morphogenesis or regenerating after trauma. To perform this task, they rely on their cytoskeleton for mechanical support. In this paper, we present a three-component active gel model that describes neurites in the three robust mechanical states observed experimentally: collapsed, static, and motile. These states arise from an interplay between the physical forces driven by growth of the microtubule-rich inner core of the neurite and the acto-myosin contractility of its surrounding cortical membrane. In particular, static states appear as a mechanical traction or compression balance of these two parallel structures. The model predicts how the response of a neurite to a towing force depends on the force magnitude and recovers the response of neurites to several drug treatments that modulate the cytoskeleton active and passive properties.

  8. Active transport of vesicles in neurons is modulated by mechanical tension.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Saif, Taher A

    2014-03-27

    Effective intracellular transport of proteins and organelles is critical in cells, and is especially important for ensuring proper neuron functionality. In neurons, most proteins are synthesized in the cell body and must be transported through thin structures over long distances where normal diffusion is insufficient. Neurons transport subcellular cargo along axons and neurites through a stochastic interplay of active and passive transport. Mechanical tension is critical in maintaining proper function in neurons, but its role in transport is not well understood. To this end, we investigate the active and passive transport of vesicles in Aplysia neurons while changing neurite tension via applied strain, and quantify the resulting dynamics. We found that tension in neurons modulates active transport of vesicles by increasing the probability of active motion, effective diffusivity, and induces a retrograde bias. We show that mechanical tension modulates active transport processes in neurons and that external forces can couple to internal (subcellular) forces and change the overall transport dynamics.

  9. Diacylglycerol lipase-alpha and -beta control neurite outgrowth in neuro-2a cells through distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Mook; Astarita, Giuseppe; Thongkham, Dean; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG) is produced through hydrolysis of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (DAG), which is catalyzed by DAG lipase (DGL). Two DGL isoforms have been molecularly cloned, but their respective roles in endocannabinoid signaling have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that DGL-α and DGL-β may contribute to all-trans-retinoic acid (RA)-induced neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells through distinct mechanisms. RA-induced differentiation of Neuro-2a cells was associated with elevations of cellular 2-AG levels and DGL activity, which were accompanied by temporally separated transcription of DGL-α and DGL-β mRNA. Knockdown of either DGL-α or DGL-β expression attenuated neurite outgrowth, which indicates that both isoforms contribute to neuritogenesis. Immunostaining experiments showed that DGL-β is localized to perinuclear lipid droplets, whereas DGL-α is found on plasma membranes. After RA-induced differentiation, both DGL-α- and DGL-β-green fluorescent protein were distributed also in neurites but in distinguishable patterns. Overexpression of either DGL-α or DGL-β increased the number of neurite-bearing cells, but DGL-β caused substantially larger morphological changes than DGL-α did. Finally, the cannabinoid-1 antagonist rimonabant (1 μM) inhibited DGL-α-induced neuritogenesis, whereas it had no such effect on DGL-β-induced morphological differentiation. The results indicate that RA-induced DGL expression is required for neurite outgrowth of Neuro-2a cells. The findings further suggest that DGL-α and -β may regulate neurite outgrowth by engaging temporally and spatially distinct molecular pathways.

  10. Effects of DS-modified agarose gels on neurite extension in 3D scaffold through mechanisms other than changing the pore radius of the gels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hao; Zhou, Xue; Jiang, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Dermatan sulfate is widely distributed as glycosaminoglycan side chains of proteoglycans, which are the main components of glial scar and inhibit neurite regeneration after nerve injury. However its role in the inhibiting process is not clear. Understanding neurite extension in three-dimensional scaffolds is critical for neural tissue engineering. This study used agarose gels modified with dermatan sulfate as the three-dimensional culture scaffold. We explored structure-function relationship between the three-dimensional scaffold and neurite extension and examined the role of dermatan sulfate on neurite extension in the three-dimensional scaffold. A range of agarose concentrations was used to generate varied gel physical structures and the corresponding neurite extension of embryonic day (E9) chick dorsal root ganglia was examined. We measured gel stiffness and gel pore size to determine whether dermatan sulfate changed the gels' conformation. As gel concentration increased, neurite length and gel pore size decreased, and gel stiffness increased. At 1.00 and 1.25% (wt/vol) concentrations, dermatan sulfates both immobilized with agarose gels and dissolved in culture medium inhibit neurite extension. While at 1.50 and 1.75% (wt/vol) concentrations, only immobilized dermatan sulfate worked. Immobilized dermatan sulfate could modify molecular shape of agarose gels, decrease gel pore size statistically, but did not influence gel stiffness. We have proved that the decrease of gel pore size is insufficient to inhibit neurite extension. These results indicate that dermatan sulfate inhibits neurite extension not through forming a mechanical barrier. Maybe its interaction with neuron membrane is the key factor in neurite extension.

  11. How do mechanical interactions generate surface tension in tissues?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Lisa; Foty, Ramsey; Schoetz, Eva-Maria

    2010-03-01

    Many biological tissues behave like viscous fluids on long timescales and posses a macroscopic, measurable surface tension. This surface tension correlates strongly with tissue type and successfully explains cell sorting of embryonic tissues. Both the differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH), which postulates that surface tension is proportional to the expression levels of adhesion molecules, and the differential interfacial tension hypothesis (DITH), which suggests that surface tension is generated by differences in the contractility of individual cell interfaces, have been used to explain experimental data. We have developed a minimal model that considers cell adhesion and cortical tension, incorporating ideas from both the DAH and the DITH. This model can successfully explain the available experimental data and differs from previous analyses because it considers the feedback between mechanical energy and geometry and makes novel predictions about the shapes of cells on the surface of an aggregate, which we verify experimentally. Combining numerical simulations with analytic results, we predict how tissue surface tension varies as the ratio between adhesion and the cortical tension is altered. We find that surface tension increases with adhesion for a large range of parameters, but that there is a regime in which the cortical tension is important.

  12. Bioassay, isolation and studies on the mechanism of action of neurite extension factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kligman, D.

    1984-01-01

    The identification and purification of molecules active in promoting neurite outgrowth requires a sensitive reproducible bioassay. A quantitative bioassay was utilized to purify a neurite extension factor (NEF) based on counting the number of phase bright neurons with processes at least equal to one cell body diameter after 20 hrs. in culture is defined, serum free medium. Using a combination of heat treatment DEAE cellulose chromatography and gel filtration, an acidic protein of M sub r = 75,000 was highly purified. Upon reduction, it yields subunits of M sub r = 37,000. Purified fractions are active half maximally at 100 ng/ml in inducing neurite outgrowth in this bioassay. Currently, monoclonal antibodies to NEF are being produced. Female Balb C mice were immunized with the antigen and fusions with mouse myeloma cells will be performed to yield hybridoma cells.

  13. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  14. Mechanisms involved in the regulation of neuropeptide-mediated neurite outgrowth: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Bakos, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The present knowledge, regarding the neuronal growth and neurite extension, includes neuropeptide action in the central nervous system. Research reports have brought much information about the multiple intracellular signaling pathways of neuropeptides. However, regardless of the differences in the local responses elicited by neuropeptides, there exist certain functional similarities in the effects of neuropeptides, mediated by their receptors. In the present review, data of the relevant studies, focused on G protein-coupled receptors activated by neuropeptides, are summarized. Particularly, receptors that activate phosphatidylinositol-calcium system and protein kinase C pathways, resulting in the reorganization of the neuronal cytoskeleton and changes in the neuronal morphology, are discussed. Based on our data received, we are showing that oxytocin increases the gene expression of GTPase cell division cycle protein 42 (Cdc42), implicated in many aspects of the neuronal growth and morphology. We are also paying a special attention to neurite extension and retraction in the context of neuropeptide regulation. PMID:27560639

  15. The death receptor antagonist FAIM promotes neurite outgrowth by a mechanism that depends on ERK and NF-kapp B signaling.

    PubMed

    Sole, Carme; Dolcet, Xavier; Segura, Miguel F; Gutierrez, Humberto; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Teresa; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Sanchis, Daniel; Bayascas, Jose R; Gallego, Carme; Moscat, Jorge; Davies, Alun M; Comella, Joan X

    2004-11-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) is a protein identified as an antagonist of Fas-induced cell death. We show that FAIM overexpression fails to rescue neurons from trophic factor deprivation, but exerts a marked neurite growth-promoting action in different neuronal systems. Whereas FAIM overexpression greatly enhanced neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons grown with nerve growth factor (NGF), reduction of endogenous FAIM levels by RNAi decreased neurite outgrowth in these cells. FAIM overexpression promoted NF-kappa B activation, and blocking this activation by using a super-repressor I kappa B alpha or by carrying out experiments using cortical neurons from mice that lack the p65 NF-kappa B subunit prevented FAIM-induced neurite outgrowth. The effect of FAIM on neurite outgrowth was also blocked by inhibition of the Ras-ERK pathway. Finally, we show that FAIM interacts with both Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptor NGF receptors in a ligand-dependent manner. These results reveal a new function of FAIM in promoting neurite outgrowth by a mechanism involving activation of the Ras-ERK pathway and NF-kappa B.

  16. Regulating mechanical tension at compartment boundaries in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Marcus; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During animal development, cells with similar function and fate often stay together and sort out from cells with different fates. In Drosophila wing imaginal discs, cells of anterior and posterior fates are separated by a straight compartment boundary. Separation of anterior and posterior cells requires the homeodomain-containing protein Engrailed, which is expressed in posterior cells. Engrailed induces the expression of the short-range signaling molecule Hedgehog in posterior cells and confines Hedgehog signal transduction to anterior cells. Transduction of the Hedgehog signal in anterior cells is required for the separation of anterior and posterior cells. Previous work showed that this separation of cells involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell junctions along the compartment boundary. However, how mechanical tension was locally increased along the compartment boundary remained unknown. A recent paper now shows that the difference in Hedgehog signal transduction between anterior and posterior cells is necessary and sufficient to increase mechanical tension. The local increase in mechanical tension biases junctional rearrangements during cell intercalations to maintain the straight shape of the compartment boundary. These data highlight how developmental signals can generate patterns of mechanical tension important for tissue organization. PMID:27362651

  17. Regulating mechanical tension at compartment boundaries in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marcus; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-10-01

    During animal development, cells with similar function and fate often stay together and sort out from cells with different fates. In Drosophila wing imaginal discs, cells of anterior and posterior fates are separated by a straight compartment boundary. Separation of anterior and posterior cells requires the homeodomain-containing protein Engrailed, which is expressed in posterior cells. Engrailed induces the expression of the short-range signaling molecule Hedgehog in posterior cells and confines Hedgehog signal transduction to anterior cells. Transduction of the Hedgehog signal in anterior cells is required for the separation of anterior and posterior cells. Previous work showed that this separation of cells involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell junctions along the compartment boundary. However, how mechanical tension was locally increased along the compartment boundary remained unknown. A recent paper now shows that the difference in Hedgehog signal transduction between anterior and posterior cells is necessary and sufficient to increase mechanical tension. The local increase in mechanical tension biases junctional rearrangements during cell intercalations to maintain the straight shape of the compartment boundary. These data highlight how developmental signals can generate patterns of mechanical tension important for tissue organization.

  18. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  19. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  20. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation.

  1. Mechanical evaluation of anastomotic tension and patency in arteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Lineaweaver, W C; Buntic, R; Walker, R

    1996-02-01

    This study quantified arterial anastomotic tension, evaluated subsequent patency rates, and examined the degree of tension reduction with vessel mobilization. The study was divided into two components. In part I, a mechanical analysis was undertaken to evaluate tension, based on the determination of the force required to deflect a cable (vessel) laterally, and its resulting lateral displacement. Six Sprague-Dawley rats with 12 femoral arteries were divided into two subgroups: 1) no mobilization; and 2) axial mobilization by ligation and transection of superficial epigastric and gracilis muscular branches. The tension of femoral arterial anastomoses was calculated in vessels with no segmental defect and with 1.5-, 3-, 4.5-, 6-, and 7.5-mm defects. In part II, patency was evaluated. Fifty-five rats with 110 femoral arteries were divided into two sub-groups as defined in part I: 1) no mobilization; and 2) axial mobilization by ligation and transection of superficial epigastric and gracilis muscular branches. Microvascular anastomoses were performed with no segmental defect and with 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, 7-, 8-, 9-, and 10-mm segmental vessel defects. Patency was evaluated 24 hr postoperatively. Part I of the study revealed that anastomotic tension gradually increased along with an increase in the length of the vessel defect, from 1.9 to 11.34 g in the no-mobilization group and from 1.97 to 8.44 g in the axial-mobilization group. Comparison of tension linear regression coefficient showed a significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.05). In part II of the study, the maximum length of femoral artery defects still able to maintain 100 percent patency of anastomoses was 4 mm (tension approximately 6 g) in the no-mobilization group and 6 mm in the axial-mobilization group (tension approximately 6.48 g). Microanastomotic tension was related to the size of the vessel defect, with increasing tension leading to thrombosis. Axial mobilization significantly reduced

  2. Protein under tension and mechanical unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tongye; Canino, Larry; Wolynes, Peter G.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2003-03-01

    The mechanical properties of proteins are important for a wide variety of functions ranging from stabilizing cellular structures to the transduction of signals across the membrane. We examined changes in protein conformation under external force fields by simple theoretical methods and new simulation techniques. The theoretical model solved a Gaussian chain plus native contact residue-level model under approximations. The simulations used the force ensemble replica exchange method and all-atom stochastic dynamics with a generalized Born plus solvent accessible surface as the solvation model. We applied these methods to study the protein spectrin as well as the domains of titin. Both global properties (such as energy and extension) and local roperties (especially, the specific contacts maintained and the secondary structure) are shown as functions of external force.

  3. Mechanical tension and electrical conductivity of liquid crystal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Oliver H.

    During the NSF funded IRES internship at the Otto-von-Geuricke Univeristy in Magdeburg, Germany, I studied the optical properties and mechanical behavior in the form of line tension of bent-core liquid crystal fiber bundles and verified previously published tension values and temperature dependent behavior. Then, carbon nanotubes were added and it as found that the tension in the fibers decreased by a factor of two instead of increasing as was hoped. A new device for pulling fibers and measuring tension by deflection due to the adhesion of glass beads was built at the LCI. The device was meant to improve upon the device used at O.v.G. Improvements included a smaller heating chamber with better insulation, temperature control, large viewing windows, more stable mounting interface, easier disassembly and the option to quickly modify the device in order to perform a variety of other experiments such as observing behavior due to acoustic driving (based on previous literature), observing optical behavior under a polarizing microscope and introducing probes to measure the electrical properties of fibers. The platform remains modular and makes the addition of new components for carrying out new experiments very simple and straightforward. The addition of carbon nanotubes has scattered results regarding the modulation of fiber tension. It seems that the addition of CNTs to BLC1571 may slightly be decreasing tension while the addition to BLC1688 may be increasing it. In both mesogens, 10wt% CNT yielded the highest tension value above the theoretical surface tension contribution. A reversal of temperature dependence was observed for fibers containing CNT; their tension increased with temperature instead of decreased. A driving rod attached to a speaker was used to acoustically drive a filament of pure BLC1571 in an attempt to replicate the tension values in a different way. The movement of the fiber and the driving rod were captured using a high-speed camera and MATLAB code

  4. Line-Tension Controlled Mechanism for Influenza Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Grubmüller, Helmut; Marrink, Siewert Jan; Müller, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Our molecular simulations reveal that wild-type influenza fusion peptides are able to stabilize a highly fusogenic pre-fusion structure, i.e. a peptide bundle formed by four or more trans-membrane arranged fusion peptides. We rationalize that the lipid rim around such bundle has a non-vanishing rim energy (line-tension), which is essential to (i) stabilize the initial contact point between the fusing bilayers, i.e. the stalk, and (ii) drive its subsequent evolution. Such line-tension controlled fusion event does not proceed along the hypothesized standard stalk-hemifusion pathway. In modeled influenza fusion, single point mutations in the influenza fusion peptide either completely inhibit fusion (mutants G1V and W14A) or, intriguingly, specifically arrest fusion at a hemifusion state (mutant G1S). Our simulations demonstrate that, within a line-tension controlled fusion mechanism, these known point mutations either completely inhibit fusion by impairing the peptide’s ability to stabilize the required peptide bundle (G1V and W14A) or stabilize a persistent bundle that leads to a kinetically trapped hemifusion state (G1S). In addition, our results further suggest that the recently discovered leaky fusion mutant G13A, which is known to facilitate a pronounced leakage of the target membrane prior to lipid mixing, reduces the membrane integrity by forming a ‘super’ bundle. Our simulations offer a new interpretation for a number of experimentally observed features of the fusion reaction mediated by the prototypical fusion protein, influenza hemagglutinin, and might bring new insights into mechanisms of other viral fusion reactions. PMID:22761674

  5. Consequences of Neurite Transection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Nurettin; Erdoğan, Ender; Him, Aydın; Oğuz, Elif Kaval

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In order to quantify degenerative and regenerative changes and analyze the contribution of multiple factors to the outcome after neurite transection, we cultured adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, and with a precise laser beam, we transected the nerve fibers they extended. Cell preparations were continuously visualized for 24 h with time-lapse microscopy. More distal cuts caused a more elongated field of degeneration, while thicker neurites degenerated faster than thinner ones. Transected neurites degenerated more if the uncut neurites of the same neuron simultaneously degenerated. If any of these uncut processes regenerated, the transected neurites underwent less degeneration. Regeneration of neurites was limited to distal cuts. Unipolar neurons had shorter regeneration than multipolar ones. Branching slowed the regenerative process, while simultaneous degeneration of uncut neurites increased it. Proximal lesions, small neuronal size, and extensive and rapid neurite degeneration were predictive of death of an injured neuron, which typically displayed necrotic rather than apoptotic form. In conclusion, this in vitro model proved useful in unmasking many new aspects and correlates of mechanically-induced neurite injury. PMID:20121423

  6. [A study of mechanical properties of orthodontic wires in tension].

    PubMed

    Konstantellos, B; Lagoudakis, M; Toutountzakis, N

    1990-12-01

    Orthodontic forces are applied to the teeth basically by means of different types of orthodontic wires. Knowledge of the mechanical properties of such wires are very helpful to the clinician in design and application of optimal force systems during orthodontic treatment. The basic mechanical properties were studied for 17 types of orthodontic wires (all rectangular and of the same size), in tension. Modulus of elasticity (E), yield strength (YS) and maximum elastic strain (Springback) (YS/E) were calculated for each type of wires. Stainless steel wires have demonstrated higher modulus of elasticity (and yield strength) in comparison with wires of nickel-titanium and beta titanium alloys. B-titanium wires showed higher modulus of elasticity than nickel-titanium ones. In addition stainless steel wires were found to have higher values for springback than cobalt-chromium ones and lower values (for the same variable) than nickel-titanium and B-titanium wires. PMID:2129597

  7. Mechanical properties of orthodontic wires in tension, bending, and torsion.

    PubMed

    Drake, S R; Wayne, D M; Powers, J M; Asgar, K

    1982-09-01

    The mechanical properties of three sizes of stainless steel (SS), nickel-titanium (NT), and titanium-molybdenum (TM) orthodontic wires were studied in tension, bending, and torsion. The wires (0.016 inch, 0.017 by 0.025 inch, and 0.019 by 0.025 inch) were tested in the as-received condition. Tensile testing and stiffness testing machines along with a torsional instrument were used. Mean values and standard deviations of properties were computed. The data were analyzed statistically by analysis of variance using a factorial design. Means were ranked by a Tukey interval calculated at the 95 percent level of confidence. In tension, the stainless steel wires had the least maximum elastic strain or springback, whereas the titanium-molybdenum wires had the most. Higher values of springback indicate the capacity for an increased range of activation clinically. In bending and torsion, the stainless steel wires had the least stored energy at a fixed moment, whereas the nickel-titanium wires had the most. Spring rates in bending and torsion, however, were highest for stainless steel wires and lowest for nickel-titanium wires. A titanium-molybdenum teardrop closing loop delivered less than one half the force of a comparable stainless steel loop for similar activations. PMID:6961793

  8. Rapid cable tension estimation using dynamic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Castro, Rosana E.; Jang, Shinae; Christenson, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Main tension elements are critical to the overall stability of cable-supported bridges. A dependable and rapid determination of cable tension is desired to assess the state of a cable-supported bridge and evaluate its operability. A portable smart sensor setup is presented to reduce post-processing time and deployment complexity while reliably determining cable tension using dynamic characteristics extracted from spectral analysis. A self-recording accelerometer is coupled with a single-board microcomputer that communicates wirelessly with a remote host computer. The portable smart sensing device is designed such that additional algorithms, sensors and controlling devices for various monitoring applications can be installed and operated for additional structural assessment. The tension-estimating algorithms are based on taut string theory and expand to consider bending stiffness. The successful combination of cable properties allows the use of a cable's dynamic behavior to determine tension force. The tension-estimating algorithms are experimentally validated on a through-arch steel bridge subject to ambient vibration induced by passing traffic. The tension estimation is determined in well agreement with previously determined tension values for the structure.

  9. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Kieu, Quang Minh N.; Iandoli, Jason A.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  11. Mechanisms for lowering of interfacial tension in alkali/acidic oil systems; Effect of added surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, J. Wasan, D.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports that experimental studies are conducted in order to determine the physicochemical mechanism responsible for lowering of interfacial tension in alkali, surfactant, and surfactant-enhanced alkali/acidic oil systems. A well-defined model oil is chosen to examine the influence of various surfactants and surfactant mixtures, such as oleic acid and its ionic counterpart, sodium dodecyl sulfate, petroleum sulfonate, and isobutanol, on equilibrium interfacial tension. With added surfactant alone, the interfacial tension goes through an ultralow minimum with increasing acid concentration. This proves for the first time that the un-ionized acid species plays a major role in affecting interfacial tension, and the ionized acid species.

  12. Lighting Up the Force: Investigating Mechanisms of Mechanotransduction Using Fluorescent Tension Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jurchenko, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense the physical nature of their surroundings is critical to the survival of multicellular organisms. Cellular response to physical cues from adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix leads to a dynamic cycle in which cells respond by remodeling their local microenvironment, fine-tuning cell stiffness, polarity, and shape. Mechanical regulation is important in cellular development, normal morphogenesis, and wound healing. The mechanisms by which these finely balanced mechanotransduction events occur, however, are not well understood. In large part, this is due to the limited availability of tools to study molecular mechanotransduction events in live cells. Several classes of molecular tension probes have been recently developed which are rapidly transforming the study of mechanotransduction. Molecular tension probes are primarily based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and report on piconewton scale tension events in live cells. In this minireview, we describe the two main classes of tension probes, genetically encoded tension sensors and immobilized tension sensors, and discuss the advantages and limitations of each type. We discuss future opportunities to address major biological questions and outline the challenges facing the next generation of molecular tension probes. PMID:26031334

  13. Joining mechanism with stem tension and interlocked compression ring

    DOEpatents

    James, Allister W.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-09-04

    A stem (34) extends from a second part (30) through a hole (28) in a first part (22). A groove (38) around the stem provides a non-threaded contact surface (42) for a ring element (44) around the stem. The ring element exerts an inward force against the non-threaded contact surface at an angle that creates axial tension (T) in the stem, pulling the second part against the first part. The ring element is formed of a material that shrinks relative to the stem by sintering. The ring element may include a split collet (44C) that fits partly into the groove, and a compression ring (44E) around the collet. The non-threaded contact surface and a mating distal surface (48) of the ring element may have conic geometries (64). After shrinkage, the ring element is locked onto the stem.

  14. Mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 ion channels can be tuned by cellular membrane tension.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda H; Grandl, Jörg

    2015-12-08

    Piezo1 ion channels mediate the conversion of mechanical forces into electrical signals and are critical for responsiveness to touch in metazoans. The apparent mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 varies substantially across cellular environments, stimulating methods and protocols, raising the fundamental questions of what precise physical stimulus activates the channel and how its stimulus sensitivity is regulated. Here, we measured Piezo1 currents evoked by membrane stretch in three patch configurations, while simultaneously visualizing and measuring membrane geometry. Building on this approach, we developed protocols to minimize resting membrane curvature and tension prior to probing Piezo1 activity. We find that Piezo1 responds to lateral membrane tension with exquisite sensitivity as compared to other mechanically activated channels and that resting tension can drive channel inactivation, thereby tuning overall mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1. Our results explain how Piezo1 can function efficiently and with adaptable sensitivity as a sensor of mechanical stimulation in diverse cellular contexts.

  15. The role of calsyntenin-3 in dystrophic neurite formation in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya

    2016-03-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomers may play an important role in the early pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: cognitive impairment caused by synaptic dysfunction. Dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques, another pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease, are plaque-associated neuritic alterations preceding the appearance of synaptic loss. In the present review, we focus on the mechanism of dystrophic neurite formation by Aß oligomers, and discuss the neurotoxic role of Aβ-induced calsyntenin-3 in mediating dystrophic neurite formation. PMID:27018282

  16. Tension in mechanically disrupted mammalian cardiac cells: effects of magnesium adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Best, P M; Donaldson, S K; Kerrick, W G

    1977-01-01

    1. Maximum and submaximum Ca-activated tension in mechanically disrupted rat ventricular fibres was examined in solutions containing 30 micron, 100 micron and 4 mM-MgATP and either 50 micron or 1 mM ionized Mg. 2. In the absence of added Ca, significant amounts of base-line tension (up to 50% of maximum) develop in solutions containing less than 30 micron-MgATP. This effect is Mg-dependent; more tension is produced with 50 micron-Mg than with 1 mM. 3. Increasing the MgATP concentration shifts the pCa-% maximum tension relationship in the direction of increasing Ca required for activation. At 50 micron-Mg the pCa which produces 50% maximum tension is 5-8, 5-3 and 5-5 for the 30 micron, 100 micron and 4 mM-MgATP solutions. The effect of MgATP on position is relatively independent of the Mg concentration. 4. The steepness of the pCa-% maximum tension curve increases as MgATP is elevated to the millimolar range. The Hill coefficients for the different MgATP curves at 50 micron-Mg are 1-1, 1-3 and 3-0. This change in steepness accounts for the slightly lower Ca concentration needed for half-maximum tension as the MgATP concentration is increased to millimolar levels. Raising the Mg concentration to 1 mM greatly diminishes the effect of MgATP on the slope of the pCa-tension relationship. 5. The maximum tnesion a fibre bundle can produce decreases as the amount of MgATP is raised from micromolar to millimolar levels. For 50 muM-Mg, maximum tension drops about 35% as MgATP is raised from 30 micronM to 4 mM. For any concentraiton of MgATP, maximum tension is higher at 1 mM-Mg than at 50 micron-Mg. 6. Existing theories of interaction between myosin heads and the thin filament are sufficient to account for the effects of MgATP on the position of the pCa-tension curves and on maximum tension. The effects on slope are less satisfactorily explained. PMID:850150

  17. Mechano-adaptive sensory mechanism of α-catenin under tension

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Koichiro; Han, Sung-Woong; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hakoshima, Toshio; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-01-01

    The contractile forces in individual cells drive the tissue processes, such as morphogenesis and wound healing, and maintain tissue integrity. In these processes, α-catenin molecule acts as a tension sensor at cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs), accelerating the positive feedback of intercellular tension. Under tension, α-catenin is activated to recruit vinculin, which recruits actin filaments to AJs. In this study, we revealed how α-catenin retains its activated state while avoiding unfolding under tension. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy employing atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that mechanically activated α-catenin fragment had higher mechanical stability than a non-activated fragment. The results of our experiments using mutated and segmented fragments showed that the key intramolecular interactions acted as a conformational switch. We also found that the conformation of α-catenin was reinforced by vinculin binding. We demonstrate that α-catenin adaptively changes its conformation under tension to a stable intermediate state, binds to vinculin, and finally settles into a more stable state reinforced by vinculin binding. Our data suggest that the plastic characteristics of α-catenin, revealed in response to both mechanical and biochemical cues, enable the functional-structural dynamics at the cellular and tissue levels. PMID:27109499

  18. Sensing Viruses by Mechanical Tension of DNA in Responsive Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The rapid worldwide spread of severe viral infections, often involving novel mutations of viruses, poses major challenges to our health-care systems. This means that tools that can efficiently and specifically diagnose viruses are much needed. To be relevant for broad applications in local health-care centers, such tools should be relatively cheap and easy to use. In this paper, we discuss the biophysical potential for the macroscopic detection of viruses based on the induction of a mechanical stress in a bundle of prestretched DNA molecules upon binding of viruses to the DNA. We show that the affinity of the DNA to the charged virus surface induces a local melting of the double helix into two single-stranded DNA. This process effects a mechanical stress along the DNA chains leading to an overall contraction of the DNA. Our results suggest that when such DNA bundles are incorporated in a supporting matrix such as a responsive hydrogel, the presence of viruses may indeed lead to a significant, macroscopic mechanical deformation of the matrix. We discuss the biophysical basis for this effect and characterize the physical properties of the associated DNA melting transition. In particular, we reveal several scaling relations between the relevant physical parameters of the system. We promote this DNA-based assay as a possible tool for efficient and specific virus screening.

  19. An AT-barrier mechanically controls DNA reannealing under tension.

    PubMed

    Bongini, L; Pongor, C; Falorsi, G; Pertici, I; Kellermayer, M; Lombardi, V; Bianco, P

    2016-09-19

    Regulation of genomic activity occurs through the manipulation of DNA by competent mechanoenzymes. Force-clamp optical tweezers that allow the structural dynamics of the DNA molecule to be measured were used here to investigate the kinetics of mechanically-driven strand reannealing. When the force on the torsionally unconstrained λ-phage DNA is decreased stepwise from above to below the overstretching transition, reannealing occurs via discrete shortening steps separated by exponentially distributed time intervals. Kinetic analysis reveals a transition barrier 0.58 nm along the reaction coordinate and an average reannealing-step size of ∼750 bp, consistent with the average bp interval separating segments of more than 10 consecutive AT bases. In an AT-rich DNA construct, in which the distance between segments of more than 10 consecutive AT is reduced to ∼210 bps, the reannealing step reduces accordingly without changes in the position of the transition barrier. Thus, the transition barrier for reannealing is determined by the presence of segments of more than 10 consecutive AT bps independent of changes in sequence composition, while the length of the reannealing strand changes according to the distance between poly-AT segments at least 10 bps long. PMID:27378772

  20. An AT-barrier mechanically controls DNA reannealing under tension

    PubMed Central

    Bongini, L.; Pongor, C.; Falorsi, G.; Pertici, I.; Kellermayer, M.; Lombardi, V.; Bianco, P.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of genomic activity occurs through the manipulation of DNA by competent mechanoenzymes. Force-clamp optical tweezers that allow the structural dynamics of the DNA molecule to be measured were used here to investigate the kinetics of mechanically-driven strand reannealing. When the force on the torsionally unconstrained λ-phage DNA is decreased stepwise from above to below the overstretching transition, reannealing occurs via discrete shortening steps separated by exponentially distributed time intervals. Kinetic analysis reveals a transition barrier 0.58 nm along the reaction coordinate and an average reannealing-step size of ∼750 bp, consistent with the average bp interval separating segments of more than 10 consecutive AT bases. In an AT-rich DNA construct, in which the distance between segments of more than 10 consecutive AT is reduced to ∼210 bps, the reannealing step reduces accordingly without changes in the position of the transition barrier. Thus, the transition barrier for reannealing is determined by the presence of segments of more than 10 consecutive AT bps independent of changes in sequence composition, while the length of the reannealing strand changes according to the distance between poly-AT segments at least 10 bps long. PMID:27378772

  1. Control of cytoskeletal mechanics by extracellular matrix, cell shape, and mechanical tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated how extracellular matrix (ECM) alters the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton (CSK). Mechanical stresses were applied to integrin receptors on the apical surfaces of adherent endothelial cells using RGD-coated ferromagnetic microbeads (5.5-microns diameter) in conjunction with a magnetic twisting device. Increasing the number of basal cell-ECM contacts by raising the fibronectin (FN) coating density from 10 to 500 ng/cm2 promoted cell spreading by fivefold and increased CSK stiffness, apparent viscosity, and permanent deformation all by more than twofold, as measured in response to maximal stress (40 dyne/cm2). When the applied stress was increased from 7 to 40 dyne/cm2, the stiffness and apparent viscosity of the CSK increased in parallel, although cell shape, ECM contacts, nor permanent deformation was altered. Application of the same stresses over a lower number ECM contacts using smaller beads (1.4-microns diameter) resulted in decreased CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity, confirming that this technique probes into the depth of the CSK and not just the cortical membrane. When magnetic measurements were carried out using cells whose membranes were disrupted and ATP stores depleted using saponin, CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity were found to rise by approximately 20%, whereas permanent deformation decreased by more than half. Addition of ATP (250 microM) under conditions that promote CSK tension generation in membrane-permeabilized cells resulted in decreases in CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity that could be detected within 2 min after ATP addition, before any measurable change in cell size.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 ion channels can be tuned by cellular membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Grandl, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels mediate the conversion of mechanical forces into electrical signals and are critical for responsiveness to touch in metazoans. The apparent mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 varies substantially across cellular environments, stimulating methods and protocols, raising the fundamental questions of what precise physical stimulus activates the channel and how its stimulus sensitivity is regulated. Here, we measured Piezo1 currents evoked by membrane stretch in three patch configurations, while simultaneously visualizing and measuring membrane geometry. Building on this approach, we developed protocols to minimize resting membrane curvature and tension prior to probing Piezo1 activity. We find that Piezo1 responds to lateral membrane tension with exquisite sensitivity as compared to other mechanically activated channels and that resting tension can drive channel inactivation, thereby tuning overall mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1. Our results explain how Piezo1 can function efficiently and with adaptable sensitivity as a sensor of mechanical stimulation in diverse cellular contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12088.001 PMID:26646186

  3. Mechanical tension as a driver of connective tissue growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cameron J; Pearcy, Mark J; Epari, Devakara R

    2014-07-01

    We propose the progressive mechanical expansion of cell-derived tissue analogues as a novel, growth-based approach to in vitro tissue engineering. The prevailing approach to producing tissue in vitro is to culture cells in an exogenous "scaffold" that provides a basic structure and mechanical support. This necessarily pre-defines the final size of the implantable material, and specific signals must be provided to stimulate appropriate cell growth, differentiation and matrix formation. In contrast, surgical skin expansion, driven by increments of stretch, produces increasing quantities of tissue without trauma or inflammation. This suggests that connective tissue cells have the innate ability to produce growth in response to elevated tension. We posit that this capacity is maintained in vitro, and that order-of-magnitude growth may be similarly attained in self-assembling cultures of cells and their own extracellular matrix. The hypothesis that growth of connective tissue analogues can be induced by mechanical expansion in vitro may be divided into three components: (1) tension stimulates cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis; (2) the corresponding volume increase will relax the tension imparted by a fixed displacement; (3) the repeated application of static stretch will produce sustained growth and a tissue structure adapted to the tensile loading. Connective tissues exist in a state of residual tension, which is actively maintained by resident cells such as fibroblasts. Studies in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that cellular survival, reproduction, and matrix synthesis and degradation are regulated by the mechanical environment. Order-of-magnitude increases in both bone and skin volume have been achieved clinically through staged expansion protocols, demonstrating that tension-driven growth can be sustained over prolonged periods. Furthermore, cell-derived tissue analogues have demonstrated mechanically advantageous structural adaptation in

  4. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics studies of the translocation mechanism of polyarginines across asymmetric membrane under tension

    PubMed Central

    He, XiaoCong; Lin, Min; Sha, BaoYong; Feng, ShangSheng; Shi, XingHua; Qu, ZhiGuo; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding interactions between cell-penetrating peptides and biomembrane under tension can help improve drug delivery and elucidate mechanisms underlying fundamental cellular events. As far as the effect of membrane tension on translocation, it is generally thought that tension should disorder the membrane structure and weaken its strength, thereby facilitating penetration. However, our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation results showed that membrane tension can restrain polyarginine translocation across the asymmetric membrane and that this effect increases with increasing membrane tension. We also analyzed the structural properties and lipid topology of the tensed membrane to explain the phenomena. Simulation results provide important molecular information on the potential translocation mechanism of peptides across the asymmetric membrane under tension as well as new insights in drug and gene delivery. PMID:26235300

  5. Surface tension and the mechanics of liquid inclusions in compliant solids.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Wettlaufer, John S; Dufresne, Eric R

    2015-01-28

    Eshelby's theory of inclusions has wide-reaching implications across the mechanics of materials and structures including the theories of composites, fracture, and plasticity. However, it does not include the effects of surface stress, which has recently been shown to control many processes in soft materials such as gels, elastomers and biological tissue. To extend Eshelby's theory of inclusions to soft materials, we consider liquid inclusions within an isotropic, compressible, linear-elastic solid. We solve for the displacement and stress fields around individual stretched inclusions, accounting for the bulk elasticity of the solid and the surface tension (i.e. isotropic strain-independent surface stress) of the solid-liquid interface. Surface tension significantly alters the inclusion's shape and stiffness as well as its near- and far-field stress fields. These phenomena depend strongly on the ratio of the inclusion radius, R, to an elastocapillary length, L. Surface tension is significant whenever inclusions are smaller than 100L. While Eshelby theory predicts that liquid inclusions generically reduce the stiffness of an elastic solid, our results show that liquid inclusions can actually stiffen a solid when R<3L/2. Intriguingly, surface tension cloaks the far-field signature of liquid inclusions when R=3L/2. These results are have far-reaching applications from measuring local stresses in biological tissue, to determining the failure strength of soft composites.

  6. Mechanical stabilities and nonlinear properties of monolayer Gallium selenide under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Xia, Suxia; Hou, Bin; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Ru

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical stabilities and nonlinear properties of monolayer Gallium selenide (GaSe) under tension are investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). The ultimate stresses and ultimate strains and the structure evolutions of monolayer GaSe under armchair (AC), zigzag (ZZ) and equiaxial (EQ) tensions are predicted. A thermodynamically rigorous continuum description of nonlinear elastic response is given by expanding the elastic strain energy density in a Taylor series in Lagrangian strain truncated after the fifth-order term. Fourteen nonzero independent elastic constants are determined by least-square fit to the DFT calculations. Pressure-dependent elastic constants (Cij(P)) and pressure derivatives of Cij (P) (C'ij) are also calculated. Calculated values of ultimate stresses and strains and the in-plane Young's modulus are all positive. It proves that monolayer GaSe is mechanically stable.

  7. Sharpening of neurite morphology using complex coherence enhanced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mustaffa, Izadora; Trenado, Carlos; Rahim, Hazli Rafis Abd; Schafer, Karl-Herbert; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    The study of the molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and differentiation, requires essential accurate and reproducible segmentation and quantification of neuronal processes. The common method used in this study is to detect and trace individual neurites, i.e. neurite tracing. The challenge comes mainly from the morphological problem in which these images contains ambiguities such as neurites discontinuities and intensity differences. In our work, we encounter a bigger challenge as the neurites in our images have a higher density of neurites. In this paper, we present a hybrid complex coherence-enhanced method for sharpening the morphology of neurons from such images. Coherence-enhanced diffusion (CED) is used to enhance the flowlike structures of the neurites, while the imaginary part of the complex nonlinear diffusion of the image cancels the appearance of 'clouds'. We also describe an elementary method for estimating the density of neuritis based on the obtained images. Our preliminary results show that the proposed methodology is a step ahead toward an effective neuronal morphology algorithm.

  8. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  9. Fabrication of Open-Cell Al Foams and Evaluation of their Mechanical Response under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailidis, N.; Stergioudi, F.; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D. N.

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper a novel procedure for describing the solid geometry of open cell foams is introduced, facilitating the establishment of a corresponding FEM model for simulating the material behaviour in micro-tension. Open-cell Al-foams were fabricated using the polymer impregnating method. A serial sectioning image-based process is described to capture, reproduce and visualize the exact three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the examined foam. The generated 3D geometry of the Al-foam, derived from the synthesis of digital cross sectional images of the foam, was appropriately adjusted to build a FE model simulating the deformation conditions of the Al-foam under micro-tension loads. The obtained results enabled the visualisation of the stress fields in the Al-foam, allowing for a full investigation of its mechanical behaviour.

  10. Myths and Truths of Nitinol Mechanics: Elasticity and Tension-Compression Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucsek, Ashley N.; Paranjape, Harshad M.; Stebner, Aaron P.

    2016-08-01

    Two prevalent myths of Nitinol mechanics are examined: (1) Martensite is more compliant than austenite; (2) Texture-free Nitinol polycrystals do not exhibit tension-compression asymmetry. By reviewing existing literature, the following truths are revealed: (1) Martensite crystals may be more compliant, equally stiff, or stiffer than austenite crystals, depending on the orientation of the applied load. The Young's Modulus of polycrystalline Nitinol is not a fixed number—it changes with both processing and in operando deformations. Nitinol martensite prefers to behave stiffer under compressive loads and more compliant under tensile loads. (2) Inelastic Nitinol martensite deformation in and of itself is asymmetric, even for texture-free polycrystals. Texture-free Nitinol polycrystals also exhibit tension-compression transformation asymmetry.

  11. Static model of a violin bow: influence of camber and hair tension on mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Ablitzer, Frédéric; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Dauchez, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Experienced bow makers empirically know the influence of wood, tapering, and camber on the playing and tonal qualities of a bow. However, the way each parameter affects the bow mechanical behavior is not clearly established. An in-plane finite element model is developed to highlight the link between the adjustable design parameters and the mechanical behavior of a bow. This model takes into account geometric nonlinearity as well as compliance of the hair. Its validity is discussed from measurements on a bow. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from previous studies. The consequences of adjusting hair tension and camber are then investigated. PMID:22280700

  12. Static model of a violin bow: influence of camber and hair tension on mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Ablitzer, Frédéric; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Dauchez, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Experienced bow makers empirically know the influence of wood, tapering, and camber on the playing and tonal qualities of a bow. However, the way each parameter affects the bow mechanical behavior is not clearly established. An in-plane finite element model is developed to highlight the link between the adjustable design parameters and the mechanical behavior of a bow. This model takes into account geometric nonlinearity as well as compliance of the hair. Its validity is discussed from measurements on a bow. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from previous studies. The consequences of adjusting hair tension and camber are then investigated.

  13. Effects of mechanical tension on protrusive activity and microfilament and intermediate filament organization in an epidermal epithelium moving in culture

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical tension influences tissue morphogenesis and the synthetic, mitotic, and motile behavior of cells. To determine the effects of tension on epithelial motility and cytoskeletal organization, small, motile clusters of epidermal cells were artificially extended with a micromanipulated needle. Protrusive activity perpendicular to the axis of tension was dramatically suppressed. To determine the ultrastructural basis for this phenomenon, cells whose exact locomotive behavior was recorded cinemicrographically were examined by transmission electron microscopy. In untensed, forward-moving lamellar protrusions, microfilaments appear disorganized and anisotropically oriented. But in cytoplasm held under tension by micromanipulation or by the locomotive activity of other cells within the epithelium, microfilaments are aligned parallel to the tension. In non-spreading regions of the epithelial margin, microfilaments lie in tight bundles parallel to apparent lines of tension. Thus, it appears that tension causes alignment of microfilaments. In contrast, intermediate filaments are excluded from motile protrusions, being confined to the thicker, more central part of the cell. They roughly follow the contours of the cell, but are not aligned relative to tension even when microfilaments in the same cell are. This suggests that the organization of intermediate filaments is relatively resistant to physical distortion and the intermediate filaments may act as passive structural support within the cell. The alignment of microfilaments under tension suggests a mechanism by which tension suppresses protrusive activity: microfilaments aligned by forces exerted through filament-surface or filament-filament interconnections cannot reorient against such force and so cannot easily extend protrusions in directions not parallel to tension. PMID:3958054

  14. Tensioning the helix: a mechanism for force generation in twining plants

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Sandrine; Cobb, Alexander R.; Holbrook, N.Michele; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Dumais, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Twining plants use their helical stems to clasp supports and to generate a squeezing force, providing stability against gravity. To elucidate the mechanism that allows force generation, we measured the squeezing forces exerted by the twiner Dioscorea bulbifera while following its growth using time-lapse photography. We show that the development of the squeezing force is accompanied by stiffening of the stem and the expansion of stipules at the leaf base. We use a simple thin rod model to show that despite their small size and sparse distribution, stipules impose a stem deformation sufficient to account for the measured squeezing force. We further demonstrate that tensioning of the stem helix, although counter-intuitive, is the most effective mechanism for generating large squeezing forces in twining plants. Our observations and model point to a general mechanism for the generation of the twining force: a modest radial stem expansion during primary growth, or the growth of lateral structures such as leaf bases, causes a delayed stem tensioning that creates the squeezing forces necessary for twining plants to ascend their supports. Our study thus provides the long-sought answer to the question of how twining plants ascend smooth supports without the use of adhesive or hook-like structures. PMID:19386656

  15. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals. PMID:25958335

  16. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals.

  17. Micro-mechanical model for the tension-stabilized enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thao; Ruberti, Jeffery

    We present a study of how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. Experiments of collagen fibrils and tissues show that mechanical tension can slow and halt enzymatic degradation. Tissue-level experiments also show that degradation rate is minimum at a stretch level coincident with the onset of strain-stiffening in the stress response. To understand these phenomena, we developed a micro-mechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation. Collagen fibers are described as sinusoidal elastica beams, and the tissue is described as a distribution of fibers. We assumed that the degradation reaction is inhibited by the axial strain energy of the crimped collagen fibers. The degradation rate law was calibrated to experiments on isolated single fibrils from bovine sclera. The fiber crimp and properties were fit to uniaxial tension tests of tissue strips. The fibril-level kinetic and tissue-level structural parameters were used to predict tissue-level degradation-induced creep rate under a constant applied force. We showed that we could accurately predict the degradation-induce creep rate of the pericardium and cornea once we accounted for differences in the fiber crimp structure and properties.

  18. Drosophila neurons actively regulate axonal tension in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Jagannathan; Tofangchi, Alireza; A Saif, M Taher

    2010-11-17

    Several experiments have shown that mechanical forces significantly influence the initiation, growth, and retraction of neurites of cultured neurons. A similar role has long been suggested for mechanical forces in vivo, but this hypothesis has remained unverified due to the paucity of in vivo studies of neuronal mechanical behavior. In this study, we used high-resolution micromechanical force sensors to study the mechanical response of motor neurons in live Drosophila embryos. Our experiments showed that Drosophila neurons maintained a rest tension (1-13 nN) and behaved like viscoelastic solids (i.e., with a linear force-deformation response followed by force relaxation to steady state) in response to sustained stretching. More importantly, when the tension was suddenly diminished by a release of the externally applied force, the neurons contracted and actively generated force to restore tension, sometimes to a value close to their rest tension. In addition, axons that were slackened by displacing the neuromuscular junction contracted and became taut in 10-30 min. These observations are remarkably similar to results from in vitro studies and suggest that mechanical tension may also strongly influence neuronal behavior in vivo.

  19. Autophagy protects end plate chondrocytes from intermittent cyclic mechanical tension induced calcification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-guang; Yu, Yun-fei; Zheng, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chuang-dong; Zhao, Xiao-yn; Tong, Wen-xue; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2014-09-01

    Calcification of end plate chondrocytes is a major cause of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of end plate chondrocyte calcification is still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify whether autophagy in end plate chondrocytes could protect the calcification of end plate chondrocytes. Previous studies showed that intermittent cyclic mechanical tension (ICMT) contributes to the calcification of end plate chondrocytes in vitro. While autophagy serves as a cell survival mechanism, the relationship of autophagy and induced end plate chondrocyte calcification by mechanical tension in vitro is unknown. Thus, we investigated autophagy, the expression of the autophagy genes, Beclin-1 and LC3, and rat end plate chondrocyte calcification by ICMT. The viability of end plate chondrocytes was examined using the LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the expression of Beclin-1; LC3; type I, II and X collagen; aggrecan; and Sox-9 genes. Immunofluorescent and fluorescent microscopy showed decreased autophagy in the 10- and 20-day groups loaded with ICMT. Additionally, Alizarin red and alkaline phosphatase staining detected the palpable calcification of end plate chondrocytes after ICMT treatment. We found that increased autophagy induced by short-term ICMT treatment was accompanied by an insignificant calcification of end plate chondrocytes. To the contrary, the suppressive autophagy inhibited by long-term ICMT was accompanied by a more significant calcification. The process of calcification induced by ICMT was partially resisted by increased autophagy activity induced by rapamycin, implicating that autophagy may prevent end plate chondrocyte calcification.

  20. Laminin receptors for neurite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, H.K.; Ogle, R.C.; Cannon, F.B.; Little, C.D.; Sweeney, T.M.; Luckenbill-Edds, L.

    1988-02-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein promotes both cell attachment and neurite outgrowth. Separate domains on laminin elicit these responses, suggesting that distinct receptors occur on the surface of cells. NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma cells rapidly extend long processes in the presence of laminin. The authors report here that /sup 125/I-labeled laminin specifically binds to these cells and to three membrane proteins of 67, 110, and 180 kDa. These proteins were isolated by affinity chromatography on laminin-Sepharose. The 67-kDa protein reacted with antibody to the previously characterized receptor for cell attachment to laminin. Antibodies to the 110-kDa and 180-kDa bands demonstrated that the 110-kDa protein was found in a variety of epithelial cell lines and in brain, whereas the 180-kDa protein was neural specific. Antibodies prepared against the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins inhibited neurite outgrowth induced by the neurite-promoting domain of laminin, whereas antibodies to the 67-kDa laminin receptor had no effect on neurite outgrowth. They conclude that neuronal cells have multiple cell-surface laminin receptors and that the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins are involved in neurite formation.

  1. Strain rate effects on mechanical properties in tension of aluminium alloys used in armour applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Bianchi, S.; Kaufmann, H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical properties in tension of two aluminium alloys (AA5059-H131 and AA7039-T651) used in armour applications were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experimental research was developed in the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The target strain rates were set at the following four levels: 10-3, 30, 300 and 1000s-1. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electromechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. The required parameters by the Johnson-Cook constitutive law were also determined.

  2. Parameter Interpretation and Reduction for a Unified Statistical Mechanical Surface Tension Model.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Hallie; Wexler, Anthony; Dutcher, Cari S

    2015-09-01

    Surface properties of aqueous solutions are important for environments as diverse as atmospheric aerosols and biocellular membranes. Previously, we developed a surface tension model for both electrolyte and nonelectrolyte aqueous solutions across the entire solute concentration range (Wexler and Dutcher, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 1723-1726). The model differentiated between adsorption of solute molecules in the bulk and surface of solution using the statistical mechanics of multilayer sorption solution model of Dutcher et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 3198-3213). The parameters in the model had physicochemical interpretations, but remained largely empirical. In the current work, these parameters are related to solute molecular properties in aqueous solutions. For nonelectrolytes, sorption tendencies suggest a strong relation with molecular size and functional group spacing. For electrolytes, surface adsorption of ions follows ion surface-bulk partitioning calculations by Pegram and Record (J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 5411-5417). PMID:26275040

  3. Influence of strain rate on the mechanical behaviour in tension of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, C.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Tesio, N.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of bones when subjected to tension loading in a wide range of strain-rates is fundamental to develop protection systems. The paper presents the preliminary tests on the tensile behaviour of bovine cortical bone at medium and high strain rates. Two special apparatus, both installed at the DynaMat Laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, a Hydro-Pneumatic Machine and a Modified Hopkinson Bar respectively for medium and high strain-rate tests have been used. Flat shape specimens (having 10 mm of gauge length, 5 mm width and 3 mm thickness) have been obtained from 15 bovine femurs with the same age. The paper describes the preparation techniques of the samples and the experimental results obtained. The bovine cortical bone shown a quite important strain rate dependency.

  4. Pressure and tension effects on mechanical properties of ZrAl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pinliang; Tang, Xiuzhang; Meng, Fanchen; Gong, Zizheng; Ji, Guangfu; Yang, Jinke

    2014-11-15

    Structural, elastic, thermodynamic of ZrAl{sub 2} under pressure, ideal strength and deformation mode under tension are investigated by the first-principles method. The calculated structural parameters at zero pressure are in consistent with experiments. Under pressure, elastic constants and their pressure dependence are obtained using the static finite strain technique. ZrAl{sub 2} exhibits lower elastic anisotropy. The linear thermal expansion coefficient shows greater effects of temperature at lower pressure. The ideal tensile have been investigated by stress–strain calculations. Finally, the microscopic mechanism that determines the structural stability is studied using the results of electronic structure calculations. We propose that the weakening of Zr-Zr leads to the significant change of stress–strain curve at strain ∼0.27, and the breaking of Zr{sub 2}-Zr{sub 3} leads to the structural instability of ZrAl{sub 2} under large tensile strains.

  5. Parameter Interpretation and Reduction for a Unified Statistical Mechanical Surface Tension Model.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Hallie; Wexler, Anthony; Dutcher, Cari S

    2015-09-01

    Surface properties of aqueous solutions are important for environments as diverse as atmospheric aerosols and biocellular membranes. Previously, we developed a surface tension model for both electrolyte and nonelectrolyte aqueous solutions across the entire solute concentration range (Wexler and Dutcher, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 1723-1726). The model differentiated between adsorption of solute molecules in the bulk and surface of solution using the statistical mechanics of multilayer sorption solution model of Dutcher et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 3198-3213). The parameters in the model had physicochemical interpretations, but remained largely empirical. In the current work, these parameters are related to solute molecular properties in aqueous solutions. For nonelectrolytes, sorption tendencies suggest a strong relation with molecular size and functional group spacing. For electrolytes, surface adsorption of ions follows ion surface-bulk partitioning calculations by Pegram and Record (J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 5411-5417).

  6. Mechanical characterisation of porcine rectus sheath under uniaxial and biaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2014-06-01

    Incisional hernia development is a significant complication after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is known to initiate the extrusion of intestines through the abdominal wall, but there is limited data on the mechanics of IAP generation and the structural properties of rectus sheath. This paper presents an explanation of the mechanics of IAP development, a study of the uniaxial and biaxial tensile properties of porcine rectus sheath, and a simple computational investigation of the tissue. Analysis using Laplace׳s law showed a circumferential stress in the abdominal wall of approx. 1.1MPa due to an IAP of 11kPa, commonly seen during coughing. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests were conducted on samples of porcine rectus sheath to characterise the stress-stretch responses of the tissue. Under uniaxial tension, fibre direction samples failed on average at a stress of 4.5MPa at a stretch of 1.07 while cross-fibre samples failed at a stress of 1.6MPa under a stretch of 1.29. Under equi-biaxial tension, failure occurred at 1.6MPa with the fibre direction stretching to only 1.02 while the cross-fibre direction stretched to 1.13. Uniaxial and biaxial stress-stretch plots are presented allowing detailed modelling of the tissue either in silico or in a surrogate material. An FeBio computational model of the tissue is presented using a combination of an Ogden and an exponential power law model to represent the matrix and fibres respectively. The structural properties of porcine rectus sheath have been characterised and add to the small set of human data in the literature with which it may be possible to develop methods to reduce the incidence of incisional hernia development. PMID:24725440

  7. Periostin Responds to Mechanical Stress and Tension by Activating the MTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K.; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Volk, Sarah L.; Murai, Marcelo J.; Rios, Hector F.; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about Periostin biology has expanded from its recognized functions in embryogenesis and bone metabolism to its roles in tissue repair and remodeling and its clinical implications in cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that Periostin plays a critical role in the mechanism of wound healing; however, the paracrine effect of Periostin in epithelial cell biology is still poorly understood. We found that epithelial cells are capable of producing endogenous Periostin that, unlike mesenchymal cell, cannot be secreted. Epithelial cells responded to Periostin paracrine stimuli by enhancing cellular migration and proliferation and by activating the mTOR signaling pathway. Interestingly, biomechanical stimulation of epithelial cells, which simulates tension forces that occur during initial steps of tissue healing, induced Periostin production and mTOR activation. The molecular association of Periostin and mTOR signaling was further dissected by administering rapamycin, a selective pharmacological inhibitor of mTOR, and by disruption of Raptor and Rictor scaffold proteins implicated in the regulation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 complex assembly. Both strategies resulted in ablation of Periostin-induced mitogenic and migratory activity. These results indicate that Periostin-induced epithelial migration and proliferation requires mTOR signaling. Collectively, our findings identify Periostin as a mechanical stress responsive molecule that is primarily secreted by fibroblasts during wound healing and expressed endogenously in epithelial cells resulting in the control of cellular physiology through a mechanism mediated by the mTOR signaling cascade. PMID:24349533

  8. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  9. Defect induced plasticity and failure mechanism of boron nitride nanotubes under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-07-28

    The effects of Stone-Wales (SW) and vacancy defects on the failure behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under tension are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to model the atomic interaction and the temperature is maintained close to 300 K. The effect of a SW defect is studied by determining the failure strength and failure mechanism of nanotubes with different radii. In the case of a vacancy defect, the effect of an N-vacancy and a B-vacancy is studied separately. Nanotubes with different chiralities but similar diameter is considered first to evaluate the chirality dependence. The variation of failure strength with the radius is then studied by considering nanotubes of different diameters but same chirality. It is observed that the armchair BNNTs are extremely sensitive to defects, whereas the zigzag configurations are the least sensitive. In the case of pristine BNNTs, both armchair and zigzag nanotubes undergo brittle failure, whereas in the case of defective BNNTs, only the zigzag ones undergo brittle failure. An interesting defect induced plastic behavior is observed in defective armchair BNNTs. For this nanotube, the presence of a defect triggers mechanical relaxation by bond breaking along the closest zigzag helical path, with the defect as the nucleus. This mechanism results in a plastic failure.

  10. VAMP-2 promotes neurite elongation and SNAP-25A increases neurite sprouting in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, M; Kimura, K; Kataoka, M; Takahashi, M; Okajima, S; Kawaguchi, S; Hirasawa, Y; Ide, C; Mizoguchi, A

    2000-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attached protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE)-mediated membrane fusion system is involved in vesicle fusion in the plasma membrane that allows expansion for neurite elongation. There have been several reports analyzing the effects of neurite outgrowth by inhibition of SNAREs. In this study, we took the opposite approach by overexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion SNAREs, including VAMP-2, SNAP-25A, and syntaxin1A, in PC12 cells to investigate the role of SNAREs in the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Neurite outgrowth analysis demonstrated that: (1) GFP-VAMP-2 increased the length of individual neurites, without changing the number of neurites per cell; (2) GFP-SNAP-25A increased the number of neurites per cell, with no change in the length of the individual neurites. In both cases, the total length of neurites per cell was increased; (3) GFP-syntaxin1A resulted in no significant change, either in neurite length, or in the number of neurites per cell. These findings suggest that when overexpressed in PC12 cells, VAMP-2 can promote neurite elongation, while SNAP-25A can stimulate neurite sprouting. On the other hand, overexpression of syntaxin1A neither promotes nor inhibits neurite outgrowth. Thus VAMP-2 and SNAP-25A play different roles in neurite elongation and sprouting.

  11. Rabin8 regulates neurite outgrowth in both GEF activity–dependent and –independent manners

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Yuta; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of membrane-trafficking events are regulated by Rab-family small GTPases. Neurite outgrowth requires massive addition of proteins and lipids to the tips of growing neurites by membrane trafficking, and although several Rabs, including Rab8, Rab10, and Rab11, have been implicated in this process, their regulatory mechanisms during neurite outgrowth are poorly understood. Here, we show that Rabin8, a Rab8-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), regulates nerve growth factor (NGF)–induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Knockdown of Rabin8 results in inhibition of neurite outgrowth, whereas overexpression promotes it. We also find that Rab10 is a novel substrate of Rabin8 and that both Rab8 and Rab10 function during neurite outgrowth downstream of Rabin8. Surprisingly, however, a GEF activity–deficient isoform of Rabin8 also promotes neurite outgrowth, indicating the existence of a GEF activity–independent role of Rabin8. The Arf6/Rab8-positive recycling endosomes (Arf6/Rab8-REs) and Rab10/Rab11-positive REs (Rab10/Rab11-REs) in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells are differently distributed. Rabin8 localizes on both RE populations and appears to activate Rab8 and Rab10 there. These localizations and functions of Rabin8 are Rab11 dependent. Thus Rabin8 regulates neurite outgrowth both by coordinating with Rab8, Rab10, and Rab11 and by a GEF activity–independent mechanism. PMID:27170183

  12. Mechanosensitive currents in the neurites of cultured mouse sensory neurones

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Lewin, Gary R

    2006-01-01

    Almost all sensory neurones in the dorsal root ganglia have a mechanosensory function. The transduction of mechanical stimuli in vivo takes place exclusively at the sensory ending. For cutaneous sensory receptors it has so far proved impossible to directly record the mechanically gated receptor potential because of the small size and inaccessibility of the sensory ending. Here we investigate whether mechanosensitive currents are present in the neurites of freshly isolated adult mouse sensory neurones in culture. Amost all sensory neurone neurites possess currents gated by submicrometre displacement stimuli (92%). Three types of mechanically activated conductance were characterized based on different inactivation kinetics. A rapidly adapting conductance was found in larger sensory neurones with narrow action potentials characteristic of mechanoreceptors. Slowly and intermediate adapting conductances were found exclusively in putative nociceptive neurones. Mechanically activated currents with similar kinetics were found also after stimulating the cell soma. However, soma currents were only observed in around 60% of cells tested and the displacement threshold was several times larger than for the neurite (∼6 μm). The reversal potential of the rapidly adapting current indicated that this current is largely selective for sodium ions whereas the slowly adapting current is non-selective. It is likely that distinct ion channel entities underlie these two currents. In summary, our data suggest that the high sensitivity and robustness of mechanically gated currents in the sensory neurite make this a useful in vitro model for the mechanosensitive sensory endings in vivo. PMID:17038434

  13. Neuroprotective Copper Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes Promote Neurite Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M.; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J.; White, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, CuII(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that CuII(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, CuII(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by CuII(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75–99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM CuII(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that CuII(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM CuII(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between CuII(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes. PMID:24587210

  14. Influence of Tension-Compression Asymmetry on the Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheets in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for lightweight design in the automotive industry due to their high strength-to-mass ratio. This study aims to study the influence of tension-compression asymmetry on the radius of curvature and energy absorption capacity of AZ31B-O magnesium alloy sheets in bending. The mechanical properties were characterized using tension, compression, and three-point bending tests. The material exhibits significant tension-compression asymmetry in terms of strength and strain hardening rate due to extension twinning in compression. The compressive yield strength is much lower than the tensile yield strength, while the strain hardening rate is much higher in compression. Furthermore, the tension-compression asymmetry in terms of r value (Lankford value) was also observed. The r value in tension is much higher than that in compression. The bending results indicate that the AZ31B-O sheet can outperform steel and aluminum sheets in terms of specific energy absorption in bending mainly due to its low density. In addition, the AZ31B-O sheet was deformed with a larger radius of curvature than the steel and aluminum sheets, which brings a benefit to energy absorption capacity. Finally, finite element simulation for three-point bending was performed using LS-DYNA and the results confirmed that the larger radius of curvature of a magnesium specimen is mainly attributed to the high strain hardening rate in compression.

  15. Material Stiffness Effects on Neurite Alignment to Photopolymerized Micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to direct neurite growth into a close proximity of stimulating elements of a neural prosthesis, such as a retinal or cochlear implant (CI), may enhance device performance and overcome current spatial signal resolution barriers. In this work, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), which are the target neurons to be stimulated by CIs, were cultured on photopolymerized micropatterns with varied matrix stiffnesses to determine the effect of rigidity on neurite alignment to physical cues. Micropatterns were generated on methacrylate thin film surfaces in a simple, rapid photopolymerization step by photomasking the prepolymer formulation with parallel line–space gratings. Two methacrylate series, a nonpolar HMA-co-HDDMA series and a polar PEGDMA-co-EGDMA series, with significantly different surface wetting properties were evaluated. Equivalent pattern periodicity was maintained across each methacrylate series based on photomask band spacing, and the feature amplitude was tuned to a depth of 2 μm amplitude for all compositions using the temporal control afforded by the UV curing methodology. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. All micropatterned films adsorb similar amounts of laminin from solution, and no significant difference in SGN survival was observed when the substrate compositions were compared. SGN neurite alignment significantly increases with increasing material modulus for both methacrylate series. Interestingly, SGN neurites respond to material stiffness cues that are orders of magnitude higher (GPa) than what is typically ascribed to neural environments (kPa). The ability to understand neurite response to engineered physical cues and mechanical properties such as matrix stiffness will allow the development of advanced biomaterials that direct de novo neurite growth to address the spatial signal resolution limitations of current neural prosthetics. PMID:25211120

  16. The cytoskeleton and neurite initiation

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Neurons begin their life as simple spheres, but can ultimately assume an elaborate morphology with numerous, highly arborized dendrites, and long axons. This is achieved via an astounding developmental progression which is dependent upon regulated assembly and dynamics of the cellular cytoskeleton. As neurites emerge out of the soma, neurons break their spherical symmetry and begin to acquire the morphological features that define their structure and function. Neurons regulate their cytoskeleton to achieve changes in cell shape, velocity, and direction as they migrate, extend neurites, and polarize. Of particular importance, the organization and dynamics of actin and microtubules directs the migration and morphogenesis of neurons. This review focuses on the regulation of intrinsic properties of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and how specific cytoskeletal structures and dynamics are associated with the earliest phase of neuronal morphogenesis—neuritogenesis. PMID:24002528

  17. A local difference in Hedgehog signal transduction increases mechanical cell bond tension and biases cell intercalations along the Drosophila anteroposterior compartment boundary.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Katrin; Umetsu, Daiki; Aliee, Maryam; Sui, Liyuan; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian

    2015-11-15

    Tissue organization requires the interplay between biochemical signaling and cellular force generation. The formation of straight boundaries separating cells with different fates into compartments is important for growth and patterning during tissue development. In the developing Drosophila wing disc, maintenance of the straight anteroposterior (AP) compartment boundary involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell bonds along the boundary. The biochemical signals that regulate mechanical tension along the AP boundary, however, remain unknown. Here, we show that a local difference in Hedgehog signal transduction activity between anterior and posterior cells is necessary and sufficient to increase mechanical tension along the AP boundary. This difference in Hedgehog signal transduction is also required to bias cell rearrangements during cell intercalations to keep the characteristic straight shape of the AP boundary. Moreover, severing cell bonds along the AP boundary does not reduce tension at neighboring bonds, implying that active mechanical tension is upregulated, cell bond by cell bond. Finally, differences in the expression of the homeodomain-containing protein Engrailed also contribute to the straight shape of the AP boundary, independently of Hedgehog signal transduction and without modulating cell bond tension. Our data reveal a novel link between local differences in Hedgehog signal transduction and a local increase in active mechanical tension of cell bonds that biases junctional rearrangements. The large-scale shape of the AP boundary thus emerges from biochemical signals inducing patterns of active tension on cell bonds.

  18. Developing a 'thick skin': a paradoxical role for mechanical tension in maintaining epidermal integrity?

    PubMed

    Galletti, Roberta; Verger, Stéphane; Hamant, Olivier; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2016-09-15

    Plant aerial epidermal tissues, like animal epithelia, act as load-bearing layers and hence play pivotal roles in development. The presence of tension in the epidermis has morphogenetic implications for organ shapes but it also constantly threatens the integrity of this tissue. Here, we explore the multi-scale relationship between tension and cell adhesion in the plant epidermis, and we examine how tensile stress perception may act as a regulatory input to preserve epidermal tissue integrity and thus normal morphogenesis. From this, we identify parallels between plant epidermal and animal epithelial tissues and highlight a list of unexplored questions for future research. PMID:27624830

  19. Change Mechanisms in EMG Biofeedback Training: Cognitive Changes Underlying Improvements in Tension Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Subjects (N=43) suffering from tension headache were assigned to one of four electromyograph (EMG) biofeedback conditions and were led to believe they were achieving high or moderate success in decreasing EMG activity. Regardless of actual EMG changes, subjects receiving high-success feedback showed greater improvement for headaches than…

  20. Activation of Rac1-dependent redox signaling is critically involved in staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Du Sik; An, Jeong Mi; Lee, Han Gil; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Seon Sook; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kang, Jeong Wan; Bae, Yun Soo; Seo, Jeong Taeg

    2013-02-01

    Staurosporine, a non-specific protein kinase inhibitor, has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, but the mechanism by which staurosporine induces neurite outgrowth is still obscure. In the present study, we investigated whether the activation of Rac1 was responsible for the neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. Staurosporine caused rapid neurite outgrowth independent of the ERK signaling pathways. In contrast, neurite outgrowth in response to staurosporine was accompanied by activation of Rac1, and the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated the staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, suppression of Rac1 activity by expression of the dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 also blocked the staurosporine-induced morphological differentiation of PC12 cells. Staurosporine caused an activation of NADPH oxidase and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was prevented by NSC23766 and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth was attenuated by pretreatment with DPI and exogenous addition of sublethal concentration of H2O2 accelerated neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. These results indicate that activation of Rac1, which leads to ROS generation, is required for neurite outgrowth induced by staurosporine in PC12 cells.

  1. The neurite-initiating effect of microbial extracellular glycolipids in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Isoda, H; Shinmoto, H; Matsumura, M; Nakahara, T

    1999-09-01

    The effects of several kinds of microbial extracellular glycolipids on neurite initiation in PC12 cells were examined. Addition of mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A), MEL-B, and sophorose lipid (SL) to PC12 cells caused significant neurite outgrowth. Other glycolipids, such as polyol lipid (PL), rhamnose lipid (RL), succinoyl trehalose lipid-A (STL-A) and STL-B caused no neurite-initiation. MEL-A increased acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity to an extent similar to nerve growth factor (NGF). However, MEL-A induced one or two long neurites from the cell body, while NGF induced many neurites. In addition, MEL-A-induced differentiation was transient, and after 48 h, percentage of cells with neurites started to decrease in contrast to neurons induced by NGF, which occurred in a time-dependent manner. MEL-A could induce neurite outgrowth after treatment of PC12 cells with an anti-NGF receptor antibody that obstructed NGF action. These results indicate that MEL-A and NGF induce differentiation of PC12 cells through different mechanisms. PMID:19003137

  2. Neurite Tracing With Object Process.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sreetama; Ooi, Wei Tsang; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a pipeline for automatic analysis of neuronal morphology: from detection, modeling to digital reconstruction. First, we present an automatic, unsupervised object detection framework using stochastic marked point process. It extracts connected neuronal networks by fitting special configuration of marked objects to the centreline of the neurite branches in the image volume giving us position, local width and orientation information. Semantic modeling of neuronal morphology in terms of critical nodes like bifurcations and terminals, generates various geometric and morphology descriptors such as branching index, branching angles, total neurite length, internodal lengths for statistical inference on characteristic neuronal features. From the detected branches we reconstruct neuronal tree morphology using robust and efficient numerical fast marching methods. We capture a mathematical model abstracting out the relevant position, shape and connectivity information about neuronal branches from the microscopy data into connected minimum spanning trees. Such digital reconstruction is represented in standard SWC format, prevalent for archiving, sharing, and further analysis in the neuroimaging community. Our proposed pipeline outperforms state of the art methods in tracing accuracy and minimizes the subjective variability in reconstruction, inherent to semi-automatic methods. PMID:26742129

  3. Post-tetanic mechanical tension and evoked action potentials in McArdle's disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, N. J.; Buchthal, F.; Ebbesen, F.; Kamieniecka, Z.; Krarup, C.

    1977-01-01

    The tension produced by the cramp evoked in the adductor pollicis muscle by repetitive stimuli to the nerve (20/s for 50 s) and by full voluntary effort in the brachial biceps was measured in a patient with McArdle's disease. The contracture was 17% of the peaktetanic tension, and was not associated with action potentials. Twitches superimposed on the contracture were at most diminished to half, as were their action potentials. Both slow and fast muscle fibres participated in the contracture. The contraction time of the twitches elicited after the tetanus was prolonged more in the patient than in a normal subject of the same age. There was evidence of delayed firing, first observed 90 seconds after the peak of the contracture. The patient had electromyographic and histological signs of myopathy. PMID:271684

  4. Semi-automatic quantification of neurite fasciculation in high-density neurite images by the Neurite Directional Distribution Analysis (NDDA)

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Amy M; Wheeler, Brandon; Staii, Cristian; Kaplan, David L.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bundling of neurite extensions occur during nerve development and regeneration. Understanding the factors that drive neurite bundling is important for designing biomaterials for nerve regeneration toward the innervation target and preventing nociceptive collateral sprouting. High-density neuron cultures including dorsal root ganglia explants are employed for in vitro screening of biomaterials designed to control directional outgrowth. Although some semiautomated image processing methods exist for quantification of neurite outgrowth, methods to quantify axonal fasciculation in terms of direction of neurite outgrowth are lacking. New Method This work presents a semi-automated program to analyze micrographs of high-density neurites; the program aims to quantify axonal fasciculation by determining the orientational distribution function of the tangent vectors of the neurites and calculating its Fourier series coefficients (‘c’ values). Results We found that neurite directional distribution analysis (NDDA) of fasciculated neurites yielded ‘c’ values of ≥ ~0.25 whereas branched outgrowth led to statistically significant lesser values of <~0.2. The ‘c’ values correlated directly to the width of neurite bundles and indirectly to the number of branching points. Comparison with Existing Methods Information about the directional distribution of outgrowth is lost in simple counting methods or achieved laboriously through manual analysis. The NDDA supplements previous quantitative analyses of axonal bundling using a vector-based approach that captures new information about the directionality of outgrowth. Conclusion The NDDA is a valuable addition to open source image processing tools available to biomedical researchers offering a robust, precise approach to quantification of imaged features important in tissue development, disease, and repair. PMID:24680908

  5. Contribution of human skin topography to the characterization of dynamic skin tension during senescence: morpho-mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahouani, H.; Djaghloul, M.; Vargiolu, R.; Mezghani, S.; Mansori, M. E. L.

    2014-03-01

    The structuring of the dermis with a network of collagen and elastic fibres gives a three-dimensional structure to the skin network with directions perpendicular and parallel to the skin surface. This three-dimensional morphology prints on the surface of the stratum corneum a three dimensional network of lines which express the mechanical tension of the skin at rest. To evaluate the changes of skin morphology, we used a three-dimensional confocal microscopy and characterization of skin imaging of volar forearm microrelief. We have accurately characterize the role of skin line network during chronological aging with the identification of depth scales on the network of lines (z <= 60μm) and the network of lines covering Langer's lines (z > 60 microns). During aging has been highlighted lower rows for elastic fibres, the decrease weakened the tension and results in enlargement of the plates of the microrelief, which gives us a geometric pertinent indicator to quantify the loss of skin tension and assess the stage of aging. The study of 120 Caucasian women shows that ageing in the volar forearm zone results in changes in the morphology of the line network organisation. The decrease in secondary lines (z <= 60 μm) is counterbalanced by an increase in the depth of the primary lines (z > 60 μm) and an accentuation of the anisotropy index.

  6. Mechanical tension induces lateral movement of intramembrane components of the tight junction: studies on mouse mammary cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Occluding junctions of mammary epithelial cells in nonproliferating primary culture occasionally display an atypical pattern of intramembrane strands oriented predominantly perpendicular, instead of roughly parallel, to the apical border of the junction. To test whether the orienting influence was a centripetal cytoskeletal tension often observed in epithelial sheets on fixed substrates, we seeded cells at low density; this allows them to spread maximally while forming a barely confluent pavement. The result was a fourfold increase in the percentage of junctions with the strongly aligned, atypical pattern. Closely similar configurations were observed as the earliest detectable effect of chelation of extracellular Ca++, which induced pronounced centripetal contraction of the cell body. Externally imposed tension, applied so as to stretch cells in one direction only, affected the positions of strands in stretched junctions as might be predicted, by flattening their undulations, increasing their alignment parallel to the apical border. Thus mechanical tension alone, whether inherent in the cytoskeleton or imposed on the cell surface by exogenous force, can cause coordinate lateral displacement of macromolecular assemblies within the membranes of both joined cells. PMID:6682108

  7. In vitro neurite guidance effects induced by polylysine pinstripe micropatterns with polylysine background.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sunghoon; Kang, Kyungtae; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-08-01

    Engineered culture substrates with chemical neurite guidance cues have been used for studying the mechanism of axon pathfinding at cellular level. In this study, we designed a novel poly-l-lysine (PLL) micropattern ("pinstripe micropattern") to investigate how the same biomolecules with slightly different surface concentration can affect in vitro neuronal growth. The pinstripe micropattern was fabricated by stamping PLL on a PLL-coated glass coverslip, which resulted in denser PLL lines and a less-dense PLL background. There were two effects of the substrate on cultured primary hippocampal neuron: neurite initiation and growth cone turning. Although the whole surface was permissive for neurite outgrowth, we observed that the growth direction of neurites had a strong tendency to follow the stamped PLL line patterns with PLL background. However, the micropattern did not affect the spreading of cell body on the substrate. According to these investigations, we concluded that the PLL pinstripe pattern with PLL background, which had the step difference of polylysine concentrations, would be very useful for designing novel cell assays for the investigation of neurite guidance mechanisms, and suggested it as a new design method for controlling the direction of neurite growth on in vitro neural network.

  8. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  9. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  10. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  11. Pressure and surface tension of an active simple liquid: a comparison between kinetic, mechanical and free-energy based approaches.

    PubMed

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-06-29

    We discuss different definitions of pressure for a system of active spherical particles driven by a non-thermal coloured noise. We show that mechanical, kinetic and free-energy based approaches lead to the same result up to first order in the non-equilibrium expansion parameter. The first prescription is based on a generalisation of the kinetic mesoscopic virial equation and expresses the pressure exerted on the walls in terms of the average of the virial of the inter-particle forces. In the second approach, the pressure and the surface tension are identified with the volume and area derivatives, respectively, of the partition function associated with the known stationary non-equilibrium distribution of the model. The third method is a mechanical approach and is related to the work necessary to deform the system. The pressure is obtained by comparing the expression of the work in terms of local stress and strain with the corresponding expression in terms of microscopic distribution. This is determined from the force balance encoded in the Born-Green-Yvon equation. Such a method has the advantage of giving a formula for the local pressure tensor and the surface tension even in inhomogeneous situations. By direct inspection, we show that the three procedures lead to the same values of the pressure, and give support to the idea that the partition function, obtained via the unified coloured noise approximation, is more than a formal property of the system, but determines the stationary non-equilibrium thermodynamics of the model.

  12. Prediction of plastic instabilities under thermo-mechanical loadings in tension and simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manach, P. Y.; Mansouri, L. F.; Thuillier, S.

    2016-08-01

    Plastic instabilities like Portevin-Le Châtelier were quite thoroughly investigated experimentally in tension, under a large range of strain rates and temperatures. Such instabilities are characterized both by a jerky flow and a localization of the strain in bands. Similar phenomena were also recorded for example in simple shear [1]. Modelling of this phenomenon is mainly performed at room temperature, taking into account the strain rate sensitivity, though an extension of the classical Estrin-Kubin-McCormick was proposed in the literature, by making some of the material parameters dependent on temperature. A similar approach is considered in this study, furthermore extended for anisotropic plasticity with Hill's 1948 yield criterion. Material parameters are identified at 4 different temperatures, ranging from room temperature up to 250°C. The identification procedure is split in 3 steps, related to the elasticity, the average stress level and the magnitude of the stress drops. The anisotropy is considered constant in this temperature range, as evidenced by experimental results [2]. The model is then used to investigate the temperature dependence of the critical strain, as well as its capability to represent the propagation of the bands. Numerical predictions of the instabilities in tension and simple shear at room temperature and up to 250°C are compared with experimental results [3]. In the case of simple shear, a monotonic loading followed by unloading and reloading in the reverse direction (“Bauschinger-type” test) is also considered, showing that (i) kinematic hardening should be taken into account to fully describe the transition at re-yielding (ii) the modelling of the critical strain has to be improved.

  13. Self-aligned Schwann cell monolayers demonstrate an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggio, A. M.; Narayanaswamy, A.; Roysam, B.; Thompson, D. M.

    2010-08-01

    In vivo nerve guidance channel studies have identified Schwann cell (SC) presence as an integral factor in axonal number and extension in an injury site, and in vitro studies have provided evidence that oriented SCs can direct neurite outgrowth. However, traditional methods used to create oriented SC monolayers (e.g. micropatterns/microtopography) potentially introduce secondary guidance cues to the neurons that are difficult to de-couple. Although SCs expanded on uniform laminin-coated coverslips lack a global orientation, the monolayers contain naturally formed regions of locally oriented cells that can be used to investigate SC-mediated neurite guidance. In this work, novel image analysis techniques have been developed to quantitatively assess local neurite orientation with respect to the underlying regional orientation of the Schwann cell monolayer. Results confirm that, in the absence of any secondary guidance cues, a positive correlation exists between neurite outgrowth and regional orientation of the SC monolayer. Thus, SCs alone possess an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth, and expansion of the co-culture-based quantitative method described can be used to further deconstruct specific biomolecular mechanisms of neurite guidance.

  14. Design of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels to Promote Neurite Outgrowth in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Dominte; Hamard, Lauriane; Caraguel, Flavien; Wion, Didier; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2016-09-28

    A hyaluronic acid (HA)-based extracellular matrix (ECM) platform with independently tunable stiffness and density of cell-adhesive peptide (RGD, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) that mimics key biochemical and mechanical features of brain matrix has been designed. We demonstrated here its utility in elucidating ECM regulation of neural progenitor cell behavior and neurite outgrowth. The analysis of neurite outgrowth in 3-D by two-photon microscopy showed several important results in the development of these hydrogels. First, the ability of neurites to extend deeply into these soft HA-based matrices even in the absence of cell-adhesive ligand further confirms the potential of HA hydrogels for central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Second, the behavior of hippocampal neural progenitor cells differed markedly between the hydrogels with a storage modulus of 400 Pa and those with a modulus of 800 Pa. We observed an increased outgrowth and density of neurites in the softest hydrogels (G' = 400 Pa). Interestingly, cells seeded on the surface of the hydrogels functionalized with the RGD ligand experienced an optimum in neurite outgrowth as a function of ligand density. Surprinsingly, neurites preferentially progressed inside the gels in a vertical direction, suggesting that outgrowth is directed by the hydrogel structure. This work may provide design principles for the development of hydrogels to facilitate neuronal regeneration in the adult brain.

  15. Design of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels to Promote Neurite Outgrowth in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Dominte; Hamard, Lauriane; Caraguel, Flavien; Wion, Didier; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2016-09-28

    A hyaluronic acid (HA)-based extracellular matrix (ECM) platform with independently tunable stiffness and density of cell-adhesive peptide (RGD, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) that mimics key biochemical and mechanical features of brain matrix has been designed. We demonstrated here its utility in elucidating ECM regulation of neural progenitor cell behavior and neurite outgrowth. The analysis of neurite outgrowth in 3-D by two-photon microscopy showed several important results in the development of these hydrogels. First, the ability of neurites to extend deeply into these soft HA-based matrices even in the absence of cell-adhesive ligand further confirms the potential of HA hydrogels for central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Second, the behavior of hippocampal neural progenitor cells differed markedly between the hydrogels with a storage modulus of 400 Pa and those with a modulus of 800 Pa. We observed an increased outgrowth and density of neurites in the softest hydrogels (G' = 400 Pa). Interestingly, cells seeded on the surface of the hydrogels functionalized with the RGD ligand experienced an optimum in neurite outgrowth as a function of ligand density. Surprinsingly, neurites preferentially progressed inside the gels in a vertical direction, suggesting that outgrowth is directed by the hydrogel structure. This work may provide design principles for the development of hydrogels to facilitate neuronal regeneration in the adult brain. PMID:27598554

  16. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  17. Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the passive mechanical properties of infarcted tissue at different healing stages is essential to explore the emerging biomaterial injection-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). Although rats have been widely used as animal models in such investigations, the data in literature that quantify the passive mechanical properties of rat heart infarcts is very limited. MI was induced in rats and hearts were harvested immediately (0 day), 7, 14 and 28 days after infarction onset. Left ventricle anterioapical samples were cut and underwent equibiaxial and non equibiaxial tension followed by uniaxial compression mechanical tests. Histological analysis was conducted to confirm MI and to quantify the size of the induced infarcts. Infarcts maintained anisotropy and the nonlinear biaxial and compressive mechanical behaviour throughout the healing phases with the circumferential direction being stiffer than the longitudinal direction. Mechanical coupling was observed between the two axes in all infarct groups. The 0, 7, 14 and 28 days infarcts showed 438, 693, 1048 and 1218kPa circumferential tensile moduli. The 28 day infarct group showed a significantly higher compressive modulus compared to the other infarct groups (p=0.0060, 0.0293, and 0.0268 for 0, 7 and 14 days groups). Collagen fibres were found to align in a preferred direction for all infarct groups supporting the observed mechanical anisotropy. The presented data are useful for developing material models for healing infarcts and for setting a baseline for future assessment of emerging mechanical-based MI therapies.

  18. Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the passive mechanical properties of infarcted tissue at different healing stages is essential to explore the emerging biomaterial injection-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). Although rats have been widely used as animal models in such investigations, the data in literature that quantify the passive mechanical properties of rat heart infarcts is very limited. MI was induced in rats and hearts were harvested immediately (0 day), 7, 14 and 28 days after infarction onset. Left ventricle anterioapical samples were cut and underwent equibiaxial and non equibiaxial tension followed by uniaxial compression mechanical tests. Histological analysis was conducted to confirm MI and to quantify the size of the induced infarcts. Infarcts maintained anisotropy and the nonlinear biaxial and compressive mechanical behaviour throughout the healing phases with the circumferential direction being stiffer than the longitudinal direction. Mechanical coupling was observed between the two axes in all infarct groups. The 0, 7, 14 and 28 days infarcts showed 438, 693, 1048 and 1218kPa circumferential tensile moduli. The 28 day infarct group showed a significantly higher compressive modulus compared to the other infarct groups (p=0.0060, 0.0293, and 0.0268 for 0, 7 and 14 days groups). Collagen fibres were found to align in a preferred direction for all infarct groups supporting the observed mechanical anisotropy. The presented data are useful for developing material models for healing infarcts and for setting a baseline for future assessment of emerging mechanical-based MI therapies. PMID:27434651

  19. Piezoelectric substrates promote neurite growth in rat spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Royo-Gascon, Núria; Wininger, Michael; Scheinbeim, Jerry I; Firestein, Bonnie L; Craelius, William

    2013-01-01

    We tested the possibility that exogenous electrical activity from a piezoelectric substrate could influence neuronal structure in cultured spinal cord neurons. Oscillating electrical fields were delivered to rat neurons via substrates consisting of poly(vinylidene fluoride) film, both in its piezoelectric (PZ) and non-piezoelectric (PV) forms. To induce oscillating electrical fields at the film surfaces, a 50 Hz mechanical vibration was applied. After 4 days of mechano-electrical stimulation, neuronal densities were increased by 115% and neurons grew 79% more neurites, with more than double the branch points, compared with neurons grown on non-stimulated PZ films (p < 0.001). The effects were due to electrical field, because vibration applied to non-PZ films did not increase neurite growth. We conclude that the oscillating electric fields produced from PZ polymer substrates can induce plastic changes in neurons of the central nervous system and herein we show its influence on neurite growth and branching. PMID:22864823

  20. Quantitative analysis of surface tension of liquid nano-film with thickness: Two stage stability mechanism, molecular dynamics and thermodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Li, Qibin; Chen, Jie; Gao, Xuechao

    2016-11-01

    The effects of thickness on surface tension of aqueous nano-films under the same lateral size were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The surface tension was found to decrease with decreasing thickness when film thickness is below 1.5 nm. Between 4 and 1.5 nm, the trend is for the surface tension to decrease but this is not as significant as between 1.5 and 1.2 nm. For the surface tension of salt nano-films, with low temperatures resulting in monotonous decreasing with thickness, while high temperature (e.g. 479 K) exhibited a first increase then decrease for surface tension with thickness. Filippini et al. (2014) suggested that surface tension is constant with the thickness as long as the sheet remains in one piece, also the decrease observed and as proposed by Werth et al. (2013) is not due to a confinement effect on Lennard-Jones systems. However, in this study for aqueous nano-films, a two stage mechanism was proposed to interpret this effect, for which the stability was classified according to thickness range and validated by disjoining pressure. The results are important in describing the role of surface tension in determining the behaviour of disjoining pressure.

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Two High Strength Alloy Steels Under Conditions of Cyclic Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Manigandan, K.; Sastry, S.; Quick, T.; Schmidt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The results of a recent study aimed at understanding the conjoint influence of load ratio and microstructure on the high cycle fatigue properties and resultant fracture behavior of two high strength alloy steels is presented and discussed. Both the chosen alloy steels, i.e., 300M and Tenax™ 310 have much better strength and ductility properties to offer in comparison with the other competing high strength steels having near similar chemical composition. Test specimens were precision machined from the as-provided stock of each steel. The machined specimens were deformed in both uniaxial tension and cyclic fatigue under conditions of stress control. The test specimens of each alloy steel were cyclically deformed over a range of maximum stress at two different load ratios and the number of cycles to failure recorded. The specific influence of load ratio on cyclic fatigue life is presented and discussed keeping in mind the maximum stress used during cyclic deformation. The fatigue fracture surfaces were examined in a scanning electron microscope to establish the macroscopic mode and to concurrently characterize the intrinsic features on the fracture surface. The conjoint influence of nature of loading, maximum stress, and microstructure on cyclic fatigue life is discussed.

  2. Effect of surface tension of mucosal lining liquid on upper airway mechanics in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Jason P; Eastwood, Peter R; Szollosi, Irene; Platt, Peter R; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C; Hillman, David R

    2003-07-01

    Upper airway (UA) patency may be influenced by surface tension (gamma) operating within the (UAL). We examined the role of gamma of UAL in the maintenance of UA patency in eight isoflurane-anesthetized supine human subjects breathing via a nasal mask connected to a pneumotachograph attached to a pressure delivery system. We evaluated 1). mask pressure at which the UA closed (Pcrit), 2). UA resistance upstream from the site of UA collapse (RUS), and 3). mask pressure at which the UA reopened (Po). A multiple pressure-transducer catheter was used to identify the site of airway closure (velopharyngeal in all subjects). UAL samples (0.2 microl) were collected, and the gamma of UAL was determined by using the "pull-off force" technique. Studies were performed before and after the intrapharyngeal instillation of 5 ml of exogenous surfactant (Exosurf, Glaxo Smith Kline). The gamma of UAL decreased from 61.9 +/- 4.1 (control) to 50.3 +/- 5.0 mN/m (surfactant; P < 0.02). Changes in Po, RUS, and Po - Pcrit (change = control - surfactant) were positively correlated with changes in gamma (r2 > 0.6; P < 0.02) but not with changes in Pcrit (r2 = 0.4; P > 0.9). In addition, mean peak inspiratory airflow (no flow limitation) significantly increased (P < 0.04) from 0.31 +/- 0.06 (control) to 0.36 +/- 0.06 l/s (surfactant). These findings suggest that gamma of UAL exerts a force on the UA wall that hinders airway opening. Instillation of exogenous surfactant into the UA lowers the gamma of UAL, thus increasing UA patency and augmenting reopening of the collapsed airway. PMID:12626492

  3. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  5. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension.

    PubMed

    Homman, A-A; Bourasseau, E; Stoltz, G; Malfreyt, P; Strafella, L; Ghoufi, A

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Immature Porcine Brainstem in Tension at Dynamic Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Yin, Zhiyong; Li, Kui; Liao, Zhikang; Xiang, Hongyi; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Many brain injury cases involve pediatric road traffic accidents, and among these, brainstem injury causes disastrous outcomes. A thorough understanding of the tensile characterization of immature brainstem tissue is crucial in modeling traumatic brain injury sustained by children, but limited experimental data in tension is available for the immature brain tissue at dynamic strain rates. Material/Methods We harvested brainstem tissue from immature pigs (about 4 weeks old, and at a developmental stage similar to that of human toddlers) as a byproduct from a local slaughter house and very carefully prepared the samples. Tensile tests were performed on specimens at dynamic strain rates of 2/s, 20/s, and 100/s using a biological material instrument. The constitutive models, Fung, Ogden, Gent, and exponential function, for immature brainstem tissue material property were developed for the recorded experimental data using OriginPro® 8.0 software. The t test was performed for infinitesimal shear modules. Results The curves of stress-versus-stretch ratio were convex in shape, and inflection points were found in all the test groups at the strain of about 2.5%. The average Lagrange stress of the immature brainstem specimen at the 30% strain at the strain rates of 2, 20, and 100/s was 273±114, 515±107, and 1121±197 Pa, respectively. The adjusted R-Square (R2) of Fung, Ogden, Gent, and exponential model was 0.820≤R2≤0.933, 0.774≤R2≤0.940, 0.650≤R2≤0.922, and 0.852≤R2≤0.981, respectively. The infinitesimal shear modulus of the strain energy functions showed a significant association with the strain rate (p<0.01). Conclusions The immature brainstem is a rate-dependent material in dynamic tensile tests, and the tissue becomes stiffer with increased strain rate. The reported results may be useful in the study of brain injuries in children who sustain injuries in road traffic accidents. Further research in more detail should be performed in the

  7. Fracture Mechanics of Thin, Cracked Plates Under Tension, Bending and Out-of-Plane Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehnder, Alan T.; Hui, C. Y.; Potdar, Yogesh; Zucchini, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Cracks in the skin of aircraft fuselages or other shell structures can be subjected to very complex stress states, resulting in mixed-mode fracture conditions. For example, a crack running along a stringer in a pressurized fuselage will be subject to the usual in-plane tension stresses (Mode-I) along with out-of-plane tearing stresses (Mode-III like). Crack growth and initiation in this case is correlated not only with the tensile or Mode-I stress intensity factor, K(sub I), but depends on a combination of parameters and on the history of crack growth. The stresses at the tip of a crack in a plate or shell are typically described in terms of either the small deflection Kirchhoff plate theory. However, real applications involve large deflections. We show, using the von-Karman theory, that the crack tip stress field derived on the basis of the small deflection theory is still valid for large deflections. We then give examples demonstrating the exact calculation of energy release rates and stress intensity factors for cracked plates loaded to large deflections. The crack tip fields calculated using the plate theories are an approximation to the actual three dimensional fields. Using three dimensional finite element analyses we have explored the relationship between the three dimensional elasticity theory and two dimensional plate theory results. The results show that for out-of-plane shear loading the three dimensional and Kirchhoff theory results coincide at distance greater than h/2 from the crack tip, where h/2 is the plate thickness. Inside this region, the distribution of stresses through the thickness can be very different from the plate theory predictions. We have also explored how the energy release rate varies as a function of crack length to plate thickness using the different theories. This is important in the implementation of fracture prediction methods using finite element analysis. Our experiments show that under certain conditions, during fatigue crack

  8. Contact force and mechanical loss of multistage cable under tension and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Yanyun; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical model for calculating the stress and strain states of cabling structures with different loadings has been developed in this paper. We solve the problem for the first- and second-stage cable with tensile or bending strain. The contact and friction forces between the strands are presented by two-dimensional contact model. Several theoretical models have been proposed to verify the results when the triplet subjected to the tensile strain, including contact force, contact stresses, and mechanical loss. It is found that loadings will affect the friction force and the mechanical loss of the triplet. The results show that the contact force and mechanical loss are dependent on the twist pitch. A shorter twist pitch can lead to higher contact force, while the trend of mechanical loss with twist pitch is complicated. The mechanical loss may be reduced by adjusting the twist pitch reasonably. The present model provides a simple analysis method to investigate the mechanical behaviors in multistage-structures under different loads.

  9. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  10. Electrical and Neurotrophin Enhancement of Neurite Outgrowth within a 3D Collagen Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Rendell, Sara R.; Counts, Lauren R.; Papke, Jason B.; Willits, Rebecca K.; Harkins, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical and chemical stimulation have been studied as potent mechanisms of enhancing nerve regeneration and wound healing. However, it remains unclear how electrical stimuli affect nerve growth, particularly in the presence of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this study was to explore (1) the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) supplementation to support neurite outgrowth in a 3D scaffold, and (2) the effect of brief, low voltage, electrical stimulation (ES) on neurite outgrowth prior to neurotrophin supplementation. Dissociated E11 chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were seeded within a 1.5 mg/mL type-I collagen scaffold. For neurotrophin treatments, scaffolds were incubated for 24 hrs in culture media containing nerve growth factor (NGF, 10 ng/mL) or BDNF (200 ng/mL), or both. For ES groups, scaffolds containing neurons were stimulated for 10 min at 8–10 V/m DC, then incubated for 24 hrs with neurotrophin. Fixed and labeled neurons were imaged to measure neurite growth and directionality. BDNF supplementation was not as effective as NGF at supporting DRG neurite outgrowth. ES prior to NGF supplementation improved DRG neurite outgrowth compared to NGF alone. This combination of brief ES with NGF treatment was the most effective treatment compared to NGF or BDNF alone. Brief ES had no impact on neurite directionality in the 3D scaffolds. These results demonstrate that ES improves neurite outgrowth in the presence of neurotrophins, and could provide a potential therapeutic approach to improve nerve regeneration when coupled with neurotrophin treatment. PMID:24710795

  11. Applied electric field enhances DRG neurite growth: influence of stimulation media, surface coating and growth supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Matthew D.; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2009-08-01

    Electrical therapies have been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. This enhanced neural growth existed even after the electric field (EF) or stimulation was removed, but the factors that may influence the enhanced growth, such as stimulation media or surface coating, have not been fully investigated. This study characterized neurite outgrowth and branching under various conditions: EF magnitude and application time, ECM surface coating, medium during EF application and growth supplements. A uniform, low-magnitude EF (24 or 44 V m-1) was applied to dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglia seeded on collagen or laminin-coated surfaces. During the growth period, cells were either exposed to NGF or N2, and during stimulation cells were exposed to either unsupplemented media (Ca2+) or PBS (no Ca2+). Parallel controls for each experiment included cells exposed to the chamber with no stimulation and cells remaining outside the chamber. After brief electrical stimulation (10 min), neurite length significantly increased 24 h after application for all conditions studied. Of particular interest, increased stimulation time (10-100 min) further enhanced neurite length on laminin but not on collagen surfaces. Neurite branching was not affected by stimulation on any surface, and no preferential growth of neurites was noted after stimulation. Overall, the results of this report suggest that short-duration electric stimulation is sufficient to enhance neurite length under a variety of conditions. While further data are needed to fully elucidate a mechanism for this increased growth, these data suggest that one focus of those investigations should be the interaction between the growth cone and the substrata.

  12. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients. PMID:27088926

  13. Neurite outgrowth enhancement by jiadifenolide: possible targets.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, R A

    2016-04-01

    Covering: 1860-2016A mechanistic link may exist between convulsant plant substances typified by picrotoxinin, and 'neurotrophic' sesquiterpenes like jiadifenolide. Picrotoxinin elicits convulsion by anion blockade of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels. These same receptors mediate neuronal development and neurite outgrowth prior to synapse formation. Due to its structural homology with picrotoxin and anisatin, it is possible that jiadifenolide enhances NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth by modulation of the Cys-loop family of receptors. PMID:26891462

  14. Differential intensity-dependent effects of magnetic stimulation on the longest neurites and shorter dendrites in neuroscreen-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Whitney J.; Li, Kevin; Swanson, Roy; Cheung, Brian; Lin, Vernon W.; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Magnetic stimulation (MS) is a potential treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether MS-regulated neuronal activity can translate to specific changes in neuronal arborization and thus regulate synaptic activity and function. Approach. To test our hypotheses, we examined the effects of MS on neurite growth of neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells over the pulse frequencies of 1, 5 and 10 Hz at field intensities controlled via machine output (MO). Cells were treated with either 30% or 40% MO. Due to the nature of circular MS coils, the center region of the gridded coverslip (zone 1) received minimal (∼5%) electromagnetic current density while the remaining area (zone 2) received maximal (∼95%) current density. Plated NS-1 cells were exposed to MS twice per day for three days and then evaluated for length and number of neurites and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Main results. We show that MS dramatically affects the growth of the longest neurites (axon-like) but does not significantly affect the growth of shorter neurites (dendrite-like). Also, MS-induced changes in the longest neurite growth were most evident in zone 1, but not in zone 2. MS effects were intensity-dependent and were most evident in bolstering longest neurite outgrowth, best seen in the 10 Hz MS group. Furthermore, we found that MS-increased BDNF expression and secretion was also frequency-dependent. Taken together, our results show that MS exerts distinct effects when different frequencies and intensities are applied to the neuritic compartments (longest neurite versus shorter dendrite(s)) of NS-1 cells. Significance. These findings support the concept that MS increases BDNF expression and signaling, which sculpts longest neurite arborization and connectivity by which neuronal activity is regulated. Understanding the mechanisms underlying MS is crucial for efficiently incorporating its use into potential therapeutic strategies.

  15. Synergistic Effects of 3D ECM and Chemogradients on Neurite Outgrowth and Guidance: A Simple Modeling and Microfluidic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2014-01-01

    During nervous system development, numerous cues within the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) guide the growing neurites along specific pathways to reach their intended targets. Neurite motility is controlled by extracellular signal sensing through the growth cone at the neurite tip, including chemoattractive and repulsive cues. However, it is difficult to regenerate and restore neurite tracts, lost or degraded due to an injury or disease, in the adult central nervous system. Thus, it is important to evaluate the dynamic interplay between ECM and the concentration gradients of these cues, which would elicit robust neuritogenesis. Such information is critical in understanding the processes involved in developmental biology, and in developing high-fidelity neurite regenerative strategies post-injury, and in drug discovery and targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we quantitatively investigated this relationship using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, and determined the synergistic role of guidance cues and ECM on neurite outgrowth and turning. Using a biomimetic microfluidic system, we have shown that cortical neurite outgrowth and turning under chemogradients (IGF-1 or BDNF) within 3D scaffolds is highly regulated by the source concentration of the guidance cue and the physical characteristics of the scaffold. A mechanistic-driven partial differential equation model of neurite outgrowth has been proposed, which could also be used prospectively as a predictive tool. The parameters for the chemotaxis term in the model are determined from the experimental data using our microfluidic assay. Resulting model simulations demonstrate how neurite outgrowth was critically influenced by the experimental variables, which was further supported by experimental data on cell-surface-receptor expressions. The model results are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This integrated approach represents a

  16. chemo-mechanical coupling in water unsaturated domains: capillary tension and crystallization pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulin, Claudie; Mercury, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    Unsaturated zones are widely present in natural systems, such as soils, deep aquifers and building stones under wetting-drying cycles. Such porous media contains the three phases liquid, gas and solid and present specific physico-chemical processes or properties - as soluble salts precipitation or capillary water properties rise - have important impact on environmental issues since they are coupled with mechanical effects. The driving force of both phase transitions and capillarization is the decreasing relative humidity below the saturated value in the atmospheric air contacting the unsaturated materials. - Decreasing relative humidity leads to evaporation, creating local supersaturation and then driving crystallization. According to the usual theory of crystallization pressure, a confined growing crystal can exert a constraint against the pore wall, leading to its rupture if it exceeds the tensile strength of the pore material. This coupled chemo-mechanical process requires a nano-scale film of solution to hold between the crystal and the pore, which allows the solutes to diffuse and the solution not to precipitate despite increasing supersaturation. The repulsive effect between growing and host solids, ultimately increases the local pressure and may induce the host rupture - Capillarity has a large occurrence in unsaturated porous media and depends on pore radius and relative humidity of air. The capillary state makes the internal pressure of capillary water can drop down to negative values, meaning it is under tensile state and potentially exert traction on pore wall. These effects of chemo-mechanical coupling are observed using an experimental approach on three simplified natural analogues: porous membrane, borosilicate microcapillaries, and synthetic fluid inclusions. In the two former samples, sodium sulfates precipitates are induced through wetting-drying cycles and the role of both the capillarity and the crystallization pressure are observed. In the

  17. Mechanical properties of alumina-PEEK unidirectional composite - Compression, shear, and tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriz, R. D.; Mccolskey, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    An Al2O3 (alumina)-fiber composite with high strain to failure was fabricated with a thermal plastic PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone). The Al2O3-PEEK composite shows a marked improvement over thermally setting composite in that it absorbs 150 percent more elastic-strain energy at 76 K than at room temperature. This increase in fracture toughness at low temperatures can provide improved fatigue performance for thermal isolation straps at low temperature. Other mechanical property results suggest improvements for applications where graphite-epoxy materials are presently being used at low temperatures and where light weight is not a critical issue.

  18. Tension Strength, Failure Prediction and Damage Mechanisms in 2D Triaxial Braided Composites with Notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Anglin, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unnotched and notched (open hole) tensile strength and failure mechanisms of two-dimensional (2D) triaxial braided composites were examined. The effect of notch size and notch position were investigated. Damage initiation and propagation in notched and unnotched coupons were also examined. Theory developed to predict the normal stress distribution near an open hole and failure for tape laminated composites was evaluated for its applicability to 2D triaxial braided textile composite materials. Four different fiber architectures were considered; braid angle, yarn and braider size, percentage of longitudinal yarns and braider angle varied. Tape laminates equivalent to textile composites were also constructed for comparison. Unnotched tape equivalents were stronger than braided textiles but exhibited greater notch sensitivity. Notched textiles and tape equivalents have roughly the same strength at large notch sizes. Two common damage mechanisms were found: braider yarn cracking and near notch longitudinal yarn splitting. Cracking was found to initiate in braider yarns in unnotched and notched coupons, and propagate in the direction of the braider yarns until failure. Damage initiation stress decreased with increasing braid angle. No significant differences in prediction of near notch strain between textile and tape equivalents could be detected for small braid angle, but the correlations were weak for textiles with large braid angle. Notch strength could not be predicted using existing anisotropic theory for braided textiles due to their insensitivity to notch.

  19. On the mechanical behavior of WS2 nanotubes under axial tension and compression

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Cohen, Sidney R.; Gartsman, Konstantin; Ivanovskaya, Viktoria; Heine, Thomas; Seifert, Gotthard; Wiesel, Inna; Wagner, H. Daniel; Tenne, Reshef

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical properties of materials and particularly the strength are greatly affected by the presence of defects; therefore, the theoretical strength (≈10% of the Young's modulus) is not generally achievable for macroscopic objects. On the contrary, nanotubes, which are almost defect-free, should achieve the theoretical strength that would be reflected in superior mechanical properties. In this study, both tensile tests and buckling experiments of individual WS2 nanotubes were carried out in a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. Tensile tests of MoS2 nanotubes were simulated by means of a density-functional tight-binding-based molecular dynamics scheme as well. The combination of these studies provides a microscopic picture of the nature of the fracture process, giving insight to the strength and flexibility of the WS2 nanotubes (tensile strength of ≈16 GPa). Fracture analysis with recently proposed models indicates that the strength of such nanotubes is governed by a small number of defects. A fraction of the nanotubes attained the theoretical strength indicating absence of defects. PMID:16407141

  20. A Reduced Order Model of Force Displacement Curves for the Failure of Mechanical Bolts in Tension.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Keegan J.; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2015-12-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry causes issues when generating a mesh of the model. This report will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  1. Flow in porous media, phase and ultralow interfacial tensions: Mechanisms of enhanced petroleum recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1991-07-01

    A major program of university research, longer-ranged and more fundamental in approach than industrial research, into basic mechanisms of enhancing petroleum recovery and into underlying physics, chemistry, geology, applied mathematics, computation, and engineering science has been built at Minnesota. The original focus was surfactant-based chemical flooding, but the approach taken was sufficiently fundamental that the research, longer-ranged than industrial efforts, has become quite multidirectional. Topics discussed are volume controlled porosimetry; fluid distribution and transport in porous media at low wetting phase saturation; molecular dynamics of fluids in ultranarrow pores; molecular dynamics and molecular theory of wetting and adsorption; new numerical methods to handle initial and boundary conditions in immiscible displacement; electron microscopy of surfactant fluid microstructure; low cost system for animating liquid crystallites viewed with polarized light; surfaces of constant mean curvature with prescribed contact angle.

  2. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  3. The impact of laminin on 3D neurite extension in collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn E.; Papke, Jason B.; Kutosky, Hannah P.; Throm, Allison; Hammer, Joshua A.; Harkins, Amy B.; Kuntz Willits, Rebecca

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this research was to characterize the effect of laminin on three-dimensional (3D) neurite growth. Gels were formed using type I collagen at concentrations of 0.4-2.0 mg mL-1 supplemented with laminin at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 µg mL-1. When imaged with confocal microscopy, laminin was shown to follow the collagen fibers; however, the addition of laminin had minimal effect on the stiffness of the scaffolds at any concentration of collagen. Individual neurons dissociated from E9 chick dorsal root ganglia were cultured in the gels for 24 h, and neurite lengths were measured. For collagen gels without laminin, a typical bimodal response of neurite outgrowth was observed, with increased growth at lower concentrations of collagen gel. However, alteration of the chemical nature of the collagen gel by the laminin additive shifted, or completely mitigated, the bimodal neurite growth response seen in gels without laminin. Expression of integrin subunits, α1, α3, α6 and β1, were confirmed by PCR and immunolabeling in the 3D scaffolds. These results provide insight into the interplay between mechanical and chemical environment to support neurite outgrowth in 3D. Understanding the relative impact of environmental factors on 3D nerve growth may improve biomaterial design for nerve cell regeneration.

  4. Neurite-outgrowth regulating functions of the amyloid protein precursor of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Small, D H; Clarris, H L; Williamson, T G; Reed, G; Key, B; Mok, S S; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Nurcombe, V

    1999-11-01

    Many studies have shown that breakdown of the amyloid protein precursor (APP) to produce the amyloid protein is an important step in the pathogenic mechanism which causes Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the normal function of APP. Developmental studies show that APP expression increases during the period of brain development when neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis is maximal. APP is expressed highly within growing neurites and in growth cones, and purified APP has been shown to stimulate neurite outgrowth from cells in culture. Thus APP may regulate neurite outgrowth or synaptogenesis in vivo. APP is actively secreted from many cells, and the C-terminally secreted APP has been shown to associate with components of the extracellular matrix, such as the heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Two putative heparin-binding domains on APP have been reported. Binding of HSPGs to an N-terminal heparin-binding domain (HBD-1) stimulates the effect of substrate-bound APP on neurite outgrowth. In the mature nervous system, APP may play an important role in the regulation of wound repair. It is highly likely that studies on the normal functions of APP will shed further light on aspects of the pathogenesis of AD.

  5. c-Fos activated phospholipid synthesis is required for neurite elongation in differentiating PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Germán A; Bussolino, Daniela F; Portal, Maximiliano M; Alfonso Pecchio, Adolfo; Renner, Marianne L; Borioli, Graciela A; Guido, Mario E; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2004-04-01

    We have previously shown that c-Fos activates phospholipid synthesis through a mechanism independent of its genomic AP-1 activity. Herein, using PC12 cells induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor, the genomic effect of c-Fos in initiating neurite outgrowth is shown as distinct from its nongenomic effect of activating phospholipid synthesis and sustaining neurite elongation. Blocking c-Fos expression inhibited differentiation, phospholipid synthesis activation, and neuritogenesis. In cells primed to grow, blocking c-Fos expression determined neurite retraction. However, transfected cells expressing c-Fos or c-Fos deletion mutants with capacity to activate phospholipid synthesis sustain neurite outgrowth and elongation in the absence of nerve growth factor. Results disclose a dual function of c-Fos: it first releases the genomic program for differentiation and then associates to the endoplasmic reticulum and activates phospholipid synthesis. Because phospholipids are key membrane components, we hypothesize this latter phenomenon as crucial to support membrane genesis demands required for cell growth and neurite elongation. PMID:14767061

  6. RTN/Nogo in forming Alzheimer’s neuritic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Marguerite; Shi, Qi; Hu, Xiangyou; He, Wanxia; Levey, Allan; Yan, Riqiang

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the pathological hallmarks in brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the presence of neuritic plaques, in which amyloid deposits are surrounded by reactive gliosis and dystrophic neurites. Within neuritic plaques, reticulon 3 (RTN3), a homolog of Nogo protein, appears to regulate the formation of both amyloid deposition via negative modulation of BACE1 activity and dystrophic neurites via the formation of RTN3 aggregates. Transgenic mice over-expressing RTN3, but not the other known markers of dystrophic neurites in AD brain, spontaneously develop RTN3-immunoreactive dystrophic neurites. The presence of dystrophic neurites impairs cognition. Blocking abnormal RTN3 aggregation will increase the available RTN3 monomer and is therefore a promising potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing cognitive function in AD patients. PMID:20144652

  7. The Selector Gene apterous and Notch Are Required to Locally Increase Mechanical Cell Bond Tension at the Drosophila Dorsoventral Compartment Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Marcus; Aliee, Maryam; Rudolf, Katrin; Bialas, Lisa; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The separation of cells with distinct fates and functions is important for tissue and organ formation during animal development. Regions of different fates within tissues are often separated from another along straight boundaries. These compartment boundaries play a crucial role in tissue patterning and growth by stably positioning organizers. In Drosophila, the wing imaginal disc is subdivided into a dorsal and a ventral compartment. Cells of the dorsal, but not ventral, compartment express the selector gene apterous. Apterous expression sets in motion a gene regulatory cascade that leads to the activation of Notch signaling in a few cell rows on either side of the dorsoventral compartment boundary. Both Notch and apterous mutant clones disturb the separation of dorsal and ventral cells. Maintenance of the straight shape of the dorsoventral boundary involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell bonds along the boundary. The mechanisms by which cell bond tension is locally increased however remain unknown. Here we use a combination of laser ablation of cell bonds, quantitative image analysis, and genetic mutants to show that Notch and Apterous are required to increase cell bond tension along the dorsoventral compartment boundary. Moreover, clonal expression of the Apterous target gene capricious results in cell separation and increased cell bond tension at the clone borders. Finally, using a vertex model to simulate tissue growth, we find that an increase in cell bond tension at the borders of cell clones, but not throughout the cell clone, can lead to cell separation. We conclude that Apterous and Notch maintain the characteristic straight shape of the dorsoventral compartment boundary by locally increasing cell bond tension. PMID:27552097

  8. The Selector Gene apterous and Notch Are Required to Locally Increase Mechanical Cell Bond Tension at the Drosophila Dorsoventral Compartment Boundary.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marcus; Aliee, Maryam; Rudolf, Katrin; Bialas, Lisa; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The separation of cells with distinct fates and functions is important for tissue and organ formation during animal development. Regions of different fates within tissues are often separated from another along straight boundaries. These compartment boundaries play a crucial role in tissue patterning and growth by stably positioning organizers. In Drosophila, the wing imaginal disc is subdivided into a dorsal and a ventral compartment. Cells of the dorsal, but not ventral, compartment express the selector gene apterous. Apterous expression sets in motion a gene regulatory cascade that leads to the activation of Notch signaling in a few cell rows on either side of the dorsoventral compartment boundary. Both Notch and apterous mutant clones disturb the separation of dorsal and ventral cells. Maintenance of the straight shape of the dorsoventral boundary involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell bonds along the boundary. The mechanisms by which cell bond tension is locally increased however remain unknown. Here we use a combination of laser ablation of cell bonds, quantitative image analysis, and genetic mutants to show that Notch and Apterous are required to increase cell bond tension along the dorsoventral compartment boundary. Moreover, clonal expression of the Apterous target gene capricious results in cell separation and increased cell bond tension at the clone borders. Finally, using a vertex model to simulate tissue growth, we find that an increase in cell bond tension at the borders of cell clones, but not throughout the cell clone, can lead to cell separation. We conclude that Apterous and Notch maintain the characteristic straight shape of the dorsoventral compartment boundary by locally increasing cell bond tension. PMID:27552097

  9. The Selector Gene apterous and Notch Are Required to Locally Increase Mechanical Cell Bond Tension at the Drosophila Dorsoventral Compartment Boundary.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marcus; Aliee, Maryam; Rudolf, Katrin; Bialas, Lisa; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The separation of cells with distinct fates and functions is important for tissue and organ formation during animal development. Regions of different fates within tissues are often separated from another along straight boundaries. These compartment boundaries play a crucial role in tissue patterning and growth by stably positioning organizers. In Drosophila, the wing imaginal disc is subdivided into a dorsal and a ventral compartment. Cells of the dorsal, but not ventral, compartment express the selector gene apterous. Apterous expression sets in motion a gene regulatory cascade that leads to the activation of Notch signaling in a few cell rows on either side of the dorsoventral compartment boundary. Both Notch and apterous mutant clones disturb the separation of dorsal and ventral cells. Maintenance of the straight shape of the dorsoventral boundary involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell bonds along the boundary. The mechanisms by which cell bond tension is locally increased however remain unknown. Here we use a combination of laser ablation of cell bonds, quantitative image analysis, and genetic mutants to show that Notch and Apterous are required to increase cell bond tension along the dorsoventral compartment boundary. Moreover, clonal expression of the Apterous target gene capricious results in cell separation and increased cell bond tension at the clone borders. Finally, using a vertex model to simulate tissue growth, we find that an increase in cell bond tension at the borders of cell clones, but not throughout the cell clone, can lead to cell separation. We conclude that Apterous and Notch maintain the characteristic straight shape of the dorsoventral compartment boundary by locally increasing cell bond tension.

  10. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  11. Arylsulfatase B modulates neurite outgrowth via astrocyte chondroitin-4-sulfate: dysregulation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Kusumo, Handojo; Goodlett, Charles R; Tobacman, Joanne K; Guizzetti, Marina

    2014-02-01

    In utero ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, associated with reduced brain plasticity; the mechanisms of these effects are not well understood, particularly with respect to glial involvement. Astrocytes release factors that modulate neurite outgrowth. We explored the hypothesis that ethanol inhibits neurite outgrowth by increasing the levels of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in astrocytes. Astrocyte treatment with ethanol inhibited the activity of arylsulfatase B (ARSB), the enzyme that removes sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) and triggers the degradation of C4S, increased total sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), C4S, and neurocan core-protein content and inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons cocultured with ethanol-treated astrocytes in vitro, effects reversed by treatment with recombinant ARSB. Ethanol also inhibited ARSB activity and increased sulfate GAG and neurocan levels in the developing hippocampus after in vivo ethanol exposure. ARSB silencing increased the levels of sulfated GAGs, C4S, and neurocan in astrocytes and inhibited neurite outgrowth in cocultured neurons, indicating that ARSB activity directly regulates C4S and affects neurocan expression. In summary, this study reports two major findings: ARSB modulates sulfated GAG and neurocan levels in astrocytes and astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in cocultured neurons; and ethanol inhibits the activity of ARSB, increases sulfated GAG, C4S, and neurocan levels, and thereby inhibits astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth. An unscheduled increase in CSPGs in the developing brain may lead to altered brain connectivity and to premature decrease in neuronal plasticity and therefore represents a novel mechanism by which ethanol can exert its neurodevelopmental effects.

  12. Microtopographical features generated by photopolymerization recruit RhoA/ROCK through TRPV1 to direct cell and neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shufeng; Tuft, Bradley; Xu, Linjing; Polacco, Marc; Clarke, Joseph C.; Guymon, C. Allan; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2015-01-01

    Cell processes, including growth cones, respond to biophysical cues in their microenvironment to establish functional tissue architecture and intercellular networks. The mechanisms by which cells sense and translate biophysical cues into directed growth are unknown. We used photopolymerization to fabricate methacrylate platforms with patterned microtopographical features that precisely guide neurite growth and Schwann cell alignment. Pharmacologic inhibition of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or reduced expression of TRPV1 by RNAi significantly disrupts neurite guidance by these microtopographical features. Exogenous expression of TRPV1 induces alignment of NIH3T3 fibroblasts that fail to align in the absence of TRPV1, further implicating TRPV1 channels as critical mediators of cellular responses to biophysical cues. Microtopographic features increase RhoA activity in growth cones and in TRPV1-expressing NIH3T3 cells. Further, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) phosphorylation is elevated in growth cones and neurites on micropatterned surfaces. Inhibition of RhoA/ROCK by pharmacological compounds or reduced expression of either ROCKI or ROCKII isoforms by RNAi abolishes neurite and cell alignment, confirming that RhoA/ROCK signaling mediates neurite and cell alignment to microtopographic features. These studies demonstrate that microtopographical cues recruit TRPV1 channels and downstream signaling pathways, including RhoA and ROCK, to direct neurite and cell growth. PMID:25890710

  13. The influence of mercury contact angle, surface tension, and retraction mechanism on the interpretation of mercury porosimetry data.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Sean P; Edler, Karen J

    2002-06-01

    The use of a semi-empirical alternative to the standard Washburn equation for the interpretation of raw mercury porosimetry data has been advocated. The alternative expression takes account of variations in both mercury contact angle and surface tension with pore size, for both advancing and retreating mercury meniscii. The semi-empirical equation presented was ultimately derived from electron microscopy data, obtained for controlled pore glasses by previous workers. It has been found that this equation is also suitable for the interpretation of raw data for sol-gel silica spheres. Interpretation of mercury porosimetry data using the alternative to the standard Washburn equation was found to give rise to pore sizes similar to those obtained from corresponding SAXS data. The interpretation of porosimetry data, for both whole and finely powdered silica spheres, using the alternative expression has demonstrated that the hysteresis and mercury entrapment observed for whole samples does not occur for fragmented samples. Therefore, for these materials, the structural hysteresis and overall level of mercury entrapment is caused by the macroscopic (> approximately 30 microm), and not the microscopic (< approximately 30 microm), properties of the porous medium. This finding suggested that mercury porosimetry may be used to obtain a statistical characterization of sample macroscopic structure similar to that obtained using MRI. In addition, from a comparison of the pore size distribution from porosimetry with that obtained using complementary nitrogen sorption data, it was found that, even in the absence of hysteresis and mercury entrapment, pore shielding effects were still present. This observation suggested that the mercury extrusion process does not occur by a piston-type retraction mechanism and, therefore, the usual method for the application of percolation concepts to mercury retraction is flawed. PMID:16290649

  14. Optimizing neurotrophic factor combinations for neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deister, C.; Schmidt, C. E.

    2006-06-01

    Most neurotrophic factors are members of one of three families: the neurotrophins, the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs) and the neuropoietic cytokines. Each family activates distinct but overlapping cellular pathways. Several studies have shown additive or synergistic interactions between neurotrophic factors from different families, though generally only a single combination has been studied. Because of possible interactions between the neurotrophic factors, the optimum concentration of a factor in a mixture may differ from the optimum when applied individually. Additionally, the effect of combinations of neurotrophic factors from each of the three families on neurite extension is unclear. This study examines the effects of several combinations of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), the GFL glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neuropoietic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on neurite outgrowth from young rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. The combination of 50 ng ml-1 NGF and 10 ng ml-1 of each GDNF and CNTF induced the highest level of neurite outgrowth at a 752 ± 53% increase over untreated DRGs and increased the longest neurite length to 2031 ± 97 µm compared to 916 ± 64 µm for untreated DRGs. The optimum concentrations of the three factors applied in combination corresponded to the optimum concentration of each factor when applied individually. These results indicate that the efficacy of future therapies for nerve repair would be enhanced by the controlled release of a combination of neurotrophins, GFLs and neuropoietic cytokines at higher concentrations than used in previous conduit designs.

  15. Mechanical Characterization of Ultralow Interfacial Tension Oil-in-Water Droplets by Thermal Capillary Wave Analysis in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Guido; Saito, Yuki; Tyler, Arwen I I; Ward, Andrew D; Bain, Colin D; Ces, Oscar

    2016-04-19

    Measurements of the ultralow interfacial tension and surfactant film bending rigidity for micron-sized heptane droplets in bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate-NaCl aqueous solutions were performed in a microfluidic device through the analysis of thermally driven droplet interface fluctuations. The Fourier spectrum of the stochastic droplet interface displacement was measured through bright-field video microscopy and a contour analysis technique. The droplet interfacial tension, together with the surfactant film bending rigidity, was obtained by fitting the experimental results to the prediction of a capillary wave model. Compared to existing methods for ultralow interfacial tension measurements, this contactless, nondestructive, all-optical approach has several advantages, such as fast measurement, easy implementation, cost-effectiveness, reduced amount of liquids, and integration into lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:26982629

  16. Dendrite and Axon Specific Geometrical Transformation in Neurite Development

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Vasily I.; Semyanov, Alexey V.; Kazantsev, Victor B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model of neurite growth to explain the differences in dendrite and axon specific neurite development. The model implements basic molecular kinetics, e.g., building protein synthesis and transport to the growth cone, and includes explicit dependence of the building kinetics on the geometry of the neurite. The basic assumption was that the radius of the neurite decreases with length. We found that the neurite dynamics crucially depended on the relationship between the rate of active transport and the rate of morphological changes. If these rates were in the balance, then the neurite displayed axon specific development with a constant elongation speed. For dendrite specific growth, the maximal length was rapidly saturated by degradation of building protein structures or limited by proximal part expansion reaching the characteristic cell size. PMID:26858635

  17. Sliding-induced non-uniform pre-tension governs robust and reversible adhesion: a revisit of adhesion mechanisms of geckos

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Q. H.; Chen, B.; Gao, H. J.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2012-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed in the literature to explain the robust attachment and rapid, controllable detachment of geckos' feet on vertical walls or ceilings, yet, it is still debatable, which one is ultimately responsible for geckos' extraordinary capabilities for robust and reversible adhesion. In this paper, we re-examine some of the key movements of geckos' spatula pads and seta hairs during attachment and detachment, and propose a sequence of simple mechanical steps that would lead to the extraordinary properties of geckos observed in experiments. The central subject under study here is a linear distribution of pre-tension along the spatula pad induced by its sliding motion with respect to a surface. The resulting pre-tension, together with a control of setae's pulling force and angle, not only allows for robust and strong attachment, but also enables rapid and controllable detachment. We perform computational modelling and simulations to validate the following key steps of geckos' adhesion: (i) creation of a linear distribution of pre-tension in spatula through sliding, (ii) operation of an instability envelope controlled by setae's pulling force and angle, (iii) triggering of an adhesion instability leading to partial decohesion along the interface, and (iv) complete detachment of spatula through post-instability peeling. The present work not only reveals novel insights into the adhesion mechanism of geckos, but also develops a powerful numerical simulation approach as well as additional guidelines for bioinspired materials and devices. PMID:21775325

  18. Detailed finite element analysis and preliminary study of the effects of friction and fastener pre-tension on the mechanical behavior of fastened built-up members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonachera Martin, Francisco Javier

    The characterization of fatigue resistance is one of the main concerns in structural engineering, a concern that is particularly important in the evaluation of existing bridge members designed or erected before the development of fatigue design provisions. The ability of a structural member to develop alternate load paths after the failure of a component is known as member-level or internal redundancy. In fastened built-up members, these alternate load paths are affected by the combination of fastener pre-tension and friction between the structural member components in contact. In this study, a finite element methodology to model and analyze riveted and bolted built-up members was developed in ABAQUS and validated with experimental results. This methodology was used to created finite element models of three fastened plates subjected to tension, in which the middle plate had failed, in order to investigate the fundamental effects of combined fastener pre-tension and friction on their mechanical behavior. Detailed finite element models of riveted and bolted built-up flexural members were created and analyze to understand the effect of fastener pre-tension in member-level redundancy and resistance to fatigue and fracture. The obtained results showed that bolted members are able to re-distribute a larger portion of the load away from the failing component into the rest of the member than riveted members, and that this transfer of load also took place over a smaller length. Superior pre-tension of bolts, in comparison to rivets, results in larger frictional forces that develop at the contact interfaces between components and constitute additional alternate load paths that increase member-level redundancy which increase the fatigue and fracture resistance of the structural member during the failure of one of its components. Although fatigue and fracture potential may be mitigated by compressive stresses developing around the fastener hole due to fastener pre-tension, it

  19. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  20. Pale neurites, premature α-synuclein aggregates with centripetal extension from axon collaterals.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Toshiro; Adachi, Eijiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Nakamura, Ayako; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    Progressive aggregation of α-synuclein (αS) from pale bodies (PBs) and extension from Lewy neurites (LNs) are candidate mechanisms for Lewy body (LB) formation. To identify how aggregation of αS is related to its extension along neurites, 60-µm-thick brainstem sections of Parkinson disease (PD) patients were prepared for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of αS-positive neurites with neurofilament (NF) and thiazin red (TR), a fluorochrome with an affinity to solid aggregates. This demonstrated 3D layering of αS surrounded by NF with the aggregates probed by TR in the center, corresponding to the eosinophilic core of mature LBs. This eosinophilic/TR-positive profile, characteristically absent in PBs, premature counterpart of LBs, was similarly absent in some LNs. We would like to refer these premature LNs as "pale neurites" (PNs). Their premature nature was evidenced by 3D fluoroprofiling with quantum dots (QDs) and subsequent electron microscopic identification (3D-oriented immunoelectron microscopy) as loosely packed αS (QDs)-positive filaments. Quantification of LNs, frequently extended around branching axons, demonstrated that LNs are initiated at axon collaterals to extend centripetally into proximal segments. This branching-oriented extension of αS is related to its selective predisposition to systems with highly divergent axons, preferentially affected in PD, which may explain barely somatotopic manifestations of PD.

  1. Tissue kallikrein mediates neurite outgrowth through epidermal growth factor receptor and flotillin-2 pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengyu; Cui, Mei; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Yan; Dong, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein (TK) was previously shown to take most of its biological effects through bradykinin receptors. In this study, we assumed that TK mediated neurite outgrowth was independent of bradykinin receptors. To test the hypothesis, we investigated TK-induced neurite outgrowth and its signaling mechanisms in cultured primary neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells. We found that TK stimulation could increase the number of processes and mean process length of primary neurons, which were blocked by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor or down-regulation, small interfering RNA for flotillin-2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 inhibitor. Moreover, TK-induced neurite outgrowth was associated with EGFR and ERK1/2 activation, which were inhibited by EGFR antagonist or RNA interference and flotillin-2 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibition of bradykinin receptors had no significant effects on EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In the present research, our data also suggested that EGFR and flotillin-2 formed constitutive complex that translocated to around the nuclei in the TK stimulation. In sum, our findings provided evidence that TK could promote neurite outgrowth via EGFR, flotillin-2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathway in vitro. PMID:24211626

  2. Neurite outgrowth resistance to rho kinase inhibitors in PC12 Adh cell.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua; Hou, Xiaolin; Tao, Tingrui; Lv, Xiaoman; Zhang, Luyong; Duan, Weigang

    2015-05-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor is a promising agent for neural injury disorders, which mechanism is associated with neurite outgrowth. However, neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell was treated with ROCK inhibitors for a longer time. PC12 Adh cells were treated with ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or NGF for different durations. Neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell exposed to Y27632 (33 µM) for 3 or more days, but not happen when exposed to nerve growth factor (NGF, 100 ng/mL). The gene expression in the PC12 Adh cells treated with Y27632 (33 µM) or NGF (100 ng/mL) for 2 or 4 days was assayed by gene microarray, and the reliability of the results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Cluster analysis proved that the gene expression profile of PC12 Adh cell treated with Y27632 for 4 days was different from that treated with Y27632 for 2 days and those treated with NGF for 2 and 4 days, respectively. Pathway analysis hinted that the neurite outgrowth resistance could be associated with up-regulation of inflammatory pathways, especially rno04610 (complement and coagulation cascades), and down-regulation of cell cycle pathways, especially rno04110.

  3. SCIRR39 promotes neurite extension via RhoA in NGF-induced PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C F; Liu, Y; Ni, Y L; Yang, J W; Hui, H D; Sun, Z B; Liu, S J

    2013-01-01

    SCIRR39 is an identified upregulated gene in rat primary neuron injury and/or regeneration process with roles largely unexplored. Using real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence, SCIRR39 expression was detected in normal PC12 cells and upregulated in differentiated cells. The results of cell proliferation by Cell Counting Kit and cell cycle by flow cytometry indicated that SCIRR39 inhibited cell proliferation and induced the decrease in S phase. Importantly, immunofluorescent and RhoA pull-down assays showed that SCIRR39 strongly affected the neurite extension of NGF-treated PC12 cells through a RhoA-dependent mechanism, but the truncated mutants of SCIRR39 containing a truncation from 141AA to 211AA or from 397AA to 424AA failed to mock the SCIRR39 effect on neurite extension. Moreover, change of SCIRR39 expression in NGF-treated PC12 cells regulated the expression and phosphorylation of Fyn, a regulator of RhoA activity, but not the expression of ROCK II protein. Finally, immunofluorescence and RhoA pull-down assays revealed that obvious inhibition of neurite extension by SCIRR39 shRNA was reversed by RhoA inhibitor C3-transferase. Our results indicated that SCIRR39 increased the neurite extension in NGF-treated PC12 cells via RhoA, suggesting that SCIRR39 contributes to the regeneration of neuron injury by specifically altering the differentiation program.

  4. Outgrowth of neurites is a dual process.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Racchetti, Gabriella; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2010-11-01

    In neurons and neurosecretory (nerve) cells, neurite outgrowth requires the enlargement of the plasma membrane sustained by the exocytosis of specific vesicles. The well known, slow canonical form of outgrowth induced in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells by NGF, as well as the outgrowth taking place in neurons, involve vesicles positive for the vSNARE Ti-VAMP. Working in defective PC12 clones expressing high levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, we have identified now a new, rapid form of outgrowth, triggered by activation of a small GTPase, Rac1. This form is sustained by the exocytosis of another type of vesicles, taking place locally at the tip of neurite growth cones, the enlargeosomes (vSNARE: VAMP4). This new form, which is positively controlled by REST, requires the dynamics of microtubules, but not of microfilaments. Its signaling remains undefined because established second messengers, (Ca(2+), DAG, cAMP) seem not involved. Using a high REST/enlargeosome-rich PC12 clone transfected with TrkA we have found that the NGF-induced outgrowth is not always slow, but can be fast in cells expressing high levels of the receptor involved, TrkA; that PC12 can express together the two distinct forms of outgrowth, canonical and new, activated independently from each other. Their comparative characterization in terms of changes in the cytoskeleton has now been initiated. The two forms are present also in neurons where the new one seems to predominate in the initial phases of development, the canonical one later on. Our results identify a new aspect of the REST impact in nerve cell specificity/function. The existence of two distinct forms of neurite outgrowth may cope better than a single form with the variable needs of nerve cells in the subsequent stages of their development. PMID:21331244

  5. Evidence for direct effect of magnetic fields on neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F. ); Benane, S.G.; House, D.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Electric fields can cause changes in cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. Alternating magnetic fields have been proposed to act through the electric fields induced in the conducting medium surrounding the cells. We have used a simple exposure system to test the relative contribution of magnetic fields compared to induced electric fields in a standard PC-12 cell culture assay, in which cells respond to nerve growth factor by producing neurites. This response to stimulation by nerve growth factor is inhibited by sinusoidal, 50-Hz magnetic fields at field strengths below 10 [mu]T (100 mG). A standard procedure to distinguish magnetic- vs. electric-field effects demonstrates that the induced electric field is not involved. Additional work is necessary to identify the critical reaction site (or sites), and to establish the molecular mechanisms responsible for these result, 27 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Basak; Caglayan, Berrak; Hausott, Barbara; Erdogan, Burcu; Dag, Ugur; Demir, Ozlem; Sogut, Melis S.; Klimaschewski, Lars; Kurnaz, Isil A.

    2014-01-01

    Pea3 subfamily of E–twenty six transcription factors consist of three major -exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3. PMID:25018694

  7. The combinatorics of neurite self-avoidance.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Elizabeth M; Hunt, Jonathan J; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2011-11-01

    During neural development in Drosophila, the ability of neurite branches to recognize whether they are from the same or different neurons depends crucially on the molecule Dscam1. In particular, this recognition depends on the stochastic acquisition of a unique combination of Dscam1 isoforms out of a large set of possible isoforms. To properly interpret these findings, it is crucial to understand the combinatorics involved, which has previously been attempted only using stochastic simulations for some specific parameter combinations. Here we present closed-form solutions for the general case. These reveal the relationships among the key variables and how these constrain possible biological scenarios.

  8. The combinatorics of neurite self-avoidance.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Elizabeth M; Hunt, Jonathan J; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2011-11-01

    During neural development in Drosophila, the ability of neurite branches to recognize whether they are from the same or different neurons depends crucially on the molecule Dscam1. In particular, this recognition depends on the stochastic acquisition of a unique combination of Dscam1 isoforms out of a large set of possible isoforms. To properly interpret these findings, it is crucial to understand the combinatorics involved, which has previously been attempted only using stochastic simulations for some specific parameter combinations. Here we present closed-form solutions for the general case. These reveal the relationships among the key variables and how these constrain possible biological scenarios. PMID:21732864

  9. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S

    2014-01-15

    Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation.

  10. Fabrication of Aligned Conducting PPy-PLLA Fiber Films and Their Electrically Controlled Guidance and Orientation for Neurites.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuanwen; Qin, Jiabang; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; He, Da

    2016-05-25

    Electrically conductive biomaterial scaffolds have great potential in neural tissue regeneration. In this work, an aligned conductive fibrous scaffold was prepared by electrospinning PLLA on rotating collector and chemical oxidation polymerization of pyrrole (PPy) codoped with poly(glutamic acid)/dodecyl benzenesulfonic acid sodium. The characterization results of composition, structure and mechanics of fiber films show that the existence of weak polar van der Waals' force between PPy coating and PLLA fibers. The resistivity of aligned rough PPy-PLLA fiber film (about 800 nm of fiber diameter) at the perpendicular and parallel directions is 0.971 and 0.874 Ω m, respectively. Aligned rough PPy-PLLA fiber film could guide the extension of 68% PC12 neurites along the direction of fiber axis. Under electrostimulation (ES) of 100, 200, and 400 mV/cm, median neurite lengths of differentiated PC12 on aligned fiber-films are 128, 149, and 141 μm, respectively. Furthermore, under ES of 100, 200, and 400 mV/cm, the alignment rate of neurite along the electropotential direction (angle between neurite and electropotential direction ≤10°) on random fibers film are 17, 23, and 28%, respectively, and the alignment rate of neurites along the fiber axis (angle between neurite and fiber axis ≤10°) on aligned fibers film reach to 76, 83, and 79%, respectively, indicating that the combination of ES and rough conducting aligned structure could adjust the alignment of cellular neurites along the direction of the fiber axis or electropotential. PMID:27172537

  11. Reelin Prevents Apical Neurite Retraction during Terminal Translocation and Dendrite Initiation

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Ryan S.; Cameron, David A.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling cortical dendrite initiation and targeting are poorly understood. Multiphoton imaging of developing mouse cortex reveals that apical dendrites emerge by direct transformation of the neuron's leading process during the terminal phase of neuronal migration. During this ∼110 min period, the dendritic arbor increases ∼2.5-fold in size and migration arrest occurs below the first stable branch point in the developing arbor. This dendritic outgrowth is triggered at the time of leading process contact with the marginal zone (MZ) and occurs primarily by neurite extension into the extracellular matrix of the MZ. In reeler cortices that lack the secreted glycoprotein Reelin, a subset of neurons completed migration but then retracted and reorganized their arbor in a tangential direction away from the MZ soon after migration arrest. For these reeler neurons, the tangential oriented primary neurites were longer lived than the radially oriented primary neurites, whereas the opposite was true of wild-type (WT) neurons. Application of Reelin protein to reeler cortices destabilized tangential neurites while stabilizing radial neurites and stimulating dendritic growth in the MZ. Therefore, Reelin functions as part of a polarity signaling system that links dendritogenesis in the MZ with cellular positioning and cortical lamination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whether the apical dendrite emerges by transformation of the leading process of the migrating neuron or emerges de novo after migration is completed is unclear. Similarly, it is not clear whether the secreted glycoprotein Reelin controls migration and dendritic growth as related or separate processes. Here, multiphoton microscopy reveals the direct transformation of the leading process into the apical dendrite. This transformation is coupled to the successful completion of migration and neuronal soma arrest occurs below the first stable branch point of the nascent dendrite. Deficiency in Reelin causes

  12. Real-time detection of neurite outgrowth using microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Samhwan; Jang, Jongmoon; Choi, Hongsoo; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    We developed a simple method for real-time detection of the neurite outgrowth using microfluidic device. Our microfluidic device contains three compartmentalized channels which are for cell seeding, hydrogel and growth factors. Collagen gel is filled in the middle channel and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are seeded in the left channel. To induce differentiation of PC12 cells, 50 ng/ml to1000 ng/ml of nerve growth factor (NGF) is introduced into the right channel. After three days of NGF treatment, PC12 cells begin to extend neurites and formed neurite network from sixth day. Quantification of neurite outgrowth is analyzed by measuring the total area of neurites. On sixth day, the area is doubled compared to the area on third day and increases by 20 times on ninth day.

  13. Tension Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  14. Extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongjie; Wei, Yin; Wen, Jiangbo; Niu, Min; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to clarify the extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical behaviors of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension. It is found that fracture stresses show almost no change with increasing strain rate. However, fracture strains decrease gradually due to the appearance of additional N(2c)-Si bond breaking defects in the deformation process. With increasing loading temperature, there is a noticeable drop in fracture stress and fracture strain. In the low temperature range, roughness phases can be observed owing to a combination of factors such as configuration evolution and energy change.

  15. Human AQP1 is a constitutively open channel that closes by a membrane-tension-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ozu, Marcelo; Dorr, Ricardo A; Gutiérrez, Facundo; Politi, M Teresa; Toriano, Roxana

    2013-01-01

    This work presents experimental results combined with model-dependent predictions regarding the osmotic-permeability regulation of human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) expressed in Xenopus oocyte membranes. Membrane elastic properties were studied under fully controlled conditions to obtain a function that relates internal volume and pressure. This function was used to design a model in which osmotic permeability could be studied as a pressure-dependent variable. The model states that hAQP1 closes with membrane-tension increments. It is important to emphasize that the only parameter of the model is the initial osmotic permeability coefficient, which was obtained by model-dependent fitting. The model was contrasted with experimental records from emptied-out Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing hAQP1. Simulated results reproduce and predict volume changes in high-water-permeability membranes under hypoosmotic gradients of different magnitude, as well as under consecutive hypo- and hyperosmotic conditions. In all cases, the simulated permeability coefficients are similar to experimental values. Predicted pressure, volume, and permeability changes indicate that hAQP1 water channels can transit from a high-water-permeability state to a closed state. This behavior is reversible and occurs in a cooperative manner among monomers. We conclude that hAQP1 is a constitutively open channel that closes mediated by membrane-tension increments. PMID:23332061

  16. Sensing the Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Spanning over 4 decades, NASA's bolt tension monitoring technology has benefited automakers, airplane builders, and other major manufacturers that rely on the devices to evaluate the performance of computerized torque wrenches and other assembly line mechanisms. In recent years, the advancement of ultrasonic sensors has drastically eased this process for users, ensuring that proper tension and torque are being applied to bolts and fasteners, with less time needed for data analysis. Langley Research Center s Nondestructive Evaluation Branch is one of the latest NASA programs to incorporate ultrasonic sensors within a bolt tension measurement instrument. As a multi-disciplined research group focused on spacecraft and aerospace transportation safety, one of the branch s many commitments includes transferring problem solutions to industry. In 1998, the branch carried out this obligation in a licensing agreement with Micro Control, Inc., of West Bloomfield, Michigan. Micro Control, an automotive inspection company, obtained the licenses to two Langley patents to provide an improved-but-inexpensive means of ultrasonic tension measurement.

  17. Angiotensin II AT2 receptors regulate NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth via the NO-cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Hashikawa, Naoya

    2016-09-16

    We investigated whether Angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor activation was involved in NGF-induced nerve regeneration. NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells was significantly inhibited by AT2 receptor antagonist (PD123,319) treatment. AT2 receptor knockdown also inhibited NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth. To determine the mechanisms, we analyzed the NO-cGMP pathway. The cGMP analog increased NGF-mediated nerve elongation, which inhibited by PD123,319. Furthermore, soluble guanylate cyclase expression was significantly less in NGF and PD123,319 treatment DRG than in NGF treatment alone. These results suggest that NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth is suppressed by AT2 receptor signaling via the NO-cGMP-PKG pathway. PMID:27524238

  18. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  19. Matrix interactions modulate neurotrophin-mediated neurite outgrowth and pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Madl, Christopher M; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-04-01

    Both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors are known to modulate neurite outgrowth and pathfinding; however, the interplay between these two factors is less studied. While previous work has shown that the biochemical identity of the matrix can alter the outgrowth of neurites in response to neurotrophins, the importance of the concentration of cell-adhesive ligands is unknown. Using engineered elastin-like protein matrices, we recently demonstrated a synergistic effect between matrix-bound cell-adhesive ligand density and soluble nerve growth factor treatment on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia. This synergism was mediated by Schwann cell-neurite contact through L1CAM. Cell-adhesive ligand density was also shown to alter the pathfinding behavior of dorsal root ganglion neurites in response to a gradient of nerve growth factor. While more cell-adhesive matrices promoted neurite outgrowth, less cell-adhesive matrices promoted more faithful neurite pathfinding. These studies emphasize the importance of considering both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors when designing biomaterials for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26170800

  20. Matrix interactions modulate neurotrophin-mediated neurite outgrowth and pathfinding

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Christopher M.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors are known to modulate neurite outgrowth and pathfinding; however, the interplay between these two factors is less studied. While previous work has shown that the biochemical identity of the matrix can alter the outgrowth of neurites in response to neurotrophins, the importance of the concentration of cell-adhesive ligands is unknown. Using engineered elastin-like protein matrices, we recently demonstrated a synergistic effect between matrix-bound cell-adhesive ligand density and soluble nerve growth factor treatment on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia. This synergism was mediated by Schwann cell-neurite contact through L1CAM. Cell-adhesive ligand density was also shown to alter the pathfinding behavior of dorsal root ganglion neurites in response to a gradient of nerve growth factor. While more cell-adhesive matrices promoted neurite outgrowth, less cell-adhesive matrices promoted more faithful neurite pathfinding. These studies emphasize the importance of considering both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors when designing biomaterials for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26170800

  1. Tensional homeostasis in single fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kevin D; Ng, Win Pin; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Adherent cells generate forces through acto-myosin contraction to move, change shape, and sense the mechanical properties of their environment. They are thought to maintain defined levels of tension with their surroundings despite mechanical perturbations that could change tension, a concept known as tensional homeostasis. Misregulation of tensional homeostasis has been proposed to drive disorganization of tissues and promote progression of diseases such as cancer. However, whether tensional homeostasis operates at the single cell level is unclear. Here, we directly test the ability of single fibroblast cells to regulate tension when subjected to mechanical displacements in the absence of changes to spread area or substrate elasticity. We use a feedback-controlled atomic force microscope to measure and modulate forces and displacements of individual contracting cells as they spread on a fibronectin-patterned atomic-force microscope cantilever and coverslip. We find that the cells reach a steady-state contraction force and height that is insensitive to stiffness changes as they fill the micropatterned areas. Rather than maintaining a constant tension, the fibroblasts altered their contraction force in response to mechanical displacement in a strain-rate-dependent manner, leading to a new and stable steady-state force and height. This response is influenced by overexpression of the actin crosslinker α-actinin, and rheology measurements reveal that changes in cell elasticity are also strain- rate-dependent. Our finding of tensional buffering, rather than homeostasis, allows cells to transition between different tensional states depending on how they are displaced, permitting distinct responses to slow deformations during tissue growth and rapid deformations associated with injury.

  2. Nerve abscess in primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Jain, Amita; Kohli, Neera; Singh, Shailesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Nerve abscess is an infrequently reported complication of leprosy. We describe a patient with a pure neuritic type of leprosy with multiple nerve abscesses, who presented with tingling and numbness in the medial aspect of his right forearm and hand. Subsequently he developed pain, redness and swelling over the medial side of his right elbow and the flexor aspect of his right wrist. High-resolution ultrasound showed diffuse thickening of the right ulnar nerve with hypoechoic texture housing a cystic lesion with internal debris suggesting an abscess, at the cubital tunnel. Histopathological examination of the pus and tissue obtained from the abscess revealed presence of granulomas with lepra bacilli. The patient responded to surgery and multidrug therapy. In conclusion, the nerve abscess as the first manifestation of leprosy is uncommon and a high index of suspicion is required to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24171239

  3. A cohesion/tension mechanism explains the gating of water channels (aquaporins) in Chara internodes by high concentration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Wiera, Boguslaw; Steudle, Ernst

    2004-02-01

    Isolated internodes of Chara corallina have been used to study the gating of aquaporins (water channels) in the presence of high concentrations of osmotic solutes of different size (molecular weight). Osmolytes were acetone and three glycol ethers: ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGMME), diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DEGMME), and triethylene glycol monoethyl ether (TEGMEE). The 'osmotic efficiency' of osmolytes was quite different. Their reflection coefficients ranged between 0.15 (acetone), 0.59 (EGMME), 0.78 (DEGMME), and 0.80 (TEGMEE). Bulk water permeability (Lp) and diffusive permeabilities (Ps) of heavy water (HDO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), acetone, and glycol ethers (EGMME, DEGMME, and TEGMEE) were measured using a cell pressure probe. Cells were treated with different concentrations of osmotic solutes of up to 800 mM ( approximately 2.0 MPa of osmotic pressure). Inhibition of aquaporin activity increased with both increasing concentration and size of solutes (reflection coefficients). As cell Lp decreased, Ps increased, indicating that water and solutes used different passages across the plasma membrane. Similar to earlier findings of an osmotic gating of ion channels, a cohesion/tension model of the gating of water channels in Chara internodes by high concentration is proposed. According to the model, tensions (negative pressures) within water channels affected the open/closed state by changing the free energy between states and favoured a distorted/collapsed rather than the open state. They should have differed depending on the concentration and size of solutes that are more or less excluded from aquaporins. The bigger the solute, the lower was the concentration required to induce a reversible closure of aquaporins, as predicted by the model.

  4. Guaifenesin derivatives promote neurite outgrowth and protect diabetic mice from neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hadimani, Mallinath B; Purohit, Meena K; Vanampally, Chandrashaker; Van der Ploeg, Randy; Arballo, Victor; Morrow, Dwane; Frizzi, Katie E; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2013-06-27

    In diabetic patients, an early index of peripheral neuropathy is the slowing of conduction velocity in large myelinated neurons and a lack of understanding of the basic pathogenic mechanisms hindered therapeutics development. Racemic (R/S)-guaifenesin (1) was identified as a potent enhancer of neurite outgrowth using an in vitro screen. Its R-enantiomer (R)-1 carried the most biological activity, whereas the S-enantiomer (S)-1 was inactive. Focused structural variations to (R/S)-1 was conducted to identify potentially essential groups for the neurite outgrowth activity. In vivo therapeutic studies indicated that both (R/S)-1 and (R)-1 partially prevented motor nerve conduction velocity slowing in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. In vitro microsomal assays suggested that compounds (R)-1 and (S)-1 are not metabolized rapidly, and PAMPA assay indicated moderate permeability through the membrane. Findings revealed here could lead to the development of novel drugs for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23758573

  5. Preparation of embryonic retinal explants to study CNS neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Hanea, Sonia T; Shanmugalingam, Ushananthini; Fournier, Alyson E; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-05-01

    This protocol outlines the preparation of embryonic mouse retinal explants, which provides an effective technique to analyze neurite outgrowth in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. This validated ex vivo system, which displays limited neuronal death, is highly reproducible and particularly amenable to manipulation. Our previously published studies involving embryonic chick or adult mouse retinal explants were instrumental in the preparation of this protocol; aspects of these previous techniques were combined, adopted and optimized. This protocol thus permits more efficient analysis of neurite growth. Briefly, the retina is dissected from the embryonic mouse eye using precise techniques that take into account the small size of the embryonic eye. The approach applied ensures that the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer faces the adhesion substrate on coated cover slips. Neurite growth is clear, well-delineated and readily quantifiable. These retinal explants can therefore be used to examine the neurite growth effects elicited by potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27072342

  6. Planar polarity genes and inhibition of supernumerary neurites.

    PubMed

    Colavita, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have recently emerged as important players in sculpting neuronal connections. The bipolar VC neurons display stereotypical differences in axon extension along the anterior-posterior (AP) body axis: VC1-3 and VC6 polarize along the AP axis while VC4 and VC5 polarize along the orthogonal left-right (LR) axis generated by the developing vulva. vang-1 and prkl-1, the worm orthologs of Van Gogh and Prickle, are required to restrict the polarity of neurite emergence to a specific tissue axis. vang-1 and prkl-1 loss results in ectopic VC4 and VC5 neurites extending inappropriately along the AP axis. Conversely, prkl-1 overexpression in VC neurons suppresses neurite formation. These findings suggest that a PCP-like pathway acts to silence or antagonize neuronal responses to polarity cues that would otherwise be permissive for neurite growth.

  7. Serum- and substratum-dependent modulation of neuritic growth.

    PubMed

    Skaper, S D; Selak, I; Varon, S

    1983-01-01

    Explants of embryonic day 8 (E8) chicken dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been cultured with medium containing serum or the serum-free supplement N1 on one of three substrata: collagen, polyornithine (PORN), or PORN exposed to a polyornithine-binding neurite-promoting factor (PNPF-PORN). Replicate cultures were maintained with or without nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF elicited its classical neuritic outgrowth on all three substrata in serum-containing or serum-free medium. In the absence of NGF, however, a gradation of increasing neurite growth was seen with: PNPF-PORN greater than PORN greater than collagen. This response occurred in both media. In addition, the neuritic halo in each instance was markedly more developed in the absence of serum, especially on PNPF-PORN. Nonneuronal behaviors reflected both serum and substratum influences: thus, nonneuronal outgrowth consisted mainly of flat cells with serum and collagen, was nonexistent with serum and PORN or PNPF-PORN, and involved mostly Schwann-like scattered cells in the absence of serum on any one substratum. The serum-dependent behaviors of ganglionic neurites were examined further with explants from chicken E11 sympathetic ganglia. A single substratum was used (PORN), without exogenous trophic factor. Neurite outgrowth was depressed by the presence of fetal calf serum, thus supporting the generality of this phenomenon. Lastly, PC12 cells, a clonal line of rat pheochromocytoma, will grow neurites in the presence of NGF after 48 hr in serum-free, but not serum-containing media. Addition of serum to serum-free cultures at this time results in the rapid and complete retraction of neurites.

  8. Serum- and substratum-dependent modulation of neuritic growth.

    PubMed

    Skaper, S D; Selak, I; Varon, S

    1983-01-01

    Explants of embryonic day 8 (E8) chicken dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been cultured with medium containing serum or the serum-free supplement N1 on one of three substrata: collagen, polyornithine (PORN), or PORN exposed to a polyornithine-binding neurite-promoting factor (PNPF-PORN). Replicate cultures were maintained with or without nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF elicited its classical neuritic outgrowth on all three substrata in serum-containing or serum-free medium. In the absence of NGF, however, a gradation of increasing neurite growth was seen with: PNPF-PORN greater than PORN greater than collagen. This response occurred in both media. In addition, the neuritic halo in each instance was markedly more developed in the absence of serum, especially on PNPF-PORN. Nonneuronal behaviors reflected both serum and substratum influences: thus, nonneuronal outgrowth consisted mainly of flat cells with serum and collagen, was nonexistent with serum and PORN or PNPF-PORN, and involved mostly Schwann-like scattered cells in the absence of serum on any one substratum. The serum-dependent behaviors of ganglionic neurites were examined further with explants from chicken E11 sympathetic ganglia. A single substratum was used (PORN), without exogenous trophic factor. Neurite outgrowth was depressed by the presence of fetal calf serum, thus supporting the generality of this phenomenon. Lastly, PC12 cells, a clonal line of rat pheochromocytoma, will grow neurites in the presence of NGF after 48 hr in serum-free, but not serum-containing media. Addition of serum to serum-free cultures at this time results in the rapid and complete retraction of neurites. PMID:6876195

  9. Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells Stimulated by Components from Dendranthema × grandiflorum cv. “Mottenohoka” Is Enhanced by Suppressing Phosphorylation of p38MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Koketsu, Mamoru; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Furukawa, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Components from Dendranthema × grandiflorum cv. “Mottenohoka” that promote neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells were identified and the mechanism of neurite outgrowth stimulated by isolated components was studied. Components that promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) of PC12 cells were isolated. From various structural analyses, the active components were identified as acacetin and luteolin. The effects of acacetin or luteolin on PC12 cells were evaluated by electro-blotting and immunostaining. Slight neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells was observed within 2 days of culture after stimulation by luteolin or acacetin. However, NGF-stimulation induced remarkable neurite outgrowth in comparison. Neurite outgrowth by luteolin or acacetin was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with SB203580 (a p38MAPK inhibitor). The results of this study into the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and p38MAPK by flavonoids suggest that the inhibition of p38MAPK phosphorylation may effectively enhance neurite outgrowth. PMID:23554829

  10. Transgenic mice overexpressing reticulon 3 develop neuritic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangyou; Shi, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yi, Hong; Yin, Xinghua; Gearing, Marla; Levey, Allan; Yan, Riqiang

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic neurites are swollen dendrites or axons recognizable near amyloid plaques as a part of important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report herein that reticulon 3 (RTN3) is accumulated in a distinct population of dystrophic neurites named as RTN3 immunoreactive dystrophic neurites (RIDNs). The occurrence of RIDNs is concomitant with the formation of high-molecular-weight RTN3 aggregates in brains of AD cases and mice expressing mutant APP. Ultrastructural analysis confirms accumulation of RTN3-containing aggregates in RIDNs. It appears that the protein level of RTN3 governs the formation of RIDNs because transgenic mice expressing RTN3 will develop RIDNs, initially in the hippocampal CA1 region, and later in other hippocampal and cortical regions. Importantly, we show that the presence of dystrophic neurites in Tg-RTN3 mice causes impairments in spatial learning and memory, as well as synaptic plasticity, implying that RIDNs potentially contribute to AD cognitive dysfunction. Together, we demonstrate that aggregation of RTN3 contributes to AD pathogenesis by inducing neuritic dystrophy. Inhibition of RTN3 aggregation is likely a therapeutic approach for reducing neuritic dystrophy. PMID:17476306

  11. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense.

    PubMed

    Lehne, Moritz; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life). The omnipresence of tension and suspense suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie) build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying tension and suspense. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena.

  12. Magnetic NGF-releasing PLLA/iron oxide nanoparticles direct extending neurites and preferentially guide neurites along aligned electrospun microfibers.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, Jonathan M; Provenza, Christina; Caliendo, Tyler; Dutz, Silvio; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2015-11-18

    Nerve growth factor releasing composite nanoparticles (NGF-cNPs) were developed to direct the extension of neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles were incorporated into poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) nanoparticles in order to position the NGF-cNPs in a culture dish. Neurites growing from DRG extended toward the NGF released from the NGF-cNPs. DRG were then cultured on aligned PLLA microfibers in the presence of NGF-cNPs, and these biomaterials combined to align DRG neurite extension along one axis and preferentially toward the NGF-cNPs. This combinatorial biomaterial approach shows promise as a strategy to direct the extension of regenerating neurites. PMID:26322376

  13. Small membranes under negative surface tension.

    PubMed

    Avital, Yotam Y; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-28

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes-(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability.

  14. Cadmium inhibits neurite outgrowth in differentiating human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pak, Eun Joo; Son, Gi Dong; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium, a highly ubiquitous heavy metal, is well known to induce neurotoxicity. However, the underlying mechanism of cadmium-mediated neurotoxicity remains unclear. We have studied cadmium inhibition of neurite outgrowth using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Cadmium, at a concentration of 3 μmol/L, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells 48 hours after cadmium treatment (1-3 μmol/L cadmium) was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 1 to 3 μmol/L cadmium resulted in decreased level of cross-reactivities with 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, NAC (N-acetyl-l-cysteine), recovered the expression of GAP-43 in cadmium-treated cells. The results indicate that cadmium is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells and that this effect might result from ROS generation by cadmium.

  15. Influence of micro-patterned PLLA membranes on outgrowth and orientation of hippocampal neurites.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Sabrina; Salerno, Simona; Piscioneri, Antonella; Papenburg, Bernke J; Di Vito, Anna; Giusi, Giuseppina; Canonaco, Marcello; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2010-09-01

    In neuronal tissue engineering many efforts are focused on creating biomaterials with physical and chemical pathways for controlling cellular proliferation and orientation. Neurons have the ability to respond to topographical features in their microenvironment causing among others, axons to proliferate along surface features such as substrate grooves in micro-and nanoscales. As a consequence these neuronal elements are able to correctly adhere, migrate and orient within their new environment during growth. Here we explored the polarization and orientation of hippocampal neuronal cells on nonpatterned and micro-patterned biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) membranes with highly selective permeable properties. Dense and porous nonpatterned and micro-patterned membranes were prepared from PLLA by Phase Separation Micromolding. The micro-patterned membranes have a three-dimensional structure consisting of channels and ridges and of bricks of different widths. Nonpatterned and patterned membranes were used for hippocampal neuronal cultures isolated from postnatal days 1-3 hamsters and the neurite length, orientation and specific functions of cells were investigated up to 12 days of culture. Neurite outgrowth, length plus orientation tightly overlapped the pattern of the membrane surface. Cell distribution occurred only in correspondence to membrane grooves characterized by continuous channels whereas on membranes with interconnected channels, cells not only adhered to and elongated their cellular processes in the grooves but also in the breaking points. High orientation degrees of cells were determined particularly on the patterned porous membranes with channel width of 20 mum and ridges of 17 mum whereas on dense nonpatterned membranes as well as on polystyrene culture dish (PSCD) controls, a larger number of primary developed neurites were distributed. Based on these results, PLLA patterned membranes may directly improve the guidance of neurite extension and

  16. Neurite outgrowth at the biomimetic interface.

    PubMed

    Kofron, Celinda M; Liu, Yu-Ting; López-Fagundo, Cristina Y; Mitchel, Jennifer A; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2010-06-01

    Understanding the cues that guide axons and how we can optimize these cues to achieve directed neuronal growth is imperative for neural tissue engineering. Cells in the local environment influence neurons with a rich combination of cues. This study deconstructs the complex mixture of guidance cues by working at the biomimetic interface--isolating the topographical information presented by cells and determining its capacity to guide neurons. We generated replica materials presenting topographies of oriented astrocytes (ACs), endothelial cells (ECs), and Schwann cells (SCs) as well as computer-aided design materials inspired by the contours of these cells (bioinspired-CAD). These materials presented distinct topographies and anisotropies and in all cases were sufficient to guide neurons. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells and neurites demonstrated the most directed response on bioinspired-CAD materials which presented anisotropic features with 90 degrees edges. DRG alignment was strongest on SC bioinspired-CAD materials followed by AC bioinspired-CAD materials, with more uniform orientation to EC bioinspired-CAD materials. Alignment on replicas was strongest on SC replica materials followed by AC and EC replicas. These results suggest that the topographies of anisotropic tissue structures are sufficient for neuronal guidance. This work is discussed in the context of feature dimensions, morphology, and guidepost hypotheses.

  17. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model of brain white matter in biaxial tension and structural-mechanical relationships.

    PubMed

    Labus, Kevin M; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2016-09-01

    Computational models of the brain require accurate and robust constitutive models to characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The anisotropy of white matter has been previously demonstrated; however, there is a lack of data describing the effects of multi-axial loading, even though brain tissue experiences multi-axial stress states. Therefore, a biaxial tensile experiment was designed to more fully characterize the anisotropic behavior of white matter in a quasi-static loading state, and the mechanical data were modeled with an anisotropic hyperelastic continuum model. A probabilistic analysis was used to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions because the mechanical data of brain tissue can show a high degree of variability, and computational studies can benefit from reporting the probability distribution of model responses. The axonal structure in white matter can be heterogeneous and regionally dependent, which can affect computational model predictions. Therefore, corona radiata and corpus callosum regions were tested, and histology and transmission electron microscopy were performed on tested specimens to relate the distribution of axon orientations and the axon volume fraction to the mechanical behavior. These measured properties were implemented into a structural constitutive model. Results demonstrated a significant, but relatively low anisotropic behavior, yet there were no conclusive mechanical differences between the two regions tested. The inclusion of both biaxial and uniaxial tests in model fits improved the accuracy of model predictions. The mechanical anisotropy of individual specimens positively correlated with the measured axon volume fraction, and, accordingly, the structural model exhibited slightly decreased uncertainty in model predictions compared to the model without structural properties. PMID:27214689

  18. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model of brain white matter in biaxial tension and structural-mechanical relationships.

    PubMed

    Labus, Kevin M; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2016-09-01

    Computational models of the brain require accurate and robust constitutive models to characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The anisotropy of white matter has been previously demonstrated; however, there is a lack of data describing the effects of multi-axial loading, even though brain tissue experiences multi-axial stress states. Therefore, a biaxial tensile experiment was designed to more fully characterize the anisotropic behavior of white matter in a quasi-static loading state, and the mechanical data were modeled with an anisotropic hyperelastic continuum model. A probabilistic analysis was used to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions because the mechanical data of brain tissue can show a high degree of variability, and computational studies can benefit from reporting the probability distribution of model responses. The axonal structure in white matter can be heterogeneous and regionally dependent, which can affect computational model predictions. Therefore, corona radiata and corpus callosum regions were tested, and histology and transmission electron microscopy were performed on tested specimens to relate the distribution of axon orientations and the axon volume fraction to the mechanical behavior. These measured properties were implemented into a structural constitutive model. Results demonstrated a significant, but relatively low anisotropic behavior, yet there were no conclusive mechanical differences between the two regions tested. The inclusion of both biaxial and uniaxial tests in model fits improved the accuracy of model predictions. The mechanical anisotropy of individual specimens positively correlated with the measured axon volume fraction, and, accordingly, the structural model exhibited slightly decreased uncertainty in model predictions compared to the model without structural properties.

  19. The history of tissue tension.

    PubMed

    Peters, W S; Tomos, A D

    1996-06-01

    In recent years the phenomenon of tissue tension and its functional connection to elongation growth has regained much interest. In the present study we reconstruct older models of mechanical inhomogenities in growing plant organs, in order to establish an accurate historical background for the current discussion. We focus on the iatromechanic model developed in Stephen Hales' Vegetable Staticks, Wilhelm Hofmeister's mechanical model of negative geotropism, Julius Sachs' explanation of the development of tissue tension, and the differential-auxin-response-hypothesis by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider. Each of these models is considered in the context of its respective historic and theoretical environment. In particular, the dependency of the biomechanical hypotheses on the cell theory and the hormone concept is discussed. We arrive at the conclusion that the historical development until the middle of our century is adequately described as a development towards more detailed explanations of how differential tensions are established during elongation growth in plant organs. Then we compare with the older models the structure of more recent criticism of hormonal theories of tropic curvature, and particularly the epidermal-growth-control hypothesis of Ulrich Kutschera. In contrast to the more elaborate of the older hypotheses, the recent models do not attempt an explanation of differential tensions, but instead focus on mechanical processes in organs, in which tissue tension already exists. Some conceptual implications of this discrepancy, which apparently were overlooked in the recent discussion, are briefly evaluated. PMID:11541099

  20. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  1. Fluorescence-Based Force/Tension Sensors: A Novel Tool to Visualize Mechanical Forces in Structural Proteins in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Sachs, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Three signaling systems, chemical, electrical, and mechanical, ubiquitously contribute to cellular activities. There is limited information on the mechanical signaling system because of a lack of tools to measure stress in specific proteins. Although significant advances in methodologies such as atomic force microscopy and laser tweezers have achieved great success in single molecules and measuring the mean properties of cells and tissues, they cannot deal with specific proteins in live cells. Recent Advances: To remedy the situation, we developed a family of genetically encoded optical force sensors to measure the stress in structural proteins in living cells. The sensors can be incorporated into specific proteins and are not harmful in transgenic animals. The chimeric proteins distribute and function as their wild-type counterparts, and local stress can be read out from changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Critical Issues: Our original sensor used two mutant green fluorescence proteins linked by an alpha helix that served as a linking spring. Ever since, we have improved the probe design in a number of ways. For example, we replaced the helical linker with more common elastic protein domains to better match the compliance of the wild-type hosts. We greatly improved sensitivity by using the angular dependence of FRET rather than the distance dependence as the transduction mechanism, because that has nearly 100% efficiency at rest and nearly zero when stretched. Future Directions: These probes enable researchers to investigate the roles of mechanical force in cellular activities at the level of single molecules, cells, tissues, and whole animals. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 986–999. PMID:24205787

  2. Integrin-mediated neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells depends on the activation of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Electrical signals elicited by integrin interaction with ECM components and their role in neurite outgrowth were studied in two clones (N1 and N7) isolated from 41A3 murine neuroblastoma cell line. Although the two clones similarly adhered to fibronectin (FN) and vitronectin (VN), this adhesion induced neurite outgrowth in N1 but not in N7 cells. Patch clamp recordings in whole cell configuration showed that, upon adhesion to FN or VN but not to platelet factor 4 (PF4), N1 cells undergo a marked (approximately equal to 20 mV) hyperpolarization of the resting potential (Vrest) that occurred within the first 20 min after cell contact with ECM, and persisted for approximately 1 h before reverting to the time zero values. This hyperpolarization was totally absent in N7 cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in N1 and N7 cell adhesion to ECM substrata was performed by using antibodies raised against the FN receptor and synthetic peptides variously competing with the FN or VN binding to integrin receptor (GRGDSP and GRGESP). Antibodies, as well as GRGDSP, abolished adhesion of N1 and N7 clones to FN and VN, revealing a similar implication of integrins in the adhesion of these clones to the ECM proteins. However, these anti-adhesive treatments, while ineffective on Vrest of N7 cells, abolished in N1 cells the FN- or VN-induced hyperpolarization and neurite outgrowth, that appeared therefore strictly associated and integrin-mediated phenomena. The nature of this association was deepened through a comparative analysis of the integrin profiles and the ion channels of N1 and N7 cells. The integrin immunoprecipitation profile resulted very similarly in the two clones, with only minor differences concerning the alpha V containing complexes. Both clones possessed Ca2+ and K+ delayed rectifier (KDR) channels, while only N1 cells were endowed with inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels. The latter governed the Vrest, and, unlike KDR channels, were blocked by

  3. Alpha-Synuclein affects neurite morphology, autophagy, vesicle transport and axonal degeneration in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koch, J C; Bitow, F; Haack, J; d'Hedouville, Z; Zhang, J-N; Tönges, L; Michel, U; Oliveira, L M A; Jovin, T M; Liman, J; Tatenhorst, L; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropathological and experimental studies suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and axons precedes the demise of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which finally results in the clinical symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying this early axonal degeneration are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein (αSyn-WT), a protein associated with PD, and its mutant variants αSyn-A30P and -A53T on neurite morphology and functional parameters in rat primary midbrain neurons (PMN). Moreover, axonal degeneration after overexpression of αSyn-WT and -A30P was analyzed by live imaging in the rat optic nerve in vivo. We found that overexpression of αSyn-WT and of its mutants A30P and A53T impaired neurite outgrowth of PMN and affected neurite branching assessed by Sholl analysis in a variant-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the number of primary neurites per neuron was increased in neurons transfected with αSyn. Axonal vesicle transport was examined by live imaging of PMN co-transfected with EGFP-labeled synaptophysin. Overexpression of all αSyn variants significantly decreased the number of motile vesicles and decelerated vesicle transport compared with control. Macroautophagic flux in PMN was enhanced by αSyn-WT and -A53T but not by αSyn-A30P. Correspondingly, colocalization of αSyn and the autophagy marker LC3 was reduced for αSyn-A30P compared with the other αSyn variants. The number of mitochondria colocalizing with LC3 as a marker for mitophagy did not differ among the groups. In the rat optic nerve, both αSyn-WT and -A30P accelerated kinetics of acute axonal degeneration following crush lesion as analyzed by in vivo live imaging. We conclude that αSyn overexpression impairs neurite outgrowth and augments axonal degeneration, whereas axonal vesicle transport and autophagy are severely altered. PMID:26158517

  4. Mechanical analysis of the strains generated by water tension in plant stems. Part I: stress transmission from the water to the cell walls.

    PubMed

    Alméras, Tancrède; Gril, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Plant tissues shrink and swell in response to changes in water pressure. These strains can be easily measured, e.g., at the surface of tree stems, to obtain indirect information about plant water status and other physiological parameters. We developed a mechanical model to clarify how water pressure is transmitted to cell walls and causes shrinkage of plant tissues, particularly in the case of thick-walled cells such as wood fibers. Our analysis shows that the stress inside the fiber cell walls is lower than the water tension. The difference is accounted for by a stress transmission factor that depends on two main effects. The first effect is the dilution of the stress through the cell wall, because water acts at the lumen border and is transmitted to the outer border of the cell, which has a larger circumference. The second effect is the partial conversion of radial stress into tangential stress. Both effects are quantified as functions of parameters of the cell wall structure and its mechanical properties.

  5. A rapid, inexpensive high throughput screen method for neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Yeyeodu, Susan T; Witherspoon, Sam M; Gilyazova, Nailya; Ibeanu, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth assays are the most common phenotypic screen to assess chemical effects on neuronal cells. Current automated assays involve expensive equipment, lengthy sample preparation and handling, costly reagents and slow rates of data acquisition and analysis. We have developed a high throughput screen (HTS) for neurite outgrowth using a robust neuronal cell model coupled to fast and inexpensive visualization methods, reduced data volume and rapid data analysis. Neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cell, a subclone of PC12, possessing rapid growth and enhanced sensitivity to NGF was used as a model neuron. This method reduces preparation time by using cells expressing GFP or native cells stained with HCS CellMask(™) Red in a multiplexed 30 min fixation and staining step. A 2x2 camera binning process reduced both image data files and analysis times by 75% and 60% respectively, compared to current protocols. In addition, eliminating autofocus steps during montage generation reduced data collection time. Pharmacological profiles for stimulation and inhibition of neurite outgrowth by NGF and SU6656 were comparable to current standard method utilizing immunofluorescence detection of tubulin. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by members of a 1,120-member Prestwick compound library as assayed using this method identified six molecules, including etoposide, isoflupredone acetate, fludrocortisone acetate, thioguanosine, oxyphenbutazone and gibberellic acid, that more than doubled the neurite mass primed by 2 ng/ml NGF. This simple procedure represents an important routine approach in high throughput screening of large chemical libraries using the neurite outgrowth phenotype as a measure of the effects of chemical molecules on neuronal cells. PMID:21347208

  6. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures.

  7. Pleurotus giganteus (Berk.) Karunarathna & K.D. Hyde: Nutritional value and in vitro neurite outgrowth activity in rat pheochromocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs dedicated to alleviate neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s have always been associated with debilitating side effects. Medicinal mushrooms which harness neuropharmacological compounds offer a potential possibility for protection against such diseases. Pleurotus giganteus (formerly known as Panus giganteus) has been consumed by the indigenous people in Peninsular Malaysia for many years. Domestication of this wild mushroom is gaining popularity but to our knowledge, medicinal properties reported for this culinary mushroom are minimal. Methods The fruiting bodies P. giganteus were analysed for its nutritional values. Cytotoxicity of the mushroom’s aqueous and ethanolic extracts towards PC12, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line was assessed by using 3-[4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Neurite outgrowth stimulation assay was carried out with nerve growth factor (NGF) as control. To elucidate signaling mechanisms involved by mushroom extract-induced neurite outgrowth, treatment of specific inhibitor for MEK/ERK and PI3K signalling pathway was carried out. Results The fruiting bodies of P. giganteus were found to have high carbohydrate, dietary fibre, potassium, phenolic compounds and triterpenoids. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in a dose- and time-dependant manner with no detectable cytotoxic effect. At day 3, 25 μg/ml of aqueous extract and 15 μg/ml of ethanolic extract showed the highest percentage of neurite-bearing cells, i.e. 31.7 ± 1.1% and 33.3 ± 0.9%; respectively. Inhibition treatment results suggested that MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt are responsible for neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells stimulated by P. giganteus extract. The high potassium content (1345.7 mg/100 g) may be responsible for promoting neurite extension, too. Conclusions P. giganteus contains bioactive compounds that mimic NGF and are responsible for neurite

  8. Automatic quantification of neurite outgrowth by means of image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wouwer, Gert; Nuydens, Rony; Meert, Theo; Weyn, Barbara

    2004-07-01

    A system for quantification of neurite outgrowth in in-vitro experiments is described. The system is developed for routine use in a high-throughput setting and is therefore needs fast, cheap, and robust. It relies on automated digital microscopical imaging of microtiter plates. Image analysis is applied to extract features for characterisation of neurite outgrowth. The system is tested in a dose-response experiment on PC12 cells + Taxol. The performance of the system and its ability to measure changes on neuronal morphology is studied.

  9. Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling-6 Promotes Neurite Outgrowth via JAK2/STAT5-Mediated Signalling Pathway, Involving Negative Feedback Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sakshi; Mishra, Kanchan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Banerjee, Kakoli

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) protein family are key regulators of cellular responses to cytokines and play an important role in the nervous system. The SOCS6 protein, a less extensively studied SOCS family member, has been shown to induce insulin resistance in the retina and promote survival of the retinal neurons. But no reports are available about the role of SOCS6 in neuritogenesis. In this study, we examined the role of SOCS6 in neurite outgrowth and neuronal cell signalling. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of SOCS6 in neural stem cells differentiation was studied in neural stem cells and PC12 cell line. Highly elevated levels of SOCS6 were found upon neural cell differentiation both at the mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, SOCS6 over-expression lead to increase in neurite outgrowth and degree of branching, whereas SOCS6 knockdown with specific siRNAs, lead to a significant decrease in neurite initiation and extension. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulation which enhanced neurite outgrowth of neural cells resulted in further enhancement of SOCS6 expression. Jak/Stat (Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer And Activator Of Transcription) pathway was found to be involved in the SOCS6 mediated neurite outgrowth. Bioinformatics study revealed presence of putative Stat binding sites in the SOCS6 promoter region. Transcription factors Stat5a and Stat5b were involved in SOCS6 gene upregulation leading to neuronal differentiation. Following differentiation, SOCS6 was found to form a ternary complex with IGFR (Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor) and JAK2 which acted in a negative feedback loop to inhibit pStat5 activation. Conclusion/Significance The current paradigm for the first time states that SOCS6, a SOCS family member, plays an important role in the process of neuronal differentiation. These findings define a novel molecular mechanism for Jak2/Stat5 mediated SOCS6 signalling. PMID:22125600

  10. Flow in porous media, phase behavior and ultralow interfacial tensions: mechanisms of enhanced petroleum recovery. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    A major program of university research, longer-ranged and more fundamental in approach than industrial research, into basic mechanisms of enhancing petroleum recovery and into underlying physics, chemistry, geology, applied mathematics, computation, and engineering science has been built at Minnesota. The 1982 outputs of the interdisciplinary team of investigators were again ideas, instruments, techniques, data, understanding and skilled people: forty-one scientific and engineering papers in leading journals; four pioneering Ph.D. theses; numerous presentations to scientific and technical meetings, and to industrial, governmental and university laboratories; vigorous program of research visits to and from Minnesota; and two outstanding Ph.D.'s to research positions in the petroleum industry, one to a university faculty position, one to research leadership in a governmental institute. This report summarizes the 1982 papers and theses and features sixteen major accomplishments of the program during that year. Abstracts of all forty-five publications in the permanent literature are appended. Further details of information transfer and personnel exchange with industrial, governmental and university laboratories appear in 1982 Quarterly Reports available from the Department of Energy and are not reproduced here. The Minnesota program continues in 1983, notwithstanding earlier uncertainty about the DOE funding which finally materialized and is the bulk of support. Supplemental grants-in-aid from nine companies in the petroleum industry are important, as are the limited University and departmental contributions. 839 references, 172 figures, 29 tables.

  11. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  12. ENDOCHONDRAL GROWTH IN GROWTH PLATES OF THREE SPECIES AT TWO ANATOMICAL LOCATIONS MODULATED BY MECHANICAL COMPRESSION AND TENSION

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.F.; Aronsson, David D.; Dimock, Abigail N.; Cortright, Valerie; Beck., Samantha

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose Sustained mechanical loading alters longitudinal growth of bones, and this growth sensitivity to load has been implicated in progression of skeletal deformities during growth. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between altered growth and different magnitudes of sustained altered stress in a diverse set of non-human growth plates. Methods The sensitivity of endochondral growth to differing magnitudes of sustained compression or distraction stress was measured in growth plates of three species of immature animals (rats, rabbits, calves) at two anatomical locations (caudal vertebra and proximal tibia) with two different ages of rats and rabbits. An external loading apparatus was applied for eight days and growth was measured as the distance between fluorescent markers administered 24 and 48 hours prior to euthanasia. Results An apparently linear relationship between stress and percentage growth modulation (percent difference between loaded and control growth plates) was found, with distraction accelerating growth and compression slowing growth. The growth-rate sensitivity to stress was between 9.2 and 23.9% per 0.1 MPa for different growth plates, and averaged 17.1% per 0.1 MPa. The growth-rate sensitivity to stress differed between vertebrae and the proximal tibia (15 and 18.6 percent per 0.1 MPa respectively). The range of control growth rates of different growth plates was large (30 microns/day for rat vertebrae to 366 microns/day for rabbit proximal tibia). Conclusions The relatively small differences in growth-rate sensitivity to stress for a diverse set of growth plates suggests that these results might be generalized to other growth plates, including human. These data may be applicable to planning the management of progressive deformities in patients having residual growth. PMID:16705695

  13. Effect of point and grain boundary defects on the mechanical behavior of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under tension via atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Khanh Q.; Spearot, Douglas E.

    2014-07-07

    Atomistic simulation is used to study the structure and energy of defects in monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the role of defects on the mechanical properties of monolayer MoS{sub 2}. First, energy minimization is used to study the structure and energy of monosulfur vacancies positioned within the bottom S layer of the MoS{sub 2} lattice, and 60° symmetric tilt grain boundaries along the zigzag and armchair directions, with comparison to experimental observations and density functional theory calculations. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are used to subject suspended defect-containing MoS{sub 2} membranes to a state of multiaxial tension. A phase transformation is observed in the defect-containing membranes, similar to prior work in the literature. For monolayer MoS{sub 2} membranes with point defects, groups of monosulfur vacancies promote stress-concentration points, allowing failure to initiate away from the center of the membrane. For monolayer MoS{sub 2} membranes with grain boundaries, failure initiates at the grain boundary and it is found that the breaking force for the membrane is independent of grain boundary energy.

  14. CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhengxu; Huang, Jinghui; He, Fei; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:27611779

  15. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Johnson, William M.; Pilat, Jennifer M.; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca2+-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  16. CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Ye, Zhengxu; Huang, Jinghui; He, Fei; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:27611779

  17. Link between the Semi-empirical Andrade and Schytil Equations and the Statistical-Mechanical Born-Green Equation for Viscosity and Surface Tension of Pure Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptay, G.

    2008-04-01

    The semi-empirical Andrade and Schytil equations are revisited for the melting point dynamic viscosity and surface tension of pure liquid metals. Both equations are derived in modified forms, with easy-to-use, dimensionless semi-empirical parameters. The modified equations are used to reproduce the theoretical equation of Born-Green on the ratio of surface tension and viscosity of pure liquid metals.

  18. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ya-Yun; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates production and apoptotic damage induced by high glucose are major causes of neuronal damage in diabetic neuropathy. Berberine (BBR), a natural antidiabetes drug with PI3K-activating activity, holds promise for diabetes because of its dual antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities. We have previously reported that BBR attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} neurotoxicity via activating the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway. In this study, we further explored the novel protective mechanism of BBR on high glucose-induced apoptotic death and neurite damage of SH-SY5Y cells. Results indicated BBR (0.1–10 nM) significantly attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nucleus condensation, and apoptotic death in high glucose-treated cells. However, AG1024, an inhibitor of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, significantly abolished BBR protection against high glucose-induced neuronal death. BBR also increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased cytochrome c release. High glucose down-regulated IGF-1 receptor and phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β, the effects of which were attenuated by BBR treatment. BBR also activated nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key antioxidative transcription factor, which is accompanied with up-regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, BBR markedly enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF) expression and promoted neurite outgrowth in high glucose-treated cells. To further determine the role of the Nrf2 in BBR neuroprotection, RNA interference directed against Nrf2 was used. Results indicated Nrf2 siRNA abolished BBR-induced HO-1, NGF, neurite outgrowth and ROS decrease. In conclusion, BBR attenuated high glucose-induced neurotoxicity, and we are the first to reveal this novel mechanism of BBR as an Nrf2 activator against glucose neurotoxicity, providing another potential therapeutic use of BBR on the treatment of diabetic complications. - Highlights: • BBR attenuates high glucose-induced ROS

  19. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  20. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later. PMID:6481819

  1. Functional Consequences of Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density in Humans across the Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Nazeri, Arash; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Rotenberg, David J.; Rajji, Tarek K.; Rathi, Yogesh; Michailovich, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    As humans age, a characteristic pattern of widespread neocortical dendritic disruption coupled with compensatory effects in hippocampus and other subcortical structures is shown in postmortem investigations. It is now possible to address age-related effects on gray matter (GM) neuritic organization and density in humans using multishell diffusion-weighted MRI and the neurite-orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) model. In 45 healthy individuals across the adult lifespan (21–84 years), we used a multishell diffusion imaging and the NODDI model to assess the intraneurite volume fraction and neurite orientation-dispersion index (ODI) in GM tissues. We also determined the functional correlates of variations in GM microstructure by obtaining resting-state fMRI and behavioral data. We found a significant age-related deficit in neocortical ODI (most prominently in frontoparietal regions), whereas increased ODI was observed in hippocampus and cerebellum with advancing age. Neocortical ODI outperformed cortical thickness and white matter fractional anisotropy for the prediction of chronological age in the same individuals. Higher GM ODI sampled from resting-state networks with known age-related susceptibility (default mode and visual association networks) was associated with increased functional connectivity of these networks, whereas the task-positive networks tended to show no association or even decreased connectivity. Frontal pole ODI mediated the negative relationship of age with executive function, whereas hippocampal ODI mediated the positive relationship of age with executive function. Our in vivo findings align very closely with the postmortem data and provide evidence for vulnerability and compensatory neural mechanisms of aging in GM microstructure that have functional and cognitive impact in vivo. PMID:25632148

  2. Study of laser uncaging induced morphological alteration of rat cortical neurites using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Tu, Chunlong; Liang, Yitao; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-09-30

    Activity-dependent structural remodeling is an important aspect of neuronal plasticity. In the previous researches, neuronal structure variations resulting from external interventions were detected by the imaging instruments such as the fluorescence microscopy, the scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and the laser confocal microscopy. In this article, a new platform which combined the photochemical stimulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) was set up to detect the activity-dependent structural remodeling. In the experiments, the cortical neurites on the glass coverslips were stimulated by locally uncaged glutamate under the ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses, and a calcium-related structural collapse of neurites (about 250 nm height decrease) was observed by an AFM. This was the first attempt to combine the laser uncaging with AFM in living cell researches. With the advantages of highly localized stimulation (<5 μm), super resolution imaging (<3.8 nm), and convenient platform building, this system was suitable for the quantitative observation of the neuron mechanical property variations and morphological alterations modified by neural activities under different photochemical stimulations, which would be helpful for studying physiological and pathological mechanisms of structural and functional changes induced by the biomolecule acting.

  3. Automated quantification of neurite outgrowth orientation distributions on patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew; Wang, Dadong; Sinclair, Catriona M.; Kapsa, Robert M. I.; Quigley, Anita F.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Razal, Joselito M.; Baughman, Ray H.; Münch, Gerald; Vallotton, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Objective. We have developed an image analysis methodology for quantifying the anisotropy of neuronal projections on patterned substrates. Approach. Our method is based on the fitting of smoothing splines to the digital traces produced using a non-maximum suppression technique. This enables precise estimates of the local tangents uniformly along the neurite length, and leads to unbiased orientation distributions suitable for objectively assessing the anisotropy induced by tailored surfaces. Main results. In our application, we demonstrate that carbon nanotubes arrayed in parallel bundles over gold surfaces induce a considerable neurite anisotropy; a result which is relevant for regenerative medicine. Significance. Our pipeline is generally applicable to the study of fibrous materials on 2D surfaces and should also find applications in the study of DNA, microtubules, and other polymeric materials.

  4. Foxp2 regulates gene networks implicated in neurite outgrowth in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Vernes, Sonja C; Oliver, Peter L; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Lockstone, Helen E; Puliyadi, Rathi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Ho, Joses; Mombereau, Cedric; Brewer, Ariel; Lowy, Ernesto; Nicod, Jérôme; Groszer, Matthias; Baban, Dilair; Sahgal, Natasha; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Davies, Kay E; Geschwind, Daniel H; Fisher, Simon E

    2011-07-01

    Forkhead-box protein P2 is a transcription factor that has been associated with intriguing aspects of cognitive function in humans, non-human mammals, and song-learning birds. Heterozygous mutations of the human FOXP2 gene cause a monogenic speech and language disorder. Reduced functional dosage of the mouse version (Foxp2) causes deficient cortico-striatal synaptic plasticity and impairs motor-skill learning. Moreover, the songbird orthologue appears critically important for vocal learning. Across diverse vertebrate species, this well-conserved transcription factor is highly expressed in the developing and adult central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms regulated by Foxp2 during brain development. We used an integrated functional genomics strategy to robustly define Foxp2-dependent pathways, both direct and indirect targets, in the embryonic brain. Specifically, we performed genome-wide in vivo ChIP-chip screens for Foxp2-binding and thereby identified a set of 264 high-confidence neural targets under strict, empirically derived significance thresholds. The findings, coupled to expression profiling and in situ hybridization of brain tissue from wild-type and mutant mouse embryos, strongly highlighted gene networks linked to neurite development. We followed up our genomics data with functional experiments, showing that Foxp2 impacts on neurite outgrowth in primary neurons and in neuronal cell models. Our data indicate that Foxp2 modulates neuronal network formation, by directly and indirectly regulating mRNAs involved in the development and plasticity of neuronal connections.

  5. Leadership Tensions and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Bill; Mulford, Bill; Kendall, Diana; Kendall, Lawrie

    2008-01-01

    Results from the Tasmanian Successful School Principal Project (SSPP) survey concur with the four major leadership tensions and dilemmas identified in a background literature review. These tensions and dilemmas relate to internal/external control, ethic of care/responsibility, and an emphasis on professional/personal as well as…

  6. Perspectives on Campus Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, David C., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to provide background information and insight on campus tensions, and suggest ideas on how to go about reducing these tensions. The papers are divided into 5 parts. Part I, The New Situation, includes papers by Kenneth E. Boulding, William M. Birenbaum, Marcus G. Raskin, and Peter Schrag. Part II, Where the Students…

  7. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  8. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  9. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  10. Varying the diameter of aligned electrospun fibers alters neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Bing; Mullins, Michael E; Cregg, Jared M; McCarthy, Connor W; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2010-08-01

    Aligned, electrospun fibers have shown great promise in facilitating directed neurite outgrowth within cell and animal models. While electrospun fiber diameter does influence cellular behavior, it is not known how aligned, electrospun fiber scaffolds of differing diameter influence neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell (SC) migration. Thus, the goal of this study was to first create highly aligned, electrospun fiber scaffolds of varying diameter and then assess neurite and SC behavior from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants. Three groups of highly aligned, electrospun poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers were created (1325+383 nm, large diameter fibers; 759+179 nm, intermediate diameter fibers; and 293+65 nm, small diameter fibers). Embryonic stage nine (E9) chick DRG were cultured on fiber substrates for 5 days and then the explants were stained against neurofilament and S100. DAPI stain was used to assess SC migration. Neurite length and SC migration distance were determined. In general, the direction of neurite extension and SC migration were guided along the aligned fibers. On the small diameter fiber substrate, the neurite length was 42% and 36% shorter than those on the intermediate and large fiber substrates, respectively. Interestingly, SC migration did not correlate with that of neurite extension in all situations. SCs migrated equivalently with extending neurites in both the small and large diameter scaffolds, but lagged behind neurites on the intermediate diameter scaffolds. Thus, in some situations, topography alone is sufficient to guide neurites without the leading support of SCs. Scanning electron microscopy images show that neurites cover the fibers and do not reside exclusively between fibers. Further, at the interface between fibers and neurites, filopodial extensions grab and attach to nearby fibers as they extend down the fiber substrate. Overall, the results and observations suggest that fiber diameter is an important parameter to consider when

  11. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  12. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  13. Tension chylothorax following pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Hemang; Nolan, Matthew E.; Nichols, Francis C.; Daniels, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-pneumonectomy chylothorax is an uncommon complication following surgery, with an estimated incidence of less than 0.7%. Post-pneumonectomy tension chylothorax, where rapid accumulation of chyle in the post-pneumonectomy space results in hemodynamic compromise, is exceedingly rare, with just 7 cases previously reported. All prior cases of tension chylothorax were managed operatively with decompressive chest tube placement followed by open thoracic duct repair. Our case is the first reported tension chylothorax to be managed conservatively by thoracostomy drainage coupled with a period of parenteral nutrition followed by a medium chain triglyceride-restricted diet. PMID:26029569

  14. Tension chylothorax following pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hemang; Nolan, Matthew E; Nichols, Francis C; Daniels, Craig E

    2015-01-01

    Post-pneumonectomy chylothorax is an uncommon complication following surgery, with an estimated incidence of less than 0.7%. Post-pneumonectomy tension chylothorax, where rapid accumulation of chyle in the post-pneumonectomy space results in hemodynamic compromise, is exceedingly rare, with just 7 cases previously reported. All prior cases of tension chylothorax were managed operatively with decompressive chest tube placement followed by open thoracic duct repair. Our case is the first reported tension chylothorax to be managed conservatively by thoracostomy drainage coupled with a period of parenteral nutrition followed by a medium chain triglyceride-restricted diet. PMID:26029569

  15. Tension Type Headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Fernández-de-Las-Penas, César

    2016-01-01

    Tension type headache (TTH) is the most common headache and it has been discussed for years without reaching consensus on its pathophysiology, or proper rationale management. This primary headache remains a challenge into its management for clinicians. This review aims to provide an updated and critical discussion on what is currently known and supported by scientific evidence about TTH and which gaps there still may be in our understanding of this condition. Clinical features of TTH resemble common manifestations of muscle referred pain. Episodic TTH may evolve into the chronic form by different aspects and several triggers may be involved at the same time. Both peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms seem to be clearly involved in this process. Individuals with episodic TTH exhibit higher levels of peripheral excitability whereas chronic TTH clearly show central sensitization manifestations. The role of associated muscle hyperalgesia seems to be important factors in TTH. Therapeutic management of individuals with TTH should be multimodal including appropriate use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to reduce the nociceptive peripheral drive to the central nervous system. If properly applied, treatment may not only reduce the number of TTH attacks but may also prevent or delay the transition from episodic to chronic TTH. Scientific evidence of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment is discussed in this review. PMID:26717946

  16. Xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase (XET) functions in gelatinous layers of tension wood fibers in poplar--a glimpse into the mechanism of the balancing act of trees.

    PubMed

    Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Awano, Tatsuya; Banasiak, Alicja; Bourquin, Veronica; Ibatullin, Farid; Funada, Ryo; Brumer, Harry; Teeri, Tuula T; Hayashi, Takahisa; Sundberg, Björn; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2007-06-01

    Tension wood is a specialized tissue of deciduous trees that functions in bending woody stems to optimize their position in space. Tension wood fibers that develop on one side of the stem have an increased potency to shrink compared with fibers on the opposite side, thus creating a bending moment. It is believed that the gelatinous (G) cell wall layer containing almost pure cellulose of tension wood fibers is pivotal to their shrinking. By analyzing saccharide composition and linkage in isolated G-layers of poplar, we found that they contain some matrix components in addition to cellulose, of which xyloglucan is the most abundant. Xyloglucan, xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase (XET) activity and xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) gene products were detected in developing G-layers by labeling using CCRC-M1 monoclonal antibody, in situ incorporation of XXXG-SR and the polyclonal antibody to poplar PttXET16-34, respectively, indicating that xyloglucan is incorporated into the G-layer during its development. Moreover, several XTH transcripts were altered and were generally up-regulated in developing tension wood compared with normal wood. In mature G-fibers, XTH gene products were detected in the G-layers while the XET activity was evident in the adjacent S(2) wall layer. We propose that XET activity is essential for G-fiber shrinking by repairing xyloglucan cross-links between G- and S(2)-layers and thus maintaining their contact. Surprisingly, XTH gene products and XET activity persisted in mature G-fibers for several years, suggesting that the enzyme functions after cell death repairing the cross-links as they are being broken during the shrinking process.

  17. A miniature tension sensor to measure surgical suture tension of deformable musculoskeletal tissues during joint motion.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new suture tension sensor for musculoskeletal soft tissue that shows deformation or movements. The suture tension sensor was 10 mm in size, which was small enough to avoid conflicting with the adjacent sensor. Furthermore, the sensor had good linearity up to a tension of 50 N, which is equivalent to the breaking strength of a size 1 absorbable suture defined by the United States Pharmacopeia. The design and mechanism were analyzed using a finite element model prior to developing the actual sensor. Based on the analysis, adequate material was selected, and the output linearity was confirmed and compared with the simulated result. To evaluate practical application, the incision of the skin and capsule were sutured during simulated total knee arthroplasty. When conventional surgery and minimally invasive surgery were performed, suture tensions were compared. In minimally invasive surgery, the distal portion of the knee was dissected, and the proximal portion of the knee was dissected additionally in conventional surgery. In the skin suturing, the maximum tension was 4.4 N, and this tension was independent of the sensor location. In contrast, the sensor suturing the capsule in the distal portion had a tension of 4.4 N in minimally invasive surgery, while the proximal sensor had a tension of 44 N in conventional surgery. The suture tensions increased nonlinearly and were dependent on the knee flexion angle. Furthermore, the tension changes showed hysteresis. This miniature tension sensor may help establish the optimal suturing method with adequate tension to ensure wound healing and early recovery.

  18. The Adhesion Molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1 Regulates Neurite Branching through a SAX-7/L1CAM-EGL-15/FGFR Receptor Complex.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A; Lázaro-Peña, María I; Ramos-Ortiz, Gibram A; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-06-01

    Neurite branching is essential for correct assembly of neural circuits, yet it remains a poorly understood process. For example, the neural cell adhesion molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1, which is mutated in Kallmann syndrome, regulates neurite branching through mechanisms largely unknown. Here, we show that KAL-1/anosmin-1 mediates neurite branching as an autocrine co-factor with EGL-17/FGF through a receptor complex consisting of the conserved cell adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM and the fibroblast growth factor receptor EGL-15/FGFR. This protein complex, which appears conserved in humans, requires the immunoglobulin (Ig) domains of SAX-7/L1CAM and the FN(III) domains of KAL-1/anosmin-1 for formation in vitro as well as function in vivo. The kinase domain of the EGL-15/FGFR is required for branching, and genetic evidence suggests that ras-mediated signaling downstream of EGL-15/FGFR is necessary to effect branching. Our studies establish a molecular pathway that regulates neurite branching during development of the nervous system. PMID:26004184

  19. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  20. The Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth of Neurons on Poly(D-lysine)/Hyaluronan Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haifei; Sheng, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    Poly(D-lysine)/hyaluronan (PDL/HA) films were prepared using layer-by-layer assembly technique and chemically cross-linked with a water soluble carbodiimide (EDC) in combination with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) through formation of amide bonds. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to follow the cross-linking reaction. Atomic force measurement, ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were performed to study the chemical structure, topography, thickness and mechanical properties of the cross-linked films. QCM-D and Frictional force study were used to reveal the viscoelasticity of the films after cross-linking treatment. The stability of the films was studied via incubating the films in physiological environment. Finally, the neurons were used to evaluate the interaction between films and cells. The results indicated that the neurons were preferably proliferating and outgrowth neurite on cross-linked films while uncross-linked films are highly cell resistant. PMID:27427590

  1. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Moritz; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life). The omnipresence of tension and suspense suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie) build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying tension and suspense. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena. PMID:25717309

  2. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  3. The neuritic plaque facilitates pathological conversion of tau in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Braunstein, Kerstin E.; Zhang, Juhong; Lau, Ashley; Sibener, Leslie; Deeble, Christopher; Wong, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    A central question in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is whether the neuritic plaque is necessary and sufficient for the development of tau pathology. Hyperphosphorylation of tau is found within dystrophic neurites surrounding β-amyloid deposits in AD mouse models but the pathological conversion of tau is absent. Likewise, expression of a human tau repeat domain in mice is insufficient to drive the pathological conversion of tau. Here we developed an Aβ-amyloidosis mouse model that expresses the human tau repeat domain and show that in these mice, the neuritic plaque facilitates the pathological conversion of wild-type tau. We show that this tau fragment seeds the neuritic plaque-dependent pathological conversion of wild-type tau that spreads from the cortex and hippocampus to the brain stem. These results establish that in addition to the neuritic plaque, a second determinant is required to drive the conversion of wild-type tau. PMID:27373369

  4. A Farnesyltransferase Acts to Inhibit Ectopic Neurite Formation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David; Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Imai, Janice H.; Slatculescu, Cristina; Noblett, Nathaniel; Mao, Lei; Beese, Lorena; Colavita, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pathways that regulate nascent neurite formation play a critical role in neuronal morphogenesis. The core planar cell polarity components VANG-1/Van Gogh and PRKL-1/Prickle are involved in blocking inappropriate neurite formation in a subset of motor neurons in C. elegans. A genetic screen for mutants that display supernumerary neurites was performed to identify additional factors involved in this process. This screen identified mutations in fntb-1, the β subunit of farnesyltransferase. We show that fntb-1 is expressed in neurons and acts cell-autonomously to regulate neurite formation. Prickle proteins are known to be post-translationally modified by farnesylation at their C-terminal CAAX motifs. We show that PRKL-1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane in both a CAAX-dependent and CAAX-independent manner but that PRKL-1 can only inhibit neurite formation in a CAAX-dependent manner. PMID:27300162

  5. A Farnesyltransferase Acts to Inhibit Ectopic Neurite Formation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Carr, David; Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Imai, Janice H; Slatculescu, Cristina; Noblett, Nathaniel; Mao, Lei; Beese, Lorena; Colavita, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pathways that regulate nascent neurite formation play a critical role in neuronal morphogenesis. The core planar cell polarity components VANG-1/Van Gogh and PRKL-1/Prickle are involved in blocking inappropriate neurite formation in a subset of motor neurons in C. elegans. A genetic screen for mutants that display supernumerary neurites was performed to identify additional factors involved in this process. This screen identified mutations in fntb-1, the β subunit of farnesyltransferase. We show that fntb-1 is expressed in neurons and acts cell-autonomously to regulate neurite formation. Prickle proteins are known to be post-translationally modified by farnesylation at their C-terminal CAAX motifs. We show that PRKL-1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane in both a CAAX-dependent and CAAX-independent manner but that PRKL-1 can only inhibit neurite formation in a CAAX-dependent manner.

  6. Absence of aluminium in neuritic plaque cores in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J P; McDonald, B; Watt, F

    1992-11-01

    Controversy exists over whether aluminium has a role in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is neuropathologically characterized by the occurrence of a minimum density of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the hippocampus and the association cortex of the brain. The purported association of aluminium with Alzheimer's disease is based on: (1) the experimental induction of fibrillary changes in the neurons of animals by the injection of aluminium salts into brain tissue; (2) reported detection of aluminium in neuritic plaques and tangle-bearing neurons; (3) epidemiological studies linking aluminium levels in the environment, notably water supplies, with an increased prevalence of dementia; and (4) a reported decrease in the rate of disease progression following the administration of desferroxamine, an aluminium chelator, to clinically diagnosed sufferers of Alzheimer's disease. Here we use nuclear microscopy, a new analytical technique involving million-volt nuclear particles, to identify and analyse plaques in postmortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease without using chemical staining techniques and fail to demonstrate the presence of aluminium in plaque cores in untreated tissue. PMID:1436075

  7. Tension in active shapes.

    PubMed

    Papari, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The concept of tension is introduced in the framework of active contours with prior shape information, and it is used to improve image segmentation. In particular, two properties of this new quantity are shown: 1) high values of the tension correspond to undesired equilibrium points of the cost function under minimization and 2) tension decreases if a curve is split into two or more parts. Based on these ideas, a tree is generated whose nodes are different local minima of the cost function. Deeper nodes in the tree are expected to correspond to lower values of the cost function. In this way, the search for the global optimum is reduced to visiting and pruning a binary tree. The proposed method has been applied to the problem of fish segmentation from low quality underwater images. Qualitative and quantitative comparison with existing algorithms based on the Euler–Lagrange diffusion equations shows the superiority of the proposed approach in avoiding undesired local minima.

  8. Influence of cAMP and protein kinase A on neurite length from spiral ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Engbers, Jonathan; Khaja, Sobia; Xu, Linjing; Clark, J. Jason; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2011-01-01

    Regrowth of peripheral spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) fibers is a primary objective in efforts to improve cochlear implant outcomes and to potentially reinnervate regenerated hair cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates neurite growth and guidance via activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Exchange Protein directly Activated by Cylic AMP (Epac). Here we explored the effects of cAMP signaling on SGN neurite length in vitro. We find that the cAMP analog, cpt-cAMP, exerts a biphasic effect on neurite length; increasing length at lower concentrations and reducing length at higher concentrations. This biphasic response occurs in cultures plated on laminin, fibronectin, or tenascin C suggesting that it is not substrate dependent. cpt-cAMP also reduces SGN neurite branching. The Epac-specific agonist, 8-pCPT-2’-O-Me-cAMP, does not alter SGN neurite length. Constitutively active PKA isoforms strongly inhibit SGN neurite length similar to higher levels of cAMP. Chronic membrane depolarization activates PKA in SGNs and also inhibits SGN neurite length. However, inhibition of PKA fails to rescue neurite length in depolarized cultures implying that activation of PKA is not necessary for the inhibition of SGN neurite length by chronic depolarization. Expression of constitutively active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, isoforms partially rescues SGN neurite length in the presence of activated PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of cAMP/PKA represents a potential strategy to enhance SGN fiber elongation following deafness; however such therapies will likely require careful titration so as to simultaneously promote rather than inhibit nerve fiber regeneration. PMID:22154930

  9. Slit2 inactivates GSK3β to signal neurite outgrowth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Byun, Justin; Kim, Bo Taek; Kim, Yun Tai; Jiao, Zhongxian; Hur, Eun-Mi; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Slit molecules comprise one of the four canonical families of axon guidance cues that steer the growth cone in the developing nervous system. Apart from their role in axon pathfinding, emerging lines of evidence suggest that a wide range of cellular processes are regulated by Slit, ranging from branch formation and fasciculation during neurite outgrowth to tumor progression and to angiogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms downstream of Slit remain largely unknown, in part, because of a lack of a readily manipulatable system that produces easily identifiable traits in response to Slit. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using the cell line CAD as an assay system to dissect the signaling pathways triggered by Slit. Here, we show that CAD cells express receptors for Slit (Robo1 and Robo2) and that CAD cells respond to nanomolar concentrations of Slit2 by markedly decelerating the rate of process extension. Using this system, we reveal that Slit2 inactivates GSK3β and that inhibition of GSK3β is required for Slit2 to inhibit process outgrowth. Furthermore, we show that Slit2 induces GSK3β phosphorylation and inhibits neurite outgrowth in adult dorsal root ganglion neurons, validating Slit2 signaling in primary neurons. Given that CAD cells can be conveniently manipulated using standard molecular biological methods and that the process extension phenotype regulated by Slit2 can be readily traced and quantified, the use of a cell line CAD will facilitate the identification of downstream effectors and elucidation of signaling cascade triggered by Slit.

  10. Carbon disulfide inhibits neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration of dorsal root ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Xiang, Yujuan; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2011-12-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS₂) is a neurotoxic industrial solvent and widely used in the vulcanization of rubber, rayon, cellophane, and adhesives. Although the neurotoxicity of CS₂ has been recognized for over a century, the precise mechanism of neurotoxic action of CS₂ remains unknown. In the present study, a embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants culture model was established. Using the organotypic DRG cultures, the direct neurotoxic effects of CS₂ on outgrowth of neurites and migration of neurons from DRG explants were investigated. The organotypic DRG cultures were exposed to different concentrations of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 0.1 mmol/L, 1 mmol/L). The number of nerve fiber bundles extended from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 15.00 ± 2.61, p < .05; 0.1 mmol/L, 11.17 ± 1.47, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 8.00 ± 1.41, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (17.83 ± 2.48). The number of neurons migrated from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 79.50 ± 9.40, p < .01; 0.1 mmol/L, 62.50 ± 14.15, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 34.67 ± 7.58, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (99.33 ± 15.16). And also, the decreases in the number of nerve fiber bundles and migrated DRG neurons were in a dose-dependent manner of CS₂. These data implicated that CS₂ could inhibit neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration from DRG explants in vitro. PMID:21777162

  11. [Association between the frequency and duration, but not the intensity, of headache with mechanical hypersensitivity and the health of patients with tension-type headache].

    PubMed

    Palacios-Cena, M; Fernandez-Munoz, J J; Cigaran-Mendez, M; Moron-Verdasco, A; Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, C

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. La asociacion entre las variables clinicas de la cefalea y otras variables neurofisiologicas o de salud es controvertida. Objetivo. Determinar la asociacion de la frecuencia, duracion e intensidad del dolor con la sensibilidad mecanica craneocervical, considerando el efecto de otras variables de salud y fisicas. Pacientes y metodos. Se incluyeron 72 pacientes con cefalea de tension. Se mantuvo un diario mensual para determinar la frecuencia, duracion e intensidad del dolor. Se calcularon los umbrales de dolor a la presion (UDP) y la sensibilidad a la palpacion sobre la region craneocervical, calidad de vida (Short Form-36), discapacidad, depresion y movilidad cervical. Se introdujeron todas las variables en modelos de regresion logistica jerarquica para determinar las interacciones. Resultados. Se encontraron correlaciones entre la frecuencia y duracion de la cefalea, pero no la intensidad, con el resto de variables. El analisis de regresion mostro que la combinacion del UDP sobre el temporal, dolor corporal, edad y rol fisico explicaba el 22,3% de la varianza de la frecuencia, mientras que la combinacion de salud general, UDP sobre el trapecio superior y frecuencia del dolor explicaba el 20% de la varianza de la duracion (p < 0,001). Conclusiones. Este estudio ha encontrado que la frecuencia y la duracion de la cefalea, pero no la intensidad, se encuentran asociadas con variables neurofisiologicas, como el UDP sobre el cuello/cabeza o la percepcion de dolor generalizado en la cefalea tensional. Otras variables, como la edad, el rol fisico y la salud general tambien mostraron una asociacion con la frecuencia y la duracion de la cefalea.

  12. The Tension Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    This is a bibliography of literature on the subject of tension. Books, films, and periodicals with a bearing on stress, relaxation, anxiety, and/or methods of controlling stress are listed from the fields of physiology, psychology, and philosophy. New methods such as transcendental meditation and biofeedback are analyzed briefly and criteria are…

  13. 21. Typical lower chord tension member and diagonal tension member ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Typical lower chord tension member and diagonal tension member pinning. View is of north side of 3rd span looking west. - Cleves Bridge, Spanning Great Miami River on U.S. Highway 50, Cleves, Hamilton County, OH

  14. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  15. Neurite outgrowth at the interface of 2D and 3D growth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Fong, Vivian J.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2009-02-01

    Growing neurons navigate complex environments, but in vitro systems for studying neuronal growth typically limit the cues to flat surfaces or a single type of cue, thereby limiting the resulting growth. Here we examined the growth of neurons presented with two-dimensional (2D) substrate-bound cues when these cues were presented in conjunction with a more complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants were cultured at the interface between a collagen I matrix and a glass coverslip. Laminin (LN) or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) were uniformly coated on the surface of the glass coverslip or patterned in 50 µm tracks by microcontact printing. Quantitative analysis of neurite outgrowth with a novel grid system at multiple depths in the gel revealed several interesting trends. Most of the neurites extended at the surface of the gel when LN was presented whereas more neurites extended into the gel when CSPG was presented. Patterning of cues did not affect neurite density or depth of growth. However, neurite outgrowth near the surface of the gel aligned with LN patterns, and these extensions were significantly longer than neurites extended in other cultures. In interface cultures, DRG growth patterns varied with the type of cue where neurite density was higher in cultures presenting LN than in cultures presenting CSPG. These results represent an important step toward understanding how neurons integrate local structural and chemical cues to make net growth decisions.

  16. Triggering of high-speed neurite outgrowth using an optical microheater

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Kotaro; Zeeb, Vadim; Kawamura, Yuki; Arai, Tomomi; Gotoh, Mizuho; Itoh, Hideki; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Optical microheating is a powerful non-invasive method for manipulating biological functions such as gene expression, muscle contraction, and cell excitation. Here, we demonstrate its potential usage for regulating neurite outgrowth. We found that optical microheating with a water-absorbable 1,455-nm laser beam triggers directional and explosive neurite outgrowth and branching in rat hippocampal neurons. The focused laser beam under a microscope rapidly increases the local temperature from 36 °C to 41 °C (stabilized within 2 s), resulting in the elongation of neurites by more than 10 μm within 1 min. This high-speed, persistent elongation of neurites was suppressed by inhibitors of both microtubule and actin polymerization, indicating that the thermosensitive dynamics of these cytoskeletons play crucial roles in this heat-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we showed that microheating induced the regrowth of injured neurites and the interconnection of neurites. These results demonstrate the efficacy of optical microheating methods for the construction of arbitrary neural networks. PMID:26568288

  17. Neurite Outgrowth on Nanofiber Scaffolds with Different Orders, Structures, and Surface Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingwei; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Li, Xiaoran; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.; Xia, Younan

    2009-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers can be readily assembled into various types of scaffolds for applications in neural tissue engineering. The objective of this study is to examine and understand the unique patterns of neurite outgrowth from primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultured on scaffolds of electrospun nanofibers having different orders, structures, and surface properties. We found that the neurites extended radially outward from the DRG main body without specific directionality when cultured on a nonwoven mat of randomly oriented nanofibers. In contrast, the neurites preferentially extended along the long axis of fiber when cultured on a parallel array of aligned nanofibers. When seeded at the border between regions of aligned and random nanofibers, the same DRG simultaneously expressed aligned and random neurite fields in response to the underlying nanofibers. When cultured on a double-layered scaffold where the nanofibers in each layer were aligned along a different direction, the neurites were found to be dependent on the fiber density in both layers. This bi-axial pattern clearly demonstrates that neurite outgrowth can be influenced by nanofibers in different layers of a scaffold, rather than the topmost layer only. Taken together, these results will provide valuable information pertaining to the design of nanofiber scaffolds for neuroregenerative applications, as well as the effects of topology on neurite outgrowth, growth cone guidance, and axonal regeneration. PMID:19397333

  18. CHLORHEXIDINE INHIBITS L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE MEDIATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Bamford, Penny; Aucott, Susan W.; Tang, Ningfeng; White, Kimberly R.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a skin disinfectant that reduces skin and mucous membrane bacterial colonization and inhibits organism growth. Despite numerous studies assessing chlorhexidine safety in term infants, residual concerns have limited its use in hospitalized neonates, especially low birth weight preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess the potential neurotoxicity of chlorhexidine on the developing central nervous system using a well-established in vitro model of neurite outgrowth that includes laminin and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) as neurite outgrowth promoting substrates. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons are plated on either poly L-lysine, L1 or laminin. Chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene or their excipients are added to the media. Neurons are grown for 24 h, then fixed and neurite length measured. Results Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the length of neurites grown on L1 but not laminin. Chlorhexidine concentrations as low as 125 ng/ml statistically significantly reduced neurite length on L1. Hexachlorophene did not affect neurite length. Conclusion Chlorhexidine at concentrations detected in the blood following topical applications in preterm infants specifically inhibited L1 mediated neurite outgrowth of cerebellar granule neurons. It is now vital to determine whether the blood brain barrier is permeable to chlorhexidine in preterm infants. PMID:24126818

  19. Rabies virus neuritic paralysis: immunopathogenesis of nonfatal paralytic rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, F; Cox, J H; Meyer, S; Dahme, E; Reddehase, M J

    1992-01-01

    Two pathogenetically distinct disease manifestations are distinguished in a murine model of primary rabies virus infection with the Evelyn-Rokitnicky-Abelseth strain, rabies virus neuritic paralysis (RVNP) and fatal encephalopathogenic rabies. RVNP develops with high incidence in immunocompetent mice after intraplantar infection as a flaccid paralysis restricted to the infected limb. The histopathologic correlate of this monoplegia is a degeneration of the myelinated motor neurons of the peripheral nerve involved. While, in this model, fatal encephalopathogenic rabies develops only after depletion of the CD4 subset of T lymphocytes and without contribution of the CD8 subset, RVNP is identified as an immunopathological process in which both the CD4 and CD8 subsets of T lymphocytes are critically implicated. Images PMID:1629964

  20. Orientation and temperature dependence of some mechanical properties of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4. 3: Tension-compression anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gaab, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Hemker, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy specimens with various crystallographic directions along their axes were tested in compression at room temperature, 650, 760, 870, and 980 deg C. These results are compared with the tensile behavior studied previously. The alloy, Rene N4, was developed for gas turbine engine blades and has the nominal composition 3.7 Al, 4.2 Ti, 4 Ta, 0.5 Nb, 6 W, 1.5 Mo 9 Cr. 7.5 Co, balance Ni, in weight percent. Slip trace analysis showed that primary cube slip occurred even at room temperature for the 111 specimens. With increasing test temperature more orientations exhibited primary cube slip, until at 870 deg C only the 100 and 011 specimens exhibited normal octahedral slip. The yield strength for octahedral slip was numerically analysed using a model proposed by Lall, Chin, and Pope to explain deviations from Schmid's Law in the yielding behavior of a single phase Gamma prime alloy, Ni3(Al, Nb). The Schmid's Law deviations in Rene N4 were found to be largely due to a tension-compression anisotropy. A second effect, which increases trength for orientations away from 001, was found to be small in Rene N4. Analysis of recently published data on the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 yielded the same result.

  1. Genetic Analysis of a Novel Tubulin Mutation That Redirects Synaptic Vesicle Targeting and Causes Neurite Degeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L.; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress. PMID:25392990

  2. Surface tension and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, J.; Sanz-Andrés, A.; Pérez-Grande, I.; Pindado, S.; Franchini, S.; Alonso, G.

    2014-09-01

    The behaviour of confined liquids on board an orbiting spacecraft is mainly driven by surface tension phenomena, which cause an apparently anomalous response of the liquid when compared with the behaviour that can be observed on an Earth laboratory provided that the amount of liquid is high enough. The reason is that in an orbiting spacecraft the different inertial forces acting on the bulk of the liquid are almost zero, causing thus capillary forces to be the dominant ones. Of course, since gravity forces are proportional to the liquid volume, whereas surface tension forces are proportional to the liquid surface, there are situations on Earth where capillarity can be the dominant effect, as it happens when very small volume liquid samples are considered. However, work with small size samples may require the use of sophisticated optical devices. Leaving aside the neutral buoyancy technique, a way of handling large liquid interfaces is by using drop towers, where the sample falls subjected to the action of Earth’s gravity. This approach is suitable when the characteristic time of the problem under consideration is much smaller than the drop time. In this work the transformation of an out-of-use chimney into a drop tower is presented. Because of the miniaturization, hardiness and low cost of current electronic devices, a drop tower can be used as an inexpensive tool for undergraduate students to experimentally analyse a large variety of surface tension driven phenomena.

  3. GTP hydrolysis of TC10 promotes neurite outgrowth through exocytic fusion of Rab11- and L1-containing vesicles by releasing exocyst component Exo70.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Akane; Koinuma, Shingo; Yasuda, Sayaka; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Wada, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    The use of exocytosis for membrane expansion at nerve growth cones is critical for neurite outgrowth. TC10 is a Rho family GTPase that is essential for specific types of vesicular trafficking to the plasma membrane. Recent studies have shown that TC10 and its effector Exo70, a component of the exocyst tethering complex, contribute to neurite outgrowth. However, the molecular mechanisms of the neuritogenesis-promoting functions of TC10 remain to be established. Here, we propose that GTP hydrolysis of vesicular TC10 near the plasma membrane promotes neurite outgrowth by accelerating vesicle fusion by releasing Exo70. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, we show that TC10 activity at the plasma membrane decreased at extending growth cones in hippocampal neurons and nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells. In neuronal cells, TC10 activity at vesicles was higher than its activity at the plasma membrane, and TC10-positive vesicles were found to fuse to the plasma membrane in NGF-treated PC12 cells. Therefore, activity of TC10 at vesicles is presumed to be inactivated near the plasma membrane during neuronal exocytosis. Our model is supported by functional evidence that constitutively active TC10 could not rescue decrease in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth induced by TC10 depletion. Furthermore, TC10 knockdown experiments and colocalization analyses confirmed the involvement of Exo70 in TC10-mediated trafficking in neuronal cells. TC10 frequently resided on vesicles containing Rab11, which is a key regulator of recycling pathways and implicated in neurite outgrowth. In growth cones, most of the vesicles containing the cell adhesion molecule L1 had TC10. Exocytosis of Rab11- and L1-positive vesicles may play a central role in TC10-mediated neurite outgrowth. The combination of this study and our previous work on the role of TC10 in EGF-induced exocytosis in HeLa cells suggests that the signaling machinery containing TC10 proposed here may be

  4. Entropic Tension in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Sens, Pierre; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Unlike their model membrane counterparts, biological membranes are richly decorated with a heterogeneous assembly of membrane proteins. These proteins are so tightly packed that their excluded area interactions can alter the free energy landscape controlling the conformational transitions suffered by such proteins. For membrane channels, this effect can alter the critical membrane tension at which they undergo a transition from a closed to an open state, and therefore influence protein function in vivo. Despite their obvious importance, crowding phenomena in membranes are much less well studied than in the cytoplasm. Using statistical mechanics results for hard disk liquids, we show that crowding induces an entropic tension in the membrane, which influences transitions that alter the projected area and circumference of a membrane protein. As a specific case study in this effect, we consider the impact of crowding on the gating properties of bacterial mechanosensitive membrane channels, which are thought to confer osmoprotection when these cells are subjected to osmotic shock. We find that crowding can alter the gating energies by more than in physiological conditions, a substantial fraction of the total gating energies in some cases. Given the ubiquity of membrane crowding, the nonspecific nature of excluded volume interactions, and the fact that the function of many membrane proteins involve significant conformational changes, this specific case study highlights a general aspect in the function of membrane proteins. PMID:22438801

  5. Students' difficulties with tension in massless strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-García, S.; Alfaro-Avena, L. L.; Chávez-Pierce, J. E.; Luna-González, J.; González-Quezada, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Many students enrolled in introductory mechanics courses have difficulties with understanding the concept of static equilibrium. Some of these difficulties are related to the concept of force in the context of tension in massless strings. We identify three kinds of misconceptions: Students' beliefs that the angle of the string and proximity to the object are related to the tension. Students also use incorrect compensation arguments to reason about situations where both the angle and proximity change simultaneously. These difficulties were identified during investigations conducted in laboratory and lecture sessions at three universities in the United States and Mexico.

  6. Epac and the high affinity rolipram binding conformer of PDE4 modulate neurite outgrowth and myelination using an in vitro spinal cord injury model

    PubMed Central

    Boomkamp, S D; McGrath, M A; Houslay, M D; Barnett, S C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose cAMP and pharmacological inhibition of PDE4, which degrades it, are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Using our previously described in vitro SCI model, we studied the mechanisms by which cAMP modulators promote neurite outgrowth and myelination using enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram and other modulators of downstream signalling effectors. Experimental Approach Rat mixed neural cell myelinating cultures were cut with a scalpel and treated with enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram, Epac agonists and PKA antagonists. Neurite outgrowth, density and myelination were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cytokine levels analysed by qPCR. Key Results Inhibition of the high-affinity rolipram-binding state (HARBS), rather than the low-affinity rolipram binding state (LARBS) PDE4 conformer promoted neurite outgrowth and myelination. These effects were mediated through the activation of Epac and not through PKA. Expression of the chemokine CXCL10, known to inhibit myelination, was markedly elevated in astrocytes after Rho inhibition and this was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase or PDE4. Conclusions and Implications PDE4 inhibitors targeted at the HARBS conformer or Epac agonists may provide promising novel targets for the treatment of SCI. Our study demonstrates the differential mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as the benefit of a combined pharmacological approach and highlighting potential promising targets for the treatment of SCI. These findings need to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:24467222

  7. Sulf1 and Sulf2 Differentially Modulate Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Sulfation during Postnatal Cerebellum Development: Evidence for Neuroprotective and Neurite Outgrowth Promoting Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Rohn, Susanne; Puvirajesinghe, Tania M.; Guimond, Scott E.; Eyckerman-Kölln, Pieter J.; ten Dam, Gerdy; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Turnbull, Jeremy E.; Dierks, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sulf1 and Sulf2 are cell surface sulfatases, which remove specific 6-O-sulfate groups from heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, resulting in modulation of various HS-dependent signaling pathways. Both Sulf1 and Sulf2 knockout mice show impairments in brain development and neurite outgrowth deficits in neurons. Methodology and Main Findings To analyze the molecular mechanisms behind these impairments we focused on the postnatal cerebellum, whose development is mainly characterized by proliferation, migration, and neurite outgrowth processes of precursor neurons. Primary cerebellar granule cells isolated from Sulf1 or Sulf2 deficient newborns are characterized by a reduction in neurite length and cell survival. Furthermore, Sulf1 deficiency leads to a reduced migration capacity. The observed impairments in cell survival and neurite outgrowth could be correlated to Sulf-specific interference with signaling pathways, as shown for FGF2, GDNF and NGF. In contrast, signaling of Shh, which determines the laminar organization of the cerebellar cortex, was not influenced in either Sulf1 or Sulf2 knockouts. Biochemical analysis of cerebellar HS demonstrated, for the first time in vivo, Sulf-specific changes of 6-O-, 2-O- and N-sulfation in the knockouts. Changes of a particular HS epitope were found on the surface of Sulf2-deficient cerebellar neurons. This epitope showed a restricted localization to the inner half of the external granular layer of the postnatal cerebellum, where precursor cells undergo final maturation to form synaptic contacts. Conclusion Sulfs introduce dynamic changes in HS proteoglycan sulfation patterns of the postnatal cerebellum, thereby orchestrating fundamental mechanisms underlying brain development. PMID:26448642

  8. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu-Feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-Bo; Feng, Da-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  9. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  11. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  12. Analysis of the action of euxanthone, a plant-derived compound that stimulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Naidu, M; Kuan, C-Y K; Lo, W-L; Raza, M; Tolkovsky, A; Mak, N-K; Wong, R N-S; Keynes, R

    2007-09-21

    We have investigated the neurite growth-stimulating properties of euxanthone, a xanthone derivative isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Polygala caudata. Euxanthone was shown to exert a marked stimulatory action on neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia explanted in collagen gels, in the absence of added neurotrophins. It was also shown to promote cell survival in explanted chick embryo ganglia, and to stimulate neurite outgrowth from isolated adult rat primary sensory neurons in vitro. The further finding that euxanthone stimulates neurite outgrowth from explants of chick embryo retina and ventral spinal cord suggests an action on signaling pathways downstream of neuronal receptors for specific neurotrophic factors. Consistent with this, euxanthone did not promote neurite outgrowth from non-transfected PC12 cells, or from PC12 cells transfected with TrkB or TrkC, under conditions in which these cells extended neurites in response to, respectively, the neurotrophins nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3. Western blot analysis of euxanthone-stimulated dorsal root ganglion explants showed that expression of phospho-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was up-regulated after 1 h of euxanthone-treatment. Inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway using PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase, blocked all euxanthone-stimulated neurite outgrowth. However, analysis of phospho-Akt expression indicated that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway, another major signaling pathway engaged by neurotrophins, is not significantly activated by euxanthone. These results suggest that euxanthone promotes neurite outgrowth by selectively activating the MAP kinase pathway.

  13. Effects of serum, tissue extract, conditioned medium, and culture substrata on neurite appearance from spinal cord explants of chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Sakai, M; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    The effects of serum, tissue extracts, conditioned medium, (CM), and culture substrata on neurite appearance from spinal cord explants of 6- to 8-day-old chick embryos were investigated. In Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) with no supplement neurites from explants did not appear on collagen coating but on polyornithine coating (PORN). It is concluded that cell-to-substratum interaction is important in neurite appearance. CM, serum and tissue extract potentiated neurite appearance, but their activities were highly dependent on the coating. The amount of collagen was also crucial. On collagen, neurite appearance was observed only when promoting substances were present. CM and serum contained at least two components; one affected neurite appearance after deposition on collagen and the other affected neurite appearance when present in the culture medium. The former was included also in tissue extracts. Both of adsorbable and non-adsorbable components from any origin were necessary for effective induction of neurite appearance. Heat treatment and dialysis differentiated these active components. On PORN, CM highly potentiated neurite appearance. The activity of the CM was reproduced by its low molecular weight fraction. Serum also promoted neurite appearance, but to a lesser extent than CM. The effect of tissue extract was not remarkable.

  14. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  15. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  16. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  17. Immobilized laminin concentration gradients on electrospun fiber scaffolds for controlled neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Beebe, Thomas P

    2014-03-01

    Neuronal process growth is guided by extrinsic environmental cues such as extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent reports have described that the growth cone extension is superior across gradients of the ECM protein laminin compared to growth across uniformly distributed laminin. In this work, the authors have prepared gradients of laminin on aligned electrospun nanofibers for use as substrates for neuronal growth. The substrates therefore presented both topographical and chemical guidance cues. Step gradients were prepared by the controlled robotic immersion of plasma-treated polycaprolactone fibers reacted with N-hydroxysuccinimide into the protein solution. The gradients were analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Gradients with a dynamic range of protein concentrations were successfully generated and neurite outgrowth was evaluated using neuronlike pheochromocytoma cell line 12 (PC12) cells. After 10 days of culture, PC12 neurite lengths varied from 32.7 ± 14.2 μm to 76.3 ± 9.1 μm across the protein concentration gradient. Neurite lengths at the highest concentration end of the gradient were significantly longer than neurite lengths observed for cells cultured on samples with uniform protein coverage. Gradients were prepared both in the fiber direction and transverse to the fiber direction. Neurites preferentially aligned with the fiber direction in both cases indicating that fiber alignment has a more dominant role in controlling neurite orientation, compared to the chemical gradient. PMID:24739010

  18. Amyloid β-Protein as a Substrate Interacts with Extracellular Matrix to Promote Neurite Outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Edward H.; Park, Lisa; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1993-05-01

    Progressive deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain parenchyma and blood vessels is a characteristic feature of Alzheimer disease. Recent evidence suggests that addition of solubilized synthetic Aβ to medium may produce toxic or trophic effects on cultured hippocampal neurons. Because soluble Aβ may not accumulate in significant quantities in brain, we asked whether immobilized Aβ peptide as a substrate alters neurite outgrowth from cultured rat peripheral sensory neurons. This paradigm may closely mimic the conditions in Alzheimer disease brain tissue, in which neurites contact insoluble, extracellular aggregates of β-amyloid. We detected no detrimental effects of Aβ substrate on neurite outgrowth. Rather, Aβ in combination with low doses of laminin or fibronectin enhanced neurite out-growth from these neuronal explants. Our results suggest that insoluble Aβ in the cerebral neuropil may serve as a neurite-promoting matrix, perhaps explaining the apparent regenerative response of neurites observed around amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease. Moreover, in concert with the recent discovery of Aβ production by cultured neurons, our data suggest that Aβ plays a normal physiological role in brain by complexing with the extracellular matrix.

  19. Survival and neurite growth of chick embryo spinal cord cells in serum-free culture.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    Cell survival and neurite growth were investigated in serum-free spinal cord cell cultures on polyornithine coating (PORN). Cells were obtained from 6- or 7-day-old chick embryos. Isolated spinal cord cells required promoting factors for their survival and neurite growth. The survival-promoting factors were initially present in spinal cord cells. High density cultures, co-cultures with spinal cord explants, and spinal cord extract promoted survival of isolated spinal cord cells in MEM with no additives. Other tissue extracts (brain, liver, heart and skeletal muscle), serum, and serum-free conditioned medium (SF-CM) of muscle or glioma C6 cells also promoted survival. The active substances in the brain extract and SF-CM were shown to be protein and were separated into 3 fractions (approximately molecular weight 150,000, 70,000, 40,000) by gel filtration chromatography. Survival and neurite growth were suggested to be promoted by different factors because: (1) survival was promoted by both tissue extract and SF-CM, but neurite growth was promoted only by SF-CM; (2) the neurite growth-stimulating activity of SF-CM was lost following dialysis and heat (100 degrees C, 2 min) treatment; however, the survival-promoting activity was not. It was also suggested that spinal cord cells produce neurite growth promoting factors, but did not initially contain these factors.

  20. Multiscale Analysis of Neurite Orientation and Spatial Organization in Neuronal Images.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj; Negi, Pooran; Laezza, Fernanda; Papadakis, Manos; Labate, Demetrio

    2016-10-01

    The spatial organization of neurites, the thin processes (i.e., dendrites and axons) that stem from a neuron's soma, conveys structural information required for proper brain function. The alignment, direction and overall geometry of neurites in the brain are subject to continuous remodeling in response to healthy and noxious stimuli. In the developing brain, during neurogenesis or in neuroregeneration, these structural changes are indicators of the ability of neurons to establish axon-to-dendrite connections that can ultimately develop into functional synapses. Enabling a proper quantification of this structural remodeling would facilitate the identification of new phenotypic criteria to classify developmental stages and further our understanding of brain function. However, adequate algorithms to accurately and reliably quantify neurite orientation and alignment are still lacking. To fill this gap, we introduce a novel algorithm that relies on multiscale directional filters designed to measure local neurites orientation over multiple scales. This innovative approach allows us to discriminate the physical orientation of neurites from finer scale phenomena associated with local irregularities and noise. Building on this multiscale framework, we also introduce a notion of alignment score that we apply to quantify the degree of spatial organization of neurites in tissue and cultured neurons. Numerical codes were implemented in Python and released open source and freely available to the scientific community. PMID:27369547

  1. VANG-1 and PRKL-1 cooperate to negatively regulate neurite formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Visanuvimol, Jiravat; McEwan, Andrea; Su, Anna; Imai, Janice H; Colavita, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Neuritogenesis is a critical early step in the development and maturation of neurons and neuronal circuits. While extracellular directional cues are known to specify the site and orientation of nascent neurite formation in vivo, little is known about the genetic pathways that block inappropriate neurite emergence in order to maintain proper neuronal polarity. Here we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of Van Gogh (vang-1), Prickle (prkl-1), and Dishevelled (dsh-1), core components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, are required in a subset of peripheral motor neurons to restrict neurite emergence to a specific organ axis. In loss-of-function mutants, neurons display supernumerary neurites that extend inappropriately along the orthogonal anteroposterior (A/P) body axis. We show that autonomous and non-autonomous gene activities are required early and persistently to inhibit the formation or consolidation of growth cone protrusions directed away from organ precursor cells. Furthermore, prkl-1 overexpression is sufficient to suppress neurite formation and reorient neuronal polarity in a vang-1- and dsh-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest a novel role for a PCP-like pathway in maintaining polarized neuronal morphology by inhibiting neuronal responses to extrinsic or intrinsic cues that would otherwise promote extraneous neurite formation.

  2. Survival and neurite growth of chick embryo spinal cord cells in serum-free culture.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    Cell survival and neurite growth were investigated in serum-free spinal cord cell cultures on polyornithine coating (PORN). Cells were obtained from 6- or 7-day-old chick embryos. Isolated spinal cord cells required promoting factors for their survival and neurite growth. The survival-promoting factors were initially present in spinal cord cells. High density cultures, co-cultures with spinal cord explants, and spinal cord extract promoted survival of isolated spinal cord cells in MEM with no additives. Other tissue extracts (brain, liver, heart and skeletal muscle), serum, and serum-free conditioned medium (SF-CM) of muscle or glioma C6 cells also promoted survival. The active substances in the brain extract and SF-CM were shown to be protein and were separated into 3 fractions (approximately molecular weight 150,000, 70,000, 40,000) by gel filtration chromatography. Survival and neurite growth were suggested to be promoted by different factors because: (1) survival was promoted by both tissue extract and SF-CM, but neurite growth was promoted only by SF-CM; (2) the neurite growth-stimulating activity of SF-CM was lost following dialysis and heat (100 degrees C, 2 min) treatment; however, the survival-promoting activity was not. It was also suggested that spinal cord cells produce neurite growth promoting factors, but did not initially contain these factors. PMID:7104764

  3. Myoblasts and myoblast-conditioned medium attract the earliest spinal neurites from frog embryos.

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, C D

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the capacity of newly segmented somites, unsegmented mesoderm and medium conditioned by each of these tissues to attract the growth of the earliest spinal neurites from the neural tube of Xenopus laevis in tissue culture. When presented with segmented somitic myoblasts or sheets of skin, spinal neurites grew selectively towards the somitic myoblasts. Neurites were not attracted specifically to somitic myoblasts from their own rostrocaudal level. A variable proportion of myoblasts from unsegmented caudal mesoderm differentiated and elongated in co-culture with neural tube and skin. These myoblasts also attracted neural outgrowths, but only if present in sufficient numbers. An agar slab containing medium conditioned by the presence of segmented myoblasts for 1 day attracted neurite outgrowths. A source of medium conditioned by the presence of undifferentiated, unsegmented myotomal mesoderm alone did not attract neurite outgrowths. Nerve growth factor (NGF) at a range of concentrations in the agar source (500-10,000 ng/ml) did not attract the earliest neurite outgrowths. It is concluded that the earliest skeletal myoblasts from Xenopus laevis embryos may attract neural outgrowths by releasing a soluble factor. Myoblasts may have to develop to the stage of somite segmentation before secretion of such an agent begins. The release of a myoblast-derived factor so early in development may assist directed nerve growth in vivo. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:3795063

  4. Effects of elevated magnesium and substrate on neuronal numbers and neurite outgrowth of neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vennemeyer, John J; Hopkins, Tracy; Kuhlmann, Julia; Heineman, William R; Pixley, Sarah K

    2014-07-01

    Because a potential treatment for brain injuries could be elevating magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) intracerebrally, we characterized the effects of elevating external Mg(2+) in cultures of neonatal murine brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs). Using a crystal violet assay, which avoids interference of Mg(2+) in the assay, it was determined that substrate influenced Mg(2+) effects on cell numbers. On uncoated plastic, elevating Mg(2+) levels to between 2.5 and 10mM above basal increased NSC numbers, and at higher concentrations numbers decreased to control or lower levels. Similar biphasic curves were observed with different plating densities, treatment durations and length of time in culture. When cells were plated on laminin-coated plastic, NSC numbers were higher even in basal medium and no further effects were observed with Mg(2+). NSC differentiation into neurons was not altered by either substrate or Mg(2+) supplementation. Some parameters of neurite outgrowth were increased by elevated Mg(2+) when NSCs differentiated into neurons on uncoated plastic. Differentiation on laminin resulted in increased neurites even in basal medium and no further effects were seen when Mg(2+) was elevated. This system can now be used to study the multiple mechanisms by which Mg(2+) influences neuronal biology. PMID:24815060

  5. The stress-regulated protein M6a is a key modulator for neurite outgrowth and filopodium/spine formation.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Julieta; Fernández, María E; Cooper, Benjamin; Flugge, Gabriele; Frasch, Alberto C

    2005-11-22

    Neuronal remodeling is a fundamental process by which the brain responds to environmental influences, e.g., during stress. In the hippocampus, chronic stress causes retraction of dendrites in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We have recently identified the glycoprotein M6a as a stress-responsive gene in the hippocampal formation. This gene is down-regulated in the hippocampus of both socially and physically stressed animals, and this effect can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. In the present work, we analyzed the biological function of the M6a protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that the M6a protein is abundant in all hippocampal subregions, and subcellular analysis in primary hippocampal neurons revealed its presence in membrane protrusions (filopodia/spines). Transfection experiments revealed that M6a overexpression induces neurite formation and increases filopodia density in hippocampal neurons. M6a knockdown with small interference RNA methodology showed that M6a low-expressing neurons display decreased filopodia number and a lower density of synaptophysin clusters. Taken together, our findings indicate that M6a plays an important role in neurite/filopodium outgrowth and synapse formation. Therefore, reduced M6a expression might be responsible for the morphological alterations found in the hippocampus of chronically stressed animals. Potential mechanisms that might explain the biological effects of M6a are discussed. PMID:16286650

  6. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  7. Tension leg platform system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.B.

    1983-12-20

    A tension leg platform system for use in drilling wellbores into the floor of an offshore body of water. Includes in the system is a buoyancy control vessel having a plurality of pull down cables attached thereto which extend to the ocean floor. A plurality of spaced apart anchors disposed at the ocean floor are positioned to receive the lower ends of the respective pull down cables. A submergible hull slidably engages the respective hold down cables such that the hull can be controllably lowered to the ocean floor whereby a canopy carried on the hull will cover an uncontrollably flowing well to conduct the effluent to the water's surface.

  8. Neuritic regeneration and synaptic reconstruction induced by withanolide A

    PubMed Central

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Tohda, Chihiro; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether withanolide A (WL-A), isolated from the Indian herbal drug Ashwagandha (root of Withania somnifera), could regenerate neurites and reconstruct synapses in severely damaged neurons. We also investigated the effect of WL-A on memory-deficient mice showing neuronal atrophy and synaptic loss in the brain. Axons, dendrites, presynapses, and postsynapses were visualized by immunostaining for phosphorylated neurofilament-H (NF-H), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), respectively. Treatment with Aβ(25–35) (10 μM) induced axonal and dendritic atrophy, and pre- and postsynaptic loss in cultured rat cortical neurons. Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 μM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 μmol kg−1 day−1, for 13 days, p.o.) recovered Aβ(25–35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks. PMID:15711595

  9. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by EGF and KCl depolarization: a Ca(2+)-independent phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    MAP kinase activity is necessary for growth factor induction of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Although NGF and EGF both stimulate MAP kinase activity, EGF does not stimulate neurite extension. We report that EGF, in combination with KCl, stimulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. This phenomenon was independent of intracellular Ca2+ increases and not due to enhancement of MAP kinase activity over that seen with EGF alone. However, EGF plus KCl increased intracellular cAMP, and other cAMP elevating agents acted synergistically with EGF to promote neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth by cAMP and EGF was blocked by inhibitors of transcription suggesting that synergistic regulation of transcription by the cAMP and MAP kinase pathways may stimulate neurite growth. PMID:7622569

  10. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE PAGES

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  11. Separation anxiety: Stress, tension and cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Krithika; Iglesias, Pablo A.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2012-07-15

    Cytokinesis, the physical separation of a mother cell into two daughter cells, progresses through a series of well-defined changes in morphology. These changes involve distinct biochemical and mechanical processes. Here, we review the mechanical features of cells during cytokinesis, discussing both the material properties as well as sources of stresses, both active and passive, which lead to the observed changes in morphology. We also describe a mechanosensory feedback control system that regulates protein localization and shape progression during cytokinesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytokinesis progresses through three distinct mechanical phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cortical tension initially resists deformation of mother cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late in cytokinesis, cortical tension provides stress, enabling furrow ingression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanosensory feedback control system regulates cytokinesis.

  12. FRET-based Molecular Tension Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gayrard, Charlène; Borghi, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Cells generate and experience mechanical forces that may shape tissues and regulate signaling pathways in a variety of physiological or pathological situations. How forces propagate and transduce signals at the molecular level is poorly understood. The advent of FRET-based Molecular Tension Microscopy now allows to achieve mechanical force measurements at a molecular scale with molecular specificity in situ, and thereby better understand the mechanical architecture of cells and tissues, and mechanotransduction pathways. In this review, we will first expose the basic principles of FRET-based MTM and its various incarnations. We will describe different ways of measuring FRET, their advantages and drawbacks. Then, throughout the range of proteins of interest, cells and organisms to which it has been applied, we will review the tests developed to validate the approach, how molecular tension was related to cell functions, and conclude with possible developments and offshoots.

  13. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients’ neurons

    PubMed Central

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K.; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W.; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H.; Winner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients. PMID:24381312

  14. Dishevelled attenuates the repelling activity of Wnt signaling during neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chaogu; Diaz-Cuadros, Margarete; Chalfie, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Wnt proteins regulate axonal outgrowth along the anterior–posterior axis, but the intracellular mechanisms that modulate the strength of Wnt signaling in axon guidance are largely unknown. Using the Caenorhabditis elegans mechanosensory PLM neurons, we found that posteriorly enriched LIN-44/Wnt acts as a repellent to promote anteriorly directed neurite outgrowth through the LIN-17/Frizzled receptor, instead of controlling neuronal polarity as previously thought. Dishevelled (Dsh) proteins DSH-1 and MIG-5 redundantly mediate the repulsive activity of the Wnt signals to induce anterior outgrowth, whereas DSH-1 also provides feedback inhibition to attenuate the signaling to allow posterior outgrowth against the Wnt gradient. This inhibitory function of DSH-1, which requires its dishevelled, Egl-10, and pleckstrin (DEP) domain, acts by promoting LIN-17 phosphorylation and is antagonized by planar cell polarity signaling components Van Gogh (VANG-1) and Prickle (PRKL-1). Our results suggest that Dsh proteins both respond to Wnt signals to shape neuronal projections and moderate its activity to fine-tune neuronal morphology. PMID:26460008

  15. Dishevelled attenuates the repelling activity of Wnt signaling during neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaogu; Diaz-Cuadros, Margarete; Chalfie, Martin

    2015-10-27

    Wnt proteins regulate axonal outgrowth along the anterior-posterior axis, but the intracellular mechanisms that modulate the strength of Wnt signaling in axon guidance are largely unknown. Using the Caenorhabditis elegans mechanosensory PLM neurons, we found that posteriorly enriched LIN-44/Wnt acts as a repellent to promote anteriorly directed neurite outgrowth through the LIN-17/Frizzled receptor, instead of controlling neuronal polarity as previously thought. Dishevelled (Dsh) proteins DSH-1 and MIG-5 redundantly mediate the repulsive activity of the Wnt signals to induce anterior outgrowth, whereas DSH-1 also provides feedback inhibition to attenuate the signaling to allow posterior outgrowth against the Wnt gradient. This inhibitory function of DSH-1, which requires its dishevelled, Egl-10, and pleckstrin (DEP) domain, acts by promoting LIN-17 phosphorylation and is antagonized by planar cell polarity signaling components Van Gogh (VANG-1) and Prickle (PRKL-1). Our results suggest that Dsh proteins both respond to Wnt signals to shape neuronal projections and moderate its activity to fine-tune neuronal morphology.

  16. AMPK over-activation leads to accumulation of α-synuclein oligomers and decrease of neurites

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peizhou; Gan, Ming; Ebrahim, Abdul Shukkur; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Dickson, Dennis W.; Yen, Shu-Hui C.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal inclusions of α-synuclein (α-syn), termed Lewy bodies, are a hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Increased α-syn levels can occur in brains of aging human and neurotoxin treated mice. Since previous studies have shown increased brain lactate levels in aging brains, in PD affected subjects when compared to age-matched controls, and in mice treated with MPTP, we tested the effects of lactate exposure on α-syn in a cell based-study. We demonstrated that (i) lactate treatment led to α-syn accumulation and oligomerization in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, (ii) such alterations were mediated via adenosine-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and associated with increasing cytoplasmic phosphorylated AMPK levels, (iii) AMPK activation facilitated α-syn accumulation and phosphorylation, (iv) lactate treatment or overexpression of active form of AMPK decreased α-syn turnover and neurite outgrowth and (v) Lewy body-bearing neurons displayed abnormal cytoplasmic distribution of phosphorylated AMPK, which normally is located in nuclei. Together, our results suggest that chronic neuronal accumulation of α-syn induced by lactate-triggered AMPK activation in aging brains may be a novel mechanism underlying α-synucleionpathies in PD and related disorders. PMID:23200460

  17. Novel High Content Screen Detects Compounds That Promote Neurite Regeneration from Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Whitlon, Donna S.; Grover, Mary; Dunne, Sara F.; Richter, Sonja; Luan, Chi-Hao; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) carry sound information from cochlear hair cells to the brain. After noise, antibiotic or toxic insult to the cochlea, damage to SGN and/or hair cells causes hearing impairment. Damage ranges from fiber and synapse degeneration to dysfunction and loss of cells. New interventions to regenerate peripheral nerve fibers could help reestablish transfer of auditory information from surviving or regenerated hair cells or improve results from cochlear implants, but the biochemical mechanisms to target are largely unknown. Presently, no drugs exist that are FDA approved to stimulate the regeneration of SGN nerve fibers. We designed an original phenotypic assay to screen 440 compounds of the NIH Clinical Collection directly on dissociated mouse spiral ganglia. The assay detected one compound, cerivastatin, that increased the length of regenerating neurites. The effect, mimicked by other statins at different optimal concentrations, was blocked by geranylgeraniol. These results demonstrate the utility of screening small compound libraries on mixed cultures of dissociated primary ganglia. The success of this screen narrows down a moderately sized library to a single compound which can be elevated to in-depth in vivo studies, and highlights a potential new molecular pathway for targeting of hearing loss drugs. PMID:26521685

  18. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  19. The tension of a curved surface from simulation.

    PubMed

    Sodt, Alexander J; Pastor, Richard W

    2012-12-21

    This paper demonstrates a method for calculating the tension of a system with a curved interface from a molecular dynamics simulation. To do so, the pressure of a subset of the system is determined by applying a local (virtual) mechanical deformation, fitting the response to that of a bulk fluid, and then using the Young-Laplace equation to infer the tension of the interface. The accuracy of the method is tested by calculating the local pressure of a series of water simulations at various external pressures. The tension of a simulated curved octane-water interface is computed with the method and compares well with the planar tension (≈ 46.7 dyn/cm). Finally, an ambiguity is resolved between the Harasima and Irving-Kirkwood methods of calculating the local pressure as a means for computing the tension.

  20. The atRA-responsive gene neuron navigator 2 functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation.

    PubMed

    Muley, P D; McNeill, E M; Marzinke, M A; Knobel, K M; Barr, M M; Clagett-Dame, M

    2008-11-01

    Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) was first identified as an all-trans retinoic acid (atRA)-responsive gene in human neuroblastoma cells (retinoic acid-induced in neuroblastoma 1, RAINB1) that extend neurites after exposure to atRA. It is structurally related to the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-53 gene that is required for cell migration and axonal outgrowth. To gain insight into NAV2 function, the full-length human protein was expressed in C. elegans unc-53 mutants under the control of a mechanosensory neuron promoter. Transgene expression of NAV2 rescued the defects in unc-53 mutant mechanosensory neuron elongation, indicating that Nav2 is an ortholog of unc-53. Using a loss-of-function approach, we also show that Nav2 induction is essential for atRA to induce neurite outgrowth in SH-SY5Y cells. The NAV2 protein is located both in the cell body and along the length of the growing neurites of SH-SY5Y cells in a pattern that closely mimics that of neurofilament and microtubule proteins. Transfection of Nav2 deletion constructs in Cos-1 cells reveals a region of the protein (aa 837-1065) that directs localization with the microtubule cytoskeleton. Collectively, this work supports a role for NAV2 in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation and suggests this protein may act by facilitating interactions between microtubules and other proteins such as neurofilaments that are key players in the formation and stability of growing neurites.

  1. Essential role of NKCC1 in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori . E-mail: marunaka@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    The Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporter (NKCC) mediates electroneutral transport of 2Cl{sup -} coupled with Na{sup +} and K{sup +} across the plasma membrane, and plays crucial roles in Cl{sup -} uptake into the cells, homeostasis of cellular Cl{sup -}, and cell volume regulation. However, we have very limited information on the roles of ion transporters in neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells. In the present study, we report the role of NKCC1 (an isoform of NKCC) in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma PC12D cells. The expression level of NKCC1 protein was increased by NGF treatment. Knock-down of NKCC1 by RNA interference (RNAi) drastically diminished the NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Transfection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged rat NKCC1 into cells for clarification of intracellular localization of NKCC1 revealed that the EGFP-rNKCC1 was mainly localized in the plasma membrane at growth cone during neurite outgrowth. These observations suggest that NKCC1 plays a fundamental role in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12D cells.

  2. Polystyrene replicas of neuronal basal lamina act as excellent guides for regenerating neurites.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Martin; Johansson, Fredrik; Kanje, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Various scaffolds, natural or artificial, have been used for neural repair, including basal lamina scaffolds obtained through extraction of nerves. Here we tested whether plastic casts of such preparations could be used for neurite guidance. To this end, longitudinal micron thick sections of rat sciatic nerve were extracted with detergents and treated with Dnase, yielding an acellular basal lamina master. From the basal lamina master a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold was made. Then a polystyrene replica was made using the PDMS mold as the master. The polystyrene replica showed high similarity to the master within nanometer resolution as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Organ cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia grown on the polystyrene replica and the master preparation exhibited guided outgrowth of neurites as assayed by two-dimensional fast Fourier transform analysis on preparations, where the neurites had been visualized by β-III-tubulin staining. The neurites aligned longitudally in the direction of the original basal lamina tubes. Thus, using inexpensive methods it is possible to make replicas of basal lamina which can be used for neurite guidance. This opens a new avenue for nerve reconstruction.

  3. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  4. Mutations changing tropomodulin affinity for tropomyosin alter neurite formation and extension.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Natalia; Guillaud, Laurent; Desai, Brinda; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the actin cytoskeleton is an important part of formation of neurites in developing neurons. Tropomodulin, a tropomyosin-dependent capping protein for the pointed end of the actin filament, is one of the key players in this process. Tropomodulin binds tropomyosin in two binding sites. Tmod1 and Tmod2, tropomodulin isoforms found in neurons, were overexpressed in PC12 cells, a model system for neuronal differentiation. Tmod1 did not affect neuronal differentiation; while cells expressing Tmod2 showed a significant reduction in the number and the length of neurites. Both tropomodulins bind short α-, γ- and δ-tropomyosin isoforms. Mutations in one of the tropomyosin-binding sites of Tmod1, which increased its affinity to short γ- and δ-tropomyosin isoforms, caused a decrease in binding short α-tropomyosin isoforms along with a 2-fold decrease in the length of neurites. Our data demonstrate that Tmod1 is involved in neuronal differentiation for proper neurite formation and outgrowth, and that Tmod2 inhibits these processes. The mutations in the tropomyosin-binding site of Tmod1 impair neurite outgrowth, suggesting that the integrity of this binding site is critical for the proper function of Tmod1 during neuronal differentiation.

  5. Enhanced Neurite Growth from Mammalian Neurons in Three-Dimensional Salmon Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El; Janmey, Paul A.; McCormick, Margaret; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional fibrin matrices have been used as cellular substrates in vitro and as bridging materials for central nervous system repair. Cells can be embedded within fibrin gels since the polymerization process is non-toxic, making fibrin an attractive scaffold for transplanted cells. Most studies have utilized fibrin prepared from human or bovine blood proteins. However, fish fibrin may be well suited for neuronal growth since fish undergo remarkable central nervous system regeneration and molecules implicated in this process are present in fibrin. We assessed the growth of mammalian central nervous system neurons in bovine, human, and salmon fibrin and found that salmon fibrin gels encouraged the greatest degree of neurite (dendrite and axon) growth and were the most resistant to degradation by cellular proteases. The neurite growth-promoting effect was not due to the thrombin used to polymerize the gels or to any copurifying plasminogen. Co-purified fibronectin partially accounted for the effect on neurites, and blockade of fibrinogen/fibrin-binding integrins markedly decreased neurite growth. Anion exchange chromatography revealed different elution profiles for salmon and mammalian fibrinogens. These data demonstrate that salmon fibrin encourages the growth of neurites from mammalian neurons and suggest that salmon fibrin may be a beneficial scaffold for neuronal regrowth after CNS injury. PMID:17258313

  6. Tiam1 mediates neurite outgrowth induced by ephrin-B1 and EphA2

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Riuko; Nakamura, Ritsuko; Shinmura, Kazuya; Kamo, Takaharu; Sakai, Ryuichi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    Bidirectional signals mediated by Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, play pivotal roles in the formation of neural networks by induction of both collapse and elongation of neurites. However, the downstream molecular modules to deliver these cues are largely unknown. We report here that the interaction of a Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide-exchanging factor, Tiam1, with ephrin-B1 and EphA2 mediates neurite outgrowth. In cells coexpressing Tiam1 and ephrin-B1, Rac1 is activated by the extracellular stimulation of clustered soluble EphB2 receptors. Similarly, soluble ephrin-A1 activates Rac1 in cells coexpressing Tiam1 and EphA2. Cortical neurons from the E14 mouse embryos and neuroblastoma cells significantly extend neurites when placed on surfaces coated with the extracellular domain of EphB2 or ephrin-A1, which were abolished by the forced expression of the dominant-negative mutant of ephrin-B1 or EphA2. Furthermore, the introduction of a dominant-negative form of Tiam1 also inhibits neurite outgrowth induced by the ephrin-B1 and EphA2 signals. These results indicate that Tiam1 is required for neurite outgrowth induced by both ephrin-B1-mediated reverse signaling and EphA2-mediated forward signaling. PMID:14988728

  7. Two stages in neurite formation distinguished by differences in tubulin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, S; Tashiro, T; Komiya, Y

    1995-01-01

    Changes in tubulin solubility during neurite formation were studied biochemically using rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. When fractionated with Ca(2+)-containing buffer at low temperature, a considerable proportion of total cellular tubulin was recovered in the insoluble fraction. We designated this cold/Ca(2+)-insoluble tubulin (InsT) and distinguished it from cold/Ca(2+)-soluble tubulin (SoIT). From the relative amount of InsT, neurite formation was found to proceed through two distinct stages. The first 6 days after plating (stage 1) in which the proportion of InsT increased dramatically (from 5 to 60%) coincided with neurite outgrowth. In the following period (stage 2), a constant level of InsT was maintained, whereas neurite maturation took place. Pulse-labeling experiments further revealed that the two stages differed significantly in terms of tubulin metabolism. High rates of synthesis as well as conversion from SoIT to InsT were observed in stage 1, whereas stage 2 was characterized by a decrease in both of these rates and an increase in the rate of degradation. The results show for the first time the coordinated changes in tubulin metabolism that underlie the process of neurite formation. PMID:7798932

  8. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  9. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors.

  10. Cholinergic neuronotrophic factors: V. Segregation of survival- and neurite-promoting activities in heart-conditioned media.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Varon, S

    1980-04-28

    Chick embryo ciliary ganglionic (CG) neurons will not survive in monolayer culture unless special supplements are provided in the medium. We have previously reported that two such supplements, chick embryo extract and medium conditioned over chick heart cell cultures (HCM) share the capacity to support survival of CG neurons but differ in their neurite-promoting effects. Thus, embryo extract elicited neuritic outgrowth only on collagen and HCM did so only on polyornithine (PORN), although both agents supported neuronal survival on both substrata. We report here the separation and quantitation of two different HCM components. One is a trophic agent which supports survival of CG neurons on either collagen or PORN, but does not seem to adsorb to either substratum. The other is a neurite-promoting factor (NPF) which adsorbs to PORN but not to collagen. Overnight incubation of HCM on PORN yields two products: (i) an NPF-deprived HCM, that has no neurite-promoting activity and (ii) an NPF-coated PORN, that promotes neuritic development of CG neurons trophically supported by either embryo extract or NPF-deprived HCM. CG requirements for neuritic outgrowth were also examined in explant cultures. No neurites were present after 24 h when explants were cultured in plain medium on PORN. Very extensive radial neuritic outgrowth was observed when explants were cultured in HCM on fresh PORN, or in NPF-deprived HCM on NPF-derivatized PORN. In contrast to what happens with dissociated cells, neuritic outgrowth was also present when ganglia were cultured in NPF-deprived HCM on fresh PORN. However, neurites grew radially only to a limited extent, after which they adopted a circular pattern grossly concentric to the ganglionic explant. It is proposed that explanted ciliary ganglia produce a neurite-promoting factor that coats the PORN substratum in widening circles.

  11. Matrix RGD ligand density and L1CAM-mediated Schwann cell interactions synergistically enhance neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Romano, Nicole H; Madl, Christopher M; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    The innate biological response to peripheral nerve injury involves a complex interplay of multiple molecular cues to guide neurites across the injury gap. Many current strategies to stimulate regeneration take inspiration from this biological response. However, little is known about the balance of cell-matrix and Schwann cell-neurite dynamics required for regeneration of neural architectures. We present an engineered extracellular matrix (eECM) microenvironment with tailored cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions to study their individual and combined effects on neurite outgrowth. This eECM regulates cell-matrix interactions by presenting integrin-binding RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) ligands at specified densities. Simultaneously, the addition or exclusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) is used to modulate L1CAM-mediated Schwann cell-neurite interactions. Individually, increasing the RGD ligand density from 0.16 to 3.2mM resulted in increasing neurite lengths. In matrices presenting higher RGD ligand densities, neurite outgrowth was synergistically enhanced in the presence of soluble NGF. Analysis of Schwann cell migration and co-localization with neurites revealed that NGF enhanced cooperative outgrowth between the two cell types. Interestingly, neurites in NGF-supplemented conditions were unable to extend on the surrounding eECM without the assistance of Schwann cells. Blocking studies revealed that L1CAM is primarily responsible for these Schwann cell-neurite interactions. Without NGF supplementation, neurite outgrowth was unaffected by L1CAM blocking or the depletion of Schwann cells. These results underscore the synergistic interplay between cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions in enhancing neurite outgrowth for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25308870

  12. Fabrication of molecular tension probes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: •Molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase.•Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes.•Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI.

  13. Fabrication of molecular tension probes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: • Molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase. • Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes. • Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI. PMID:27222821

  14. The influence of a weight-bearing platform on the mechanical behavior of two Ilizarov ring fixators: tensioned wires vs. half-pins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A weight-bearing platform applied at the distal end of an Ilizarov external frame allows patients with hindfoot transfixations, foot deformities or plantar skin lesions to bear weight. This leads to an indirect loading of the fracture or osteotomy site. However, the effect on the fracture/osteotomy site's motion or compressive loads is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the mechanical effects of a weight-bearing platform on the traditional all-wire, four-ring frame in comparison to a two-ring frame consisting of half-pins. Methods Two frame configurations, with either anatomically positioned wires or half-pins, were analyzed with and without a weight-bearing platform applied underneath the distal ring. Composite tibiae with a mid-diaphyseal osteotomy of 3.5 mm were used in all the experiments. An axial load was applied with the use of a universal test machine (UTS®). Interfragmentary movements, the relative movements of bone fragments and movements between rings were recorded using displacement transducers. Compressive loads at the osteotomy site were recorded with loading cells. Results Indirect loading with a weight-bearing platform altered the force transmission through the osteotomy. Indirect loading of the tibiae decreased the extent of the axial micro-motion by 50% under the applied weight load when compared to direct weight loading (p < 0.05). The half pin frame was 25% stiffer than the wire frame under both direct and indirect loading of the tibiae (p < 0.05). Compressive loads under indirect loading were reduced by 67% in the wire frame and by 57% in the half-pin frames compared to direct loading of the bones (p < 0.05). While axial loading in the wire frames resulted in plain axial movements at the site of the osteotomy, it was coupled with translational movements and angular displacements in the half pin mountings. This effect was more apparent in the case of indirect loading. Conclusions A weight-bearing platform has substantial

  15. Reduced Neurite Density in Neuronal Cell Cultures Exposed to Serum of Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Chagas, Vinicius de Saraiva; Castro, Mauro A A; Passos, Ives Cavalcante; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Márcia; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased inflammatory markers and oxidative stress have been reported in serum among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study is to assess whether biochemical changes in the serum of patients induces neurotoxicity in neuronal cell cultures. Methods: We challenged the retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the serum of BD patients at early and late stages of illness and assessed neurite density and cell viability as neurotoxic endpoints. Results: Decreased neurite density was found in neurons treated with the serum of patients, mostly patients at late stages of illness. Also, neurons challenged with the serum of late-stage patients showed a significant decrease in cell viability. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the serum of patients with bipolar disorder induced a decrease in neurite density and cell viability in neuronal cultures. PMID:27207915

  16. Inhibition of dynein but not kinesin induces aberrant focal accumulation of neurofilaments within axonal neurites.

    PubMed

    Motil, Jennifer; Dubey, Maya; Chan, Walter K-H; Shea, Thomas B

    2007-08-20

    Studies from several laboratories indicate that the microtubule motors kinesin and dynein respectively participate in anterograde and retrograde axonal transport of neurofilaments. Inhibition of dynein function by transfection with a construct expressing dynamitin or intracellular delivery of anti-dynein antibodies accelerates anterograde transport, which has been interpreted to indicate that the opposing action of both motors mediates the normal distribution of neurofilaments along axons. Herein, we demonstrate that, while expression of relatively low levels of exogenous dynamitin indeed accelerated anterograde neurofilament transport along axonal neurites in culture, expression of progressively increasing levels of dynamitin induced focal accumulation of neurofilaments within axonal neurites and eventually caused neurite retraction. Inhibition of kinesin inhibited anterograde transport, but did not induce similar focal accumulations. These findings are consistent with studies indicating that perturbations in dynein activity can contribute to the aberrant accumulations of neurofilaments that accompany ALS/motor neuron disease.

  17. MicroRNA miR-124 Regulates Neurite Outgrowth during Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jenn-Yah; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Deo, Monika; Thompson, Robert C.; Turner, David L.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs with diverse regulatory roles. The miR-124 miRNA is expressed in neurons in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that overexpression of miR-124 in differentiating mouse P19 cells promotes neurite outgrowth, while blocking miR-124 function delays neurite outgrowth and decreases acetylated α-tubulin. Altered neurite outgrowth also was observed in mouse primary cortical neurons when miR-124 expression was increased, or when miR-124 function was blocked. In uncommitted P19 cells, miR-124 expression led to disruption of actin filaments and stabilization of microtubules. Expression of miR-124 also decreased Cdc42 protein and affected the subcellular localization of Rac1, suggesting that miR-124 may act in part via alterations to members of the Rho GTPase family. Furthermore, constitutively active Cdc42 or Rac1 attenuated neurite outgrowth promoted by miR-124. To obtain a broader perspective, we identified mRNAs downregulated by miR-124 in P19 cells using microarrays. mRNAs for proteins involved in cytoskeletal regulation were enriched among mRNAs downregulated by miR-124. A miR-124 variant with an additional 5’ base failed to promote neurite outgrowth and downregulated substantially different mRNAs. These results indicate that miR-124 contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth during neuronal differentiation, possibly by regulation of the cytoskeleton. PMID:18619591

  18. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  19. Neurite outgrowth on electrospun PLLA fibers is enhanced by exogenous electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach. To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide films or electrospun fibers (2 µm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Main Results. Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurites, indicating topographical cues are responsible for guiding neurite extension. Significance. Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury.

  20. Neurite Outgrowth On Electrospun PLLA Fibers Is Enhanced By Exogenous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from DRG neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide (PLLA) films or electrospun fibers (2 μm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Results Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurite, indicating topographical cues are responsible to guide neurite extension. Significance Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:24891494

  1. Neurite outgrowth and branching of PC12 cells on very soft substrates sharply decreases below a threshold of substrate rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Jennie B.; Brown, Xin Q.; Jacot, Jeffrey G.; Di Milla, Paul A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2007-06-01

    Rationally designed matrices for nerve tissue engineering and encapsulated cell therapies critically rely on a comprehensive understanding of neural response to biochemical as well as biophysical cues. Whereas biochemical cues are established mediators of neuronal behavior (e.g., outgrowth), physical cues such as substrate stiffness have only recently been recognized to influence cell behavior. In this work, we examine the response of PC12 neurites to substrate stiffness. We quantified and controlled fibronectin density on the substrates and measured multiple neurite behaviors (e.g., growth, branching, neurites per cell, per cent cells expressing neurites) in a large sample population. We found that PC12 neurons display a threshold response to substrate stiffness. On the softest substrates tested (shear modulus ~10 Pa), neurites were relatively few, short in length and unbranched. On stiffer substrates (shear modulus ~102-104 Pa), neurites were longer and more branched and a greater percentage of cells expressed neurites; significant differences in these measures were not found on substrates with a shear modulus >102 Pa. Based on these data and comparisons with published neurobiology and neuroengineering reports of neurite mechanotransduction, we hypothesize that results from studies of neuronal response to compliant substrates are cell-type dependent and sensitive to ligand density, sample size and the range of stiffness investigated.

  2. Secreted glypican binds to the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease (APP) and inhibits APP-induced neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Williamson, T G; Mok, S S; Henry, A; Cappai, R; Lander, A D; Nurcombe, V; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Small, D H

    1996-12-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro. The effect of APP on neurite outgrowth can be enhanced if APP is presented to neurons in substrate-bound form, in the presence of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. To identify specific heparan sulfate proteoglycans that bind to APP, conditioned medium from neonatal mouse brain cells was subjected to affinity chromatography with recombinant APP695 as a ligand. Glypican bound strongly to the APP affinity column. Purified glypican bound to APP with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.8 nM and inhibited APP-induced neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic neurons. The effect of glypican was specific for APP, as glypican did not inhibit laminin-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, treatment of cultures with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-xyloside, a competitive inhibitor of proteoglycan glycanation, inhibited APP-induced neurite outgrowth but did not inhibit laminin-induced neurite outgrowth. This result suggests that endogenous proteoglycans are required for substrate-bound APP to stimulate neurite outgrowth. Secreted glypican may act to inhibit APP-induced neurite outgrowth in vivo by competing with endogenous proteoglycans for binding to APP.

  3. Preparation of Primary Neurons for Visualizing Neurites in a Frozen-hydrated State Using Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradian, Sarah H.; Galiano, Mauricio R.; Wu, Chengbiao; Chen, Shurui; Rasband, Matthew N.; Mobley, William C.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Neurites, both dendrites and axons, are neuronal cellular processes that enable the conduction of electrical impulses between neurons. Defining the structure of neurites is critical to understanding how these processes move materials and signals that support synaptic communication. Electron microscopy (EM) has been traditionally used to assess the ultrastructural features within neurites; however, the exposure to organic solvent during dehydration and resin embedding can distort structures. An important unmet goal is the formulation of procedures that allow for structural evaluations not impacted by such artifacts. Here, we have established a detailed and reproducible protocol for growing and flash-freezing whole neurites of different primary neurons on electron microscopy grids followed by their examination with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). This technique allows for 3-D visualization of frozen, hydrated neurites at nanometer resolution, facilitating assessment of their morphological differences. Our protocol yields an unprecedented view of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurites, and a visualization of hippocampal neurites in their near-native state. As such, these methods create a foundation for future studies on neurites of both normal neurons and those impacted by neurological disorders. PMID:24561719

  4. Data-based hybrid tension estimation and fault diagnosis of cold rolling continuous annealing processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Chai, Tianyou; Wang, Hong; Qin, Si-Zhao Joe

    2011-12-01

    The continuous annealing process line (CAPL) of cold rolling is an important unit to improve the mechanical properties of steel strips in steel making. In continuous annealing processes, strip tension is an important factor, which indicates whether the line operates steadily. Abnormal tension profile distribution along the production line can lead to strip break and roll slippage. Therefore, it is essential to estimate the whole tension profile in order to prevent the occurrence of faults. However, in real annealing processes, only a limited number of strip tension sensors are installed along the machine direction. Since the effects of strip temperature, gas flow, bearing friction, strip inertia, and roll eccentricity can lead to nonlinear tension dynamics, it is difficult to apply the first-principles induced model to estimate the tension profile distribution. In this paper, a novel data-based hybrid tension estimation and fault diagnosis method is proposed to estimate the unmeasured tension between two neighboring rolls. The main model is established by an observer-based method using a limited number of measured tensions, speeds, and currents of each roll, where the tension error compensation model is designed by applying neural networks principal component regression. The corresponding tension fault diagnosis method is designed using the estimated tensions. Finally, the proposed tension estimation and fault diagnosis method was applied to a real CAPL in a steel-making company, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Influence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on spiral ganglion neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, D; Hansen, S; Minovi, A; Laub, M; Jennissen, H P; Dazert, S; Neumann, A

    2009-09-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is a growth factor of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. Members of this protein family are involved in the development of various mammalian tissues, including the inner ear. As their notations indicate, they also have well-known effects on bone formation and regeneration. In this study, we examined the influence of rhBMP-2 on spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth in vitro and showed the presence of its most preferred receptor BMPR-IB in spiral ganglion cells both in vitro and in vivo. SG explants of postnatal day 4 rats were analysed for neurite length and number after organotypical cell culture for 72 h, fixation and immunolabeling. Different concentrations of rhBMP-2 were used in a serum-free culture media. Neurite growth was compared with control groups that lacked stimulative effects; with neutrophin-3 (NT-3), which is a well-established positive stimulus on neurite length and number; and with combinations of these parameters. The results display that neurite number and total neurite length per explant in particular concentrations of rhBMP-2 increased by a maximum factor of two, while the mean neurite length was not affected. NT-3 demonstrated a much more potent effect, delivering a maximum increase of a factor of five. Furthermore, a combination of both growth factors shows a predominant effect on NT-3. Immunohistological detection of BMPR-IB was successful both in cell culture explants and in paraffin-embedded sections of animals of different ages. The results show that rhBMP-2 is, among other growth factors, a positive stimulus for SG neurite growth in vitro. Most growth factors are unstable and cannot be attached to surfaces without loss of their biological function. In contrast, rhBMP-2 can be attached to metal surfaces without loss of activity. Our findings suggest in vivo studies and a future clinical application of rhBMP-2 in cochlear implant technology to improve the tissue

  6. A simplified micropatterning method for straight-line neurite extension of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Odawara, Aoi; Alhebshi, Amani; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We report a simplified micropatterning method for the straight-line extension of the neurites of cultured neurons. We prepared a poly-D-lysine (PDL)-patterned surface using a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic stamp. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on the PDL-bound substrate with the stamp removed, allowing for conventional cell seeding and detailed optical observation without fluorescent label. Cultured neurons elongated neurites along straight lines at the single-cell level and displayed spontaneous firing as detected by time-lapse imaging and Ca(2+) imaging.

  7. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  8. A comparative first-principles study on electronic structures and mechanical properties of ternary intermetallic compounds Al8Cr4Y and Al8Cu4Y: Pressure and tension effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Pang, Mingjun; Tan, Yong; Zhan, Yongzhong

    2016-11-01

    An investigation into the bulk properties, elastic properties and Debye temperature under pressure, and deformation mode under tension of Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y compounds was investigated by using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The calculated lattice constants for the ternary compounds (Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y) are in good agreement with the experimental data. It can be seen from interatomic distances that the bonding between Al1 atom and Cr, Y, and Al2 atoms in Al8Cr4Y are stronger than Al8Cu4Y. The results of cohesive energy show that Al8Cr4Y should be easier to be formed and much stronger chemical bonds than Al8Cu4Y. The bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν can be obtained by using the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme. From the results of elastic properties, Al8Cr4Y has the stronger mechanical behavior than Al8Cu4Y. Our calculations also show that pressure has a greater effect on mechanical behavior for both compounds. The ideal tensile strength are obtained by stress-strain relationships under [001](001) uniaxial tensile deformation, which are 15.4 and 23.4 GPa for Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y, respectively. The total and partial density of states and electron charge density under uniaxial tensile deformations for Al8Cu4Y and Al8Cr4Y compounds are also calculated and discussed in this work.

  9. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  10. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  11. DNA loops generate intracentromere tension in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrimore, Josh; Vasquez, Paula A.; Falvo, Michael R.; Taylor, Russell M.; Vicci, Leandra; Yeh, Elaine; Forest, M. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is the DNA locus that dictates kinetochore formation and is visibly apparent as heterochromatin that bridges sister kinetochores in metaphase. Sister centromeres are compacted and held together by cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase-mediated entanglements until all sister chromosomes bi-orient along the spindle apparatus. The establishment of tension between sister chromatids is essential for quenching a checkpoint kinase signal generated from kinetochores lacking microtubule attachment or tension. How the centromere chromatin spring is organized and functions as a tensiometer is largely unexplored. We have discovered that centromere chromatin loops generate an extensional/poleward force sufficient to release nucleosomes proximal to the spindle axis. This study describes how the physical consequences of DNA looping directly underlie the biological mechanism for sister centromere separation and the spring-like properties of the centromere in mitosis. PMID:26283798

  12. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  13. Complement Protein C1q Modulates Neurite Outgrowth In Vitro and Spinal Cord Axon Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Sheri L.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Mendez, Oscar A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to CNS fiber tracts is accompanied by failure of severed axons to regenerate and results in lifelong functional deficits. The inflammatory response to CNS trauma is mediated by a diverse set of cells and proteins with varied, overlapping, and opposing effects on histological and behavioral recovery. Importantly, the contribution of individual inflammatory complement proteins to spinal cord injury (SCI) pathology is not well understood. Although the presence of complement components increases after SCI in association with axons and myelin, it is unknown whether complement proteins affect axon growth or regeneration. We report a novel role for complement C1q in neurite outgrowth in vitro and axon regrowth after SCI. In culture, C1q increased neurite length on myelin. Protein and molecular assays revealed that C1q interacts directly with myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in myelin, resulting in reduced activation of growth inhibitory signaling in neurons. In agreement with a C1q-outgrowth-enhancing mechanism in which C1q binding to MAG reduces MAG signaling to neurons, complement C1q blocked both the growth inhibitory and repulsive turning effects of MAG in vitro. Furthermore, C1q KO mice demonstrated increased sensory axon turning within the spinal cord lesion after SCI with peripheral conditioning injury, consistent with C1q-mediated neutralization of MAG. Finally, we present data that extend the role for C1q in axon growth and guidance to include the sprouting patterns of descending corticospinal tract axons into spinal gray matter after dorsal column transection SCI. PMID:25762679

  14. Curcuminoids promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells through MAPK/ERK- and PKC-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Kai; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Chen, Pei-Yi; Huang, Szu-Wei; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2012-01-11

    Curcuminoids, the predominant polyphenolic compounds in the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn., consist of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC). They exhibit multiple desirable characteristics for a neuroprotective agent including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiamyloid activities. In this work, we report the first investigation of the neurotrophic action and mechanism of curcuminoids in PC12 cells, which respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) and therefore serve as a model system for primary neuronal cells. The percentages of neurite-bearing cells for those treated with 20 μM curcumin, DMC, and BDMC for 72 h reached 21.6 ± 2.0%, 16.3 ± 2.4%, and 19.9 ± 2.5%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that of the negative control (2.0 ± 0.3%, p < 0.05). In parallel, increased expression of the neuronal differentiation markers, growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), and neurofilament-L (NF-L) was found in curcuminoid-treated cells. All three curcuminoids (20 μM) activated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase C (PKC) signalings, and inhibition of these kinases with the respective pharmacological inhibitors effectively attenuated curcuminoid-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, our results show that both curcumin and DMC, but not BDMC, induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CRE-reporter gene activity significantly (p < 0.05). These inductions were markedly attenuated by the addition of MEK/ERK or PKC inhibitor; as a consequence, ERK- and PKC-dependent pathways may be involved in curcuminoid-mediated neuritogenesis in PC12 cells. Moreover, activation of CREB coupling with CRE-dependent gene transcription may play a vital role for curcumin- or DMC-induced PC12 differentiation. PMID:22145830

  15. Posttraumatic delayed tension pneumocephalus: Rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kankane, Vivek Kumar; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Gupta, Tarun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is commonly seen after head and facial trauma, ear infections, and tumors of the skull base or neurosurgical interventions. In tension pneumocephalus, the continuous accumulation of intracranial air is thought to be caused by a “ball valve” mechanism. In turn, this may lead to a mass effect on the brain, with subsequent neurological deterioration and signs of herniation. Tension pneumocephalus is considered a life-threatening, neurosurgical emergency burr-hole evacuation was performed and he experienced a full recovery. However, more invasive surgery was needed to resolve the condition. Delayed tension pneumocephalus is extremely rare and considered a neurosurgical emergency. Pneumocephalus is a complication of head injury in 3.9–9.7% of the cases. The accumulation of intracranial air can be acute (<72 h) or delayed (≥72 h). When intracranial air causes intracranial hypertension and has a mass effect with neurological deterioration, it is called tension pneumocephalus. We represent a clinical case of a 30-year-old male patient with involved in a road traffic accident, complicated by tension pneumocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea on 1 month after trauma and underwent urgent surgical intervention. Burr-hole placement in the right frontal region, evacuation of tension pneumocephalus. Tension pneumocephalus is a life-threatening neurosurgical emergency case, which needs to undergo immediate surgical intervention. PMID:27695534

  16. Tension of red blood cell membrane in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Barthès-Biesel, D.; Salsac, A.-V.; Imai, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2012-11-01

    When a red blood cell (RBC) is subjected to an external flow, it is deformed by the hydrodynamic forces acting on its membrane. The resulting elastic tensions in the membrane play a key role in mechanotransduction and govern its rupture in the case of hemolysis. In this study, we analyze the motion and deformation of an RBC in a simple shear flow and the resulting elastic tensions on the membrane. The large deformation of the red blood cell is modelled by coupling a finite element method to solve the membrane mechanics and a boundary element method to solve the flows of the internal and external liquids. Depending on the capillary number Ca, ratio of the viscous to elastic forces, we observe three kinds of RBC motion: tumbling at low Ca, swinging at larger Ca, and breathing at the transitions. In the swinging regime, the region of the high principal tensions periodically oscillates, whereas that of the high isotropic tensions is almost unchanged. Due to the strain-hardening property of the membrane, the deformation is limited but the membrane tension increases monotonically with the capillary number. We have quantitatively compared our numerical results with former experimental results. It indicates that a membrane isotropic tension O(10-6 N/m) is high enough for molecular release from RBCs and that the typical maximum membrane principal tension for haemolysis would be O(10-4 N/m). These findings are useful to clarify not only the membrane rupture but also the mechanotransduction of RBCs.

  17. Posttraumatic delayed tension pneumocephalus: Rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kankane, Vivek Kumar; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Gupta, Tarun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is commonly seen after head and facial trauma, ear infections, and tumors of the skull base or neurosurgical interventions. In tension pneumocephalus, the continuous accumulation of intracranial air is thought to be caused by a “ball valve” mechanism. In turn, this may lead to a mass effect on the brain, with subsequent neurological deterioration and signs of herniation. Tension pneumocephalus is considered a life-threatening, neurosurgical emergency burr-hole evacuation was performed and he experienced a full recovery. However, more invasive surgery was needed to resolve the condition. Delayed tension pneumocephalus is extremely rare and considered a neurosurgical emergency. Pneumocephalus is a complication of head injury in 3.9–9.7% of the cases. The accumulation of intracranial air can be acute (<72 h) or delayed (≥72 h). When intracranial air causes intracranial hypertension and has a mass effect with neurological deterioration, it is called tension pneumocephalus. We represent a clinical case of a 30-year-old male patient with involved in a road traffic accident, complicated by tension pneumocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea on 1 month after trauma and underwent urgent surgical intervention. Burr-hole placement in the right frontal region, evacuation of tension pneumocephalus. Tension pneumocephalus is a life-threatening neurosurgical emergency case, which needs to undergo immediate surgical intervention.

  18. Flavonoids isolated from Rumex aquaticus exhibit neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties by enhancing neurite outgrowth and synaptophysin.

    PubMed

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Raghavan, Aparna; Vasas, Andrea; Forgo, Peter; Hohmann, Judit; Shah, Zahoor A

    2014-01-01

    There is heightened interest in the field of stroke recovery as there is need for agents that would prevent the debilitating effects of the disorder, thereby tremendously reducing the societal and economic costs associated with it. In this study, the isolation of two flavonoids--quercetin-3-O-galactoside (1) and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside (2)--from Rumex aquaticus (western dock) and their neuroprotective effects were reported in the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of in vitro ischemia using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell line. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the ethyl-acetate extract of Rumex aquaticus L. afforded the isolation of compounds 1 and 2. The structures of compounds were established on the basis of spectroscopic analyses (UV, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Both compounds were isolated for the first time from this species. In the course of the pharmacological experiments it was detected that these flavonoids at 10 µM concentration significantly improved cell survival in the oxygen-glucose deprivation model of ischemia. Moreover, they also increased neurite outgrowth in differentiated PC12 cells subjected to ischemic insult. Investigations on the cellular mechanism for the observed effect revealed that compound 1 (10 µM) enhances the expression of synaptophysin - a marker of synapses, and an indicator of synaptic plasticity. Rapid restoration of neurological function following injury is paramount to the prevention of debilitating consequences of ischemic stroke. This combination of neuroprotection and neuritogenic potential could be particularly useful in the recovery phase of stroke.

  19. Neurite guidance and three-dimensional confinement via compliant semiconductor scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Francesca; Huang, Yu; Dent, Erik W; Williams, Justin C; Lagally, Max G

    2014-12-23

    Neurons are often cultured in vitro on a flat, open, and rigid substrate, a platform that does not reflect well the native microenvironment of the brain. To address this concern, we have developed a culturing platform containing arrays of microchannels, formed in a crystalline-silicon nanomembrane (NM) resting on polydimethylsiloxane; this platform will additionally enable active sensing and stimulation at the local scale, via devices fabricated in the silicon. The mechanical properties of the composite Si/compliant substrate nanomaterial approximate those of neural tissue. The microchannels, created in the NM by strain engineering, demonstrate strong guidance of neurite outgrowth. Using plasma techniques, we developed a means to coat just the inside surface of these channels with an adhesion promoter (poly-d-lysine). For NM channels with openings larger than the cross-sectional area of a single axon, strong physical confinement and guidance of axons through the channels are observed. Imaging of axons that grow in channels with openings that approximate the size of an axon suggests that a tight seal exists between the cell membrane and the inner surface of the channel, mimicking a myelin sheath. Such a tight seal of the cell membrane with the channel surface would make this platform an attractive candidate for future neuronal repair. Results of measurements of impedance and photoluminescence of bare NM channels are comparable to those on a flat NM, demonstrating electrical and optical modalities of our platform and suggesting that this scaffold can be expanded for active sensing and monitoring of neuron cellular processes in conditions in which they exist naturally.

  20. Patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds in three-dimensional hydrogel constructs enhance neurite outgrowth and directional control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, Richard J.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural tissue engineering holds incredible potential to restore functional capabilities to damaged neural tissue. It was hypothesized that patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds could control neurite direction and enhance neurite outgrowth. Approach. A method of creating aligned electrospun nanofibers was implemented and fiber characteristics were analyzed using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Nanofibers were composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer, PCL mixed with gelatin, or PCL with a laminin coating. Three-dimensional hydrogels were then integrated with embedded aligned nanofibers to support neuronal cell cultures. Microscopic images were captured at high-resolution in single and multi-focal planes with eGFP-expressing neuronal SH-SY5Y cells in a fluorescent channel and nanofiber scaffolding in another channel. Neuronal morphology and neurite tracking of nanofibers were then analyzed in detail. Main results. Aligned nanofibers were shown to enable significant control over the direction of neurite outgrowth in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) neuronal cultures. Laminin-functionalized nanofibers in 3D hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels enabled significant alignment of neurites with nanofibers, enabled significant neurite tracking of nanofibers, and significantly increased the distance over which neurites could extend. Specifically, the average length of neurites per cell in 3D HA constructs with laminin-functionalized nanofibers increased by 66% compared to the same laminin fibers on 2D laminin surfaces, increased by 59% compared to 2D laminin-coated surface without fibers, and increased by 1052% compared to HA constructs without fibers. Laminin functionalization of fibers also doubled average neurite length over plain PCL fibers in the same 3D HA constructs. In addition, neurites also demonstrated tracking directly along the fibers, with 66% of neurite lengths directly tracking laminin-coated fibers in 3D HA

  1. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells: dependence on adhesion surface--cell surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth of C 1300 neuroblastoma cells, which were dispersed from adherent cultures or grown in suspension, was studied on different protein-coated surfaces. Of 29 different surface structures studied, including surfaces treated with various fibronectins, lectins, glycosidases, or glycosyltransferases capable of stimulating fibroblast spreading, only the surfaces coated with plasma fibronectin or with a protein mixture secreted by C6 glioma cells displayed an extensive activity in the sprouting assay. Neurite outgrowth was inhibited by brain gangliosides and by colominic acid (a sialic acid polymer). A 50% inhibition of neurite outgrowth of N18 neuroblasts induced by the glioma cell proteins was observed at the following approximate concentration: 100 microM (0.2 mg/ml) GD1A ganglioside, 20 microM (0.04 mg/ml) GT1B ganglioside, and 5 mg/ml colominic acid. Specificity of inhibition was suggested by the finding that a few polyanionic substances tested were not inhibitory in the sprouting assay, and that the type of gangliosides inhibiting sprouting were found to be major sialoglycolipids of the neuroblasts. A hypothesis is discussed, according to which neurite outgrowth of neuroblasts is stimulated by adhesion involving interactions of the adhesion-mediating protein with cell surface carbohydrates characteristic of brain gangliosides. PMID:6699078

  2. Oriented collagen as a potential cochlear implant electrode surface coating to achieve directed neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Kirkwood, John E; Lai, Edwina; Dazert, Stefan; Fuller, Gerald G; Heller, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    In patients with severe to profound hearing loss, cochlear implants (CIs) are currently the only therapeutic option when the amplification with conventional hearing aids does no longer lead to a useful hearing experience. Despite its great success, there are patients in which benefit from these devices is rather limited. One reason may be a poor neuron-device interaction, where the electric fields generated by the electrode array excite a wide range of tonotopically organized spiral ganglion neurons at the cost of spatial resolution. Coating of CI electrodes to provide a welcoming environment combined with suitable surface chemistry (e.g. with neurotrophic factors) has been suggested to create a closer bioelectrical interface between the electrode array and the target tissue, which might lead to better spatial resolution, better frequency discrimination, and ultimately may improve speech perception in patients. Here we investigate the use of a collagen surface with a cholesteric banding structure, whose orientation can be systemically controlled as a guiding structure for neurite outgrowth. We demonstrate that spiral ganglion neurons survive on collagen-coated surfaces and display a directed neurite growth influenced by the direction of collagen fibril deposition. The majority of neurites grow parallel to the orientation direction of the collagen. We suggest collagen coating as a possible future option in CI technology to direct neurite outgrowth and improve hearing results for affected patients.

  3. Androgen-induced neurite outgrowth is mediated by neuritin in motor neurones.

    PubMed

    Marron, T U; Guerini, V; Rusmini, P; Sau, D; Brevini, T A L; Martini, L; Poletti, A

    2005-01-01

    In the brain, the spinal cord motor neurones express the highest levels of the androgen receptor (AR). Experimental data have suggested that neurite outgrowth in these neurones may be regulated by testosterone or its derivative 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), formed by the 5alpha-reductase type 2 enzyme. In this study we have produced and characterized a model of immortalized motor neuronal cells expressing the mouse AR (mAR) [neuroblastoma-spinal cord (NSC) 34/mAR] and analysed the role of androgens in motor neurones. Androgens either activated or repressed several genes; one has been identified as the mouse neuritin, a protein responsible for neurite elongation. Real-time PCR analysis has shown that the neuritin gene is expressed in the basal condition in immortalized motor neurones and is selectively up-regulated by androgens in NSC34/mAR cells; the DHT effect is counteracted by the anti-androgen Casodex. Moreover, DHT induced neurite outgrowth in NSC34/mAR, while testosterone was less effective and its action was counteracted by the 5alpha-reductase type 2 enzyme inhibitor finasteride. Finally, the androgenic effect on neurite outgrowth was abolished by silencing neuritin with siRNA. Therefore, the trophic effects of androgens in motor neurones may be explained by the androgenic regulation of neuritin, a protein linked to neurone development, elongation and regeneration. PMID:15606892

  4. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be...

  5. Controlled neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on micropatterned nanofiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkoc, Veysi; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nelson, Tyler; Lannutti, John J.; Hansford, Derek J.

    2015-12-01

    Patterning neuronal cells and guiding neurite growth are important for applications such as prosthetics, cell based biosensors, and tissue engineering. In this paper, a microdevice is presented that provides neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on a collagen coated gelatin/PCL nanofiber mat. The pattern consisted of a grid of polystyrene microwells/nodes to confine the cell bodies and orthogonal grooves to guide neurite growth from each node. Vacuum assisted cell seeding was used to localize cell bodies in the microwells and physically separate the cells during seeding. The electrospun nanofiber mats under the polystyrene microstructures were coated with collagen to enhance the cellular attachment and enhance differentiation. We evaluated the performance of our device using adhesion, viability, and differentiation assays of neuron-like PC12 cells compared to controls for vacuum seeding, spatial isolation and guidance, and collagen coating of the fibers. The device provided PC12 cell patterning with increased adhesion, differentiation, and guided neurite outgrowth compared to controls, demonstrating its potential for in vitro neuronal cell patterning studies.

  6. APP independent and dependent effects on neurite outgrowth are modulated by the receptor associated protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    Billnitzer, Andrew J; Barskaya, Irina; Yin, Cailing; Perez, Ruth G

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its secreted form, sAPP, contribute to the development of neurons in hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Full-length APP binds the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), which stimulates APP endocytosis. LRP also contributes to neurite growth. Furthermore, the receptor associated protein (RAP) binds LRP in a manner that blocks APP-LRP interactions. To elucidate APP contributions to neurite growth for full-length APP and sAPP, we cultured wild type (WT) and APP knockout (KO) neurons in sAPPα and/or RAP and measured neurite outgrowth at 1 day in vitro. Our data reveal that WT neurons had less axonal outgrowth including less axon branching. RAP treatment potentiated the inhibitory effects of APP. KO neurons had significantly more outgrowth and branching, especially in response to RAP, effects which were also associated with ERK2 activation. Our results affirm a major inhibitory role by full-length APP on all aspects of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and show that RAP-LRP binding stimulated axon growth independently of APP. These findings support a major role for APP as an inhibitor of neurite growth and reveal novel signaling functions for LRP that may be disrupted by Alzheimer's pathology or therapies aimed at APP processing.

  7. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham J; Venkatesan, Guru A; Collier, C Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A

    2015-10-14

    Thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow for determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.

  8. Hyperelastic tension of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra Flores, E. I.; Ajaj, R. M.; Adhikari, S.; Dayyani, I.; Friswell, M. I.; Castro-Triguero, Rafael

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the hyperelastic tensile behaviour of single layer graphene sheets (SLGSs). A one-term incompressible Ogden-type hyperelastic model is chosen to describe the mechanical response of C-C bonds. By establishing equality between the Ogden strain-energy and the variation of the Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential, three different geometries of SLGSs are studied under tensile loading. We compute the Young's modulus, the finite-deformation Poisson's ratio, ultimate strains, total reactions, and the variation of the potential energy per carbon atom for large strains. Numerical simulations are compared with results obtained by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, finite elements, continuum mechanics theory, and experiments. Our predictions are validated, revealing the potential predictive capabilities of the present hyperelastic framework for the analysis of graphene in the context of infinitesimal and large deformations. The good agreement found between our calculations and the published data suggests that graphene may be described as a hyperelastic material.

  9. Hyperelastic tension of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra Flores, E. I.; Ajaj, R. M.; Adhikari, S.; Dayyani, I.; Friswell, M. I.; Castro-Triguero, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the hyperelastic tensile behaviour of single layer graphene sheets (SLGSs). A one-term incompressible Ogden-type hyperelastic model is chosen to describe the mechanical response of C-C bonds. By establishing equality between the Ogden strain-energy and the variation of the Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential, three different geometries of SLGSs are studied under tensile loading. We compute the Young's modulus, the finite-deformation Poisson's ratio, ultimate strains, total reactions, and the variation of the potential energy per carbon atom for large strains. Numerical simulations are compared with results obtained by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, finite elements, continuum mechanics theory, and experiments. Our predictions are validated, revealing the potential predictive capabilities of the present hyperelastic framework for the analysis of graphene in the context of infinitesimal and large deformations. The good agreement found between our calculations and the published data suggests that graphene may be described as a hyperelastic material.

  10. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth and alteration of cytoskeletal gene expression by sodium arsenite.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw Htet; Kurihara, Ryohei; Nakashima, Shizuka; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Nohara, Keiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic compounds that are often found in drinking water increase the risk of developmental brain disorders. In this study, we performed live imaging analyses of Neuro-2a cells expressing SCAT3, a caspase-3 cleavage peptide sequence linking two fluorescent proteins; enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) and Venus, to determine whether sodium arsenite (NaAsO(2); 0, 1, 5, or 10 μM) affects both neurite outgrowth and/or induces apoptosis with the same doses and in the same cell cultures. We observed that the area ratio of neurite to cell body in SCAT3-expressing cells was significantly reduced by 5 and 10 μM NaAsO(2), but not by 1 μM, although the emission ratio of ECFP to Venus, an endpoint of caspase-3 activity, was not changed. However, cytological assay using apoptotic and necrotic markers resulted in that apoptosis, but not necrosis, was significantly induced in Neuro-2a cells when NaAsO(2) exposure continued after the significant effects of NaAsO(2) on neurite outgrowth were found by live imaging. These results suggested that neurite outgrowth was suppressed by NaAsO(2) prior to NaAsO(2)-induced apoptosis. Next, we examined the effects of NaAsO(2) on cytoskeletal gene expression in Neuro-2a cells. NaAsO(2) increased the mRNA levels of the light and medium subunits of neurofilament and decreased the mRNA levels of tau and tubulin in a dose-dependent manner; no significant effect was found in the mRNA levels of the heavy subunit of neurofilament, microtubule-associated protein 2, or actin. The changes in cytoskeletal gene expression are likely responsible for the inhibitory effects of NaAsO(2) on neurite outgrowth.

  11. Hydrocortisone Stimulates Neurite Outgrowth from Mouse Retinal Explants by Modulating Macroglial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Berlinicke, Cynthia; Zack, Donald J.; Nickells, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is mounting evidence that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) require a complex milieu of trophic factors to enhance cell survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. The authors' goal was to examine the contribution of components of a combination of hormones, growth factors, steroids, and small molecules to creating a regenerative environment and to determine if any of these components modulated macroglial behavior to aid in regeneration. Methods Postnatal day 7 mouse retinal explants embedded in collagen were used as an in vitro model of neurite regeneration. Explants were treated with the culture supplements fetal bovine serum, N2, and G5 and a mixture of G5 and N2 components, designated enhanced N2 (EN2). Explants were evaluated for neurite outgrowth over 7 days in culture. The effects of each treatment were also evaluated on cultured RGCs purified by Thy1 immunopanning. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR analysis were used to evaluate differences in gene expression in the explants due to different treatments. Results EN2 stimulated significant neurite outgrowth from explants but not from purified RGCs. Elimination of hydrocortisone (HC) from EN2 reduced the mean neurites per explant by 37%. EN2-treated explants demonstrated increased expression of Gfap, Glul, Glt1, Cntf, Pedf, and VegfA compared with explants treated with EN2 without HC. Subsequent experiments showed that increased expression of Cntf and Glul was critical to the trophic effect of HC. Conclusions These data suggest that the HC in EN2 indirectly contributed to neurite outgrowth by activating macroglia to produce neurotrophic and neuroprotective molecules. PMID:22395888

  12. NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Schneider, Torben; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Alexander, Daniel C

    2012-07-16

    This paper introduces neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), a practical diffusion MRI technique for estimating the microstructural complexity of dendrites and axons in vivo on clinical MRI scanners. Such indices of neurites relate more directly to and provide more specific markers of brain tissue microstructure than standard indices from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). Mapping these indices over the whole brain on clinical scanners presents new opportunities for understanding brain development and disorders. The proposed technique enables such mapping by combining a three-compartment tissue model with a two-shell high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) protocol optimized for clinical feasibility. An index of orientation dispersion is defined to characterize angular variation of neurites. We evaluate the method both in simulation and on a live human brain using a clinical 3T scanner. Results demonstrate that NODDI provides sensible neurite density and orientation dispersion estimates, thereby disentangling two key contributing factors to FA and enabling the analysis of each factor individually. We additionally show that while orientation dispersion can be estimated with just a single HARDI shell, neurite density requires at least two shells and can be estimated more accurately with the optimized two-shell protocol than with alternative two-shell protocols. The optimized protocol takes about 30 min to acquire, making it feasible for inclusion in a typical clinical setting. We further show that sampling fewer orientations in each shell can reduce the acquisition time to just 10 min with minimal impact on the accuracy of the estimates. This demonstrates the feasibility of NODDI even for the most time-sensitive clinical applications, such as neonatal and dementia imaging.

  13. Nimodipine enhances neurite outgrowth in dopaminergic brain slice co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Sygnecka, Katja; Heine, Claudia; Scherf, Nico; Fasold, Mario; Binder, Hans; Scheller, Christian; Franke, Heike

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play important roles in neuroplasticity and the regeneration of nerves. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are regulated by Ca(2+) channels, among them L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which are inhibited by dihydropyridines like nimodipine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nimodipine on neurite growth during development and regeneration. As an appropriate model to study neurite growth, we chose organotypic brain slice co-cultures of the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system, consisting of the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and the prefrontal cortex from neonatal rat brains. Quantification of the density of the newly built neurites in the border region (region between the two cultivated slices) of the co-cultures revealed a growth promoting effect of nimodipine at concentrations of 0.1μM and 1μM that was even more pronounced than the effect of the growth factor NGF. This beneficial effect was absent when 10μM nimodipine were applied. Toxicological tests revealed that the application of nimodipine at this higher concentration slightly induced caspase 3 activation in the cortical part of the co-cultures, but did neither affect the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release or propidium iodide uptake nor the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Furthermore, the expression levels of different genes were quantified after nimodipine treatment. The expression of Ca(2+) binding proteins, immediate early genes, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin components did not change significantly after treatment, indicating that the regulation of their expression is not primarily involved in the observed nimodipine mediated neurite growth. In summary, this study revealed for the first time a neurite growth promoting effect of nimodipine in the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system that is highly dependent on the applied concentrations.

  14. Nimodipine enhances neurite outgrowth in dopaminergic brain slice co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Sygnecka, Katja; Heine, Claudia; Scherf, Nico; Fasold, Mario; Binder, Hans; Scheller, Christian; Franke, Heike

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play important roles in neuroplasticity and the regeneration of nerves. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are regulated by Ca(2+) channels, among them L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which are inhibited by dihydropyridines like nimodipine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nimodipine on neurite growth during development and regeneration. As an appropriate model to study neurite growth, we chose organotypic brain slice co-cultures of the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system, consisting of the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and the prefrontal cortex from neonatal rat brains. Quantification of the density of the newly built neurites in the border region (region between the two cultivated slices) of the co-cultures revealed a growth promoting effect of nimodipine at concentrations of 0.1μM and 1μM that was even more pronounced than the effect of the growth factor NGF. This beneficial effect was absent when 10μM nimodipine were applied. Toxicological tests revealed that the application of nimodipine at this higher concentration slightly induced caspase 3 activation in the cortical part of the co-cultures, but did neither affect the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release or propidium iodide uptake nor the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Furthermore, the expression levels of different genes were quantified after nimodipine treatment. The expression of Ca(2+) binding proteins, immediate early genes, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin components did not change significantly after treatment, indicating that the regulation of their expression is not primarily involved in the observed nimodipine mediated neurite growth. In summary, this study revealed for the first time a neurite growth promoting effect of nimodipine in the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system that is highly dependent on the applied concentrations. PMID:25447789

  15. The effects of ambient impurities on the surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Torres, A.; Vega, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    A liquid bridge is a liquid column held captive between two coaxial and parallel solid disks. It is an excellent test bench where measuring the surface tension. In this paper, we used this fluid configuration to examine experimentally the effects of ambient impurities on the surface tension over time. For this purpose, the liquid bridge equilibrium shape was analyzed when the liquid bridge was surrounded by three environments: the uncontrolled ambient, and both air and argon encapsulated in a small glass cover. Ambient contamination produced a sharp decrease of the surface tension of ultra-pure water. The presence of an anionic surfactant in the free surface of an aqueous solution did not inhibit the action of impurities coming from the ambient. Impurities can influence the dynamical behavior of the free surface in flows dominated by the surface tension. Therefore, a careful control of that influence can be crucial in many applications of fluid mechanics.

  16. Ca2+ transients are not required as signals for long-term neurite outgrowth from cultured sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A method for clamping cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in cultures of rat sympathetic neurons at or below resting levels for several days was devised to determine whether Ca2+ signals are required for neurite outgrowth from neurons that depend on Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) for their growth and survival. To control [Ca2+]i, normal Ca2+ influx was eliminated by titration of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA and reinstated through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. The rate of neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites thus became dependent on the extent of depolarization by KCl, and withdrawal of KCl caused an immediate cessation of growth. Neurite outgrowth was completely blocked by the L type Ca2+ channel antagonists nifedipine, nitrendipine, D600, or diltiazem at sub- or micromolar concentrations. Measurement of [Ca2+]i in cell bodies using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura-2 established that optimal growth, similar to that seen in normal medium, was obtained when [Ca2+]i was clamped at resting levels. These levels of [Ca2+]i were set by serum, which elevated [Ca2+]i by integral of 30 nM, whereas the addition of NGF had no effect on [Ca2+]i. The reduction of [Ca2+]o prevented neurite fasciculation but this had no effect on the rate of neurite elongation or on the number of extending neurites. These results show that neurite outgrowth from NGF-dependent neurons occurs over long periods in the complete absence of Ca2+ signals, suggesting that Ca2+ signals are not necessary for operating the basic machinery of neurite outgrowth. PMID:2324199

  17. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-06-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability.

  18. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-01-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability. PMID:27264106

  19. Tensional acoustomechanical soft metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tianjian

    2016-01-01

    We create acoustomechanical soft metamaterials whose response to uniaxial tensile stressing can be easily tailored by programming acoustic wave inputs, resulting in force versus stretch curves that exhibit distinct monotonic, s-shape, plateau and non-monotonic snapping behaviors. We theoretically demonstrate this unique metamaterial by considering a thin soft material sheet impinged by two counter-propagating ultrasonic wave inputs across its thickness and stretched by an in-plane uniaxial tensile force. We establish a theoretical acoustomechanical model to describe the programmable mechanics of such soft metamaterial, and introduce the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of its force versus stretch curve to boundary different behaviors that appear during deformation. The proposed phase diagrams for the underlying nonlinear mechanics show promising prospects for designing tunable and switchable photonic/phononic crystals and microfluidic devices that harness snap-through instability. PMID:27264106

  20. HMGB1, a pathogenic molecule that induces neurite degeneration via TLR4-MARCKS, is a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Hama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Matsumi, Chiemi; Kajikawa, Masunori; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Sobue, Gen; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, but it remains an intractable condition. Its pathogenesis is predominantly attributed to the aggregation and transmission of two molecules, Aβ and tau; however, other pathological mechanisms are possible. Here, we reveal that phosphorylation of MARCKS, a submembrane protein that regulates the stability of the actin network, occurs at Ser46 prior to aggregation of Aβ and is sustained throughout the course of AD in human and mouse brains. Furthermore, HMGB1 released from necrotic or hyperexcitatory neurons binds to TLR4, triggers the specific phosphorylation of MARCKS via MAP kinases, and induces neurite degeneration, the classical hallmark of AD pathology. Subcutaneous injection of a newly developed monoclonal antibody against HMGB1 strongly inhibits neurite degeneration even in the presence of Aβ plaques and completely recovers cognitive impairment in a mouse model. HMGB1 and Aβ mutually affect polymerization of the other molecule, and the therapeutic effects of the anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody are mediated by Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent mechanisms. We propose that HMGB1 is a critical pathogenic molecule promoting AD pathology in parallel with Aβ and tau and a new key molecular target of preclinical antibody therapy to delay the onset of AD. PMID:27557632

  1. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)−1 and (−)−1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)−1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (−)−1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)−1 and (−)−1. PMID:26585042

  2. HMGB1, a pathogenic molecule that induces neurite degeneration via TLR4-MARCKS, is a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Hama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Matsumi, Chiemi; Kajikawa, Masunori; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Sobue, Gen; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, but it remains an intractable condition. Its pathogenesis is predominantly attributed to the aggregation and transmission of two molecules, Aβ and tau; however, other pathological mechanisms are possible. Here, we reveal that phosphorylation of MARCKS, a submembrane protein that regulates the stability of the actin network, occurs at Ser46 prior to aggregation of Aβ and is sustained throughout the course of AD in human and mouse brains. Furthermore, HMGB1 released from necrotic or hyperexcitatory neurons binds to TLR4, triggers the specific phosphorylation of MARCKS via MAP kinases, and induces neurite degeneration, the classical hallmark of AD pathology. Subcutaneous injection of a newly developed monoclonal antibody against HMGB1 strongly inhibits neurite degeneration even in the presence of Aβ plaques and completely recovers cognitive impairment in a mouse model. HMGB1 and Aβ mutually affect polymerization of the other molecule, and the therapeutic effects of the anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody are mediated by Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent mechanisms. We propose that HMGB1 is a critical pathogenic molecule promoting AD pathology in parallel with Aβ and tau and a new key molecular target of preclinical antibody therapy to delay the onset of AD. PMID:27557632

  3. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)-1 and (-)-1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)-1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (-)-1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)-1 and (-)-1.

  4. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins.

  5. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Thomas P.; Sedlak, Deborah A.

    1997-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) was designed to study basic fluid mechanics and heat transfer on thermocapillary flows generated by temperature variations along the free surfaces of liquids in microgravity. STDCE first flew on the USML-1 mission in July 1992 and was rebuilt for the USML-2 mission that was launched in October 1995. This was a collaborative project with principal investigators from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), Professors Simon Ostrach and Yasuhiro Kamotani, along with a team from the NASA Lewis Research Center composed of civil servants and contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication, Inc. (ADF), Analex, and NYMA, Inc.

  6. The tension raft jacket concept

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, P.; Nygaard, C.; Greiner, W.; Johnson, B.; Datta, B.; Dove, P.G.S.; Souza, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Concept level engineering has been performed for a promising new deepwater platform design. The tension raft jacket (TRJ) employs a fairly conventional fixed platform-type jacket and deck supported by a deeply submerged buoyant concrete raft. The raft is founded to the sea bottom by vertically tensioned tendons similar to conventional TLPs. Tensioned drilling and production risers are used. A TRJ design is discussed for a medium-size deck payload and a water depth of about 1,500 feet. Work to date includes preliminary sizing of the deck, jacket, raft and tendons; global response analysis; development of potential fabrication and installation methods; and development of preliminary schedules and costs. The TRJ concept is expected to compete with compliant tower platforms in shallow water depths and with large drilling TLPs in deep water. The primary benefits of the TRJ concept are simplicity of design, constructability with existing Gulf of Mexico (GOM) infrastructure, lower capital costs, and shorter development schedules.

  7. Friedmann branes with variable tension

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, Laszlo Arpad

    2008-10-15

    We introduce braneworlds with nonconstant tension, strengthening the analogy with fluid membranes, which exhibit a temperature dependence according to the empirical law established by Eoetvoes. This new degree of freedom allows for evolving gravitational and cosmological constants, the latter being a natural candidate for dark energy. We establish the covariant dynamics on a brane with variable tension in full generality, by considering asymmetrically embedded branes and allowing for nonstandard model fields in 5-dimensional space-time. Then we apply the formalism for a perfect fluid on a Friedmann brane, which is embedded in a 5-dimensional charged Vaidya-anti-de Sitter space-time.

  8. Lithium Alters the Morphology of Neurites Regenerating from Cultured Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. M.; Patel, C. H.; Feng, A. S.; Kollmar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The small-molecule drug lithium (as a monovalent ion) promotes neurite regeneration and functional recovery, is easy to administer, and is approved for human use to treat bipolar disorder. Lithium exerts its neuritogenic effect mainly by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3, a constitutively-active serine/threonine kinase that is regulated by neurotrophin and “wingless-related MMTV integration site” (Wnt) signaling. In spiral ganglion neurons of the cochlea, the effects of lithium and the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 have not been investigated. We, therefore, set out to test whether lithium modulates neuritogenesis from adult spiral ganglion neurons. Primary cultures of dissociated spiral ganglion neurons from adult mice were exposed to lithium at concentrations between 0 and 12.5 mM. The resulting neurite morphology and growth-cone appearance were measured in detail by using immunofluorescence microscopy and image analysis. We found that lithium altered the morphology of regenerating neurites and their growth cones in a differential, concentration-dependent fashion. Low concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5 mM (around the half-maximal inhibitory concentration for glycogen synthase kinase 3 and the recommended therapeutic serum concentration for bipolar disorder) enhanced neurite sprouting and branching. A high concentration of 12.5 mM, in contrast, slowed elongation. As the lithium concentration rose from low to high, the microtubules became increasingly disarranged and the growth cones more arborized. Our results demonstrate that lithium selectively stimulates phases of neuritogenesis that are driven by microtubule reorganization. In contrast, most other drugs that have previously been tested on spiral ganglion neurons are reported to inhibit neurite outgrowth or affect only elongation. Lithium sensitivity is a necessary, but not sufficient condition for the involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Our results are, therefore, consistent with, but do not

  9. Surface-tension-induced convection experiment MA-041

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    In the absence of gravity, stirring in a liquid is suppressed because of density differences caused by thermal or compositional gradients. However, other mechanisms resulting in natural convection in a microgravity environment exist. One of the most important mechanisms for liquid metals is surface tension driven convection, which becomes predominant in the low gravity environment. In this case, surface tension differences caused by compositional or temperature gradients have been demonstrated to cause stirring in liquids during experiments performed onboard Skylab. Compositional gradients were created by adding a soap solution to a large water globule, which caused vigorous fluid motion for some moments after the addition.

  10. Prenatal low-dose methylmercury exposure impairs neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression and suppresses TrkA pathway activity and eEF1A1 expression in the rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatake; Usuki, Fusako; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang

    2016-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic environmental chemical that can cause developmental impairments. Human fetuses and neonates are particularly susceptible to MeHg toxicity; however, the mechanisms governing its effects in the developing brain are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal and lactational MeHg exposure on the developing cerebellum in rats. We demonstrated that exposure to 5ppm MeHg decreased postnatal expression of pre- and postsynaptic proteins, suggesting an impairment in synaptic development. MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth, as shown by a decrease in the expression of the neurite marker neurofilament H. These changes were not observed in rats exposed to 1ppm MeHg. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we investigated the effects of MeHg exposure on the tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) A pathway, which plays important roles in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation. We demonstrated suppression of the TrkA pathway on gestation day 20 in rats exposed to 5ppm MeHg. In addition, down-regulation of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A1 (eEF1A1) was observed on postnatal day 1. eEF1A1 knockdown in differentiating PC12 cells impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression, similar to the results of MeHg exposure in the cerebellum. These results suggest that suppression of the TrkA pathway and subsequent decreases in eEF1A1 expression induced by prenatal exposure to MeHg may lead to reduced neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression in the developing cerebellum.

  11. Quantitative assessment of neurite outgrowth in human embryonic stem-cell derived neurons using automated high-content image analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    During development neurons undergo a number of morphological changes including neurite outgrowth from the cell body. Exposure to neurotoxicants that interfere with this process may cause in permanent deficits in nervous system function. While many studies have used rodent primary...

  12. Front-to-rear membrane tension gradient in rapidly moving cells.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Arnon D; Schweitzer, Yonatan; Kozlov, Michael M; Keren, Kinneret

    2015-04-01

    Membrane tension is becoming recognized as an important mechanical regulator of motile cell behavior. Although membrane-tension measurements have been performed in various cell types, the tension distribution along the plasma membrane of motile cells has been largely unexplored. Here, we present an experimental study of the distribution of tension in the plasma membrane of rapidly moving fish epithelial keratocytes. We find that during steady movement the apparent membrane tension is ∼30% higher at the leading edge than at the trailing edge. Similar tension differences between the front and the rear of the cell are found in keratocyte fragments that lack a cell body. This front-to-rear tension variation likely reflects a tension gradient developed in the plasma membrane along the direction of movement due to viscous friction between the membrane and the cytoskeleton-attached protein anchors embedded in the membrane matrix. Theoretical modeling allows us to estimate the area density of these membrane anchors. Overall, our results indicate that even though membrane tension equilibrates rapidly and mechanically couples local boundary dynamics over cellular scales, steady-state variations in tension can exist in the plasma membranes of moving cells.

  13. Researching with Children: Ethical Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Einarsdottir, Johanna; Perry, Bob

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to reflect on both the processes and outcomes of the range of approaches aimed at promoting children's engagement in research, with the specific intent of listening to children's voices. This article considers some of the ethical tensions we have experienced when engaging children in research about their prior-to-school and school…

  14. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Gohar, H.

    2015-09-01

    We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax =c4 / 4 G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  15. Attenuation of actinomyosinII contractile activity in growth cones accelerates filopodia-guided and microtubule-based neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Harald; Möller, Wolfgang; Wassermann, Torsten; Mihatsch, Julia; Blum, Martin

    2007-10-24

    The myosinII-specific inhibitor blebbistatin was used to attenuate actinomyosinII contractility in E7-chicken retina explant, medulla and spinal cord neuronal cell cultures. Addition of 20-100 microM blebbistatin, a concentration range that reversibly disrupts actin stress fibers, led to a reduction of growth cone lamellipodial areas and to an elongation of filopodia within 5 to 10 min. These morphological changes were completely reversed after removing the inhibitor. In the continued presence of blebbistatin for several hours, a dose-dependent acceleration (up to 6-fold) of neurite outgrowth was observed. The rapidly elongating neuritic processes displayed narrowed growth cones with one to three long filopodia at the leading edge. At the same time, thin neuritic branches emerged in a "push"-like fashion guided by filopodial extensions. Immunocytochemical characterization of these thin sprouts revealed that they contained actin filaments, myosinIIA, phosphorylated neurofilament/tau epitopes, MAP2, NCAM-PSA, and microtubules, demonstrating that these processes presented neurites and not filopodia. The crucial involvement of microtubules in blebbistatin-induced accelerated neurite extension was confirmed by its inhibition in the presence of nocodazole or taxol. The promotion by blebbistatin of neurite outgrowth occurred on polylysine, laminin, as well as on fibronectin as substrate. The presence of the Rho/ROCK-inhibitor Y-27632 also caused a dose-dependent promotion of neurite growth which was, however, 3-fold less pronounced as compared to blebbistatin. In contrast to blebbistatin, Y-27632 led to the enlargement of growth cone lamellipodial extensions. Our data demonstrate that neurite outgrowth and branching are inversely correlated with the degree of actinomyosinII contractility which determines the speed of retrograde flow and turnover of actin filaments and, by this, microtubule extension.

  16. L- and D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) inhibit neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Hynds, D L; Takehana, A; Inokuchi, J; Snow, D M

    2002-01-01

    Gangliosides and extracellular matrix molecules influence neurite outgrowth, but the combinatorial effects of these endogenous agents on outgrowth are unclear. Exogenous gangliosides inhibit neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and different isoforms of the ceramide analog threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) stimulate (L-PDMP) or inhibit (D-PDMP) glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. In this study, we determined whether altering the endogenous ganglioside levels with PDMP in SH-SY5Y cells regulates neurite outgrowth on the outgrowth-supporting extracellular matrix molecule, laminin. In cells stimulated with 20 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor-BB to promote outgrowth, we used image analysis to evaluate neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells grown on endogenous matrix or laminin and exposed to L- or D-PDMP. Both L- and D-PDMP decreased neurite initiation (the number of neurites/cell, the percent of neurite-bearing cells), elongation (the length of the longest neurite/cell, the total neurite length/cell), and branching (the number of branch points/neurite) from SH-SY5Y cells on endogenous matrix or laminin in a dose-dependent manner in serum-free or serum-containing medium. The inhibitory effects of each PDMP isoform were reversible. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth by L-PDMP could be mimicked by addition of exogenous gangliosides or C2-ceramide. Our analyses of neurite outgrowth in SH-SY5Y cells, a model of developing or regenerating noradrenergic neurons, demonstrate that increasing or decreasing endogenous ganglioside levels decreases neurite outgrowth. These results may indicate that SH-SY5Y cells undergo tight regulation by gangliosides, possibly through modulation of growth/trophic factor- and/or extracellular matrix-activated signaling cascades.

  17. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  18. Anisotropic three-dimensional peptide channels guide neurite outgrowth within a biodegradable hydrogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Musoke-Zawedde, Patricia; Shoichet, Molly S

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the neurite guidance potential of concentration gradients of glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (GRGDS) oligopeptides immobilized within three-dimensional patterned cylindrical volumes created in a biodegradable nerve guidance matrix. This was achieved using ultraviolet (UV) laser micropatterning of a hyaluronan (HA) hydrogel matrix modified with S-2-nitrobenzyl cysteine. Upon exposure to focused laser light, the 2-nitrobenzyl group was cleaved, exposing thiol groups which reacted with maleimide-terminated GRGDS exclusively within these laser-defined volumes. We show that the UV laser micropatterning technique can be used to create GRGDS peptide concentration gradients within the oligopeptide channels and that these channels guide neurite outgrowth from primary neural cells. PMID:18458398

  19. Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Luo, Shyh-Chyang; Zhao, Haichao; Lin, Hsing-An; Sekine, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Chen, Chi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it. PMID:25060339

  20. DNA Looping, Supercoiling and Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura

    2007-11-01

    In complex organisms, activation or repression of gene expression by proteins bound to enhancer or silencer elements located several kilobases away from the promoter is a well recognized phenomenon. However, a mechanistic understanding of any of these multiprotein interactions is still incomplete. Part of the difficulty in characterizing long-range interactions is the complexity of the regulatory systems and also an underestimation of the effect of DNA supercoiling and tension. Supercoiling is expected to promote interactions between DNA sites because it winds the DNA into compact plectonemes in which distant DNA segments more frequently draw close. The idea that DNA is also under various levels of tension is becoming more widely accepted. Forces that stretch the double helix in vivo are the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone, the action of motor enzymes perhaps acting upon a topologically constrained sequence of DNA or chromosome segregation during cell mitosis following DNA replication. Presently, little is known about the tension acting on DNA in vivo, but characterization of how physiological regulatory processes, such as loop formation, depend on DNA tension in vitro will indicate the stretching force regimes likely to exist in vivo. In this light, the well studied CI protein of bacteriophage l, which was recently found to cause a of 3.8 kbp loop in DNA, is an ideal system in which to characterize long-range gene regulation. The large size of the loop lends itself to single-molecule techniques, which allow characterization of the dynamics of CI-mediated l DNA looping under controlled levels of supercoiling and tension. Such experiments are being used to discover the principles of long-range interactions in l and in more complex systems.

  1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development. PMID:24158140

  2. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development.

  4. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in vesicular transport mediating neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Arca, S; Alberts, P; Zahraoui, A; Louvard, D; Galli, T

    2000-05-15

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH(2)-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH(2)-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH(2)-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process.

  5. Role of Tetanus Neurotoxin Insensitive Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein (Ti-Vamp) in Vesicular Transport Mediating Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Alberts, Philipp; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Louvard, Daniel; Galli, Thierry

    2000-01-01

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH2-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH2-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH2-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process. PMID:10811829

  6. Growth cone collapse and inhibition of neurite growth by Botulinum neurotoxin C1: a t-SNARE is involved in axonal growth

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The growth cone is responsible for axonal growth, where membrane expansion is most likely to occur. Several recent reports have suggested that presynaptic proteins are involved in this process; however, the molecular mechanism details are unclear. We suggest that by cleaving a presynaptic protein syntaxin, which is essential in targeting synaptic vesicles as a target SNAP receptor (t-SNARE), neurotoxin C1 of Clostridium botulinum causes growth cone collapse and inhibits axonal growth. Video-enhanced microscopic studies showed (a) that neurotoxin C1 selectively blocked the activity of the central domain (the vesicle-rich region) at the initial stage, but not the lamellipodia in the growth cone; and (b) that large vacuole formation occurred probably through the fusion of smaller vesicles from the central domain to the most distal segments of the neurite. The total surface area of the accumulated vacuoles could explain the membrane expansion of normal neurite growth. The gradual disappearance of the surface labeling by FITC-WGA on the normal growth cone, suggesting membrane addition, was inhibited by neurotoxin C1. The experiments using the peptides derived from syntaxin, essential for interaction with VAMP or alpha-SNAP, supported the results using neurotoxin C1. Our results demonstrate that syntaxin is involved in axonal growth and indicate that syntaxin may participate directly in the membrane expansion that occurs in the central domain of the growth cone, probably through association with VAMP and SNAPs, in a SNARE-like way. PMID:8698815

  7. MicroRNA-127 targeting of mitoNEET inhibits neurite outgrowth, induces cell apoptosis and contributes to physiological dysfunction after spinal cord transection

    PubMed Central

    He, Qin-Qin; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Liu, Fei; He, Xiang; Feng, Guo-Ying; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Wang, You-Cui; Qiu, De-Lu; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Liu, Jia; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroregeneration and apoptosis are two important pathophysiologic changes after spinal cord injury (SCI), but their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in the regulation of neuroregeneration and neuronal apoptosis, research areas that have been greatly expanded in recent years. Here, using miRNA arrays to profile miRNA transcriptomes, we demonstrated that miR-127-3p was significantly down-regulated after spinal cord transection (SCT). Then, bioinformatics analyses and experimental detection showed that miR-127-3p exhibited specific effects on the regulation of neurite outgrowth and the induction of neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein mitoNEET. Moreover, knockdown of MitoNEET leaded to neuronal loss and apoptosis in primary cultured spinal neurons. This study therefore revealed that miR-127-3p, which targets mitoNEET, plays a vital role in regulating neurite outgrowth and neuronal apoptosis after SCT. Thus, modificatioin of the mitoNEET expression, such as mitoNEET activition may provide a new strategy for the treatment of SCI in preclinical trials. PMID:27748416

  8. C. elegans fmi-1/flamingo and Wnt pathway components interact genetically to control the anteroposterior neurite growth of the VD GABAergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ackley, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    During development, multiple environmental cues, e.g., growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, etc., interact to influence the pattern of outgrowth of axons and dendrites in a cell-specific fashion. As a result, individual neurons may receive similar signals, but make unique choices, leading to distinct wiring within the nervous system. C. elegans has been useful in identifying molecular cues that influence neuronal development, as well as the downstream mechanisms that allow individual neurons to make cell-specific responses. Recently, we described a role for the conserved cadherin domain-containing protein, FMI-1/flamingo, in multiple stages of neural development in C. elegans. During the initial phase of neurite outgrowth, FMI-1 seems to have a relatively cell-specific effect on the VD neurons to promote the initial neurite formed to grow toward the anterior. In this capacity, FMI-1 appears to work coordinately with at least two Wnt ligands, EGL-20 and LIN-44, and multiple downstream Wnt signaling components (including LIN-17/Frizzled, DSH-1/Disheveled, and BAR-1/β-catenin). Here I will discuss some of the ideas we considered about how FMI-1 could affect neurons as they acquire their morphology during development. PMID:24778938

  9. Automated wire tension measurement system for LHCb muon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; Dumps, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Frenkel, A.; Graulich, J.-S.; Kachtchouk, A.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.; Nedosekin, A. A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Schmidt, B.; Shubin, V.

    2005-06-01

    A wire tension meter has been developed for the multi-wire proportional chambers of the LHCb muon detector. The wire tension is deduced from its mechanical resonance frequency. In the LHCb muon chambers, the wires are 2 mm apart and electrically connected in groups of 3-32, so that the wire excitation system must be precisely positioned with respect to the wire to be tested. This wire is forced to oscillate by a periodic high voltage applied between that wire and a non-oscillating "sense wire" placed parallel and close to it. This oscillation produces a variation of the capacitance between these two wires which is measured by a high precision digital electronic circuit. At the resonance frequency this capacitance variation is maximum. The system has been systematically investigated and its parameters were optimized. In the range 0.4-1 N a good agreement is found between the mechanical tension measured by this system and by a dynamometer.

  10. Variable-Tension-Cord Suspension/Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villemarette, Mark L.; Boston, Joshua; RInks, Judith; Felice, Pat; Stein, Tim; Payne, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A system for mechanical suspension and vibration isolation of a machine or instrument is based on the use of Kevlar (or equivalent aromatic polyamide) cord held in variable tension between the machine or instrument and a surrounding frame. The basic concept of such a tensioned-cord suspension system (including one in which the cords are made of aromatic polyamide fibers) is not new by itself; what is new here is the additional provision for adjusting the tension during operation to optimize vibration- isolation properties. In the original application for which this system was conceived, the objective is to suspend a reciprocating cryocooler aboard a space shuttle and to prevent both (1) transmission of launch vibrations to the cryocooler and (2) transmission of vibrations from the cryocooler to samples in a chamber cooled by the cryocooler. The basic mechanical principle of this system can also be expected to be applicable to a variety of other systems in which there are requirements for cord suspension and vibration isolation. The reciprocating cryocooler of the original application is a generally axisymmetric object, and the surrounding frame is a generally axisymmetric object with windows (see figure). Two cords are threaded into a spoke-like pattern between attachment rings on the cryocooler, holes in the cage, and cord-tension- adjusting assemblies. Initially, the cord tensions are adjusted to at least the level necessary to suspend the cryocooler against gravitation. Accelerometers for measuring vibrations are mounted (1) on the cold tip of the cryocooler and (2) adjacent to the cage, on a structure that supports the cage. During operation, a technician observes the accelerometer outputs on an oscilloscope while manually adjusting the cord tensions in an effort to minimize the amount of vibration transmitted to and/or from the cryocooler. A contemplated future version of the system would include a microprocessor-based control subsystem that would include cord-tension

  11. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3 Prime ends. Because 3 Prime -UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits-CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  12. NeuriteQuant: An open source toolkit for high content screens of neuronal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, some of the most useful and physiologically relevant neuronal cell culture systems, such as high density co-cultures of astrocytes and primary hippocampal neurons, or differentiated stem cell-derived cultures, are characterized by high cell density and partially overlapping cellular structures. Efficient analytical strategies are required to enable rapid, reliable, quantitative analysis of neuronal morphology in these valuable model systems. Results Here we present the development and validation of a novel bioinformatics pipeline called NeuriteQuant. This tool enables fully automated morphological analysis of large-scale image data from neuronal cultures or brain sections that display a high degree of complexity and overlap of neuronal outgrowths. It also provides an efficient web-based tool to review and evaluate the analysis process. In addition to its built-in functionality, NeuriteQuant can be readily extended based on the rich toolset offered by ImageJ and its associated community of developers. As proof of concept we performed automated screens for modulators of neuronal development in cultures of primary neurons and neuronally differentiated P19 stem cells, which demonstrated specific dose-dependent effects on neuronal morphology. Conclusions NeuriteQuant is a freely available open-source tool for the automated analysis and effective review of large-scale high-content screens. It is especially well suited to quantify the effect of experimental manipulations on physiologically relevant neuronal cultures or brain sections that display a high degree of complexity and overlap among neurites or other cellular structures. PMID:21989414

  13. Induction of neurite outgrowth in 3D hydrogel-based environments.

    PubMed

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C; Oliveira, Cátia Costa; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Gomes, Eduardo D; Sahar, Abraham; Sousa, Nuno; Silva, Nuno A; Salgado, António J

    2015-09-01

    The ability of peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons to regenerate and re-innervate their targets after an injury has been widely recognized. However, despite the considerable advances made in microsurgical techniques, complete functional recovery is rarely achieved, especially for severe peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs). Therefore, alternative therapies that can successfully repair peripheral nerves are still essential. In recent years the use of biodegradable hydrogels enriched with growth-supporting and guidance cues, cell transplantation, and biomolecular therapies have been explored for the treatment of PNIs. Bearing this in mind, the aim of this study was to assess whether Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser synthetic peptide (GRGDS)-modified gellan gum (GG) based hydrogels could foster an amenable environment for neurite/axonal growth. Additionally, strategies to further improve the rate of neurite outgrowth were also tested, namely the use of adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs), as well as the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In order to increase its stability and enhance its bioactivity, the GDNF was conjugated covalently to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The impact of hydrogel modification as well as the effect of the GDNF-IONPs on ASC behavior was also screened. The results revealed that the GRGDS-GG hydrogel was able to support dorsal root ganglia (DRG)-based neurite outgrowth, which was not observed for non-modified hydrogels. Moreover, the modified hydrogels were also able to support ASCs attachment. In contrast, the presence of the GDNF-IONPs had no positive or negative impact on ASC behavior. Further experiments revealed that the presence of ASCs in the hydrogel improved axonal growth. On the other hand, GDNF-IONPs alone or combined with ASCs significantly increased neurite outgrowth from DRGs, suggesting a beneficial role of the proposed strategy for future applications in PNI regenerative medicine. PMID:26480959

  14. Induction of neurite outgrowth in 3D hydrogel-based environments.

    PubMed

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C; Oliveira, Cátia Costa; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Gomes, Eduardo D; Sahar, Abraham; Sousa, Nuno; Silva, Nuno A; Salgado, António J

    2015-09-01

    The ability of peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons to regenerate and re-innervate their targets after an injury has been widely recognized. However, despite the considerable advances made in microsurgical techniques, complete functional recovery is rarely achieved, especially for severe peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs). Therefore, alternative therapies that can successfully repair peripheral nerves are still essential. In recent years the use of biodegradable hydrogels enriched with growth-supporting and guidance cues, cell transplantation, and biomolecular therapies have been explored for the treatment of PNIs. Bearing this in mind, the aim of this study was to assess whether Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser synthetic peptide (GRGDS)-modified gellan gum (GG) based hydrogels could foster an amenable environment for neurite/axonal growth. Additionally, strategies to further improve the rate of neurite outgrowth were also tested, namely the use of adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs), as well as the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In order to increase its stability and enhance its bioactivity, the GDNF was conjugated covalently to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The impact of hydrogel modification as well as the effect of the GDNF-IONPs on ASC behavior was also screened. The results revealed that the GRGDS-GG hydrogel was able to support dorsal root ganglia (DRG)-based neurite outgrowth, which was not observed for non-modified hydrogels. Moreover, the modified hydrogels were also able to support ASCs attachment. In contrast, the presence of the GDNF-IONPs had no positive or negative impact on ASC behavior. Further experiments revealed that the presence of ASCs in the hydrogel improved axonal growth. On the other hand, GDNF-IONPs alone or combined with ASCs significantly increased neurite outgrowth from DRGs, suggesting a beneficial role of the proposed strategy for future applications in PNI regenerative medicine.

  15. The role of cell adhesion molecules in visual circuit formation: From neurite outgrowth to maps and synaptic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Missaire, Mégane

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of visual circuitry is a multistep process that involves cell–cell interactions based on a range of molecular mechanisms. The correct implementation of individual events, including axon outgrowth and guidance, the formation of the topographic map, or the synaptic targeting of specific cellular subtypes, are prerequisites for a fully functional visual system that is able to appropriately process the information captured by the eyes. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) with their adhesive properties and their high functional diversity have been identified as key actors in several of these fundamental processes. Because of their growth‐promoting properties, CAMs play an important role in neuritogenesis. Furthermore, they are necessary to control additional neurite development, regulating dendritic spacing and axon pathfinding. Finally, trans‐synaptic interactions of CAMs ensure cell type‐specific connectivity as a basis for the establishment of circuits processing distinct visual features. Recent discoveries implicating CAMs in novel mechanisms have led to a better general understanding of neural circuit formation, but also revealed an increasing complexity of their function. This review aims at describing the different levels of action for CAMs to shape neural connectivity, with a special focus on the visual system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 569–583, 2015 PMID:25649254

  16. Mevastatin accelerates loss of synaptic proteins and neurite degeneration in aging cortical neurons in a heme-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Madhuvanthi; Steinert, Joern R; Forsythe, Ian D; Smith, Andrew G; Chernova, Tatyana

    2010-09-01

    The therapeutic use of statins in reducing cholesterol requires careful assessment of potential neuroprotective and/or neurotoxic mechanisms. Chronic treatment with mevastatin (MV) exerts effects on cortical neuron morphology, protein expression and synaptic function in primary culture. MV impaired expression of synaptic proteins, reduced N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents and accelerated neurodegeneration associated with aging. The down-regulating effect of MV on neuronal protein expression was additive with aging-associated decline in culture. Induction of Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) by MV was superimposed on age-related up-regulation. Comparison of MV-treated and heme-deficient neurons showed that inhibition of heme synthesis (by succinyl acetone) had similar damaging effect on neurite integrity and MNDAR expression and function but not on expression of the receptor for neuropeptide Y1 (NPY1R). Replacement of heme in heme-deficient cultures restored protein expression but had no effect in those cultures co-treated with MV. Despite the dramatic induction of HMOX1, intracellular heme remained sufficient in MV-treated cultures, consistent with a heme-independent mechanism of MV-induced neurotoxicity and this was confirmed by analysing neurons with lentiviral over-expression of HMOX1. We conclude that MV exerts a neurotoxic effect in cultured neurons in a heme-independent manner.

  17. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  18. Hearing development and spiral ganglion neurite growth in VASP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Schick, Bernhard; Hartensuer, Rene; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Hansen, Stefan; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa E; Eigenthaler, Martin; Walter, Ulrich; Ryan, Allen F; Brors, Dominik

    2007-10-31

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) has been found to be involved in intracellular signalling pathways and to play an important role in the actin associated organization and formation of the cytoskeleton. Since differential VASP expression was noted in inner ear tissues, the present study was performed to investigate the hearing development in VASP deficient mice. Hearing development in VASP-/- mice and wild type animals was investigated by auditory brain stem (ABR) measurements. In addition, inner ear tissues of wild type animals were tested for VASP expression using PCR, Western blot analysis, in situ hybridisation, and immunohistochemistry. To compare spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth, SG explants from VASP-/- and wild type mice were analyzed under cell culture conditions. The electroacoustical results of the present study indicate that VASP deficient mice present with a later onset of hearing during postnatal development compared to wild type animals. Transient VASP expression was detected in neonatal SG of wild type mice. Tissue culture experiments with SG explants from VASP-/- animals revealed significant alterations in SG neurite extension compared to wild types. The present findings suggest a role for VASP during neonatal development of the mammalian cochlea and allow speculation on a possible delayed innervation of cochlear hair cells due to changes in SG neurite growth in VASP-deficient mice. Temporary VASP deficits in the neonatal inner ear may be compensated by related proteins like MENA leading to a delayed but complete development of hearing function in VASP-/- animals.

  19. Regulation of microglial migration, phagocytosis, and neurite outgrowth by HO-1/CO signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheiblich, Hannah; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    Clearance of infected and apoptotic neuronal corpses during inflammatory conditions is a fundamental process to create a favorable environment for neuronal recovery. Microglia are the resident immune cells and the predominant phagocytic cells of the CNS, showing a multitude of cellular responses upon activation. Here, we investigated in functional assays how the CO generating enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) influences BV-2 microglial migration, clearance of debris, and neurite outgrowth of human NT2 neurons. Stimulation of HO-1 activity attenuated microglial migration in a scratch wound assay, and phagocytosis in a cell culture model of acute inflammation comprising lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia and apoptosis-induced neurons. Application of a CO donor prevented the production of NO during LPS stimulation, and reduced microglial migration and engulfment of neuronal debris. LPS-activated microglia inhibited neurite elongation of human neurons without requiring direct cell-cell surface contact. The inhibition of neurite outgrowth was totally reversed by application of exogenous CO or increased internal CO production through supply of the substrate hemin to HO. Our results point towards a vital cytoprotective role of HO-1/CO signaling after microglial activation. In addition, they support a therapeutic potential of CO releasing chemical agents in the treatment of excessive inflammatory conditions in the CNS.

  20. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells.

  1. Spatial confinement of neurite regrowth from dorsal root ganglia within nonporous microconduits.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Richard G; Molino, Yves; Williams, Philip M; Tendler, Saul J B; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2003-04-01

    Tissue engineering is founded on the concept of controlling the behavior of individual cells to stimulate tissue formation. This control is achieved by mimicking signals that manage natural tissue development or repair. These interdependent signals include cytokine delivery, extracellular matrix interactions, and cell-cell communication. Here, we report on the effect of spatial guidance as a signal for nerve tissue regeneration, using a simple in vitro model. We observe the acceleration of neurite extension from rat dorsal root ganglia within micron-scale tubes. Within these hydrogel-filled conduits, neurites were observed to extend more rapidly than when cultured within the hydrogel alone. The spatial cue also induced a change in tissue architecture, with the cabling of cells within the microconduit. The acceleration of neurite extension was found to be independent of conduit diameter within the range of 200 to 635 microm. Finally, our in vitro model enabled quantification of the effect of combining spatial control and localized nerve growth factor delivery.

  2. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  3. How do mechanosensitive channels sense membrane tension?

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Tim

    2016-08-15

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels provide protection against hypo-osmotic shock in bacteria whereas eukaryotic MS channels fulfil a multitude of important functions beside osmoregulation. Interactions with the membrane lipids are responsible for the sensing of mechanical force for most known MS channels. It emerged recently that not only prokaryotic, but also eukaryotic, MS channels are able to directly sense the tension in the membrane bilayer without any additional cofactor. If the membrane is solely viewed as a continuous medium with specific anisotropic physical properties, the sensitivity towards tension changes can be explained as result of the hydrophobic coupling between membrane and transmembrane (TM) regions of the channel. The increased cross-sectional area of the MS channel in the active conformation and elastic deformations of the membrane close to the channel have been described as important factors. However, recent studies suggest that molecular interactions of lipids with the channels could play an important role in mechanosensation. Pockets in between TM helices were identified in the MS channel of small conductance (MscS) and YnaI that are filled with lipids. Less lipids are present in the open state of MscS than the closed according to MD simulations. Thus it was suggested that exclusion of lipid fatty acyl chains from these pockets, as a consequence of increased tension, would trigger gating. Similarly, in the eukaryotic MS channel TRAAK it was found that a lipid chain blocks the conducting path in the closed state. The role of these specific lipid interactions in mechanosensation are highlighted in this review. PMID:27528747

  4. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2012-12-01

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 10(5) cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m(-1)) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip.

  5. Biaxial tension on polymer in thermoforming range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Combeaud, C.; Fournier, F.; Rodriguez, J.; Billon, N.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental characterization of mechanical properties of a polyethylene terephtalate (PET) resin classically used in stretch blow moulding process. We have applied on such a material a well established experimental protocol at CEMEF, including new and relevant biaxial tensile tests. The experimental set-up relative to biaxial tension will be presented and described in a first part of the paper. Furthermore, we will focus on the experimental DMTA preliminary tests which are required to estimate the resin sensibility to temperature and strain rate in linear viscoelasticity domain. Finally, we will be interested in the material large strain behaviour: biaxial tensile results are presented and discussed. Finally, such an experimental approach should allow a relevant modelling of polymer physics and mechanics; this point will not be discussed here because of a lack of time.

  6. Light Scattering by Surface Tension Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbuch, G.; Garbay, F.

    1979-01-01

    This simple and inexpensive experiment is an illustration of the physical concepts of interaction between light and surface tension waves, and provides a new method of measuring surface tension. (Author/GA)

  7. Mycolactone-mediated neurite degeneration and functional effects in cultured human and rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sinisi, M; Fox, M; MacQuillan, A; Quick, T; Korchev, Y; Bountra, C; McCarthy, T; Anand, P

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone is a polyketide toxin secreted by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, responsible for the extensive hypoalgesic skin lesions characteristic of patients with Buruli ulcer. A recent pre-clinical study proposed that mycolactone may produce analgesia via activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In contrast, AT2R antagonist EMA401 has shown analgesic efficacy in animal models and clinical trials for neuropathic pain. We therefore investigated the morphological and functional effects of mycolactone in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the role of AT2R using EMA401. Primary sensory neurons were prepared from avulsed cervical human DRG and rat DRG; 24 h after plating, neurons were incubated for 24 to 96 h with synthetic mycolactone A/B, followed by immunostaining with antibodies to PGP9.5, Gap43, β tubulin, or Mitotracker dye staining. Acute functional effects were examined by measuring capsaicin responses with calcium imaging in DRG neuronal cultures treated with mycolactone. Results Morphological effects: Mycolactone-treated cultures showed dramatically reduced numbers of surviving neurons and non-neuronal cells, reduced Gap43 and β tubulin expression, degenerating neurites and reduced cell body diameter, compared with controls. Dose-related reduction of neurite length was observed in mycolactone-treated cultures. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the length of neurites and soma of control neurons, but clustered in the neurites and soma of mycolactone-treated neurons. Functional effects: Mycolactone-treated human and rat DRG neurons showed dose-related inhibition of capsaicin responses, which were reversed by calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-Methylxanthine, indicating involvement of cAMP/ATP reduction. The morphological and functional effects of mycolactone were not altered by Angiotensin II or AT2R antagonist EMA401. Conclusion Mycolactone

  8. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  9. Convection and surface tension profiles for aqueous droplet under microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Yushin; Asada, Masahiro; Asakuma, Yusuke; Honda, Itsuro; Phan, Chi; Parmar, Harisinh; Pareek, Vishnu; Evans, Geoffrey

    2014-08-01

    Application of microwave irradiation for chemical processes, such as emulsification and polymerization, has been reported [1,2]. Surfactant free emulsion can be produced with the help of microwave irradiation. Surface tension is an important property for the industrial process such as foaming/defoaming, wetting/dewetting and flotation. Similarly, the interfacial tension plays crucial role in separation and mixing process of two immiscible liquids, which are important unit operations of the fundamental chemical engineering. In practice, surface and interfacial tensions are often altered by introducing surfactants. In our previous research [3,4], specific property for surface tension of water droplet with salt under microwave radiation was found. For example, lower surface tension after the radiation was measured. The formation of nano-bubble will explain this behavior. Normally, the surface tension of aqueous solution increases with the salt concentration because cation and anion collect water molecule more strongly as a solvation. However, the exact mechanism of surface tension reduction by microwave radiation is not clear. We tried not only measurement of surface tension but also convection in the droplet during microwave radiation. This study investigates the influence of microwave on surface tension of aqueous solution. Moreover, relation between the concentration, temperature and droplet shape, which are related with surface tension.

  10. Multiscale surface roughening of commercial purity titanium during uniaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina Kozelskaya, Anna Sinyakova, Elena; Lider, Andrey Sklyarova, Elena

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of the surface roughening of the titanium specimens during uniaxial tension were demonstrated. By means of optical profilometry and electron backscattered diffraction it was shown that the formation of surface roughening is a multilevel process. The correlation between the density of slip in some grains, and grain rotation, and their displacement towards the free surface was investigated.

  11. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  12. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  13. Professional Identity Tensions of Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillen, Marieke; Beijaard, Douwe; den Brok, Perry

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on interviews with 24 beginning teachers about tensions they experienced regarding their professional identity. The interviewees reported a total of 59 tensions of tension that fell into three themes: (1) the change in role from student to teacher; (2) conflicts between desired and actual support given to students; and (3)…

  14. Phase-locked scroll waves defy turbulence induced by negative filament tension.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Chao; Gao, Xiang; Zheng, Fei-Fei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong; Dierckx, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Scroll waves in a three-dimensional media may develop into turbulence due to negative tension of the filament. Such negative tension-induced instability of scroll waves has been observed in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction systems. Here we propose a method to restabilize scroll wave turbulence caused by negative tension in three-dimensional chemical excitable media using a circularly polarized (rotating) external field. The stabilization mechanism is analyzed in terms of phase-locking caused by the external field, which makes the effective filament tension positive. The phase-locked scroll waves that have positive tension and higher frequency defy the turbulence and finally restore order. A linear theory for the change of filament tension caused by a generic rotating external field is presented and its predictions closely agree with numerical simulations. PMID:26871082

  15. Phase-locked scroll waves defy turbulence induced by negative filament tension.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Chao; Gao, Xiang; Zheng, Fei-Fei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong; Dierckx, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Scroll waves in a three-dimensional media may develop into turbulence due to negative tension of the filament. Such negative tension-induced instability of scroll waves has been observed in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction systems. Here we propose a method to restabilize scroll wave turbulence caused by negative tension in three-dimensional chemical excitable media using a circularly polarized (rotating) external field. The stabilization mechanism is analyzed in terms of phase-locking caused by the external field, which makes the effective filament tension positive. The phase-locked scroll waves that have positive tension and higher frequency defy the turbulence and finally restore order. A linear theory for the change of filament tension caused by a generic rotating external field is presented and its predictions closely agree with numerical simulations.

  16. Phase-locked scroll waves defy turbulence induced by negative filament tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Teng-Chao; Gao, Xiang; Zheng, Fei-Fei; Cai, Mei-Chun; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong; Dierckx, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Scroll waves in a three-dimensional media may develop into turbulence due to negative tension of the filament. Such negative tension-induced instability of scroll waves has been observed in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction systems. Here we propose a method to restabilize scroll wave turbulence caused by negative tension in three-dimensional chemical excitable media using a circularly polarized (rotating) external field. The stabilization mechanism is analyzed in terms of phase-locking caused by the external field, which makes the effective filament tension positive. The phase-locked scroll waves that have positive tension and higher frequency defy the turbulence and finally restore order. A linear theory for the change of filament tension caused by a generic rotating external field is presented and its predictions closely agree with numerical simulations.

  17. Fluctuation-induced forces in a fluid membrane under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Roya

    2012-02-01

    We develop an exact method to calculate thermal Casimir forces between inclusions of arbitrary shapes and separation, embedded in a fluid membrane whose fluctuations are governed by the combined action of surface tension, bending modulus, and Gaussian rigidity. Each object's shape and mechanical properties enter only through a characteristic matrix, a static analog of the scattering matrix. We calculate the Casimir interaction between two elastic disks embedded in a membrane. In particular, we find that at short separations the interaction is strong and independent of surface tension.

  18. Surface tension mediated conversion of light to work

    DOEpatents

    Okawa, David; Pastine, Stefan J; Zettl, Alexander K; Frechet, Jean M. J

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for converting light energy to mechanical energy by modification of surface tension on a supporting fluid. The apparatus comprises an object which may be formed as a composite object comprising a support matrix and a highly light absorptive material. The support matrix may comprise a silicon polymer. The highly light absorptive material may comprise vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VANTs) embedded in the support matrix. The composite object is supported on a fluid. By exposing the highly light absorptive material to light, heat is generated, which changes the surface tension of the composite object, causing it to move physically within the fluid.

  19. Experimental and computational models of neurite extension at a choice point in response to controlled diffusive gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catig, G. C.; Figueroa, S.; Moore, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Ojective. Axons are guided toward desired targets through a series of choice points that they navigate by sensing cues in the cellular environment. A better understanding of how microenvironmental factors influence neurite growth during development can inform strategies to address nerve injury. Therefore, there is a need for biomimetic models to systematically investigate the influence of guidance cues at such choice points. Approach. We ran an adapted in silico biased turning axon growth model under the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) and compared the results to corresponding in vitro experiments. We examined if growth simulations were predictive of neurite population behavior at a choice point. We used a biphasic micropatterned hydrogel system consisting of an outer cell restrictive mold that enclosed a bifurcated cell permissive region and placed a well near a bifurcating end to allow proteins to diffuse and form a gradient. Experimental diffusion profiles in these constructs were used to validate a diffusion computational model that utilized experimentally measured diffusion coefficients in hydrogels. The computational diffusion model was then used to establish defined soluble gradients within the permissive region of the hydrogels and maintain the profiles in physiological ranges for an extended period of time. Computational diffusion profiles informed the neurite growth model, which was compared with neurite growth experiments in the bifurcating hydrogel constructs. Main results. Results indicated that when applied to the constrained choice point geometry, the biased turning model predicted experimental behavior closely. Results for both simulated and in vitro neurite growth studies showed a significant chemoattractive response toward the bifurcated end containing an NGF gradient compared to the control, though some neurites were found in the end with no NGF gradient. Significance. The integrated model of neurite growth we describe will allow

  20. Enhanced Neurite Outgrowth of Human Model (NT2) Neurons by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Rho/ROCK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roloff, Frank; Scheiblich, Hannah; Dewitz, Carola; Dempewolf, Silke; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Axonal injury in the adult human central nervous system often results in loss of sensation and motor functions. Promoting regeneration of severed axons requires the inactivation of growth inhibitory influences from the tissue environment and stimulation of the neuron intrinsic growth potential. Especially glial cell derived factors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin in general, prevent axon regeneration. Most of the glial growth inhibiting factors converge onto the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in neurons. Although conditions in the injured nervous system are clearly different from those during neurite outgrowth in vitro, here we use a chemical approach to manipulate Rho/ROCK signalling with small-molecule agents to encourage neurite outgrowth in cell culture. The development of therapeutic treatments requires drug testing not only on neurons of experimental animals, but also on human neurons. Using human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A GTPase) activation and promotes neurite growth. Inhibition of the downstream effector Rho kinase by the drug Y-27632 results in a strong increase in neurite outgrowth. Conversely, activation of the Rho pathway by lysophosphatidic acid results in growth cone collapse and eventually to neurite retraction. Finally, we show that blocking of Rho kinase, but not RhoA results in an increase in neurons bearing neurites. Due to its anti-inflammatory and neurite growth promoting action, the use of a pharmacological treatment of damaged neural tissue with Ibuprofen should be explored. PMID:25714396

  1. Identification of a peripheral nerve neurite growth-promoting activity by development and use of an in vitro bioassay.

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, A W; Matthew, W D

    1987-01-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay. Images PMID:3477817

  2. Thrombin Enhances NGF-Mediated Neurite Extension via Increased and Sustained Activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Rania E.; Sarker, Krishna; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Rapid neurite remodeling is fundamental to nervous system development and plasticity. It involves neurite extension that is regulated by NGF through PI3K/AKT, p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. It also involves neurite retraction that is regulated by the serine protease, thrombin. However, the intracellular signaling pathway by which thrombin causes neurite retraction is unknown. Using the PC12 neuronal cell model, we demonstrate that thrombin utilizes the PI3K/AKT pathway for neurite retraction in NGF-differentiated cells. Interestingly, however, we found that thrombin enhances NGF-induced neurite extension in differentiating cells. This is achieved through increased and sustained activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. Thus, thrombin elicits opposing effects in differentiated and differentiating cells through activation of distinct signaling pathways: neurite retraction in differentiated cells via PI3K/AKT, and neurite extension in differentiating cells via p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. These findings, which also point to a novel cooperative role between thrombin and NGF, have significant implications in the development of the nervous system and the disease processes that afflicts it as well as in the potential of combined thrombin and NGF therapy for impaired learning and memory, and spinal cord injury which all require neurite extension and remodeling. PMID:25061982

  3. Disassembly of microtubules and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, neuroblastoma cell proliferation, and MAP kinase tyrosine dephosphorylation by dibenzyl trisulphide.

    PubMed

    Rösner, H; Williams, L A; Jung, A; Kraus, W

    2001-08-22

    Dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), a main lipophilic compound in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae), was identified as one of the active immunomodulatory compounds in extracts of the plant. To learn more about its biological activities and molecular mechanisms, we conducted one-dimensional NMR interaction studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tested DTS and related compounds in two well-established neuronal cell-and-tissue culture systems. We found that DTS preferentially binds to an aromatic region of BSA which is rich in tyrosyl residues. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, DTS attenuates the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of MAP kinase (erk1/erk2). In the same neuroblastoma cell line and in Wistar 38 human lung fibroblasts, DTS causes a reversible disassembly of microtubules, but it did not affect actin dynamics. Probably due to the disruption of the microtubule dynamics, DTS also inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth from spinal cord explants. Related dibenzyl compounds with none, one, or two sulphur atoms were found to be significantly less effective. These data confirmed that the natural compound DTS has a diverse spectrum of biological properties, including cytostatic and neurotoxic actions in addition to immunomodulatory activities.

  4. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunjia; Chen, Mengmeng; Qiu, Zilong; Hu, Keping; McGee, Warren; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Jianghong; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jane Y

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development. PMID:27245166

  5. Aspen Tension Wood Fibers Contain β-(1---> 4)-Galactans and Acidic Arabinogalactans Retained by Cellulose Microfibrils in Gelatinous Walls.

    PubMed

    Gorshkova, Tatyana; Mokshina, Natalia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ibragimova, Nadezhda; Salnikov, Vadim; Mikshina, Polina; Tryfona, Theodora; Banasiak, Alicja; Immerzeel, Peter; Dupree, Paul; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-11-01

    Contractile cell walls are found in various plant organs and tissues such as tendrils, contractile roots, and tension wood. The tension-generating mechanism is not known but is thought to involve special cell wall architecture. We previously postulated that tension could result from the entrapment of certain matrix polymers within cellulose microfibrils. As reported here, this hypothesis was corroborated by sequential extraction and analysis of cell wall polymers that are retained by cellulose microfibrils in tension wood and normal wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). β-(1→4)-Galactan and type II arabinogalactan were the main large matrix polymers retained by cellulose microfibrils that were specifically found in tension wood. Xyloglucan was detected mostly in oligomeric form in the alkali-labile fraction and was enriched in tension wood. β-(1→4)-Galactan and rhamnogalacturonan I backbone epitopes were localized in the gelatinous cell wall layer. Type II arabinogalactans retained by cellulose microfibrils had a higher content of (methyl)glucuronic acid and galactose in tension wood than in normal wood. Thus, β-(1→4)-galactan and a specialized form of type II arabinogalactan are trapped by cellulose microfibrils specifically in tension wood and, thus, are the main candidate polymers for the generation of tensional stresses by the entrapment mechanism. We also found high β-galactosidase activity accompanying tension wood differentiation and propose a testable hypothesis that such activity might regulate galactan entrapment and, thus, mechanical properties of cell walls in tension wood.

  6. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  7. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  8. Surface tension regularizes the crack singularity of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; van Wijngaarden, Leen; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-05-11

    The elastic and adhesive properties of a solid surface can be quantified by indenting it with a rigid sphere. Indentation tests are classically described by the JKR-law when the solid is very stiff, while recent work highlights the importance of surface tension for exceedingly soft materials. Here we show that surface tension plays a crucial role even in stiff solids: Young's wetting angle emerges as a boundary condition and this regularizes the crack-like singularity at the edge of adhesive contacts. We find that the edge region exhibits a universal, self-similar structure that emerges from the balance of surface tension and elasticity. The similarity theory is solved analytically and provides a complete description of adhesive contacts, by which we reconcile global adhesion laws and local contact mechanics. PMID:27087459

  9. A Kolsky tension bar technique using a hollow incident tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, O.; Frew, D. J.; Chen, W.

    2011-04-01

    Load control of the incident pulse profiles in compression Kolsky bar experiments has been widely used to subject the specimen to optimal testing conditions. Tension Kolsky bars have been used to determine dynamic material behavior since the 1960s with limited capability to shape the loading pulses due to the pulse-generating mechanisms. We developed a modified Kolsky tension bar where a hollow incident tube is used to carry the incident stress waves. The incident tube also acts as a gas gun barrel that houses the striker for impact. The main advantage of this new design is that the striker impacts on an impact cap of the incident tube. Compression pulse shapers can be attached to the impact cap, thus fully utilizing the predictive compression pulse-shaping capability in tension experiments. Using this new testing technique, the dynamic tensile material behavior for Al 6061-T6511 and TRIP 800 (transformation-induced plasticity) steel has been obtained.

  10. Surface energy and surface tension at holes and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajapakse, Y. D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of surface tension and surface energy of solids was used by Griffith to obtain a criterion for the extension of cracks in brittle materials. Griffith, however, neglected the stresses due to the normal traction at the crack implied by the surface tension. A complete solution to the problem of an elliptic hole in an infinite plate with surface tension loading at the hole is given. Complex potentials are given in closed form in terms of elliptic integrals of the first, second, and third kinds. Stress distributions are studied. For a flat crack, the nature of the singularity at the tip is shown to be radically different from that usually encountered in fracture mechanics. The implications of our analysis for theories of fracture in brittle materials are discussed.

  11. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow formore » determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.« less

  12. Influence of micro and submicro poly(lactic-glycolic acid) fibers on sensory neural cell locomotion and neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Binder, Carmen; Milleret, Vincent; Hall, Heike; Eberli, Daniel; Lühmann, Tessa

    2013-10-01

    For successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a complex interplay of growth factors, topographical guidance structure by cells and extracellular matrix proteins, are needed. Aligned fibrous biomaterials with a wide variety in fiber diameter have been used successfully to support neuronal guidance. To better understand the importance of size of the topographical features, we investigated the directionality of neuronal migration of sensory ND7/23 cells on aligned electrospun poly(lactic-glycolic acid) PLGA fibers in the range of micrometer and submicrometer diameters by time-lapse microscopy. Cell trajectories of single ND7/23 cells were found to significantly follow topographies of PLGA fibers with micrometer dimensions in contrast to PLGA fibers within the submicrometer range, where cell body movement was observed to be independent of fibrous structures. Moreover, neurite alignment of ND7/23 cells on various topographies was assessed. PLGA fibers with micrometer dimensions significantly aligned 83.3% of all neurites after 1 day of differentiation compared to similar submicrometer structures, which orientated 25.8% of all neurites. Interestingly, after 7 days of differentiation ND7/23 cells on submicrometer PLGA fibers increased their alignment of neurites to 52.5%. Together, aligned PLGA fibers with micrometer dimensions showed a superior influence on directionality of neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth of sensory ND7/23 cells, indicating that electrospun micro-PLGA fibers might represent a potential material to induce directionality of neuronal growth in engineering applications for sensory nerve regeneration.

  13. Cortex Mori Radicis Extract induces neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells activating ERK signaling pathway via inhibiting Ca2+ influx

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Nina; Hong, Xiaoping; Han, Yongming; Duan, Yanjun; Zhang, Yanhong; Chen, Zebin

    2015-01-01

    Cortex Mori Radicis is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine which has a long history of use for the treatment of headaches, cough, edema and diabetes. However, its function and mode of action within nervous system remain largely unclear. In the present study, we have attempted to determine the effects of Cortex Mori Radicis Extract (CMRE) on neuronal differentiation. Here, we reported that CMRE induces the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and primary cortical neuron. Following the generation of neurite outgrowth, extracellular Ca2+ influx was inhibited and intracellular Ca2+ decreased. In addition, CMRE induced the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation and also stimulated the Rap1-GTP expression, which is closely linked to neuritogenesis. Moreover, the neurite outgrowth induced by CMRE was antagonized to a marked degree by suppressing activation of p-ERK1/2 with the specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), suggesting the involvement of Rap1-GTP and ERK1/2 in CMRE-induced neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CMRE induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells through Rap1-ERK signaling pathway via inhibiting Ca2+ influx, and provide a novel insight into the manner in which CMRE participates in neuritogenesis. PMID:26131075

  14. Zonisamide Enhances Neurite Elongation of Primary Motor Neurons and Facilitates Peripheral Nerve Regeneration In Vitro and in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hideki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishii, Hisao; Noto, Kimitoshi; Ohta, Kyotaro; Masuda, Akio; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-01-01

    No clinically applicable drug is currently available to enhance neurite elongation after nerve injury. To identify a clinically applicable drug, we screened pre-approved drugs for neurite elongation in the motor neuron-like NSC34 cells. We found that zonisamide, an anti-epileptic and anti-Parkinson’s disease drug, promoted neurite elongation in cultured primary motor neurons and NSC34 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The neurite-scratch assay revealed that zonisamide enhanced neurite regeneration. Zonisamide was also protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death of primary motor neurons. Zonisamide induced mRNA expression of nerve growth factors (BDNF, NGF, and neurotrophin-4/5), and their receptors (tropomyosin receptor kinase A and B). In a mouse model of sciatic nerve autograft, intragastric administration of zonisamide for 1 week increased the size of axons distal to the transected site 3.9-fold. Zonisamide also improved the sciatic function index, a marker for motor function of hindlimbs after sciatic nerve autograft, from 6 weeks after surgery. At 8 weeks after surgery, zonisamide was protective against denervation-induced muscle degeneration in tibialis anterior, and increased gene expression of Chrne, Colq, and Rapsn, which are specifically expressed at the neuromuscular junction. We propose that zonisamide is a potential therapeutic agent for peripheral nerve injuries as well as for neuropathies due to other etiologies. PMID:26571146

  15. Role of Varp, a Rab21 exchange factor and TI-VAMP/VAMP7 partner, in neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Andrea; Sotirakis, Emmanuel; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Verraes, Agathe; Chamot, Christophe; Simpson, Jeremy C; Lanzetti, Letizia; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Galli, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    The vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP/VAMP7) was previously shown to mediate an exocytic pathway involved in neurite growth, but its regulation is still largely unknown. Here we show that TI-VAMP interacts with the Vps9 domain and ankyrin-repeat-containing protein (Varp), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of the small GTPase Rab21, through a specific domain herein called the interacting domain (ID). Varp, TI-VAMP and Rab21 co-localize in the perinuclear region of differentiating hippocampal neurons and transiently in transport vesicles in the shaft of neurites. Silencing the expression of Varp by RNA interference or expressing ID or a form of Varp deprived of its Vps9 domain impairs neurite growth. Furthermore, the mutant form of Rab21, defective in GTP hydrolysis, enhances neurite growth. We conclude that Varp is a positive regulator of neurite growth through both its GEF activity and its interaction with TI-VAMP. PMID:19745841

  16. Role of Varp, a Rab21 exchange factor and TI-VAMP/VAMP7 partner, in neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Andrea; Sotirakis, Emmanuel; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Verraes, Agathe; Chamot, Christophe; Simpson, Jeremy C; Lanzetti, Letizia; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Galli, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    The vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP/VAMP7) was previously shown to mediate an exocytic pathway involved in neurite growth, but its regulation is still largely unknown. Here we show that TI-VAMP interacts with the Vps9 domain and ankyrin-repeat-containing protein (Varp), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of the small GTPase Rab21, through a specific domain herein called the interacting domain (ID). Varp, TI-VAMP and Rab21 co-localize in the perinuclear region of differentiating hippocampal neurons and transiently in transport vesicles in the shaft of neurites. Silencing the expression of Varp by RNA interference or expressing ID or a form of Varp deprived of its Vps9 domain impairs neurite growth. Furthermore, the mutant form of Rab21, defective in GTP hydrolysis, enhances neurite growth. We conclude that Varp is a positive regulator of neurite growth through both its GEF activity and its interaction with TI-VAMP.

  17. Releasing the spindle assembly checkpoint without tension.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce F; Dong, Yimin

    2009-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that facilitates accurate genomic segregation during mitosis by delaying anaphase onset in response to errors in kinetochore microtubule attachment. In contrast to the well-studied molecular mechanism by which the SAC blocks anaphase onset, the events triggering SAC release are poorly understood. Papers in this issue by Uchida et al. (Uchida, K.S.K., K. Takagaki, K. Kumada, Y. Hirayama, T. Noda, and T. Hirota. 2009. J. Cell Biol. 184:383-390) and Maresca and Salmon (Maresca, T.J., and E.D. Salmon. 2009. J. Cell Biol. 184:373-381) make an important advance by demonstrating that SAC release depends on molecular rearrangements within the kinetochore rather than tension-produced stretch between sister kinetochores.

  18. Concrete hulls for tension-leg platforms

    SciTech Connect

    De Oliveira, J.G. ); Fjeld, S. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the main features of a concrete-hull tension-leg-platform (TLP) concept developed for the Heidrun field in the Haltenbanken area of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The hydrodynamic response and the methods adopted to optimize the hull dimensions, as well as the mooring system and hull mechanical outfitting, are discussed first. Then construction methods are briefly described. Inspection, maintenance, and repair are also addressed. Finally, the advantages of the concrete-hull TLP concept are summarized, including the concrete hull's adaptability to a large range of design requirements, low cost, and short construction time. This paper shows that the concrete-hull TLP is a very cost-efficient solution for the development of deepwater fields.

  19. Continuum damage interactions between tension and compression in osteonal bone.

    PubMed

    Mirzaali, Mohammad J; Bürki, Alexander; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K; Wolfram, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis impose a severe socio-economic burden to ageing societies. Decreasing mechanical competence causes a rise in bone fracture incidence and mortality especially after the age of 65 y. The mechanisms of how bone damage is accumulated under different loading modes and its impact on bone strength are unclear. We hypothesise that damage accumulated in one loading mode increases the fracture risk in another. This study aimed at identifying continuum damage interactions between tensile and compressive loading modes. We propose and identify the material constants of a novel piecewise 1D constitutive model capable of describing the mechanical response of bone in combined tensile and compressive loading histories. We performed several sets of loading-reloading experiments to compute stiffness, plastic strains, and stress-strain curves. For tensile overloading, a stiffness reduction (damage) of 60% at 0.65% accumulated plastic strain was detectable as stiffness reduction of 20% under compression. For compressive overloading, 60% damage at 0.75% plastic strain was detectable as a stiffness reduction of 50% in tension. Plastic strain at ultimate stress was the same in tension and compression. Compression showed softening and tension exponential hardening in the post-yield regime. The hardening behaviour in compression is unaffected by a previous overload in tension but the hardening behaviour in tension is affected by a previous overload in compression as tensile reloading strength is significantly reduced. This paper demonstrates how damage accumulated under one loading mode affects the mechanical behaviour in another loading mode. To explain this and to illustrate a possible implementation we proposed a theoretical model. Including such loading mode dependent damage and plasticity behaviour in finite element models will help to improve fracture risk analysis of whole bones and bone implant structures. PMID:26093346

  20. Tension-compression asymmetry and twin boundaries spacings effects in polycrystalline Ni nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Jianqiu

    2016-07-01

    Tension-compression asymmetry could be a notable feature in many nanocrystalline (NC) materials. The scientific and practical research on the tension-compression asymmetry may play an important role of improving the mechanical behavior of NC materials. Using large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the strain rate of 109 s-1, both tension and compression tests are complemented in twin-structural polycrystalline Ni nanowires (NWs). The MD simulation suggests that twin boundaries spacing (TBS) has an interesting effect on the tension-compression asymmetry. For NW (radius = 9 nm) with different TBSs, the flow stresses are totally higher under compression than under tension. The asymmetry gets a minimum value at a particular TBS. Such results can be explained by the interplay of the work of dislocations mechanism under various TBSs and the free surface in NWs.

  1. Tension/compression asymmetry in creep behavior of a Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kakehi, K.

    1999-08-06

    Orientation and temperature dependence of yield stress or CRSS (Critical Resolved Shear Stress) and tension/compression anisotropy of the yield stress of CRSS have been shown by Shah and Duhl, Heredia and Pope, and Miner et al. Tension/compression asymmetry in the yield strength of Ni-based superalloys has been explained in terms of the core width effect. Shah and Duhl observed the tension/compression asymmetry in creep deformation, which is similar to that observed in the yield strength, and indicated that it can be attributed to cross slip and dislocation core-constriction mechanisms associated with octahedral slip. However, little is known about the mechanism of tension/compression asymmetry in creep. In the present study, single crystals of a Ni-base superalloy were subjected to tensile and compressive creep tests. Tension/compression asymmetry in creep behavior was examined in detail for each orientation.

  2. White Matter Changes of Neurite Density and Fiber Orientation Dispersion during Human Brain Maturation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi Shin; Owen, Julia P; Pojman, Nicholas J; Thieu, Tony; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari L J; Berman, Jeffrey I; Roberts, Timothy P L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Sherr, Elliott H; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies of human brain development have consistently shown widespread, but nonlinear increases in white matter anisotropy through childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood. However, despite its sensitivity to changes in tissue microstructure, DTI lacks the specificity to disentangle distinct microstructural features of white and gray matter. Neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) is a recently proposed multi-compartment biophysical model of brain microstructure that can estimate non-collinear properties of white matter, such as neurite orientation dispersion index (ODI) and neurite density index (NDI). In this study, we apply NODDI to 66 healthy controls aged 7-63 years to investigate changes of ODI and NDI with brain maturation, with comparison to standard DTI metrics. Using both region-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses, we find that NDI exhibits striking increases over the studied age range following a logarithmic growth pattern, while ODI rises following an exponential growth pattern. This novel finding is consistent with well-established age-related changes of FA over the lifespan that show growth during childhood and adolescence, plateau during early adulthood, and accelerating decay after the fourth decade of life. Our results suggest that the rise of FA during the first two decades of life is dominated by increasing NDI, while the fall in FA after the fourth decade is driven by the exponential rise of ODI that overcomes the slower increases of NDI. Using partial least squares regression, we further demonstrate that NODDI better predicts chronological age than DTI. Finally, we show excellent test-retest reliability of NODDI metrics, with coefficients of variation below 5% in all measured regions of interest. Our results support the conclusion that NODDI reveals biologically specific characteristics of brain development that are more closely linked to the microstructural features of white matter than are

  3. Nerve growth factor-treated, neurite-bearing PC12 cells continue to synthesize DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatius, M.J.; Chandler, C.R.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-02-01

    Cultures of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells treated with beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) for up to 15 days continue to synthesize DNA. The present study compares the extent of maintained DNA synthesis in cells with and without processes and asks whether the observed DNA synthesis in differentiated PC12 cells reflects either the continued division of the cells or the formation of polyploid cells, or both. PC12 cells were grown on tissue coverslips for various lengths of time with or without 50 ng/ml of beta-NGF and then assayed for DNA synthesis by (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling and autoradiography. In 8-day-old control cultures (no NGF), 30% of the cells had labeled nuclei after a 2-hr (/sup 3/H)thymidine pulse. In contrast, in cultures treated for 8 days with NGF, only 7% of the cells were labeled (i.e., still synthesizing DNA). The fractions of process-bearing and non-process-bearing cells with labeled nuclei were identical. Even after 14 days in NGF, 7% of the cells with neurites were still synthesizing DNA during any 2-hr period. With continuous (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling in the presence of NGF from 8 to 13 days, nearly 70% of the cells with neurites were labeled. The presence of neurites induced by NGF does not preclude continued (albeit reduced) DNA synthesis in these PC12 cells. To determine the fate of this newly synthesized DNA, nuclei extracted from NGF-treated PC12 cells were analyzed for the cellular distribution of DNA by combined propidium iodine staining and flow microfluorimetry. NGF treatment resulted in a 3-fold increase in the number of G2+M/4N cells along with the appearance of 8N cells.

  4. Organic Photovoltaics and Bioelectrodes Providing Electrical Stimulation for PC12 Cell Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Sheng; Liao, Yan-Hao; Chen, Huan-Lin; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2016-04-13

    Current bioelectronic medicines for neurological therapies generally involve treatment with a bioelectronic system comprising a power supply unit and a bioelectrode device. Further integration of wireless and self-powered units is of practical importance for implantable bioelectronics. In this study, we developed biocompatible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for serving as wireless electrical power supply units that can be operated under illumination with near-infrared (NIR) light, and organic bioelectronic interface (OBEI) electrode devices as neural stimulation electrodes. The OPV/OBEI integrated system is capable to provide electrical stimulation (ES) as a means of enhancing neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. For the OPV design, we prepared devices incorporating two photoactive material systems--β-carotene/N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (β-carotene/PTCDI-C8) and poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM)--that exhibited open circuit voltages of 0.11 and 0.49 V, respectively, under NIR light LED (NLED) illumination. Then, we connected OBEI devices with different electrode gaps, incorporating biocompatible poly(hydroxymethylated-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), to OPVs to precisely tailor the direct current electric field conditions during the culturing of PC12 cells. This NIR light-driven OPV/OBEI system could be engineered to provide tunable control over the electric field (from 220 to 980 mV mm(-1)) to promote 64% enhancement in the neurite length, direct the neurite orientation on chips, or both. The OPV/OBEI integrated systems under NIR illumination appear to function as effective power delivery platforms that should meet the requirements for wirelessly offering medical ES to a portion of the nervous system; they might also be a key technology for the development of next-generation implantable bioelectronics. PMID:26999636

  5. Tenascin-C contains distinct adhesive, anti-adhesive, and neurite outgrowth promoting sites for neurons

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The glia-derived extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TN-C) is transiently expressed in the developing CNS and may mediate neuron-glia interactions. Perturbation experiments with specific monoclonal antibodies suggested that TN-C functions for neural cells are encoded by distinct sites of the glycoprotein (Faissner, A., A. Scholze, and B. Gotz. 1994. Tenascin glycoproteins in developing neural tissues--only decoration? Persp. Dev. Neurobiol. 2:53-66). To characterize these further, bacterially expressed recombinant domains were generated and used for functional studies. Several short-term-binding sites for mouse CNS neurons could be assigned to the fibronectin type III (FNIII) domains. Of these, the alternatively spliced insert TNfnA1,2,4,B,D supported initial attachment for both embryonic day 18 (E18) rat and postnatal day 6 (P6) mouse neurons. Only TNfn1-3 supported binding and growth of P6 mouse cerebellar neurons after 24 h, whereas attachment to the other domains proved reversible and resulted in cell detachment or aggregation. In choice assays on patterned substrates, repulsive properties could be attributed to the EGF-type repeats TNegf, and to TNfnA1,2,4. Finally, neurite outgrowth promoting properties for E18 rat hippocampal neurons and P0 mouse DRG explants could be assigned to TNfnB,D, TNfnD,6, and TNfn6. The epitope of mAb J1/tn2 which abolishes the neurite outgrowth inducing effect of intact TN-C could be allocated to TNfnD. These observations suggest that TN-C harbors distinct cell- binding, repulsive, and neurite outgrowth promoting sites for neurons. Furthermore, the properties of isoform-specific TN-C domains suggest functional significance of the alternative splicing of TN-C glycoproteins. PMID:8647898

  6. β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) Promotes Neurite Outgrowth in Neuro2a Cells

    PubMed Central

    Girón, María D.; Cabrera, Elena; Campos, Nefertiti; Manzano, Manuel; Rueda, Ricardo; López-Pedrosa, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) has been shown to enhance cell survival, differentiation and protein turnover in muscle, mainly activating phosphoinositide-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases/ extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways. Since these two pathways are related to neuronal survival and differentiation, in this study, we have investigated the neurotrophic effects of HMB in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells. In Neuro2a cells, HMB promotes differentiation to neurites independent from any effects on proliferation. These effects are mediated by activation of both the PI3K/Akt and the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) signaling as demonstrated by the use of specific inhibitors of these two pathways. As myocyte-enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors are involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, the transcriptional activity and protein levels of MEF2 were also evaluated. HMB promoted MEF2-dependent transcriptional activity mediated by the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. Furthermore, HMB increases the expression of brain glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), and mTOR phosphorylation, which translates in a higher protein synthesis in Neuro2a cells. Furthermore, Torin1 and rapamycin effects on MEF2 transcriptional activity and HMB-dependent neurite outgrowth support that HMB acts through mTORC2. Together, these findings provide clear evidence to support an important role of HMB in neurite outgrowth. PMID:26267903

  7. Organic Photovoltaics and Bioelectrodes Providing Electrical Stimulation for PC12 Cell Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Sheng; Liao, Yan-Hao; Chen, Huan-Lin; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2016-04-13

    Current bioelectronic medicines for neurological therapies generally involve treatment with a bioelectronic system comprising a power supply unit and a bioelectrode device. Further integration of wireless and self-powered units is of practical importance for implantable bioelectronics. In this study, we developed biocompatible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for serving as wireless electrical power supply units that can be operated under illumination with near-infrared (NIR) light, and organic bioelectronic interface (OBEI) electrode devices as neural stimulation electrodes. The OPV/OBEI integrated system is capable to provide electrical stimulation (ES) as a means of enhancing neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. For the OPV design, we prepared devices incorporating two photoactive material systems--β-carotene/N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (β-carotene/PTCDI-C8) and poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM)--that exhibited open circuit voltages of 0.11 and 0.49 V, respectively, under NIR light LED (NLED) illumination. Then, we connected OBEI devices with different electrode gaps, incorporating biocompatible poly(hydroxymethylated-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), to OPVs to precisely tailor the direct current electric field conditions during the culturing of PC12 cells. This NIR light-driven OPV/OBEI system could be engineered to provide tunable control over the electric field (from 220 to 980 mV mm(-1)) to promote 64% enhancement in the neurite length, direct the neurite orientation on chips, or both. The OPV/OBEI integrated systems under NIR illumination appear to function as effective power delivery platforms that should meet the requirements for wirelessly offering medical ES to a portion of the nervous system; they might also be a key technology for the development of next-generation implantable bioelectronics.

  8. Transthyretin provides trophic support via megalin by promoting neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, J R; Nogueira, RS; Vieira, M; Santos, SD; Ferraz-Nogueira, J P; Relvas, J B; Saraiva, M J

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a protein whose function has been associated to binding and distribution of thyroid hormones in the body and brain. However, little is known regarding the downstream signaling pathways triggered by wild-type TTR in the CNS either in neuroprotection of cerebral ischemia or in physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated how TTR affects hippocampal neurons in physiologic/pathologic conditions. Recombinant TTR significantly boosted neurite outgrowth in mice hippocampal neurons, both in number and length, independently of its ligands. This TTR neuritogenic activity is mediated by the megalin receptor and is lost in megalin-deficient neurons. We also found that TTR activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (ERK1/2) and Akt through Src, leading to the phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB. In addition, TTR promoted a transient rise in intracellular calcium through NMDA receptors, in a Src/megalin-dependent manner. Moreover, under excitotoxic conditions, TTR stimulation rescued cell death and neurite loss in TTR KO hippocampal neurons, which are more sensitive to excitotoxic degeneration than WT neurons, in a megalin-dependent manner. CREB was also activated by TTR under excitotoxic conditions, contributing to changes in the balance between Bcl2 protein family members, toward anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2/BclXL versus Bax). Finally, we clarify that TTR KO mice subjected to pMCAO have larger infarcts than WT mice, because of TTR and megalin neuronal downregulation. Our results indicate that TTR might be regarded as a neurotrophic factor, because it stimulates neurite outgrowth under physiological conditions, and promotes neuroprotection in ischemic conditions. PMID:27518433

  9. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation impairs neurite outgrowth of embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhai; Ma, Qinlong; Liu, Chuan; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Duan, Weixia; Pei, Liping; Li, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-05-29

    A radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) of 1800 MHz is widely used in mobile communications. However, the effects of RF-EMFs on cell biology are unclear. Embryonic neural stem cells (eNSCs) play a critical role in brain development. Thus, detecting the effects of RF-EMF on eNSCs is important for exploring the effects of RF-EMF on brain development. Here, we exposed eNSCs to 1800 MHz RF-EMF at specific absorption rate (SAR) values of 1, 2, and 4 W/kg for 1, 2, and 3 days. We found that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure did not influence eNSC apoptosis, proliferation, cell cycle or the mRNA expressions of related genes. RF-EMF exposure also did not alter the ratio of eNSC differentiated neurons and astrocytes. However, neurite outgrowth of eNSC differentiated neurons was inhibited after 4 W/kg RF-EMF exposure for 3 days. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of the proneural genes Ngn1 and NeuroD, which are crucial for neurite outgrowth, were decreased after RF-EMF exposure. The expression of their inhibitor Hes1 was upregulated by RF-EMF exposure. These results together suggested that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure impairs neurite outgrowth of eNSCs. More attention should be given to the potential adverse effects of RF-EMF exposure on brain development.

  10. A subset of chicken statoacoustic ganglion neurites are repelled by Slit1 and Slit2

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, Andrea C.; Fantetti, Kristen N.; Moyers, Bryan A.; Fekete, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells in the chicken inner ear are innervated by bipolar afferent neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG). During development, individual SAG neurons project their peripheral process to only one of eight distinct sensory organs. These neuronal subtypes may respond differently to guidance cues as they explore the periphery in search of their target. Previous gene expression data suggested that Slit repellants might channel SAG neurites into the sensory primordia, based on the presence of robo transcripts in the neurons and the confinement of slit transcripts to the flanks of the prosensory domains. This led to the prediction that excess Slit proteins would impede the outgrowth of SAG neurites. As predicted, axonal projections to the primordium of the anterior crista were reduced 2-3 days after electroporation of either slit1 or slit2 expression plasmids into the anterior pole of the otocyst on embryonic day 3 (E3). The posterior crista afferents, which normally grow through and adjacent to slit expression domains as they are navigating towards the posterior pole of the otocyst, did not show Slit responsiveness when similarly challenged by ectopic delivery of slit to their targets. The sensitivity to ectopic Slits shown by the anterior crista afferents was more the exception than the rule: responsiveness to Slits was not observed when the entire E4 SAG was challenged with Slits for 40 hours in vitro. The corona of neurites emanating from SAG explants was unaffected by the presence of purified human Slit1 and Slit2 in the culture medium. Reduced axon outgrowth from E8 olfactory bulbs cultured under similar conditions for 24 hours confirmed bioactivity of purified human Slits on chicken neurons. In summary, differential sensitivity to Slit repellents may influence the directional outgrowth of otic axons toward either the anterior or posterior otocyst. PMID:24456709

  11. Update on Normal Tension Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Jyotiranjan; Devi, Lily; Malik, Pradeep K; Mallick, Jogamaya

    2016-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP) constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases), systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine) and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG. PMID:27413503

  12. Physical mechanisms underlying neurite outgrowth: A quantitative analysis of neuronal shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, F.; Stanley, H. E.; Eldred, W. D.; Daccord, G.; Hausman, R. E.; Nittmann, J.

    1990-01-01

    We show that-over a range of length scales r-the shapes of quasi-two-dimensional retinal neurons are fractal objects, and hence may be quantitatively characterized in part by their fractal dimension df. We analyze the shapes of numerous retinal neurons, both in vivo and in vitro. The neurons in vivo are found to have a fractal dimension df of 1.68+/-0.15. We also propose an explanation of certain stages of neuronal shape development in terms of a diffusion-limited-aggregation model, which predicts df=1.70+/-0.1.

  13. Interfering polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII/STX mRNA inhibits neurite growth during early hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C C

    2006-08-21

    Polysialic acid (PSA) attached to NCAM is involved in cell-cell interactions participating in structural and functional plasticity of neuronal circuits. Two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII/STX and ST8SiaIV/PST, polysialylate NCAM. We previously suggested that ST8SiaII/STX is the key enzyme for polysialylation in hippocampus. Here, polysialyltransferase mRNA interference experiments showed that, knock down of ST8SiaIV/PST transcripts did not affect PSA expression, but PSA was almost absent from neuronal surfaces when ST8SiaII/STX mRNA was interfered. Non-polysialylated neurons bore a similar number of neurites per cell than polysialylated neurons. However, non-polysialylated processes were shorter and a lower density of synaptophysin clusters accompanied this reduced neuritic growth. Therefore, ST8SiaII/STX expression is essential to allow a correct neuritic development at initial stages of hippocampus ontogeny.

  14. The Effect of Surface Modification of Aligned Poly-L-Lactic Acid Electrospun Fibers on Fiber Degradation and Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Le Beux, Clémentine; Miao, Jianjun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Alauzun, Johan G.; Laurencin, Danielle; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface of aligned, electrospun poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers was chemically modified to determine if surface chemistry and hydrophilicity could improve neurite extension from chick dorsal root ganglia. Specifically, diethylenetriamine (DTA, for amine functionalization), 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol (AEO, for alcohol functionalization), or GRGDS (cell adhesion peptide) were covalently attached to the surface of electrospun fibers. Water contact angle measurements revealed that surface modification of electrospun fibers significantly improved fiber hydrophilicity compared to unmodified fibers (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fibers revealed that surface modification changed fiber topography modestly, with DTA modified fibers displaying the roughest surface structure. Degradation of chemically modified fibers revealed no change in fiber diameter in any group over a period of seven days. Unexpectedly, neurites from chick DRG were longest on fibers without surface modification (1651 ± 488 μm) and fibers containing GRGDS (1560 ± 107 μm). Fibers modified with oxygen plasma (1240 ± 143 μm) or DTA (1118 ± 82 μm) produced shorter neurites than the GRGDS or unmodified fibers, but were not statistically shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers. Fibers modified with AEO (844 ± 151 μm) were significantly shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers (p<0.05). Based on these results, we conclude that fiber hydrophilic enhancement alone on electrospun PLLA fibers does not enhance neurite outgrowth. Further work must be conducted to better understand why neurite extension was not improved on more hydrophilic fibers, but the results presented here do not recommend hydrophilic surface modification for the purpose of improving neurite extension unless a bioactive ligand is used. PMID:26340351

  15. The Effect of Surface Modification of Aligned Poly-L-Lactic Acid Electrospun Fibers on Fiber Degradation and Neurite Extension.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Nicholas J; Le Beux, Clémentine; Miao, Jianjun; Linhardt, Robert J; Alauzun, Johan G; Laurencin, Danielle; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    The surface of aligned, electrospun poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers was chemically modified to determine if surface chemistry and hydrophilicity could improve neurite extension from chick dorsal root ganglia. Specifically, diethylenetriamine (DTA, for amine functionalization), 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol (AEO, for alcohol functionalization), or GRGDS (cell adhesion peptide) were covalently attached to the surface of electrospun fibers. Water contact angle measurements revealed that surface modification of electrospun fibers significantly improved fiber hydrophilicity compared to unmodified fibers (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fibers revealed that surface modification changed fiber topography modestly, with DTA modified fibers displaying the roughest surface structure. Degradation of chemically modified fibers revealed no change in fiber diameter in any group over a period of seven days. Unexpectedly, neurites from chick DRG were longest on fibers without surface modification (1651 ± 488 μm) and fibers containing GRGDS (1560 ± 107 μm). Fibers modified with oxygen plasma (1240 ± 143 μm) or DTA (1118 ± 82 μm) produced shorter neurites than the GRGDS or unmodified fibers, but were not statistically shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers. Fibers modified with AEO (844 ± 151 μm) were significantly shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers (p<0.05). Based on these results, we conclude that fiber hydrophilic enhancement alone on electrospun PLLA fibers does not enhance neurite outgrowth. Further work must be conducted to better understand why neurite extension was not improved on more hydrophilic fibers, but the results presented here do not recommend hydrophilic surface modification for the purpose of improving neurite extension unless a bioactive ligand is used. PMID:26340351

  16. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  17. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  18. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duka, M. V.; Dvoretskaya, L. N.; Babelkin, N. S.; Khodzitskii, M. K.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 - 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth.

  19. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duka, M V; Dvoretskaya, L N; Babelkin, N S; Khodzitskii, M K; Chivilikhin, S A; Smolyanskaya, O A

    2014-08-31

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 – 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth. (laser biophotonics)

  20. Trophic factor and hormonal regulation of neurite outgrowth in sensory neuron-like 50B11 cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacherjee, Aritra; Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G

    2014-01-13

    Sensory axon integrity and regenerative capacity are important considerations in understanding neuropathological conditions characterized by hyper- or insensitivity. However, our knowledge of mechanisms regulating axon outgrowth are limited by an absence of suitable high-throughput assay systems. The 50B11 cell line generated from rat embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons offers a promising model for screening assays. Prior characterization shows that these cells express cytoskeletal proteins and genes encoding ion channels and neurotrophin receptors in common with sensory nociceptor neurons. In the present study we further characterized 50B11 cells in regard to their phenotypes and responsiveness to neurotrophic and hormonal factors. 50B11 cells express neuronal cytoplasmic proteins including beta-3 tubulin, peripherin (a marker of unmyelinated neurons), and the pan-neuronal ubiquitin hydrolase, PGP9.5. Only PGP9.5 immunoreactivity was uniformly distributed throughout soma and axons, and therefore presents the best means for visualizing the entire axon arbor. All cells co-express both NGF and GDNF receptors and addition of ligands increased neurite length. 50B11 cells also showed immunoreactivity for the estrogen receptor-α and the angiotensin receptor type II, and both 17-β estradiol and angiotensin II increased outgrowth by differentiated cells. 50B11 cells therefore show features reported previously for primary unmyelinated nociceptor neurons, including responsiveness to classical neurotrophins and hormonal modulators. Coupled with their ease of culture and predictable differentiation, 50B11 cells represent a promising cell line on which to base assays that more clearly reveal mechanisms regulating axon outgrowth and integrity. PMID:24269872

  1. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  2. Non-prenylatable, cytosolic Rac1 alters neurite outgrowth while retaining the ability to be activated.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jairus M; Samuel, Filsy G; McConnell, Jordan A; Reddy, Cristina P; Beck, Brian W; Hynds, DiAnna L

    2015-03-01

    Rac1 is an important regulator of axon extension, cell migration and actin reorganization. Like all Rho guanine triphosphatases (GTPases), Rac1 is targeted to the membrane by the addition of a geranylgeranyl moiety, an action thought to result in Rac1 guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding. However, the role that Rac1 localization plays in its activation (GTP loading) and subsequent activation of effectors is not completely clear. To address this, we developed a non-prenylatable emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-Rac1 fusion protein (EmGFP-Rac1(C189A)) and assessed how expressing this construct affected neurite outgrowth, Rac1 localization and activation in neuroblastoma cells. Expression of EmGFP-Rac1(C189A) increased localization to the cytosol and induced cell clustering while increasing neurite initiation. EmGFP-Rac1(C189A) expression also increased Rac1 activation in the cytosol, compared to cells expressing wild-type Rac1 (EmGFP-Rac1). These results suggest that activation of Rac1 may not require plasma membrane localization, potentially leading to differential activation of cytosolic signaling pathways that alter cell morphology. Understanding the consequences of differential localization and activation of Rho GTPases, including Rac1, could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating neurological disorders. PMID:25479592

  3. Neurite-promoting factor in conditioned medium from RN22 Schwannoma cultures: bioassay, fractionation, and properties.

    PubMed

    Manthorpe, M; Varon, S; Adler, R

    1981-09-01

    On polyornithine (PORN) substrata dissociated 8-day chick embryo ciliary ganglionic neurons will survive if the culture medium is supplemented with Ciliary neuronotrophic Factor. However, neuritic growth will not occur unless the substratum is derivatized with a PORN-bindable Neurite Promoting Factor (PNPF). In this preliminary study we report that soluble PNPF can be (1) assayed by a convenient in vitro system; (2) obtained in relatively large amounts from serum-free media conditioned over RN22 Schwannoma cultures; (3) concentrated by using Amicon XM100 ultrafiltration; and (4) separated from nearly all of the non-active protein by using ion-exchange chromatography. The partially purified PNPF can be concentrated using XM100 and is heat- and protease-sensitive. In the course of these fractionation studies we observed in some cases a concentration-dependent interference with the expression of PNPF activity in the bioassay; we propose graphical methods to permit the simultaneous determination of PNPF and the extent of such interference. Different treatments that affected the interference property did not always affect PNPF activity in a reciprocal manner, leaving open the possibility that the interference with PNPF activity results from reversible alteration of the PNPF molecule, or that there exists a separate interfering agent.

  4. Channeling of developing rat corticospinal tract axons by myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, M.E.; Schnell, L. )

    1991-03-01

    CNS myelin contains 2 membrane proteins that are potent inhibitors of neurite growth (NI-35 and NI-250). Because myelin formation starts at different times in different regions and tracts of the CNS, this inhibitory property of myelin could serve boundary and guidance functions for late-growing fiber tracts. In the rat, the corticospinal tract (CST) grows into and down the spinal cord during the first 10 postnatal days, in close proximity to the sensory tracts fasciculus cuneatus and gracilis. Immunofluorescence for myelin constituents showed that, in the rostral half of the spinal cord, the myelinating tissue of these ascending tracts surrounds the growing, myelin-free CST in a channellike fashion. Elimination of oligodendrocytes by x-irradiation of the newborn rats, or application of antibody IN-1, which neutralizes the inhibitory substrate property of CNS myelin, resulted in significant anatomical aberration of CST fibers. In particular, the tract was larger in cross-section, and aberrant CST fibers and fascicles intermixed with the neighboring sensory ascending tracts. These results assign an important channeling and guard-rail function to the oligodendrocyte-associated neurite growth inhibitors for the developing CST in the rat spinal cord.

  5. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on organelle movement in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurites.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2010-03-01

    Aminopyridines, widely used as a K(+) channel blocker, are membrane-permeable weak bases and have the ability to form vacuoles in the cytoplasm. The vacuoles originate from acidic organelles such as lysosomes. Here, we investigated the effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) on organelle movement in neurites of cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by using video-enhanced microscopy. Some experiments were carried out using fluorescent dyes for lysosomes and mitochondria and confocal microscopy. Treatment of DRG neurons with 4 mM 4-AP caused Brownian movement of some lysosomes within 5 min. The Brownian movement gradually became rapid and vacuoles were formed around individual lysosomes 10-20 min after the start of treatment. Axonal transport of organelles was inhibited by 4-AP. Lysosomes showing Brownian movement were not transported in longitudinal direction of the neurite and the transport of mitochondria was interrupted by vacuoles. The 4-AP-induced Brownian movement of lysosomes with vacuole formation and inhibition of axonal transport were prevented by the simultaneous treatment with vacuolar H(+) ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or in Cl(-)-free SO(4)(2-) medium. These results indicate that changes in organelle movement by 4-AP are related to vacuole formation and the vacuolar H(+) ATPase and Cl(-) are required for the effects of 4-AP.

  6. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  7. Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects of nimodipine in a model system of neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Bork, Kaya; Wurm, Franziska; Haller, Hannes; Strauss, Christian; Scheller, Christian; Gnanapragassam, Vinayaga S; Horstkorte, Rüdiger

    2015-01-09

    Nimodipine is a Ca2+-channel antagonist mainly used for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) to prevent cerebral vasospasms. However, it is not clear if the better outcome of nimodipine-treated patients is mainly due to vasodilatation or whether other cellular neuroprotective or neuregenerative effects of nimodipine are involved. We analysed PC12 cells after different stress stimuli with or without nimodipine pretreatment. Cytotoxicity of 200 mM EtOH and osmotic stress (450 mosmol/L) was significantly reduced with nimodipine pretreatment, while nimodipine has no influence on the hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells. The presence of nimodipine also increased the NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. However, nimodipine alone was not able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. These results support the idea that nimodipine has general neuroprotective or neuregenerative effect beside its role in vasodilatation and is maybe useful also in other clinical applications beside aSAH.

  8. Neurite-promoting factor in conditioned medium from RN22 Schwannoma cultures: bioassay, fractionation, and properties.

    PubMed

    Manthorpe, M; Varon, S; Adler, R

    1981-09-01

    On polyornithine (PORN) substrata dissociated 8-day chick embryo ciliary ganglionic neurons will survive if the culture medium is supplemented with Ciliary neuronotrophic Factor. However, neuritic growth will not occur unless the substratum is derivatized with a PORN-bindable Neurite Promoting Factor (PNPF). In this preliminary study we report that soluble PNPF can be (1) assayed by a convenient in vitro system; (2) obtained in relatively large amounts from serum-free media conditioned over RN22 Schwannoma cultures; (3) concentrated by using Amicon XM100 ultrafiltration; and (4) separated from nearly all of the non-active protein by using ion-exchange chromatography. The partially purified PNPF can be concentrated using XM100 and is heat- and protease-sensitive. In the course of these fractionation studies we observed in some cases a concentration-dependent interference with the expression of PNPF activity in the bioassay; we propose graphical methods to permit the simultaneous determination of PNPF and the extent of such interference. Different treatments that affected the interference property did not always affect PNPF activity in a reciprocal manner, leaving open the possibility that the interference with PNPF activity results from reversible alteration of the PNPF molecule, or that there exists a separate interfering agent. PMID:7276956

  9. A role for the cytoskeleton-associated protein palladin in neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Boukhelifa, M; Parast, M M; Valtschanoff, J G; LaMantia, A S; Meeker, R B; Otey, C A

    2001-09-01

    The outgrowth of neurites is a critical step in neuronal maturation, and it is well established that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. Investigators from our laboratory recently described a novel protein named palladin, which has been shown to play an essential role in organizing the actin cytoskeleton in cultured fibroblasts. We investigated the expression of palladin in the developing rat brain by Western blot and found that the E18 brain contained a unique variant of palladin that is significantly smaller (approximately 85 kDa) than the common form found in other developing tissues (90-92 kDa). Because the expression of a tissue-specific isoform suggests the possibility of a cell type-specific function, we investigated the localization and function of palladin in cultured cortical neurons. Palladin was found preferentially targeted to the developing axon but not the dendrites and was strongly localized to the axonal growth cone. When palladin expression was attenuated by transfection with antisense constructs in both the B35 neuroblastoma cell line and in primary cortical neurons, a reduction in the expression of palladin resulted in a failure of neurite outgrowth. These results implicate palladin as a critical component of the developing nervous system, with an important role in axonal extension.

  10. A Role for the Cytoskeleton-associated Protein Palladin in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Boukhelifa, Malika; Parast, Mana M.; Valtschanoff, Juli G.; LaMantia, Anthony S.; Meeker, Rick B.; Otey, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    The outgrowth of neurites is a critical step in neuronal maturation, and it is well established that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. Investigators from our laboratory recently described a novel protein named palladin, which has been shown to play an essential role in organizing the actin cytoskeleton in cultured fibroblasts. We investigated the expression of palladin in the developing rat brain by Western blot and found that the E18 brain contained a unique variant of palladin that is significantly smaller (∼85 kDa) than the common form found in other developing tissues (90–92 kDa). Because the expression of a tissue-specific isoform suggests the possibility of a cell type-specific function, we investigated the localization and function of palladin in cultured cortical neurons. Palladin was found preferentially targeted to the developing axon but not the dendrites and was strongly localized to the axonal growth cone. When palladin expression was attenuated by transfection with antisense constructs in both the B35 neuroblastoma cell line and in primary cortical neurons, a reduction in the expression of palladin resulted in a failure of neurite outgrowth. These results implicate palladin as a critical component of the developing nervous system, with an important role in axonal extension. PMID:11553711

  11. A study of the effects of flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jun; Duan, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pulsed electromagnetic fields with various flux densities and frequencies on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. We have studied the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, average length of neurites and directivity of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells cultured for 96 hours in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells were exposed to 50 Hz pulsed electromagnetic fields with a flux density of 1.37 mT, 0.19 mT and 0.016 mT respectively. The field was generated through a Helmholtz coil pair housed in one incubator and the control samples were placed in another identical incubator. It was found that exposure to both a relatively high flux density (1.37 mT) and a medium flux density (0.19 mT) inhibited the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and promoted neurite length significantly. Exposure to high flux density (1.37 mT) also resulted in nearly 20% enhancement of neurite directivity along the field direction. However, exposure to low flux density field (0.016 mT) had no detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. We also studied the effect of frequency at the constant flux density of 1.37 mT. In the range from 1 approximately 100 Hz, only 50 and 70 Hz pulse frequencies had significant effects on neurite outgrowth. Our study has shown that neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells is sensitive to flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field.

  12. [Tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax following tracheal perforation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, C T; Tsokos, M; Kurz, S D; Kleber, C

    2015-07-01

    Tension pneumothorax can occur at any time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with external cardiac massage and invasive ventilation either from primary or iatrogenic rib fractures with concomitant pleural or parenchymal injury. Airway injury can also cause tension pneumothorax during CPR. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old woman who suffered cardiopulmonary arrest after undergoing elective mandibular surgery. During CPR the upper airway could not be secured by orotracheal intubation due to massive craniofacial soft tissue swelling. A surgical airway was established with obviously unrecognized iatrogenic tracheal perforation and subsequent development of tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax during ventilation. Neither the tension pneumomediastinum nor the tension pneumothorax were decompressed and accordingly resuscitation efforts remained unsuccessful. This case illustrates the need for a structured approach to resuscitate patients with ventilation problems regarding decompression of tension pneumomediastinum and/or tension pneumothorax during CPR.

  13. MiR-124 is differentially expressed in derivatives of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage and promotes neurite elongation in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Shtukmaster, Stella; Narasimhan, Priyanka; El Faitwri, Tehani; Stubbusch, Jutta; Ernsberger, Uwe; Rohrer, Hermann; Unsicker, Klaus; Huber, Katrin

    2016-08-01

    The neural-crest-derived sympathoadrenal cell lineage gives rise to sympathetic neurons and to endocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. Both cell types express a largely overlapping set of genes, including those coding for the molecular machinery related to the synthesis and exocytotic release of catecholamines. During their early development, sympathetic neurons and chromaffin cells rely on a shared transcription factor network that controls the establishment of these common features. Despite many similarities, mature sympathetic neurons and chromaffin cells significantly differ regarding their morphology and function. Most prominently, sympathetic neurons possess axons that are absent in mammalian adrenal chromaffin cells. The molecular mechanism underlying the divergent development of sympathoadrenal cells into neuronal and endocrine cells remains elusive. Mutational inactivation of the ribonuclease dicer hints at the importance of microRNAs in this diversification. We show here that miR-124 is detectable in developing sympathetic neurons but absent in chromaffin cell precursors. We further demonstrate that miR-124 promotes neurite elongation when transfected into cultured chromaffin cells indicating its capability to support the establishment of a neuronal morphology in non-neuronal sympathoadrenal cells. Our results also show that treatment of PC12 cells with the neurotrophin nerve growth factor leads to an upregulation of miR-124 expression and that inhibition of miR-124 reduces nerve-growth-factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Thus, our data indicate that miR-124 contributes to the establishment of specific neuronal features in developing sympathoadrenal cells. PMID:27094431

  14. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Myofibrils Bear Most of the Resting Tension in Frog Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magid, Alan; Law, Douglas J.

    1985-12-01

    The tension that develops when relaxed muscles are stretched is the resting (or passive) tension. It has recently been shown that the resting tension of intact skeletal muscle fibers is equivalent to that of mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Laser diffraction measurements of sarcomere length have now been used to show that the exponential relation between resting tension and sarcomere length for whole frog semitendinosus muscle is similar to that of single fibers. Slack sarcomere lengths and the rates of stress relaxation in these muscles were similar to those in skinned fibers, and sarcomere length remained unchanged during stress relaxation, as in skinned fibers. Thus, in intact semitendinosus muscle of the frog up to a sarcomere length of about 3.8 micrometers, resting tension arises, not in the connective tissue as is commonly thought, but in the elastic resistance of the myofibrils.

  16. Theoretical Studies of the Surface Tension of Liquid Metal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, D. G.; Shih, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to understand the surface tension and other thermophysical properties of liquid metals and alloys from a fundamental viewpoint. The approach is to calculate these quantities by a first principles technique which combines the statistical-mechanical theory of the liquid state with an electronic pseudopotential theory of electrons in metals. The inhomogeneity of the surface is treated using an ionic-density-functional formalism developed with the support of NASA. Of particular interest are the variation of surface tension with temperature and impurity concentration: such variations strongly influence the types of convection which make take place in a low-gravity environment. Some progress has already been achieved in computing the reduction of surface tension due to the presence of low-surface-tension impurities, and the corresponding surface segregation of such impurities. In the coming year, it is planned to concentrate on the surface properties of materials of particular interest to the MSA program: Si, Ga and GaSn alloys. An additional goal is to gain some theoretical understanding of the high temperature thermophysical properties of liquid metals, particularly high melting point materials which have not been studied extensively from a theoretical viewpoint.

  17. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements. PMID:24471906

  18. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow for determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.

  19. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor is highly expressed in embryonic cortical projection neurons and negatively regulates neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vitalis, Tania; Lainé, Jeanne; Simon, Anne; Roland, Alexandre; Leterrier, Christophe; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2008-11-01

    In the rodent and human embryonic brains, the cerebral cortex and hippocampus transiently express high levels of type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB(1)Rs), at a developmental stage when these areas are composed mainly of glutamatergic neurons. However, the precise cellular and subcellular localization of CB(1)R expression as well as effects of CB(1)R modulation in this cell population remain largely unknown. We report that, starting from embryonic day 12.5, CB(1)Rs are strongly expressed in both reelin-expressing Cajal-Retzius cells and newly differentiated postmitotic glutamatergic neurons of the mouse telencephalon. CB(1)R protein is localized first to somato-dendritic endosomes and at later developmental stages it localizes mostly to developing axons. In young axons, CB(1)Rs are localized both to the axolemma and to large, often multivesicular endosomes. Acute maternal injection of agonist CP-55940 results in the relocation of receptors from axons to somato-dendritic endosomes, indicating the functional competence of embryonic CB(1)Rs. The adult phenotype of CB(1)R expression is established around postnatal day 5. By using pharmacological and mutational modulation of CB(1)R activity in isolated cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we also show that basal activation of CB(1)R acts as a negative regulatory signal for dendritogenesis, dendritic and axonal outgrowth, and branching. Together, the overall negative regulatory role in neurite development suggests that embryonic CB(1)R signaling may participate in the correct establishment of neuronal connectivity and suggests a possible mechanism for the development of reported glutamatergic dysfunction in the offspring following maternal cannabis consumption.

  20. Tensions in Rhetorics of Presence and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Sundy Louise

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation draws on theories of survivance and rhetorical sovereignty to document and interrogate interactional tensions in rhetorics of presence and performance occurring between selected American Indian students and non-Native faculty, staff, and graduate research assistants within a research-extensive university context. Tensions arise,…

  1. Age Differences in Types of Interpersonal Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cichy, Kelly E.; Fingerman, Karen L.; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined age differences in topics that generate interpersonal tensions as well as relationship level characteristics that may account for variability in the content of interpersonal tensions. Participants aged 13 to 99 years (N = 184) diagramed their close and problematic social networks, and then provided open-ended descriptions of…

  2. Effect of Gravity on Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Azzam, M. O. J.; Mann, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of liquid-vapor interfaces are made in +/- 1-g environments to note the effect of gravity on surface tension. A slight increase is detected at -1-g0, but is arguably within the uncertainty of the measurement technique. An increased dependence of surface tension on the orientation and magnitude of the gravitational vector is anticipated as the critical point is approached.

  3. Surface Tension Measurements of Chemically Modified Oleochemical

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface tension is an important physical property of a substance, which plays a part in a variety of physical phenomenon relevant to many industrial processes. For example, the efficiency of the atomization of a fuel has been shown to be effected dramatically by surface tension and viscosity. Beca...

  4. Tension-dependent removal of pericentromeric shugoshin is an indicator of sister chromosome biorientation.

    PubMed

    Nerusheva, Olga O; Galander, Stefan; Fernius, Josefin; Kelly, David; Marston, Adele L

    2014-06-15

    During mitosis and meiosis, sister chromatid cohesion resists the pulling forces of microtubules, enabling the generation of tension at kinetochores upon chromosome biorientation. How tension is read to signal the bioriented state remains unclear. Shugoshins form a pericentromeric platform that integrates multiple functions to ensure proper chromosome biorientation. Here we show that budding yeast shugoshin Sgo1 dissociates from the pericentromere reversibly in response to tension. The antagonistic activities of the kinetochore-associated Bub1 kinase and the Sgo1-bound phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-Rts1 underlie a tension-dependent circuitry that enables Sgo1 removal upon sister kinetochore biorientation. Sgo1 dissociation from the pericentromere triggers dissociation of condensin and Aurora B from the centromere, thereby stabilizing the bioriented state. Conversely, forcing sister kinetochores to be under tension during meiosis I leads to premature Sgo1 removal and precocious loss of pericentromeric cohesion. Overall, we show that the pivotal role of shugoshin is to build a platform at the pericentromere that attracts activities that respond to the absence of tension between sister kinetochores. Disassembly of this platform in response to intersister kinetochore tension signals the bioriented state. Therefore, tension sensing by shugoshin is a central mechanism by which the bioriented state is read.

  5. Achieving tunable surface tension in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Luo, K H

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we aim to address an important issue about the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model, which has attracted much attention as a mesoscopic model for simulating interfacial dynamics of complex fluids, but suffers from the problem that the surface tension cannot be tuned independently of the density ratio. In the literature, a multirange potential was devised to adjust the surface tension [Sbragaglia et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 026702 (2007)]. However, it was recently found that the density ratio of the system will be changed when the multirange potential is employed to adjust the surface tension. An alternative approach is therefore proposed in the present work. The basic strategy is to add a source term to the LB equation so as to tune the surface tension of the pseudopotential LB model. The proposed approach can guarantee that the adjustment of the surface tension does not affect the mechanical stability condition of the pseudopotential LB model, and thus provides a separate control of the surface tension and the density ratio. Meanwhile, it still retains the mesoscopic feature and the computational simplicity of the pseudopotential LB model. Numerical simulations are carried out for stationary droplets, capillary waves, and droplet splashing on a thin liquid film. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed approach is capable of achieving a tunable surface tension over a very wide range and can keep the density ratio unchanged when adjusting the surface tension.

  6. Achieving tunable surface tension in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Luo, K H

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we aim to address an important issue about the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model, which has attracted much attention as a mesoscopic model for simulating interfacial dynamics of complex fluids, but suffers from the problem that the surface tension cannot be tuned independently of the density ratio. In the literature, a multirange potential was devised to adjust the surface tension [Sbragaglia et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 026702 (2007)]. However, it was recently found that the density ratio of the system will be changed when the multirange potential is employed to adjust the surface tension. An alternative approach is therefore proposed in the present work. The basic strategy is to add a source term to the LB equation so as to tune the surface tension of the pseudopotential LB model. The proposed approach can guarantee that the adjustment of the surface tension does not affect the mechanical stability condition of the pseudopotential LB model, and thus provides a separate control of the surface tension and the density ratio. Meanwhile, it still retains the mesoscopic feature and the computational simplicity of the pseudopotential LB model. Numerical simulations are carried out for stationary droplets, capillary waves, and droplet splashing on a thin liquid film. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed approach is capable of achieving a tunable surface tension over a very wide range and can keep the density ratio unchanged when adjusting the surface tension. PMID:24329379

  7. Comparison of PC12 and Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures for Evaluating Neurite Outgrowth Using High Content Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of high-throughput assays for chemical screening and hazard identification is a pressing priority worldwide. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which recapitulate biological events observed in vivo. Neurite outgrowth is one such critical cellular process un...

  8. Extracellularly Recorded Somatic and Neuritic Signal Shapes and Classification Algorithms for High-Density Microelectrode Array Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Frey, Urs

    2016-01-01

    High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEA) have been recently introduced to study principles of neural function at high spatial resolution. However, the exact nature of the experimentally observed extracellular action potentials (EAPs) is still incompletely understood. The soma, axon and dendrites of a neuron can all exhibit regenerative action potentials that could be sensed with HDMEA electrodes. Here, we investigate the contribution of distinct neuronal sources of activity in HDMEA recordings from low-density neuronal cultures. We recorded EAPs with HDMEAs having 11,011 electrodes and then fixed and immunostained the cultures with β3-tubulin for high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Immunofluorescence images overlaid with the activity maps showed EAPs both at neuronal somata and distal neurites. Neuritic EAPs had mostly narrow triphasic shapes, consisting of a positive, a pronounced negative peak and a second positive peak. EAPs near somata had wide monophasic or biphasic shapes with a main negative peak, and following optional positive peak. We show that about 86% of EAP recordings consist of somatic spikes, while the remaining 14% represent neuritic spikes. Furthermore, the adaptation of the waveform shape during bursts of these neuritic spikes suggested that they originate from axons, rather than from dendrites. Our study improves the understanding of HDMEA signals and can aid in the identification of the source of EAPs.

  9. MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES. C. F. Blackman1, D. E. House2*, S. G. Benane3*, A. Ubeda4, M.A. TrilIo4. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, EPA,
    Research Triangle Park, North Caro...

  10. Neurite Mistargeting and Inverse Order of Intraretinal Vascular Plexus Formation Precede Subretinal Vascularization in Vldlr Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Verity; Xiang, Mengqing; Chen, Zhe; Junge, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    In the retina blood vessels are required to support a high metabolic rate, however, uncontrolled vascular growth can lead to impaired vision and blindness. Subretinal vascularization (SRV), one type of pathological vessel growth, occurs in retinal angiomatous proliferation and proliferative macular telangiectasia. In these diseases SRV originates from blood vessels within the retina. We use mice with a targeted disruption in the Vldl-receptor (Vldlr) gene as a model to study SRV with retinal origin. We find that Vldlr mRNA is strongly expressed in the neuroretina, and we observe both vascular and neuronal phenotypes in Vldlr-/- mice. Unexpectedly, horizontal cell (HC) neurites are mistargeted prior to SRV in this model, and the majority of vascular lesions are associated with mistargeted neurites. In Foxn4-/- mice, which lack HCs and display reduced amacrine cell (AC) numbers, we find severe defects in intraretinal capillary development. However, SRV is not suppressed in Foxn4-/-;Vldlr-/- mice, which reveals that mistargeted HC neurites are not required for vascular lesion formation. In the absence of VLDLR, the intraretinal capillary plexuses form in an inverse order compared to normal development, and subsequent to this early defect, vascular proliferation is increased. We conclude that SRV in the Vldlr-/- model is associated with mistargeted neurites and that SRV is preceded by altered retinal vascular development. PMID:26177550

  11. Extracellularly Recorded Somatic and Neuritic Signal Shapes and Classification Algorithms for High-Density Microelectrode Array Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Frey, Urs

    2016-01-01

    High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEA) have been recently introduced to study principles of neural function at high spatial resolution. However, the exact nature of the experimentally observed extracellular action potentials (EAPs) is still incompletely understood. The soma, axon and dendrites of a neuron can all exhibit regenerative action potentials that could be sensed with HDMEA electrodes. Here, we investigate the contribution of distinct neuronal sources of activity in HDMEA recordings from low-density neuronal cultures. We recorded EAPs with HDMEAs having 11,011 electrodes and then fixed and immunostained the cultures with β3-tubulin for high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Immunofluorescence images overlaid with the activity maps showed EAPs both at neuronal somata and distal neurites. Neuritic EAPs had mostly narrow triphasic shapes, consisting of a positive, a pronounced negative peak and a second positive peak. EAPs near somata had wide monophasic or biphasic shapes with a main negative peak, and following optional positive peak. We show that about 86% of EAP recordings consist of somatic spikes, while the remaining 14% represent neuritic spikes. Furthermore, the adaptation of the waveform shape during bursts of these neuritic spikes suggested that they originate from axons, rather than from dendrites. Our study improves the understanding of HDMEA signals and can aid in the identification of the source of EAPs. PMID:27683541

  12. Extracellularly Recorded Somatic and Neuritic Signal Shapes and Classification Algorithms for High-Density Microelectrode Array Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Frey, Urs

    2016-01-01

    High-density microelectrode arrays (HDMEA) have been recently introduced to study principles of neural function at high spatial resolution. However, the exact nature of the experimentally observed extracellular action potentials (EAPs) is still incompletely understood. The soma, axon and dendrites of a neuron can all exhibit regenerative action potentials that could be sensed with HDMEA electrodes. Here, we investigate the contribution of distinct neuronal sources of activity in HDMEA recordings from low-density neuronal cultures. We recorded EAPs with HDMEAs having 11,011 electrodes and then fixed and immunostained the cultures with β3-tubulin for high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Immunofluorescence images overlaid with the activity maps showed EAPs both at neuronal somata and distal neurites. Neuritic EAPs had mostly narrow triphasic shapes, consisting of a positive, a pronounced negative peak and a second positive peak. EAPs near somata had wide monophasic or biphasic shapes with a main negative peak, and following optional positive peak. We show that about 86% of EAP recordings consist of somatic spikes, while the remaining 14% represent neuritic spikes. Furthermore, the adaptation of the waveform shape during bursts of these neuritic spikes suggested that they originate from axons, rather than from dendrites. Our study improves the understanding of HDMEA signals and can aid in the identification of the source of EAPs. PMID:27683541

  13. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-12-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and superior cervical ganglia, and were co-cultured, either in a random or localized way. Neurite growth from SNs toward CMs was assessed by immunohistochemistry for neurofilament M and α-actinin in response to neurotrophic factors-nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and a chemical repellent, semaphorin 3A. As a result, GDNF as well as NGF and BDNF stimulated neurite growth. GDNF enhanced neurite outgrowth even under the NGF-depleted culture condition, excluding an indirect effect of GDNF via NGF. Quantification of mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry at different developmental stages revealed that GDNF is abundantly expressed in the hearts of embryos and neonates, but not in adult hearts. GDNF plays an important role in inducing cardiac sympathetic innervation at the early developmental stages. A possible role in (re)innervation of injured or transplanted or cultured and transplanted myocardium may deserve investigation.

  14. Dialectical tensions in stroke survivor relationships.

    PubMed

    Brann, Maria; Himes, Kimberly Leezer; Dillow, Megan R; Weber, Keith

    2010-06-01

    Stroke is an unpredictable and life-altering medical occurrence that causes immediate change in survivors' relationships. This study unearthed dialectical tensions expressed by spouses of stroke survivors and examined how those dialectical tensions compare to those experienced by stroke survivors themselves. Sixteen spouses of stroke survivors participated in interviews, and four tensions ultimately emerged: self-orientation-partner-orientation, realism-idealism, uncertainty-acceptance, and emotional release-emotional reservation. Three dialectical tensions (i.e., uncertainty-acceptance, realism-idealism, self-orientation-partner-orientation) were similar to those communicated by stroke survivors. Recognizing dialectical tensions experienced and shared can open communication lines and ultimately improve the health of individuals and their relationships. PMID:20512714

  15. The Pseudophosphatase MK-STYX Induces Neurite-Like Outgrowths in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Brittany M.; Rusnak, Lauren E.; Wong, Kristen E.; Banks, Dallas A.; Munyikwa, Michelle R.; McFarland, Alexander G.; Hinton, Shantá D.

    2014-01-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line is a widely used system to study neuronal differentiation for which sustained activation of the extracellular signaling related kinase (ERK) pathway is required. Here, we investigate the function of MK-STYX [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphoserine/threonine/tyrosine-binding protein] in neuronal differentiation. MK-STYX is a member of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) family, which is generally responsible for dephosphorylating the ERKs. However, MK-STYX lacks catalytic activity due to the absence of the nucleophilic cysteine in the active site signature motif HC(X5)R that is essential for phosphatase activity. Despite being catalytically inactive, MK-STYX has been shown to play a role in important cellular pathways, including stress responses. Here we show that PC12 cells endogenously express MK-STYX. In addition, MK-STYX, but not its catalytically active mutant, induced neurite-like outgrowths in PC12 cells. Furthermore, MK-STYX dramatically increased the number of cells with neurite extensions in response to nerve growth factor (NGF), whereas the catalytically active mutant did not. MK-STYX continued to induce neurites in the presence of a MEK (MAP kinase kinase) inhibitor suggesting that MK-STYX does not act through the Ras-ERK/MAPK pathway but is involved in another pathway whose inactivation leads to neuronal differentiation. RhoA activity assays indicated that MK-STYX induced extensions through the Rho signaling pathway. MK-STYX decreased RhoA activation, whereas RhoA activation increased when MK-STYX was down-regulated. Furthermore, MK-STYX affected downstream players of RhoA such as the actin binding protein cofilin. The presence of MK-STYX decreased the phosphorylation of cofilin in non NGF stimulated cells, but increased its phosphorylation in NGF stimulated cells, whereas knocking down MK-STYX caused an opposite effect. Taken together our data suggest that MK-STYX may be a regulator of RhoA signaling, and

  16. Magnetic tension of sunspot fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Context. The equilibrium structure of sunspots depends critically on its magnetic topology and is dominated by magnetic forces. Tension force is one component of the Lorentz force, which balances the gradient of magnetic pressure in force-free configurations. Aims: We employ the tension term of the Lorentz force to clarify the structure of sunspot features like penumbral filaments, umbral light bridges, and outer penumbral fine structures. Methods: We computed the vertical component of the tension term of Lorentz force over two active regions, NOAA AR 10933 and NOAA AR 10930 observed on 5 January 2007 and 12 December 2006, respectively. The former is a simple active region while the latter is a complex one with highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL). We obtained the vector magnetograms from Hinode(SOT/SP). Results: We find an inhomogeneous distribution of tension with both positive and negative signs in various features of the sunspots. The existence of positive tension at locations of lower field strength and higher inclination is compatible with the uncombed model of the penumbral structure. Positive tension is also seen in umbral light bridges, which could be indication of uncombed structure of the light bridge. Likewise, the upwardly directed tension associated with bipolar regions in the penumbra could be a direct confirmation of the sea serpent model of penumbral structures. Upwardly directed tension at the PIL of AR 10930 seems to be related to flux emergence. The magnitude of the tension force is greater than the force of gravity in some places, implying a nearly force-free configuration for these sunspot features. Conclusions: From our study, magnetic tension emerges as a useful diagnostic of the local equilibrium of the sunspot fine structures. Figures A.1-A.3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Dynamical Modeling of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, Jeremiah U.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows 'represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics'. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF formulation might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin (1996). This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated. For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin (1996), are discussed.

  18. Propofol treatment modulates neurite extension regulated by immunologically challenged rat primary astrocytes: a possible role of PAI-1.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun Myung; Joo, So Hyun; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jeong Min; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-04-01

    Propofol, a widely used anesthetic, regulates neurological processes including neurotoxicity, neuroprotection, glial activation, synaptic plasticity and neuronal maturation. Tissue plasminogen activator/tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (tPA/PAI-1) in CNS acts as a neuromodulator regulating synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth, seizure spreading and cell survival. Here, we investigated the effects of propofol on tPA/PAI-1 system using cultured neurons and astrocytes and their role in the regulation of neurite extension. Cultured rat primary astrocytes were treated with propofol (1-10 µM) and LPS (10 ng/ml). The expression of functional tPA/PAI-1 was examined by casein zymography, Western blot and RT-PCR. Alternatively, culture supernatants were added to cultured rat primary neuron to investigate the effects on neurite extension. Propofol alone did not affect tPA activity in rat primary cortical neuron. Similarly, propofol alone changed neither tPA nor PAI-1 activity in rat primary astrocytes. In immunologically challenged situation using LPS, propofol synergistically increased expression of PAI-1 in rat primary astrocytes without affecting tPA expression in a manner dependent on MAPKs activation. Increased expression of PAI-1 reduced tPA activity in LPS plus propofol-treated rat primary astrocytes. Consistent with the critical role of tPA activity in the regulation of neurite extension (Cho et al. 2013), the diminished tPA activity in astrocyte culture supernatants resulted in decreased neurite extension when administered to cultured rat primary cortical neuron. The results from the present study suggest that propofol, especially in immunologically-challenged situation, dysregulates tPA/PAI-1 system in brain. Whether the dysregulated tPA/PAI-1 activity adversely affects neural differentiation as well as regeneration of neuron in vivo should be empirically determined in the future.

  19. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect. PMID:24508523

  20. Nuclear kinesis, neurite sprouting and abnormal axonal projections of cone photoreceptors in the aged and AMD-afflicted human retina.

    PubMed

    Pow, David V; Sullivan, Robert K P

    2007-05-01

    Tissues often respond to damage by recapitulating developmental programs. We have investigated whether anatomical signs of developmental recapitulation are evident in cone photoreceptors of the aged and AMD-afflicted human retina. Radial migration of cell nuclei mediated by microtubules is a characteristic feature of cells in the developing retina. Similarly, neurite outgrowth is a feature of developing neurons. We have examined whether nuclear kinesis and neurite outgrowth from cone photoreceptors is evident. Calbindin-positive cone photoreceptor nuclei are normally positioned as a single layer of somata at the outer border of the outer nuclear layer. In AMD-afflicted retinae, many nuclei are translocated, with some somata abutting the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and others outside the outer limiting membrane whilst many nuclei are present at intermediate levels. The axonal processes of many cones were also aberrant, displaying tortuous pathways as they projected to the OPL, with occasional evidence for bifurcation at points where the axon changed direction. We suggest that tangential extension of collateral neurites and the rapid retraction of the original process may give rise to the tortuous axonal projections observed. Since microtubules are key mediators of both neurite extension and nuclear kinesis we examined expression of microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) which is an important regulator of neurite extension. The strong expression of MAP2 observed in those cells with aberrant morphologies supports the notion that abnormal microtubule-mediated remodelling events are present in the AMD retina and to a lesser extent in normal aged retinas, allowing cone photoreceptors to recapitulate two key features of development.

  1. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  2. Centlein, a novel microtubule-associated protein stabilizing microtubules and involved in neurite formation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhenli; Yin, Huilong; Wang, Pan; Gao, Juntao; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported that the centriolar protein centlein functions as a molecular link between C-Nap1 and Cep68 to maintain centrosome cohesion [1]. In this study, we identified centlein as a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP), directly binding to purified microtubules (MTs) via its longest coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of centlein caused profound nocodazole- and cold-resistant MT bundles, which also relied on its MT-binding domain. siRNA-mediated centlein depletion resulted in a significant reduction in tubulin acetylation level and overall fluorescence intensity of cytoplasmic MT acetylation. Centlein was further characterized in neurons. We found that centlein overexpression inhibited neurite formation in retinoic acid (RA)-induced SH-SY5Y and N2a cells. Taken together, we propose that centlein is involved in MT stability and neuritogenesis in vivo. PMID:26915804

  3. Neuronal plasticity after spinal cord injury: identification of a gene cluster driving neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Simone; Faden, Alan I; Yakovlev, Alexander; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S; Finn, Tom; Thouin, Melissa; Knoblach, Susan; De Biase, Andrea; Bregman, Barbara S; Hoffman, Eric P

    2005-01-01

    Functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in part from axon outgrowth and related plasticity through coordinated changes at the molecular level. We employed microarray analysis to identify a subset of genes the expression patterns of which were temporally coregulated and correlated to functional recovery after SCI. Steady-state mRNA levels of this synchronously regulated gene cluster were depressed in both ventral and dorsal horn neurons within 24 h after injury, followed by strong re-induction during the following 2 wk, which paralleled functional recovery. The identified cluster includes neuritin, attractin, microtubule-associated protein 1a, and myelin oligodendrocyte protein genes. Transcriptional and protein regulation of this novel gene cluster was also evaluated in spinal cord tissue and in single neurons and was shown to play a role in axonal plasticity. Finally, in vitro transfection experiments in primary dorsal root ganglion cells showed that cluster members act synergistically to drive neurite outgrowth. PMID:15522907

  4. Mannosylerythritol lipid increases levels of galactoceramide in and neurite outgrowth from PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, M; Zhao, X; Wakamatsu, Y; Nomura, N; Nakahara, T; Jin, C; Nagaso, H; Murata, T; Yokoyama, K K

    2000-07-01

    We report here that a microbial extracellular glycolipid,mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL), induces the outgrowth ofneurites from and enhances the activity of acetylcholinesterase(AChE) in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. Furthermore, treatment ofPC12 cells with MEL increased levels of galactosylceramide(Galbeta1-1'Cer; GalCer). Exposure of PC12 cells to exogenous GalCer caused the dose-dependent outgrowth ofneurites. By contrast, treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growthfactor (NGF) did not increase the level of GalCer in the cells. The neurite-related morphological changes induced by GalCerdifferend from those induced by NGF, indicating differencesbetween the signal transduction pathways triggered by NGF and by GalCer. PMID:19002832

  5. Imaging growth of neurites in conditioned hydrogel by coherent anti-stokes raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Wang, Han-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Panitch, Alyssa

    2009-10-01

    Cultured DRGs in different gel scaffolds were analyzed using CA RS microscopy to determine its possible use as a label-free imaging option for tracking cellular growth in a gel scaffold. This study demonstrates for the first time the applicability of CA RS microscopy to the imaging of live neuronal cells in GAG hydrogels. By tuning the laser beating frequency, omega(p)-omega(s), to match the vibration of C-H bonds in the cell membrane, the CA RS signal yields detailed, high-quality images of neurites with single membrane detection sensitivity. The results demonstrate that CA RS imaging allows monitoring of cellular growth in a tissue scaffold over time, with a contrast that shows comparable cellular structures to those obtained using standard fluorescent staining techniques. These findings show the potential of CARS microscopy to assist in the understanding of organogenesis processes in a tissue scaffold. PMID:20539743

  6. Neurotransmitters and synaptic components in the Merkel cell-neurite complex, a gentle touch receptor

    PubMed Central

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cells are an enigmatic group of rare cells found in the skin of vertebrates. Most make contacts with somatosensory afferents to form Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which are gentle-touch receptors that initiate slowly adapting type I responses. The function of Merkel cells within the complex remains debated despite decades of research. Numerous anatomical studies demonstrate that Merkel cells form synaptic-like contacts with sensory afferent terminals. Moreover, recent molecular analysis reveals that Merkel cells express dozens of presynaptic molecules that are essential for synaptic vesicle release in neurons. Merkel cells also produce a host of neuro-active substances that can act as fast excitatory neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. Here, we review the major neurotransmitters found in Merkel cells and discuss these findings in relation to the potential function of Merkel cells in touch reception. PMID:23530998

  7. Effect of human skin explants on the neurite growth of the PC12 cell line.

    PubMed

    Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Pennec, Jean-Pierre; Le Gall, Christelle; Pereira, Ulysse; Boulais, Nicholas; Cheret, Jeremy; Jeanmaire, Christine; Danoux, Louis; Pauly, Gilles; Misery, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    The skin is a densely innervated organ. After a traumatic injury, such as an amputation, burn or skin graft, nerve growth and the recovery of sensitivity take a long time and are often incomplete. The roles played by growth factors and the process of neuronal growth are crucial. We developed an in vitro model of human skin explants co-cultured with a rat pheochromocytoma cell line differentiated in neuron in presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). This model allowed the study of the influence of skin explants on nerve cells and nerve fibre growth, probably through mediators produced by the explant, in a simplified manner. The neurite length of differentiated PC12 cells co-cultured with skin explants increased after 6 days. These observations demonstrated the influence of trophic factors produced by skin explants on PC12 cells.

  8. Early expression of the high molecular weight neurofilament subunit attenuates axonal neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Boumil, Edward; Vohnoutka, Rishel; Lee, Sangmook; Shea, Thomas B

    2015-09-14

    Phospho-dependent interactions of the C-terminal region of the high molecular weight NF subunit (NF-H) with each other and with other cytoskeletal elements stabilize the axonal cytoskeleton and contribute to an increase in axonal caliber. The same kinase cascades that mediate axonal pathfinding via growth cone dynamics are those that foster NF-mediated axonal stabilization, yet there is a developmental delay in the accumulation of NF C-terminal phosphorylation. Moreover, the phospho-mediated C-terminal NF-H interactions that stabilize the axonal cytoskeleton also inhibit axonal elongation. We hypothesized that a delay in expression and/or accumulation of NF-H within developing axons is essential to allow axonal elongation and pathfinding. We tested this hypothesis in differentiating NB2a/d1 cells. The first 3 days of differentiation of NB2a/d1 cells is normally accompanied by rapid elongation of axonal neurites. This period is followed by the accumulation of C-terminally phosphorylated NF-H, cessation of axonal elongation and an increase in axonal caliber. Herein, overexpression of GFP-tagged NF-H simultaneously with induction of differentiation fostered accumulation of C-terminally phosphorylated NF-H within developing axonal neurites within 48hr, which was accompanied by retardation of axonal elongation and a hastened increase in caliber. These effects were prevented by treatment with inhibitors of kinases that mediate the association of NFs with other cytoskeletal elements. Overexpression of GFP-NF-H lacking the C-terminal 187 amino acids (which mediate NF-NF interactions) did not retard elongation nor increase caliber. These findings support the hypothesis that a developmental delay in NF-H C-terminal phosphorylation is essential to allow appropriate axonal elongation prior to stabilization. PMID:26225928

  9. Photopolymerized microfeatures for directed spiral ganglion neurite and Schwann cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Tuft, Bradley W.; Li, Shufeng; Xu, Linjing; Clarke, Joseph C.; White, Scott P.; Guymon, Bradley A.; Perez, Krystian X.; Hansen, Marlan R.; Guymon, C. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) provide auditory perception to individuals with severe hearing impairment. However, their ability to encode complex auditory stimuli is limited due, in part, to poor spatial resolution caused by electrical current spread in the inner ear. Directing nerve cell processes towards target electrodes may reduce the problematic current spread and improve stimulatory specificity. In this work, photopolymerization was used to fabricate micro- and nano-patterned methacrylate polymers to probe the extent of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) neurite and Schwann cell (SGSC) contact guidance based on variations in substrate topographical cues. Micropatterned substrates are formed in a rapid, single-step reaction by selectively blocking light with photomasks which have parallel line-space gratings with periodicities of 10 – 100 μm. Channel amplitudes of 250 nm – 10 μm are generated by modulating UV exposure time, light intensity, and photoinitiator concentration. Gradual transitions are observed between ridges and grooves using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The transitions stand in contrast to vertical features generated via etching lithographic techniques. Alignment of neural elements increases significantly with increasing feature amplitude and constant periodicity, as well as with decreasing periodicity and constant amplitude. SGN neurite alignment strongly correlates (r = 0.93) with maximum feature slope. Multiple neuronal and glial types orient to the patterns with varying degrees of alignment. This work presents a method to fabricate gradually-sloping micropatterns for cellular contact guidance studies and demonstrates spatial control of inner ear neural elements in response to micro- and nano-scale surface topography. PMID:23069708

  10. Novel genes that mediate nuclear respiratory factor 1-regualted neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chih-Wei; Wang, Jen-Ling; Jiang, Mei-Sian; Hsu, Chia-Hao; Chang, Wen-Teng; Huang, A-Min

    2013-02-15

    Nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) is a transcription factor that functions in neurite outgrowth; however, the genes downstream from NRF-1 that mediate this function remain largely unknown. This study employs a genome-wide analysis approach to identify NRF-1-targeted genes in human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells. A total of 916 human genes containing the putative NRF-1 response element (NRE) in their promoter regions were identified using a cutoff score determined by results from electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Seventy-four NRF-1 target genes were listed according to the typical locations and high conservation of NREs. Fifteen genes, MAPRE3, NPDC1, RAB3IP, TRAPPC3, SMAD5, PIP5K1A, USP10, SPRY4, GTF2F2, NR1D1, SUV39H2, SKA3, RHOA, RAPGEF6, and SMAP1 were selected for biological confirmation. EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that all NREs of these fifteen genes are critical for NRF-1 binding. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA levels of 12 of these genes are regulated by NRF-1. Overexpression or knockdown of candidate genes demonstrated that MAPRE3, NPDC1, SMAD5, USP10, SPRY4, GTF2F2, SKA3, SMAP1 positively regulated, and RHOA and RAPGEF6 negatively regulated neurite outgrowth. Overall, our data showed that the combination of genome-wide bioinformatic analysis and biological experiments helps to identify the novel NRF-1-regulated genes, which play roles in differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

  11. Whole-exome sequencing and neurite outgrowth analysis in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Yasuda, Yuka; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Matsumura, Kensuke; Kawashima, Hitoshi; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Fujimoto, Michiko; Ohi, Kazutaka; Umeda-Yano,